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HISTORY 


OF THE 

MOST ANCIENT AND HONORABLE FRATERNITY 

OF 

FREE AND ACCEPTED MASONS 


IN 

NEW YORK 


FROM THE EARLIEST DATE. 


EMBRACING THE HISTORY OF THE GRAND LODGE IN THE STATE, FROM ITS 
FORMATION IN 1781 , AND A SKETCH OF EACH LODGE UNDER ITS JURIS- 
DICTION ; PRECEDED BY A BRIEF ACCOUNT OF EARLY MASONRY IN 
ENGLAND, SCOTLAND, IRELAND, AND SEVERAL CONTINENTAL 
NATIONS, TOGETHER WITH AN OUTLINE OF THE 
ORIGIN OF THE INSTITUTION IN THE THIRTEEN 
COLONIES OF THE UNION. 


BY 

CHARLES T. ^cCLENACHAN, 

HISTORIAN OF THE GRAND LODGE. 


VOLUME II. 


NEW YORK: 

PUBLISHED BY THE GRAND LODGE. 


1892 . 

€> 




Copyright, 1892, by 

EDWARD M. L. EHLERS, Grand Seoretary of the Grand Lodge of 
Free and Accepted Masons of the State of New York. 



Press of J. J. Little & Co, 
Astor Place, New York 









CONTENTS OF VOLUME II. 


PAGE 

Illustrations in Second Volume, ix 

Introduction, xi 

The Inchoate Grand Lodge, 1 

The Provincial Grand Lodge, 3 

The Grand Lodge of Masons of the State of New York, . 10 

Brief Sketches relating to Grand Officers : 


Rev. William Walter and William Cock, Grand Mas- 
ters, 1781-1784, . 21 

Hon. Robert R. Livingston, Grand Master 1784-1800, 26 


Gen. Jacob Morton, Gran/1 Master, 1801-1805, . 190 

Hon. De Witt Clinton, Grand Master, 1806-19, , 215 

Hon. Daniel D. Tompkins, Grand Master, 1820-21, 324 

M. W. Joseph Enos, Grand Master, 1822-24, . 414 

Hon. Martin Hoffman, Grand Master, 1822-25, . 404 

Hon. Stephen Van Rensselaer, Grand Master, 1825- 

29, 424 

M. W. Elisha W. King, Grand Master, 1826, . 404 

Gen. Morgan Lewis, Grand Master, 1830-43, . . 609 

R. W. John Jacob Astor, Grand Treasurer, 1798- 

1800, 112 

R. W. Robert Cocks, Grand Treasurer, 1801-11, 246, 256 
R. W. R. J. Vandenbroeck, Grand Secretary, 1800, . 191 

R. W. James Herring, Grand Secretary, 1829-45, 600 

Rev. James Milnor, Grand Chaplain, . . . 276 

R. W. Thomas Smith Webb, Grand Lecturer, . 110 

Gen. George Washington, President United States, 116, 123 



Vlll 


CONTENTS OP VOLUME TWO. 


Gen. Lafayette, Grand Visitor, 

PAGE 

. 399 

William Morgan, .... 

585 

Lucinda Morgan, nee Pendleton, 

. 515, 587 

Thomas Paine, The Freeman,” . 

103 

Preliminary Proceedings to a Division of the Grand 

Lodge, 

351 

The City Grand Lodge, . 

. 376 

The Country Grand Lodge, 

412 

The Re-Union, .... 

. 445 

The Uprising against Masonry, . 

458-596 



ILLUSTRATIONS IN SECOND VOLUME, 


PAGE 

1, R. W . Thomas Smith Webb, Frontispiece 


2. Coat of Arms: Ancients, Moderns, v 

3. Ancient Building in which the First Lodge in Lon- 

don met, ......... Facing 5 

4. Fraunce’s Tavern, Washington taking leave of his 

Generals, “ 15 

5. York, England, a.d. 926, “35 

6. White Conduit House, Corri’s, “ 38 

7. St. Paul’s Church, Broadway, ,k 47 

8. Federal Hall, Wall Street, “ 48 

9. The First Presidential Mansion, .... “ 58 

10. Washington Medallion and Letter, . . . “ 124 

11. Washington House, No. 1 Broadway, . . . “ 127 

12. Allegory, Constitutions by Payne, . . . “ 136 

13. French (Huguenot) Church, “191 

14. St. John’s Hall, the First Masonic Hall in New 

York City, “ 206 

15. R. W. Cadwallader D. Colden, “217 

16. McGowan’s Pass, 1812, “256 

17. The Old Tun Tavern in Philadelphia, in which the 

First Lodge met, “ 278 

18. Washington Hall, “ 331 

19. New Masonic Hall, “ 458 




INTRODUCTION. 


No historian can have greater difficulty in the accomplish- 
ment of his task than one who attempts to record the times, 
events, and occurrences incident to a secret organization, 
whose members have been thoroughly imbued with the idea 
that its existence and success depended upon the shrouding 
with secrecy their acts and surroundings, and who held the 
impression that in no manner should aught pertaining to its 
existence be allowed to become public, if essential, even to 
the suppression of the entire records, meagre as they were. 
The Masonic Fraternity, in its earlier days, purposely com* 
mitted to writing only the smallest amount of record essen- 
tial to keep trace of its doings — one half dozen lines to note 
a lengthened Lodge Communication, and those few lines 
expressed in an abbreviated form and in doubtful language. 
Matters of grave and interesting importance would meet with 
no mention, and oblivion seemed to be the favored idea for 
the burial of all information and historic knowledge. 

Much now depends upon tradition and extraneous history ; 
and, where a century has intervened, or over three genera- 
tions, research for the truth, that it may be placed of record, 
becomes a difficult task and of uncertain result. Reliance 
must be partially had upon what has escaped personal or col- 
lective vigilance, and which has incidentally been obtained 
through the curiosity or business tact of the press, or that 
has been the private memorandum of some enthusiast who 
had outlived his care and secretiveness. During the later 
period, time gradually awakened the thoughtful; and the 
successful contest ended, in which the teachings of the arts 
and sciences, the philosophy and the principles sought to be 
inculcated by the symbols and the allegories of the loving 
Brotherhood, should not be longer trusted to uncertain tra- 



INTRODUCTION. 


xii 

dition, but should, in a conserved way, and by the press, be 
brought to the wider attention of the initiated, if not to the 
improvement of humanity generally. 

Thus the press gradually became the helpmeet of the great 
Secret Fraternity. Among the fugitive writings of the 
renowned author, Dr. Albert G. Mackey, we quote upon 
this subject the following : 

“ The liberty of the Masonic press and the free expression 
of their thoughts, which has been now conceded to Masonic 
writers, is a victory that has not been gained without an 
arduous struggle. It was the general opinion of those who 
were high in office, but not deep in Masonic knowledge, that 
all the learning of Masonry should be confined to a mere 
recital of the ritual and an acquaintance with the Lodge 
lectures. They supposed that the whole curriculum of 
Masonic science and philosophy was embraced within the 
narrow limits of oral instruction ; or, rather, that they knew 
nothing of any science or philosophy, and were wont to 
deem him the most learned Mason who could but recite by 
rote the stereotyped catechism that he had acquired by fre- 
quent repetition. 

But there were some few scholars who thought that there 
was more in Speculative Masonry than was to be found 
within the meagre limits of the ritual. They believed that 
this ritual was a mere skeleton, which, to make it presenta- 
ble to men of cultivated intellects, required to be clothed 
with elevated thoughts ; that there was, indeed, a system of 
profound religious philosophy in Masonry, which could only 
be developed by research ; that of this system, the ritual was 
only an index pointing out the subjects that were to be 
investigated ; and, finally, to give to these investigations any 
value, it was absolutely necessary that they should be given 
to the world, like the investigations in any other science or 
philosophy, by means of publications which Masons could 
read, and thus enlarge within their homes the ideas, the rudi- 
ments of which they had first acquired at the Lodge. 

Between the friends and enemies of Masonic progress, 



INTRODUCTION. 


xiii 


whose battle .centered on the question of Masonic publica- 
tions, there was a severe struggle, ending, as such struggles 
always do, in victory for the right. 

Among those who for a long time sought to suppress 
all Masonic literature, it is with regret that we are forced 
to name the Grand Lodge of England. Up to compara- 
tively a recent period, this Body, the mother of all modern 
Freemasonry, seems to have been inspired with hostility 
toward the art of printing. 

It is most fortunate for the progress of Masonic literature 
that the Grand Lodge of England abandoned this opposition 
to the press. Had it been continued to the present day, the 
English Craft, as well as the whole Masonic world, would 
have been deprived of those valuable historical investiga- 
tions for which they are indebted to the researches of 
Hughan, Woodford, and some other able and industrious 
antiquaries. The persistent condemnation by the highest 
authority of all publication of the ‘ concerns of Masonry/ 
would very naturally have extinguished all ardor for inves- 
tigation. 

The cloud of ignorance seeking to obscure the rays of 
intellectual light was not confined to England. It extended 
its baneful influence to other countries. 

In France, Clavel published a Masonic History in 1842, 
and commenced a Masonic journal in 1844. In neither case 
had he sought the sanction of the Grand Orient, and. for 
this offense a sentence of perpetual exclusion from that body 
was pronounced against him. 

In Germany, Krause and Mossdorf, two of the most 
learned Masons that the Order in any country can boast, 
suffered a similar punishment for their valuable contributions 
to Masonic literature. The treatise of Dr. Krause on the 
‘ Three Oldest Documents of the Masonic Brotherhood ’ is 
one of the most learned, the most philosophical, and the most 
useful of all the books which have ever been issued from the 
Masonic press. Its destruction, as was desired by some of 
the German Lodges, would have entailed an irreparable loss 
on Masonic literature. 



XIV 


INTRODUCTION. 


In the United States, the spirit of antagonism to Masonic 
publications has, with rare exceptions, never been exhibited. 
Too many of the Craft have been indifferent to the cultiva- 
tion of the literature of the Fraternity, but none has opposed 
its dissemination. 

For a long time, it is true, the Grand Lodge of Pennsyl- 
vania refused to print more than a very brief and inadequate 
account of its proceedings. But it has abandoned this course 
of reticence, and there is now no Grand Lodge in the Union 
whose published transactions are of more value or interest 
than those of the Keystone State. And its Grand Lodge 
has shown its patronage of Masonic literature by the founda- 
tion of an admirable library. Years ago, the Grand Lodge 
of Delaware expressed its opinion that Masonic literature 
was doing more harm than good to the Institution. But 
this illiterate view has long since been abandoned. 

In fact no greater change has within the last half century 
taken place in the relations of Masonry, internal and exter- 
nal, than its cultivation of the literature of the Society. The 
effect of this 6 change of front’ has been most advanta- 
geous. From the character of a merely social club, or a 
benevolent association, it has become a school of philosophy. 
Books on its history and its science, once so rare, are now 
abundant. Every country where there is a congregation of 
Masons has its scholars investigating the character, the aim, 
and the design of the Institution, and periodical works, con- 
ducted, for the most part, with ability, in which the results 
of these investigations are given to the Craft. 

The means of acquiring Masonic learning are within the 
reach of every Mason. He who is ignorant must attribute 
his ignorance to his own indifference. He who contents 
himself with the acquisition of the ritual as given in the 
Lodge may be in possession of all the forms of initiation, 
and may call himself bright,’ but his brightness will be 
utter darkness, when compared with the knowledge of 
him who, from books, has learned the true meaning and 
significance of that ritual and the real philosophy of that 
Institution.” 



INTRODUCTION. 


XV 


The conflict for the freedom of the press has ended, and 
through its victory there have been, in modem times, saved 
from utter loss the traditions of the past and such records as 
could be collated and reprinted of incidents and events that 
tend to make a connected history and a reliable record. 
This, however, has been attained only through diligent 
search and unremitting care and discrimination. 

We regret being compelled to add that the following 
pages will show that the Grand Lodge of New York, in 
more instances than one, was a party, directly and indi- 
rectly, to the loss of some material matter that would have 
been beneficial to its history. 




HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


in 

NEW YORK. 


THE GRAND LODGE, FROM THE TIME OF GRANTING THE WAR- 
RANT IN 1781 TO THE PRESENT- DAT, EXCLUSIVE OF 
AN HISTORICAL ACCOUNT OF INDIVIDUAL 
LODGES SO FAR AS PRACTICABLE. 


CHAPTER L 
1781-1790. 


1781. 

THE INCHOATE GRAND LODGE. 

The Grand Lodge of New York existed as an inchoate 
organization from January 23, 1781, to December 5, 1782, 
under Rev. Brother William Walter, M. A., Grand Master. 

The records in the archives inform us as follows : “ Minutes 
of Lodge 169, Ancient York Masons, held at their Lodge- 
room, on Tuesday evening, January 23, 5781, being a Grand 
Lodge assembled in ample form.” This early Grand Lodge 
formation was organized by the twenty-nine representatives 
of six Lodges ; to wit, Nos. 132, 169, 210, 212, Registry of 
England, and No. 441, Registry of Ireland, and Sion’s Lodge, 
U. D. Subsequent to the opening of a Grand Lodge in “ Due 
Form” by the Brother James McCuen, Past Master of 
Lodge No. 169, as temporary Grand Master, Brother Brown 
as Senior Grand Warden, and Brother Taylor as Junior 
Vol. n.— 1 



2 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


Grand Warden, the representatives agreed to enter upon a 
permanent formation, and with unanimity elected Rev. 
Brother William Walter, M. A., of No. 169, Grand Master; 
Brother John Browning of No. 212, Senior Grand Warden ; 
and the Rev. Brother John Beardsley of No. 210, Junior 
Grand Warden. 

In response to the communication transmitted by the com- 
mittee, requesting the acceptance by these three officers of 
the positions to which they had been selected, the following 
letters were received : 

GRAND MASTER ELECT WILLIAM WALTER. 

“ New York, February 8, 1781. 

I take in kind part, my respected brothers, this compli- 
ment of congratulation from my parent Lodge, and beg you 
to assure them that I have all the sense which I conceive 
they would wish me to have, of the honor done me in the. 
late free and unanimous designation of me to the principal 
office among the lodges of this province. I only wish that 
my power to serve them was equal to my inclination. Such 
as it is, however, I pray them to be assured, that it shall be 
exerted to the full, for the advancement of the interest and 
dignity of our truly ancient and honorable institution. 

Walter. 

To the very respectful Committee, 

J. McCuen, Chairman.” 

SENIOR GRAND WARDEN ELECT, J. S. BROWNING. 

“New York, February 13, 1781. 

Sir: Give me leave to return my sincerest thanks for 
the honor you and the other brethren of the Lodge, 169, have 
■conferred on me, by electing me Senior Warden of a Grand 
Lodge, to be established in this country. The pleasure I must 
feel on so flattering a mark of distinction is much abated by 
a sense of my great inability to discharge so important a 
trust. But permit me to assure you, I shall always use every 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


3 


endeavor in my power to promote the good of the craft, and 
to acquit myself of the unmerited appointment bestowed on 
me to the utmost of my knowledge. 

I have the honor to be, with respect, sir, your most obe- 
dient and very humble servant and brother, 

J. S. Browning.” 

JUNIOR GRAND WARDEN ELECT, JOHN BEARDSLEY. 

“ W. M. and Brethren : I beg leave to return you my 
most sincere thanks for your very polite address, by the 
hands of Bro. Warden, and for the honor its contents confer 
on me. And I request by your advocate, to present my 
thanks to the members of that respected body, from whom 
you are a committee, with my best wishes for their health 
and happiness. I will (with the advice and assistance of my 
brethren) do all in my power to establish and promote the 
interest, honor and happiness of the Ancient Craft in this 
part of the world. 

I have the honor to be (Worshipful Master and Brethren) 
your most obedient and most affectionate brother, 

John Beardsley, 

E. W., G-. J. W., Elect, A. Y. M ” 

1782. 

The inchoate existence of the Grand Lodge continued until 
the time of the First Meeting of 

THE PROVINCIAL GRAND LODGE, 

at the Assembly Hall at Eoubalet’s, in the city of Hew York, 
on December 5, 1782, convened by authority of the Grand 
Lodge of England. 

The authority for this Provincial Grand Lodge was con- 
tained in Warrant Ho. 219, dated September 5, 1781, the 
original copy of which will be found of record in the Grand 
Secretary’s Office of the Grand Lodge of Hew York. 



4 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


Prior, however, to the organization of the Provincial 
Grand Lodge, the constitution of an Army Lodge, No. 
215, transpired February 21, 1781, by the opening of the 
Grand Lodge of England, in the city of New York, under 
an especial authority, as will be seen below. 

The following extract is from the Minutes of the Grand 
Lodge of Free and Accepted Masons, according to “the Old 
Constitutions, 55 at present in the Archives of the United 
Grand Lodge of England, Freemasons 5 Hall, London. This 
extract is certified by Shadwell W. Clerke, Grand Secretary, 
Grand Lodge, England, and was delivered to the keeping of 
John W. Yrooman, the Grand Master of Masons of New 
York, when in London, 1889, and will be found of record in 
the Grand Secretary’s office, city of New York. 

“Grand Lodge opened at 4 o’clock in the city of New 
York, N. America, on February 21, An. Do. 1782, An. Lap. 
5782. 

The E. W. and Eev. Bro., William Walter, Dep. G. M. 
Elect, as D. G. Master. 

The E. W. Bro., John S. Browning, Esq., S. G. W. Elect, 
as S. G. W. 

The E. W. and Eev. Bro., John Barkley, J. G. W. Elect, 
as J. G. W. 

The E. W. Bro., Isaac Collins, M. of 169, as Grand Sec- 
retary. 

Present, Brothers 


Cunningham, M. of No. 169. 

Cock, 

M. 

of No. 212. 

Warden, 

S.W. 

cc 

Courtney, S. W. 

cc 

Bounds, 

J. W. 

cc 

Harrison, J. W. 

cc 

Barclay, 

P. M. 

u 

Hodson, P. M. 

cc 

McEwen, 

P. M. 

cc 

Crowell, 

P. M. 

cc 

Collins, 

M. of No. 210. 

Drew, 

H. 

of No. 213. 

Watson, 

S. W. 

cc 

Fife, 

S.W. 

cc 

Gregg, 

J. w. 

cc 

Geddes, J. W. 

cc 




Stokes, 

P. M. 

cc 


Installed according to Ancient Usage, 
Maximilian De Strait, Master. 





THE ANCIENT BUILDING IN WHICH THE FIRST LODGE IN LONDON MET, 




IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


5 


The Rev. Bro., John Philip Erb, S.W., vice David Schoeph, 
absent. 

George Dorg, J. W., vice Ferdinand Forster, dead. 

All matters relative to this Constitution being completed, 
the Grand Officers aforesaid, in the name of the Most Noble 
Prince, John, Duke of Athol, G. M., proclaimed the New 
Lodge duly constituted, No. 215, registered in Grand Lodge 
Book, Yolume 8, Letter H, to be held in the Second Regi- 
ment of Anspach Berauth. 

Closed before 7 o’clock ; adjourned to the Grand Lodge in 
London. 

N. B. The Rev. William Walter was empowered to act 
as Deputy Grand Master (for three hours only), by an au- 
thority from Wm. Dickey, Esq., D. G. M.” 

In explanation of the above, it maybe said that the Grand 
Lodge, at London, desired to have constituted an Army 
Lodge, which was authorized to be established October 10, 
1781, as No. 215. The regiment was located at the time in 
New York City, and was known as the Brandenburgh An- 
spach. That, in order to do so, it authorized the opening of 
the Grand Lodge, for three hours only, in New York City, 
when it “ adjourned to the Grand Lodge in London.” (See 
p. 424, Yol. I., of this history.) 

The Provincial Grand Lodge had been authorized by War- 
rant No. 219, dated September 5, 1781, naming Rev. Wil- 
liam Walter, Brother John Stedholme Browning, and Rev. 
John Beardsley as the first three officers thereof; but it had 
not organized, and possibly No. 215 was expected to assist. 
The spelling of several names will be found incorrect, but 
this is immaterial. It is singular, however, that No. 215 
should be warranted after No. 219. 

The names Atholl, Browning, McCuen, De Strait, Huston, 
Beardsley, and Schoeph are sometimes differently spelled in 
the records. 

The Atholl, or original Warrant of the Grand Lodge of 
Freemasons for the Province of New York, authorizing the 
“Masons of New York in North America to congregate, 



6 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


form and hold a Provincial Grand Lodge in the City of New 
York, independent of any former Dispensation, Warrant or 
Constitution, ordered, given, or granted by us, or any of our 
Predecessors, Grand Masters of England, to any Mason or 
Masons residing within the Masonical Jurisdiction aforesaid,” 
will be found in full on pp. 140-2 of Vol. I. This valued 
Warrant from the Grand Lodge of England, numbered 
219, was received by Brother Lewis, of Lodge No. 210, and 
carefully preserved until his arrival in New York City, when 
he delivered it with the by-laws, letters, etc., to the Grand 
Master ; in return for which the Grand Lodge, April 2, 1783, 
expressed its warmest thanks, and directed the Grand Secre- 
tary to signify the same by letter. 

At the assembly held at Roubalet’s, there were present the 
first three Grand Officers mentioned in the Warrant, together 
with Past Master Ellerington, Senior Warden Jennings, and 
Junior Warden Scott, as representatives of Lodge No. 52, 
held in His Majesty’s 37th Regiment of Foot. 

The Worshipful Master Harvey, Past Master Grant, Pro- 
vincial Senior Warden Douglass, and Provincial Junior 
Warden Hanault, of Moriah Lodge, No. 132, held in His 
Majesty’s 22d Regiment of Foot. 

The Master Cunningham, Past Master McCuen, Senior 
Warden Campbell, and Junior Warden Kerr, representing No. 
169, Ancient York Masons, afterward named St. Andrew’s 
Lodge. 

The Master pro tern. John Leverel Hudson, Past Master 
Lynch, Senior Warden Courtney, Junior Warden Harrison, 
of Solomon’s Lodge, No. 212. 

The Master Joshua Watson, Past Master Isaac Collins, 
Senior Warden Richard Jenkins, Junior Warden Gregg, of 
No. 210, afterward Temple Lodge. 

The Master Fife, Past Master Stoakes, and Senior Warden 
Crawford, of Lodge No. 213, held in His Majesty’s 4th Bat- 
talion of the Royal Artillery. 

The Master M. De Strait, and Senior Warden David 
Schoeph, of Lodge No. 215, Ancient York Masons, held in 
the 2d Regiment of Brandenburgh Anspach. 



IN THE STATE OP NEW YORK. 


7 


The Master Fowler, Past Master Nicholson, Past Master 
Woolet, Senior Warden Campbell, Junior Warden Gibson, 
of Lodge No. 441, under the registry of Ireland, held in His 
Majesty’s 38th Eegiment. 

The Master Hugh Gillespie, Senior Warden James 
Huston, and Junior Warden William Ault, of Sion’s Lodge, 
held under dispensation, in His Majesty’s 57th Eegiment. 

The Eev. William Walter, Grand Master, was a member 
of Lodge No. 169 ; John Stedholme Browning, Senior 
Grand Warden, was a member of Lodge No. 441, and the 
Eev. John Beardsley, Junior Grand Warden, was a mem- 
ber of Lodge No. 210. 

Lodge No. 169 was pre-eminent in the establishment and 
organization of the Inchoate, as well as of the Provincial 
Grand Lodge of the Province of New York ; it was in their 
Lodge-room that the first assembly was held of representa- 
tives of five Lodges and of one Lodge under dispensation, 
for organization, and one of its members was selected for 
Grand Master on December 5, 1782, at Roubalet’s Assembly 
Hall. It was Brother Clarke, Secretary of No. 169, who 
read the Grand Warrant and letter from Charles Bear block, 
Grand Secretary, and immediately thereafter proclaimed, with 
all formality, the Grand Officers appointed in the Warrant. 

The records of the Grand Lodge state that the E. W. 
Grand Master, after delivering a suitable and affectionate 
address from the Chair, observed that it was a right inherent 
in him to appoint a Provincial Deputy Grand Master, and 
that, after mature consideration, he had resolved upon call- 
ing from among his fellows, Brother James McCuen, Past 
Master of Lodge No. 169, to fill that necessary and impor- 
tant office, which meeting with the approbation of all the 
Lodges present, Brother McCuen was invested with the 
proper jewel and duly proclaimed. 

The Grand Master then recommended the election of such 
officers as were necessary for completing Grand Lodge for- 
mation, and rendering permanent and effectual their future 
proceedings, when the following brethren were unanimously 
selected to the offices respectively : 



8 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


“ William Cock, Master of Lodge No. 212, Grand Secretary. 
James Clarke, Secretary of Lodge No. 169, Deputy Grand 
Secretary. 

Joshua Watson, Master of Lodge No. 210, Grand Treasurer. 


Bro. John L. Chevalier Boome, No. 169, 
“ George Clarke, No. 210, 

“ Collom Homfries, No. 212, 

“ Charles Morris, No. 213, 

Bro. Archibald McNiel, No. 169, 

“ Oliver Burdet, No.. 210, 

“ Huggeford, No. 212, 

££ Alexander Melvil, No. 213, 


Grand Deacons. 


Grand Stewards. 


The several Lodges present, paid their homage to the Bight 
Worshipful, the Grand Officers, and surrendered their War- 
rants to the Grand Master, in token of their submission to the 
Grand Lodge, who returned them stating his fullest confi- 
dence, that the Lodges would act under them with that zeal, 
honor and propriety which become the Ancient Craft.” 


It was unanimously determined to meet at six o’clock in 
the evening of the first Wednesday of each month, at the 
Assembly Hall at Boubalet’s. 

The essential books for Grand Lodge use and a seal were 
duly authorized. It was determined that the Lodges should 
go in procession, on St. John’s Day, to Divine service at 
Trinity Church, and a request was made of the Bev. Dr. 
Seabury to preach the sermon. It was also not forgotten to 
appoint a committee to provide for the dinner at Boubalet’s 
to be given after Church service. Boutin e business and mat- 
ters of detail were evidently considered, as the records state, 
among other subjects, that there was received a petition from 
the officers of Lodge No. 213, held in His Majesty’s 4th Battal- 
ion of Boyal Artillery, quartered in New York City, repre- 
senting that the Grand Lodge of England had permitted their 
Mother Lodge, No. 86, held at Woolwich, in the said Begi- 
ment, the privilege of wearing their hangings trimmed with 
gold, in conformity to the uniform of the said Begiment, 



IN THE STATE OP NEW YORK. 


9 


and praying that the same indulgence may be extended to 
them. This was granted. Afterward it was resolved, that 
Grand Officers only, shall wear gold jewels and hangings, and 
that officers of subordinate Lodges shall wear silver jewels, 
with such silk hangings as they may think proper, excepting 
Lodge No. 213. 

Several members of Lodge No. 169, who were officers in 
the 3d Battalion of New Jersey Volunteers, were the first to 
seek a Warrant to form and hold a Lodge under the Provin- 
cial Grand Lodge. (See Vol. L, p. 265.) 

THE FIRST WARRANT AUTHORIZED. 

“ As the petition was recommended by the Master and 
Wardens of Lodge No. 169, in obedience to a vote of that 
Lodge, the same was unanimously granted” to Brothers 
Samuel Byerse, Abraham Buskirk, Edward Earl, John Bus- 
kirk, Bichard Cooper, Justus Earl, John Van Norden, Wil- 
liam Sorrell and John Hammel. On the following fifth day 
of February, 1783, this Lodge, then known as No. 2, was, 
on request, granted the name, St. George. 

st. John’s day — the first observance. 

The Second Meeting of the Provincial Grand Lodge was 
held on St. John the Evangelist’s Day, December 27, 1782, 
the Grand Master, William Walter, presiding. 

Present, representatives from Lodges Nos. 52, 169, 210, 
212, 213 and 441. All the Officers and Brethren repaired in 
procession to St. Paul’s Chapel, where a sermon was deliv- 
ered by Bev. Dr. Seabury, one of the Brotherhood, to 
whom due thanks were given. The Brethren dined as pro- 
vided at Boubalet’s. A committee was requested to solicit 
a copy of the sermon, that the same might be printed, and 
furthermore, to return thanks to Dr. Inglis for accommo- 
dating the Brethren with the use of the chapel. 

This concluded the Masonic business of the Grand Lodge 
■ for the year 1782. 



10 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


1783. 

THE GRAND LODGE OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 

As the year 1783 gave acknowledged independence to a 
national government, and to the Grand Lodge of Masons of 
the State of New York as well, and as many Lodges and 
prominent Brethren were deeply interested in the political 
movements of governments, in their relationships to the 
United States, it is deemed essential to note current events 
at this time. 

It must not be forgotten that the American War, then im- 
pending, had its baleful influence on the progress of Masonry, 
as well as on that of all other charitable institutions. The 
Declaration of the Colonies as Independent States in 1776, 
was not recognized by Great Britain until 1783. Florida, 
which had been ceded to Great Britain in 1763, was taken by 
Spain in 1781, and was ceded to it in 1783. The war between 
England and France, which had broken out in 1778, was 
an evident outgrowth of the American Bevolution, and 
through the temporary preponderance of French vessels of 
war in American waters, it had a decided effect upon the out- 
come of that struggle. France had eighty ships-of-the-line 
in good condition, and sixty-seven thousand seamen ; and 
Spain, when she came to the aid of France in the second 
year, had sixty line-of-battle ships ; while England possessed 
one hundred and fifty vessels of war. The political trouble 
of the Americans was whether the French and Spanish - 
governments desired to see American independence, until 
after they had turned the embarrassment of England to their 
own advantage. In the spring of 1781, however, the Count 
de Grasse, a member of the Fraternity, in command of the 
French, appeared in the West Indies with twenty-five ships- 
of-the-line ; but, fortunately or unfortunately for him, was 
too late to meet the English. The engagement in March of 
eight vessels on each side, off the Capes of the Chesapeake, 
resulted in a slight disadvantage to the English, who had the 
heavier armament ; nevertheless they carried out the purpose 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


11 


of their expedition, which was to save Benedict Arnold from 
capture in Virginia. Arnold was a* member of the Frater- 
nity, but subsequently was expelled. Finally De Grasse re- 
pulsed the attack of Admiral Graves, who had nineteen line- 
of-battle ships. The return of Graves to New York put an 
end to General Cornwallis’s hope of succor, and compelled 
the surrender of seven thousand British troops at Yorktown. 
The battle of the Saints followed, between Bodney and De 
Grasse, April 12, 1782, in which the Count de Grasse lost five 
ships, including his own. It is asserted that Bodney failed 
to follow up his advantage with sufficient vigor, hence he 
was held primarily responsible for the surrender of Cornwal- 
lis, because he sent only fourteen ships to re-enforce Graves 
at New York. Bodney asserts the disaster was due to the 
evacuation of Bhode Island, and the excessive extension of 
the fines of the English through the invasion of the Carolinas. 
The surrender of Cornwallis assured the independence of the 
States. 


The Grand Lodge made its formal bow of existence, in 
its independence, in the same year (1783) that the Colonies 
became an acknowledged nation of independent States. 

The city of New York at this time was quite meagre in 
its proportions ; its eastern boundary was Pearl Street, and it 
did not reach Chatham Square; the Chatham or Bowerie 
road was a defile through hills and meadows. On the 
north was a hill, commencing at or near the Fields, now the 
City Hall Park, and its highest point was at what is now 
Duane Street ; from there it sloped toward the Collect. On 
the hill was a school-house, and about, were scattered a few 
rude country dwellings, whose gardens stretched up the hill- 
side toward Bose Street. A brick-front suburban house, a 
little more pretentious than the others, stood near the corner 
of what are now Duane and Chatham streets. 

BATTLE OF G-OLDEH HILL. 

An old house in New York stands at No. 122 William 
Street. It was built in 1692, during which year the Corpora- 



12 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


tion opened up the streets between Wall and Fair streets. 
Fair Street is now called Fulton Street. Lots were sold by 
the city, and one of the terms of purchase required the 
buyers to erect buildings thereon of brick or stone not less 
than two stories high. This house was built of narrow 
Dutch bricks, brought over from Holland as ballast, and laid 
in an imperishable cement, which is as hard to-day as the 
noted bricks. 

On the grounds immediately back of the house, was shed 
the first blood for liberty of the Colonists, prior to the Revo- 
lution. This was at the battle of Golden Hill, fought some 
time before the Boston massacre. About eighty members of 
the Sixteenth Regiment of Foot (British) had taken up their 
position on the highest point of the Golden Hill, which was 
situated on the block now bounded by William, John, Fulton 
and Gold streets. The Sons of Liberty hastily collected 
some muskets and pistols, and marched to the hill, deter- 
mined to disperse the soldiers and make them prisoners. 
Blood was shed on both sides. One old man was shot 
through the head, three citizens and five soldiers were 
wounded. The house was used at various periods before 
and during the Revolution as a tavern. Among its patrons 
were the prominent Masonic Brethren, George Washington, 
Baron Steuben, Generals Putnam and Lafayette. 


FRAUNCEs’ TAVERN. 

Fraunces’ Tavern was situated at the comer of Broad and 
Pearl streets, and was made Brother Washington’s Head- 
quarters, on the evacuation of the city, by the British troops, 
November 25, 1783. This old mansion, around which some 
of the most interesting reminiscences of our Revolutionary 
history are connected, was standing in 1890, although some- 
what altered from its original appearance. It was erected 
about 150 years ago, by the Delancey family, then one of 
the most distinguished and opulent in New York, and was 
considered equal in size and aTchitectural display to any at 
that period in the city. 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


13 


As a tavern, it was the most noted in New York, and was 
the resort of the “ bloods 55 of that day, who formed them- 
selves into social clubs, among whom were some of the most 
active and distinguished men of the Revolution. Samuel 
Fraunces, or, as he was familiarly called, Black Sam (in con- 
sequence of his swarthy complexion), was of French extrac- 
tion, and appears to have been a prince of a publican. He 
purchased the house in 1762 from Oliver Delancey, . for 
£2,000, provincial currency, but did not open it as a public 
house until some time afterward. 

The “ Masons 5 Arms 55 was very popular, under the man- 
agement of Sam, as a mead and tea garden, a place much 
frequented by both sexes, on pleasant afternoons. On pur- 
chasing the Broad Street house, Sam sold out this, and it is 
thus announced in the same paper: “May 13, 1762, John 
Jones — Begs leave to acquaint the publick, That he has 
removed to the house formerly kept by Samuel Francis, at 
the sign of the Masons 5 Arms, next to Mr. Degrusia, in the 
Fields, where he intends to give the same entertainment 
as formerly given by Mr. Francis, and that in the best 
manner.” 

During the troubles which preceded the Revolution, 
Fraunces 5 Tavern seems to have been the resort of both 
Whig and Loyalist, political affairs not having sufficient 
power to sever the social ties of those whose custom it was 
to assemble there and discuss his madeira, a wine for the ex- 
cellent quality of which Sam’s cellar stood proverbial. His 
sympathies were with the Whigs, and he became one of 
Washington’s most faithful friends and followers. It was 
through the instrumentality of his daughter, that the attempt 
to poison Washington was frustrated, she being at that time 
housekeeper at Richmond Hill, his quarters. This house 
was one of those which suffered some injury from the broad- 
side of the Asia , when she fired upon the city in 1775. 

The following is a list of some of the members of the 
Social Club, which passed Saturday evenings at Sam 
Fraunces 5 , corner of Broad and Dock streets, in winter, and 
in summer at Kip’s Bay, where they built a neat, large room 



14 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


for the club-house. The British landed at this spot the day 
they took the city, September 15, 1776. 

Members of this club, dispersed in December, 1775, and 
never afterward assembled : > 

“ John Jay (disaffected). — Became Member of Congress, a Resident Minister 
to Spain, Commissioner to make peace, Chief Justice, Minister to Eng- 
land, and on his return, Governor of New York. 

Gouverneur Morris (disaffected). — Member of Congress, Minister to France, 
etc. 

Robert R. Livingston (disaffected). — Minister to France, Chancellor of New 
York, etc. 

Egbert Benson (disaffected). — District Judge, New York, and member of the 
Legislature. 

Morgan Lewis (disaffected). — Governor of New York, and a General in the 
war of 1812. 

Gulian Verplanck (disaffected). — But in Europe till 1783. President of 
New York Bank. 

John Livingston and his brother Henry (disaffected). — But of no political 
importance. 

James Seagrove (disaffected). — Went to the southward as a merchant. 
Francis Lewis (disaffected). — But of no political importance. 

John Watts (doubtful).— During the war, Recorder of New York. 

Leonard Lispenard and his brother Anthony (doubtful). —But remained 
quiet at New York.’ 

The Declaration of National Independence was read to the 
Troops by order of General Washington, and in his presence, 
on July 9, 1776, in the City Hall Park, front of the present 
City Hall. 

The 25th day of November, 1783, Being the time fixed 
upon for the exodus of the British troops, arrangements 
were made for the triumphal entry of Washington and the 
American army, to take possession of the city. On the 
morning of that day— a cold, frosty, but clear and brilliant 
morning — the troops, under General Knox, encamped at 
Harlem, marched to the Bowery lane, and halted at the 
present junction of Third Avenue and the Bowery. There 
they remained until about one o’clock in the afternoon, when 
the British left their posts in that vicinity and marched to 
Whitehall. The American troops followed, and before three 
o’clock, General Knox took formal possession of Fort George, 





DINING-ROOM, FRAUNCE'S TAVERN, 

COR. OF PEARL AND BROAD STS. 





IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


15 


amid the acclamations of thousands of emancipated freemen, 
and the roar of artillery upon the Battery. Washington re- 
paired to his quarters at Fraunces 5 Tavern, and there, during 
the afternoon, Governor Clinton gave a public dinner to the 
officers of the army, and in the evening the town was brill- 
iantly illuminated. But the most remarkable event con- 
nected with the history of Fraunces’ Tavern, and which has 
rendered it the greatest monument to perpetuate the virtues 
and patriotism of Washington, is the fact that in it he vir- 
tually resigned the charge which he had assumed on taking 
command of the army. In the room on the second story 
occurred the scene of his taking leave of his officers. 

On Thursday, December 4, 1783, the principal officers of 
the army assembled at Fraunces’ to take a final leave of 
their beloved chief. The scene is described as one of great 
tenderness. Washington entered the room where they were 
all waiting, and taking a glass of wine in his hand, said : 
“ With a heart full of love and gratitude, I now take leave 
of you. I most devoutly wish that your latter days may be 
as prosperous and happy as your former ones have been 
glorious and honorable.” Having drunk, he continued : “ I 
cannot come to each of you to take my leave, but shall be 
obliged to you if each will come and take me by the hand.” 
Knox, who at first w T as overcome and shed tears, embraced 
Washington, who kissed him and the other officers, in suc- 
cession. Washington then repaired to Whitehall, and took 
boat for a point up the Hudson. 


The year 1783 opened January 2d with a monthly session 
of the Grand Lodge, and with five numbered Lodges and 
Sion’s Lodge in attendance. The Masters of the Lodges 
were instructed to devise a plan for raising a fund, which 
should support the dignity and reputation of the Grand 
Lodge, and enable it the more effectually to extend the 
beneficent purposes of the Institution. 

A Warrant was ordered to take the place of the Dispen- 
sation held by brethren in His Majesty’s 57th Regiment, 



16 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


known as Sion’s Lodge, and of which James Huston was 
Master. Then arose the question so oft discussed, and which 
for over thirty years had been the bane of Masonry in Eng- 
land and the Colonies, the estrangement and non-inter- 
course between 

THE MODERNS AND THE ANCIENTS, 

and the open schism and formation of a “ Grand Lodge of 
England, according to Old Institutions.” (See Yol. I., pp. 36 
to 43.) The Hew York Atholl Warrant came from the 
Ancients, and after mature deliberation it was voted and 
resolved, January 2, 1783, “ that a modern Master Mason, 
known to be such, may be healed and admitted into the 
mysteries of the Ancient Craft, in the manner determined 
upon this evening, and that the same be recommended to 
the several Lodges under this jurisdiction, of which the sev- 
eral Masters and Wardens present, are desired perfectly to 
understand, and communicate the same to their respective 
Lodges.” 

In pursuance of this action, St. John’s Lodge, Ho. 4, peti- 
tioned at the February Communication to become Ancient 
Masons, which was granted, and the Master, Charles Horton, 
Senior Warden McQuhae, and Junior Warden John Stick- 
land, were admitted and initiated into the mysteries of the 
Ancient Craft, agreeably to the form determined upon. 
These officers then repaired to their Lodge, and having caused 
the members to comply with the requirements of the Grand 
Lodge, the latter Body, at an Emergent Communication, 
February 13th, ordered a Warrant for them, and awarded 
them a Book of Constitution and By-Laws for their guidance. 

THE LOTTERY. 

At the session of February 5, there was received and read 
a letter from John Moore, Esq., of Hew York City, expres- 
sive of his affectionate regard and kind wishes for the pros- 
perity of this Grand Lodge, and offering two State lottery 
tickets at the London price, free from any advance ; upon 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


17 


which it was Resolved, unanimously, That the Grand Secre- 
tary return the thanks of this Grand Lodge to Mr. Moore for 
his kind attention toward them, and assure him they will ever 
bear in remembrance a proper sense of his generous offer; 
and it was 

Resolved, That the thanks of this Grand Lodge be given to 
Bro. Joshua Watson, Grand Treasurer, for his liberal dona- 
tion of a State lottery ticket, and that the Grand Secre- 
tary transmit the same, in terms of suitable respect and af- 
fection, for so particular an instance of benevolence. 

NAMES AND NUMBERS OF LODGES. 

It was further Resolved, That six guineas be fixed as the 
price for a Warrant, and one guinea for a book of By-Laws. 
Also, that all Lodges may be designated by a name, as well 
as a number. 

LODGES NOS. 5 AND 6. 

On March 6th, sundry officers of the Auxiliary Troops, 
and members of Lodge Ho. 213, held in His Majesty’s 
Fourth Battalion of Royal Artillery, petitioned for a War- 
rant to form and hold a Lodge in the Regiment de Knyp- 
hausen, which petition was received and granted, whereupon 
Lodge Ho. 213 made a generous donation to the Grand Lodge 
of a set of marble columns and a Box for the Jewels, which 
the Grand Lodge accepted. An Emergent Grand Lodge was 
held four days thereafter, to constitute a Lodge in the Regi- 
ment de Knyphausen, when the following brethren were pre- 
sented to the Deputy Grand Master, as* the officers elected 
by the petitioners to fill the chairs of said Lodge : William 
Drake, Master, Henry Lorey, Senior Warden, and Joseph 
Horn, Junior Warden, and, being approved by the brethren, 
they were installed and invested with the proper jewels, as 
officers of Hiram Lodge, Ho. 5, and authorized to meet on the 
first Saturday of every calendar month. 

At the same Communication a petition was received from 
John J. Lotheissen and other brethren, praying for a War- 
YOL. n. — 2 



18 


HISTORY OP FREEMASONRY 


rant, which was also granted. Thereupon, a Special Grand 
Lodge was opened in ample form on March 13th, for the 
purpose of constituting Concordia Lodge, No. 6. The peti- 
tioners for that Lodge presented John Jacob Lotheissen for 
their Master, Frederick Spangenberg for their Senior War- 
den, and Frederick Wacks for their Junior Warden, who, 
being severally approved of, were installed and invested with 
the proper jewels of their office, after which they received 
their Warrant, Book of By-Laws and Constitutions, with in- 
structions to meet on the first and third Tuesdays of each 
calendar month. 

A BLANK WARRANT. 

A singular action was taken by the Grand Lodge on April 
2, wherein it passed the following : 

“ Resolved , That a blank Warrant, free of all expense, be 
presented to our Wor. Brother James McCuen, Esq., Deputy 
Grand Master, with liberty to fill the blanks with such names 
as he may think proper ; and that the thanks of this Grand 
Lodge be returned for the many essential services he hath 
rendered in its institution and progression.’ 5 

DEPUTY GRAND MASTER. 

Brother James McCuen vacated his office by resignation, 
and on May 7, in open Lodge, William Walter, Grand Master, 
called Archibald Cunningham, of No. 169, to succeed to the 
office of Deputy Grand Master, who was duly invested and 
assumed charge of his duties. 

The Grand Treasurer, Joshua Watson, having departed 
for Halifax, Junior Warden Kerr, of No. 169, was elected 
and invested with the jewel. 

LODGE NO. 7. 

At this meeting a petition from sundry Ancient brethren 
was received, praying for a Warrant for forming and hold- 
ing a Lodge in His Majesty’s Loyal American Regiment; 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


19 


which was granted under the recommendation of No. 210. 
Whereupon the Grand Lodge held a Special Session on June 
12, for the purpose of constituting Lodge No. 7, to be held 
in His Majesty’s Loyal American Eegiment or elsewhere. 
The petitioners for that Lodge presented Brother William 
Fowler to be Master, Brother Anthony Allaire to be Senior 
Warden, Brother Caleb Fowler to be Junior Warden ; who, 
meeting with the approbation of the brethren, were installed 
and invested with their proper jewels, after which the Grand 
Master delivered to them their Warrant, By-Laws, and Book 
of Constitution, with instructions to meet on the first and 
third Tuesdays of each calendar month. 

THE JUNIOR GRAND WARDEN. 

Another change took place in the personnel of the officers 
of the Grand Lodge on June 5, when the Eev. John 
Beardsley resigned, as he intended leaving the city, and 
William Cock, Master of Lodge No. 210, then Grand Secre- 
tary, was elected Junior Grand Warden to fill the vacancy. 
The Deputy Grand Secretary, J ames Clarke, was thereupon 
elected Grand Secretary to fill the vacancy created by the 
promotion of William Cock. The dissensions that broke out 
in Lodge No. 210, and which came before the Grand Lodge, 
June 19, will be found on p. 399, Yol. I. 

The several new officers were installed on the following 

ST. JOHN THE BAPTIST’S DAY, 

June 24, it having been determined to commemorate that 
day, under the resolution adopted June 5, when a Commit- 
tee of three, Brothers Cunningham, Clarke and Fife, were 
“ vested with full powers to regulate the Solemnities of the 
Festival.” 

In due order the Grand Lodge attended by the brethren 
of Lodges 169, 210, 213, 52, 478 and St. John’s, No. 4, went 
in procession from Eoubalet’s Tavern to St. Paul’s Chapel, 
where an excellent sermon was preached by the Eev. Dr. 
Inglis, Eector of New York. After Divine service, the 



20 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


G-rand and other Lodges returned to Roubalet’s, and taking 
into their serious consideration the repeated instances of 
civility they had received from Dr. Inglis, particularly for 
the sermon he was pleased to preach before them on that 
day, it was unanimously resolved, that the Grand Secretary 
take the earliest opportunity to transmit to him their thanks, 
and to assure him they would ever retain a grateful sense of 
his attention and benevolence, not only on the present, but 
on former occasions. And also to acquaint him, they would 
consider it as an additional favor if he would be pleased to 
give them a copy of his sermon for the press. 

LODGE NO. 90 PAYS HOMAGE. 

On August 5, 1783, Lodge No. 90, held in His Majesty’s 
33d Regiment, presented their Warrant, granted August 19, 
1761, by the Grand Lodge of London, under the auspices of 
Earl Kelly, Grand Master, and acknowledged the jurisdic- 
tion of the Grand Lodge of New York, whereupon they 
were admitted to take their seats. 

The Grand Lodge at this date accepted the offer of 
Brother Campbell, the Master of Lodge No. 169, to meet 
in their Lodge-room. 

This meeting was made memorable by the instituting and 
establishing a 

COMMITTEE OF CHARITY, 

to whom all petitions of indigent brethren were to be re- 
ferred, and vesting them with power to grant relief, such 
as the circumstances may appear to require, and the funds 
of the Grand Lodge would permit. This first Committee 
consisted of the Grand Secretary, James Clarke, Grand 
Treasurer Kerr and Worshipful Brother Fife, to whom the 
charities of the Grand Lodge were committed. This was 
the commencement of the 

GRAND STEWARDS’ LODGE. 

And it was specially u Resolved , That the Grand Deacons, 
or Grand Stewards, if they neglect to attend to their duty 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


21 


on the stated Lodge nights, unless prevented by sickness 
or unavoidable business, shall be suspended and others ap- 
appointed in their places.” 

The first three instances of charity reported by the Com- 
mittee of Charity, and the sums allowed, were, to Matthew 
Arnold, of Lodge No. 293, £4 ; to Peter Vincent, £9, 6. 8. ; 
to James Spencer, of Lodge No. 15, Kingston, Jamaica, 
£26, 2. 8. 

THE GRAND WARRANT. 

At a meeting of a Grand Lodge of Emergency, opened Sep- 
tember 19, 1783, at which representatives of six Lodges were 
present, a warm discussion arose as to the propriety of leav- 
ing the Grand Warrant in New York City , considering the 
momentous political changes which were transpiring, more 
especially in the city. In consideration of the Grand Lodge 
having been established in the Province, it was resolved that 
the same should be left, and remain in the care of such 
brethren as may hereafter be appointed to succeed the 
present Grand officers, the most of whom were under the 
necessity of leaving New York upon the removal of His 
Majesty’s troops. 

GRAND MASTER WALTER RESIGNS. 

The Grand Master, William Walter, signified to the Grand 
Lodge his intention of leaving the city with his family, in a 
few days, and that it was necessary the Grand Lodge should 
think of some brother to succeed him ; he then begged leave 
to resign his office, which he accordingly did, after taking an 
affectionate leave of the several Lodges, in terms of the high- 
est respect and gratitude. As an evidence of esteem a valu- 
able jewel, duly inscribed, was shortly thereafter presented 
by the Grand Lodge to Kev. William Walter. 

WILLIAM COCK, GRAND MASTER. 

The Junior Grand Warden, William Cock, having been 
nominated by the Grand Master as his successor, was 



22 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


unanimously elected, proclaimed, installed and inducted in 
the Chair, after which he received the salutation of the sev- 
eral Lodges present, with the ceremonies usual on such occa- 
sions. William Cock was Deputy Register in the Court of 
Chancery, and had his office as a lawyer, as well as his 
residence, at No. 66 Wall Street. 

This action left the Junior Grand Warden’s chair vacant ; 
thereupon Patrick McDavitt, of Lodge No. 169, a merchant 
of the city, was nominated and unanimously elected to fill 
that office. 


CHANGES IN THE GRAND OFFICES. 

On October 1, five Lodges being represented, the following 
proceedings were had : 

Resolved , That this Grand Lodge is impressed with the 
liveliest sense of gratitude to the Right Worshipful the Rev. 
William Walter, their late Grand Master, for the attention, 
candor and abilities he displayed in the various important 
duties of his office. And, as a testimony of their affection 
and regard, they beg he will accept their sincerest thanks, 
accompanied with the most ardent wishes for his prosperity 
and happiness in every situation where God in His Provi- 
dence may order his lot. 

Brother John S. Browning, Senior Grand Warden, ac- 
quainted the Grand Lodge that as he should leave this city, 
probably before their next meeting, he begged leave to resign 
his office, which he accordingly did in terms of great respect 
and affection for the different Lodges in this jurisdiction. 

The Senior Grand Warden’s chair being now vacant, 
Brother Patrick McDavitt was unanimously elected Senior 
Grand Warden, after which he was installed and vested 
with the jewel of his office. 

The Junior Grand Warden’s chair being vacant by the 
promotion of Brother McDavitt, Brother James Saidler, 
member of Lodge No. 169, was unanimously elected Junior 
Grand Warden, after which he was installed. Brother Said- 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


23 


ler was a merchant, having his residence and place of business 
at 34 Queen, now Pearl, Street. 

Brother Archibald Cunningham, Deputy Grand Master, 
having since the last meeting of the Grand Lodge embarked 
for Nova Scotia, the Grand Master called upon Brother 
Browning to fill the Chair during his residence in the city, 
which he accepted. 

It was then 

Resolved , , That the thanks of this Grand Lodge be given 
to the K. W. Brother Browning, late Senior Grand Warden, 
for the faithful discharge of the duties of his office, not only 
by a regular attendance in the Grand Lodge, but in support- 
ing the reputation and dignity of the Ancient Craft on 
every occasion. 

In addition to the above, it appears the Grand Pursuivant, 
Woolett, resigned, and the two Grand Deacons, Clarke and 
Roome, having announced their intention of leaving the 
city, their positions were filled by Brothers Miller and Tem- 
pleton, of Lodge No. 169. Brothers Burdett and Hickford, 
the Grand Stewards, also having left the city, Brothers 
Wilson and Seaman,* of Lodge No. 169, were elected to fill 
their places. 

Thus every permanent Grand Officer, excepting the Grand 
Master, William Cock, of Lodge No. 212, was a member of 
Lodge No. 169. 

On November 29, 1783, the Grand Lodge formed and 
granted a Warrant to Union Lodge, No. 8, and James Said- 
ler was installed Master; Oliver Templeton, Senior Warden, 
and John Miller, Junior Warden. 

Preparations were instituted early in December for the 
due celebration of St. John’s Day. 

At the Assembly on December 3, the time of meeting was 
changed to the first Wednesday in every second month , com- 
mencing in February. 

A number of petitions praying for relief having been 
presented to Grand Lodge, the same were referred to a 
Committee, and it appearing that two of the Committee on 



24 


HISTORY OP FREEMASONRY 


Charity had departed for Nova Scotia, the Committee was 
newly constituted by the appointment of Brothers Horton 
and Saidler in conjunction with Brother Kerr. It was also 
deemed judicious “ that the several Grand Officers, together 
with the respective Masters in the Chair of the Lodges 
within this jurisdiction, be a committee to open a corre- 
spondence with the different Grand Lodges of America .” 


1784. 

On February 4, 1784, Brother Samuel Kerr, a retired mer- 
chant, Master of Lodge No. 169, was duly elected Deputy 
Grand Master for the ensuing year. He was a member of 
St. Andrew’s Society of the State of New York. 

A GRAND LODGE FOR CONNECTICUT. 

A letter from Brother Samuel H. Parsons, of New Haven, 
Conn., was received in November, stating the situation of 
the Lodges of that State and of their having no responsible 
head; a Committee was accordingly appointed to confer 
with the bearer of the communication, “ and to enter fully 
and amply into the constitution of every proposal he may 
lay before them, and finally to determine thereon.” 

The Committee so appointed reported on December 3, 
which report was read and approved. The subject was 
taken up for action, on the succeeding February 4, when 
it was unanimously voted, that the officers of the Grand 
Lodge should be “a Committee to determine the most 
eligible mode, for the Grand Officers-elect of the State of 
Connecticut obtaining a Grand Warrant from the Grand 
Lodge of England.” 

The meetings of the Grand Lodge were again ordered to 
be changed ; that hereafter the meetings would be held quar- 
terly on the first Wednesday in March, June, September, 
and December. 

Upon the petition of Brothers James Gardiner, John L. 



IN THE STATE OP NEW YORK. 


25 


Hudson, and Joseph Corwin, a Warrant was granted to form 
the first lodge on Long Island . 

CHARITY. 

The duties and responsibilities of the Committee on 
Charity now began to broaden ; the Committee constituted 
in August, began to realize the importance of their cares and 
the importunities of the numerous applicants. The Grand 
Lodge, out of regard for the claims continually being made, 
“ voted, unanimously, that the three oldest Masters of the 
different Lodges, meet as often as possible, the Secretary and 
books always present, to grant relief to the petitioners of this 
Grand Lodge or Stewards’ Lodge for Charity.” 

The effect of this action, in conjunction with the fact that 
the Grand Lodge determined to meet quarterly, was to 
deposit with the Grand Stewards' Lodge much of the duties 
of the Grand Lodge, pending the Quarterly Sessions. It now 
becomes essential, to consider the movements and actions of 
the Grand Stewards’ Lodge in continuity with the Sessions 
of the Grand Lodge. 

FIRST MEETING GRAND STEWARDS’ LODGE. 

The first regular meeting of the Grand Stewards’ Lodge 
was held February 18, 1784, at the Lodge-room of Ho. 
169, and being opened in ample form, the Deputy Grand 
Master, Samuel Kerr, opened proceedings by offering two 
resolutions which were unanimously adopted, first, that the 
prayers of Brother John Wood’s petition be granted, and that 
the sum of ten dollars be given to him ; second, that Brothers 
Morris, Joy and Horton wait on Brother Jeremiah Wright 
and inquire into his circumstances, and, if found necessary, 
afford him relief. The Grand Tyler was donated ten dol- 
lars and his fees ordered paid. 

HON. ROBERT R. LIVINGSTON, GRAND MASTER. 

At the meeting of Grand Lodge held February 4, Grand 
Master William Cock resigned his official duties, and nomi- 



26 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


Bated to fill the vacancy, the Hon. Robert R. Livingston, 
who was unanimously elected Grand Master, and accordingly 
was proclaimed and installed by proxy. The last recorded 
Masonic act of William Cock was the installation of the 
Grand Officers, June 25, 1792. 

The Grand Stewards 5 Lodge, on February 18, resolved 
that the next meeting of the Grand Lodge for the purpose of 
installing the Grand Master, be at Brother Cape’s tavern, and 
that Brothers Kerr and Saidler wait on the Grand Master, 
to know his pleasure whether the installation shall be public 
or not. 

Brother Livingston having signified his pleasure, the Grand 
Lodge was opened on March 3 by Grand Master William 
Cock, when the Hon. Robert R. Livingston attended, was 
installed and inducted in the chair and proclaimed Grand 
Master, after which he received the salutations of the several 
Lodges present, with the ceremonies usual on such occa- 
sions. 


SKETCH OF GRAND MASTER LIVINGSTON. 

Among the Free Masons who have exercised the highest 
judicial functions in the United States, ranking with Chief 
Justice William Allen, the earliest Provincial Grand Master 
of Pennsylvania, and also the earliest in America, Chief 
Justices J. Bannister Gibson and John M. Reed, subsequent 
Grand Masters of Pennsylvania, and Chief Justice John Mar- 
shall, Grand Master of Virginia, was Chancellor Robert R. 
Livingston, Grand Master of New York, who merits distin- 
guished mention. He was no less active and prominent as a 
Free Mason, than he was as a citizen, a patriot, a jurist, and 
a statesman. 

On April 18, 1771, Solomon’s Lodge, No. 1, of Poughkeepsie 
was constituted. Brother Robert R. Livingston, then Master 
of Union Lodge of the city of New York, acting as Grand 
Master by authority of Prov. Grand Master, Brother George 
Harrison, constituted the Lodge and installed its officers. 

The Master of the new Lodge, Brother Col. James Living- 
ston, was a kinsman of Chancellor Livingston, a trustee of 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


27 


King’s College, New York, and a member of the State 
Assembly. 

In 1789, Grand Master Robert R. Livingston, and other 
officers and members of Grand Lodge, observed St. John’s 
Day, Jane 24, by attending at St. Paul’s Chapel and listening 
to a sermon delivered by Brother Beach. Among the breth- 
ren attending with them was Brother, the Hon. James Jack- 
son, member of Congress and Grand Master of Masons of 
Georgia. 

In 1798 Brother John Jacob Astor was elected Grand Treas- 
urer, serving under Brother Livingston as Grand Master. No 
other Grand Master served as long in the supreme station as 
he did, and certainly none was more eminent for ability, or 
held an office exceeding in dignity that of Chancellor of the 
Court of Equity of a great commonwealth. 

Brother Robert R. Livingston, LL.D., of New York, came 
of illustrious ancestry. He was a lineal descendant of the 
fifth Lord Livingston, who was intrusted with the guardian- 
ship of Mary, Queen of Scots. His father, who bore the same 
name, was in succession a judge of the Court of Admiralty 
and a justice of the Supreme Court of New York, and was of 
Scotch descent. Robert Livingston emigrated to America, 
arriving in New York in 1676, where he was warmly wel- 
comed, and soon after was employed in the colonial govern- 
ment at Albany. In 1686 he became the grantee of the 
famous territorial “ manor of Livingston ” on the Hudson, 
which was only less valuable than the manor of Yan Rensse- 
laer. The Livingston Manor House stood forty miles south 
of Albany, and there, for several generations, the Livingstons 
dispensed a princely hospitality. Every foreigner of distinc- 
tion received a courteous welcome within its portals. There 
was a second Livingston Manor, of Clermont, on the lower 
Hudson. This consisted of thirteen thousand acres, and 
devolved by descent upon Chancellor Livingston, and it was 
here that the latter died. It was Robert Livingston, the 
grandfather of Robert R., who introduced the then famous 
(afterward infamous) Captain Kidd to Lord Bellomont, rec- 
ommending him as a fit person to command the expedition 



28 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


against the pirates. Kidcl sailed in 1696, and it is familiar 
history that he turned pirate himself, was apprehended, sent 
to England for trial, found guilty, and executed in 1701. 

At seventeen years of age, the future Chancellor and 
Grand Master of New York was graduated at King’s (now 
Columbia) College, New York City — John Jay and Gou- 
verneur Morris being in the same class. He immediately 
commenced the study of the law with William Smith, the 
eminent justice and historian, was admitted to the bar in 
1773, and shortly afterward was appointed Recorder of the 
city of Hew York. His office was Ho. 3 Broadway. In 
the Revolutionary War, which soon followed, he and his 
father, both of whom held public office under the Crown, 
promptly resigned, and cast their fortunes with the patriots 
in the cause of independence. 

He at once took a foremost place in the councils of the 
State and nation. In 1775, Brother Livingston was a mem- 
ber of the Provincial Convention, and a member of the com- 
mittee appointed to prepare a plan of confederation for the 
colonies. In 1775-7, he was a member of the Continental 
Congress, and, with Jefferson, Franklin, Adams, and Sher- 
man, was on the committee appointed to draft the Declara- 
tion of Independence ; but in consequence of his absence on 
public business in Hew York he lost the opportunity of being 
a signer to the Declaration — which has been truly styled 
“ more than a Battle Abbey roll.” He was a member of the 
Council of Safety, and of the committee which prepared the 
first Constitution of Hew York. Under this Constitution, 
he was appointed the first Chancellor of the State, in 1777, 
and served in that high office for twenty-four years, until he 
resigned in 1801, to become Minister to France. During 
this period, he also performed temporarily various important 
functions, being in 1781-3 Secretary of Foreign Affairs, in 
1781 a delegate to Congress at Philadelphia, and in 1788 
chairman of the convention of Hew York that adopted the 
Constitution of the United States. In 1789, while Chan- 
cellor, he administered the oath of office as President to 
Brother Gen. George Washington in Hew York City. On 



IN THE STATE OP NEW YORK. 


29 


the Fourth of July, 1787, he delivered an exceedingly able 
and eloquent oration before the Society of the Cincinnati, in 
New York. In 1796, he declined the position of Minister to 
France tendered him by President Washington. 

A praiseworthy episode in the distinguished career of 
Livingston was his active and enthusiastic co-operation with 
Brother Bobert Fulton, in promoting steam navigation, lend- 
ing the latter both his influence and his means. In 1798, he 
drew an act and had it presented to the Legislature of New 
York, providing that Fulton should have the exclusive priv- 
ilege to navigate the waters of the State of New York for 
twenty years. The act, when introduced, was received with 
derision “ as an idle, whimsical project.” It has been 
seriously questioned that Brother Bobert Fulton was the 
inventor or first successful experimenter with the steamboat, 
since it is believed that Brother John Fitch is entitled to this 
honor, and that Philadelphia first witnessed the triumph of 
steam navigation. For evidence of this fact we need only 
refer to the issues of the Philadelphia Federal Gazette of 
June, July, August, and September, 1790, when “ The Steam- 
boat ” was statedly advertised as a regular packet boat run- 
ning between “Arch Street Ferry” and Burlington, Bor- 
dentown, and Trenton on the upper Delaware Biver, with 
occasional trips to Chester and Wilmington down the river. 
The failure of the company running the boat, unfortunately, 
ended for a time the continuance of steam navigation in the 
vicinity of Philadelphia, thus successfully introduced. When 
Livingston was Minister to France, he aided Fulton in that 
country in his experiments on the Seine, and on his return in 
1805 he aided him again on the Hudson. In return for the 
co-operation of his patron, Fulton named his first steamboat 
“ The Clermont” after Livingston’s manor of that name. 
On August 7, 1807, the steamboat left New York on a trial 
trip to Albany, and was successful, and ever afterward 
steam navigation has been continuously prosecuted. 

As Minister to France, Chancellor Livingston bore himself 
with distinction, ability, and success. Bandall, in his “ Life 
of Jefferson,” says, — without coming under Sir Henry Woot- 



30 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


ton’s punning definition of an ambassador, “ an honest gen- 
tleman, sent to lie abroad for his country,” — Livingston was 
a man of the world, possessed of social tact and business 
experience, remarkably well informed and distinguished for 
broad and liberal views. He became a favorite with Bona- 
parte, being permitted to communicate with him directly, 
without the intervention of a minister. To him, in connec- 
tion with Presidents Jefferson and Monroe, we owe the 
important acquisition of the territory of Louisiana, by pur- 
chase from France, for twelve millions of dollars. When 
Livingston resigned his mission to France, in 1805, he re- 
ceived from Napoleon the parting gift of a gold snuff-box, 
ornamented with a portrait of the First Consul. Upon 
his return from the French mission to the United States, 
Livingston at once became active again as a citizen. He was 
an ardent lover of the Fine Arts, and President of the New 
York Academy. He was Yice-President of St. Andrew’s 
Society of the State of New York. He was also President 
of the Society for the Promotion of the Useful Arts, and of 
the Agricultural Society, and the first to introduce into New 
York the use of gypsum and the breed of merino sheep. A 
number of his addresses and essays were published, with 
formal treatises on agriculture and sheep. His mental 
activity continued until his death, only a few days before 
which, he completed a paper on agriculture for the American 
edition of “ Brewster’s Encyclopaedia.” Past Grand Master 
Livingston died at his favorite home, Clermont on the 
Hudson, February 26, 1813, at the age of sixty-three years. 
In person our distinguished brother was of a commanding 
presence, and eminently courteous in his bearing. His abili- 
ties as a lawyer and judge were remarkable, and as a public 
speaker he was persuasive, eloquent, and powerful. Both 
the American people and the Masonic Craft have every 
reason to be proud of his eminent career of usefulness. 

As an evidence of the loyalty and true Masonic affection 
entertained by the Lodges for their newly elected Grand 
Master, the following letters of congratulation from Nos. 169 
and 210 are herein inserted : 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


31 


“ To the Right Worshipful and Honorable Robert R. firing- 
ston y Gh'and Master of Ancient Masons in the State of 
New York and Chancellor of the same , dec., d&c., dec. 

We, the Master, Wardens and Brethren of Lodge No. 169, 
highly pleased with your appointment as Grand Master of 
Ancient Masons in this State, beg leave to Congratulate you 
& the Craft in general on that happy Event, and to assure 
you of our Concurrence and Support in whatever may tend 
to the good of that Ancient & Honorable Society. 

Universal Benevolence, Charity & Urbanity being the 
grand Characteristics of Masonry, under the protection and 
patronage of a Gentleman so distinguished for those Virtues, 
and the high Station in which your Country has so deserv- 
edly placed you, with inexpressible pleasure we look forward 
with firmest hope that Unanimity, Concord and Harmony 
will universally prevail amongst the Royal Craft in this 
State. 

And may its benign influence soon extend thro’ the whole 
continent, a blessing to themselves and mankind in general, 
to the latest posterity. 

That you may long live to see the universal Influence of 
Masonry and the prosperity of this Country, and enjoy every 
other happiness, is the ardent wish of Lodge No. 169. 

Samuel Kerb, Master. 

Tho® Tucker, Sen r Warden. 

Peter McDougall, Jun-Warden. 

New York, March 8, 5784.” 

“ TO THE RIGHT WORSHIPFUL THE HONORABLE ROB. R. LIVINGSTON, 
ESQ®, GRAND MASTER OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 

The humble address of the Mastery Wardens and Brethren of 
Lodge No. 210, Ancient York Masons. 

Right Worshipful Sir and Brother: 

Permit us, the Master, Wardens, and Brethren of Lodge 
No. 210, A. Y. M., to testify in the most unfeigned manner 



32 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


our happiness in having a Gentleman of your exalted char- 
acter and ability placed in the Chief Chair of Masonry in 
this State, and to exult in the idea of the Craft’s thus receiv- 
ing so great an additional ornament. 

We return you our warmest acknowledgments for your 
expressions of regard for Masonry in general, but more par- 
ticularly for the excellent instructions which we received on 
your taking the Chair. Tour good example cannot but have 
an extensive influence over the conduct of every individual, 
making Harmony, Friendship, and Brotherly Love the rule 
by which they square their actions, and the good of the com- 
munity the centre to which they all tend, and we have every 
thing to hope and expect from your precepts. - 

We, for our own parts, promise you all due obedience, and 
every assistance in supporting the Honor of the Craft and the 
dignity of your station, and can with justice assert it is our 
inclination as well as duty so to do. 

May the Great Architect of the Hni verse take you, our 
worthy Brother, into His Holy Protection and keeping, is 
and shall be the sincere prayer of, Bight Worshipful Sir, 
Your Affectionate Brother, 

And w Morris, Master. 

Hew York, March 9, 5784.” 

GRAND TREASURER. GRAND SECRETARIES. 

In consequence of the promotion of Brother Samuel Kerr 
to the position of Deputy Grand Master, the office of Grand 
Treasurer had been left vacant ; thereupon Daniel McCor- 
mick, Master of Union Lodge, was appointed Grand Treas- 
urer. 

The Warrant of St. John’s Lodge, Ho. 2, having been sur- 
rendered to the Grand Lodge and accepted, and the Lodge 
conforming to the Eegulations, John Lawrence, the Master, 
and James Giles, the Junior Warden, Avere jointly appointed 
Grand Secretaries until St. John’s Day. Brother James 
Giles was a lawyer, with office and residence at 65 Maiden 
Lane. 



IN THE STATE OP NEW YORK. 


33 


st. John’s lodge, no. 2. royal aroh lodge, no. s. 

A Grand Stewards 5 Lodge of Emergency was held March 
27, when it was 

“ Resolved , 1st. That St. John’s Lodge, No. 2, having sur- 
rendered their Warrant to the Grand Lodge March 3, inst., 
and agreed to conform to its Regulations, be entitled to all 
the rights and privileges of members of said Grand Lodge, 
and take rank of all Lodges that may be constituted by the 
Grand Lodge after said surrender. ’ , 

2d. That all other Lodges in this State who were in the 
same situation as St. John’s Lodge, No. 2, and who are will- 
ing to conform to the Regulations of this Grand Lodge, be 
received in like manner as St. John’s Lodge, No. 2, and be 
entitled to all the rights and privileges of the other Lodges 
now in this city.” 

St. John the Baptist’s Day was duly observed by a pro- 
cession and the attendance at Church for a sermon. 

Royal Arch Lodge, No. 8, having surrendered its Warrant 
on June 2, another was granted gratis, when the Lodge ap- 
pears under the name Independent Royal Arch, No. 8. 

When the Grand Lodge of Emergency was opened on 
June 23, 1784, there were present representatives from Lodges 
169, 210, 212, 4, Hiram No. 5, Union No. 8, Lodge No. 2, 
Royal Arch No. 8, Masters’ No. 2, Solomon’s Lodge of 
Poughkeepsie, and Lodge No. 1 of Clarke’s Town. 

The representatives of Solomon’s Lodge, Union Lodge, 
Masters’ Lodge, and St. John’s Lodge, No. 1, in behalf of 
their respective Lodges, acknowledged the jurisdiction of the 
Grand Lodge, and were awarded seats accordingly. 

ELECTION OF SEVERAL GRAND OFFICERS. 

Hon. Peter W. Yates, one of the four members represent- 
ing the State of New York in Congress, which met in Fed- 
eral Hall, Wall Street, Master of Union Lodge of Albany, 
vol. n.— 3 



34 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


was elected to the office of Senior Grand Warden ; James 
Saidler to the office of Junior Grand Warden ; Daniel Mc- 
Cormick was re-elected Grand Treasurer ; John Lawrence 
and James Giles were re-elected Joint Grand Secretaries. 


The Warrant of St. Patrick’s Lodge, in Tryon County, 
having been taken surreptitiously to Canada, or destroyed, 
on motion of Brother Peter W. Yates, a new one was author- 
ized, free of expense. 

An engraved plate for Grand Lodge Certificates was 
ordered. 

The Grand Lodge opened with the usual solemnities on 
September 1, 1784. The following were the officers of the 
Grand Lodge at that time : 


Robert R. Livingston, M. W. Grand Master ; 

Samuel Kerr, R. W. Deputy Grand Master ; 

Peter W. Yates (installed Nov. 22), R. W. Sen. G. Warden ; 
James Saidler, R. W. Junior Grand Warden ; 

Daniel McCormick, Grand Treasurer ; 

John Lawrence, | 

James Giles, ) 


Grand Secretaries. 


All were present, except the Grand Master and the Senior 
Grand Warden. There were also present representatives of 
. eight Lodges. 

Regularity in the keeping of a detailed Register of all 
members and in the issuance of Grand Lodge Certificates, 
became subjects of discussion, and were favorably acted upon. 
The price of the certificate was fixed at ten shillings. 

It was also Resolved , in Grand Stewards 5 Lodge held Sep- 
tember 15, that every regular Mason shall pay to the Grand 
Body, eight shillings per annum. 


1785. 

A Committee appointed in February, to prepare Rules and 
Regulations for the government of the Grand Lodge, reported 





YORK, ENGLAND, A.D. 926. 





IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


35 


complete on March 2 ; they were agreed to and ordered pub- 
lished. These 

RULES AND REGULATIONS 

were dedicated : 

“ To His Excellency, George Washington, Esq. 

In Testimony, as well of his exalted Services to his Coun- 
try, as of his distinguished Character as a Mason, the follow- 
ing Book of Constitutions of the most ancient and honorable 
Fraternity of Free and Accepted Masons, by order and in 
behalf of the Grand Lodge of the State of Hew York, is 
dedicated, 

By his most Humble Servant, 

James Giles, G. Secretary. 

A. L. 5785.” 

YORK CONSTITUTIONS. YORK LEGEND. YORK RITE. 

The popular form of the “ York Legend ” places the date 
at A. D. 926, and is given by Dr. Anderson in these words : 
“ Prince Edwin summon’d all the Free and Accepted Masons 
in the Eealm, to meet him in the Congregation at York, who 
came and form’d the Grand Lodge, under him as their 
Grand Master, A. D. 926.” 

Preston uses the following language: “Edward died in 
924, and was succeeded by Athelstane, his son, who ap- 
pointed his brother Edwin patron of the Masons. This 
prince procured a Charter from Athelstane, empowering 
them to meet annually in Communication at York. In this 
city the First Grand Lodge of England was formed in 926, 
at which Edwin presided as Grand Master. Here many old 
writings were produced in Greek, Latin and other languages, 
from which it is said the Constitutions of the English Lodge 
have been extracted.” 

As all Masonic writers agree in the main features of the 
York Legend, it is universally accepted, that an Assembly 
was held at York in A. D. 926, and that “ a Code of Laws 
was adopted, which became the basis on which all subse- 
quent Masonic Constitutions were framed. 53 



36 


HISTORY OP FREEMASONRY 


Old York manuscripts are still preserved and carefully 
guarded, such as those of date, 1600, 1670, 1680, 1693, 1704. 

It is evidently a misnomer to speak of the “ York Kite ” 
as of the present day ; Brother William J. Hughan remarks, 
“ There is no such Kite, and what it was no one now knows” 
Dr. Albert G. Mackey says, “The Kite in its purity does 
not now exist anywhere. The nearest approach to it is the 
St. John’s Masonry of Scotland.” (See Yol. L, p. 35.) 

Inasmuch as at this period (1785) in the history of the 
Grand Lodge but few rules had been adopted in addition 
to the Old Regulations, Constitutions, etc. (see Yol. I., pp. 
17-29), and which have herein been quoted, the Warrant 
numbers not determined, nor the rank of Lodges assigned ; 
and inasmuch as many changes were made within the suc- 
ceeding fifteen years, the number of Lodges increased and 
more definitive regulations made, it is deemed advisable that 
these first Rules and Regulations embracing the old Consti- 
tutions and Charges be not repeated herein until the year of 
their fuller publication in 1801, which will be found post. It 
is also well to notice that the Copy of these Laws, as used 
by the Grand Lodge and its Subordinates, differed materially 
in language from the original Constitutions and Charges 
of 1722, ’23, *26, and ’30, and were those as known to the 
Ancients . They are published in this history in the dic- 
tion in which they were used by the Grand Lodge of Hew 
York. 

The Grand Lodge held a Communication June 1, 1785. 
Robert R. Livingston was re-elected Grand Master ; Samuel 
Kerr, Deputy Grand Master; Peter W. Yates, Senior Grand 
Warden; James Saidler, Junior Grand Warden; Daniel 
McCormick, Grand Treasurer, and James Giles continued as 
Grand Secretary. 

Warrants for Dutchess County Lodge and Fort Edward 
Lodge were granted July 12 on petitions duly presented. 

A letter received September 7, from the Grand Master of 
Massachusetts, Paschal H. Smith, conveying the proceedings 
of a Convention at Boston, was read, together with the 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


37 


proceedings, and referred to the Grand Stewards 5 Lodge for 
reply. 

The observance of the Festival of St. John the Evangelist 
became a subject of more than usual consideration in Decem- 
ber, 1785 ; resolutions and orders were adopted announcing 
a procession, the march to commence from Cape’s Tavern, at 
eleven o’clock, accompanied by a band of music. The Eev. 
Mr. Beach was requested to officiate on the occasion, and 
allow the sermon to be printed. That due ceremony should 
mark the event, the following was adopted : 

“ Resolved, That the order for procession on St. John’s 
Day next be as follows : 

The Lodges shall walk according to the time they respec- 
tively were adopted by the Grand Lodge. 

Two Tylers with drawn swords. 

Music. 

Knights Templars with swords, etc. 

Two Stewards with Eods. 

Brethren out of office, two and two. 

Treasurer and Secretary. 

Senior and Junior Wardens. 

Junior Deacon, Present and Past Masters. 

GRAND. 

One Deacon ( Grand Pursuivant, with Bible, ) One Deacon 
or < Square, and Compasses on a > or 

Steward. ( Velvet Cushion. ) Steward. 

Clergymen. 

Brethren invited by the Grand Lodge. 

Grand Treasurer and Secretary. 

Senior and Junior Grand Wardens. 

Past Grand Master and Deputy Grand Master. 

I Eight Worshipful Grand Mas- ) 
ter, supported by two G. Dea- > 
cons and two Grand Stewards. ; 

Knights Templars, properly clothed, drawn swords , etc .” 



38 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


The event proved uneventful, except in the matter of 
enjoyment and the gratification of the brethren in having 
listened to an unusually excellent sermon. It will be 
observed that the escort consisted of Knights Templars. 

The Committee to whom had been referred a Memorial 
from Brothers Charles Bingham, Samuel Webb, and Charles 
Thompson of Perth Amboy, 1ST. J., praying for the bene- 
fits of Masonry, reported unfavorably on December 21, 
and the subject seems to have been dropped for all future 
time. Shortly thereafter it was determined that Marshals 
should be appointed for the Grand Body, but no immediate 
appointments seem to have been made. 


1786. 

Hon. Robert R. Livingston, on June 7, 1786, was re- 
elected Grand Master ; Peter W. Yates, Senior Grand War- 
den ; and Peter McDougall, Junior Grand Warden. 

A Warrant was authorized to be issued for the establish- 
ment of a Lodge at Fishkill, to be known as St. Simon and 
St. Jude. 

The Grand Lodge determined on the celebration of St. 
John’s Day by a departure from the usual custom of a 
sermon and procession, and recommended the brethren to 
assemble at five o’clock in the afternoon at the White Conduit 
House on west side of Broadway, between Anthony and 
Leonard streets, on the Kalekhood Hill, overlooking the 
country, afterward known as Mt. Vernon Garden, kept by 
Mons. Corri, a Frenchman ; and that they assist at the instal- 
lation of the Grand Officers, and furthermore, that a band 
of music be procured for the occasion at the cost of four and 
a half guineas. In the meantime a letter was received by 
the Grand Stewards’ Lodge from the Grand Master elect, 
expressing his regrets, that he could not attend on the day 
appointed for the installation ceremony. 

At the same assemblage, it was announced by Brother 






mS mm&s m 

van I 

** '■ySISKI 


:<rj-,.,.«,^»ui| 


r H 


i; C J/ 

i • . 

1 r I|*&^;' , i 




WHITE CONDUIT HOUSE, 

IN LEONARD ST., BETWEEN BROADWAY AND CHURCH ST., N. Y. t 1816. 
Drawn by J. Evers. 





IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


39 


Samuel Kerr, that Lodge No. 169 requested to be known 
by the name, St. Andrew’s Lodge, No. 169, which was 
unanimously agreed to. 

MASONIC CLOTHING AT THE THEATER PROHIBITED. 

An incident and decision of note is here worthy of mention. 

Eight Worshipful Brother Kerr informed the Grand Lodge 
that Brother Morris, a member of St. John’s Lodge, No. 2, 
had made application for the Fraternity to attend his bene- 
fit play in their Masonic clothing. 

Brother Marshall requested the Grand Lodge to counte- 
nance Brother Morris as an old and worthy member of his 
Lodge. 

On which it was agreed that this Lodge cannot consent 
to the Brotherhood’s attending the theater in their Masonic 
clothing, or as a Society, but will in their private capacity 
give him their countenance and support. 

It appears from the proceedings had, July 27, at a Grand 
Lodge of Emergency, that Samuel Kerr had resigned as 
Deputy Grand Master, and that the Grand Master had ap- 
pointed W. Brother E. Harrison, of Union Lodge, No. 3, to 
fill the vacancy. Further, that James Giles had resigned 
as Grand Secretary, and that Brother James Scott, of St. 
Andrew’s Lodge, No. 169, had been appointed in his place. 

The newly appointed officers were duly installed, and a 
jewel with a “motto emblematica” was tendered, with the 
thanks of the Grand Lodge, to E. W. Samuel Kerr for his 
many eminent services. 

GRAND LODGE OF NEW YORK HAS SOLE JURISDICTION. 

A question arose on November 29, in the Grand Stewards’ 
Lodge, which was quickly determined by the Grand Body on 
December 6. John Harrison, the Master of Lodge No. 210, 
had stated that his Lodge declined to pay further dues to the 
Grand Lodge of the State, in consequence of the receipt of 
letters from the Grand Lodge of England, requesting them 



40 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


to pay dues to that Grand Body. The decision was made 
in these words : “No Lodge can exist in this State but under 
the jurisdiction of this Grand Lodge.” 

The above, and the action in relation to the St. John’s 
celebration to be held December 27, brought out two promi- 
nent matters for consideration and determination by the 
Grand Lodge : 

1st. The decision as toj precedency of Lodges^ which finally 
resulted in giving names and dates to Lodges. 

2d. The determination of the question of the Grand 
Charter. 

The following had been adopted : 

“ Resolved , That the Brethren assemble at the Coffee house, 
at Eleven O’clock, and march thence in Procession to Saint 
George’s Chapel. 

That Bros. McDougall, McDavifct and Adams be a Com- 
mittee to wait on the Rev. Brother Beach, to request that 
he prepare and deliver a Sermon on the occasion. 

Resolved^ That Bros. Mallenbrey, Welsh and Martin be a 
Committee to provide music for St. John’s Day. 

Resolved , That the different Lodges go in Procession as 
one Lodge. 

Resolved^ That the Procession be conducted along Queen 
Street to the Chapel ; thence thro’ William and Smith Streets, 
and along Wall Street to Coffee house; after, the Brethren 
to dine in separate Lodges, or as they please.” 

PRECEDENCY OF RANK. 

The result was, that at a Grand Lodge of Emergency held 
on December 23, resolutions from St. John’s Lodge, No. 2, 
were presented and read, stating that they could not join in 
the procession without surrendering their right of precedence. 
This led to a motion “ That it was not the intention of this 
Grand Lodge, by the late order of Procession, to infringe on 
the rights of St. John’s Lodge, No. 2, or any other Lodge. 



IK THE STATE OP NEW YORK. 


41 


Resolved , That next Grand Lodge be appointed for all 
the Lodges in the State to give in their respective Warrants 
or Constitutions, or copies of them properly authenticated, 
that the Rank and Precedency of the whole, may be then 
determined. And that the Grand Secretary give Notice 
Accordingly. 

Resolved , That copy of the Proceedings of this evening, 
respecting St. John’s Lodge, No. 2, be delivered by the Grand 
Secretary to the Worshipful Bro. Malcom, to lay before his 
Lodge.” 

Another resolution of St. John’s Lodge pertaining to the 
validity of the Grand Warrant, and the exercise of authorities 
outside of its explicit letter, was referred to the next session. 


1787. 

THE OKAJN'D WARRANT. 

The Session of March 7, 1787, was important ; the follow- 
ing transpired : 

On motion of Worshipful Brother Malcom, it was agreed to 
postpone the arranging of precedency of the different Lodges 
of this State until next Quarterly Communication. 

The resolution of St. John’s Lodge, No. 2, relating to 
the Grand Warrant, was read, and debate arising, it was 
Resolved , That a Committee be appointed to consider the pro- 
priety of holding the Grand Lodge under the present War- 
rant, and the proper measures to effect a change if it should 
be thought constitutional and expedient, and report their 
opinion, with the reasons on which it is founded, to the 
Grand Lodge at their next Quarterly Communication. 

Resolved , That the Committee consist of the following 
nine : Bight Worshipful Brothers Cock, Kerr, and McDougall, 
the Worshipful Brothers Malcom, Robert Cocks, Farrell, Mc- 
Cormick, Giles, and Matlack. And that the Masters and 
Past Masters of the several Lodges within the State may, if 



42 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


they think proper, meet from time to time with the Com- 
mittee to confer with them on that subject. 

Before the subject was further considered, the Grand 
Lodge granted Warrants to form new Lodges. 

Warrants were granted for a Lodge at the City of Hud- 
son, also one for Lansingburgh, and one for Jamaica, Long 
Island. 

An application for a Lodge to be established in the city 
of Hew York, under the name of Holland Lodge, was pre- 
sented June 6, considered, and the subject postponed. At 
the subsequent meeting of Grand Lodge, the application was 
granted provided the records were kept in English. 

The election held June 6 resulted as follows : Robert R. 
Livingston, Chancellor of the State, was re-elected Grand 
Master; Peter W. Yates was duly elected Senior Grand 
Warden ; Peter McDougall, Junior Grand Warden ; William 
Maxwell, Grand Treasurer; James Scott, Grand Secretary. 

It was Resolved , That the Committee appointed to ascer- 
tain the precedency of Lodges in the State, confine their 
investigation to those of the city, and determine according 
to seniority of Warrants, as the Constitutions point out. 

The Committee to whom was referred the consideration of 
the propriety of holding the Grand Lodge under the present 
Warrant, then made a report which was read, accepted, and 
confirmed, to wit : 

“Your Committee appointed at the last Quarterly Com- 
munication, in consequence of certain resolutions of St. John’s 
Lodge respecting the Warrant under which the Grand Lodge 
is established, report their opinion as follows, viz. : 

That the Grand Lodge of this State is established, ac- 
cording to the antient and universal usages of Masonry, upon 
a Constitution formed by the representatives of the regular 
Lodges, convened under a legal warrant from the Grand 
Lodge of England, dated the fifth day of September, in the 
year of Masonry five thousand seven hundred and eighty- 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


43 


one, the Most Noble Prince John the Third, Duke of Atholl, 
being the then Grand Master. And your Committee further 
beg leave to report that, in their opinion, nothing is necessary 
or essential in the future proceeding of the Grand Lodge upon 
the subject matter referred to them, but that a Committee be 
appointed to prepare a draft of the style of Warrant to be 
hereafter granted by the Grand Lodge, conformable to the 
said Constitution. All of which is, nevertheless, most 
respectfully submitted to the wisdom of the Most Worship- 
ful Grand Lodge. 

Witness our hands, this sixth day of June, 5787. 

(Signed) W. Cock, 

Samxjel Kerr, 

Peter McDougall, 
White Matlack, 

. Robert Cocks.” 

FORM OF LODGE WARRANT. DUES. 

At this session it was 

“ Resolved., That the Committee of Nine, appointed at last 
Grand Lodge Communication draw up a form of Warrant, 
to be granted to brethren making application therefor, and 
report.” 

On September 5, Brother Samuel Kerr informed the Grand 
Lodge that the Committee appointed to draw up and have 
printed Warrants, had done as directed, and that the forms 
therefor were ready for inspection. 

The two following recommendations from the Grand 
Stewards’ Lodge were read and confirmed, Brothers O’Con- 
nor, of Lodge No. 210, and Clark, of Lodge No. 8, voting in 
the negative : 

“ That all Lodges in this city give in their account of 
dues to the Grand Secretary within thirty days, under the 
penalty of having their names struck off the list and their 
seats declared vacant.” Also, “ That as soon as the Com- 
mittee appointed to establish the precedency of Rank of the 



44 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


Lodges of this city do .report, that then all the Lodges in the 
State be required to take out new Warrants and deliver up 
the old ones, the dues to the Grand Lodge being previously 
paid.” 


1788. 

On March 5, 1788, a Warrant was ordered, in response to 
a petition, to form a Lodge in the County of Columbia. 

The Grand Secretary, James Scott, announced that inas- 
much as he was about to leave the State permanently, and 
for other reasons, it became incumbent upon him to resign 
the duties of his office. Subsequently, on June 4, with the' 
thanks for services rendered to the Grand Lodge, Brother 
Scott was directed to be presented with a ring, or other 
Masonic token. It was then announced that Brother Jacob 
Morton had been appointed Domestic Grand Secretary, and 
Brother John Myer, Past Master of Holland Lodge, had been 
appointed Foreign Grand Secretary. 

The officers of 1787 were re-elected, and George Hopkins 
was appointed Grand Pursuivant, and Duncan McDougall, 
Grand Tyler. 

The subject of the appointment of Grand Deacons and 
Grand Stewards having been referred to the Grand Stew- 
ards’ Lodge, the following were appointed : Brothers Henry 
Eemson, Jr., and Peter Collin, both of Holland Lodge, as 
Grand Stewards, and Brothers Gilbert Morewood, of Ho. 169, 
and Charles F. Weissenfels, of Hiram Lodge, Ho. 5, as Grand 
Deacons. 

A Warrant was ordered to be issued for the establishment 
of Steuben’s Lodge at Hewburgh. 

The Worshipful Master, Brother Eutledge, of Solomon’s 
Lodge Ho. 212, surrendered the Warrant of the Lodge; 
whereupon Brothers James Carter, James Saidler, and 

Frost petitioned for the renewal of the same under the 

name of St. Patrick’s Lodge, Ho. 212, which was referred for 
future consideration. 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


45 


THE GRAND SEAL ALTERED. 

The Grand Secretary having mentioned that the word 
“ Provincial” now on the Grand Seal, was inappropriate, 
it was 

“ Ordered, therefore, That the Grand Secretary cause the 
same to be altered, and that the words ‘ Grand Lodge of the 
State of New York be sunk on the seal in place of the 
present inscription.” 

The appointments of Deacons, Stewards, and the alter- 
ations on the seal as made by the Grand Stewards’ Lodge 
were approved by the Grand Lodge September 3. At 
this meeting the petition of Brothers Carter, Saidler, and 
Frost for the Warrant of Lodge No. 212, under the name 
St. Patrick’s Lodge, was granted. It was further deter- 
mined that the different Lodges in the country should make 
payment of their dues, and a Committee to obtain that 
result was appointed, consisting of Brothers Cock, Vanden- 
broeck, and the Domestic Grand Secretary. This last-named 
officer handed in an estimate of the expense that would attend 
the printing of a new edition of the Book of Constitutions, 
which had been recommended by the Grand Stewards’ 
Lodge, and the work was ordered to be executed. 

The important announcement was made at this Session 
that the Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania had become an 
Independent Grand Lodge. 

It had been evident for years, that the celebration of St. 
John the Evangelist’s Day was greatly more favored than 
that of St. John the Baptist, and so, in 1788, although the 
usual procession was postponed, the dining of the several 
Lodges on December 27 at such places as they might select, 
was recommended, and that there be an interchange of com- 
pliments and fraternal attention. 

A minor subject which had occupied the attention of the 
Grand Lodge from June 4, 1788, to March 4, succeeding, 
was based on the announcement of the Master of Lodge No. 
212, Brother Rutledge, that the late Treasurer, Brother Rose- 



46 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


man, had defaulted to the Lodge, hence his expulsion, which 
it was sought to have confirmed. After sundry courses of 
action, it was claimed in defense, that the Treasurer had a 
demand claim against the Lodge, and that he had retained 
moneys of the Lodge to cover what was due to him. This 
led to much debate in the Grand Stewards’ Lodge, which 
passed a resolution, that was confirmed by the Grand Lodge. 
The resolution provided, that Brother Roseman before the 
next meeting, should pay into the hands of the Grand Treas- 
urer, the moneys of the Lodge held by him, and then, that a 
Committee should examine and allow, if just, the claim of 
Brother Roseman against Lodge N o. 212. That should this 
be done, all censure should be removed from Brother Rose- 
man. The results, however, turned out unsatisfactorily, 
whereupon it was unanimously resolved that the expulsion 
of Brother Roseman be confirmed. 

The act of expulsion occurred on June 3. 

The Rev. John Wesley was initiated in this year, 1788, 
October 30, in Lodge No. 367, at Downpatrick, Ireland. 

1789. 

GEORGE WASHINGTON, 

7 

THE MASONIC BROTHER. 

Inaugurated President of the United States . 

On the first Wednesday in January, 1789, the election of 
the first President of the United States was announced, and 
George Washington was unanimously elected President, and 
John Adams, Yice-President. The inauguration was to have 
taken place on March 4, but it was not until April 30th that 
the event transpired. Then, upon the balcony of the Old 
City Hall, in Wall Street, at the head of Broad, Hew York 
City, Washington took the oath of office, on the celebrated 
Bible of St. John’s Lodge, which had been procured under 
an emergency for this special purpose. 




ST. PAUL’S CHURCH, BROADWAY. 





IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


47 


The Oath of Inauguration was administered by the Grand 
Chancellor of the State, Eobert E. Livingston, Grand Mas- 
ter of Masons of the State of New York. Washington then 
proceeded to the Senate Chamber, and delivered his first 
address as Chief Magistrate of the Federal Union. 

As soon as these ceremonies and duties were performed, 
President Washington and both houses of Congress pro- 
ceeded to St. Paul’s Church, where Divine services were held. 
St. Paul’s Church is situated on Broadway between Fulton 
and Yesey streets. Its erection commenced in 1763, and its 
dedication occurred October 30, 1766. Around it are the 
graves of the dead of several generations. Under its great 
Broadway window is a mural monument, erected to the 
memory of the General, Brother Montgomery, who fell at the 
Siege of Quebec, in 1775. A brief description of the City 
Hall, called Federal Hall in 1789, in Wall Street, opposite 
Broad Street, will show the political business home of many 
of the prominent Grand Officers of Masonry in New York 
City. 

On the north-east corner of Wall and Nassau streets, in 
the year 1700, was erected the “ New City Hall,” which in 
1789 was called “ Federal Hall.” In front of this building 
in 1709 were a cage, whipping-post, pillory, and stocks for 
the punishment of criminals. Within its doors were held 
the sessions of the Common Council, Provincial Assembly, 
Supreme Court, and the Mayor’s and Admiralty courts. It 
also was the place for elections, and, for a time, was used as 
the City Prison. One of its chambers contained the Public 
Library, which the English destroyed during the Ee volution. 
The first Congress under the Constitution met within its 
walls, and from its balcony, which overlooked the street, 
Washington was inaugurated first President of the United 
States, April 30, 1789. 

“ This auspicious ceremony took place under the portico 
of Federal Hall, upon the balcony, in the immediate pres- 
ence of both houses of Congress, and in full view of the 
crowds that thronged the adjacent streets. The oath was 
administered by Chancellor Livingston, and when the illus- 



48 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


trious chief had kissed the book, the Chancellor, with a loud 
voice, proclaimed, * Long live George Washington, President 
of the United States.’ Never shall I forget the thrilling 
effect of the thundering cheers which broke forth, as from 
one voice, peal after peal, from the assembled multitude.” — 
Dr . Duers Oration. 

After the National Government was removed to Philadel- 
phia, the courts and State Legislature were held here until 
the State Capitol was established in Albany, in 1797. 

BENJAMIN FRANKLIN. MIDDLE DUTCH CHURCH. 

Not a thousand feet from the New City Hall stood the 
Middle Dutch Church, on the east side of Nassau Street, 
between Cedar and Liberty streets. From the belfry of this 
church Brother Franklin flew his silken kite, in 1752, and 
taught the lightning, he was its master. During the Revo- 
lution, this church was used by the British as a prison and 
riding-school. From 1845 to 1875 it was used as the general 
post-office. 


Brother James Grummal having died, a Grand Lodge of 
Emergency was convened February 25, 1789, under petition 
that the deceased might be buried with Masonic honors. 
Objections were made in consequence of the severity of the 
weather, and the Grand Lodge declined to have the body 
interred under Masonic Form. 

On the succeeding 4th of March a petition from Mrs. 
Grummal, widow of Brother James Grummal, deceased, set- 
ting forth that she was aged, infirm, and in necessitous sit- 
uation, and praying the Grand Lodge to grant her a sum 
of money to enable her to discharge the funeral expenses of 
her late husband, was read, when it was 

Resolved, That the Grand Treasurer be directed to pay to 
Mrs. Grummal the sum of eight pounds, four shillings, and 
three pence, being the amount of the funeral expenses, as 
exhibited by her to the Lodge, this evening. 






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FEDERAL HALL AND THE VERPLANCK MANSION 

WALL STREET, 1789^ 

Drawn by David Grim. 





IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


49 


Worshipful Brother Scott stated to the Grand Lodge, that 
it was the opinion of many of the members at the last Grand 
Lodge Session, that there should be a procession on St. John’s 
Day ; the Grand Secretary was directed to give notice to 
the respective Lodges in the State of the observance of the 
day, and also cause the same to be published in the public / 
newspapers. 

PRECEDENCE OF LODGES. 

Worshipful Brother Yandenbroeck observed, in Grand 
Lodge, that as a procession had been agreed upon for the 
next St. John’s Day, it appeared to him highly necessary 
that the rank of the several Lodges should be settled previous 
to that day. Accordingly it was 

“Resolved) That a Committee consisting of one member 
from each of the Lodges in this city meet in Holland Lodge 
Boom, on the first Saturday in April next, at six o’clock in 
the evening, for the purpose of settling the rank of the 
respective Lodges in this city, and that they make report of 
their proceedings to the next Grand Lodge.” 

The Committee on this important subject was appointed, 
and of it, B. J. Yandenbroeck was made Chairman, and 
Jacob Morton, Grand Secretary, verified the report of June 
3, 1789. The report was to ascertain and determine the 
rank of the several Lodges, and was in the following lan- 
guage : 

“ The Committee for ascertaining the rank of the several 
Lodges in New York City, consisting of one member from 
each Lodge appointed in pursuance of a resolve of the Grand 
Lodge, met at Holland Lodge Boom, on Saturday evening, 
April 4, 1789. 

Worshipful Bro. Yandenbroeck presiding. 

Present : 

Bight Worshipful Bro. Cock, from No. 212. 

Worshipful Bro. Malcom, from St. John’s No. 2. 

“ Bro. Scott, from St. Andrew’s No. 169. 


4 




IN THE STATE OP NEW YORK. 


51 


Affirmative . Negative . 

No. 169 No. 210 No. 4 No. 212 No. 5 

2 8 

Holland Lodge. 

Worshipful Bro. Welsh then moved that No. 8 be con- 
sidered the second in rank, which being seconded by Bro. 
Malcom was carried in the affirmative, as follows : 

Affirmative. Negative. 

No. 169 No. 210 No. 4 No. 212 No. 5 

2 8 

Holland Lodge. 

Worshipful Bro. Scott then moved that St. Andrew’s 
Lodge No. 169 be considered as the third in rank, which was 
seconded by Bro. Welsh. Right Worshipful Bro. Cock 
moved as an amendment that No. 169 be considered as the first 
in rank. Bro. Malcom objected to the amendment as being 
out of order, and moved that the sense of the Committee be 
taken whether the amendment of Bro. Cock be in order. 
On the question being put it was carried in the negative as 
follows : 

Negative. Affirmative. 

No. 2 No. 8 No. 4 No. 210 No. 212 No. 5 No. 169 

Bro. Scott’s motion was then put and carried in the affirm- 
ative, as follows : 

Affirmative. Negative. 

No. 169 No. 2 No. 210 No. 4 No. 8 No. 5 No. 212 
Holland Lodge. 

Worshipful Bro. Harrison moved that No. 210 be con- 
sidered as the fourth in rank. Seconded by Bro. Malcom, 
and carried in the affirmative, as follows : 

Affirmative. Negative . 

No. 2 No. 169 No. 8 No. 4 No. 210 No. 212 

Holland Lodge. 



52 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


Worshipful Bro. Cannon then moved that No. 212 be 
considered as the fifth in rank, which being seconded, was 
carried in the affirmative, as follows : 

Affirmative . Negative. 

No. 169 No. 2 No. 210 No. 4 No. 5 No. 8 No. 212 
Holland Lodge. 

Worshipful Bro. Cannon then moved that St. John’s 
Lodge No. 4 be considered as the sixth in rank, which 
being put was carried in the affirmative as before. Bro. 
Malcom, seconded by Bro. Harrison, moved that No. 5 be 
considered as the seventh, and carried in the affirmative, as 
follows : 

Affirmative. Negative. 

No. 2 No. 8 No. 168 No. 4 No. 210 No. 212 No. 5 
Holland Lodge. 

Bro. Malcom then moved that Holland Lodge be con- 
sidered as the eighth in rank, which being seconded, was 
carried in the affirmative, as before. 

The foregoing minutes being read and confirmed, it was 
resolved unanimously that a copy thereof should be trans- 
mitted to every Lodge, signed by the Chairman ; and also a 
copy signed by the Chairman and Grand Secretary to the 
Eight Worshipful Grand Lodge.” 

The report having been read, Worshipful Brother Malcom 
moved that the Grand Lodge approve of said report, and 
that the same stand confirmed. The question being taken, 
it was carried in the affirmative, Worshipful Brother Adams, 
Past Master of No. 5, being the only dissentient. 

THE OLD WARRANTS TO BE SURRENDERED. 

It was then ordered, that the several Lodges surrender 
their old Warrants agreeably to a former resolution of the 
Grand Lodge, and that the Grand Secretary issue new 
Warrants under the jurisdiction of this Grand Lodge. 

At the request of Worshipful Brother Thomas, of Lodge 



IN’ THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


53 


No. 210, the new Warrant to be granted to that Lodge was to 
state that the Lodge shall be styled “ Temple Lodge,” in ad- 
dition to the number which by rank it was entitled to. 

In due order the Grand Lodge then proceeded to the 
election of officers for the ensuing year, as prescribed by the 
Constitution, with the following result : 

The Honorable Eobert E. Livingston was unanimously 
re-elected Grand Master. 

Peter McDougall was elected Senior Grand Warden. 

John Myer, Junior Grand Warden. 

White Matlack, Grand Treasurer. 

George Hopkins, Grand Pursuivant. 

Duncan McDougall, Grand Tyler. 

It was 

Resolved, That the Grand Stewards’ Lodge appoint the 
Stewards and Deacons for the Grand Lodge. 

The Eight Worshipful Brother McDougall having, by 
request of the Grand Lodge, withdrawn from the Hall, it was 
unanimously resolved, that the thanks of this Lodge be pre- 
sented to said brother, for the fidelity and unremitted atten- 
tion with which he discharged the duties of his office as Jun- 
ior Grand Warden; and resolved, further, that the Grand 
Secretary be directed to present the thanks of this Lodge in 
writing to said brother. 

FESTIVAL OF ST. JOHN THE BAPTIST. 

On the following June 18, the Grand Lodge opened in 
Extra Session for the purpose of installing the officers elect, 
five Lodges being represented. 

Eight Worshipful Brother Malcom produced a letter from 
the Most Worshipful, the Grand Master, appointing him 
Deputy Grand Master, which was read, and was as follows ; 

“ New Tore, June 8, 1789. 

Brother, — Our worthy Bro. Eichard Harrison, Esquire, 
having resigned the place of Deputy Grand Master of 



54 


HISTORY OP FREEMASONRY 


Masons for this State, I have turned my eyes to you as 
most capable of supplying his loss, and by your zeal, knowl- 
edge, and diligence of continuing to the Lodges under my 
care, the advantages they derived from his attention ; I must, 
therefore, pray you to take upon you the office of Deputy 
Grand Master; to consider this as your Warrant for so 
doing, and to cause it to be entered, accordingly, on the 
records of the Grand Lodge. 

I am, Brother, with the sincerest wishes for your hap- 
piness and prosperity, 

Your affectionate Brother, 

R. R. Livingston. 

To Right Worshipful William Malcom, Esquire/’ 

It appearing from this letter that the said brother was 
duly appointed Deputy Grand Master of this State, the 
Right Worshipful Brother McDougall proceeded in due form, 
and with the accustomed ceremonies, to install him into 
that important office. The Right Worshipful, the Deputy 
Grand Master, then took the chair, and in like form installed 
the Right Worshipful Brother McDougall to the office of 
Senior Grand Warden, Brother Myer to that of Junior Grand 
Warden, Brother White Matlack to that of Grand Treasurer, 
Right Worshipful Brother Jacob Morton signifying his con- 
tinuance in the office of Grand Secretary. 

The officers then received from the brethren present the 
accustomed Masonic honors and congratulations. 

It was decided by the Grand Lodge that a sermon should 
be preached on the ensuing festival of St. John the Baptist, 
and further resolved, that a Committee wait upon the Rev. 
Dr. Beach, and re.quest that he preach a sermon for them on 
the 24th June, in St. Paul’s Chapel. 

Arrangements for the procession were left to the Grand 
Stewards’ Lodge. 

Permission was granted to Steuben Lodge to celebrate 
the festival at Newburgh, in consequence of the inconven- 
ience of attending at New York. 

The Grand Stewards’ Lodge on June 10, decided that the 



IN THE STATE OP NEW YORK. 


55 


Grand Lodge on St. John’s Day, would assemble at the 
Coffee House at eleven in the morning, the Lodges at con- 
tiguous convenient places, that all should move in line 
through Queen and Beekman streets to St. Paul’s Chapel, 
and after service, return through Broadway and Wall Street 
to the Grand Lodge Room in the Coffee House. 

That the collection at the church be given to the Society 
instituted for the relief of distressed debtors confined in 
prison, to be applied by it to the benevolent purposes of the 
Institution. 

And furthermore, that it be recommended that the differ- 
ent Lodges dine together. 

On St. John’s Day, June 24, 1789, the Grand Lodge was 
opened in ample form by Grand Master Robert R. Living- 
ston ; William Mai com, Deputy Grand Master ; Peter Mc- 
Dougall, Senior Grand Warden; John My er, Junior Grand 
Warden ; White Matlack, Grand Treasurer ; Jacob Morton, 
Grand Secretary. 

There were also present the Rev. Brother Beach and a 
number of brethren of distinction. The Right Wor., the 
Hon. Brother James Jackson, Representative in Congress 
of the United States from the State of Georgia, and Grand 
Master of Masons in said State, was introduced by the 
Grand Secretary and received with Masonic honors. At 
twelve o’clock the Grand Lodge, attended by the other 
Lodges, went in procession to St. Paul’s Chapel, in the order 
hereinafter mentioned, where an excellent sermon was deliv- 
ered by Bro. Beach, and a handsome collection made, which 
was applied, by the direction of the Grand Lodge, to the 
Humane Society of Hew York City, instituted for the relief 
of distressed debtors. After Divine services, the brethren 
returned in like order to the Coffee House, and were dis- 
missed. 


OEDEE OF PEOCESSION. 


Knights Templars. 

Holland Lodge, in the following order : 
Tyler. 



56 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


Steward. Steward. 

Members, two and two. 

Treasurer. Secretary. 

Junior Warden. Senior Warden. 

Past Masters. 

A Master Mason bearing the Warrant of the Lodge, 
supported by two Brethren. 

Deacon. Master. Deacon. 

Jamaica Lodge. 

Hiram N o. 5. 

St. John’s No. 4. 

Band of Music. 

St. Patrick’s No. 212. 

Lodge No. 210. 

St. Andrew’s No. 169. 

Independent Eoyal Arch No. 8. 

St. John’s No. 2. 

Band of Music. 


Grand Lodge. 

Grand Tyler. 

Visiting Brethren of Distinction. 

Past Grand Officers, two and two. 

Grand Treasurer. Grand Secretary. 

Junior Grand Warden. Senior Grand Warden. 
Chaplain. 


Grand Deacons. 


( Grand Pursuivant ) 
l bearing the Bible, j 


Grand Deacons. 


Knights 

Templars. 


Deputy Grand Master. 
Grand Master. 

Grand Master of Georgia. 
Grand Deacon. Grand Deacon. 
Knights Templars. 


Knights 

Templars. 


The officers of the Grand Lodge, the Grand Master of 
Georgia, and many brethren of distinction, together with 
the officers and brethren of Lodges Nos. 2, 169, 210, and 
Holland Lodge, dined at the City Tavern. The day was 
spent with festivity and harmony. The several Lodges 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


51 


dined separately from the Grand Lodge, and congratulations 
were offered by the Grand Lodge to them. 

The collections at the Church amounted to fifty pounds, 
“exclusive of coppers, 55 and were so reported in August. 
Forty pounds were directed to be forwarded to the Society 
for the Belief of Distressed Debtors, the balance to pay the 
expenses of the festival, and if insufficient, the funds of the 
Grand Lodge were to be drawn upon. Furthermore, six 
pounds were voted for charity, and in the succeeding month 
a larger sum. 

The services of Eev. Brother Beach had been called upon 
on several occasions, and it therefore behooved Grand Lodge, 
not only to acknowledge the same with thanks, but the 
reverend brother was appointed the Grand Lodge Chaplain. 

THE FINANCIAL SITUATION. 

Brother E. J. Yandenbroeck, Chairman of the Committee 
on Accounts, reported in December, that there was due the 
Grand Secretary two shillings and six pence, which when paid 
would leave a balance of twenty-eight pounds, sixteen shil- 
lings and six pence. Further, that the city Lodges owed 
the Grand Body about fifty pounds, which was exclusive of 
amounts due from country Lodges. 

It was during this period that the difficulties of Lodge FT o. 
210 exacted so much of the time of the Grand Lodge, and 
finally resulted in dissolving the Lodge, from which a new 
Warrant and a new Lodge evolved. 

EFFICIENCY OF A MASTER. 

Brother Yandenbroeck urged the passage of a resolution 
of efficiency, on the part of “ every Master Mason being or 
having been a Master, Past Master, or Warden, elected or 
re-elected to preside in any Lodge, requiring that he shall 
hereafter, previous to his installation into office, be examined 
by the Grand officers, or by some skillful person or persons 
appointed by them, as to his being sufficiently acquainted 



58 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


with Masonry, and if he is possessed of the required abilities 
to fill the chair, and that on his producing a certificate of his 
having passed a regular and strict examination, and found to 
be qualified, he then shall be installed into his office, and not 
before.” The resolution was defeated, but nevertheless Bro. 
Yandenbroeck insisted on its being placed in full upon the 
record. 

A Grand Lodge of Emergency was held December 23. 
R. W. Brother William Malcom, Deputy Grand Master, in 
the Chair, and representatives of seven Lodges present. The 
Deputy Grand Master moved the following Regulation, which 
was established : 

“ That at all future meetings of the Grand Lodge, previous 
to the opening, none but the members of the Grand Lodge 
shall be admitted, but that the Tyler may report the names 
of such as shall come as visitors, after the Grand Lodge is 
opened, that the Grand Lodge may have an opportunity of 
knowing, either by examination or by the vouchers of Breth- 
ren, who are proper Brethren to be admitted as visitors.” 

THE FIRST PRESIDENTIAL MANSION, 

which was occupied by Brother Washington during the first 
session of the first Congress, 1789, was located at No. 1 Cherry 
Street, in the city of New York, and became an object of 
veneration. 


1790. 

In 1790, June 2, the Grand Lodge held its annual election, 
with the following result : The Hon. Robert R. Livingston 
was unanimously re-elected Grand Master ; Peter McDougall 
was re-elected Senior Grand Warden ; John Myer was re- 
elected Junior Grand Warden. White Matlack declined 
re-election as Grand Treasurer, and John Pintard, of Hol- 
land Lodge, was elected to that office ; Rev. Dr. Abraham 
Beach was re-elected Grand Chaplain ; George Hopkins was 
re-elected Grand Pursuivant, and Duncan McDougall was 
re-elected Grand Tyler. 






THE FIRST PRESIDENTIAL MANSION. 




IN THE STATE OP NEW YORK. 


59 


SUPREME GRAND LODGE. GEORGIA. 

The following official Communication and resolutions were 
received from James Jackson, Past Grand Master of Masons 
of the State of Georgia, and read : 

“ New York, May 1, A. L. 1790. 
Bight Worshipful Brother: 

Enclosed I have the honor to transmit you copies of two 
resolutions of the Grand Lodge of Georgia. It is needless 
for me to point out the propriety of the step on which they 
are founded. Our being members of the same political com- 
munity, and the benefits which would result to our Society 
from a general controlling power, will, of themselves, evince 
its necessity. I cannot, however, forbear mentioning that 
the frequent innovation in the mode of work, and the 
authorities set up in some S tabes under Warrants from other 
States, demand the serious attention of the Brotherhood. 

I authorized Bros. Stevens and Lloyd to communicate 
with the Grand Lodges of the more northern States, and to 
assent to a convention at such time and place as may be 
generally convenient. 

Requesting that I may be favored with an answer, as 
early as the opinion of your Grand Lodge can be obtained, 
I am, Eight Worshipful, 

Your very obed’t servant and brother, 

Jas. Jackson, Past G. Master, State of Georgia. 
Eight Worshipful Grand Master, New York.” 

“ Grand Lodge of Georgia, ) 
December 28, 57$9. f 

Present. 

The Eight Worshipful James Jackson, G. M. 

Resolved, As the sense of this Grand Lodge, that there 
ought to be a Federal or Supreme Grand Lodge constituted, 
to have jurisdiction over the respective Grand and other 
Lodges throughout the continent, and that 



60 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


have authority to communicate with the Grand Lodges to 
the northward, to pledge the faith of this Grand Lodge in 
support of such an undertaking, and to assent to a Masonic 
Convention for that purpqse. 

Extract from the minutes. 

U. Tobler, Gr. Sec’y.” 

“ Grand Lodge of Georgia, ) 
March 5, 5790. f 

Present. 

The Right Worshipful Sir George Houston, Bart., G. M. 

On motion, 

Resolved, That Right Worshipful Bros. Jackson and 
Stevens, and Worshipful Bro. Edward Lloyd, be a committee 
to carry into effect the resolution entered into at last meet- 
ing, for the purpose of establishing a Federal Grand Lodge 
in America. 

Extract from the minutes. 

U. Tobler, Gr. Sec’y.” 

Whereupon, it was Resolved, That the said resolutions be 
referred to a committee, consisting of the officers of the Grand 
Lodge, and that they be requested to report, as early as pos- 
sible, their ideas of the proposed measures, as also of the 
mode in which they should be carried into effect, if approved. 

On June 22 a Warrant was authorized to be issued to Isaac 
T. Tallman as Master, William Terry as Senior Warden, and 
Oliver Kellogg as Junior Warden, of a Lodge to be known 
as Lafayette, in the vicinity of Dover, Duchess County. 

August 13. — A Grand Lodge of Emergency was specially 
summoned for the purpose of taking into consideration the 
resolutions adopted by the Grand Lodge of Georgia, in the 
matter of a 


supreme federal grand lodge. 

Debate having been had thereon, the following was 
u Resolved , That this Grand Lodge do concur with the 
Grand Lodge of Georgia, in the proposed measure of calling 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


61 


a convention, for the purpose of establishing a Supreme Fed- 
eral Grand Lodge, to have jurisdiction over the respective 
Grand Lodges of the United States, and the Most Worship- 
ful, the Grand Master of this State, is hereby requested to 
assure the Grand Lodge of Georgia, that this Grand Lodge 
will meet by its delegates the other Grand Lodges by their 
delegates, for the purpose above mentioned, at such time and 
place as shall be agreed on. 55 

On September 20, a Warrant was authorized for Washing- 
ton Lodge at Clermont, Columbia County, of which Philip 
Hoffman was to be Master, William Wheeler, Senior Warden, 
and John A. Fonda, Junior Warden. 

On December 1, authority was given to establish a Lodge 
in Kingston, Ulster County, by the name of Livingston 
Lodge. 

At this meeting Brother John Myer resigned as Junior 
Grand Warden. 

March 2, the Grand Lodge accepted the offer of Wor. 
Brother Pintard, of Holland Lodge, to hold the Grand Com- 
munications at Holland Lodge Room. 

It was in this year, 1790, that war broke out with the 
Miami Indians in the Northwest Territory, and troops were 
sent out from Fort Washington (now Cincinnati), the capital 
of the Territory. These were defeated and compelled to 
return to the Fort. The Indians, however, were conquered 
in 1793 by the forces under the General, Brother Anthony 
Wayne. 



62 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


CHAPTER II. 
1791-1800. 


1791. 

ELECTION OF GRAND OFFICERS. NEW YORK LODGE. AMERICAN 
UNION LODGE. 

June 8, 1791, the officers of the Grand Body were re- 
elected, except that John Pintard, the Grand Treasurer, was 
elected Junior Grand Warden, and Frederick Childs, who 
had been acting Junior Grand Warden, was elected Grand 
Treasurer. 

The melancholy occasion of the death of the Deputy 
Grand Master, William Malcom, caused the Grand Lodge 
to be convened on September 1, when it was “ Resolved, 
That the Grand Lodge and the different Lodges in the City 
of New York, attend the funeral on September 2, in Masonic 
form ; and as a testimony of the respectful affection which 
the Grand Lodge bears to the memory of the deceased 
brother, it was further unanimously resolved, that the R. W. 
Brother Cock be requested to pronounce a funeral eulogium 
at the grave of the deceased brother. 55 

NEW YORK LODGE IN CURAgOA. 

A Traveling Warrant was authorized on October 22, to be 
issued to Anthony Rutgers as Master, Samuel Merry, late 
of Holland Lodge, as Senior Warden, Jacob Kermes, as 
Junior Warden, and other petitioners in the island of Cura- 
§oa, the same to be designated New York Lodge. 

A Warrant was also granted for Montgomery Lodge, at 
Stillwater, John Yernon being the first Master, Cornelius 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


63 


Vanderbergh the Senior Warden, and Abraham Livingston 
the Junior Warden. 

On this date, the petition of American Union Lodge N o. 1 
(embracing brethren of the Ancient Craft northwest of the 
River Ohio, submitting a copy of the Warrant by them held, 
authorizing them to assemble and work, as successors of 
Joel Clarke and others, to whom the original Warrant was 
granted) asking Masonic intercourse and good fellowship, 
was read ; which was directed to be entered in full upon 
the Minutes, and the Grand Secretary ordered to draft an 
answer and report the same. For full text of this unique 
petition, see pp. 393-5 of Vol. I. General Rufus Putnam 
was made a Mason in American Union Lodge, near West 
Point, and was the first Grand Master of Ohio. 

PROXIES OF COUNTRY LODGES. 

It was resolved, that the Grand Secretary write to the 
Lodges in the country, requesting them to avail themselves 
of a right, given them by the Constitution, of nominating a 
proxy to represent them in the Grand Lodge. This action 
was the result of an intimation from the Grand Secretary, 
that it had lately been found extremely difficult to convene 
the number prescribed by the Constitution for forming a 
Grand Lodge, owing to the number of Lodges in this city 
having diminished. Notices of these proxies will be given 
herein, until the year 1800. 


1792. 

On March 7, the application of Timothy Hosmer and eight 
others, praying for a Warrant to erect a Lodge in Canan- 
daigua, Ontario County, was read and the request granted. 

And furthermore, a resolution was adopted that no Lodge 
which had not complied with the resolution of June, 1789, 
requesting all the Lodges to surrender their old Warrants 
and take out new ones, shall hereafter be entitled to a vote 



64 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


in this Grand Lodge, until they shall have taken out a new 
Warrant under the Grand Lodge of this State. 

Most Worshipful Robert R. Livingston, Grand Master, on 
April 6, 1792, was present and took the Chair, at a Grand 
Lodge of Emergency. This was the fifth time this Grand 
Master presided since his original election, February 4, 1784, 
or during a period of eight years. 

Brother Jacob Morton, Grand Secretary, announced that 
he had been appointed proxy under the Constitution, by St. 
George’s Lodge of Schenectady ; the certificate was ordered 
filed. 

Amicable Lodge was established in Herkimer County, with 
John I. Morgan for Master, John Post for Senior Warden, 
and Michael Myers for Junior Warden. 

PORTUGUESE REFUGEES. 

Brother Abrams announced at the meeting of Grand Stew- 
ards’ Lodge in May, that a number of Portuguese brethren 
had arrived in Hew York City, who had been obliged to quit 
the island of Madeira on account of some measures, taken by 
the government against them, incident to their being Masons. 

A committee was thereupon appointed to wait upon the 
Deputy Grand Master, and request a meeting of Grand 
Lodge, to pay some mark of attention to these persecuted 
brethren. 

The Grand Lodge having been convened, June 2, a commit- 
tee was appointed to wait upon the said brethren, request 
their attendance, and provide refreshments. On June 6, the 
exiled brethren from the island of Madeira were received, 
Brother Morton making the welcoming and sympathetic 
address, and a copy thereof was subsequently furnished at 
the solicitation of the guests. At a later date they were 
invited to dine with the Grand Lodge, and the several Lodges 
of the city and country. 

The Grand Secretary announced his appointment as proxy, 
by Washington Lodge of Clermont, in the county of Colum- 
bia. On June 6, the annual election resulted as follows : 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


65 


Eobert E. Livingston, Grand Master. 

Jacob Morton, Senior Grand Warden. 

James Scott, Junior Grand Warden. 

Wright, Grand Treasurer. 

Abraham Beach, Grand Chaplain. 

George Hopkins, Grand Pursuivant. 

Duncan McDougall, Grand Tyler. 

Brother Abrams was requested to discharge the duties of 
Grand Secretary until the Grand Master should express his 
intentions in that regard. 

SEQUENCE OF PRESIDING OFFICERS. 

September 5. — A decision was made, that in case of the 
absence of any of the Grand presiding officers, the vacancy 

shall be filled by the Master of the Senior Lodge present. 

% 

GRAND LODGE FEES. 

“ Resolved , That for every apprentice or fellow craft, who 
joins a Lodge under the jurisdiction of this Grand Lodge, 
such Lodge shall pay to this Grand Lodge ten shillings, and 
for every Master Mason eight shillings.” 

It was further 

“ Resolved , That no Lodge under the jurisdiction of this 
Lodge shall receive, for conferring the second degree of Ma- 
sonry, a less sum than one guinea, and that the said sum of 
one guinea, at least, be received by every Lodge under this 
jurisdiction for conferring the third degree of Masonry, and 
that the Grand Secretary furnish all the Lodges with a copy 
of this resolve.”- 

At the request of Brother Wright, he was relieved from 
serving on the Committee on Charity, and Brother Otterson, 
of St. John’s Lodge, Ho. 1, was appointed in his stead. 

In November, Brother Harrison of Hew York City, was 
appointed proxy for Jerusalem Lodge, and shortly thereafter 

5 



66 


HISTORY OP FREEMASONRY 


Brother John Abrams was appointed to fill the office of 
Grand Secretary. 

QUEBEC WARRANT IN NEW YORK. 

A subject of irritation in the Grand Lodge was apparent, 
in December, upon the announcement that a number of 
clandestine Masons were occasionally assembling and work- 
ing under a traveling Warrant of the Grand Lodge of Quebec, 
which caused the appointment of a committee of three, of 
which Brother Cock was chairman, to examine and report, 
and, if possible, to obtain possession of the Warrant and 
deliver it to the Grand Lodge of New York. 

Brother Cock, from the Committee on the conduct of 
members of a Traveling Quebec Lodge, delivered a list of a 
number of Masons who occasionally assembled in this city, 
and who did not acknowledge the authority of this Grand 
Lodge, but were working under the said traveling Warrant 
of the Grand Lodge of Quebec. On motion, it was 

“ Resolmed^ That the Grand Secretary send a copy of the 
said list to each of the Lodges in this city, and that the 
Masters be warned not to suffer any of the brethren, whose 
names are thereon, to visit their respective Lodges.’ 5 

A petition of Edward O’Connor, Holmes, Burhams, and 
others for the establishment of a Lodge at the town of Half 
Moon, Saratoga County, had been presented to the Grand 
Lodge in April, 1792 ; but it appeared in the course of some 
eight months, that Union, Montgomery, and St. George’s 
Lodges questioned the characters of Edward O’Connor and 
the others, and the result was the retention by the Grand 
Lodge of the authorized Warrant, and the installation of the 
officers by Brother Peter W. Yates, previously ordered, was 
deferred. An unfavorable report caused the Warrant to be 
recalled in December, and the country Lodges were recom- 
mended not to admit any of the above-mentioned brethren. 

In March, a Warrant was authorized for the erection of a 
Lodge in the town of Catskill, county of Albany. It was in 



IN THE STATE OP NEW YORK. 


67 


this year, 1792, that Kentucky was admitted into the Union ; 
and the Presidential election took place, resulting in the 
re-election of both Washington and Adams to the head of 
the government. 

NEW YORK LODGE AT OURAQOA. 

Communications from New York Lodge, at Cura§oa, were 
delivered by the Worshipful Master Rutgers to the Grand 
Secretary, and read by order of the Giand Lodge. By them, 
it appeared that the conduct of Brothers Cruger and Ring- 
ling had given so much disgust to the other members of the 
Lodge, that the Lodge had come to a resolve, to suspend 
them for twelve calendar months, and to report them to this 
Grand Lodge. 

Whereupon it was Resolved, That the said communication 
be referred to a committee, consisting of Brothers Morton, 
Yandenbroeck, and Clinton, to examine the facts and report 
to this Grand Lodge. 

Wor. Brother Yandenbroeck read a resolve of Holland 
Lodge, begging this Grand Lodge to come to some resolution 
regarding “ Modern ” Masons, and say whether they may or 
may not be admitted into the Lodges under the jurisdiction 
of this Grand Lodge, after being hailed, and if they may be 
admitted, to determine the manner in which hailing is to 
be conducted. The Grand Lodge then passed the following 
resolution : 

“ That the above be referred to a committee consisting of 
the officers of the Grand Lodge and the Masters of the 
Lodges in this city, who are authorized to bring any skillful 
brethren with them.” 

The ensuing festival and walking in procession on St. 
John’s Day, June 24, 1792, were duly observed. 



68 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


m3. 

master’s lodge, proxies. 

Master’s Lodge, of the city of Albany, proving intractable 
to the government of the Grand Lodge, was, on September 
5, 1792, specially invited to join the Grand Lodge, and the 
Grand Secretary was directed to communicate such invita- 
tion to Master’s Lodge. No word having been returned, in 
the succeeding March, a committee was appointed to repre- 
sent the matter, and try and convince Master’s Lodge of the 
propriety and general benefit that Masonry would probably 
receive in the State, by its coming under the jurisdiction of 
the Grand Lodge. This committee reported verbally in 
June, 1793, that the most eligible plan the Grand Lodge 
could adopt, would be to appoint a committee to confer per- 
sonally with Master’s Lodge during the session of the Legis- 
lature. This course was approved, but the committee was 
not appointed until a subsequent meeting, which reported 
June 4, 1794, setting forth certain terms of settlement of the 
difficulty, which were approved by the Grand Body. 

Brother John J. Morgan presented his power as proxy of 
Amicable Lodge, which was filed. 

It was then “ Resolved , That each proxy be entitled to 
three votes in the Grand Lodge, in behalf of the Lodge he 
represents, but that no brother be admitted as proxy for 
more than one Lodge.” 

At this meeting of June 4, all the Grand Officers were re- 
elected. 

Freehold Lodge, in a town of that name, county of 
Albany, was warranted on the recommendation of B. W. 
Brother Peter W. Yates. 

It was further determined that the Festival of St. John 
the Baptist should be observed; “that the Grand Lodge 
walk by Lodges.” That a church and music be procured ; 
the Grand Chaplain preach the sermon ; Brother Low com- 
pose an anthem for the occasion ; that the collection of the 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


69 


day be given to the charity school of the church ; and that 
the Lodges dine separately, or with each other, as they should 
determine. 

Accordingly on June 24, at eleven in the morning, the 
Grand Lodge, attended by the several Lodges in the city, 
under its jurisdiction, went in procession from the Old 
Coffee House to Trinity Church, where a sermon, adapted to 
the occasion, was delivered by the Kev. Brother Beach ; an 
anthem was sung by the children of the Episcopal Charity 
School ; two odes recited from Handel’s Messiah, by Mrs. 
Pownall ; and a collection made for the benefit of the Char- 
ity School of Trinity Church which amounted to <£77, odd 
shillings. 

Union Lodge, No. 30, was chartered on June 28, 1793, 
based upon an application from Amos Park, James Cameron, 
and others, to establish a Lodge in Newtown, now Elmira, 
Tioga County, which had been presented on the twenty- 
fourth of the month. 

Brother W. Tapp produced and had filed his proxy of 
Unity Lodge, No. 17. 

The Grand Lodge favored a Warrant being granted for 
the town of Cortlandt, Westchester County. 

A DISPENSATION FOE SAN DOMINGO. 

A number of brethren, who had been driven from the 
island of San Domingo by the political and rebellious 
troubles which existed there, petitioned for a Dispensation 
to work under certain vouchers which they produced of 
their legal establishment in that island. The Grand Lodge 
appointed a committee consisting of Brothers Morton, Yan- 
denbroeck, and Abrams, to examine into their situation, 
and if they were found worthy, that a Dispensation for six 
months issue conformably to their request. This was granted, 
the Lodge to be designated La Tendre Amiti6 Franco-Ameri- 
caine. The Dispensation was surrendered on June 4, 1794, 
and on petition of Brother A. Maydieu a new Dispensation 
was granted to a given number of the brethren. 



70 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


A Warrant for the establishment of Rural Lodge was 
granted, to be held in the town of Cambridge. 

AN INDIGENT PRISONER. 

As an incident it may be mentioned, that a prisoner in 
the jail of New York City, Brother Benjamin Seaman, com- 
municated with the Grand Lodge in writing, stating his 
necessitous circumstances. The subject was examined by a 
committee, who reported that the cause of the incarceration 
appeared to be of a family nature, into which it was not 
their province to inquire, u as it would lead to an indelicate 
and impertinent inquiry,” but deemed the condition of the 
prisoner worthy of notice. The Grand Lodge authorized an 
expenditure of £10. 

FORMS OF RETURNS. 

Forms of returns now began to attract the attention of 
the Grand Lodge, in consequence of complaints of Lafayette 
Lodge, that the country Lodges very generally neglected to 
pay their dues to the Grand Lodge, and who prayed that 
effectual measures be adopted to compel attention to that 
duty. At the instigation of Brother Morton the following 
resolution was accordingly adopted : 

“ Resolved , That a form of returns be made out by the Grand 
Secretary, and by him be forwarded to the different Lodges 
under the jurisdiction of this Grand Lodge, pointing out to 
them at the same time how very necessary it is for them to 
be regular in forwarding their returns, and punctual in pay- 
ing their dues agreeably to the Constitutions.” 

On the petition of Brother T. Arburgh and others, a War- 
rant was authorized to erect and hold a Lodge in the town of 
Beekman, Dutchess County ; and another from Brother C. 
Seldon and others, to erect and hold a Lodge in the city of 
Lansingburgh, Rensselaer County. 

Brothers Buxton, Waterbury, Marvin, and Richardson 
were appointed Deacons of the Grand Lodge, and the fol- 
lowing general resolutions adopted : 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


71 


LODGE RECOMMENDATION. 

“ Resolved . , That all petitions for Warrants shall, in future, 
come recommended by the officers of the Lodge nearest to 
the place where the new one is proposed to be erected.” 

REGISTER OF MEMBERS. 

“ Resolved , That that part of the Constitution, which 
orders the registering the members of all the Lodges under 
the jurisdiction of this Grand Lodge, be complied with by 
the Grand Secretary, and that he procure a proper book 
for the purpose.” 

1794. 

The Meeting of March 4, 1794, was marked by the 
number of applications for the erection of new Lodges ; one 
for Columbus Lodge at Fredericktown, Dutchess County ; 
another for Franklin Lodge at Ballston, Saratoga County ; 
another for Amicable Lodge at Herkimer, Herkimer County ; 
another for Howard Lodge, by a number of brethren of 
Holland Lodge, in the city of Hew York. 

These were followed on June 4, by an application for 
Yates’ Lodge at Coxsackie, Greene County. 

Patriot Lodge was authorized and established at Pittstown 
in the county of Rensselaer. 

Brother Abrams was accepted as proxy for Livingston 
Lodge, Ho. 28, held at Kingsbury, Washington County. 

The Grand Officers for 1794 proved to be a re-election of 
those of 1792 and 1793. 

The Grand Stewards 3 Lodge, on August 27, appointed 
Brothers Ely, Speyer, Babcock, and Wells, Stewards of the 
Grand Lodge ; and Brothers Coffin, Walton, Ryckman, and 
Adams, Deacons of the Grand Lodge. 

THE THREE DEGREES IN FRENCH, WORKED IN GRAND LODGE. 

Brother R. J. Yandenbroeck on September 3, in pursuance 
of a resolution, adopted July 16, conferred the three degrees 



72 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


of Masonry on Mr. John Baptist Couret in open Grand 
Lodge. The same being administered in the French lan- 
guage. 

RITUALISTIC DIFFERENCES. 

Brother Kerr communicated to the Grand Lodge, that he 
had visited several country Lodges during the summer ; that 
he found them working very differently ; and that he con- 
ceived a number of irregular and improper practices had crept 
into many of them. He therefore made the following propo- 
sition : 

Whereas, it is a matter of high importance, that a good 
understanding and friendly intercourse should be preserved 
between the Grand and the individual Lodges under this 
jurisdiction ; that any little deviation from ancient land- 
marks should be duly rectified ; that a uniform mode of 
working should take place throughout the jurisdiction of the 
Grand Lodge, and that the unity of the Fraternity should 
be maintained inviolate ; 

Therefore, 

Resolved, That the Grand Lodge will, once in every year, 
send one or more of their own members, or some other per- 
son or persons commissioned under the seal of the Grand 
Lodge, to every individual Lodge under their jurisdiction, in 
order to a more complete attainment of the above-mentioned 
purposes. 

The proposition was referred. 

- CHEQUE WORD. 

Mention was made that the Grand Cheque Word had con- 
tinued in use for a longer time than was at first intended. It 
was resolved, in consequence, to change it. The Deputy 
Grand Master was requested to fix on a new one, deliver it to 
the Secretary, and the Secretary was desired to deliver it to 
the Masters of the Lodges in the city. Brother Clinton was 
desired to deliver it to the country Lodges, so far as may be 
practicable, during the next session of the Legislature at 
Poughkeepsie. 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


73 


1795. 

On May 19, 1795, a Dispensation was issued to Brother A. 
Maydieu and others, to form a Lodge in the city of New York 
by the name L’Unit6 Americaine, the same to be of effect for 
six months. 

A letter of resignation of the office of Deputy Grand 
Master was received from R. W. Brother Peter McDougall. 
Acknowledgments were made in return and thanks for ser- 
vices to the Grand Lodge were accompanied by a Deputy 
Grand Master’s jewel, as a testimonial. In conjunction with 
this subject a commission from the Grand Master was read, 
by which it was announced he had appointed Brother Jacob 
Morton to fill the vacancy, which appointment was con- 
firmed. 

Brother Scott announced, on June 3, that he had been 
appointed proxy for Hudson Lodge, which was approved and 
the certificate ordered filed. 

ELECTION OF GRAND OFFICERS. 

The annual election of officers resulted as follows : 

Most Worshipful Robert E. Livingston, Grand Master. 

Eight Worshipful James Scott, Senior Grand Warden. 

Eight Worshipful DeWitt Clinton, Junior Grand Warden. 

Eight Worshipful Martin Hoffman, Grand Treasurer. 

Eight Worshipful Dr. Abraham Beach, Grand Chaplain. 

Eight Worshipful the Eev. John Bissel, Assistant Grand 
Chaplain. 

Eight Worshipful the Eev. Samuel Miller, Assistant 
Grand Chaplain. 

Brother George Hopkins, Grand Pursuivant. 

Brother Duncan McDougall, Grand Tyler. 

It was then 

“ Besolved, That the Grand Secretary be authorized to 
appoint the requisite Adjutant, to keep the line of procession, 
etc., in order, on St. John’s Day next.” 

It was ordered that the money and papers belonging to 



74 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


the late Lodge La Tendre Amitie Franco-Americaine, be 
delivered to the Lodge LTTnite Americaine. 

Two Lodges were then warranted, one for Cooperstown 
and another for Schoharie. Also a Dispensation to Brother 
Edward Lee and others, to hold a Lodge in the city of New 
York for six months. 

It was 

“ Resolved , That one brother be nominated by each of the 
Masters of Lodges present, in order that four Stewards and 
four Deacons may be appointed from among them to serve 
this Grand Lodge for the ensuing year.” 

The selection of Stewards for the ensuing year resulted as 
follows : 

Brother Ely, of Independent Royal Arch Lodge. 

Brother Weeks, of Hiram Lodge. 

Brother Delamater, of Trinity Lodge. 

Brother Hughes, of Phenix Lodge. 

The Deacons of the Grand Lodge for the ensuing year 
were: 

Brother Clapp, of St. John’s Lodge No. 1. 

Brother Cuylcr, of St. Andrew’s Lodge. 

Brother Hoope, of Holland Lodge. 

Brother Adams, of Howard Lodge. 

A committee, consisting of Brothers Clinton, Bruce, and 
Cock, was appointed to assist the Grand Secretary in the 
arrangements of the procession of St. John’s Day. 

On the celebration of the Festival of St. John the Baptist, 
June 24, the Grand Lodge proceeded to the City Hall, where 
they joined the other Lodges held in the city, and whence 
the whole moved in grand procession, at half-past ten o’clock, 
down Broad Street, through Beaver Street and Broadway to 
the new Presbyterian Church in Beekman Street, where a 
sermon was delivered by the Rev. Brother Miller, and some 
sacred music was performed by Mr. and Mrs. Hodgkinson, 
Mrs. Pownall, and others, and a handsome collection was 
made for the benefit of the charity school of the said church, 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


75 


amounting to £110 ; this was paid by the Grand Secretary 
to Mr. Daniel Phenix, agreeably to a resolve of the Grand 
Lodge. After Divine service, the Lodges returned in the 
like order, down Beekman Street, and through Pearl and 
Wall streets to the City Hall, where they dispersed. 

ORDER OF PROCESSION. 

Band of Music. 

Knights Templars. 

St. Patrick’s Lodge in the following order : 

Tyler. 

Steward. Steward. 

Members two and two. 

Treasurer. Secretary. 

Junior Warden. Senior Warden. 

Past Masters two and two. 

Master Mason bearing the Warrant, supported by two 
brethren. 

Deacon. Master. Deacon. 

L’Unite Americaine. 

Phenix. 

Trinity. 

Howard. In the same 
Holland. order as 

Hiram. * St. Patrick’s 
St. John’s, Ho. 6. Lodge. 

St. Andrew’s. 

Independent Koyal Arch. 

St. John’s, Ho. 1. - 
Band of Music. 

Grand Lodoe, thus : 

Tyler. 

Past Grand Officers, two and two. 

Grand Treasurer. Grand Secretary. 

Junior Grand Warden. Senior Grand Warden. 

Chaplains. 

Deacon. Grand Pursuivant, bearing the Bible. Deacon. 
Deacon. Grand Master. Deacon. 



76 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


MAKING MASONS AT SIGHT. 

The making of Masons at sight in private Lodges under 
the auspices of the officers of this Grand Lodge, was a matter 
of serious moment, and became the subject of consideration 
and investigation at several sessions of the Grand Lodge. 

The information finally came from Brother E. J. Yanden- 
broeck in open session, on December 2, 1795, when he offered 
the following preamble and resolution : 

“ Whereas, The Constitution points out that it is the pre- 
rogative of the Grand Lodge, and that the Grand Master has 
full power and authority, when the Grand Lodge is duly as- 
sembled, to cause to be made in his presence Free and Ac- 
cepted Masons at sight, but that it cannot be done out of his 
presence without his written Dispensation ; and whereas on 
several occasions the Grand Lodge was not assembled for 
that purpose, neither was the Grand Master present, nor was 
a Dispensation produced ; therefore be it submitted to the 
consideration of the Grand Lodge as to the propriety of these 
proceedings. 55 

Many of the Grand officers being absent, it was referred 
to the next session. On which occasion the subject was 
considered, and after reading the charges therein contained 
against some of the presiding officers of this Grand Lodge, 
it was, on motion, 

“Resolved, unanimously, As the sense of this Grand Lodge, 
that there appears nothing, after an inquiry into the charges 
brought by Brother Yandenbroeck, against the Deputy Grand 
Master, Senior Grand Warden, and Grand Secretary, by his 
proposition to criminate the said officers, but that they acted 
in conformity to the duties of their offices and the Constitu- 
tion of the Fraternity. 55 

1796. 

Brother Wright presented his proxy as representative of 
Huntingdon Lodge, Ho. 26, and Brother Joseph Mallenbrey 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


77 


presented his from the Lodge of St. John and St. Jude ; both 
of which were approved and ordered filed. 

Petitions were received for Lodges to be warranted in the 
towns of Westchester, Goshen, Canaan, Stamford, Coxsackie, 
and the village of Troy, which were referred to the presiding 
officers. 

The officers re-elected were the same as in the preceding 
year, excepting that Brother Adamson became the Grand 
Pursuivant, Brother Benjamin Jones, Grand Tyler, and the 
Grand Deacons and Stewards as follows : 


Bro. Clapp of St. John’s Lodge, No. 1 


cc 

Cuyler ££ 

St. Andrew’s ££ 

“ 3 ! 

Grand 

u 

Hoope “ 

Holland ££ 

“ 8 j 

Deacons. 

it 

Adams “ 

Howard ££ 

“ 9 J 


Bro. 

Barclay of St. Andrew’s Lodge, No. 3 ] 


C( 

Graham t£ 

Hiram ££ 

“ 1 

Grand 

tt 

Bache ££ 

Howard ££ 

“ 9 

Stewards. 

it 

Horton “ 

Trinity ££ 

“ 10 



Warrants for Lodges in the towns of Salem and Fairfield 
were granted on September 7 ; also one for Temple Lodge 
in the city of Albany ; and also a Dispensation for twelve 
calendar months, for a Lodge in New York City by the name 
of Temple Lodge. 

The proxy of Hiram Lodge, No. 35, to Brother John 
Wells was presented, approved, and filed. 

GRAND LODGE JURISDICTION. 

A Communication having been received from the Most Wor- 
shipful the Grand Lodge of Masons of Massachusetts, in rela- 
tion to warranting Lodges outside the geographical limits of 
the State, and the subject having been referred to a Commit- 
tee, examined and reported upon, the following preamble and 
resolution were adopted : 

“ Whereas, The Grand Lodge of the State of Massachu- 
setts have, by a Communication dated January 4, 1796, sug- 
gested to this Grand Lodge, the adopting a regulation 



78 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


declaring that no charter or dispensation for holding a Lodge 
be issued by any Grand Lodge to any number of Masons 
residing out of the State wherein the Grand Lodge is estab- 
lished ; 

Be it therefore, 

Resolved and declared by this Grand Lodge, That no 
Charter or Dispensation for holding a Lodge of Masons be 
ever granted to any person or persons, whomsoever, residing 
out of this State and within the jurisdiction of any other 
Grand Lodge.” 

Brother Samuel Jones, Jr., for Committee, announced the 
old Certificate Plate irreparable, and that an artist was pre- 
paring a new plate, for which he must draw on the Treasurer. 

Warrants were granted for a Lodge in the town of Gran- 
ville, Washington County, by the name of Liberty; for a 
Lodge in Suffolk County, Long Island, to be known as Suf- 
folk Lodge ; for a Lodge in Steuben, Herkimer County, to 
be known as Steuben Lodge ; and for a Lodge in the town 
of Montgomery, Ulster County. 

GRAND LODGES OF NOVA SCOTIA AND MARYLAND. 

Communications were received from the Grand Lodges of 
Nova Scotia and Maryland, seeking for friendly Masonic 
intercourse ; and the Grand Secretary was directed to make 
suitable fraternal reply. 

A new star was added to the Union of States by the 
admission of Tennessee. 


1797. 

Warrants were authorized on January 18, 1797, for L’Unite 
Amdricaine Lodge ; for Moriah Lodge in Marbletown, Ulster 
County ; for a Lodge in the town of Bath, Steuben County ; 
for a Lodge in the town of Sangerfield, Herkimer County, 
to be known as Western Star Lodge ; and for a Lodge in the 
county of Onondaga, to be called Scipio Lodge. 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


79 


Brother Cadwallader D. Colden filed his power of proxy 
from Solomon’s Lodge, held in the town of Poughkeepsie. 

The Lodges in Poughkeepsie and Albany being delin- 
quents, and the Deputy Grand Master being about to visit 
those cities, it was unanimously 

“ Resolved , That he be requested to take charge of the 
delinquent Lodges in Poughkeepsie and Albany, who have 
not surrendered their original Warrants ; that he be author- 
ized to receive and cancel the same, and to furnish new ones 
under the jurisdiction of this Grand Lodge ; and also to 
commute with the said Lodges for their respective dues.” 

Two petitions were received on March 1 : 

From Isaac Delamater and others, for a Warrant to hold 
a Lodge in the city of Hew York, by the name of Temple 
Lodge, which was granted. 

And one from Tice B-ipson and others, to erect and hold a 
Lodge in the town of Canajoharie, county of Montgomery, 
by the name of St. Paul’s Lodge, which was referred to the 
presiding Grand officers, with power. 

Brother Jacob Morton received a power from Livingstone 
Lodge, No. 23, appointing him proxy, which was approved 
and filed. 

THE SUBJECT OF A REVISION OF THE CONSTITUTION 

now began to engage the attention of the Grand Lodge, 
and was brought forward by Brother Ludlow offering the 
following, which was adopted : 

“ Whereas , There are various clauses in the Constitutions of 
the Ancient and Honorable Fraternity of Free and Accepted 
Masons of the State of New York, collected and digested by 
order of the Grand Lodge of the said State, which are either 
contradictory or obscure, and several additions are necessary 
to correct the same ; 

Therefore, 



80. 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


Resolved, That a Committee be appointed to revise the 
same, and to report as soon as convenient what additions, 
explanations, expunctions, and amendments are necessary to 
render them more perfect, provided they do not transgress 
the ancient landmarks, nor in any degree violate the true 
genius and spirit of Masonry.” 

The Committee appointed consisted of Brothers Jacob 
Morton, Scott, Clinton, Abrams, Bisset, Skinner, Yanden- 
broeck, Cock, and Otterson. At the following extra ses- 
sion, held on March 13 : 

On motion of Brother Clinton, 

“ Resolved , That those of the Grand officers who are not 
already on the Committee appointed to revise the Constitu- 
tions be added thereto, and likewise all the Masters of Lodges 
within the State, and that five of the members duly assem- 
bled shall be a sufficient number to proceed to business.” 

On motion of Brother Colden, 

“ Resolved , That the Grand Secretary give notice of the 
above transactions to the several members of the Committee ; 
and that, as the members who reside in the country may not 
find it convenient to attend the meetings of the Committee, 
it shall be the duty of the Grand Secretary to inform the 
country Lodges of the time when the report of the Commit- 
tee is to be laid before the Grand Lodge, that they may 
have an opportunity of expressing their sentiments on this 
important subject by regularly appointed proxies.” 

There were nine Lodges and three proxies present at this 
Communication, when Bro. James Scott, Acting Grand 
Master, installed the officers of Cortlandt Lodge, No. 34,, to 
be held at the town of Cortlandt, Westchester County. 

THE CLANDESTINE, EDWARD LEE. 

The attention of the Grand Lodge had been called, on 
several occasions, to the report that Edward Lee was work- 
ing clandestinely in New York City. In June, 1795, a Dis- 



'IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


81 


pensation had been granted to Edward Lee to operate for six 
months. On March 1, a Committee had been appointed 
to investigate the rumor, and on June 7, the Committee, 
through their chairman, Brother De Witt Clinton, 

“ Reported , That it appears that one Edward Lee has been 
the principal cause of holding clandestine meetings of Masons, 
and conferring degrees without any regular authority, and 
that the Committee have not yet obtained full information 
respecting the other offenders ; 

Therefore, 

Resolved, , That the said Edward Lee be excluded from all 
Masonic communication, and that the said exclusion ' be 
communicated to all the Lodges under the jurisdiction of 
this Grand Lodge by the Grand Secretary.’’ 

Powers for proxies were presented from three Lodges, as 
follows : 

From Cortlandt Lodge, No. 34, to Bro. De Witt Clinton. 

“ Orange Lodge, No. 43, to Bro. William Eollinson. 

“ Suffolk Lodge, No. 60, to Bro. John Pray. 

All of which were approved and ordered on file. 

Warrants were ordered to issue for the formation of two 
Lodges, one in the town of Hempstead, Queen’s County, 
and one in the town of Brooklyn, King’s County, both on 
Long Island. 

The election being held for officers for the ensuing year, 
all the Grand officers for 1796 were re-elected to serve in 
1797. 

Solomon’s, union, temple, and master’s lodges. 

Much difficulty had been experienced in obtaining the sur- 
render of the old Warrants of the Lodges located in Pough- 
keepsie and Albany, and in having them take new ones from 
the Grand Lodge of the State. The Deputy Grand Master, 
who had been requested on January 18 to meet the brethren 
of those Lodges, reported September 6 that he had met the 
brethren of Solomon’s Lodge, held at Poughkeepsie ; that 
vol. n. — 6 



82 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


he had, agreeably to the directions of the Grand Lodge, 
required from the said brethren a surrender of their old War- 
rant, which had been complied with, and that a new War- 
rant, recognizing the jurisdiction of this Grand Lodge, was 
accordingly delivered to them ; that finding the funds of the 
said Lodge to be but trifling, and understanding that the 
brethren of that Lodge were making preparations for their 
accommodations in a new and elegant Lodge room, which, 
in addition to their funds, would require large advances 
from the individual members, he thought it expedient to 
remit to them the dues owing by them to the Grand Lodge, 
the brethren promising punctual payment of those which 
should hereafter arise ; that from the information he was 
able to collect, he believed the Lodge to be in a respectable 
and otherwise flourishing situation. 

That he had also met the brethren of Master’s, of Union, 
and of Temple Lodges in Albany ; that he made known to 
the brethren of Master’s and Union Lodges the request of 
the Grand Lodge with respect to the surrender of their old 
Warrants. 

That the former appointed a Committee, with whom the 
Deputy Grand Master had a conference, and they drew up 
a report, which was shown to the Deputy Grand Master by 
the Chairman, in which they recommend to their Lodge a 
compliance with the request of the Grand Lodge ; but the 
Lodge not having been able to effect a meeting previous to 
the departure of the Deputy Grand Master, nothing further 
was done. 

That the brethren of Union Lodge, whom the Deputy 
Grand Master met in their Lodge room, appeared to be 
willing to accede to the request of the Grand Lodge, and 
the only obstacle to its being completed, was a question 
which arose as to the rank they were to hold, as they were 
possessed of two provincial Warrants ; this the Deputy 
Grand Master did not think it was proper for him alone 
to decide. 

The Deputy Grand Master has brought with him a copy 
of the said Warrants, and should recommend its being re- 



IN THE STATE OP NEW YORK. 


83 


ferred to a Committee to report upon at the next Grand 
Lodge. 

With respect to the Lodge which has lately been estab- 
lished in Albany, the Deputy Grand Master observed that he 
was persuaded the trust had been committed into the hands 
of brethren who would do honor to the Fraternity, for that 
the Master and officers of the Lodge appeared to be persons 
well instructed in the mysteries of the Fraternity, and zeal- 
ous to advance its honor and its interests. 

In consideration of the above report, the Grand Lodge 
adopted several resolutions; in the first, approving of the 
course taken by the Deputy Grand Master, and further, that 
in compliance with his recommendation, a committee be 
appointed to examine the Warrants of Union Lodge, held at 
Albany, and to report the rank it ought to have under the 
jurisdiction of this Grand Lodge, at the next regular meeting. 

The Committee consisted of Brothers Ludlow, Bisset, and 
Abrams, who reported December 6, that the date should be 
February 26, 1765. 

A petition of Adam I. Doll and others to hold a Lodge in 
the town of Middletown, Ulster County, by the name of 
James’ Lodge, was referred to the Grand officers. 

Three other petitions were laid over for further action, in 
consequence of the Lodges recommending them not having 
paid their dues to Grand Lodge. The three applications 
were : 

From Zenas Pynneo and others, for a Lodge in the town 
of (Dorlagh, now) Sharon, Schoharie County, to be called 
Sharon Felicity Lodge. 

From St. George Talbud Perry and others, for a Lodge in 
the town of Unadilla, Otsego County, or in the town of 
Franklin, Delaware County, to be called St. George’s Lodge. 

From A. Houghtaling and others, for a Lodge in the town 
of Coeymans, Albany County, to be called Hiram Lodge. 

Subsequent to the above, on January 5, 1797, the petition 
following was presented to the Grand Lodge by Brothers 
Bidet Renmoulleau and others : 



84 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


LODGES L 5 UNITE AMERICAINE AND l’uNION FRANgAISE. 

“ To the Right Worshipful the Grand Lodge of the State of 
New York: 

The petition of the Lodge L’Unite Americaine 

Respectfully sheweth, That on application made by sev- 
eral brethren appertaining to the Craft, a Dispensation was 
granted by the Grand Lodge, to hold a Lodge under the name 
and title of L’Unite Americaine for the term of six months. 

That at the expiration thereof, on the application for an 
authority as usually is granted to all regular Masons, the said 
Dispensation was continued for the further term of twelve 
months, with the addition of such privileges as are belong- 
ing to warranted Lodges, which term is now expired. 

Your petitioners, admiring the prudence of the Grand 
Lodge in not granting immediately to strangers, although 
not novices in the Royal Art, the full extent of Rights, 
endeavored to prove, by a strict adherence to the principles 
of the order, that Masons — how distinct their climate or 
language may be — acting as such, have a claim to those bene- 
fits that are common to all and can be denied to none. 
Impressed with such sentiments and confident that this 
Grand Lodge will deem them worthy of being placed among 
the number of Lodges under its jurisdiction, they pray a 
Warrant, in the usual form granted by this Grand Lodge, 
be granted to them under the distinctive name and title of 
L’Unite Americaine, and that Bro. Peter Daniel Bidet Ren- 
moulleau may be named Master, Bro. Anthony Stafford, 
Senior Warden, and Bro. John Gabriel Tardy, Junior War- 
den, and your petitioners as true and faithful Masons will 
ever pray. 

Peter Daniel Bidet Renmoulleau 
and twenty-five others.” 

The above was referred and the following report subse- 
quently made : 

The Committee to whom was referred the above petition, 
have endeavored to avail themselves of all the information 



IN THE STATE OP NEW YORK. 


85 


in their power respecting it, and are unanimously of opin- 
ion that no reason of sufficient force exists to preclude the 
prayer of the petitioners ; but, on the contrary, from the num- 
ber and merits of the applicants, their zeal for Masonry, 
and the progressive prosperity of the Institution, the Com- 
mittee are of opinion that a Warrant in the usual form ought 
forthwith to be issued. Hew York, Jan’y 5, 1797. In behalf 
of the Committee. 


De Witt Clinton, Chairman. 
M. Hoffman, 

Henderson, 

Cocks, 

W ELLS, 


Committee. 


The difficulties which appear to have attended the Lodge 
L’Unite Americaine, Ho. 13, from the date of its inception, 
seem to have taken up much of the time and earnest consid- 
eration of the Grand Lodge. One of these sources of dis- 
turbance of harmony, was the action of the Lodge in expell- 
ing the Master, W or. Brother Bidet Eenmoulleau. The report 
of the expulsion to the Grand Body, on June 7, had caused 
the Grand Tyler to deny him admission when he presented 
himself at the door of the Grand Lodge on that occasion, 
and this caused the appointment of a committee of five, 
consisting of E. W. De Witt Clinton and Wor. Brothers 
William Wright, Eobert Cock, Abraham Skinner, and Cad- 
wallader D. Colden. 

The lengthy report, which becomes more properly a part 
of the history of the Lodge, and which will be found in its 
proper place, was presented by Brother C. D. Colden in be- 
half of the Committee, and concluded as follows : 

“Your Committee further report, that when 'the resolve 
which has expelled Brother Bidet Eenmoulleau, and which 
has been submitted to you, was passed, not more than one- 
sixth of the members of the Lodge were present. 

Finally your Committee report, that on whichever side 
of the dispute, between the Brother Yerger and the Wor. 



86 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


Brother Bidet Renmoulleau, justice may be, it does not ap- 
pear to them an affair proper to the investigation of a Lodge, 
being a mere mercantile difference, which a court of justice is 
only competent to decide, and, therefore, they consider the 
Wor. Brother improperly expelled, and are of opinion that 
he ought to be restored to all his Masonic rights.” 

This led to very considerable debate by R. J. Yanden- 
broeck, Anthony Stafford, and John G. Tardy, of L’Unite 
Americaine Lodge, against the adoption of the report, and 
by James Scott, Abraham Skinner, and C. D. Colden in favor 
of its adoption. The consideration resulted in the approval 
of the report of the Committee, and the unanimous adop- 
tion of the resolution, “ That Bro. Bidet Renmoulleau be 
reinstated in the chair of Lodge L’Unite Am6ricaine, from 
which be has been unjustly expelled, and to all his rights 
and privileges as Master of the said Lodge.” 

This seems to have irritated the members of the Lodge, 
and was followed by the call of an Extra Grand Lodge, on 
November 22, 1797, when the minutes record : 

“The Right Worshipful, the Deputy Grand Master, in- 
formed the Grand Lodge that this extra meeting was called 
in consequence of a paper, together with the Warrant of 
Lodge L’Unit6 Americaine, being handed to the Grand Sec- 
retary, by persons calling themselves a committee from the 
said Lodge L’Unite Americaine. 

The said paper being in the French language, was trans- 
lated by the Right Worshipful, the Deputy Grand Master, 
and by him read to the Grand Lodge, and is in the follow- 
ing words, to wit : 

“ Extract from the Minutes of the Golden Booh of the Resp. 

Lodge E Unite Americaine , at their sitting of the 11th of 

November > in the year of the Z., 5797. 

The Worshipful Master announced, that the object of this 
extra meeting, was to hear the report of the Committee 
appointed to attend the sittings of the Grand Lodge, where 
the judgment given by this Resp. Lodge on Pierre Daniel 
Bidet Renmoulleau would be brought in question. 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


87 


\ This report being made, and the discussion closed, resolved, 
according to the opinion of each individual member, ‘the 
Resp. Lodge, considering that every particular Lodge has an 
exclusive right to choose the members composing it, that the 
free will manifested by a majority of a Lodge, is the sole 
rule in Masonry by which is determined the expulsion of a 
member, and that every decision of a Grand Lodge, contrary 
to this principle, is only an abuse of authority ; considering 
that by a decree of the sixth day of the fourth month, the 
Resp. Lodge has ordered the erasure of P. D. Bidet Ren- 
moulleau from the list of its members, unless he would sub- 
mit to certain conditions mentioned in the said decree, and 
that P. D. Bidet Renmoulleau has not complied with any 
of those conditions ; considering that the Grand Lodge of 
New York could not invalidate the judgment of the Resp. 
Lodge which pronounces the exclusion of one of its members 
without making an attempt on the right of election inherent 
to each Lodge ; considering, finally, that the dignity of the 
Resp. Lodge requires it to maintain the liberty of its delib- 
erations, and that it cannot enjoy that liberty any longer 
under the jurisdiction of the Grand Lodge of New York : 

Resolved , unanimously (with the exception of Bro. Van- 
denbroeck, who desired his refusal to be minuted, and which 
was granted), 

First , That they persist in their resolve of the sixth day 
of the fourth month, 5797, and declare to maintain it in all 
its contents. 

Second , , That from this moment they cease to exist under 
the authority of the Grand Lodge of New York, and return 
immediately under the authority of their natural Grand 
Lodge of France ; and that in consequence, five commission- 
ers shall be charged to wait upon the Grand Secretary, in 
order to return to him the Warrant, and also a copy of the 
present resolve (so far as it concerns him), which shall be 
attested by the Secretary. 

By order of the Resp. Lodge, 

( Signed ) Joseph Gilbert, Secretary 



88 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


Whereupon, on motion, in Grand Lodge, 

“ Resolved , That the Warrant be restored to Brother Bidet 
Benmoulleau, as Master of Lodge L’Unite Americaine, and 
that discretionary powers be granted to him to assemble his 
Lodge in any convenient place. 

Resolved, That the said paper is anti-Masonic, an insult 
to the dignity and authority of this Grand Lodge, and con- 
tains such sentiments as will tend to subvert the Masonic 
government and destroy the harmony of the society. 

Resolved , That there be a Committee to obtain the best 
information in their power as to who were the persons that 
advised or agreed to the said proceedings, and make report 
to the next Grand Lodge. 

Resolved , That the Committee consist of three, and 

Resolved , That Brothers Otterson, Onderdonk, and J. C. 
Ludlow be the said Committee.” 


The Masters of the Lodges in the city were requested to 
attend the next meeting of the Lodge L’Unite Americaine, 
and report their proceedings to the next Grand Lodge. 

The Grand Secretary was directed to indorse the Warrant 
of that Lodge with these words : “ In Grand Lodge, Novem- 
ber 22, 5797. Ordered , That this Warrant be continued in 
full force, the surrender within mentioned to the contrary 
notwithstanding. I. A. G. L.” 

All the papers in the case were deposited with the Grand 
Secretary. 

On December 6, Brother J. C. Ludlow, in behalf of Com- 
mittee appointed to inquire who were the pei*sons aiding, 
assisting, or agreeing to certain proceedings of the above 
Lodge, as communicated on November 22, reported the 
names of 


Beinier J. Yandenbroeck, Chairman, 


Anthony Stafford, 
J. G. Tardy, 
Joseph Gilbert, 
Cyp. Courbe, 
Lefevre, 


J. L. Baillargeaux, 
A. T. Benault, 

H. T. Mugnie, 

P. C. Yerger, 
Liancourt. 



IN THE STATE OP NEW YORK. 


89 


Whereupon an extra Grand Lodge was ordered for De- 
cember 12, and the Grand Secretary directed to summon 
the above-named brethren to attend and answer certain 
charges which will then be exhibited to them. 

In the meantime, on December 6, 1797, in Grand Lodge, the 
Deputy Grand Master, Jacob Morton, read a letter from 
Huet Lachelle, styling himself a Deputy Grand Master under 
the jurisdiction of the Grand Lodge of France, and request- 
ing permission to visit this Grand Lodge, in that, or in his 
own private character as a Master Mason. Previous to any 
order being taken on the request, the Deputy Grand Master 
informed the Grand Lodge that he had been told, from good 
authority, that the said Brother Huet Lachelle had granted a 
Warrant for the establishment of a Lodge in this city by the 
name of L’ Union Frangaise, and which information he had, 
on inquiry, found to be true. 

Accordingly, a Committee, consisting of Brothers C. D. 
Golden, Onderdonk, and Mercadier, were appointed to wait 
on Huet Lachelle, and inform him that his conduct, in grant- 
ing a Warrant for a Lodge, was contrary to the rules estab- 
lished by this Grand Lodge, and an infringement of their 
rights, and that he could not be admitted into tips Grand 
Lodge unless he pledged himself, in writing, to revoke the 
powers granted by him in the said Warrant. 

Subsequently, the Committee reported that the said Huet 
Lachelle acknowledged he had granted a Warrant to hold 
the Lodge L’ Union Frangaise in Hew York City ; that he per- 
sisted he had a right to grant Warrants when and where he 
pleased; further, that he would not exhibit his authority 
empowering him so to do ; and that he would not revoke 
nor annul the one granted. The subject then for the time 
dropped, Mr. Huet Lachelle handing the Committee a copy 
of a letter written to the Grand Master. 

Finally summonses for an investigation ensued. At the 
Extra Grand Lodge, held December 12, Jacob Morton, 
Deputy Grand Master, presiding; James Scott, De Witt 
Clinton, John Abrams, Martin Hoffman, and John Bisset, 
Grand officers, were present, together with the represen- 



90 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


tatives of eight Lodges, and eight proxies. The Tyler in- 
formed the Grand Lodge that he had served the summonses ; 
Brother J. C. Ludlow stated he was in receipt of a letter 
from Brother B. J. Vandenbroeck, one of those summoned, 
setting forth that he was so indisposed as to render it impru- 
dent for him personalty to attend. His personal attendance 
was excused. 

The Grand Secretary read a reply received by him from 
Joseph Gilbert, Secretary of the Lodge L’Unite Americaine, 
and the Deputy Grand Master, a paper signed “ Henry Pe- 
card,” Secretary p. t., for and in behalf of the brethren 
composing the above-mentioned Lodge. 

This led to a discussion and the adoption of a resolution 
that a committee, consisting of the Deputy Grand Master, 
the Junior Grand Warden, De Witt Clinton, and Cad walla- 
der D. Colden, draw proper resolutions concerning the con- 
duct of the persons above mentioned as summoned, and 
transmit the same in reply, accompanied by a suitable letter. 
And further, that an Extra Grand Lodge be held on the 
coming Saturday night. 

Brother Pray then produced a lengthy letter, written to 
Independent Boyal Arch Lodge, Ho. 2, in behalf of a num- 
ber of persons claiming to belong to a Lodge named L’Union 
Frangaise, who were working under the Warrant given by 
Huet Lachelle. Whereupon it was 

“ Resolved , That Huet Lachelle, his associates — all persons 
working under a Warrant granted by him for the purpose of 
forming a Lodge in this city, by the name of L’ Union Fran- 
gaise — and the following persons : B. J. Vandenbroeck, An- 
thony Stafford, J. G. Tardy, Joseph Gilbert, Lefevre, 

Cyp. Courbe, J. L. Baillargeaux, A. T. Benault, Jeune Ver- 
dier, P. C. Verger, H. T. Mugnie, and Liancourt, for- 

merly members of Lodge L’Unite Americaine, be, and they 
hereby are, inhibited from visiting or otherwise associating 
with any of the Lodges in this city, until further orders are 
forwarded to the said Lodges, by this Grand Lodge, on the 
subject.” 



IN THE STATE OP NEW YORK. 


91 


In the meantime the following letter had been received 
from Brother R. John Vandenbroeck : 

“ Under the auspices of the Great Architect of the Universe , 
the tenth day of the tenth month of the year of Masonry 
5797, Brother Reinier John Vandenbroeck, Master in all 
the Masonic Degrees . , to the Right Worshipful , the Grand 
Lodge of the State of New York. S. S. S. 

Beloved Brethren : 

I have obtained information from undoubted authority 
that my name has been placed among a number of brethren, 
formerly members of Lodge L’Unite Americaine, and who 
now have formed ^themselves under the Jurisdiction of the 
Provincial Grand Lodge of France, under the title of L’Un- 
ion Frangaise, and which brethren are supposed as deserving 
the highest censure. I shall not enter to discuss the origin, 
nature, and merits of this case, being foreign to my present 
view. I am only, by duty owing to myself, called upon to 
acquaint the Grand Lodge, that whoever has furnished this 
list has committed an error. 1st. The Proceedings of Lodge 
L’Unite Americaine, No. — , at its dissolution, and of which 
an authenticated copy has been transmitted, will show my 
conduct. 2d. I do declare that I never signed, either solely 
or with any other person or persons, any application to the 
Provincial Grand Lodge of France, neither did I concur in 
the installation of Lodge L’Union Frangaise, but was invited 
and have been present with several brethren of different 
Lodges in this city, at an entertainment given by the breth- 
ren of Lodge L’Union Frangaise, on which occasion the 
Grand Lodge of the State of New York was remembered by 
them with fraternal affection. I do conceive for these rea- 
sons that my name has been erroneously mentioned. But I 
lament that my zeal for the Craft, of which on all occasions I 
gave unequivocal proofs in my advancing life and my declin- 
ing state of health, is rewarded with a desire of persecution ; 
however, I firmly rely that justice and equity will ultimately 
prevail in the Grand Lodge of the State of New York. 

Having withdrawn from Lodge L’ Unite Americaine at its 



92 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


dissolution, and having declared not to be a member of the 
Lodge under the same title, of which Bidet Kemnoulleau is 
Master, for reasons too numerous to mention, and too con- 
vincing to be enervated, I can henceforth not claim, as a Past 
Master, a seat and vote in the Grand Lodge, being no longer 
a member of a Lodge under its Jurisdiction. I therefore 
embrace this opportunity to offer my warmest thanks for the 
many proofs of friendship and Masonic confidence shown to 
me by a number of brethren, — to assure a sincere forgive- 
ness to those few who found it the interest of ambition or 
private views to injure me, and to request of every real 
Mason the continuance of such a social intercourse, as is cal- 
culated mutually to promote satisfaction in life, comfort in 
death, and felicity hereafter. 

I cannot conclude without assuring the Grand Lodge, that 
the brethren formerly of Lodge L’Union Americaine, are 
men of good report, peaceable citizens, obedient to the laws 
of the country where they dwell, good Masons, not in name, 
but from principle ; that they were attached to the Grand 
Lodge of the State of New York, and still remain so ; that 
what has been done by them, hastily done, and expressed in 
terms not well measured, gave a wrong impression of their 
feelings, of their abhorrence to vice, and a conviction that 
Bidet Benmoulleau is an unworthy Mason ; that the fear of 
being compelled to associate with him has brought them to 
the steps they have taken. This is my private opinion, as it 
appears to me. Are there no means to reconcile them? 
They are good men and good Masons ; have they erred ? 
Their principles are sound, with a religious attachment to 
every virtue, and an abhorrence to every vice. For me, it 
only remains to assure the Grand Lodge of the State of New 
York, that although calumniated and persecuted, I shall still 
entertain attachment, and when I pray the Great Architect 
may bless you, and each of you, I am sincere. 

I salute you with the Sacred Numbers known to Masons, 
and am, Beloved Brethren, faithfully 

Your Brother, 

B. J. Yandenbroeck. 



IN' THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


93 


The Deputy Grand Master informed the Grand Lodge 
that he had postponed the meeting from Saturday last until 
this evening, in consequence of a petition he had received, 
signed by twenty-eight persons, formerly members of Lodge 
L’Unite Americaine, and in virtue of a promise made to him 
that such a petition would be presented, provided the post- 
ponement took place. He then read the petition, which was 
in the words following : 

To the Right Worshipful, the Grand Lodge of the State of 
New York. 

Bight Worshipful Brethren: 

It is ever the duty of an upright mind, when convinced of 
having been in error, candidly to acknowledge it. Much 
more, then, does it become us, who stand to you in the 
endearing light of brethren of the great Masonic family, and 
as children of your immediate household, to acknowledge to 
you the error into which we have been led in our conduct, as 
members of the late Lodge L’Unite Americaine. 

Impressed in the most solemn manner with the extreme 
unworthiness of Bidet Benmoulleau as a man and as a Mason, 
of which we have the proof in our hands, we leave you to 
judge what were our feelings when we were informed that 
the Grand Lodge (deciding as we supposed on the merits of 
the question) had declared him innocent, and again placed 
him at our head. 

Unacquainted with your language and with your rules of 
proceeding, we were mistaken as to the grounds of your deci- 
sion, and were ignorant of our mode of redress. 

We did not know, as we have since learned, that you had 
not decided upon the merits of Bidet Benmoulleau, but upon 
the irregularity of our proceedings ; nor did we know that 
we might have been redressed by regularly impeaching him 
before the Grand Lodge ; we supposed there was no alterna- 
tive but to submit, and to accept Bidet Benmoulleau for our 
Master. 

Thus circumstanced, we solemnly declare to you that, 



94 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


between Bidet Renmoulleau as our Master and annihilation 
of a Lodge, there was no hesitation to prefer the latter. 

With minds thus impressed, we were induced to take advan- 
tage of the opportunity offered to us by the arrival of the 
Most Worshipful Huet. Lachelle, Grand Master of the Grand 
Lodge of France, and several members thereof, by organizing 
ourselves as a Lodge under the jurisdiction of our native 
country. For so doing, we declare to you, we supposed we 
were acting agreeably to Masonic regulations, and had no 
intention of giving offense to your Right Worshipful Grand 
Lodge. Your kindness to us was imprinted in our hearts, 
and we were fondly anticipating an interchange of friendly 
communications with you. Nor will you, brethren, we trust, 
censure us too severely when you reflect that the rights and 
privileges of your Grand Lodge, and the extent of its juris- 
diction, could not be well known to us, as we believe the 
questions had never before received your own decision, hav- 
ing probably never been raised. 

We, however, upon reflection and investigation, suppose 
your construction of your powers and authority is right, as 
we are persuaded it is for the interest and honor of the 
Masonic institution that there should be in every distinct 
government a supreme Masonic authority, from which each 
individual Lodge should exclusively derive its authority, and 
to which it should be accountable. Your Right Worshipful 
Grand Lodge, having been duly organized, is that authority, 
and, believe us, we shall, while residents of this country, ever 
pay it due homage. 

In addition to these acknowledgments, be assured it is with 
pain we reflect on the trouble this has given you ; but we are 
confident it will not lessen us in your opinion, when you re- 
flect that it has arisen from our abhorrence to fraud, though it 
should appear under the form of a brother, and from a wish 
(though improperly pursued) of preserving our Masonic insti- 
tution pure and virtuous. 

Persuaded, Right Worshipful brethren, of the liberality of 
your minds, confiding in your affections, and in our con- 
sciousness of rectitude, we venture to intimate to you that, 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


95 


separated as we are, by the misfortunes of our native land, 
from those social endearments which form the highest bliss 
of human life, we have fondly looked, until our uneasiness in 
Lodge L’Unite Americaine, to Masonry, the only source 
which could compensate us for our social misfortunes. 

*We therefore solicit from our respected brethren of the 
Grand Lodge of the State of New York, permission to as- 
semble ourselves together as a Lodge, under their jurisdiction, 
and under such officers as should be nominated by the Lodge, 
and presented to the officers of the Grand Lodge. We are 
sufficiently numerous, being twenty-eight in number present, 
and in return for your kindness we offer you hearts filled 
with affection, which we are anxious to prove by our con- 
duct. The title of the Lodge will be also communicated. 

With every sentiment of respect and attention we are, 
Right Worshipful brethren, 

Your faithful brethren. 

Signed as under : 

Parisox, Anthony Stafford, A. T. Renault, Jeune Yerdier, 
Henry Pecard, Labouseaine, Tomois J. Lombrier, Falvande, 
John G. Tardy, Stephen Liancourt, H. T. Mugnie, Lefevre, 
Rignon, Dupoy, Yaret, Caussy, Thugte, Foucier, J. L. Bail- 
largeaux, M. T. Launier, Jacque Ostin, Francisquey, Rem. 
Lerbeuapin, Remon Palide, P. C. Yerger, Courbe, Jos. Gil- 
bert, Jon. Spinola. 

The administrator and the officers of the Right Worship- 
ful Provincial Grand Lodge of San Domingo, have seen with 
edification and the greatest pleasure the steps taken by the 
worthy brethren above signed. 

Signed. Chalon Dayral, 
De Olior, 
Yerdier, 

Courbe, 

Huet Lachelle. 

These Communications led to the presentation and adop- 
tion of the following : 


c 



96 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


“ Whereas, The said petition admits that the above persons 
have hitherto acted improperly, and also admits the exclusive 
jurisdiction of this Grand Lodge ; 

Resolved , That they be re-admitted to Masonic communi- 
cation, upon their delivering up to a Committee of this Grand 
Lodge the pretended Warrant of Huet Lachelle, under 
which they have recently convened ; and also upon their 
complying with such disposition of the property of the 
Lodge L’ Unite Americaine, as the said Committee may 
direct ; and that the said Committee be authorized and 
directed to endeavor to heal the differences subsisting among 
the members of the said Lodge L’Unite Americaine, to unite 
them again together, and to restore their former harmony. 
The Committee are desired to inform Mr. Huet Lachelle that 
the apology made by him to this Grand Lodge is not satis- 
factory, and .to demand from him such apology as they may 
deem satisfactory. The Committee for the above purposes 
consists of the Eight Worshipful Brother Jacob Morton, the 
Eight Worshipful Brother James Scott, and Worshipful 
Brother Abraham Skinner.” 

The Eight Worshipful, the Deputy Grand Master, then 
read the following letter from Brother E. J. Vandenbroeck: 

Under the auspices of the Great Architect of the Universe, 
Brother Reinier John Vandenbroeck, Master in all Ma- 
sonic Degrees , to the Right Worshipful , the Grand Lodge 
of the State of New York . 

Beloved Brethren : 

Having for a number of years supported the character 
of a Mason, I am zealous to maintain it ; to obtain this aim, 
I addressed the Grand Lodge at the last meeting, being 
indisposed, and exposed convincing proofs of my behavior. 
Brother Ludlow informs me, that notwithstanding this, the 
Grand Lodge were impressed with the idea of me, as being 
the influential person in the steps taken by the brethren of 
the late Lodge, L’Unite Americaine. Although a conscience 
that knows no guilt can be assured that his innocence will 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


97 


ultimately appear, yet, as by order of the Grand Lodge, my 
name has appeared at the head of a list signed by the Grand 
Secretary, it becomes my duty to myself further to explain : 
1st. I did not agree to the mode of returning the Warrant. 
2d. I never concurred, signed, or have seen any application 
for a foreign Warrant. 3d. I never was known to letters 
written either to the Grand Lodge or to an individual Lodge 
— the first letter I have seen was the one presented at my 
house in the presence of Brethren Morton, Abrams, Colden, 
and Ludlow ; the second, I knew nothing of. 4th. I am not a 
member of Lodge L’Union Fran§aise ; have not met with 
them. These declarations I make in the most solemn manner ; 
if they have any weight to do away prejudices and groundless 
impressions, I trust that the Grand Lodge (having, by send- 
ing my name to the different Lodges, under the form of a 
criminal, injured my reputation as a man and as a Mason) will 
do me the justice I am entitled to. If this shall not be the 
case, I shall wait with patience until cooler deliberations have 
moderated the passions. I am convinced that stronger proofs 
will appear, although now injured and exposed, when indis- 
posed and confined, for in the past I have maintained the 
reputation and authority of the Grand Lodge of the State 
of New York, which viewed me once a useful member, but 
whose late decrees have exposed to injury the character of a 
faithful brother. 

I am with sentiments of attachment, beloved brethren, 
Your brother, 

(Signed) R. J. Vandenbroeck. 
New York, December 18, 1797. 

Whereupon, on motion, it was 

Resolved , That the suspension of Reinier John Yanden- 
broeck be taken off, and that the same be communicated to 
the different Lodges in the city by the Grand Secretary. 

An Extra Grand Lodge Communication was held Decem- 
ber 25, 1797, Right Worshipful Jacob Morton, Deputy Grand 
Master, presiding. 

VOL. II. — 7 



98 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


The Right Worshipful, the Deputy Grand Master, on behalf 
of the Committee appointed at the last meeting to confer 
with and endeavor to settle the differences subsisting among 
the members of Lodge L’ Unite Americaine, reported as fol- 
lows : 

LETTER BY THE COMMITTEE. 

“ New York, December 20, 1797. 

Brethren : 

The Grand Lodge of this State, at their meeting on the 
18th instant, took into consideration the memorial which you 
had addressed to them respecting your late proceedings which 
had incurred their censure, and they resolved that you should 
be again received into their bosom, as brethren of our Frater- 
nity, upon your first surrendering to their Committee, for that 
purpose appointed, the Warrant which you have received for 
instituting a Lodge entitled L’Union Frangaise ; and, second, 
upon surrendering to the said Committee the property of 
Lodge L’Unite Americaine in your possession, to be disposed 
of by the said Committee as they should deem just and equi- 
table. 

The Committee appointed for this purpose was Right Wor- 
shipful Bro. Scott, Worshipful Bro. Skinner, and myself. 
The Committee have it further in direction, upon the above- 
mentioned requisites being complied with, to endeavor to heal 
the differences now subsisting between you and the other 
members of Lodge L’Unite Americaine, and, if possible, to 
unite you together and restore your former harmony. 

I have been directed by the other brethren of the Com- 
mittee to make known to you these resolves of the Grand 
Lodge, and to request your answer to their requisitions. To 
these requests, I feel no doubt but that your answer will be 
such, as will allow us the pleasure of extending to you the 
fraternal hand of the Grand Lodge of the State of New 
York. 

For having (as you have done in your memorial to the 
Grand Lodge) acknowledged, in the most unequivocal manner, 
the supremacy in Masonic authority, you yourselves must 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


99 


be conscious of the impropriety of retaining in your hands a 
Warrant from a foreign jurisdiction. Nor will you, my breth- 
ren, we are persuaded, for a moment suffer the charge to 
remain against you, that you are exclusively holding prop- 
erty in which others claim a share. 

May we not also hope, that in the benevolent spirit of our 
institution, which breathes peace and good-will to all man- 
kind, you will close with the proposition of endeavoring to 
heal your differences, and, by assurance of your readiness to 
join in that measure, enable us to summon you together for 
that purpose ? 

We expect your answer, and are, with affection, 

Your brethren, 

(Signed) Jacob Morton, D. G. M. and Chairman. 

To Brother Tardy, ) 

“ Stafford, (■ Committee.” 

u Salier, and others, ) 

REPLY TO THE FOREGOING. 

“ Bight Worshipful Brother : 

We have received your letter communicating the resolve 
of the Grand Lodge of the 19th instant, and in our reply we 
have the satisfaction to inform you that, in conformity to our 
sentiments expressed in our letter to the Grand Lodge, we 
have returned the Warrant to the hands of the Provincial 
Grand Master of San Domingo who gave it. With respect 
to the property of Lodge L’Unite in our hands, we have too 
much sentiment of equity and honor to retain anything on 
which others may suppose they have a claim. We pledge 
ourselves to lay before you a faithful statement thereof, and 
we will cheerfully abide by that equitable decision, which we 
are confident the Committee of the Grand Lodge will pro- 
nounce. 

Kelative to an accommodation, we say safely, that none of 
the members which compose Lodge L’Unite Amdricaine are 
obnoxious to us, except the Master, Bidet Kenmoulleau, whose 
conduct does not agree with the sentiments of honor and 



100 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


probity which we profess ; but, if your Committee can pro- 
duce in him a change, so that he does what an honest man 
and a good Mason ought to do, much of the dislike to his 
person, and the utter impossibility of associating with him as 
a Mason, will be removed. We farther assure you, Worship- 
ful brother, that, placing unlimited confidence in your integ- 
rity and good-will, we are ready to comply with whatever 
may be required of us, persuaded that you, brother, will not 
demand of us anything but what is Masonic and adequate to 
promote the dignity of the order, to fix our harmony on a 
permanent foundation, and to keep the institution as well as 
the Lodge pure and virtuous, this being the summit of our 
desire. We shall always be found willing to answer your 
directions, which we are convinced are for the best, with 
that sincerity which becomes Masons and virtuous men. 

We are, with sentiments of attachment, Eight Worshipful 
brother, your affectionate brethren, for and in behalf of the 
brethren, signers of the Memorial of the 18th instant. 

(Signed) 

Anth. Stafford, John G. Tardy, 

Jos. Gilbert, L. I. Eenault, 

J. L. Baillargeaux, Bignon, 

Hugo Salier, M. T. Launier, 

A. T. Eenault, Jacque Ostin, 

Steph. Liancourt, Lambriere, 

Hy. Th. Mugnie, Andreanssy, 

Eemon Palide, Henry Pecard, 

Parisox. 

December 22, A. L. 5797.” 

report of the committee to the grand lodge. 

“ That, in pursuance of the direction of the Grand Lodge, 
they communicated to these brethren the resolves of the 
Grand Lodge, and expressed an expectation of their ready 
compliance with them ; and further intimated to them that, 
upon complying therewith, the Committee hoped that the 
brethren would, in compliance with the resolve of the Grand 



IN THE STATE OP NEW YORK. 


101 


Lodge, enable them to summon them together for the pur- 
pose of restoring the harmony which had formerly subsisted 
among them. To this communication the Committee received 
an answer, which is herewith presented to the Grand Lodge. 
The Committee, being satisfied with the answer of the 
brethren, proceeded, in pursuance of the direction of the 
Grand Lodge, to summon them together. The Master, Wor- 
shipful Bro. Bidet Benmoulleau, was accordingly applied to, 
and directed to summon all the brethren to meet in their 
former Lodge room on Saturday evening last. He accord- 
ingly furnished a copy of the summons, and the brethren 
were summoned. 

The Deputy Grand Master and Bro. Skinner, on their way 
to the Lodge room on Saturday evening, called on Bro. Bidet 
Benmoulleau, to take him with them. They there found 
assembled the brethren who have been associated with Bro. 
Bidet Benmoulleau. Supposing this a proper opportunity to 
learn the sentiments of these brethren respecting the pro- 
posed reunion, the brethren of the Committee entered into a 
very lengthy conversation, the result of which was to con- 
vince the Committee that the brethren attached to Bro. Bidet 
Benmoulleau, and those opposed to him, would never associ- 
ate together in one Lodge with that harmony becoming 
brethren of our institution. They therefore informed the 
brethren that they supposed that their attendance at the 
Lodge would not be necessary, to which the brethren as- 
sented. 

The Committee then proceeded to the Lodge room, where 
they found the brethren of the opposite party assembled, 
and from the unanimous sentiment which prevailed among 
them with regard to Bro. Bidet Benmoulleau, the Committee 
conceived that they could not, with the duty which they 
owed the institution, recommend to these brethren a reunion 
with the other brethren, convinced that it would be only the 
source of further feuds and animosities. As, therefore, these 
brethren had given the Committee entire satisfaction of their 
readiness to submit to the directions of the Grand Lodge, the 
Committee could not conceive it proper that so numerous a 



102 


HISTORY OP FREEMASONRY 


body of brethren should be denied the privilege of associat- 
ing together ; they, therefore, supposed it would be the most 
advisable method of terminating this unpleasant business, 
by giving to these brethren a separate Warrant, and per- 
mitting the other brethren to continue by themselves under 
the one which they now hold ; and they informed the breth- 
ren that this was their opinion, and they would recommend 
it to the Grand Lodge. The brethren, under this idea, 
then requested permission to proceed, in their presence, to 
nominate by ballot those persons whom they should wish (in 
case the Warrant was granted) to preside over them. The 
Committee having assented to the proposition, they proceeded, 
and unanimously nominated Bro. Stafford for Master, Bro. 
Tardy for Senior, and Bro. Renault for Junior, Wardens. 
This is the general outline of the proceedings of your Com- 
mittee, and, upon the whole, they would observe, that they 
have observed in the said brethren, a most perfect willing- 
ness to comply with every request of the Grand Lodge ; and 
as they are by far the greater proportion of the original 
members of Lodge L’Unite Americaine (being nearly seven 
to one), it would be, in the opinion of your Committee, in- 
equitable to bar them the privilege of associating together as 
Masons, because they have objections to a single individual, 
and those objections of a nature that, if well founded, ought 
to dictate to them the line of conduct they now pursue. 

Your Committee, therefore, would seriously recommend to 
the Grand Lodge, to grant to said brethren a Warrant, as 
the best means of terminating the present uneasiness.” 


Whereupon a motion was made and seconded, that a War- 
rant be granted, agreeably to the recommendation of the 
Committee. This motion was amended by one to grant a 
Dispensation for the space of six months, which passed in 
the affirmative. 

It was explicitly ordered that the minutes of Lodge 
L’Unite Am6ricaine, and those of the Lodge to be held 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


103 


under Dispensation, should be kept in the English as well as 
in the French language. 

On June 25, 1798, the Grand Secretary informed the 
Grand Lodge, that Brother P. D. Bidet Renmoulleau had fre- 
quently applied for the papers deposited by the Committee, 
appointed to settle the differences existing between him and 
some of the members of Lodge L’Unite Americaine. The 
Grand Secretary was instructed to retain the papers, and not 
to show them to either of. the parties. 

On the succeeding March 5, the Junior Grand Warden 
delivered to the Grand Lodge the Warrant of Lodge L J Unite 
Americaine, No. 12, which the Master had been ordered 
by the members of said Lodge to surrender to the Grand 
Lodge. 

A LODGE COMMUNICATION IN JAIL. 

A petition was presented to the Grand Lodge, emanating 
from a number of brethren confined in the jail of the city of 
New York for debt, begging permission to congregate on the 
ensuing Festival of St. John the Baptist, and to celebrate the 
day as a Lodge. A Dispensation was ordered to be issued 
for said purpose for that day only, and that the presiding 
officers be named by the Grand officers. 

A Warrant to establish and hold Montgomery Lodge, was 
granted on November 22, 1797, for the town of Rhinebeck, 
Dutchess County, the application having been made by 
Brother Andrew Bartholomew and others. 

THOMAS PAINE. 

The name of Paine Lodge changed to Hiram Lodge . 

On May 10, 1793, the Grand Lodge had issued a War- 
rant to a number of brethren in the town of Washington, 
Dutchess County, to erect and hold a Lodge by the name of 
“ Paine, ” in remembrance of Thomas Paine, so famously 
connected with the American and French Revolutions, who 



104 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


was born in 1737, in England, and came to America in 1774, 
and who in 1776 published the pamphlet “ Common Sense,” 
in which he maintained the cause of the Colonies against the 
mother country. This pamphlet had won for Paine the 
friendship of Washington, Franklin, and other distinguished 
leaders. In 1787, Paine visited France, and thence went to 
England, where, in 1791, he published the “ Eights of Man.” 
On the succeeding year, he was elected to the Deputyship of 
the National Convention in France, and at the trial of Louis 
XYI., he interposed, that the life of the king should be 
spared and that he be sent to America. In 1793, in con- 
sequence of Paine being a foreigner, Kobespierre caused his 
ejectment from the Convention and his being imprisoned. It 
was during his confinement that Thomas Paine wrote his 
renowned pamphlet, “ The Age of Eeason,” against Atheism 
and against Christianity, but in favor of Deism. It was the 
issuing of this work that brought the anathemas of Chris- 
tianity upon him, and caused him to be odious in the sight of 
the Church, and the consequent desire on the part of Paine 
Lodge to have its name changed to Hiram, No. 27. This 
was authorized by the Grand Lodge on December 6, 1797. 
Thomas Paine returned to the United States in 1802, and 
died seven years thereafter. 

This author was so bold and incisive a writer, that every- 
thing that emanated from his pen was caught up with avid- 
ity ; and a posthumous writing of his, 

“ On the Origin of Freemasonry 

was filed in the District Court of the United States in 1810, 
by Margaret B. Bonneville, and is very rare, perhaps because 
of its non-importance. As it is unique, a few pages showing 
the trend of Paine’s mind on the origin of the great Brother- 
hood are herein given. They run thus : 

“It is always understood that Free-Masons have a secret 
which they carefully conceal ; but from everything that can 
be collected from their own accounts of Masonry, their real 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


105 


secret is no other than their origin, which but few of them 
understand ; and those who do, envelope it in mystery. 

In 1730, Samuel Pritchard, member of a constituted lodge 
in England, published a treatise entitled 6 Masonry Dissected ; ’ 
and made oath before the Lord Mayor of London that it was 
a true copy. 

In his work he has given the catechism, or examination in 
question and answer, of the apprentice, the fellow-craft and 
the Master Mason. There was no difficulty in his doing this, 
as it is mere form. 

In his introduction he says, 4 The original institution of 
masonry consisted in the foundation of the liberal arts and 
sciences, but more especially of Geometry ; Lor at the build- 
ing of the Tower of Babel the art and mystery of Masonry 
was first introduced, and from thence handed down by 
Euclid , a worthy and excellent Mathematician of the Egyp- 
tians ; and he communicated it to Hiram , the Master Mason 
concerned in building Solomon’s Temple in Jerusalem.’ 

Beside the absurdity of deriving masonry from the build- 
ing of Babel, where, according to the legend, the confusion 
of languages prevented builders understanding each other, 
and consequently of communicating any knowledge they 
had, there is a glaring contradiction in point of chronology 
in the account given. 

Solomon’s Temple was built and dedicated 1004 years be- 
fore the Christian era ; and Euclid , as may be seen in the 
tables of chronology, lived 277 years before the same era. It 
was therefore impossible that Euclid could communicate any- 
thing to Hiram, since Euclid did not live till 700 years after 
the time of Hiram. 

In 1783 captain George Smith, inspector of the Boyal Ar- 
tillery Academy, at Woolwich, in England, and Provincial 
Grand Master of Masonry for the county of Kent, published 
a treatise entitled 4 The Use and Abuse of Free-Masonry.’ 

In his chapter on the antiquity of masonry, he makes it to 
be coeval with creation, 6 When,’ says he, 1 the sovereign ar- 
chitect raised on masonic principles; the beauteous globe, and 
commanded that master science, Geometry, to lay the plane- 



106 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


tary world, and to regulate by its laws the whole stupendous 
system in just unerring proportion, rolling round the central 
sun.’ 

The learned but unfortunate Doctor Dodd, Grand Chap- 
lain of Masonry, in his oration at the dedication of Free- 
Mason’s Hall, London, traces Masonry through a variety of 
stages. Masons, says he, are well informed from their own 
private and interior records, that the building of Solomon’s 
Temple is an important era, from whence they derive many 
mysteries of their art. ‘ How,’ says he, £ be it remembered 
that this great event took place above 1000 years before the 
Christian era, and consequently more than a century before 
Homer, the first of the Grecian poets, wrote; and above 
five centuries before Pythagoras brought from the East, his 
sublime system of truly Masonic instruction to illuminate our 
western world. 

But remote as this period is, we date not from thence the 
commencement of our art. For though it might owe to the 
wise and glorious King of Israel, some of its many mystic 
forms and hieroglyphic ceremonies, yet certainly the art 
itself is coeval with man, the great subject of it. 

We trace,’ continues he, ‘ its footsteps in the most distant, 
the most remote ages and nations of the world. We find it 
among the first and most celebrated civilizers of the East. 
We deduce it regularly from the first astronomers on the 
plains of Chaldea, to the wise and mystic kings and priests of 
Egypt, the sages of Greece, and the philosophers of Rome.’ 

From these reports and declarations of Masons of the 
highest order in the institution, we see that Masonry, with- 
out publicly declaring so, lays claim to some divine commu- 
nication from the creator in a manner different from, and 
unconnected with, the book which the Christians call the 
Bible ; and the natural result from this is, that Masonry is 
derived from some very ancient religion wholly independent 
of, and unconnected with that book. 

To come then at once to the point, Masonry (as I shall 
shew from the customs, Ceremonies, hieroglyphics and chro- 
nology of Masonry) is derived, and is the remains of, the 



IN THE STATE OP NEW YORK. 


107 


religion of the ancient Druids ; who like the magi of Persia 
and the priests of Heliopolis in Egypt, were Priests of the 
Sun. They paid worship to this great luminary, as the great 
visible agent of a great invisible first cause, whom they 
styled, time without limits. 

In Masonry many of the ceremonies of the Druids are 
preserved in their original state, at least without any parody. 
With them the sun is still the sun ; and his image, in the 
form of the sun, is the great emblematical ornament of 
Masonic Lodges and Masonic dresses. It is the central fig- 
ure on their aprons, and they wear it also pendent on the 
breast in their lodges and in their processions. 

The worship of the sun as the great visible agent of a great 
invisible first cause, time without limits, spread itself over a 
considerable part of Asia and Africa, from thence to Greece 
and Rome, through all ancient Gaul and into Britain and 
Ireland. 

Smith, in his chapter on the Antiquity of Masonry in 
Britain, says, that, { Notwithstanding the obscurity which 
envelopes Masonic history in that country, various circum- 
stances contribute to prove that Free-Masonry was intro- 
duced into Britain about 1030 years before Christ. 5 

It cannot be Masonry in its present state that Smith here 
alludes to. The Druids flourished in Britain at the period he 
speaks of, and it is from them that Masonry is descended., 
Smith has put the child in the place of the parent. 

It sometimes happens as well in writing as in conversation, 
that a person lets slip an expression that serves to unravel 
what he intends to conceal, and this is the case with Smith, 
for in the same chapter he says, ‘ The Druids, when they 
committed anything to writing, used the Greek alphabet, and 
I am bold to assert that the most perfect remains of the 
Druids 5 rites and ceremonies that are to be found existing 
among mankind are preserved in the customs and ceremonies 
of the Masons. My brethren, 5 says he, 1 may be able to trace 
them with greater exactness than I am at liberty to explain 
to the public. 5 

This is a confession from a Master Mason, without intend- 



108 


HISTORY OP FREEMASONRY 


ing it to be so understood by the public, that Masonry is the 
remains of the religion of the Druids, 55 

Thomas Paine volunteered as soon as the War for Inde- 
pendence began, and served as an aide-de-camp to General 
Greene until he laid down the sword for the pen. Ten years 
after Paine 5 s death, on June 8, 1809, William Cobbett exhumed 
the bones and conveyed them to England. Paine’s father 
was a Quaker, but, as the Friends would not permit the body 
to be buried in their cemetery, it was interred on his farm, 
which had been given to him by the State of New York, and 
embraced 277 acres, which was the confiscated estate of Fred- 
erick Devoe, a Tory. The present monument to Paine stands 
on the edge of the highway, about two miles west of New 
Rochelle ; it is not upon the site of his grave, but a few paces 
to the northwest of it, in a corner of a private road. A 
hickory tree grows out of the centre of the original grave. 
The monument is in an enclosure twelve feet square, with four 
trees — a hickory, a maple, and two willows — each sentinelling 
a corner, while a low stone wall with an iron railing in front, 
surrounds the plot. Three sides of the monument, which is 
a solid marble shaft about ten feet high, surmounted with 
an Ionic cornice, are completely covered with extracts from 
“ The Crisis, 55 “ Common Sense, 55 and “ The Age of Reason. 55 
The front of the monument has a medallion profile of Paine, 
with the following inscription : 

“ The world is my country, and to do good my religion.” 
THOMAS PAINE, 

Author of 

COMMON SENSE. 

Bom in England, Jan. 29, 1787. 

Died in New York City, June 8, 1809. 

The palaces of kings are built upon the ruins of the bowers of Paradise. 

— Common Sense. 

Erected by 
Public Contribution 
Nov. 12, 1889. 

Repaired and Rededicated 
May 30, 1881. 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


109 


THE POLITICAL DIFFICULTY WITH FRANCE IN 1797. 

John Adams, the second President of the United States, 
had been a delegate from Massachusetts to the Colonial Con- 
gress, and one of the Committee to draw up the Declaration 
of Independence. He was the first Minister to Great Britain 
from the United States as an independent government. The 
French Revolution was in progress, and a large part of the 
Americans, urged on by the French Minister, were anxious 
that the Government should ally itself with the French 
Republic. The French Directory demanded an alliance, 
ordered its men-of-war to interfere with American commerce, 
and finally dismissed the American Minister from Paris. 
Gerry, Marshall, and Pinckney were sent to Paris to attempt 
a settlement; but the Directory refused to receive them, 
unless a quarter million of dollars were first paid as restitu- 
tion for injuries which they pretended to have received by 
Jay’s treaty with Great Britain. This the ambassadors 
refused, and they, too, were ordered to leave. And so, in 
1798, preparations were made for war with France. The 
army was organized, and a navy fitted out for the protection 
of American commerce. The American, Admiral Truxton, 
attacked and took a French man-of-war with a force vastly 
superior to his own. Before the French Minister, Talleyrand, 
could receive an ambassador, whom he had solicited, to treat 
for peace, Bonaparte had overthrown the Directory and was 
master of France, and peace was declared and signed in Sep- 
tember, 1800. This was at the close of President Adams’s 
administration, and the time when the United States became 
possessed of the Louisiana Territory by the payment of a 
sum of about fourteen millions of dollars. 

As a State, Louisiana was admitted in 1812. 

The above incident shows the relative position held by the 
young Government with the older nations. 

Thomas Jefferson, of Virginia, the well-known author of 
the Declaration of Independence, became the third President 
of the United States in 1801, and in the following year Ohio 
was admitted into the Union. 



110 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


On November 27, 1797, there was presented a petition from 
Brother Andrew Bartholomew and others for a Warrant to 
erect and hold Montgomery Lodge, in the town of Rhine- 
beck, Dutchess County. 

The proxy of Bath Lodge, No. 57, to Brother J. C. Lud- 
low was approved ; also that of Hiram Lodge, No. 27, to 
Brother John F. Roorback, was accepted and filed. 

THE FREEMASON’S MONITOR, 

compiled and arranged by Brother Thomas Smith Webb, 
was issued during the year 1797. 

As this Monitor, for so many years, became the Mason’s 
guide, and as its author became the father of American 
Masonry, it is almost essential that there should be presented 
at least a brief 


SKETCH OF THOMAS SMITH WEBB, 

who was born October 13, 1771, in Boston, Mass., of English 
parents who had lately arrived in that city. Brother Smith’s 
education was obtained in the public schools. He made him- 
self proficient in Latin and French. He was apprenticed to 
a printer, and after serving his time, he took up his residence 
in Keene, N. H. Here he married Miss Martha Hopkins. 
Shortly after Webb moved to Albany, N. Y., and opened a 
book store. In 1801, he moved to Providence, R. I., and 
engaged in the manufacture of wall-paper. In 1816, he 
visited the Western States, returned to Boston from Ohio 
in 1818, but again went West in 1819, and died July 6 of that 
year, suddenly, at Cleveland, 0., presumably of apoplexy. 
The body was buried, on the following day, with Masonic 
honors, but was subsequently disinterred and conveyed to 
Providence, where it was committed to earth, on Novem- 
ber 8, by the Grand Lodge of Rhode Island. A square brick 
tomb was erected over it. 

Thomas Smith Webb was initiated in Rising Sun Lodge 
in Keene, N. H., about 1792. When living at Albany, he 
aided in the establishment of a Royal Arch Chapter and an 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


Ill 


Encampment of Knights Templars. At this time, he com- 
menced his renowned career as a Masonic teacher ; but 
his teachings were those of action, not of profundity of sci- 
ence. His famous American System was arranged after a 
careful and thorough study of the older rituals and systems 
of Europe, more especially those of Dunckerley and Preston 
as to the first three degrees, and he states in the preface of 
his “ Monitor, or Illustrations of Masonry,” that he had 
differently arranged Preston’s distributions of the Sections, 
because they were “ not agreeable to the mode of working 
in America.” 

St. John’s Lodge, of Providence, waited on him after he 
had moved to that city, and invited him “ to become a mem- 
ber of the same,” which he accepted, and in due time, 1813, 
he became Grand Master of Masons of Rhode Island. He 
was the first Junior Grand Warden of the Grand Lodge. 

Brother Webb was chairman of the convention, held Octo- 
ber 24, 1797, that established a Grand Chapter of Royal 
Arch Masons for the Northern States, organized in January, 
1798; hence, the chief cause of separation of the Royal 
Arch from the first three degrees in America. In 1799, the 
Grand Chapter assumed the title, General Grand Chapter. 
In 1816, Webb was elected Deputy General Grand High 
Priest, which he held until his death. He also entered 
actively into the organization of Encampments. He estab- 
lished the Grand Chapters of Ohio and Kentucky. 

The name of Webb will always shed a lustre on the roll of 
distinguished craftsmen, and his name and fame will redound 
to the honor and glory of our great Institution. 

1798. 

At the Grand Communication held March 7, 1798, author- 
ity for Warrants was issued as follows : To 

Samuel A. Barker and others, to erect Adoniram Lodge, 
town of Franklin, Dutchess County. 

James Bill and others, to erect Rensselaer Lodge at Rens- 
selaerville, Albany County. 



112 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


Zenas Pynneo and others, to erect Sharon Felicity Lodge, 
town of Sharon, Schoharie County. 

The application of William Colbreath and others, to estab- 
lish Roman Lodge, town of Rome, Oneida County, was re- 
ferred to the Grand presiding officers. 

JOHN JACOB ASTOR, GRAND TREASURER. 

Grand Treasurer of the Grand Lodge of New York during 
1798-1800, under Grand Master Robert R. Livingston . 

John Jacob Astor, an enterprising merchant, founder of 
the “ American Fur Company,” was born near Heidelberg, in 
Germany, 1763. After spending some years in London, he 
sailed to America in 1783, and soon invested his small capi- 
tal in furs. By economy and industry he so increased his 
means, that after six years he had acquired a fortune of 
$200,000. Although the increasing influence of the English 
fur companies in North America was unfavorable to his 
plans, he now ventured to fit out two expeditions to the 
Oregon Territory — one by land and one by sea — the pur- 
pose of which was to open up a regular commercial inter- 
course with the natives. After many mishaps, his object 
was achieved in 1811, and the fur-trading station of Astoria 
was established. From this period, notwithstanding the war 
of 1812 and other temporary obstacles, Astor’s commercial 
connections extended over the entire globe, and his ships 
were found on every sea. He died in 1848, leaving property 
amounting to $30,000,000. 

ELECTION OF GRAND OFFICERS. MASTER’S, UNION, AND OTHER 

LODGES. 

The election held June 6, 1798, for Grand officers resulted 
as follows : 

Robert R. Livingston, Grand Master, 

De Witt Clinton, Senior Grand Warden, 

Martin Hoffman, Junior Grand Warden, 

John Jacob Astor, Grand Treasurer, 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


113 


Eev. Doctor Beach, Grand Chaplain, 

Eev. John Bisset, Assistant Grand Chaplain, 
Brother Adamson, Grand Pursuivant, 

Brother Benjamin Jones, Grand Tyler. 

At this time Brother Jacob Morton was Deputy Grand 
Master, and John Abrams, Grand Secretary. 

Brother De Witt Clinton reported that he had installed 
the officers of Eensselaer Lodge, JSTo. 68 ; that he had 
received the old Warrant of Master’s Lodge at Albany and 
had given them the new one; but that he was unable to 
induce the members of Union Lodge to surrender their old 
Warrant, and recommended decisive measures. 

Authority was granted to establish a Lodge in the town 
of Union, Tioga County ; to Anthony Stafford and others, 
to hold a Lodge in the city of New York; to John Smith 
and others, to bold a Lodge in the town of Montgomery, 
Orange County. Other petitions for Lodges were received 
and referred or laid over. 

At the election held for officers of American Union Lodge, 
No. 1, of Marietta, O., it was announced that Herman 
Blannerhassett, subsequently the victim of Aaron Burr, 
had been elected Secretary, and was in the discharge of his 
duties. 

A resolution was passed on March 7, 1798, allowing, as a 
perquisite to the Grand Secretary, twenty shillings for each 
Grand Lodge certificate, and in addition, on June 6, a resolu- 
tion was adopted authorizing a salary of two hundred and 
fifty dollars per annum. 

St. John’s Day Festival was duly observed on Monday, 
June 25, 1798. 

In consequence of a fever epidemic prevailing in the' city 
of New York, the Deputy Grand Master acquiesced in the 
request of twelve representatives of Lodges, presented by 
memorial, that the September session be not held. 

Eight petitions for Warrants were considered on December 
5. One, to hold a Lodge at Duanesburgh, Albany County ; 
another, in the town of Cazenovia, Chenango County; 

YOL. II.— 8 



114 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


another, in the town of Charlestown, Montgomery County, 
were granted ; the others were referred to the Grand presid- 
ing officers. 

1799. 

A difficulty having occurred at the St. John’s Day Fes- 
tival, held by Independent Eoyal Arch Lodge, No. 2, whereat 
the Senior Grand Warden was excluded from attendance, 
the subject was considered by the Grand Lodge at Extra 
Communication on January 2, 1799, and it was declared that 
the Lodge had acted improperly in excluding the Senior 
Grand Warden. 

The annual election was held June 5, and resulted in the 
re-election of all the Grand officers, except in the case of 
the Senior Grand Warden, to which Martin Hoffman was 
elected, and of the Junior Grand Warden, to which Abraham 
Skinner was elected. * 

On June 11, the petition of Nathan Whitney and others, 
for a Warrant to erect a Lodge in the town of Paris, Oneida 
County, was granted. 

COMPANIONS OF EDWARD LEE AND THE “HIGHER DEGREES.” 

A brother by the name of Edward Lee having been dis- 
ciplined by his Lodge, which was approved by the Grand 
Lodge, devoted some of his time and attention to what 
was then designated, the higher degrees of Masonry. On 
December 5, 1798, Hiram Lodge, No. 7, to which Edward 
Lee formerly belonged, complained of the conduct of James 
McKay, the Senior Warden, and other members, for asso- 
ciating with Lee in the higher degrees. This complaint 
was ^referred to a Committee by the Grand Lodge, consist- 
ing of Brothers Samuel Jones, Jr., John Wells, and William 
Irving, Jr. The Committee reported, June 11, 1799, making 
a statement of facts concerning the conduct of the said 
Senior Warden and other members of Hiram Lodge. 

In consequence of such report, the following resolutions 
were adopted : 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


115 


“ Resolved , That James McKay, late Senior Warden of 
Hiram Lodge, No. 7, be excluded from all Masonic com- 
munication, and 

Resolved , That John Douglas, Jr., Thomas Waring, John 
West, William Teryatt, Thomas McGery, Daniel William 
McCulloch, now, or late, members of Hiram Lodge, No. 7, 
be suspended from all Masonic communication until the next 
regular meeting of this Grand Lodge, and that the Grand 
Secretary communicate these two resolves to the different 
Lodges in the city of New York.” 

The latter resolution was rescinded on December 4. 

The Grand Lodge thus recognized the Masonic existence 
of organizations known as higher degrees of Masonry, and 
asserted its right to discipline its members for fraternizing 
with those who were without the pale of regularity in a 
symbolic Lodge, in. their commingling with those who were 
inhibited as Master Masons. 

St. John’s Day was duly celebrated at the gardens of 
Brother De la Croix, on invitation. 

The Grand Secretary, John Abrams, having died, the 
Deputy Grand Master appointed, ad interim , Brother Bei- 
nier John Yandenbroeck. This appointment was confirmed 
by the Grand Master. 

GRAND LODGE OF UPPER CANADA. 

A letter, soliciting fraternal intercourse, was received from 
the Grand Lodge of Upper Canada, dated Newark, July 6, 
1799, and a favorable and courteous answer was directed to 
be returned by the Grand Secretary. 

Lodges were authorized to be established as follows : For- 
titude Lodge, in Brooklyn ; Horizontal Lodge, in the town 
of Frederick, Dutchess County. 

The Grand Lodge of Masons of the State of New York 
opened an extra Session, in due form, on December 23, 1799 : 

E. W. Jacob Morton, Deputy Grand Master. 

“ Martin Hoffman, Senior Grand Warden. 



116 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


E. W. Abraham Skinner, Junior Grand Warden. 

“ E. J. Yandenbroeck, Grand Secretary. 

“ John Jacob Astor, Grand Treasurer. 

City Lodges present : 

St. John’s Lodge, No. 1. Hiram Lodge, No. 7. 

Independent Eoyal Arch, “ 2. Holland, “ 8. 

St. Andrews, “ 3. Howard, “ 9. 

St. John’s, “ 6. Phenix, “ 11. 

And the proxies of Lodges Nos. 10, 21, 26, 43, 56, and 57. 
The record of the Grand Lodge sets forth as follows : 

THE DEATH OF BROTHER GEORGE WASHINGTON. 

The Deputy Grand Master announced that the reason of 
convening this extra session of the Grand Lodge was, the 
mournful intelligence of the death of their illustrious and 
much-beloved brother, Geofge Washington, late President of 
the United States, and Commander-in-Chief of its Army and 
Navy, and urged with energy and respectful expression, the 
duties which belong to every Mason on such a painful event, 
and the necessity of this Grand Lodge to take such steps as 
are proper and Masonic, to pay the tribute of respect due 
a brother who, being called to the celestial Lodge above, 
remains enshrined in the heart of the virtuous and wise. 
Whereupon, the following was decreed : 

“ The Grand Lodge, with the deepest and sincerest sorrow, 
announces to the Lodges under its jurisdiction, the death of 
their illustrious and much-beloved brother, George Washing- 
ton, late President of the United States, and Commander- 
in-Chief of its Army. He closed his useful and honorable 
life at Mount Yernon, on the night of the 14th instant, in the 
sixty -eighth year of his age. When, in the dispensations of 
Providence, the great and the good, when those whom we 
love and revere sink into the silent tomb, the afflicted heart 
seeks its solace in rendering to their memories every honora- 
ble tribute which affectionate gratitude can devise. 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORE. 


117 


This is a feeling engrafted in our natures as an incentive to 
honorable ambition, and the expression of the feelings, is a 
duty which the customs of civil society have enjoined ; but in 
decreeing a tribute of respect to our deceased brother, on this 
occasion, there is naught we can devise which will fully evince 
our veneration for his virtues or our sorrow for his loss. To 
decree honor to that illustrious name, upon which glory hath 
already exhausted all her store, to render a tribute of affec- 
tion to his memory, who lived in the hearts of a grateful 
people, are duties which we feel we can never satisfactorily 
perform. That humble tribute which we are unable to pay, 
we decree. 

Resolved , Therefore, that all the Lodges under our jurisdic- 
tion be clothed in mourning for the space of six months, and 
that the brethren also wear mourning for the same period. 

Resolved , That a Committee be appointed to erect, at the 
expense of this Grand Lodge, a monumental memorial to the 
virtues of our illustrious brother, to be placed in the room 
occupied by the Grand Lodge for its sittings ; and that the 
Eight Worshipful Jacob Morton, Deputy Grand Master, the 
Eight Worshipful Martin Hoffman, Senior Grand War- 
den, the Eight Worshipful Eeinier John Yandenbroeck, 
Grand Secretary, and the Worshipful brethren, Cadwalla- 
der D. Colden and Peter Irving, be a Committee for that 
purpose. 

Resolved, That the said Committee have authority to meet 
and concur with such other committees of our fellow-citi- 
zens as shall be appointed, to devise some public testimonials 
of respect and veneration to the memory of our departed 
brother. 

Resolved, That the Grand Secretary be directed to for- 
ward immediately a copy of these resolutions to the several 
Lodges in this State.” 

The action taken by other Grand Lodges was in conso- 
nance with that of JSTew York. 

During this solemn period the following transpired at the 
home of our Government : 



118 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


LETTER FROM THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES. 

“ Gentlemen of the Senate and Gentlemen of the House of 
Representatives . 

The letter herewith transmitted will inform you that it 
has pleased Divine Providence to remove from this life our 
excellent fellow-citizen, George Washington, by the purity 
of his character and a long series of services to his country, 
rendered illustrious through the world. It remains for an 
affectionate and grateful people, in whose hearts he can never 
die, to pay suitable honors to his memory. 

John Adams. 

United States, December 19, 1799.” 

“ Mount Yernon, December 15, 1799. 

Sir : It is with inexpressible grief that I have to announce 
to you the death of the great and good George Washington. 
He died last evening between ten and eleven o’clock, after a 
short illness of about twenty -four hours. His disorder was 
an inflammatory sore throat, which proceeded from a cold, of 
which he made but little complaint on Friday. On Saturday 
morning, about three o’clock, he became ill. Doctor Craik 
attended him in the morning, and Doctor Dick, of Alex- 
andria, and Doctor Brown, of Port Tobacco, were soon after 
called in. Every medical assistance was offered, but with- 
out the desired effect. His last scene corresponded with the 
whole tenor of his life, not a groan nor a complaint escaped 
him in extreme distress. With perfect resignation, and in 
full possession of his reason, he closed his well-spent life. 

I have the honor to be, with the highest respect, sir, your 
most obedient and very humble servant, 

Tobias Lear. 

To the President of the United States.” 

The following is the peroration of the eulogy pronounced 
by Major-General Lee, Member of the House for the State 
of Virginia, at the German Lutheran Church, Washington, 
D. C., December 26, 1799 ; and wherein he makes Brother 
Washington utter these farewell words to his countrymen : 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


119 


“ Cease, sons of America, lamenting our separation : go on, 
and confirm by your wisdom the fruits of our joint councils, 
joint efforts, and common dangers. Reverence religion ; dif- 
fuse knowledge throughout your land ; patronize the arts and 
sciences; let liberty and order be inseparable companions; 
control party spirit, the bane of free government ; observe 
good faith to, and cultivate peace with, all nations ; shut up 
every avenue to foreign influence ; contract rather than 
extend national connexion ; rely on yourselves only ; be 
Americans in thought and deed. Thus will you give immor- 
tality to that union, which was, the constant object of my ter- 
restrial labors. Thus will you preserve undisturbed to the 
latest posterity, the felicity of a people to me most dear ; and 
thus will you supply (if my happiness is now aught to you) 
the only vacancy in the round of pure bliss, high Heaven 
bestows.” 

Mr. Marshall, from the joint committee appointed by the 
Senate and House of Representatives of the United States, to 
prepare and report measures in honor of the memory of 
General George Washington, made a report which was read 
and considered : Whereupon, 

It was unanimously resolved that the House do agree to the 
following resolutions : 

Resolved^ by the Senate and House of Representatives of the 
United States of America in Congress assembled . , 

That it be recommended to the people of the United 
States, to assemble on the twenty-second day of February 
next, in such numbers and manner as may be convenient, 
publicly to testify tbeir grief for the death of General George 
Washington, by suitable eulogies, orations, and discourses, or 
by public prayers. 

And it is further resolved , That the President be requested 
to issue a proclamation, for the purpose of carrying the fore- 
going resolution into effect. 

In compliance with the request of Congress, the Presi- 
dent, John Adams, was desired to entreat Mrs. Washington 



120 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


to permit the interment of the remains of General George 
Washington under a marble monument in the city of Wash- 
ington ; and that the monument be so designed as to com- 
memorate the great events of his military and political life. 
Mr s. Martha Washington returned the following answer, 
which was communicated to the Senate and the House of 
Representatives on January 8, 1800 : \ 


“ Mount Vernon, December 31, 1799. 

Sir : — While I feel, with keenest anguish, the late dispen- 
sation of Divine Providence, I cannot be insensible to the 
mournful tributes of respect and veneration which are paid 
to the memory of my dear deceased husband ; and, as his 
best services and most anxious wishes were always devoted 
to the welfare of his country, to know that they were truly 
appreciated and gratefully remembered affords no inconsid- 
erable consolation. 

Taught, by that example which I have so long had be- 
fore me, never to oppose my private wishes to the public 
will, I must consent to the request made by Congress, which 
you have had the goodness to transmit to me ; and, in doing 
this, I need not, I cannot, say what a sacrifice of individual 
feeling I make to a sense of public duty. 

With grateful acknowledgments and unfeigned thanks 
for the personal respect and evidences of condolence expressed 
by Congress and yourself, I remain, very respectfully, sir, 
your most obedient humble servant, 

Martha Washington . 55 


The Grand Lodge was again convened, December 30, 
when the Senior Grand Warden announced that the extra 
meeting of the Grand Lodge was held for the purpose of 
acquainting the officers of the respective Lodges, of the 
form to be observed in the solemn funeral procession to be 
held in commemoration of our illustrious brother, George 
Washington, in conformity with the resolve of this Grand 
Lodge adopted December 23. 



IN THE STATE OP NEW YORK, 


121 


ORDER OF MASONIC PROCESSION. 

The Knights Templars, in the form as directed by their Pre- 
siding officer. 

The Lodges, under the jurisdiction of the Grand Lodge in 

this city. 

Lodge L’Union Frangaise, No. 17. 

The Tyler with a drawn sword, the handle covered with 
black crape. 

The members, two and two. 

Secretary and Treasurer. 

Past Masters. 

Senior Warden and Junior Warden. 

A Master Mason carrying the Warrant of the Lodge on 
a black cushion. 

Deacon, Master, Deacon. 

The other Lodges in the order above described will pro- 
ceed, viz. : 

2 Phenix, Lodge No. 11 

3 Trinity, “ “ 10 

4 Howard, “ “ 9 

5 Holland, “ “ 8 

6 Hiram, “ “ 7 

7 St. John’s, “ “ 6 

8 St. Andrew’s, “ “ 3 

9 Ind. E. Arch, “ “ 2 

10 St. John’s, “ “ 1 

Three Master Masons walking in a triangle, each carry- 
ing a standard on which is a pendant of white, 
bordered with black, and written thereupon 
the Cardinal Virtues of Masonfy, 

Faith, Charity, Hope. 

The Reverend Chaplain of the Grand Lodge. 

The Worshipful Brother, Cadwallader D. Colden, in mourn- 
ing, holding in his hand a short standard with a 
white pendant trimmed with black, 
on which is written : 



122 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


Brother Washington, j 
The Great , The Wise, The Virtuous, 

Expressing also the figure of an hour-glass run out, 
and a sickle. 

The Grand Tyler, in mourning, carrying a sword, the 
. handle covered with crape. 

The Grand Secretary, in mourning, carrying in his hands an 
urn. To walk under the Dome of a Temple, sup- 
ported by five columns, on an equal 
square. At the circle of 
the Dome is 
written 

Temple of Virtue, Seat of Masonry. 

On the front of the square, 

66 Blessed are the dead who die in the Lord” 

On the one side, 

“ They rest from their labours ” 

On the other side, 

“ Their works follow them.” 

The dome to be carried by four Masons of superior degree. 
The Grand Treasurer in mourning, holding in the one 
hand Incense, in the other Flowers. 

The Past Grand officers. 

The Senior and Junior Wardens. 

The Grand Pursuivant, carrying the Bible, Square 
and Compasses, on a black cushion, sup- 
ported by two Deacons. 

The Grand Master, or his Deputy, supported by two 
Deacons. 

Of which said order of procession a copy was delivered 
to the Master of, every Lodge. 

“ Resolved, That the offer made by the Grand Secretary be 
accepted, to assemble the Masonic Fraternity in the Reformed 
Protestant French Church, in Pine Street, before 10 o’clock 
to-morrow morning, to proceed from there, and to join the 
general procession of the different societies and citizens in 
that order as agreed upon by the Committee of Arrangement, 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


123 


and that the Grand Secretary cause this resolve to be pub- 
lished in three public papers to-morrow morning. 

Resolved^ That the Past Secretary of Independent Royal 
Arch, No. 2, Brother Jonathan Fisk, be the Master of Cere- 
mony, and is to arrange the procession of Masons under 
directions of the Grand Secretary. 55 


George Washington was born in Westmoreland County, 
Va., February 22, 1132, was the son of Augustine Washing- 
ton and his second wife, Mary Ball ; and was a descendant of 
John Washington, who emigrated to Virginia from England, 
about 1657. Augustine Washington died when his second 
son, George, was twelve years old, leaving a large property to 
his widow and five children. His education in local schools 
extended to reading, writing, arithmetic, bookkeeping, and 
land surveying. He was six feet two inches in height, 
athletic, and fond of a military life. He had brown hair, 
blue eyes, large head, and strong arms : a graceful rider. He 
was childless, but had adopted children. His elder brother, 
Lawrence, served under Admiral Vernon in the expedition 
against Carthagina, and named his residence on the Potomac 
Mount Vernon, in honor of his commander. Lawrence died 
and left George his estate at Mount Vernon. At the age of 
nineteen he volunteered in the seven years’ war, at twenty- 
two he commanded a regiment against the French. He was 
the only aide who escaped the ambuscade of July 9, 1755, 
but had four bullets through his coat and two horses shot 
under him. 

A Frenchman attempted to rob the tomb of Washington of ^ 
his remains, to carry them to France. Immediately after 
this attempt, a Mason of Philadelphia obtained permission of 
the family of Washington to build a new tomb, which he 
constructed. Washington’s remains were taken from the 
decayed coffin and deposited in a marble sarcophagus and 
were then placed in their new tomb. A piece of the old 



124 


HISTORY OP FREEMASONRY 


coffin was presented to the Key. Mr* Stewart, incorporated 
into a gavel, and presented to the Grand Lodge of Rhode 
Island. 

As the heart-strings are touched by whatever calls forth 
our recollections of the severed Washington, we do not re- 
frain from mentioning that four clippings of hair from his 
head are known to be in existence, three of which are in the 
possession of the Masonic Fraternity. One is preserved in a 
golden urn by the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts ; another 
was presented to Lodge No. 4, of Richmond, Va. ; a third 
is in the possession of the Grand Lodge of the State of New 
York, in the care of the Grand Secretary, E. M. L. Ehlers ; 
while the fourth is at Washington’s Headquarters, Newburgh 
on the Hudson. This last was the property of Judge Thomp- 
son, of the Supreme Court of the United States. His widow 
presented it to the Poughkeepsie Museum, from which it was 
purchased by Enoch Carter ; it is now the property of the 
city of Newburgh. The clipping is. in a gilt frame, and con- 
sists of about fifty iron-gray hairs. 

VAGARIES OF HISTORY. 

It is somewhat singular, that in the July number, 1834, of 
an English publication — that very excellent “ Free Mason’s 
Quarterly Review” — it should have been declared, that 
George Washington was initiated into Masonry in a Lodge 
in the 46th Regiment of the British Army, during the service 
of that regiment in America ; and that the Bible on which 
his obligation was taken was the property of that Lodge, and 
then (1834) in the possession of a Captain Child, an officer 
of that regiment. The Review proceeds to state, that on 
March 16 of that year the Bible was brought, under a mili- 
tary escort, to the Lodge of Yirtue, in the city of Manches- 
ter, England, as an object of very peculiar interest and vene- 
ration. That thrice the solemn procession of the brethren 
moved in solemn order round the Lodge, the Bible being 
carried by the oldest member of the Lodge. 

This, certainly, was a token of true English feeling in 









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IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


125 


Masonry, and of which all Americans would naturally feel 
honored. But it is hardly necessary to re-state that Wash- 
ington was entered as an apprentice November 4, 1752, a few 
months before he attained his majority of twenty-one years. 
On March 3, 1753, nine days after he was of age, he wa$ 
passed as a Fellow Craft, and on the succeeding August 4 
he was raised to the degree of a Master Mason. This was 
in Fredericksburg Lodge, Virginia. 

General Braddock, under whom Washington was first 
connected with the British Army, did not arrive in Virginia 
until February 20, 1755, at which time he was two years old 
as a Mason ; although it is quite probable that George Wash- 
ington Masonically associated with the Military Lodge in the 
Army of General Braddock. 

Washington’s entrance into Masonry was as truly Ameri- 
can as the whole residue of his noble career. No foreign 
soldiers taught him its sublime principles. They gave him, 
indeed, ample scope to exercise and display those principles, 
in the many provocations of that early campaign, and in the 
long and faithful probation of his character, which their 
bitter and varied hostilities hrought out in the subsequent 
Revolutionary War. But he owed nothing directly to their 
teaching. Of that army under Braddock he says, in a letter 
to his mother, after their defeat : “ The dastardly behavior 
of the regular troops (so-called) exposed all others who were 
inclined to do their duty to, almost certain death, and, at last, 
in despite of all the efforts of the officers to the contrary, 
they ran as sheep pursued by dogs, and it was impossible to 
rally them.” Of his own position in the unfortunate battle 
of that day, he says : “ By the all-powerful dispensations of 
Providence, I have been protected beyond all human proba- 
bility or expectation. I had four bullets through my coat, 
and two horses shot under me, yet escaped unhurt, although 
death was levelling my companions on every side of me.” Of 
him, then but twenty-three years old, the Eev. Samuel Davies, 
afterwards President of Princeton College, said, in a sermon 
delivered on August 17, 1755, but a month after the battle : 
“ As a remarkable instance of patriotic spirit and military 



126 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


ardor, I may point out to the public that heroic youth, Colo- 
nel Washington, whom I cannot but hope Providence has 
hitherto reserved in so signal a manner for some important 
service to his country/’ A prophecy so wonderfully realized, 
and not only to his country, but to the honor, dignity and hap- 
piness of the whole human race. His principles in life were 
evidenced after, as well as before, his death. His will records, 
“ All my debts, of which there are but few, and none of mag- 
nitude, are to be punctually and speedily paid.” “ Upon the 
decease of my wife, it is my will and desire that all the slaves 
whom I hold in my own right shall receive their freedom.” 

The evidence of Masonic thought could not have been more 
beautifully evinced than when leaving his home, to be absent 
with the armies of his country, he instructed his agent : “ Let 
the hospitality of the house, with respect to the poor, be kept 
up. Let no one go hungry away. If any of this kind of 
people should be in want of corn, supply their necessities, 
provided it does not encourage them in idleness. I have no 
objection to your giving my money in charity to the amount 
of forty or fifty pounds a year, when you think it well 
bestowed. What I mean by having no objection is, that it 
is my desire that it should be done. You are to consider 
that neither myself nor wife is now in the way to do these 
good offices.” 


WASHINGTON HOUSE. BROADWAY. 

We are told by Brother Sidney Hayden, the Masonic biog- 
rapher and eulogist of Washington, that on the evening of 
the inauguration, a magnificent transparent painting, brill- 
iantly illuminated, was suspended between the Fort and 
Bowling Green, in front of the Washington House, on the 
center of which was represented “Washington,” as the 
emblem of Fortitude / on his right hand, the Supreme 
Judiciary, by the emblem of Justice ; and on his left, the 
Supreme Legislature, by the emblem of Wisdom . 

In 1656, when the streets of New Amsterdam were named, 
Broadway was called De Heere-straat (principal street), and in 





BROADWAY FROM THE BOWLING GREEN, 1828 . 

WASHINGTON HOUSE, NO. BROADWAY. 





IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


127 


1677 it received its present title. In 1791, that portion north 
of Chambers Street was known as Great George Street, but 
in 1804 that name was dropped. In 1665, it boasted of 
twenty-one buildings, two years thereafter it had sixty-five. 
It was the first street of the city that was lighted at night, 
in conformity with an ordinance passed in 1697, which 
ordered that the inhabitants of “ every seaventh house doe 
every night in the darke time of the moon, until the 25 March 
next, cause a lanthorn and a candle to be hung out on a pole 
every night. The charge to be defrayed in equal proportion 
by the Inhabitants.” 

No. 1 Broadway, built by Captain Kennedy in 1760, for- 
merly known as the Kennedy, and afterwards as the Washing- 
ton House, was occupied at different times during the Revolu- 
tion by Lords Howe and Cornwallis, Sir Henry Clinton, and 
General Washington, and it was in one of its rooms that the 
ill-fated Major Andre received his last instructions. During 
Talleyrand’s exile in this country, in 1793 and 1794, he re- 
sided here for a time. No. 3 was the residence of the traitor 
Benedict Arnold, after his desertion from the Continental 
army and his entrance into English service. No. 11, noted 
as having been the site of the famous tavern of Burgomaster 
Martin Kruger, and as the Kings’ Arms in 1763, was the 
headquarters of General Gage when the Revolution broke 
out. 

New York State was the eleventh in succession that ac- 
cepted the New Articles of Constitution, sent to the several 
States in September, 1787. 

In 1789, Congress selected Philadelphia as the seat of 
government for ten years, and moved there in 1790, hoping 
before the expiration of that time to be able to choose a 
permanent site for a Capital. 

No special matter of Masonic interest is recorded as having 
occurred between President Washington and the Masons of 
New York while he resided in New York as President. 

The places for holding Lodge Communications iu the city 
of New York at this period were : 



128 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


Nos. 66 Liberty, 90 William, 87 Nassau, 2 George, 3 
South, 87 Fair, 31 Ann, corner Water and Oliver, and 51 
Whitehall streets. Washington Chapter, E. A. M., Holland 
and Howard Lodges met at 66 Liberty Street. 

1800. 

Sundry Master Masons having made application for a 
Warrant for a Lodge to be established in New York City by 
the name of Abrams Lodge, on December 30, 1799, and the 
same having been referred to the Grand officers, a report 
was made March 5, 1800, and the Warrant granted. 

A W arrant was also authorized to be granted to a number 
of members of Phenix Lodge to organize as Washington 
Lodge. 

A number of brethren of Howard Lodge, No. 9, made ap- 
plication, on March 25, to be organized as a Lodge, under 
the title of Warren Lodge, inasmuch as their numbers had 
increased beyond the constitutional limits. This application 
was unanimously assented to. 

Asylum Lodge was warranted to be held by sundry breth- 
ren of Coeymans, Albany County ; also a Lodge, to be desig- 
nated as Morton, to be located in the town of Schenectady, 
Albany County ; and also a Lodge, to be known as Hiram, in 
the town of Aurelius, Cayuga County. 

The election held June 4, 1800, resulted in the re-election 
of the Grand officers, except in the case of Grand Chaplain,* 
Abraham Beach, who insisted on retiring, and in whose 
place Eeverend John Ireland was unanimously elected. 

It was at this Communication that Union Lodge, of Al- 
bany, was announced as having accepted a Warrant from the 
State Grand Lodge, and that it had promised to return the 
three Warrants held by jt, relating to its own origin and 
continuance, to the archives. 

Hiram Lodge, No. 72, held at Mount Pleasant, Westchester 
County, having appointed Brother Samuel Clark its proxy, 
the same was approved. 

The subject of 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


129 


A REVISION OF THE CONSTITUTION, 

from the period of the adoption of the old Regulations and 
Constitutions in 1785, had been a matter of debate in the 
sessions of the Grand Lodge. The officers and representa- 
tives seem to have been divided as to the better course to 
pursue : to reprint the Old Charges and Constitutions of 1722 
and 1723, etc., and be solely governed by them, with the sup- 
plement of a few resolutions ; or to revise the Constitutions, 
and adapt them to more modern ideas. 

For earliest references to “ The Old Regulations and Con- 
stitutions, 1 ” see Vol. I., pp. 17-31, also reference thereto in 
Vol. II., of year 1785. 

On March 5, 1800, the Grand Secretary informed the 
Grand Lodge that he could not comply with the request to 
procure twenty-four copies of the Constitutions, although 
due inquiry had been thoroughly made. The Grand Lodge 
refused to order a reprint. 

The work of the Committee on Revision of the Constitu- 
tions and Charges, etc;, then proceeded to a conclusion. 

CONSTmiTIONS, rules, and regulations of the grand lodge 

OF THE STATE OF NEW TORE. 

The Deputy Grand Master, Jacob Morton, on June 16, 
1800, opened the Grand Lodge in Extraordinary Assembly, 
in the presence of Martin Hoffman, Senior Grand Warden ; 
Abraham Skinner, Junior Grand Warden ; R. J. Yanden- 
broeck, Grand Secretary ; John Jacob Astor, Grand Treas- 
urer ; eight Lodges by direct representation ; six Lodges 
by proxies, and the Senior Warden of Master’s Lodge at 
Albany. 

The Deputy Grand Master announced that the purpose of 
the Special Assembly was to receive the report of the Com- 
mittee appointed to revise the Constitution ; and of which 
he was Chairman. 

The report set forth that the “ Code presented in every 
instance adhered to the ancient regulations by which this 
VOL. ii. — 9 



130 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


Grand Lodge had been hitherto governed, excepting in cases 
where inconveniences have been experienced from these reg- 
ulations ; judging that, as this present Constitution was to be 
presented to the Lodges throughout the jurisdiction, it would 
be more likely to meet a ready acceptance when the ancient 
forms which had not been found inconvenient were adhered 
to, than if new systems were proposed concerning the pro- 
priety or utility of which experience could give no informa- 
tion.” 

The proposed form of Constitutions was carefully read, 
and the Grand Lodge, after considerable debate, adopted the 
following form of submitting the matter to the Lodges : 

“ Resolved , unanimously, That the said rules and regula- 
tions be recommended to the adoption of the several Lodges 
of this State, as the Constitution of the Grand Lodge of this 
State, and that the Grand Secretary be directed immediately 
to forward two printed copies of the same to each Lodge 
under the jurisdiction of this Grand Lodge, and that they be 
requested to signify their assent to the same by a resolution 
of their Lodge, to be forwarded to the Grand Lodge, under 
the seal of the Lodge, signed by the Master and counter- 
signed by the Secretary of the same; and, upon its being 
ratified by two-thirds of the several Lodges, that it be con- 
sidered as the Constitution of the Grand Lodge of the State 
of New York, and take effect immediately upon such ratifi- 
cation. 

Resolved, further, That, upon the ratification as aforesaid, 
the Grand Secretary be directed to cause a sufficient number 
of copies to be printed for the use of the Lodges under the 
jurisdiction of this Grand Lodge.” 

On December 3, 1800, the time fixed for the several 
Lodges to make returns of their proceedings in relation to the 
proposed new Constitution submitted to their consideration, 
the Grand Lodge being convened, it was announced that sev- 
enteen Lodges favored the new Constitution, but that the 
same was rejected, in whole or in part, by twenty-five 
Lodges, and the rejection was accordingly announced. 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


131 


It was then ordered, that a competent number of copies 
of the Old Book of Constitutions be printed and distributed 
among the Lodges under the jurisdiction of the Grand Lodge, 
and that the Secretary communicate the same to the several 
Lodges. 

It was further 

“Resobved, That a Committee of three be appointed to 
superintend the printing and publishing as many copies as 
they may conceive necessary, and that the Committee have 
discretionary powers to select and publish, with the Book of 
Constitutions, such of the By-Laws, or Resolutions of the 
Grand Lodge having the operation of By-Laws, as they may 
judge proper.” 

All this was intrusted to Peter Irving, of Howard Lodge ; 
George Clinton, Jr., and John W. Mulligan. 

The Report of this Committee was made on March 4, 1801, 
that they had nearly completed the object of their appoint- 
ment, and that copies would be issued from Brother Long- 
worth’s. 



132 


HISTORY OP FREEMASONRY 


CHAPTER III. 
1801-1810. 


1801. 

The officers of the Grand Lodge at this time were : 

The Hon. Robert R. Livingston, Chancellor of the State, 
Grand Master. 

Jacob Morton, Esquire, Deputy Grand Master. 

Martin Hoffman, Senior Grand Warden. 

Abraham Skinner, Junior Grand Warden. 

Reinier J. Yandenbroeck, Grand Secretary. 

John Jacob Astor, Grand Treasurer. 

Rev. John Ireland, Grand Chaplain. 

Daniel D. Tompkins, Assistant Grand Secretary. 

Samuel B. Malcolm, 

Peter A. Jay, 

Pierre C. Yan Wyck, 

Philip Church, 

R. B. Forbes, 

John F. Ellis, 

John Rodman, 

Nathaniel Paulding, 

George Adamson, Grand Pursuivant. 

Benjamin Jones, Grand Tyler. 


Grand Stewards. 


- Grand Deacons. 



IN THE STATE OP NEW YORK. 133 



The Lodges are arranged according to their seniority ; their numbers should correspond with their stations on the above list. 


134 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


A 

Sfc 

B|8 

S3 

!' 



Date of former War- 
rant surrendered by 
which the seniority 
is determined. 


Date of Warrant. 

May 10, 1793. 
June 6, 1793. 
June 6, 1793. 
June 28, 1793. 
Sept. 3, 1793. 

Oct. 14, 1793. 
Noy. 15, 1793. 
Dec. 21, 1793. 
March 20, 1794. 
April 6, 1794. 
May 16, 1794. 
Aug. 4, 1794, 
March 23, 1795. 
March 30,1795. 
Aug. 14, 1795. 
Aug. 14, 1795. 
Nov. 24, 1795. 
Nov. 25, 1795. 
Dec. 4, 1795. 
March 26, 1796. 
April 12, 1796. 
April 12, 1796. 
May 7, 1796. 

May 11, 1796, 
Juue 19, 1796. 
July 6, 1796. 

Oct. 13, 1796. 
Nov. 4, 1796. 

Nov. 11, 1796. 
Dec. 7, 1796. 

Dec. 29, 1796. 
Jan. 18, 1797. 
March 7, 1797. j 

County. 

Dutchess. 

Washington. 

Albany. 

Tioga, 

Albany. 

Washington. 

Rensselaer. 

Westchester. 

New York. 

Herkimer. 

Saratoga. 

Dutchess, 

New York. 

u tt 

Otsego. 

Albany. 

Montgomery. 

Saratoga. 

Rensselaer, 

Columbia. 

Orange. 

Ulster. 

Westchester. 

Dutchess, 

Rensselaer. 

Alhany. 

Washington. 

Herkimer. 

Albany. 

Washington, 

Herkimer. 

u 

Suffolk. 

Situated. 

City or Town. 

Armenia. 

Kingsbury. 

Freehold, 

Newton. 

Catskill. 

Cambridge. 

Hosick. 

Cortlandt. 

New York. 

Herkimer. 

Ballston. 

Frederickstown. 

New York. 

<( tt 

Cooperstown. 

Schoharie. 

Broadalhin. 

Waterford. 

Pittstown, 

Canaan. 

Goshen. 

Stanford. 

Westchester. 

Beekman. 

Troy. 

Coxsackie, 

Salem. 

Fairfield. 

Albany. 

Granville. 

Steuben. 

Uuadilla. 

Smithtown. 

Title. 

Paine. 

Livingstoh. 

Freehold. 

Union. 

Harmony, 

Rural. 

Federal. 

Cortlandt. 

Howard. 

Amicable. 

Franklin. 

Columbus. 

Trinity, > 

Pheuix. 

Otsego. 

Schoharie Union. 
Montgomeiy. 

Orange, 

Patriot. 

Canaan. 

Orange. 

St. Andrew’s. 
Westchester. 

Beekman. 

Apollo. 

Coxsackie. 

North Star. 

Aurora. 

Temple. 

Liberty. 

Steuben. 

Western Star. 

Suffolk. 


6 

Yi 


IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


135 



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136 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


MASONIC CONSTITUTIONS, Etc. 

CHAPTER i. 

Of the Temper and Qualities requisite in those who would, 
be Free and accepted Masons. 

> 

Before we enter upon the duties of the operative Mason , 
in the various offices and stations to which he may be 
called in the Lodge, it is proper to give some account of the 
temper and qualities , which are absolutely requisite in all 
who aspire to partake of the sublime honors and advantages 
belonging to those who are duly initiated into the mysteries , 
and instructed in the curt of ancient Masonry. 

SECTION I. 

Concerning God and Religion. 

Whoever, from love of knowledge, interest, or curiosity, 
desires to be a Mason , he is to know that, as his foundation 
and great corner-stone, he is to believe firmly in the eternal 
God, and to pay that worship which is due to him, as the 
great Architect and Oovernor of the universe. A Mason is 
also obliged, by his tenure, to observe the moral law, as a true 
Noachida * ; and if he rightly understands the royal art, he 
cannot tread in the irreligious paths of the unhappy libertine , 
the deist, or stupid atheist , nor, in any case, act against the 
great inward light of his own conscience. 

He will likewise shun the gross errors of bigotry and super- 
stition; making a due use of his own reason, according to 
that liberty wherein a Mason is made free. For although, in 
ancient times, the Christian Masons were charged to comply 
with the Christian usages of the countries where they so- 
journed or worked (being found in all nations, and of divers 

* Sons of Noah ; the first name for Free Masons. 






REDUCED FAC SIMILE ENGRAVING FROM GRAND MASTER 
GEORGE PAYNE'S CONSTITUTIONS OF 1723. 

(ALLEGORY.) 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


137 


religions and persuasions) yet it is now thought most expe- 
dient that the brethren in general should only be charged to 
adhere to the essentials of religion in which all men agree ; 
leaving each brother to his own private judgment, as to par- 
ticular modes and forms. Whence it follows, that all Masons 
are to be good men and true — men of honor and honesty, 
by whatever religious names or persuasions distinguished; 
always following that golden precept of “ Doing unto all 
men as (upon a change of conditions) they would that all 
men. should do unto them.” 

Thus, since Masons, by their tenure, must agree in the three 
great articles of Noah, Masonry becomes the centre of union 
among the brethren and the happy means of conciliating, 
and cementing into one body, those who might otherwise 
have remained at a perpetual distance ; thereby strengthen- 
ing and not weakening the divine obligations of religion and 
love / 


SECTION II. 

Concerning Government and the Civil Magistrate. 

Whoever would be a true Mason, is further to know that, 
by the rules of his art, his obligations as a subject and citizen 
will not be relaxed but enforced. He is to be a lover of 
quiet, peaceable and obedient to the civil powers, which yield 
him protection, and are set over him where he resides or 
works; so far as they infringe not the limited bounds of 
reason and religion. Nor can a real craftsman ever be con- 
cerned in plots against the state, or be disrespectful to the 
magistracy ; because the welfare of his country is his peculiar 
care. 

But if any brother, by forgetting for a time the rules of 
his craft, and listening to evil counsels, should unhappily fall 
into a contrary conduct, he is not to be countenanced in his 
crimes or rebellion against the state ; but he forfeits all bene- 
fits of the Lodge, and his fellows would refuse to associate 
or converse with him in private, while he continues in his 
crimes ; that neither offence nor umbrage may be given to 



138 


HISTORY OP FREEMASONRY 


lawful government. But such a person is still considered as 
a Mason, his character as such being indefeasible ; and hopes 
are to be entertained, that the rules of the craft may again 
prevail, with him, over every evil council and device that 
may have led him astray. 

From this quiet and meek temper of true Masons, and their 
constant desire to adorn the countries where they reside with 
all useful arts, crafts and improvements, they have been, 
from the earliest ages, encouraged and protected by the wis- 
est rulers of states and commonwealths, who have likewise 
thought it an honor to have their names enrolled among the 
fraternity. And thus Masonry having always flourished 
most in the most flourishing and peaceable times of every 
country, and having often suffered in a particular manner 
through the calamitous effects of war, bloodshed and devas- 
tation, the craftsmen are therefore the more strongly engaged 
to act agreeable to the rules of their art, in following peace 
and lore, as far as possible, with all men. 

SECTION III. 

Concerning private Qualities and Duties . 

In regard to himself, whoever would be a Mason should 
know how to practise all the private virtues. He should 
avoid all manner of intemperance or excess, which might 
obstruct his performance of the laudable duties of his craft, 
or lead him into crimes which would reflect dishonor upon 
the ancient fraternity. He is to be industrious in his profes- 
sion, and true to the Lord and Master he serves. He is to 
labor justly, and not to eat any man’s bread for nought ; but 
to pay truly for his meat and drink. What leisure his labor 
allows, he is to employ in studying the arts and sciences with 
a diligent mind, that he may the better perform all his duties, 
as aforesaid, to his Creator, his country, his neighbor and 
himself. For, in a few words, — “ To walk humbly in the 
sight of God, to do justice, and to love mercy,” are the true 
indispensable characteristics of a real free and accepted 
Mason . 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


139 


For the better attainment of these shining qualities, he is 
to seek and acquire as far as possible, the virtues of patience, 
meekness, self-denial, forbearance, and the like, which give 
him the command over himself, and enable him to govern 
his own family with affection, dignity and prudence ; at the 
same time checking every disposition injurious to the world, 
and promoting that love and service, which brethren of the 
same Lodge or household owe to each other. Therefore, to 
afford succour to the distressed, to divide our bread with the 
industrious poor, and to put the misguided traveller into the 
way, are qualities inherent in the craft, and suitable to its dig- 
nity. But though a Mason is never to shut his ear unkindly 
to the complaints of any of the human species ; yet when a 
brother is oppressed or suffers, he is in a more peculiar man- 
ner called to open his whole soul in love and compassion 
to him, and to relieve without prejudice, according to his 
capacity. 

It is further necessary that all who would be true Masons 
should learn to abstain from all malice and slander, evil- 
speaking, backbiting, unmannerly, scornful, provoking, re- 
proachful and ungodly language ; and that he should know 
how to obey those who are set over him on account of their 
superior qualifications as Masons , however inferior they may 
be in worldly rank or station. For although Masonry divests 
no man of his temporal honors, or titles, but on the contrary 
highly respects them, yet, in the Lodge , pre-eminence of vir- 
tue and knowledge in the royal art, is considered as the true 
fountain of all nobility, rule and government. 

The last quality and virtue which we shall mention, as 
absolutely requisite in those who would be Masons , is that 
of Secrecy ; which indeed from its importance, ought to have 
held the first place in this chapter, if it had not been intended 
to treat of it, more fully, as a conclusion of the whole. 

So great stress is laid upon this particular quality of vir- 
tue, that it is enforced among Masons under the strongest 
penalties and obligations ; nor, in their esteem, is any man to 
be counted wise , who is void of intellectual strength and 
ability sufficient to cover and conceal such honest secrets as 



140 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


are committed to him, as well as his own more serious affairs. 
Both sacred and profane history teaches us that numerous 
virtuous attempts have failed of their intended scope and 
end, through defect of secret concealment 

The ancient philosophers and wise men (the princes of 
whom were Masons ) were so fully persuaded of the great 
virtue of secrecy, that it was the first lesson which they taught 
their pupils and followers. Thus, in the school of Pythag- 
oras, we find it was a rule that every noviciate was to be 
silent for a time, and refrain from speaking, unless when a 
question was asked ; to the end that the valuable secrets 
which he had to communicate might be the better preserved 
and valued. Lycurgus made a perpetual law, obliging every 
man to keep secret whatever was committed to him, unless 
it were to the injury of the state. And Cato, the Boman 
Censor, told his friends, that of three things (if ever he hap- 
pened to be guilty) he always repented, viz. — 1st. If he di- 
vulged a secret ; 2d. If he went on water, when he might 
stay on dry land ; and 3dly. If he suffered a day to pass 
without doing (or endeavoring to do) some good . We also 
read that the Persian law punished the betraying of a secret 
more grievously than any other crime. 

Nor is the virtue of secrecy recommended only by the 
wisest heathen philosophers and law-givers ; but likewise by 
the fathers of the Church, and by inspired writers and law- 
givers. 

St. Ambrose places the patient gift of silence among the 
principal foundations of virtue ; and the wise king Solomon 
deems the man unworthy to reign or have any rule over 
others,- who cannot command himself, and keep his own 
secrets. A discoverer of secrets he deems infamous and a 
traitor; but him that conceals them he accounts a faithful 
brother. “ A tale-bearer,” says he, “revealeth secrets ; but he 
that is of a i faithful spirit concealeth them. Discover not a 
secret to another, lest he that heareth it put thee to shame, 
and thine infamy turn not away — He that keepeth his 
tongue, keepeth his own soul.” To the same purpose, in the 
book of Ecelesiasticus, (chap, xxvii.) we meet with the follow- 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 141 

ing beautiful passages, worthy to be forever recorded in the 
hearts of all Masons. — 

“Whosoever discovereth secrets , loseth his credit, and 
shall never find a friend to his mind. Love thy friend, and 
be faithful unto him; but if thou bewray eth his secrets, fol- 
low no more after him : For as a man hath destroyed his 
enemy, so hast thou lost the love of thy neighbor : As one 
that letteth a bird go out of his hand, so hast thou let thy 
neighbor go, and shall not get him again. Follow after him 
no more, for he is too far off ; he is as a roe escaped out of a 
snare. As for a wound, it may be bound up; and after 
reviling there may be reconcilement : But he that bewrayeth 
secrets , is without hope” 

Thus far hath been spoken of the internal qualities and 
virtues required in all who aspire to the sublime honor and 
advantage of becoming free and accepted Masons. We speak 
next of the external qualities and the steps to be pursued, in 
order to obtain initiation and admission into a duly war- 
ranted Lodge of ancient York Masons. 

Be it known to you then, in the first place, That no person 
is capable of becoming a member of such a Lodge, unless (in 
addition to the qualities and virtues mentioned above, or at 
least a disposition and capacity to seek and acquire them) he 
is also “free born; of mature and discreet age ; of good 
report ; of sufficient natural endowments, and the senses of 
a man; with an estate, office, trade, occupation, or some 
visible way of acquiring an honest livelihood, and of work- 
ing in his craft, as becomes the members of this ancient and 
most honorable fraternity, who ought not only to earn what 
is sufficient for themselves and families, but likewise some- 
thing to spare for works of charity, and for supporting the 
ancient grandeur and dignity of the royal craft. Every 
person desiring admission must also be upright in body, not 
deformed or dismembered, at the time of making, but of hale 
and entire limbs, as a man ought to be.” 

Thus, you see, a strict (although private and impartial) 
inquiry will be made into your character and ability, before 
you can be admitted into any Lodge ; and by the rules of 



14:2 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


Masonry, no friend, who may wish to propose you, can shew 
you any favor in this respect. But if you have a friend who 
is a Mason, and is every way satisfied in these various points 
and particulars, his duty is described as follows, viz. 

SECTION IY. 

Concerning the proposing new Members in a Lodge. 

C£ Every person desirous of being made a free Mason in 
any Lodge shall be pi'oposed by a member thereof, who shall 
give an account of the candidate’s name, age, quality, /title, 
trade, place of residence, description of his person, and other 
necessary requisites, as mentioned in the foregoing sections. 
And it is generally required that such proposal be also 
seconded by some one or more members, who likewise know 
something of the candidate. Such proposal shall also be 
made in Lodge hours, at least one night before initiation ; in 
order that the brethren may have sufficient time and oppor- 
tunity to make a strict inquiry into the morals, character 
and circumstances of the candidate ; for which purpose, a 
special committee is sometimes appointed.” 

“ The brother who proposes a candidate shall, at the same 
time, deposit such a sum of money for him as the rules or 
bye-laws of the Lodge may require ; which is forfeited to the 
Lodge if the candidate should not attend according to his 
proposal ; but it is to be returned to him if he should not be 
approved or elected. In case he is elected, he is to pay (in 
addition to his deposit) such further sum as the laws of the 
Lodge may require, and clothe the Lodge or make some 
other present, if his circumstances will admit, and the breth- 
ren agree to accept the same for the benefit of the craft, and 
of distressed members.” 

Having shewn that a strict inquiry will be made into your 
character, justice requires, that you should also be advised to 
be alike circumspect on your side, and to make inquiry into 
the character of the Lodge into which you desire admission ; 
for there is no excellence without its opposite, and no true 
coin without counterfeits. 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


143 


In the first place, then, you have a right, before admission, 
to desire your friend to shew* you the warrant or dispensa- 
tion by which the Lodge is held ; which, if genuine, you will 
find to be an instrument printed or written upon parchment, 
and signed by some noble Grand Master , his Deputy, and 
Grand Wardens, and Grand Secretary ; sealed with the 
Grand Lodge Seal : constituting particular persons (therein 
named) as Masters and Wardens , with full power to congre- 
gate and hold a Lodge at such a place, and therein “ make 
and admit Free-Masons, according to the most ancient and 
honorable custom of the royal craft, in all ages and nations, 
throughout the known world, with full power and authority 
to nominate and chuse their successors, &c.” 

You may also request the perusal of the bye-laws, which, 
being short, you may read in the presence of your friend ; or 
he will read to you, and shew you also a list of the members 
of the Lodge ; by all which you will be the better able to 
judge, whether you would chuse to associate with them, and 
submit to be conformable to their rules. Being thus free to 
judge for yourself, you will not be liable to the dangers of 
deception, nor of having your pocket picked by imposters, 
and of being perhaps afterwards laughed at into the bargain ; 
but on the contrary, you will be admitted into a society, 
where you will converse with men of honor and honesty ; be 
exercised in all offices of brotherly love ; and be made ac- 
quainted with mysteries of which it is not lawful to speak 
further , or to reveal out of the Lodge . 


CHAPTER. II. 

Of the General Regulations among ancient York Masons . 

Having in the foregoing chapter treated as briefly as 
possible “ of the temper and qualities required in those who 
wish to become free and accepted Masons,” next will follow 
those general Regulations , old as well as new, which more 
immediately concern operative Masons ; avoiding prolixity, 



14A 


HISTORY OP FREEMASONRY 


and the insertion of such old regulations as are explained or 
supplied by subsequent ones, universally received and now in 
force in all the Lodges. 


SECTION I. 

Concerning a Lodge and its Government . 

1. A Lodge is a place in which Masons meet to work. 
The assembly, or organized body of Masons, is also called a 
Lodge ; just as the word Church is expressive both of the 
congregation of people, and of the place in which they meet 
to worship. 

2. The qualities requisite in those who are to be admitted 
as members of a Lodge have been fully mentioned in the 
foregoing chapter ; and it is only necessary to repeat here in 
general that they are to be “ men of good report, free born, 
of mature age, hale and sound, not deformed or dismembered 
at the time of their making.” 

3. A Lodge ought to assemble for work, at least once in 
each kalendar month ; and must consist of one Master, two 
Wardens, senior and junior, one Secretary, one Treasurer, 
and as many members as the Master and the majority of the 
Lodge shall from time to time think proper ; although more 
than forty or fifty (when they can attend regularly, as the 
wholesome rules of the craft require) are generally found 
inconvenient for working to advantage, and therefore when 
a Lodge comes to be thus numerous, some of the ablest mas- 
ter-workmen, and others under their direction, will obtain 
leave to separate, and apply to the Grand Lodge for a war- 
rant to work by themselves, in order to the further advance- 
ment of the craft, as the laws hereafter to be delivered will 
more particularly shew. But such warrant cannot be granted 
to any number of Masons, nor can a new Lodge he formed, 
unless there be among them three Master Masons , to be 
nominated and installed officers, for governing and instruct- 
ing the brethren of such Lodge, and promoting them in due 
time, according to their merit. 

L When men of eminent quality, learning, rank or wealth, 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 145 

a pply to be made and admitted into the Lodge, they are to 
be accepted with proper respect, after due examination : for 
among such are often found those who afterwards prove 
good lords, or founders of work ; excellent officers and the 
ablest designers, to the great honor and strength of the 
Lodge. From among them also the fraternity can generally 
have some noble, honorable or learned Grand Master, and 
other Grand Officers. But still these brethren are equally 
subject to all the charges and regulations, except in what 
more immediately concerns operative Masons ; and their pre- 
ferment, as well as the preferment of all other Masons, must 
be governed by the general rule ; that is to say, founded upon 
real worth and personal merit, and not upon mere seniority 
or any other particular rank or quality. 

5. In order that due decorum be observed, while the Lodge 
is engaged in what is serious and solemn, and for the preser- 
vation of secrecy and good harmony, a brother well skilled 
in the Master's part, shall be appointed and paid for tyling 
the Lodge door, during the time of communication. 

6. Eveky Lodge shall keep a book containing their bye- 
laws, the names of their members, with a list of all the 
Lodges under the same Grand Lodge, and united in general 
communication , with the usual times and places of meeting 
in such Lodges, and such other necessary parts of their trans- 
actions as ar e proper to he written, 

7. No Lodge shall maJce more than five new brethren at 
one time, unless by dispensation from the Grand Master, or 
Deputy in his absence; nor shall any person be made or 
admitted a member of a Lodge without being proposed one 
Lodge night , before, that due notice may be given to all the 
members to make the necessary inquiries into the candidate’s 
character, and that there may be such unanimity in the elec- 
tion and admission of members as the laws require ; nor can 
there be any dispensation in this case, because unanimity is 
essential to the being of every Lodge, and its own members 
are the best judges in this matter; for if it were allowed 
that any foreign or even superior jurisdiction might im- 
pose a fractious or disagreeable member upon them, it might 

YOL. IL — 10 



146 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


destroy their harmony, and would intrench upon their lib- 
erty^ to the great injury, if not the total dissolution of such 
Lodge. 

8. Evert Lodge has the right to keep itself an entire body , 
and therefore no number of brethren can withdraw or sepa- 
rate themselves from the Lodge in which they were made, or 
were afterwards admitted members , unless such Lodge become 
too numerous for working • nor even then, unless they pay 
all dues to their Lodge, and give them notice that they intend 
to apply to the Grand Lodge for a dispensation to sepa- 
rate ; in which case, if a dispensation is granted, they must 
either join themselves to such other Lodge as shall unani- 
mously consent to receive them ; or they must obtain a war- 
rant from the Grand Lodge to form themselves into a new 
Lodge. And no set of Masons , without such warrcmt , shall 
ever take upon themselves to work together, or form any 
Lodge. 

9. The majority of every particular Lodge, when duly 
congregated, have the privilege of instructing their Masters 
and Wardens for their conduct in the Grand Lodge , and 
quarterly communications ; and all particular Lodges, in the 
same general communication, shall as much as possible, 
observe the same rules and usages, and appoint some of their 
members to visit each other in the different Lodges as often 
as it may be convenient. 

10. The Precedency of Lodges is grounded on the Sen- 
iority of their constitution. 

11. If any Lodge shall cease to meet regularly, for twelve 
months successively, its constitution shall be forfeited, and its 
name erased out of the Grand Lodge Book. 

12. That no Lodge shall make a Mason (except one made 
for the purpose of being a Tyler) for a less sum than Four- 
teen Dollars . 

18. That there shall be no funeral processions of Masons, 
in the city of New-Yorlc, without permission from the Grand 
Master or his Deputy, nor in any other part of the State, 
without such permission, or the permission of a regular con- 
stituted Lodge. 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


147 


SECTION II. 

The emcient Manner of constituting a Lodge. 

A New Lodge, for avoiding many irregularities, should be 
solemnly constituted by the Grand Master , with his Deputy 
and Wardens ; or in the Grand Master’s absence, the Deputy 
acts for his Worship, the senior Grand Warden as Deputy, the 
junior Grand Warden as the senior, and the present Master 
of a Lodge as the junior : Or if the Deputy is also absent, the 
Grand Master may depute either of his Grand Wardens, who 
can appoint others to act, as Grand Wardens, pro tempore? 

The Lodge being opened, and the candidates or new Mas- 
ter and Wardens being yet among their fellows, the Grand 
Master shall ask his Deputy if he has examined them, and 
whether he finds the Master well skilled in the noble science 
and the royal art, and duly instructed in our mysteries, &c. 
The Deputy, answering in the affirmative, shall (by the Grand 
Master’s order) take the candidate from amongst his fellows, 
and present him to the Grand Master, saying, — “ Eight Wor- 
shipful Grand Master, the brethren here desire to be formed 
into a regular Lodge ; and I present my worthy brother A. 
B. to be (installed) their Master, whom I know to be of good 
morals and great skill, true and trusty, and a lover of the 
whole fraternity, wheresoever dispersed over the face of the 
earth.” 

Then the Grand Master, placing the candidate on his left 
hand, and having asked and obtained the unanimous consent 

* When Constitutions are required, and where the distance is so great as . 
to render it impossible for the Grand Officers to attend, the Grand Master, 
or his Deputy, issues a written instrument, under his hand and private seal, 
to some worthy brother (who has been properly installed Master of a Lodge) 
with full power to congregate, install, and constitute the petitioners. 

Ip the Grand Master, or Deputy, be absent, or (through sickness) rendered 
incapable of acting, the Grand Wardens, and Grand Secretary, jointly, may 
issue a like power under their hands and seal of the Grand Lodge ; provided 
the Grand Master has first signed a warrant for holding such new Lodge : 
But the Grand Wardens must never issue any Masonic writings under their 
private seal or seals. 



148 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


of the brethren, shall say {after some other ceremonies and 
expressions) “ I constitute and form these good brethren into 
a new regular Lodge, and appoint you brother A. B. the 
Master of it, not doubting of your capacity and care to pre- 
serve the cement of the Lodge, &c.” 

Upon this the Deputy, or some other brother for him, shall 
rehearse the charge of a Master ; and the Grand Master shall 
ask the candidate, saying, Do you submit to these charges as 
Masters have done in all ages ? And the new Master signi- 
fying his cordial submission thereto, the Grand Master shall, 
by certain significant ceremonies and ancient usages , install 
him, and present him his warrant, the Booh of Constitutions , 
the Lodge Book, and the instruments of his office, one after 
another ; and after each of them the Grand Master, his Dep- 
uty, or some brother for him, shall rehearse the charge that 
is suitable to the thing present. 

Next the members of this new Lodge, bowing all together 
to the Grand Master, shall return his "Worship their thanks, 
according to the custom of Masters , and shall immediately do 
homage to their new Master, and, as faithful craftsmen, sig- 
nify their promise of subjection and obedience to him, by the 
usual congratulations . 

The Deputy and Grand Wardens, and any other brethren 
who are not members of this new Lodge, shall next con- 
gratulate the new Master, and he shall return his becoming 
acknowledgments, as Master Masons , first to the Grand Mas- 
ter and Grand Officers, and to the rest in their order. 

Then the Grand Master orders the new Master to enter 
immediately upon the exercise of his office, and calling forth 
his senior Warden, a fellow craft * {Master Mason) presents 
him to the Grand Master for his Worship’s approbation, and 
to the new Lodge for their consent : upon which the senior 
or junior Grand Warden, or some brother for him, shall re- 
hearse the charge of a Warden, &c. of a private Lodge, and he 
signifying his cordial submission thereto, the new Master shall 
present him singly with the several instruments of his office, 

* They were called fellow-crafts, because the Masons of old times never 
gave any man the title of Master Mason until he had first passed the cha/ir. 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


149 


and, m ancient manner and due form, install him * in his 
proper place. 

In like manner, the new Master shall call forth his junior 
Warden, who shall be a Master Mason, and presented, as 
above, to the junior Grand Warden, or some other brother 
in his stead, and shall in the above manner be installed in his 
proper place ; and the brethren of this new Lodge shall sig- 
nify their obedience to these new Wardens, by the usual con- 
gratulations due to Wardens. 

The Grand Master then gives all the brethren joy of their 
Master and Wardens, &c. and recommends harmony, &c. 
hoping their only contention will be, a laudable emulation of 
cultivating the royal art, and the social virtues. 

Then the Grand Secretary, or some brother for him, by 
the Grand Master’s order, in the name of the Grand Lodge, 
declares and proclaims this new Lodge duly constituted 
No. &c. 

Upon which all the new Lodge together, after the custom 
of Masters , return their hearty and sincere thanks for the 
honor of this constitution. 

The Grand Master also orders the Grand Secretary to 
register this new Lodge in the Grand Lodge Book, and to 
notify the same to the other particular Lodges ; and after 
some other ancient customs and demonstrations of joy and 
satisfaction, he orders the senior Grand Warden to close the 
Lodge. 


SECTION III. 

Concerning the Behavior of Masons, as members of a Lodge . 

1. Of Attendance. 

Evert brother ought to belong to some regular Lodge, and 
should always appear therein properly cloathed, and in clean 
and decent apparel truly subjecting himself to all its bye-laws 
and the general regulations . He must attend all meetings, 

* The Grand Wardens generally install the Wardens at new institutions; 
as being best qualified for transacting such business. 



150 HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 

whether stated or emergent , when duly summoned, unless he 
can offer to the Master and Wardens such plea of necessity 
for his absence as the said laws and regulations may admit. 

By the ancient rules and usages of Masonry (which are 
generally adopted among the bye-laws of every Lodge) no 
plea was judged sufficient to excuse any absentee, unless he 
could satisfy the Lodge that he was sick, lame, in confine- 
ment, upwards of three miles from the place of meeting, 
or detained by some extraordinary and unforeseen necessity. 

2. Of Working. 

All Masons should work faithfully and honestly. All the 
working hours appointed by law, or confirmed by custom, 
are to be strictly observed under the penalties and fines 
hereafter to be laid down. The hours of working are — “ from 
seven o’clock in the evening till ten, between the 25th of 
March and the 25th of September; and from six till nine 
between the 25th of September and the 25th of March.” 

The Master and brethren shall faithfully finish their work, 
whether task or journey ; nor shall they take the work at 
task which has been accustomed to journey. 

None shall envy a brother’s prosperity, nor supplant or 
put him out of his work, if capable of finishing it. 

All Masons shall meekly receive their wages without 
murmuring, nor desert the Master till the work is finished. 
They must avoid all unbecoming modes of expression, and 
call each other brother. They shall instruct the younger 
brethren to become bright and expert workmen. But, as 
free and accepted Masons, they must not allow Cowans to 
work with them ; nor even be themselves employed by Cow- 
ans, without an urgent necessity. And when such necessity 
happens, they shall have a separate communication, and not 
suffer Cowans to learn from them; nor any laborer to be 
employed in the proper work of Free Masons . 

3. Of Behavior in the Lodge while open. 

While the Lodge is open for work, Masons must hold no 
private conversation or committees, without leave from the 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


151 


Master; nor talk of any thing foreign or impertinent to 
the work in hand, nor interrupt the Master or Wardens, or 
any brother addressing himself to the Chair ; nor act ludi- 
crously while the Lodge is engaged in what is serious and 
solemn ; but every brother shall pay due reverence to the 
Master and Wardens, and all his fellows, and put them to 
worship. 

Every brother found guilty of a fault shall stand to 
the award of the Lodge, unless he appeals to the Grand 
Lodge. 

No private piques , or quarrels about nations , families , 
religions or politics , must be brought within the doors of the 
Lodge ; as being directly contrary to the rules already laid 
down — Masons, as such, being there declared to be the oldest 
catholic and universally acknowledged religion, likewise of 
all nations ; bound to live upon the square, level and plumb 
with each other ; following the steps of their predecessors in 
cultivating the peace and harmony of the Lodge without dis- 
tinction of sect or political party . 

4. Of Behavior after the Lodge is closed and before the Brethren depart 

home. 

When* the Lodge is closed, and the labor finished, the 
brethren before they depart home to their rest, may enjoy 
themselves with innocent mirth, enlivened and exalted with 
their own peculiar Songs and sublime pieces of music ; treat- 
ing one another according to ability, but avoiding all excess 
and compulsion, both in eating and drinking ; considering 
each other, in the hours both of labor and festivity, as always 
free . And therefore no brother is to be hindered from going 
home when he pleases; for although, after Lodge hours, 
Masons are as other men, yet if they should fall into excess, 
the blame, though unjustly, may be cast upon the fraternity, 
by the ignorant or the envious world. 



152 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


SECTION IV. 

Concerning the Behavior of Masons , in their private 
Character . 

1. When a number of Brethren happen to meet , without any strangers 
among them , and not in a formed Lodge. 

In such case you are to salute each other in a courteous 
manner, as you are, or may be instructed in the Lodge, call- 
ing each other brother ; and freely communicating hints of 
knowledge, but without disclosing secrets, unless to those 
who have given long proof of their taciturnity and honor ; 
and taking care in all your actions and conversation that 
you are neither overseen or overheard of strangers. In this 
friendly intercourse, no brother shall derogate from the re- 
spect due to another, were he not a Mason. For though all 
Masons as brothers, are upon the level, yet Masonry (as was 
said in a former section) divests no man of the honors due to 
him before, or that may become due after, he was made a 
Mason. On the contrary, it increases his respect, teaching 
us to add to all his other honors, those which as* Masons we 
cheerfully pay to an eminent brother; distinguishing him 
above all his rank and station, and serving him readily 
according to our ability. 

2. When in the presence of Strangers who are not Masons. 

Before those who are not Masons, you must be cautious 
in your words and carriage ; so that the most penetrating 
stranger shall not be able to discover what is not proper 
to be intimated. The impertinent and ensnaring questions, 
or ignorant and idle discourse of those who seek to pry 
into the secrets and mysteries of the craft, must be pru- 
dently answered and managed, or the discourse wisely 
diverted to another subject, as your discretion and duty shall 
direct. 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


153 


8. When at home and in your Neighborhood. 

Masons ought to be moral men, fully qualified as is required 
in the foregoing sections and charges. Consequently they 
should be good husbands, good parents, good sons and good 
neighbors; avoiding all excess injurious to themselves or 
families, and wise as to all affairs, both of their own house- 
hold and of the Lodge, for certain reasons known to them- 
selves. 


4. Of Behavior towards a Foreign Brother or Stranger . 

You are cautiously to examine a stranger or foreign brother 
as prudence and the rules of the craft direct, that you may 
not be imposed upon by a pretender ; and if you discover any 
one to be such, you are to reject him with scorn, taking care 
to give him no hints. But such as are found to be true and 
faithful, you are to respect as brothers, according to what is 
directed above ; relieving them, if in want, to your utmost 
power; or directing them how to find relief, and employing 
them if you can, or else recommending them to employment. 

5. Of Behavior behind a Brother's back as well as before his face. 

Free and accepted Masons have ever been charged to 
avoid all manner of slandering, and back-biting of true and 
faithful brethren, with all malice and unjust resentment, or 
talking disrespectfully of a brother’s person or performance. 
Nor must they suffer others to spread unjust reproaches or 
calumnies against a brother behind his back, nor to injure 
him in his fortune, occupation or character ; but they shall 
defend such a brother, and give him notice of any danger or 
injury wherewith he may be threatened, to enable him to 
escape the same, as far as is consistent with honor , prudence . , 
and the safety of religion , morality , and the state , but no 

FURTHER. 



154 : 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


6. Concerning Differences and Law-Suits, if any such should unhap- 
pily arise among Brethren. 

If a brother do yon injury, or if you have any difference 
with him about any worldly or temporal business or interest, 
apply first to your own or his Lodge , to have the matter in 
dispute adjusted by the brethren. And if either party be not 
satisfied with the determination of the Lodge, an appeal may 
be carried to the Grand Lodge ; and you are never to enter 
into a law-suit , till the matter cannot be decided as above. 
And if it be a matter that wholly concerns Masonry , law- 
suits are to be entirely avoided, and the good advice of pru- 
dent brethren is to be followed, as they are the best referees 
of such differences. 

But where references are either impractical or unsuccess- 
ful, and courts of law or equity must at last decide, you must 
still follow the general rules of Masonry already laid down, 
avoiding all wrath, malice, rancour, and personal ill-will, in 
carrying on the suit with a brother ; neither saying or doing 
any thing to prevent the continuance or renewal of that 
brotherly love and friendship which are the glory and cement 
of this ancient fraternity. 

Thus shall we shew to all the world the benign influences 
of Masonry , as wise, true and faithful brethren, before us, 
have done from the beginning of time ; and as all who shall 
follow us, and would be thought worthy of that name, will 
do till architecture shall be dissolved with the great fabric of 
the world, in the last general conflagration ! 

These charges and such others as shall be given to you, 
in a way that cannot be written, you are strictly and conscien- 
tiously to observe ; and that they may be the better observed, 
they should be read or made known to new brethren at their 
making- ; and at other times as the Master shall direct. 


AMEN! SO MOTE IT BE! 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


155 


SECTION V. 

Of the Master of a Lodge , his Election , Office , and Duty . 

No brother can be Master of a Lodge till he has first served 
the office of a Warden somewhere ; unless in extraordinary 
cases, or when a new Lodge is to be formed, and no past or 
former Warden is to be found amongst the members. In 
such cases, three Master Masons, although they have served 
in no former offices (if they be well learned) may be consti- 
tuted Master and Wardens of such new Lodge or of any old 
Lodge in the like emergency. 

The Master of every Lodge shall be annually chosen, by 
ballot on the stated Lodge night, next before the Festival of 
Saint John the Evangelist . Each free member hath one vote, 
and the Master two votes, where the number of votes hap- 
pens to be equal ; otherwise he has but one vote. 

When the ballot is closed, the former Master shall then 
carefully examine the ballots, and audibly declare him that 
hath the majority of votes duly elected. 

The Master-elect shall then nominate one for the senior 
Warden’s chair, and the present Master and brethren shall 
nominate one in opposition ; and in case of such nomination, 
both of them shall withdraw till the ballot is closed as afore- 
said ; after which they shall be called before the Master, and 
the ballots shall be examined and declared by him as above 
directed ; and in like manner shall the Lodge proceed in the 
choice of all the inferior officers; great care being taken 
that none be put in nomination, for favor or affection, birth 
or fortune, exclusive of the consideration of real merit, and 
ability to fill his office, for the honor and advancement of 
Masonry. No Mason chosen into any office can refuse to 
serve, without incurring the penalties laid down in the chap- 
ter of fines, unless he has served in the same office before. 
The Master of every regular Lodge, thus duly elected and 
installed, has it in special charge , (as appurtenant to his office, 
duty and dignity) to see that all the bye-laws of his Lodge, 
as well as the general regulations from the Grand Lodge, be 



156 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


duly observed ; that his Wardens discharge their office faith- 
fully, and be examples of diligence and sobriety to the craft ; 
that true and exact minutes and entries of all proceedings be 
made and kept by the Secretary ; that the Treasurer keep and 
render exact and just accounts of the stated times, according 
to the bye-laws and orders of the Lodge ; and in general, 
that all the goods and monies belonging to the body be truly 
managed and dispensed, according to the vote and direction 
of the majority. 

The Master shall further take care that no apprentice or 
fellow craft be taken into his house or Lodge, unless he has 
sufficient employment for him, and finds him to be duly qual- 
ified, according to the rules before laid down, for learning 
and understanding the sublime mysteries of the art Thus 
shall such Apprentices , when expert in the business of their 
apprenticeship, be admitted, upon further improvement, as 
Fellow-crafts ; and, in due time, be raised to the svhlime 
degree of Master-Masons • animated with the prospect of 
passing in future through all the higher honors of Masonry, 
viz. those of Wardens and Masters, of their Lodges, and per- 
haps at length of Grand Wardens and Grand Masters of 
all the Lodges, according to their merit. 

The Master of a particular Lodge has the right and author- 
ity of calling his lodge , or congregating the members into a 
chapter, at pleasure, upon the application of any of the breth- 
ren, and upon any emergency and occurrence which in his 
judgment may require their meeting ; and he is to fill the 
Chair when present. It is likewise his duty, together with 
his Wardens, tp attend the Grand Lodge, at the quarterly 
communications, and also the Steward’s Lodge, and such 
occasional or special grand communications as the good of 
the craft may require, when duly summoned by the Grand 
Secretary, and within such reasonable distance of the place 
of holding the Grand Lodge, as the laws of the same may 
have ascertained on that head. When in the Grand or 
Steward’s Lodge, and at general as well as special communi- 
cations, the Master or Warden, or either of them, have full 
power and authority to represent their Lodge, and to trans- 



IN THE STATE OP NEW YORK. 


157 


act all matters relative thereto, as well and truly as if the 
whole body were there present. 

The Master has the right of appointing some brother, who 
is most commonly the Secretary of the Lodge, to keep the 
book of bye-laws, and other laws given to the Lodge, by 
the proper authority ; and in this book shall also be kept the 
names of all the members of the Lodge, and a list of all 
the Lodges within the same grand communication, with the 
usual times and places of their meeting. 

That no Lodge be removed without the Master’s knowl- 
edge, nor any motion be made for that purpose in the Lodge 
when he is absent. But if the Master be present, and a mo- 
tion be made for moving the Lodge to some other more con- 
venient place (within the district assigned in the warrant of 
such Lodge) and if the said motion be seconded, the Master 
shall order summonses to the members of the Lodge, specify- 
ing the business, and appointing a day for hearing and deter- 
mining the affair, at least ten days before, and the determi- 
nation shall be made by the majority. But if the Master is 
not of the majority, the Lodge shall not be removed, unless, 
full two-thirds of the members present have voted for such 
removal. 

But if the Master refuse to direct such summons to be 
issued, upon a motion duly made as aforesaid, then either of 
the Wardens may direct the same, and if the Master neglect 
to attend on the day fixed, the Warden may preside in deter- 
mining the affair in the manner above prescribed. But the 
Lodge shall not, in the Master’s absence, on such special call, 
enter upon any other cause or business, but what is particu- 
larly mentioned in the said summons. 

If the Lodge is thus regularly ordered to be removed, the 
Master or Warden shall send notice to the Grand Secretary, 
that such removal may be notified and duly entered in the 
Grand Lodge books at the next Grand Lodge. 

N. B . It is also a good method to have a certificate from 
the Grand Lodge, that such removal hath been allowed, con- 
firmed, and duly registered in their books ; which will be a 
business of course, unless an appeal be lodged against such 



158 


HISTORY OP FREEMASONRY 


removal by the minority, and then a hearing will be given 
to both parties in the Grand Lodge, before such removal be 
confirmed or registered in their books. 

SECTION VI. 

Of the Wardens of a Lodge. 

1. None but Master-Masons can be Wardens of a Lodge. 
The manner of their election, and several of their duties, 
being connected with the election and duties of the Master, 
have been mentioned in the former section. 

2. The Senior Warden succeeds to all the duties of the 
Master, and fills the Chair when he is absent. Or if the 
Master goes abroad on business, resigns, demits, or is de- 
posed, the Senior Warden shall forthwith fill his place till 
the next stated time of election. And although it was for- 
merly held, that in such cases the Master’s authority ought 
to revert to the last past Master who is present, yet it is now 
the settled rule that the authority devolves upon the Senior 
Warden, and in his absence, upon the Junior Warden, even 
although a former Master be present. But the Wardens 
will generally waive this privilege in honor of any past Mas- 
ter that may be, present, and will call on him to take the 
Chair, upon the presumption of his experience and skill in 
conducting the business of the Lodge. Nevertheless such 
past Master still derives his authority under the Senior War- 
den, and cannot act until he congregates the Lodge. If 
none of the officers be present, nor any former Master to 
take the Chair, the members according to seniority and merit 
shall fill the places of the absent officers. 

The business of the Wardens in the Lodge is, generally, to 
assist the Master in conducting the business thereof, and 
managing the craft, in due order and form, when the Master 
is present ; and in doing his duties, as above set forth, when 
he is necessarily absent, all which is to be learned from the 
foregoing section. Particular Lodges do likewise, by their 
bye-laws , assign particular duties to the Wardens for their 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


159 


own better government ; which such Lodges have a right to 
do, provided they transgress not the old land-marks , nor in 
any degree violate the true genius and spirit of Masonry . 

SECTION VII. 

Of the Secretary of a Lodge . 

The Secretary shall keep a regular register or record of all 
transactions and proceedings of the Lodge, that are fit to be 
committed to writing ; which shall be faithfully entered in 
the Lodge-books, from the minutes taken in open Lodge, 
after being duly read, amended, if necessary, and approved 
of, before the close of every meeting ; in order that the said 
transactions, or authentic copies thereof, may be laid before 
the Grand Lodge, once in every quarter, if required. 

In particular, the Secretary shall keep exact lists of all the 
members of the Lodge, with the times of admission of all 
new members ; and annually, on or before the first Wednes- 
day in June , shall prepare, and send to the Secretary of the 
Grand Lodge , the list of members for the time being, which 
shall be signed not only by the new installed officers of each 
Lodge, but also by the last past officers ; to the intent that 
the Grand Secretary, and consequently the members of the 
Grand Lodge, may be at all times enabled to know the names 
and number of members in each Lodge under their jurisdic- 
tion, with the hand-writing of the different officers ; and to 
pay all due respect to the brethren recommended or certified 
by them from time to time. 

SECTION VIII. 

Of the Treasurer of a Lodge . 

The Treasurer is to receive and keep exact accounts of all 
monies raised, or paid in according to rule, for the advance- 
ment of the Lodge and benefit of the brethren ; and to pay 
all orders duly drawn upon him by the authority of the 
Lodge. lie is to keep regular entries both of his receipts 



160 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


and disbursements; and to have his books and vouchers 
always ready for examination at such stated times as the 
bye-laws require, or when specially called upon by order of 
the Master and brethren. 

The Treasurer is likewise to have the charge and custody 
of the chest, jewels and furniture of the Lodge ; unless when 
the Master and majority may judge it more convenient to 
appoint some other responsible brother for that particular 
duty ; or when the officers of the Lodge may take the charge 
immediately upon themselves. The warrant in particular is 
in the charge and custody of the Master. 

SECTION IX. 

Of the Tyler of a Lodge . 

The Tyler shall be a Master Mason , of knowledge and 
experience ; and generally a brother is to be preferred, to 
whom the fees of the office may be necessary and serviceable, 
on account of his particular circumstances. 

His duty is fixed by custom and known to every brother ; 
and his chief charge is, not to admit any person (not even a 
member, while the Lodge is sitting) without the knowledge 
and consent of the presiding officer ; neither shall he admit 
any visitor, that is not a member of a warranted Lodge, a 
second time, sojourners producing certificates excepted. 


CHAPTER III. 

SECTION I. 

Of the Grand Lodge in general . 

The Grand Lodge consists of, and is formed by, the 
Masters and Wardens of all the regular particular Lodges 
upon record, with the Grand Master at their head, the 
Deputy Grand Master on his left, and the Grand Wardens 
in their proper places; attended also by the Grand Sec- 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


161 


retary, Grand Treasurer, Grand Tyler, Grand Pursuivant, 
and other necessary officers, as will be explained in the 
proper places. But though the Master and Wardens of all 
Lodges on record have seats and a voice in every Grand 
Lodger-General, yet particular Grand Lodges are composed 
properly of the officers of the different regular Lodges under 
the same distinct Grand Jurisdiction ; and to form such 
Grand Lodge, there must be present, on due and legal notice, 
no less than the Masters and Wardens of Jive regular Lodges, 
together with one at least (and where possible or convenient, 
all) of the Grand officers at their head. 

No new Lodge is owned, nor can their officers be admitted 
into the Grand Lodge, until such new Lodge is first regularly 
constituted by the authority of the Grand Lodge, and regis- 
tered in the same. 

All past Grand Masters, past Deputy Grand Masters, past 
Grand Wardens, and past Masters of warranted Lodges on 
record, whilst they continue members of any regular Lodge, 
are likewise, by courtesy, as well as by custom, considered 
as members of, and admitted to vote in all Grand Lodges. 
By courtesy also, past Grand Secretaries, and Grand Treas- 
urers, have the same privilege of sitting in all Grand 
Lodges, and voting in such matters, as, by the rules of the 
Grand Lodge, they might or could have voted in, while in 
office. 

No Master, Warden, or other member of the Grand Lodge 
shall ever attend the same, without the jewels which he ought 
to wear in his own particular Lodge, except for some good 
and sufficient reason to be allowed of in the Grand Lodge. 
And when the officer of any particular Lodge, from such 
urgent business or necessity as may regularly plead his 
excuse, cannot personally attend the Grand Lodge, he may 
nominate and send a brother of his Lodge, with his jewel and 
cloathing, to supply his room, and support the honor of his 
Lodge in the Grand Lodge, provided such brother hath here- 
tofore been in the same office with the brother who deputes 
him, or in some higher office. And, that if a single brother 
is deputed to represent all the officers of any particular 
von ii.— 11 



162 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


Lodge, and consequently such Lodge itself, in the Grand 
Lodge, he ought not to be under the rank of a past Master, 
or one who hath otherwise duly passed the Chair in some 
regular Lodge. 

A Brother of eminence, and of the rank of Master, hav- 
ing business, or whose attendance is necessary in any point 
of evidence or intelligence, may be admitted into the Grand 
Lodge upon motion, or leave asked and given ; but such 
brother thus admitted shall have no vote, nor be allowed to 
speak to any question, without leave, or unless desired to 
give his opinion. 

The Grand Lodge must meet four times a year statedly, 
for quarterly communications, and shall also have occasional 
meetings, and adjournments monthly or otherwise, as busi- 
ness may require ; and such meetings shall be held in the 
Grand Lodge room only, unless for some particular reason 
the Grand Master should think fit to appoint some other 
place of special meeting. 

All matters in the Grand Lodge are determined by a 
majority of votes, each member having one vote, and the 
Grand Master two votes, unless the Grand Lodge leave any 
particular thing to the determination of the Grand Master, 
for the sake of expedition. 

The main business of the Grand Lodge, whether of quar- 
terly communications or other meetings, is seriously to dis- 
course of, and sedately to consider, transact and settle all 
matters that concern the prosperity of the craft and the fra- 
ternity in general, or private Lodges and single brethren in 
particular. Here, therefore, all differences that cannot be 
made up and accommodated privately, nor by a particular 
Lodge, are to be seriously considered and decided. And if 
any brother thinks himself aggrieved by such decision, he 
may, by lodging an appeal in writing with the Grand Secre- 
tary, have the matter re-heard, and finally determined upon 
at the next ensuing quarterly communication, provided it be 
not the annual Grand Lodge, or either of the Festivals of 
St John ; on which, by the new and wise regulations, it is 
agreed and ordered that no petitions or appeals shall be 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


163 


heard, nor any business transacted, that tends to interrupt 
the harmony of the assembly, but all shall be referred to the 
next Grand Lodge, or Stewards’ Lodge. And in general, 
whatever business cannot be transacted or finished at any 
one meeting of the Grand Lodge, may be either adjourned to 
the next meeting ctf the same, or, in the meanwhile, referred 
to a proper committee, to be by them maturely heard, con- 
sidered and reported upon to the said next meeting. 

It is the prerogative of the Grand Lodge, and the Eight 
Worshipful Grand Master has full power and authority, 
(when the Grand Lodge is duly assembled) to make or cause 
to be made in his Worship’s presence, free and accepted Ma- 
sons at sight , and such making is good ; but they cannot be 
made out of his Worship’s presence, without his written dis- 
pensation for that purpose; nor is any warranted Lodge 
obliged to receive any of the persons so made as members, 
except by vote, and with the full consent of the body of such 
Lodge. But the Eight Worshipful Grand Master, with the 
authority of the Grand Lodge, may grant them a warrant, 
and form them into a new Lodge. 

The officers of all private Lodges, under the jurisdiction of 
the Grand Lodge, shall at every quarterly communication, 
(except the country Lodges, which shall annually on or before 
the festival of St. John the Baptist) deliver an exact list of 
such members as have been made, or even admitted by them, 
since the last preceding communication ; and books shall be 
kept in the Grand Lodge, by some able brother to be ap- 
pointed Grand Secretary , in which the said lists and returns 
shall be duly recorded, together with all the Lodges in com- 
munication, the usual times and places of their forming, and 
the names of all their members. In the said books are also 
to be registered, all the proceedings and other affairs of the 
Grand Lodge, which are proper to be written. 

The Grand Lodge shall likewise consider of the most pru- 
dent and effectual means of collecting and managing what 
money may accrue to the general charity fund, agreeable to 
the rules hereinafter inserted for that purpose. And for the 
better conducting of this business, they must have a treasurer, 



164 : 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


whose duty and privileges, as a member of the Grand Lodge, 
will be laid down under the head of Grand Treasurer. 

SECTION II. 

Of the Election of the Grand Master. 

The Grand Lodge must meet in some convenient place, in 
order to elect new or re-appoint the old officers, and such 
election or re-appointment shall be held or made on the first 
Wednesday in June, in order that the Grand Lodge may be 
completely organized, and duly prepared for the celebration 
of the annual feast, and other important business of the 
season. 

But although it is the inherent right of the Grand Lodge 
to chuse a new Grand Master, as well as his deputy and other 
Grand Officers yearly by ballot, if a majority of the Grand 
Lodge should so require, yet such has been the harmony of 
all Grand Lodges, as far back as can be remembered, a few 
instances only excepted, that the general usage for the re- 
appointment or new election of a Grand Master and other 
Grand Officers, is as follows, viz. 

Application is to be made to the present Grand Master 
by his Deputy, or, if he neglects it, by some other brother 
appointed by the Grand Lodge, at least one month before 
Saint John the Baptist’s day, in order to know whether it 
will be convenient for his Worship to favor or honor the/^ra- 
temity with his services and continuance in office for another 
year. If he consents to continue, then one of the Grand 
Lodge, deputed for that purpose, shall represent to the breth- 
ren his Worship’s good government and other valuable qual- 
ities ; and, in the name of the Grand Lodge, shall humbly 
request the favor or honor of his continuance in office 
another year. If he accepts of this nomination and re- 
appointment in such address to the Lodge as he may think 
suitable and proper, the Grand Secretary shall thrice pro- 
claim him aloud 


Grand Master of Masons. 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


165 


All the members of the Grand Lodge shall then salute 
him in due form (if present) according to the ancient and 
laudable custom of Masons . 

But if on such application (to be made as aforesaid, one 
month at least before St John the Baptists day) the present 
Grand Master, should declare it inconvenient for him to con- 
tinue another year in office, his advice and recommendation 
are then to be requested concerning some able and fit brother 
as his successor, who on the day of election is to be proposed 
to the Grand Lodge, with any other brother or brethren who 
may be put in nomination by two or more members. And 
the election shall be made either by holding up of hands or 
by ballot , as may be agreed by the majority on motion made 
and seconded for that purpose ; provided always, that the 
brother recommended by the Grand Master in office, as his 
successor, be the first voted for, either by holding up of hands 
or by ballot, and if he is not chosen, the other candidates in 
the order they were proposed, till one has the majority of 
voices or ballots. When the election is thus made, he is to 
be proclaimed installed and saluted as above set forth, if 
present ; but if not present, a day is to be appointed for this 
ceremony, which is a most noble and grand one, but not to be 
described in writing, nor ever to be known by any but true 
Master Masons . The ceremony of installing the new Grand 
Master is to be conducted by the last Grand Master, but he 
may nevertheless order any brother well skilled in the cere- 
mony to assist him, or to act as his Deputy on the occasion. 

If the present Grand Master should be at a distance from 
the Grand Lodge at the time proposed for requesting his con- 
tinuance in office, or his recommendation of a successor ; or if 
the successor he may recommend should be at a distance, the 
Grand Secretary shall in behalf of the Lodge, write to one or 
both of them as the case may require, in order to be informed 
of their intentions, should the choice or appointment of Grand 
Master fall upon them ; and copies of such letters, as well as 
of the answers, shall be inserted in the Grand Lodge books. 

In case the new Grand Master, when nominated or chosen 
as above, cannot attend at the time appointed for his install- 



166 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


merit, he may be installed by proxy, on signifying his accept- 
ance of the office ; but such proxy must be either the last or 
a former Grand Master, or else a very reputable past Master. 

SECTION III. 

Of the Election or Appointment of the Deputy Grand 
Master. 

The last Grand Master thus continued, or a new Grand 
Master thus appointed and installed, it hath always been 
considered as his inherent right to nominate and appoint the 
Deputy Grand Master , either the last or a new one ; because, 
as the Grand Master is generally a brother of the first emi- 
nence, and cannot be supposed able to give his attendance on 
every emergency, it hath been always judged necessary not 
only to allow him a Deputy, but that such Deputy should be 
a person in whom he can perfectly confide, and with whom 
he can have full harmony ; for which reason it is proper that 
the Grand Master should have the nomination of his Dep- 
uty ; although, as aforesaid, cases may arise when the Grand 
Lodge may exercise the right of rejecting the Grand Mas- 
ter’s nomination, and of choosing for themselves ; of which 
cases (although they seldom happen) a majority of the Lodge 
can only be judges. The Deputy Grand Master being thus 
continued, or a new one appointed or chosen as above, he 
shall be proclaimed, saluted, and congratulated in due form 
on his first appearance in the Lodge ; for neither the Deputy 
nor Grand Wardens can be allowed to appear by proxy, this 
being the sole prerogative of the Grand Master. 

SECTION IY. 

Of the Election of Grand Wardens. 

The Grand Lodge has the right of electing the Grand 
Wardens, , and any member has a right to propose one or both 
the Candidates, either the old Wardens, or new ones; and 
the two persons who have the majority of votes or ballots, 
still preserving due harmony, are declared duly elected. 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


167 


SECTION Y. 

Of the Nomination , Appointment , Office of the Grand 

Secretary. 

The office of Grand Secretary hath become of very great 
importance in the Grand Lodge, from the multiplicity of 
matters committed to his care, and from the abilities and 
learning requisite in the management of them. All the trans- 
actions of the Lodge are to be drawn into form and duly 
recorded by him. All petitions, applications and appeals are 
to pass through his hands. No warrant, certificate or instru- 
ment of writing from the Grand Lodge is authentic without 
his attestation and signature, and his affixing the Grand Seal 
as the laws require. The general correspondence with Lodges 
and brethren over the whole world, is to be managed by him 
agreeably to the voice of the Grand Lodge, and directions of 
the Grand Master or his Deputy ; whom he must, therefore, 
be always ready to attend, with his Assistants or Clerks, and 
the books of the Lodge, in order to give all necessary infor- 
mation concerning the general state of matters, and what is 
proper to be done upon any emergency. 

For these reasons, at every annual election or appointment 
of Grand Officers, the nomination or appointment of the 
Grand Secretary is considered as the inherent right of the 
Grand Master, being properly his Amanuensis, and an officer 
as necessary to him as his Deputy. It is therefore held, under 
the old regulations, which yet stand unrepealed, that if the 
Grand Lodge should disapprove either of the Deputy Grand 
Master, or Grand Secretary, they cannot disannul their ap- 
pointment without choosing a new Grand Master, by which 
all his appointments will be rendered void. But this is a case 
which hath but very seldom happened, and which all true 
Masons hope there never will be any occasion to make a 
provision against. 

The Grand Secretary, by virtue of his office, is a member 
of the Grand Lodge, and hath the right of appointing his 
own Assistant or Clerk. But such Assistant or Clerk must 



168 


HISTORY OP FREEMASONRY 


be a Master Mason, and shall not be a member of the Grand 
Lodge by virtue of his appointment, nor speak without being 
permitted, unless he hath otherwise a right, by having passed 
the Chair in the Grand or some regular private Lodge. 

SECTION VL 

Of the Election and Office of Grand Treasurer. 

The Grand Treasurer is elected by the body of the Grand 
Lodge, in the same manner as the Grand Wardens ; he being 
considered an officer peculiarly responsible to all the mem- 
bers in due form assembled, as having the charge of their 
common stock and property. For to him is committed the 
care of all money raised for the general charity and other 
uses of the Grand Lodge ; an account of which he is regu- 
larly to enter into a book, with the respective uses for which 
the several sums are intended. He is likewise to pay out, 
expend or disburse the same upon such orders, signed, as the 
rules of the Grand Lodge in this respect shall allow to be 
valid. 

The Grand Treasurer, by virtue of his office, is a member 
of the Grand Lodge. He hath a right to appoint an Assist- 
ant or Clerk, who must be a Master Mason, but shall have 
no vote, nor be a member of the Grand Lodge, nor speak 
without being permitted, unless otherwise entitled to a seat 
or vote. 

The Grand Treasurer, or his Assistant or Clerk, shall 
always be present in the Lodge, and ready to attend the 
Grand Master and other Grand Officers, with his books for 
inspection when required ; and likewise any Grand Commits 
tee that may be appointed for adjusting and examining his 
accounts. 

SECTION VII. 

Of the Grand Tyler and Grand Pursuivant. 

These officers of the Grand Lodge must be Master Masons, 
but none of them are members of the Grand Lodge, nor 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


169 


allowed to speak without orders. The Tyler’s duty is to 
guard the door on the outwardside, to see that none but 
members enter, and to summon the members qn special 
occasions and emergencies, by order of the Grand Master or 
his Deputy, signified to him under the hand of the Grand 
Secretary, or his Assistant or Clerk. 

The business of the Pursuivant is to stand at the, inward- 
side of the door and to report the names and titles of all who 
want admittance, as reported to him by the Tyler. He is 
also to go upon messages, and perform sundry other services 
known only in the Lodge. 

The Grand- Deacons, whose duty is well known in the 
Grand Lodge, as particular assistants to the Grand Master 
and Senior Warden in conducting the business of the Lodge, 
are always members of the same ; and may be either nomi- 
nated occasionally on every Lodge night, or appointed 
annually by the Grand Master or presiding officer. 

These in general are the present duties of these officers ; 
and when any thing further shall be made their duty in the 
Grand Lodge, it will be explained by a new regulation. 

SECTION VIII. 

General Rules for conducting the business of the Grand 
Lodge , in case of the absence of any Grand Officers. 

If the Grand Master is absent at any meeting of the 
Grand Lodge, stated or occasional, the Deputy is to supply 
his place. 

If the Deputy be likewise absent, the Senior Grand War- 
den takes the chair, and in his absence the Junior Grand 
Warden. All Grand Officers, present and past, take place of 
every Master of a Lodge, and the present Grand Officers 
take place of all past Grand Officers. — Nevertheless, any 
of them may waive their privilege, to do honor to any emi- 
nent brother and past Master, whom the Lodge may be 
willing to place in the Chair on any particular occasion. 

If neither of the present or past Grand Officers is present 



170 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


at any Grand Lodge duly summoned, the Master of the 
Senior private Lodge who may be present is to take the 
Chair, although there may be Masters of Lodges present, who 
are older Masons. 

But to prevent disputes, the Grand Master, when he finds 
he must be necessarily absent from any Grand Lodge, usually 
gives a special commission, under his hand and seal of office, 
countersigned by the Grand Secretary, to the senior Grand 
Warden, or in his absence to the junior, or in case of the 
absence of both, to any Grand Officer or particular Master of 
a Lodge, past or present, to supply his place, pro hac vice , if 
the Deputy Grand Master should not attend, or be neces- 
sarily absent. 

But if there be no special commission appointing matters 
otherwise, the general rule of precedence is, that the Junior 
Grand Warden supplies the place of the Senior in his absence ; 
and if both are absent the oldest former Grand Wardens take 
place immediately, and act as Grand Wardens, pro tempore, 
unless (as above said) they should waive their privilege. 

When neither the Grand Warden, of the present, nor of 
any former year, are in company, the Grand Master, or he 
that legally presides in his stead, calls forth whom he pleases 
to act as Deputy Grand Master and Grand Wardens pro tem- 
pore, although the preference is generally given to the Master 
or past Master of the oldest Lodge present. The presiding 
Grand Officer has the further privilege of appointing a Secre- 
tary or any other Grand Officer pro tempore , if neither the 
stated Officers, nor the Deputies of such of them as have a 
right to nominate a Deputy be present ; for the business of 
the Lodge must never stand still for want of officers. 

In case of the death of a Grand Master, the same order of 
succession and precedency takes place, as is above set forth, 
till a new Grand Master is duly chosen and installed. 

Old Grand Officers may be again chosen officers of private 
Lodges, and this does not deprive them of any of the privi- 
leges to which, as old Grand Officers, they are entitled in the 
Grand Lodge ; only an old Grand Officer, being the officer of 
a private Lodge, must depute a past officer of his particular 



IN THE STATE OP NEW YORK. 


171 


Lodge to act pro tempore for him in the Grand Lodge, when 
he ascends to his former rank in the same. 

SECTION IX. 

Of Grand Visitations , Communications , Annual Feasts , dec. 

The Grand Master with his Deputy, the Grand Wardens 
and Grand Secretary, shall, during his Mastership, or if pos- 
sible annually, go at least once round, and visit all the Lodges 
under his jurisdiction ; or when this laudable duty becomes 
impracticable, from the extent of his jurisdiction and large 
number of Lodges, he shall as often as necessary, and if pos- 
sible annually, appoint visitors, of different districts, composed 
of his Grand* Officers and such other Assistants as he may 
think proper, who shall make faithful report of their pro- 
ceedings to the Grand Lodge, according to the instructions 
given them. 

When both the Grand Masters are absent, the Senior or 
Junior Grand Warden may preside as Deputy in visiting 
Lodges, or in constituting any new Lodge ; neither of which 
can be done without at least one of the present Grand Offi- 
cers, except in places at too great a distance from the Grand 
Lodge. In such case, some faithful brother, who has passed 
the Chair, &c. shall have a proper deputation under the Grand 
Lodge seal, if the order is made in the absence of the Gnand 
Master and his Deputy, or under their private seals, if they 
are present and sign the same. But it must also be counter- 
signed and attested by the Grand Secretary, to have the full 
authority of the Grand Lodge. Under such authority, the 
brother so appointed shall act as Grand Master pro tempore , 
in visiting old Lodges or constituting new ones, in places far 
distant from the seat of the Grand Lodge, and in remote 
countries, or beyond seas, where the Grand Officers cannot 
possibly attend. 

The brethren of all the regular Lodges, in the same general 
jurisdiction and grand communication, if within any reason- 
able and practicable distance, shall meet in some convenient 



172 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


place on St. John’s Day, and when business is over, they 
may celebrate the festival either in their own or any other 
regular Lodge, as they shall think most convenient. And 
any brethren around the globe (who are found true and 
faithful members of the ancient craft) may be admitted as 
sojourners. 

Only those who are members of the Grand Lodge must be 
within doors, during the election of Grand Officers. 


SECTION X. 

Pa/rticular Rules in the Grand Lodge of New - York. 

Every Grand Lodge has an inherent power and authority 
to make local ordinances and new regulations, as well as to 
amend and explain the old ones, for their own particular ben- 
efit and the good of Masonry in general ; provided always, 
that the ancient land marks be carefully preserved, and that 
such regulations be first duly proposed in writing for the con- 
sideration of the members, and be at last duly enacted with 
the consent of the majority. This has never been disputed ; 
for the members of every Grand Lodge are the true repre- 
sentatives of all the fraternity in communication, and are an 
absolute and independent body, with legislative authority, 
provided (as aforesaid) that the Grand Masonic Constitution 
be ciever violated, nor any of the old lamd marks removed. 
Upon these principles, the following particular rules have 
been made, or adopted, in the Grand Lodge of New-York, 
viz. 

1. “ The Quarterly communication of all the Lodges under 
the Masonic Jurisdiction of this Grand Lodge shall be held 
in the Grand Lodge Eoom, at the city of New- York, on the 
four following days annually forever; that is to say, on the 
first Wednesdays in March, June, September, and December; 
and the different Lodges are to attend on these days, by their 
proper Officers or Deputies, with or without notice for that 
purpose.” 

2. “ None but a Master Mason, who has passed the Chair 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


173 


in some regular Lodge, and is a resident or honorary member 
of the Lodge he is chosen to represent, can be admitted as 
the proxy of such Lodge, or have a voice in the proceedings 
of this Grand Lodge. And his commission, as proxy, must 
be under the seal of the Lodge that appoints him, signed by 
the Master, and countersigned by the Secretary/’ 

3. “ Every member of this Grand Lodge shall pay quar- 
terly into the Treasury of the same, Fifty Gents , and the 
same sum on default of attendance at any Quarterly Meeting ; 
without such excuse as the bye-laws admit to be reasonable. 

. L “Every member of a constituted Lodge, under this 
Grand Lodge, shall pay Twelve and a half Cents quarterly 
to the Charity fund of the same ; except the members of the 
Lodges in the city of New- York, who shall pay quarterly 
Twenty five Gents . 

5. “ Every person who obtains the benefit of Masonry in 
any regular Lodge, under the jurisdiction of this Grand Lodge, 
shall pay One Dollar and Twenty five Cents to the Charity 
Fund of the same; except those who are initiated in any of 
the Lodges of the city of New-York, who shall pay Two 
Dollars and Fifty Cents ; all which dues shall be made good 
by every particular Lodge to the Grand Lodge, at least once 
a year, at the Communication previous to St. John the Bap- 
tist’s day : except in the city of New-York, in which such 
dues shall be paid quarterly. 

6. “ Every brother who shall be returned by his Lodge, 
and registered in the Grand Lodge-books, shall pay Twelve 
and a Half Cents to the Grand Secretary for the same. 

7. “ Every member of a Lodge, requiring a Grand Lodge 
Certificate, shall pay to the Grand Secretary One Dollar and 
Fifty Cents. Nor is any member entitled to such Grand 
Certificate without a previous Certificate from the Lodge of 
which he is a member, setting forth his regular behavior, 
and that he hath discharged all Lodge dues.” 

8. 66 All petitions for warrants, shall come recommended 
by the officers of the Lodge nearest to the place where the 
new one is to be erected.” * 

* Adopted 4th December, 5793. 



174 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


9. “ No Charter, or Dispensation for holding a Lodge of 
Masons, shall be granted to any person or persons whomso- 
ever, residing out of this state, if within the jurisdiction of 
any other Grand Lodge.” * 


SECTION XI. 

Regulations for the Government of the Grand Lodge, dur- 
ing the time of public Business. 

1. No brethren shall be admitted into the Grand Lodge, 
but the members thereof, except by permission. 

2. At the third stroke of the Grand Master’s gavel, there 
shall be a general silence ; and he who breaks silence with- 
out leave from the Chair, shall be subject to a public repri- 
mand. 

3. Under the same penalty every brother shall keep his 
seat, and observe strict silence whenever the Grand Master 
or presiding officer shall think fit to rise from the Chair and 
call to order. 

4. In the Grand Lodge, every member shall keep in his 
seat (according to the number of his Lodge) and not move 
about from place to place during the Communication. 

5. No brother is to speak more than once to the same 
affair, unless by permission. 

6. Every one that speaks shall rise and keep standing, ad- 
dressing himself in a proper manner to the Chair ; nor shall 
any presume to interrupt him, under the aforesaid penalty ; 
unless the Grand Master find him wandering from the point 
in hand, and shall think fit to reduce him to order ; for 
then the said speaker shall sit down : But after he has been 
set right he may again proceed. 

7. If, in the Grand Lodge, any member is twice called to 
order at any one assembly for transgressing these rules, and 
is guilty of a third offence of the same nature, the Chair 
may peremptorily order him to quit the Lodge-room for that 
night. 


* Adopted 7th December, 5796. 



IN THE STATE OP NEW YORK. 


175 


8. Whoever shall be so rude as to ridicule any brother, or 
what another says or has said, he may be forthwith sol- 
emnly excluded the Communication, and declared incapable 
of ever being a member of any Grand Lodge for the future, 
till another time he publicly own his fault, and his grace be 
granted. 

9. Every motion for a new regulation, or for the continu- 
ance or alteration of an old one, shall be first handed up in 
writing to the Chair ; and after it has been perused by the 
Grand Master, may be moved publicly ; it shall then be 
audibly read by the Secretary ; and if seconded, must imme- 
diately be committed to the consideration of the whole 
assembly, that their sense may be fully heard ; after which 
the question shall be put. 

10. The opinions or votes of the members are to be signi- 
fied by holding up of hands ; which uplifted hands the 
Grand Wardens are to count, unless the number be so 
unequal as to render the counting them unnecessary. 1ST or 
should any other kind of division ever be admitted among 
Free Masons. 

In order to preserve harmony, it is necessary -to use count- 
ers and a balloting-box, when occasion requires. 

“ My son, forget not my law, but let thine heart keep my command- 
ments ; AND REMOVE NOT THE ANCIENT LAND MARKS WHICH THY FATHERS 

have set.” Solomon, 


SECTION XII. 

The Regulations of the Committee of Charity. 

1. The Committee of Charity consists of all present and 
former Grand Officers, Secretary and Treasurer, with the 
Masters of all the regular Lodges : who are summoned and 
obliged to attend, to hear all petitions, &c. and to order such 
relief to distressed petitioners, as their cases may require, 
and prudence may direct. 

2. All collections, contributions, and sums of money for 
charitable purposes, given or belonging to the Grand Lodge 



176 


HISTORY OR FREEMASONRY 


Fund, are to be deposited in the hands of the Grand Treas- 
urer, or such other person as the Grand Lodge may specially 
appoint; no part of which must be disbursed or expended 
on any account, without an order from the Committee of 
Charity, signed by the presiding officer, and countersigned 
by the Secretary, after being approved by the majority of 
the Committee, or Stewards, then present, and entered in 
their transaction-book, with the name or names of the person 
or persons to whom the same is given. 

3. hTo anonymous letter, petition, or recommendation, by 
or from any person or persons, must be introduced or read in 
the Committee ; and only registered Masons, who have them- 
selves contributed twelve months to the Grand Lodge Char- 
ity Fund, and were members of a warranted Lodge during 
that time, are to be considered and relieved. Sojourners 
and travelling Masons, if duly certified and recommended, 
are to be relieved by private contributions made for them 
on the occasion, or out of the general fund, as the majority 
shall think proper. 

4. All petitions or recommendations are to be signed by 
the Master and Wardens of the petitioner’s Lodge ; some of 
whom, if in town, must attend the Committee or Stewards’ 
Lodge, to answer any necessary questions. The petitioner 
or petitioners, (if within any convenient distance, or unless 
detained by sickness, or other sufficient cause) must also 
attend, and prove to the satisfaction of the Committee or 
Stewards, that he or they have been formerly in reputable, 
or at least in tolerable circumstances. And although any 
brother may send in a petition or recommendation, yet none 
can be admitted to sit and hear the debates, except the 
Stewards, or members of the Committee, as above described. 

5. It is the inherent right of the Committee, commonly 
called the Stewards’ Lodge, to dispose of the Grand Charity 
Fund, under the restrictions aforesaid, to such as appear 
really necessitous and deserving, either by weekly support or 
otherwise, as to them shall seem meet; provided always, 
that no person made in a clandestine or unconstitutional 
manner, nor any brother who has ever assisted at any such 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


m 


mating, shall ever be entitled to receive any assistance out 
of the said fund. 

6. This Committee has likewise power to hear and adjust 
all matters concerning Free Masons and Masonry, that may 
be laid before them, (except making new regulations, which 
power is vested only in the Grand Lodge ;) and the determi- 
nations of the Committee are final, unless an appeal be made 
to the Quarterly Grand Lodge. 

7. Foe the speedy relief of distressed petitioners, three of 
the Masters who are summoned, are a quorum to proceed to 
business, as prudence shall direct, with or without the Grand 
Officers ; provided the Grand Secretary and the books are 
present. And all transactions of this Committee of Charity, 
or Stewards’ Lodge, are to be read audibly, by the said Grand 
Secretary, before all the members of the Grand Lodge, upon 
the first Wednesdays in March, June, September, and De- 
cember, yearly. 

8. So far as this Committee shall exercise the power vested 
in them, to hear complaints and punish delinquents, according 
to the laws of the Craft, they are instructed to adhere most 
religiously to the following regulation, viz. “ If a complaint 
be made against a brother, by another brother, and he be 
found guilty, he shall stand to the determination of this Com- 
mittee, or the Grand Lodge. But if the accuser or complain- 
ant cannot support his charge, he shall incur such penalty as 
the said Committee shall deem just.” 

9. The Stewards’ Lodge shall meet quarterly, as follows, 
viz. On the last Wednesdays in February, May, August, and 
November, annually; at which times the dues of the Lodges 
in the City of New-York are to be paid, and in default 
thereof, each negligent Lodge shall be precluded from the 
benefits and privileges of the Grand Lodge, during such 
default or negligence. 

“ Kesolved, It is the opinion of this Grand Lodge, that 
a brotherly connection and correspondence with the Bight 
Worshipful Grand Lodges in North- America, France, Eng- 
land, Scotland, Ireland, and the West-Indies, will be produc- 
tive of honor and advantage to the craft.” 

YOL. II. — 12 



178 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


“ Ordered, That the Grand Secretary shall transmit the 
names of the officers of this Grand Lodge to the Secretaries 
of the Grand Lodges aforesaid, yearly, or as often as any 
new choice is made; together with such information as may 
tend to the honor and interest of the ancient Craft: And 
that all such information, or correspondence shall be con- 
veyed in the most respectful terms, such as may suit the 
honor and dignity of the Craft.” 


CHAPTER IY. 

CHARGES, PRAYERS, &c. 

A short Charge to a new admitted Mason. 

Brother, 

You are now admitted by the consent of this Lodge, a 
fellow of our most ancient and honorable Society — ancient , 
as having subsisted from time immemorial — and honorable, 
as tending in every particular to do honor to those who 
conform to its noble precepts. The greatest monarchs, and 
most exalted heroes and patriots, of all ages and countries 
throughout the known world, have been, encouragers of 
the Royal Art ; and many of them have presided as Grand 
Masters in their respective territories ; not thinking it any 
lessening of their dignities to level themselves with their 
brethren in Masonry, and to act upon the same square as 
they did. 

The world’s great architect is our Supreme Master ; and 
the unerring rule he has given us, is that by which we work. 
Religious disputes are never suffered within the Lodge ; for, 
as Masons, we only pursue the universal religion of nature. 
This is the centre which unites the most different principles 
in one sacred band, and brings together those who were the 
most distant from one another. 

There are three general heads of duty which Masons 
ought always to inculcate, viz. to God, our Neighbor and 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


179 


Ourselves, — to God, in never mentioning his name but with 
that reverential awe which a creature ought to bear to his 
Creator, and to look upon him always as the summum bonum 
which we came into the world to enjoy, and according to 
that view to regulate all our pursuits — to our neighbor , in 
acting upon the square, or doing as we would be done by — 
to ourselves , in avoiding all intemperance and excess, whereby 
we may be rendered incapable of following our work, or 
led into behavior unbecoming our laudable profession ; and 
always keeping within due bounds, and free from all pol- 
lution. 

In the state, a Mason is to behave as a peaceable and 
dutiful subject, conforming cheerfully to the government 
under which he lives. 

He is to pay a due deference to his superiors : and from 
his inferiors he is rather to receive honor with some reluc- 
tance, than to extort it. He is to be a man of benevolence 
and charity, not sitting down contented while his fellow 
creatures, but much more his brethren, are in want, when it 
is in his power, without prejudicing* himself or his family, to 
relieve them. 

In the Lodge, he is to behave with all due decorum, lest 
the beauty and harmony thereof should be disturbed or 
broken; he is to be obedient to the Master and presiding 
officers, and to apply himself closely to the business of Ma- 
sonry, that he may the sooner become a proficient therein, 
both for his own credit, and for that of the Lodge. 

He is not to neglect his own necessary avocations for the 
sake of Masonry, nor to involve himself in quarrels with 
those who through ignorance may speak evil of or ridi- 
cule it. 

He is to be a lover of the arts and sciences, and is to take 
all opportunities to improve himself therein. 

If he recommends a friend to be made a Mason, he must 
vouch him to be such as he really believes will conform to 
the aforesaid duties, lest by his misconduct, at any time, the 
Lodge should pass under some evil imputation. 

Nothing can prove more shocking to all faithful Masons, 



180 


HISTORY OP FREEMASONRY 


than to see any of their brethren profane or break through 
the sacred rules of their order ; and such as can act thus they 
wish had never been admitted. 


A Prayer said at the opening of the Lodge , or making a new 
Brother, dec. used by Jewish Free Masons . 

O LORD, excellent art thou in thy truth, and there is 
nothing great in comparison to thee; for thine is the praise 
from all the works of thy hands, for evermore. 

Enlighten us, we beseech thee, in the true knowledge of 
Masonry : By the sorrows of Adam, thy first made man : by 
the blood of Abel, the holy one ; by the righteousness of Seth , 
in whom thou art well pleased ; and by thy covenant with 
Noah, in whose architecture thou wast pleased to save the 
seed of thy beloved ; number us not among those that know 
not thy statutes, nor the divine mysteries of thy secret 
Cabala. 

But grant, we beseech thee, that the ruler of this Lodge 
may be endued with knowledge and wisdom, to instruct us 
and explain his secret mysteries, as our holy brother Moses * 

* In the preface to the Mishna, we find this tradition of the Jews explained 
as follows : 

God not only delivered the law to Moses on Mount Sinai, but the explana- 
tion of it likewise : When Moses came down from the mount and entered 
into his tent, Aaron went to visit him, and Moses acquainted Aaron with 
the laws he had received from God, together with the explanation of them : 
After this, Aaron placed himself at the right hand of Moses, and Eleazar 
and Ithamar (the sons of Aaron) were admitted, to whom Moses repeated 
what he had just before told to Aaron : These being seated, the one on the 
right hand, the other on the left hand of Moses, the seventy elders of Israel, 
who compose the Sanhedrim, came in, and Moses again declared the same 
laws to them, with the interpretation of them, as he had done before to Aaron 
and his sons. Lastly, all who pleased of the common people were invited to 
enter, and Moses instructed them likewise in the same manner as the rest : 
So that Aaron heard four times what Moses had been taught by God upon 
Mount Sinai; Eleazar and Ithamar three times, the seventy elders twice, and 
the people once. Moses afterwards reduced the laws which he had received 
into writing, but not the explanations of them: these he thought it sufficient 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


181 


did (in his Lodge) to Aaron, to Eleazcvr and Ithamar, (the 
sons of Aaron) and the several elders of Israel. 

And grant that we may understand, learn, and keep all 
the statutes and commands of the Lord, and this holy mys- 
tery, pure and undefiled unto our lives’ end. Amen, Lord. 

A Prayer used amongst the primitive Christian Masons. 

THE might of the Father of Heaven, and the wisdom of 
his glorious Son, through the grace and goodness of the 
Holy Ghost, being three persons in one Godhead, be with us 
at our beginning, and give us grace so to govern us here in 
our living, that we may come to his bliss that never shall 
have end. Amen. 

Another Prayer, and that which is most general at Making 

or Opening . 

MOST holy and glorious Lord God, thou great architect 
of heaven and earth, who art the giver of all good gifts and 
graces, and hath promised that when two or three are gath- 
ered together in thy name, thou wilt be in the midst of them : 
In thy name we assemble and meet together, most humbly 
beseeching thee to bless us in all our undertakings, that we 
may know and serve thee aright, that all our doings may 
tend to thy glory and the salvation of our souls. 

And we beseech thee, O Lord God, to bless this our present 
undertaking, and grant that this our new brother may dedi- 
cate his life to thy service, and be a true and faithful brother 
among us : Endue him with a competency of thy divine wis- 
dom, that he may, with the secrets of Free Masonry, be able 
to unfold the mysteries of Godliness and Christianity. This 
we most humbly beg, in the name and for the sake of Jesus 
Christ, our Lord and Saviour. Amen. 

to trust to the memories of the above-mentioned persons, who, being per- 
fectly instructed in them, delivered them to their children, and these again 
to theirs, from age to age. 



182 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


* AHABATflOLAM. 

A Prater repeated in the Royal-Arch Lodge at 
Jerusalem. 

THOU hast loved us, O Lord our God, with eternal love ; 
thou hast spared us with great and exceeding patience, our 
Father and our King, for thy Great name’s sake, and for our 
fathers’ sake, who trusted in thee, to whom thou didst teach 
the statutes of life, that they might do after the statutes of 
thy good pleasure with a "perfect heart : So be thou merciful 
to us, O our Father ! Merciful Father, that sheweth mercy, 
have mercy upon us, we beseech thee, and put understanding 
into our hearts, that we may understand, be wise, hear, learn, 
teach, keep, do, and perform all the words of the doctrine of 
thy law in love, and enlighten our eyes in thy command- 
ments, and cause our hearts to cleave to thy -law, and unite 
them in the love and fear of thy name ; we will not be 
ashamed, nor confounded, nor stumble, for ever and ever. 

Because we have trusted in thy holy, great, mighty, and 
terrible Name, we will rejoice and be glad in thy salvation, 
and in thy mercies, O Lord our God ; and the multitude of 
thy mercies shall not forsake us for ever : Selah. And now 
make haste and bring upon us a blessing, and peace from the 
four corners of the earth ; for thou art a God that worketh 
salvation, and hast chosen us out of every people and lan- 
guage ; and thou our King, hast caused us to cleave to thy 
great Name, in love to praise thee, and to be united to thee, 
and to love thy name : Blessed art thou, O Lord God, who 
hast chosen thy people Israel in love. 


* See Dr. Wooten on the Mishna, 



IK THE STATE OP NEW YORK. 


183 


APPENDIX. 

Ceremony of Consecration .* 

ON the day and hour appointed, the G-rand Master and his officers, or 
some respectahle Past-Master and brethren properly authorized to represent 
them, having assembled at some convenient place, proceed in form to the 
Lodge-room. 

Silence being proclaimed the Lodge is opened in the third degree by the 
Grand Master. 

The Grand Lodge form in order round the temple which is placed in the 
center, covered with white satin. 

The chaplain or orator rehearses a preparatory prayer. 

Solemn music dignifies the ceremony while the preparations are made. 

The Temple is uncovered, and the first clause of the consecration prayer 
rehearsed. The response is made “ Glory to God on high.” 

Incense is scattered over the temple, and the grand honors are given . 

The Grand invocation is then pronounced, with the honors: after which 
the consecration prayer is concluded, with the response and honors. 

The temple is covered ; solemn music is resumed, and the hlessing given, 
with the response and honors as before. 

An Anthem is then sung, toward the close of which the hrethren of the 
Lodge, move in circular procession, do homage to the Grand Master, and 
the consecration ends. 

Manner of Constituting a Lodge . 

THE Grand Lodge, or their representatives, duly authorized for the occa- 
sion, having convened at some suitable apartment, walk in procession to the 
Lodge room. The Lodge is then opened in the third degree by the Grand 
Master, or his substitute, and an appropriate prayer repeated. 

The Dispensation, if the brethren have been acting under one, is read by 
the Grand Secretary, as is also the Warrant or Charter of constitution. 
The transactions of the New Lodge while under dispensation are then sub- 
mitted, and, if approved, declared valid and constitutional. 

An oration or address on the nature and design of masonry is then deliv- 
ered ; at the conclusion of which, the Grand Master advances and consti- 
tutes the new Lodge in the following manner: 

“ In this my exalted character, I invoke the name of the Most High, to 
whom be glory and honor, to be with you in all your labors ; and by the 
divine aid I now constitute and form you, my worthy brethren, into a lodge 
of FREE and ACCEPTED MASONS. From henceforth I empower you 
to act as a regular LODGE, constituted in conformity to the rites of the 
order and charges of our ancient and honorable fraternity : and may God 
be with you.” 

* This ceremony is never to be used but when specially ordered . 



184 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


The Grand honors are then given, and the ceremony of installation suc- 
ceeds. 


Ceremony of Installation * 


THE Grand Master asks his Deputy, “ If he has examined the Master 
nominated in the warrant, and whether he finds him well skilled in the 
noble science and the Royal Art ? ” The Deputy answering in the affirma- 
tive, by the Grand Master’s order he takes the candidate from among his 
fellows, and presents him in front of the chair, saying, 

“ Most worshipful Grand Master, I present my worthy brother A. B. to 
be installed Master of this new Lodge. I find him to be of good morals and 
sufficient skill; and I doubt not that he will discharge the duties of his 
station with fidelity and justice.” 

The following charges are then read to the Master Elect. 

“ I. You agree to be a good man and true, and strictly to obey the moral 
law. 

“ II. You agree to be a peaceable citizen, and cheerfully to conform to 
the laws of the country in which you reside. 

“III. You promise not to be concerned in plots or conspiracies against 
government, but patiently to submit to the decisions of the constituted 
authorities. 

“ IV] You agree to pay a proper respect to the civil magistrate, to work 
diligently, live creditably, and act honorably by all men. 

“V. You agree to hold in veneration the original rulers and patrons of 
the Order of Masonry, and their regular successors supreme and subordi- 
nate, according to their stations ; and to submit to the awards and resolu- 
tions of your brethren in Grand Lodge convened, in every case consistent 
with the constitutions of the Order. 

“VI. You agree to avoid private piques and quarrels, and to guard 
against intemperance and excess. 

“ VII. You agree to be cautious in your carriage and behavior, courteous 
to your brethren, and faithful to your Lodge. 

“VIII. You promise to respect genuine brethren, and to discountenance 
all impostors, and deserters from the original plan of Masonry. 

“IX. You agree to promote the general good of society, to cultivate the 
social virtues, and to propagate the knowledge of true Masonry.” 

On the Master Elect signifying his assent to these Charges, the following 
regulations are read to him. 

I. You promise to pay homage to the Grand Master for the time being, 
and to his officers, when duly installed ; and strictly to conform to every 
edict of the Grand Lodge, or General assembly of Masons, that is not sub- 
versive of the principles and groundwork of Masonry. 

II. You admit that the power does not exist of making innovations in the 
body of Masonry, to the infringement of the ancient land-marks. 

III. You promise a regular attendance on the committees and communi- 

* The same ceremony and charges attend every succeeding installation : 
the present Master installing the Master Elect . 



IN THE STATE OP NEW YORK, 


185 


cations of the Grand Lodge on receiving proper notice thereof, and to pay 
attention to all the duties of Masonry on convenient occasions. 

IV. You admit that no new Lodge should he formed without permission 
of the Grand Lodge, and that no countenance ought to be given to such 
irregular Lodge, or to any person clandestinely initiated therein, being con- 
trary to the ancient charges of the Order. 

V. You admit that no person can be regularly made a Mason in, or 
admitted a mem her of, any Lodge, without previous notice and due inquiry 
into his character. 

VI. You promise that no visitors shall he received into your Lodge with- 
out due examination, and producing the necessary vouchers. 

The Grand Master then addresses the Master Elect : 

“Do you submit to these charges, and promise to support these regula- 
tions as Masters have done in all ages before you ? ” 

The new Master having signified his cordial acquiescence, is bound to his 
trust by the obligation of the chair. 

He is then invested with the badge of his office, and regularly installed 
by the Grand Master who thus salutes him: 

Brother A. B. in consequence of your cheerful conformity to the charges 
and regulations of the order, and in compliance with the wishes of your 
brethren, I install you Master of this Lodge, placing full confidence in your 
care and capacity. 

The Warrant is then delivered over to the new Master, and his station and 
duties explained ; after which the holy writings, the square and compasses, 
the book of constitutions, the jewels and insignia of the different officers, 
are separately presented to him, and charges suitable to each delivered. 

The new Master is then conducted by the Deacons under a Grand salute 
to the left hand of the Grand Master, where he returns his becoming 
acknowledgments. 

This ceremony being concluded, the Wardens and other officers being 
conducted in front of the chairs, are severally installed by the Grand War- 
dens*, invested with the badges of their offices, and instructed in their 
respective duties. They take their station by the side of the Grand officers 
of similar rank. 

The members of the new Lodge then sing the installation ode, during the 
close of which they move round in procession, saluting their new Master and 
officers in the three degrees, and conclude with the Grand honors. 

The ceremony of installation being concluded, the Grand Master gives 
the brethren joy of their officers in a short and suitable address. 

The Grand Secretary proclaims the new Lodge three times with the 
honors of Masonry. 

The Lodge being then called to refreshment, and a toast given by the 
Grand Master, and at his direction by the Grand Wardens, the chairs are 
resigned to the New Officers , the different Grand officers repairing to seats 
provided for them in the East. 

* The new Master installs the Wardens and other officers at each subse- 
quent installation . 



186 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


After refreshing a reasonable time, the Lodge is called to labor, and the 
Grand Lodge takes leave, departing with the customary honors. 

This is the usual ceremony observed at the constitution of a new Lodge, 
which the Grand officers may abridge or extend at pleasure, but the material 
points are on no account to be omitted. 


GRAND MASONIC PROCESSION. 

Form of a Grand Masonic Procession .* 

KNIGHTS TEMPLARS 
with martial music. 

JUNIOR LODGE in following order: 

TYLER 

MASTERS OF CEREMONY 
MEMBERS, two and two. 

TREASURER and SECRETARY. 

JUNIOR WARDEN. SENIOR WARDEN. 

PAST MASTERS. 

A MASTER MASON, bearing the WARRANT on a cushion, 
supported by two Stewards . 

Beacon . MASTER. Beacon. 

The different Lodges in the above order ; 
the Junior Lodges preceding. 

OFFICERS of the ROYAL ARCH.f 
HIGHER ORDERS, 
according to their rank. 

BAND OF MUSIC. 

GRAND LODGE. 
in the following order . 

GRAND TYLER. 

VISITING MASTERS and PAST MASTERS, 
who are neither present nor past Grand Officers. 

GRAND TREASURER. GRAND SECRETARY. 

PAST GRAND WARDENS. 

JUNIOR GRAND WARDEN. SENIOR GRAND WARDEN. 
CHAPLAINS. 

G. Beacon. GRAND PURSUIVANT, bearing the BIBLE. G. Deacon. 
DEPUTY GRAND MASTER. 

GRAND DEACON. GRAND MASTER. GRAND DEACON. 
Four GRAND STEWARDS abreast with DRAWN SWORDS. 

* A general Masonic procession is here given, agreeable to which others 
of different descriptions are to be regulated. 

f Only the Officers of the Royal Arch walk in this station, when that 
body is numerous, the members being dispersed in their respective Lodges . 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


187 


The procession having reached the church, the Knights Templars enter 
and halt. The Tyler of the Junior Lodge remains at the door: the whole 
line opens to the right and left. The Grand Lodge proceeds through the 
avenue thus formed till it reaches the Templars, who being a military 
order, precede it as an advanced guard, and take their places in seats pro- 
vided for them in the vicinity of the Grand Lodge. 


A LODGE AT DEMERARA, W. I. 

At the session of the Grand Lodge held on March 4, 1801, 
an application was made by Brother A. Cart and others, 
residents of the island of Demerara, in the West Indies, for 
the establishment of a Lodge in said island, and for the 
privilege of holding Masonic intercourse with other Lodges. 
They desired that their Warrant be issued under the auspices 
of the Grand Lodge of the State of IS Tew York, and be titled 
“ The Chosen Friends of Demerara.” They named Brother 
A. Cart for Master, John Brookes for Senior Warden, and 
Henry Beekles Gall for Junior Warden, if their petition 
should be favorably considered. The Warrant was author- 
ized. 

A number of proxies were presented, read, and ordered 
to be recorded in favor of William M. Steward, for Mor- 
ton Lodge, No. 63 ; of David Dunham, for Montgomery 
Lodge, No. 71 ; of Francis Lynch, for Salem Lodge, No. 
74; and of Elisha Dubois, for St. Simon and St. Jude’s, 
No. 12. 

The charitable disposition of the moneys received from the 
St. John’s Day celebration of 1799 was reported, and the 
action of the Committee therein approved. 


THE ELECTION OF 1801, AND THE RETIREMENT OF GRAND MASTER 

LIVINGSTON. 

The annual election of Grand Officers for 1801-2 tran- 
spired June 3 ; prior to which, however, the Grand Master, 



188 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


Robert R. Livingston, was announced as having been 
appointed Minister Plenipotentiary to the French Republic, 
and was shortly to depart on his embassy; Colonel Jacob 
Morton was consequently elected Grand Master ; Cadwalla- 
der D. Colden, Senior Grand Warden ; Philip S. Yan Rens- 
selaer, Junior Grand Warden; Robert Cocks, Grand Treas- 
urer; Daniel D. Tompkins, Grand Secretary; Reverend 
John Ireland, Grand Chaplain ; George Adamson, Grand 
Pursuivant ; and Benjamin Jones, Grand Tyler. 

A Committee of three were appointed and instructed to 
wait on Grand Master Livingston with an address, express- 
ing their grateful sense of the honor he had conferred on the 
Grand Lodge in filling the station of Grand Master so long 
and so faithfully ; also to present the retiring Grand Master 
with the Past Grand Officer’s Jewel, as a token of the 
respect and attachment of the Masonic Fraternity. (See 
report on December 2.) 

On the evening of June 15, the presence of the Most 
Worshipful Grand Master was announced, who, having been 
received as became his station, delivered an affectionate 
address. Brother John Lawrence was deputed as proxy to 
install the newly elected Grand Master on June 25. This 
was done with much ceremony. The Grand Master elect 
and Brother John Lawrence were received at the entrance 
of the building by a body of Knights Templars, with full 
insignia. The entrance was in full form, with music and 
Grand Honors. 

Right Worshipful Brother Lawrence having the Grand 
Master of Georgia on his right, and the Grand Master elect 
on his left, caused the Dispensation authorizing the installa- 
tion to be read. This had been given under the hand and 
seal of the Honorable Robert R. Livingston, Chancellor of 
the State of Hew York, and Grand Master of Masons of 
said State. 

The installation having proceeded, Brother Daniel D. 
Tompkins, the Grand Secretary, proclaimed thrice, that the 
Right Worshipful Jacob Morton had been duly elected and 
installed Grand Master of Masons of Hew York. 



IN THE STATE OP NEW YORK. 


189 


GRAND MASTER, JACOB MORTON. 

The Grand Honors having been given, the Grand Master 
arose, and delivered this singularly beautiful address : 

“ I have received, my brethren, with great sensibility, this 
proof of your affection and esteem. Known only but in the 
humble walks of private friendship, I feel that it is to those 
affections which friendship inspires, that I owe the distinction 
with which I am honored. Distinguished by no elevated sta- 
tion in society, my name could give no -luster nor add any 
influence to your Institution. Mine alone on this occasion is 
the honor and mine the advantage. For this single proof of 
disinterested esteem, I have but to offer you the sincere 
acknowledgment of a grateful heart, and the assurance of a 
faithful and an affectionate discharge of the duties of my sta- 
tion. To you, respected brother, permit me to say, that it is 
with peculiar pleasure I have received the investment of this 
office from your hands. From your hand I first received that 
badge which distinguished me as a Mason, and from the 
same hand I receive the most honored badge the Fraternity 
can confer. A coincidence of favors, of itself highly interest- 
ing, but rendered much more so by the respect and* esteem I 
have ever borne to the hand that has conferred them. Though 
your labors in the Masonic Fraternity have been lately inter- 
mitted, still you have been rendering services to the insti- 
tution. The exercise of your talents in the paths of virtuous 
ambition and of public utility, while it crowned you with 
honors, at the same time reflected a luster upon the society 
of which you were a member. And when your country 
raised you to its most honored station, the Order partici- 
pated with you in the dignity conferred. May, sir, no mis- 
fortune overshade that life, whose morning hath been thus 
prosperous, but may the meridian and evening of your days 
continue to be adorned by the esteem of your fellow-citizens 
and the affection of your brethren. 

As the representative of our much-respected Past Grand 
Master, permit me, sir, to assure you that I sensibly feel the 



190 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


many favors he conferred upon me, and that I duly appreci- 
ate the kind and affectionate manner in which they were be- 
stowed. His kind partiality raised me to the station I lately 
held, a station, though subordinate, was rendered so honorable 
by the worth and respectability of him who filled the chair, 
that no further ambition could be excited but that of merit- 
ing the distinction already conferred. But from his labors 
in the Fraternity, he hath been called by the voice of his 
country, a voice which can never be heard within these walls 
but with veneration and respect. To her call we yield him, 
and assure him, sir, that he carries with him our fondest, 
our sincerest wishes for his happiness and prosperity, that 
it is our earnest prayer, that an all-gracious Providence will 
make him its peculiar care, that it will bear him in safety 
over the waters of the mighty deep, that it will prosper his 
labors in the service of his country, and that it will return 
him crowned with honor, and with health and happiness to 
the bosom of his fellow-citizens, and to us, his affectionate 
brethren.” 


JACOB MORTON. 

• Biographical Sketch . 

Brother Jacob Morton was one of the most popular and 
honored citizens of Hew York ; of medium stature, pleasing 
aspect, gentlemanly carriage, and military bearing. What- 
ever he honored with his attention received his hearty and 
earnest endeavors for success. He was educated for the law 
and became a brilliant counselor. He was for years the 
Clerk of the Common Council of the city of Hew York, and 
at one time Inspector of the city’s health. His inclinations 
led him toward a military life, and he rose in rank in the 
State Militia to be the Major General of the First Division, 
which position he held for thirty years, until his face became 
familiar to every citizen of Hew York. 

It is narrated of his brother, Washington Morton, that, 
under a wager, he walked from Hew York City to Philadel- 
phia, and, having bathed, spent the night in much jollity 





FRENCH (HUGUENOT) CHURCH 
PINE AND NASSAU STS., 1704 








IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


191 


with his confreres , who had accompanied him on horseback 
in the accomplishment of his task. 

Major General Jacob Morton became Grand Secretary of 
the Grand Lodge in 1788, and continued' in that office until 
1792, when he was elected Senior Grand Warden, and having 
served three successive terms, he was elected Deputy Grand 
Master; in which capacity he served for seven years, or until 
1801, when he was exalted to the highest office, that of 
Grand Master, and thereto re-elected for five years. 

In Ohivalric Masonry he was quite enthusiastic, and Mor- 
ton Encampment, No. 4, received its name in honor of him. 

DEATH OF R. J. VANDENBROECK. 

On Sunday, July 12, 1801, there were interred the mortal 
remains of one of the most noble exemplars of Masonry that 
the country had ever produced ; earnest, ardent, sincere, the 
loved brother, Reinier Jan Yandenbroeck, who held, how- 
ever, but one office in the Grand Lodge, that of Secretary, to 
which he was elected in 1800. He was buried with Masonic 
honors in the burial ground of the French Church, the 
address being delivered by the Rev. Brother Ireland, Grand 
Chaplain. 

Under a previously agreed stipulation, the salary of the 
Grand Secretary for one year, and now due, was directed 
to be paid to Jane Abrams, the widow of the former Grand 
Secretary. 

The Grand Communication, held September 2, 1801, was 
sparsely attended. 

New and suitable Masonic clothing for the officers of the 
Grand Lodge was ordered to be completed before the com- 
ing St. John’s Festival. 

GRAND LODGE OF KENTUCKY ORGANIZED. 

A Communication from the Grand Lodge of Kentucky, 
announcing the organization of that body in March, 1801, 



192 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


was received, read, and ordered to be acknowledged by the 
Grand Secretary. 

The Most Worshipful Grand Master Jacob Morton, 
announced, on December 2, that he had selected Brother 
Edward Livingston, Mayor of the city of New York, to fill 
the office of Deputy Grand Master, which was now vacant. 
Whereupon his installation was ordered for St. John’s Day. 
Nevertheless the ceremony transpired on December 4. 

The Committee appointed to address the Most Worshipful 
Robert R. Livingston, Past Grand Master, on behalf of the 
Grand Lodge, and to request his acceptance of a Past Grand 
Master’s Jewel, reported that, an elegant and appropriate 
jewel having been prepared, they, on August 9 last, presented 
it in due form, accompanied with the following : 

ADDRESS TO PAST GRAND MASTER LIVINGSTON. 

“Most Worshipful Past Grand Master: 

Permit us, as a Committee of the Grand Lodge and on 
their behalf, to express their regret at being deprived of 
your superintending care, and their grateful sense of the 
respectability the Order has derived from your long and 
faithful services in the station of Grand Master, and while 
in their name we request your acceptance of an appro- 
priate jewel as a mark of their respect and attachment, 
allow us to assure you of their warm wishes for your 
future prosperity. 

Long in the habit of respecting your public character, and 
of regarding you with veneration and affection as the head 
of our Fraternity, we cannot but feel sincere regret in part- 
ing with one so long and deservedly valued. Our reluctance 
is only abated by the consideration that those talents which 
have reflected luster on the institution, will now be exerted 
to promote the welfare of your country on a more exten- 
sive scale; yet be assured, however far your public duties 
may remove you from us, the grateful attachment of your 
Masonic brethren shall be your constant companion, and 
shall connect you to us by an indissoluble chain. 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


193 


While you are journeying through distant regions or 
traversing the tumultuous billows of the deep, our fervent 
petition shall be to that Being who governs the various 
events of the world, that he may protect and guide you 
through all the dangerous passages of life, till in his own 
good time, He shall terminate your labors and conduct you 
laden with years and honors to that tranquil abode in which 
your fathers repose. 

And when at His awful fiat the slumber of death shall be 
broken — when that eternal day shall dawn whose light will 
penetrate the dark recesses of the tomb to wake the spirits 
of departed worth — may you arise decorated with the jewels 
of every Masonic virtue, entitled to partake of the pure 
delights of the celestial Lodge, erected in the heavens for 
the reception of the just.” 

To which the Most Worshipful, the Past Grand Master, 
delivered the following reply : 

REPLY. 

“ Brethren : 

I receive with great sensibility this new mark of the 
attachment with which the Grand Lodge have, on so many 
occasions, honored me. I derive, however, no small con- 
solation, when parting with them, from finding my place 
in the Lodge occupied by a brother who has, by a long 
series of services, been enabled at once to evince his attach- 
ment to the Fraternity and his ability to promote their 
interests. 

I shall wear, brethren, with pride and pleasure the jewel 
with which the Fraternity have honored me, and consider it 
as a memorial of the pleasing connection that binds us to 
each other, when the duties I owe the public shall have sepa- 
rated me from them. 

Receive my thanks, brethren, for your friendly and 
affectionate wishes, present to the Grand Lodge my ardent 
prayers for the present and future happiness of its mem- 
bers, and believe that I shall, in every situation of life, feel 

VOL. II. — 13 



194 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


myself deeply interested in their prosperity and that of the 
respectable and useful society over which they so worthily 
preside. 

Robert R. Livingston. 

To Martin Hoffman, \ 

Abraham Skinner, V Committee.” 

Peter Irving. ) 

The Festival of St. John was duly observed, the brethren 
marching from the Assembly room in the Tontine Hotel to 
the selected place of rendezvous. 

1802. 

On March 3, 1802, it was decreed that all Lodges were to 
be held responsible for the dues owing to the Grand Lodge 
by the members. 

MASONIC HALL. 

For an extended period, the Grand Lodge had been look- 
ing for a suitable Hall for its regular and special sessions. 
To this end a Committee had been appointed June 25, 1801, 
consisting of Brothers Cadwallader D. Colden, Daniel Mc- 
Cormick, and Robert Cocks. The Committee reported on 
December 2, its determination, but at the same time men- 
tioned that certain propositions had been made by Brother 
Weeks on the subject, so recently, that the Committee had 
no time previous to this meeting to confer with each other on 
those propositions, and further time was accordingly granted. 
On May 14, 1802, the Committee “ reported that, from esti- 
mates which have been presented and information obtained, 
they had formed an opinion, that lots might be purchased and 
a Masonic Hall erected thereon, sufficiently large to accom- 
modate the Grand Lodge and a number of private Lodges, for 
the sum of $15,000 ; that the Committee have had doubts 
as to what would be the best means of raising the money 
required, and that there was some difference of opinion on 
this subject, whether it would be better to do it by creating 
a stock that may be productive to the proprietors, or to rely 



IN THE STATE OP NEW YORK. 


195 


upon the zeal of the Fraternity for the honor and prosperity 
of the Craft in presenting donations adequate to the purpose. 

The Committee, therefore, determined to report to the 
Grand Lodge a scheme for raising the money. 

First, That there be six hundred shares at twenty-five 
dollars each. 

Second, That these shares be sold to Masons for notes 
payable to the Treasurer, or order, at six, nine, and twelve 
months, and that the sum of twenty shillings on each share 
be paid in advance, at the time of subscription. 

Third , That each Lodge under the jurisdiction of this 
Grand Lodge, be advised to appoint a Committee to sell the 
shares. 

Fourth, That when a sufficient number of shares are sold, 
a site may be purchased and a contract be made for the 
building, the contractor to be bound to take the notes as 
pay. 

Fifth, That the property be conveyed to trustees, who 
shall be bound to appropriate it to none other than Masonic , 
uses, and who shall receive rent from the Grand Lodge, and 
such other private Lodges as may choose to be accommo- 
dated in it, which rent the trustees shall distribute as often 
as it shall be received, among the stockholders. 

That it appeared to the Committee, that the brethren who 
may become owners of a stock of this sort, besides the satis- 
faction that must be derived from seeing the fathers of their 
institution accommodated with a place to assemble in, con- 
sistent with the respect that is due to them, find themselves 
possessed of a property, not less productive than any stock in 
the United States. 

But if the Grand Lodge should be of the opinion that 
the money may be expected from donations, the Committee 
propose that subscriptions be opened in each Lodge. That 
each Lodge be advised to appoint a Committee to obtain 
subscriptions, and that notes as above mentioned be taken 
for the sums subscribed ; provided the subscriptions exceed 
ten dollars.” 

Whereupon it was 



196 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


“ Resolved, That the first part of the report of said Com- 
mittee be adopted, and that a Committee of seven be ap- 
pointed to carry the object of the report into execution.” 

The importance given the subject is evidenced by the rank 
of the Committee — the Most Worshipful Grand Master, the 
Eight Worshipful Brother Golden, the Right Worshipful 
Grand Secretary, the Worshipful Brothers Weeks, Irving, 
Dunham, and Torrence. 

COUNTRY DISSATISFACTION WITH GRAND LODGE. 

A circular letter from the Chairman of a Joint Committee 
of Union.) Master's , and Temple Lodges) in the city of 
Albany, was communicated by Apollo Lodge, No. 49, and 
read in the words following : 


“ Albany, December 25, 1801. 

Brethren : 

Union, Master’s, and Temple Lodges in this city, from a 
conviction that the holding of the Grand Lodge in the city 
of New York is inconvenient for Lodges here and in other 
remote parts of the State, have resolved that, in their opin- 
ion, it ought in the future to be held in the city of Albany, 
as a more central, convenient, and proper place, and they 
have, by concurrent resolutions, fixed on the fifteenth day 
of next February for the Lodges East and West and North, 
and so far South as it may be deemed expedient to meet by 
proxies or deputies in this city, to take the same into con- 
sideration, and determine on that important subject, or the 
establishment of a Grand Lodge in this place, in case such 
establishment should be deemed preferable and more expedi- 
ent. By like concurrent resolutions of the Lodges here, we 
are appointed a Committee (composed of officers of those 
Lodges), to notify you of such intended meeting, and to 
request your Lodge, if you are disposed to co-operate in the 
business, to appoint one or more proxies with ample powers 
for the above purpose. 

We presume it is unnecessary to detail the various reasons 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


197 


which have induced the Lodges here to adopt this measure. 
Among many other reasons, which we presume will appear 
obvious to you, permit us to state the following : 

1. That the present Grand Lodge may be composed of the 
Grand Master and Wardens of only five Lodges, of which 
three make a quorum or majority, which can make laws and 
regulations by which all the Lodges and brethren in the 
State are to be bound ; and, 

2. That the privilege allowed to Lodges of appointing 
proxies is limited to a Master of a Lodge, or Past Master, 
residing in the city of New York. Brother Morton, as Sec- 
retary of the Grand Lodge, in his then circular letter says : 
‘ The advantages which the absent Lodges will derive from 
their proxies must be very obvious, they will thereby be 
informed of every material proceeding, &c. If there is no 
particular person in this city whom you shall wish as your 
proxy, I shall have no objection for the present to serve your 
Lodge in that capacity/ In consequence of which, Brother 
Morton was appointed proxy to several Lodges ; but so far as 
it respects St. George’s Lodge of Schenectady, and Union 
and Temple Lodges of Albany (of which he has been proxy), 
neither of them has experienced any advantage or informa- 
tion ; and, 

3. Were the privilege of appointing proxies not limited, 
and confined to a Master or Past Master residing in New 
York, the attendance of proxies, although members of 
Lodges, at so remote a distance as New York, would be 
attended with great difficulty, delay, and expense. 

4. The officers of the Lodge in New York, who generally 
compose the Grand Lodge, have steadily and uniformly 
engrossed all the offices of the Grand Lodge ; they all reside 
there, and totally deprive all the country Lodges of a par- 
ticipation in any part of their representation. 

5. By the present Constitution of the Grand Lodge (Sec- 
tion 10, Rule 4), every Master of a country Lodge is to pay 
annually fifty cents to the Grand Lodge, and by the fifth 
rule, every candidate is to pay $1.25 ; and for these dues the 
Lodges are made responsible, a thing unexampled in the 



198 


HISTORY OP FREEMASONRY 


former Constitutions, by which the Lodges paid an annual 
sum to the Grand Lodge in lieu of all other dues and con- 
tributions. 

6. It does not appear probable that the country Lodges 
are to expect a remedy so long as the Grand Lodge (which 
is generally composed of the brethren who reside in the 
city of New York) is held there, and while the liberty of 
the other Lodges having proxies is thus limited and confined ; 
nor would the inconvenience, delay, and expense of attend- 
ance be removed, even were the country Lodges at liberty 
to appoint proxies, officers of their own Lodges. 

7. That the city of Albany, being the present seat of 
Government and the most central and convenient place, the 
Grand Lodge ought to be held there. 

If your Lodge shall be disposed to send a proxy or proxies 
for the contemplated purposes, you will be pleased to make 
out a proper deputation for the purpose, under the seal of 
your Lodge, signed by the Master and Secretary. 

We would beg leave to recommend your calling a chapter 
or Extra Lodge, without delay, and permit us to recommend 
the following form for appointing a proxy : 

I 

At a meeting of Lodge, at , on 

the day of January, 1802. Resolved, that Brothers 

be, and they are hereby appointed 

proxies, to represent this Lodge in a meeting of proxies from 
Union, Master’s, and Temple Lodges in the city of Albany, 
and of such other Lodges as shall convene in said city, on 
the 15th day of February next, for the purpose of consider- 
ing and determining on the holding of the Grand Lodge in 
future in said city, or the establishment of a Grand Lodge 
there ; and further, to devise and adopt such measures as 
shall be deemed proper and expedient to advance and pro- 
mote the honor and interest of the Craft. 

And our said proxies are hereby fully empowered to do 
and act in our behalf in and concerning the premises as 
fully and effectually as if we ourselves were personally 
present. 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


199 


In witness whereof, we have fixed the seal of our Lodge, 
and the Master and Secretary have subscribed their respec- 
tive names to these presents. 

We are, brethren, 

With respect and esteem, 

Your humble servants, 

(Signed) P. W. Yates, 
Chairman of the General Committee 
of Union, Master’s, and Temple Lodges 
in the city of Albany. 

To the Worshipful Master and Wardens, and Brethren of 
Apollo Lodge.” 

The Communication being read and taken under consid- 
eration, the Senior Warden (of Apollo Lodge) moved the 
following resolutions, which were duly seconded and unani- 
mously passed, to wit : 

“ Whereupon , be it Resoloed , as the sense of this Lodge, 
that inasmuch as the said Lodges in the city of Albany, as 
well as this and the other Lodges invited to join in such 
convention, have received their several charters under the 
Grand Lodge of the Stat^ of New York, or otherwise for- 
mally acknowledged its jurisdiction over them, the only 
legal and proper place in which the subject, above proposed, 
can be regularly called up or discussed by them, is in £he 
body of the Grand Lodge, assembled in ample form, at a 
stated Grand Communication, wherein every Lodge under 
the same jurisdiction will, or ought to be, properly repre- 
sented, and that any other convention of Lodges within such 
jurisdiction, or their representatives, not authorized by war- 
rant or dispensation from the Grand Lodge for that purpose, 
who shall assume to themselves the right and power to dis- 
cuss and determine the question where the Grand Lodge 
shall be holden, would be irregular and an infringement 
upon the rights, dignity, and privileges of the Grand Lodge, 
and a breach of excellent Constitutions and a violation of 
Masonic obligations. That the reasons assigned in the said 



200 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


Communication for adopting the proposed measure appear 
to this Lodge to be dictated, in too great a degree, by partial 
and local considerations, and too strongly marked with want 
of candor and fraternal respect. 

That this Lodge is not prepared to declare that five 
Lodges in the city of New York compose not so proper and 
respectable a quorum, for transacting the business of the 
Fraternity in the Grand Lodge, as would the like number of 
Lodges in the city of Albany and its vicinity ; or, that the 
brethren in the city of New York would not experience as 
many and great inconveniences from the removal of the 
Grand Lodge to the city of Albany, as the brethren in the 
latter place now feel from its establishment in the city of 
New York; or that proxies more faithful to their charge 
might be found among the latter than are now found among 
the former; or that ‘the officers of the Lodges in New York 
have steadily and uniformly engrossed all the offices and 
officers of the Grand Lodge , 5 since the long and honorable 
services of our late Most Worshipful Grand Master are not 
forgotten; or that ‘they totally deprive all the country 
Lodges of a participation in any part of the representation , 5 
since every country Lodge has a constitutional right to be 
represented in the Grand Lodge; and it has never been 
known to this Lodge that such right was ever disputed, or 
the representatives of any country Lodge denied a seat in 
that assembly. 

That it does not sufficiently appear to this Lodge how 
the removal of the Grand Lodge to the city of Albany is to 
procure salutary alterations, in such constitutional regula- 
tions of the institution, as may, by some, have been consid- 
ered inconvenient, impolite, or oppressive. 

That, in the opinion of this Lodge, a strict adherence to 
the truth and candor in all mutual intercourse among Masons 
is an indispensable duty, and that every deviation therefrom 
ought to be marked with pointed disapprobation. 

And be it further Resolved , That this Lodge does most 
heartily concur with the brethren of Union, Master’s, and 
Temple Lodges, in the city of Albany, in a sincere and 



IN THE STATE OP NEW YORK. 


201 


ardent desire for a more frequent participation in the com- 
munication, privilege, and honors of the Grand Lodge, and 
will most cheerfully unite with them in any regular and 
constitutional measures which may be agreed upon to effect 
a removal of the Grand Lodge to the city of Albany, or for 
the establishment of a provincial Grand Lodge in that city, 
provided such a measure shall, after proper deliberation, be 
deemed expedient for the general good of the institution, 
and conducive to that harmony and good fellowship which 
ought always to subsist among Masons. 

Resolved , further, That the Secretary forthwith transmit a 
copy of the foregoing resolutions to the Chairman of the 
Joint Committee of Union, Master’s, and Temple Lodges, 
and to the Secretary of the Grand Lodge. 

By order of the Lodge, 

Jesse Bacon, Master, 

Nath. Adams, Senior Warden, 
Moses Doty, Junior Warden. 

A true extract from the minutes. 

Jacob Houghton, Secretary. 

The above Communication and resolution came before the 
Grand Lodge, under cover from Apollo Lodge, directed to 
the Grand Secretary, thus : 

Troy, January 20, 1802. 

To the Secretary of the Grand Lodge of the State of New 
York: 

Right Worshipful Brother : I have the honor, through 
you, to transmit the enclosed resolutions of Apollo Lodge, 
No. 49, to the Grand Lodge. 

And am, sir, respectfully, 

Your most obedient servant and brother, 

Jacob Houghton, 
Secretary Apollo Lodge, No. 49.” 

In Grand Lodge it was then moved, seconded, and unan- 
imously 



202 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


“ Resolved, That the Grand Secretary acknowledge the 
receipt of the said Communication, and inform the Master, 
Wardens, and brethren of Apollo Lodge, No. 49, that the 
Grand Lodge highly approve of the conduct of the said 
Lodge in relation to the said Communication (and of the 
proper sense the Grand Lodge entertain of their Masonic 
duty), and of the intelligent manner in which they repre- 
sented to the Lodges in Albany the conduct which, as mem- 
bers of the Masonic Institution, it became them to pursue. 

Resolved , That a Committee of three members of this 
Grand Lodge, be appointed a Committee to draft and for- 
ward to the Lodges in the northern parts of the State, a 
circular address apprising them of the impropriety of the 
measures pursued by the Lodges at Albany, and requesting 
them not to accede thereto. And that they also inform Mas- 
ter’s, Temple, and Union Lodges, in Albany, of the charges 
exhibited against them, and require them to appear before 
this Grand Lodge, at their next regular meeting, to answer 
concerning their said conduct.” 

7~ 

The Eight Worshipful Deputy Grand Master, Edward 
Livingston, the Eight Worshipful Brother Hoffman, and 
Worshipful Brother Samuel Jones, Jr., were appointed a 
Committee for the purpose aforesaid. 

In due course trouble was brewing in and among the 
Lodge members at Albany ; they readily began to perceive 
that they were to cope with a power that would be strength- 
ened by the good will and approval of almost all the State 
Lodges, and that their own adherents would be few. Dis- 
sension immediately appeared, and the brethren were arrayed 
on two sides of, to them, a momentous question — obedience 
and law, or severity of Grand Lodge in its judgment. 

Union Lodge appeared to be the moving spirit, and, in 
view of the possible, it ordered the Secretary to enter its 
several Warrants in extenso on record in the minutes, only 
two days prior to the proposed convention of proxies, to wit, 
February 15, 1802. The destruction of portions of minute 
and record books is certainly strong circumstantial evi- 



IN THE STATE OP NEW YORK. 


203 


deuce of the convention having been held. The December 
election quarrel showed two prominent divisions in the mem- 
bership, the decided majority favoring the position of the 
Grand Lodge, and acknowledging their subordination to that 
authority ; while the minority claimed they were still subject 
to the original Warrant, granted by the Provincial Grand 
Master, George Harrison, issued in 1765. 

Thus two elections for officers were held, the one on 
December 20, and the other on the twenty-sixth of said 
month. The nature and results of this sectional quarrel will 
be found recited in Yol. I., pp. 164-174, recounting, also, the 
deeds of the two opponent Masters, Peter Fryer and Peter 
W; Yates. 

On September 1, 1802, there was received by the Grand 
Lodge “ a memorial of the Convention of sundry Lodges 
under the jurisdiction of this Grand Lodge held at Albany.” 
Again, on December 1 succeeding, a Communication from 
sundry Masons assembled at Albany was read, and a Com- 
mittee of five appointed to take the same into consideration, 
and to draft and report a suitable reply. This Committee 
consisted of the Grand Master and his Deputy, the Senior 
Grand Warden, and Brothers Martin Hoffman and Peter 
Irving. The report was presented at a Grand Lodge of 
Emergency, held on the fifteenth, and the resolution 
adopted : 

“ That the Grand Secretary transmit the sentiments and 
opinions of the Grand Lodge to the respective Lodges that 
formed the Convention, and that the Lodges in Albany be 
summoned to appear and answer to this Grand Lodge con- 
cerning their un-Masonic conduct in calling and holding the 
said convention without the knowledge or sanction of the 
Grand Lodge.” 

The Grand Lodge showed a brave front, but carried none 
of its insinuated threats into execution. There seemed to be 
an evident hope to override the difficulty without going to 
extreme measures. In 1804, Worshipful Peter Fryer was 
governing Union Lodge under the Warrant of the State 



204 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


Grand Lodge, and memorialized the Grand Lodge in relation 
thereto; Worshipful Peter W. Yates at the same time was 
giving the impression to the members that the Lodge was 
subject to the Provincial Warrant. Little if any business 
or work was being done. In May, 1805, the Committee 
of Grand Lodge finally decided that the officers elected 
December 20 were duly and constitutionally elected. A 
compromise now, however, appeared to exhibit itself. The 
Grand Master had recommended harmony and submission 
to both parties ; that, while old Union Lodge shall be recog- 
nized, an additional Warrant shall be issued for a new Lodge, 
under the care and direction of Worshipful Peter Fryer 
and his confreres. This being accepted, both factions laid 
down their disputes, reunited, and on June 13, 1805, an 
application was made by both parties for the destruction of 
all the papers specified in the agreement. Whereupon 
Grand Lodge 

“ Ordered, that the same be referred to the Grand Secre- 
tary, with power to destroy such of the papers as to him 
appeared proper.” 

The other Lodges connected with or incident to the Con- 
vention of February 15, 1802, succumbed to the inevitable, 
upon witnessing the strife in Union Lodge. Master’s Lodge, 
which had become Ho. 2, and was subsequently numbered 4 
and then 5, utterly failed to stand out in contravention to 
the decrees and intimidation of the Grand Lodge, and Tem- 
ple Lodge also readily surrendered. 

The Festival of St. John the Evangelist was duly observed 
December 27, 1801. 

The annual election occurred on June 2, 1802, aud resulted 
in the re-election of all the Grand Officers. 

It was deemed judicious to observe the Festival of St. John 
by a procession, a sermon, a collection, and a dinner, the 
moneys collected to be divided equally, between the Society for 
the Relief of Distressed Persons, and the Society for the Relief 
of Poor Widows with Small Children. Accordingly, on St. 



IN THE STATE OP NEW YORK. 


205 


John’s Day, the Grand Officers and the brethren assembled 
at Adams’ Hotel, in William Street, whence they proceeded 
through William, Wall, Broad, and Beaver streets to Trinity 
Church, where an eloquent sermon was delivered by Brother 
Washington Morton, of Howard Lodge, No. 9. The church 
services concluded, the Knights Templars, with drawn swords, 
escorted the Officers to Lovell’s Hotel, where dinner was 
enjoyed : for two boxes of cigars furnished by Brother 
Little, twenty-eight dollars were paid. 

Warrants were authorized, on September 1, for the estab- 
lishment of the following Lodges : 

Military Lodge, in the town of Manlius, Onondaga 
County. 

Phoebus Lodge, in Norwich, Chenango County. 

Friendship Lodge, in Stephentown, Rensselaer County. 

Hiram Lodge, in town of Plattsburg, Clinton County. 

Erin Lodge, to be held in the city of New York. 

Adelphi Lodge, to be held in the city of New York. 

MASONIC CERTIFICATE. 

The Grand Lodge, at this Communication, approved of the 
form of a Masonic certificate presented by Brother M. B. 
Higgins, and recommended the same to the Lodges under 
its jurisdiction. 

Farmers’ Lodge, to be held at Easton, Washington County, 
and a Lodge to be held at Onondaga, in the county of that 
name, were warranted December 1. 

1803. 

A COMMUNICATION AS TO THE U HIGHER DEGREES.” 

On March 2, 1803, a Communication received from John 
Mitchell, of South Carolina, styling himself K. H., P. R. S., 
Sovereign Grand Inspector General of the thirty-third degree 
of Masonry, and Grand Commander in the United States of 
America, was presented and read, whereupon it was 



206 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


“ Resolved , That the said Communication be referred to a 
Committee to examine the same, and to make such report 
thereon as they shall think proper, and that the said Com- 
mittee consist of the Grand Officers.” 

Neither the above Communication, in extenso , nor the 
report thereon, if any such was made, can be found in the 
minutes or among the files of records of the Grand Lodge. 

On June 1, 1803, the election excited little interest, and all 
the officers of the Grand Lodge were re-elected. 

Six Warrants for the establishment of Lodges were 
granted at this Communication, as follows : 

Yernon Lodge, in Hillsdale, Columbia County. 

Columbia Lodge, in Claverack, Columbia County. 

Mount Moriah Lodge, in Palmyra and Phillips, Ontario 
County. 

Revival Lodge, in Windham, Greene County. 

Constellation Lodge, in Mayfield, Montgomery County. 

Charity Lodge, in Worcester, Otsego County. 

The petition for a Widow’s Son’s Lodge, in the city of 
New York, was denied. 

DEDICATION OF ST. JOHN’S HALL. 

A noted assemblage of all the Grand Officers was held on 
June 8, 1803, at St. John’s Hall, for the purpose of conse- 
crating the Lodge rooms. The Grand Lodge having been 
duly opened, the Grand Master, Jacob Morton, announced 
the object of the assembling, and having explained the 
nature of the ceremony, proceeded to consecrate the build- 
ing according to the ancient usages and customs of the 
Fraternity. The Deputy Grand Master then delivered an 
address suited to the occasion, and the Grand Master closed 
the proceedings by congratulating the Lodges and brethren 
interested in completing the building. 

St. John’s Hall was erected in 1803 by Mr. Becannon, a 
member of Holland Lodge, No. 8. It stood in Frankfort 
Street, where French’s Hotel was afterwards built, and at 








IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


207 


the rear of where now stands the World publication building. 
The hall was four stories in height. The ground-floor con- 
tained a reading-room, saloon, and living apartments; the 
second and third floors were arranged and fitted for Lodge 
purposes, but were plain and unfinished ; the fourth floor 
contained the Chapter and Encampment rooms, which were 
highly ornate. Political meetings and festivals were like- 
wise held on the second floor. 

This was the first building in New York that was dedi- 
cated to Masonic purposes. It was placed in charge of 
Brother Henry Marsh. 


1804. 

MARTIN HOFFMAN, DEPUTY GRAND MASTER. 

Brother Edward Livingston having resigned the office of 
Deputy Grand Master, the Grand Master announced on Jan- 
uary 26, 1804, his appointment of Brother Martin Hoffman 
to fill the vacancy. And a committee of five, consisting of 
Brothers Sanford, Dunham, Bleecker, Underdonk, and 
Daniel D. Tompkins, were appointed to prepare for the 
ceremonial of installation. 

A Warrant was granted to a Lodge, to be held at Marl- 
borough, Ulster County; and permission was granted to 
Horizontal Lodge, in Dutchess County, to remove from 
Frederick to the town of Carmel. 

Warrants were also granted, March 7, to 

Malta Lodge, in the town of Saratoga, Saratoga County. 

Bethlehem Lodge, at Bethlehem, Albany County. 

Albion Lodge, in the city of New York. 

All the officers of the Grand Lodge were re-elected on 
June 6, 1804. And on the same date, a Warrant to establish 
a Lodge at Sag Harbor, in Suffolk County, was granted. 

DISTRICT INSPECTORS. GRAND VISITORS. 

On December 5, 1804, a resolution was presented to the 
Grand Lodge authorizing the Grand Master to appoint 



208 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


Inspectors in the several districts of the State as he should 
think proper, whose duty it should be to visit the several 
Lodges in such respective districts, to promote uniformity in 
their mode of working, to collect their dues, etc. This was 
referred to a Special Committee consisting of the Grand 
Master and the Deputy, and the Worshipful Brothers George 
Clinton, Jr., James Woods, and John C. Ludlow, and they 
were directed to report on the subject at the next meeting of 
the Grand Lodge. 

Inasmuch as nothing had been done by December 4, 1805, 
a resolution was introduced discharging the above-mentioned 
Committee, and a new one was appointed consisting of the 
Deputy Grand Master, Senior Grand Warden, and Grand 
Secretary, who were directed to report a law on the subject. 
This was complied with on the following February 19, read, 
amended, and passed, and ordered to be entered in a book to 
be provided for such purpose. 

A Committee was further appointed to draft a circular 
address to the different Lodges, explaining and enforcing the 
principles and duties of Masonry, which should accompany 
the notification to them of the law, and the appointment of 
Grand Visitors under it. The Committee consisted of the 
Senior Grand Warden, Past Master Sanford, and the Grand 
Secretary. 

A copy of the Law does not appear to be on file in the 
office of the Grand Secretary, but one of the chief objects 
sought to be obtained, was the more prompt payment of dues 
by the various Lodges. 

On December 3, 1806, the Grand Lodge resolved that no 
Lodge in the city shall, after six months from this time, be 
entitled to vote in this Grand Lodge, in any case whatever, 
if such Lodge shall not, within six months immediately pre- 
ceding, have paid its dues to the Grand Lodge ; and that no 
Lodge out of said city, after eighteen months from this time, 
shall be entitled to vote in the Grand Lodge, in any case 
whatever, if such Lodge shall not, within eighteen months 
immediately preceding, have paid up its dues to the Grand 
Lodge. 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


209 


Upon examining the records of the Grand Stewards’ 
Lodge, August 31, 1808, it will, be found that the Grand 
Visitor, Brother Edmonds, in the City District, stated that, 
after paying amounts expended, he had $50: 75, balance. 
The account was audited, and the balance directed to be 
paid to the Grand Treasurer. But the Grand Visitor Woods 
reported that he had collected no dues, and his expenses 
were $63.68. His accounts were audited, and the Grand 
Treasurer directed to pay Brother Woods the amount of his 
expenses. By resolution, this coincidence was directed to be 
reported to the Grand Lodge. On September 7, the subject 
was reported upon to the Grand Lodge, which led to a 
detailed exhibit of the condition of seven Lodges. It was 
recommended that the dues of Hudson Lodge, No. 13, 
Friendship Lodge, No. 116, St. Lawrence Lodge, No. 92, 
and St. Andrew’s Lodge, No. 48, be remitted, but author- 
ized the Grand Visitor to compromise where the Lodges 
should offer to pay their dues in part. That the offer of 
compromise of Mark Lodge, No. 91, be accepted. That the 
Warrant of Washington Lodge, held in the town of Living- 
ston, and that of Columbia Lodge, No. 101, should be sur- 
rendered, unless the dues were paid within six months. 

Both of the Grand Visitors were voted by the Grand 
Lodge the thanks of that Body, for the great industry and 
ability with which they had discharged their respective 
duties. 

The Law as to Grand Visitors became at times a subject of 
criticism, and on December 1, 1813, several Communications 
from different Lodges respecting the present plan of Grand 
Visitors, and recommending some alterations therein, were 
read and referred to the Grand Officers. 

On the succeeding June 1, 1814, the Officers of the Grand 
Lodge, to whom had been referred several Communications 
respecting the present plan of Grand Visitors, and recom- 
mending some alterations thereon, reported 

“ That, from a variety of causes, the system of District 
Grand Visitors has not realized the expectations that had 
vol. n. — 14 



210 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


been formed of it ; that some of the Grand Visitors have 
declined acting, others have, resigned, and few have attended 
to their duty. 

That, in the opinion of the Grand Officers, the establish- 
ment of three Grand Visitations would conduce to greater 
uniformity of working, would facilitate the collection of 
dues, would promote a more intimate connection with the 
Lodges, and would essentially subserve the interests of Free- 
masonry. 

That this plan would have been recommended at an ear- 
lier period, had they not been impressed with an opinion 
that its success must depend upon the selection of proper 
characters to superintend its execution. They, therefore, 
have been diligently employed in investigating the qualifica- 
tions of suitable candidates, and now feel considerable confi- 
dence in recommending the following arrangement : 

That the State be divided into three Grand Masonic dis- 
tricts for visitation. 

1st. The first district to consist of the southern district of 
the State, except the city of New York and the counties of 
Putnam, Orange, Ulster, and Sullivan. 

2d. The second district to consist of the residue of the 
middle and of the eastern district, except the’ counties of 
Clinton and Franklin. 

3d. The third district to consist of the western ’ district 
and the counties of Clinton and Franklin. 

That the Worshipful Brother Thomas Lowndes, of the city 
of New York, be appointed Bight Worshipful Grand Visitor 
of the first district; the Worshipful Brother Ebenezer Wads- 
worth, of Lebanon, in the county of Columbia, be appointed 
Eight Worshipful Grand Visitor of the second district ; and 
the Worshipful Brother Enos, of Eaton, in the county of 
Madison, be appointed Bight Worshipful Grand Visitor of 
the third district. 

That the rules heretofore adopted for Grand Visitors shall 
apply to the present arrangement, except that, in addition to 
their expenses, a suitable compensation shall be allowed to 



IN THE STATE OP NEW YORK. 


211 


the Grand Visitors, and that the Grand Officers be author- 
ized to agree with the Grand Visitors upon the amount of 
their respective compensation. 

(Signed) De Witt Clinton, Grand Master.” 

In behalf of himself and the other Grand Officers, the 
Right Worshipful Grand Secretary then offered the follow- 
ing resolutions, which were duly seconded and carried unani- 
mously : 

“ Resolved , That the foregoing report be accepted, and the 
plan therein recommended adopted ; and that the Warrants 
heretofore granted to Grand Visitors within this State be, 
and the same are, hereby revoked and declared to be of 
no further effect, and that the Grand Visitors heretofore 
appointed do severally surrender their Warrants to the 
Grand Visitor of the district within which they respectively 
reside, by whom the said Warrants shall be transmitted to 
the Grand Secretary. 

Resolved , Also, that the Grand Visitors appointed as afore- 
said have, and they are hereby invested with, full power and 
authority to call upon the late Grand Visitors within their 
respective districts, and the representatives of such of them 
as may be deceased, for a settlement of the moneys received 
by them, and. to come to such settlement with them, touch- 
ing the same, as such Grand Visitors shall respectively think 
proper, and to receive whatever balance or balances may be 
due to the Grand Lodge, and proper receipts and acquittances 
therefor, to make and give. 

Resolved , That the Grand Visitors appointed as aforesaid 
have, and they are hereby invested with, full power and 
authority to compound with the Lodges within their respec- 
tive districts for all dues already due and payable to the 
Grand Lodge, or which shall become so on or before the 
festival of St. John the Baptist, next ensuing, provided sat- 
isfactory evidence shall be given to him that such Lodge or 
Lodges, with whom he is so authorized to compound, are 
unable to pay the whole amount of their dues, in which case 



212 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


the Grand Visitors shall and may take such compromise and 
settlement as they in their discretion shall think fit. 

Resolved , Further, that the said Grand Visitors be, and 
they are hereby expressly directed, to inform the Lodges 
under their respective visitations that this Grand Lodge does 
require an immediate settlement and payment of their dues 
to the festival aforesaid, and that they will vigorously 
enforce the punctual payment of their dues that shall accrue 
from and after that time. 

Resolved , Further, that three hundred copies of the fore- 
going report and these resolutions, be printed and distributed 
by the Grand Secretary among the different Grand Visitors 
appointed as aforesaid, for the information of f the Lodges 
under their respective visitations. 55 


1805. 

A petition, received March 6, 1805, from “Worshipful 
Brother General c Rey’ and others, 55 praying for leave to 
form a new French Lodge by the name of Lodge La Sin- 
cerity was presented by the Most Worshipful Grand Master, 
and having been read, it was 

“ Resolved , That the prayer of the petition be granted, 
and the several persons therein named be installed as the 
respective officers of that Lodge. 55 

General “ Rey 55 being in attendance, was introduced, and 
seated on the right of the Deputy Grand Master ; subse- 
quently he read a paper in the French language, which was 
referred for translation and reply. The reply was duly 
written and approved September 4. 

Hiram Lodge, Ho. 27, was permitted to locate at the town 
of Washington, instead of the town of Armenia. 

June 5, 1805, witnessed the re-election of the Grand 
Officers. Warrants were authorized to be issued to Benja- 
min Hasbrook and others, to establish a Lodge in Hopewell, 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


213 


by that name, in the county of Dutchess ; also to Samuel 0. 
Kennedy and others, in the town of Adams, by the name of 
Rising Sun Lodge, in the county of Jefferson. A motion 
that the Grand Lodge walk in procession on next St. John’s 
Day was made, but the debate was concluded and motion 
denied. 

The subject of a place of meeting for the Grand Lodge, 
which had been referred to Brothers Fox, Fitzpatrick, and 
M. L. Davis on December 7, 1803, to inquire into the most 
eligible situation, was not reported upon within the year. 
On March 6, 1805, a committee for a similar purpose was 
appointed, which reported, June 5, that diligent search had 
been made for a room to accommodate the Grand Lodge, and 
they were of the opinion that it would be most advantageous 
to remain where they were. 

Friendly Communications received from the Grand Lodges 
of Massachusetts, New Jersey, Virginia, and Kentucky, were 
read before the Grand Lodge, June 13, and suitable answers 
were directed to be transmitted. 

Tioga Lodge, No. 79, was authorized to hold its Communi- 
cations at Binghamton, in lieu of Union, Chenango County. 


NECESSARY GRAND LODGE PROPERTIES. 

The Grand Treasurer was instructed to purchase a Bible, 
and also as many candlesticks and snuffers as he should think 
necessary for use of the Grand Lodge. 

The Honorable Daniel D. Tompkins having resigned as 
Grand Secretary, the Grand Master was pleased to appoint 
Brother John Wells to that office. Fraternal Communica- 
tions received from the Grand Lodges of England and 
Maryland, were attentively listened to by the Grand Lodge, 
September 4, and suitable replies ordered to be transmitted. 

On the petition of Cyrus Strong and sundry other breth- 
ren, a Warrant was authorized to be issued to hold a Lodge 
at Jericho, Chenango County, by the name of Friendship 
Lodge. 



214 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


1806. 

DISTRICT INSPECTORS. 

The subject of the appointment, by the Grand Master, of 
Inspectors in districts of the State, to visit the several 
Lodges in such districts, to promote uniformity in their mode 
of working, to collect dues, etc., was before the Grand Lodge, 
December 5, 1804, and a Special Committee was appointed 
to consider and report upon the subject at the next session. 
Nothing, however, having been done in the matter, on 
‘December 4, 1805, the subject was placed in charge of a new 
committee, who reported, February. 19, 1806, in favor of 
dividing the State into districts and the appointment of 
Inspectors therein. This action took further form in the 
appointment of a Committee to draft a circular address to 
the different Lodges, explaining and enforcing the principles 
and duties of Masonry, which should accompany the notifi- 
cation to them of the law and the appointment of Grand 
Visitors under it. 

That the discipline of the Grand Lodge was to be main- 
tained, and its transactions promptly attended to, is evidenced 
by the adoption of a motion that no person be admitted into 
the Grand Lodge after one hour from its opening. 

Two friendly and courteous Communications were re- 
ceived, one on December 4, 1805, from the Grand Lodge of 
Kentucky ; and the other, on February 19, 1806, from the 
Grand Lodge of England, dated June 5, 1805; they were 
duly received, and it was directed that they be suitably 
responded to by the Grand Secretary. 

A Lodge, to be designated Hiram Lodge, was warranted, 
and located at Newburgh. 

Warrants were authorized, March 5, 1806, for the estab- 
lishment of the following Lodges: 

“ The Rising Sun Lodge,” at Springfield, Otsego County. 

Mount Moriah Lodge, in the city of New York. 

Coxsackie Lodge, in the town of Coxsackie, Greene 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


215 


County, in place of another Warrant theretofore granted, 
returned. 

Sherburne Lodge, at Sherburne, Chenango County. 

Mount Yernon Lodge, to be the new name of Union 
Lodge, which had surrendered its Colonial Warrant. 

The election, held June 4, 1806, resulted in a number of 
changes in the Grand Officer list, as will be seen by the fol- 
lowing result : 

The Honorable De Witt Clinton, Grand Master. 

Brother James Woods, Senior Grand Warden. 

“ Philip S. Yan Rensselaer, Junior Grand Warden. 

“ Robert Cocks, Grand Treasurer. 

“ Rev. John Ireland, Grand Chaplain. 

“ John R. Boos, Grand Pursuivant. 

“ Joseph Jacobs, Grand Tyler. 

A jewel, expressive of the high sense which the Grand 
Lodge entertained for the retiring Grand Master, Jacob Mor- 
ton, was directed to be procured and presented. 

SKETCH OF GRAND MASTER, DE WITT CLINTON. 

De Witt Clinton, an American statesman of English 
origin, son of a major-general in the United States army, 
and descended on his mother’s side from the Dutch family 
of De Witt, was born in 1769, at Little Britain, State of 
New York. Being educated at Columbia College in all the 
branches of the law, and having studied under Brother Judge 
Samuel Jones, he was admitted to the Bar, and became pri- 
vate secretary to his uncle, General George Clinton, till the 
end of his administration in 1785. In 1797 he was elected a 
member of the New York Legislature, in 1801, chosen a sen- 
ator of the United States, and, beginning with the year 1803, 
he served several terms as mayor of New York City. He 
was Lieutenant-Governor of the State from 1811 to 1813 ; 
in 1816 Brother Clinton was Governor of the State, which 
office he held for some twelve years. His name will be for- 
ever identified with the Erie Canal, on which he was borne 
triumphantly from Buffalo to the city of Albany. Brother 



216 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


Clinton was connected with most of the literary and scien- 
tific institutions of the United States and Great Britain, and 
from his pen we note several productions in the shape of 
speeches, governor’s messages, addresses to the army, and 
communications regarding the Erie Canal. 

Brother De Witt Clinton was a member of Holland 
Lodge, No. 8, and its Master in 1794; he was Junior Grand 
Warden in 1795,-96,-97, Senior Grand Warden in 1798, and 
his next official position in Grand Lodge was that of Grand 
Master, to which he was elected in 1806, and in which office 
he served for fourteen consecutive years, to and including 
1819, when he was succeeded by Daniel D. Tompkins, Vice- 
President of the United States. There is no other man of 
New York State who has exerted so great an influence on 
her destiny, or whose name is more likely to be perpetuated 
in her history. He wa^ the Pericles of his age, equal in 
intellect to the illustrious Athenian, but his superior in 
morals; and much more entitled to grateful remembrance, 
for his noble qualities were devoted more to the welfare of 
his country than to its adornment. Careless of personal 
wealth, he left little fortune but his fame, his entire estate 
being valued at $5,000. Andrew Jackson, President of the 
United States, an eminent Mason, said of him at his death, 
that New York had lost one of her most useful sons and the 
nation one of its brightest ornaments. 

The installation of the officers took place on June 19, with 
much ceremony. The Honorable De Witt Clinton was 
seated on the right of Brother Martin Hoffman, who had 
been delegated to perform the service by the retiring Grand 
Master. The Dispensation was read. 

Eight Worshipful Brother Hoffman then installed the 
Honorable De Witt Clinton, according to the ancient rites 
and ceremonies, which he concluded by a neat, perspicacious 
address to the Grand Master, explanatory of the Masonic 
duties imposed by the office. 

By request, Brother Hoffman installed the remainder of 
the Grand Officers. The Grand Master announced his 







IK THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


217 


appointment of Brother Martin Hoffman as the Deputy 
Grand Master, and Brother John Wells as the Grand Sec- 
retary. 

The Grand Master then arose and delivered an address to 
the Grand Lodge with acknowledged eloquence, replete with 
Masonic instruction. 

The records of the Grand Lodge here seem to interject an 
apologetic explanation as to why Eight Worshipful Brother 
Cadwallader D. Colden was not the officiating installing 
officer, inasmuch as he was the oldest officer of rank present 
when the Grand Lodge was first opened. The explanation 
by Deputy Grand Master Hoffman and the temporary pre- 
siding officer, Brother Glass, of Holland Lodge, Ho. 8, 
appears to have been “ that it was owing altogether to a 
mistake that Brother Colden had not been called to the East, 
and that no disrespect was intended to Brother Colden by 
the omission.” A resolution was also unanimously adopted, 
tendering the thanks of the Grand Lodge to Brother Cad- 
wallader D. Colden for his services during five years as 
Senior Grand Warden, and for his uniform zeal and atten- 
tion to the interests of the Fraternity. 

Two Warrants were then granted, one to establish Trinity 
Lodge at Cherry Yalley, Otsego County; and the other, 
Friendship Lodge, at Owego, Tioga County. The brethren 
confined within the city prison were granted a Dispensation 
to open and hold a Lodge within the said limits, for the cele- 
bration of the ensuing festival. A number of Lodges were 
warranted September 3 ; to wit : 

Zion Lodge, Ho. 1, at Detroit, Mich., it having petitioned 
for a new Warrant, and having surrendered to this Grand 
Lodge the former Warrant held by it from the Grand Lodge 
of Quebec, the State boundary line having been changed. 

Washington Lodge, at Stephentown, Westchester County. 

Benevolent Lodge, in the city of Hew York. 

Clinton Lodge, in the city of Hew York. 

Granville Lodge, at the town of Granville, Washington 
County. 



218 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


Aurora Lodge, at Sharon, Franklin County, State of Ohio. 

Fraternal Communications were received from the Grand 
Lodges of North Carolina and Tennessee ; also one from the 
Grand Lodge of England, in relation to expulsions, which 
were ordered to be answered and filed. 

Worshipful Brother John G. Tardy, proxy of Chosen 
Friends’ Lodge, Demerara, paid fifty dollars on account of 
dues, but presented no returns. 

Three Lodges were warranted December 3, 1806. 

Northern Constellation Lodge, within the limits of the 
towns of Chateaugay, or Harrison, Clinton County, as the 
brethren may elect. 

Orient Lodge, at Hamburg, Clinton County. 

Clinton Lodge, at Plattsburg, Clinton County. 

VOTES TO DEPEND UPON DUES PAID. 

The Lodges being very lax in the payment of their dues, 
it was 

“ Resolved , That no Lodge in this city shall, after six 
months from this time, be entitled to vote in this Grand 
Lodge, in any case whatever, if such Lodge shall not, within 
six months immediately preceding, have paid its dues to this 
Grand Lodge ; and that no Lodge out of the said city, after 
eighteen months from this time, shall be entitled to vote in 
this Grand Lodge, in any case whatever, if such Lodge shall 
not, within eighteen months immediately preceding, have 
paid up its dues to this Grand Lodge.” 

The observance of St. John’s Day by a procession was dis- 
cussed, and permission denied, on June 19, 1806. 

1807. 

PHYSICAL DEFICIENCY. 

A Committee of seven prominent members of the Grand 
Lodge were appointed on March 4, 1807, to report whether 
it would be proper to make a Mason of a profane, who had 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


219 


lost one eye. The report, on June 10 following, was “ that 
the loss was such a defect as ought to preclude him from 
initiation into our mysteries ; 99 and it was agreed to. Several 
petitions for Lodges were favorably acted upon ; to wit : 

Wood’s Lodge, in the city of New York. 

Harmony Lodge, in Champlain, Clinton County. 

Warren Lodge, in Warren, Herkimer County. 

Philanthropic Lodge, in Pompey, Onondaga County. 

The election was duly held June 3, with the same result 
as in 1806, excepting Brother James Yarian was elected 
Grand Tyler in place of Joseph Jacobs. 

The following four brethren were appointed Grand Stew- 
ards : 

Samuel L. Mitchell. Gabriel Key. 

David Dunham. John Caldwell. 

The following four brethren were appointed Grand Dea- 
cons : 

Adrian C. Yan Slyck. John Disbrow. 

James Friele. John G. Tardy. 

Subsequently, Warrants for numerous Lodges were author- 
ized to be issued during 1807, among them : 

Warren Lodge, for Pine Plains. 

New Jerusalem Lodge, at Bloomingdale, in the Ninth 
Ward, city of New York. 

St. Tammany Lodge, in the city of Hudson. 

Farmers’ Lodge, in Burlington, Otsego County. 

On September 2, Lewis Kerr, of New Orleans, sought a 
Warrant for a Lodge, to be located at that city, by the name 
of Louisiana Lodge, and stated he had lost the petition with 
which he had been intrusted. The sought^for authority was 
granted, as was a Warrant to Northern Light Lodge, to be 
held at De Kalb, in St. Lawrence County ; and also one to 
Jefferson Lodge, to be held at Martinsburgh, Lewis County. 

THE OBSERVANCE OF ST. JOHN’S DAY DISAPPROVED. 

An effort was made by sundry brethren, on June 10, to 
have an observance of the Festival of St. John, but the 



220 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


Grand Lodge emphatically declined. This was the third 
successive time that permission to parade was denied by the 
Grand Lodge. It would appear that the observance of the 
festival had been abused by the brethren. 

UNIFORMITY OF FEES. MASSACHUSETTS AND NEW YORK. 

On September 2, a letter was received and read from 
Isaiah Thomas, Past Grand Master of Massachusetts, stating 
certain inconveniences which some of the Lodges under their 
jurisdiction experienced, from the initiation fee being less 
under the jurisdiction of New York, and praying the Grand 
Lodge to consider and adopt some measure to promote har- 
mony and union as to this matter between the two Grand 
Lodges. The subject was placed under the charge of the 
Grand Officers. 

What action or consideration was ever taken by them in 
relation to a conformity of initiation fee does not appear. A 
marked reticence as to communicating with the Grand Lodge 
of Massachusetts seems to have pervaded the Grand Lodge 
of New York. 


LE TEMPLE DE l’aMITIE LODGE. 

Application for a Warrant to hold a Lodge in the city 
of New York, by the name of “ Le Temple de l’Amitie,” 
recommended by St. Andrew’s Lodge, was made to the 
Grand Lodge by a number of brethren, on June 10, 1807, 
Grand Master De Witt Clinton in the chair, and upon being 
read, was rejected. On September 2, following, a petition 
from the same brethren was read, in which they renewed 
their application, and prayed for an opportunity of being 
heard before a Committee, to enable them to obviate such 
objections as had been or might be made to their applica- 
tion, and suggesting, moreover, that they had other matters 
to communicate of the greatest importance, which particu- 
larly interested the Grand Lodge, and which they wished, in 
the first instance, to lay before the same Committee. 

The Grand Lodge 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


221 


“ Resolved , That the said petition be referred to a Commit- 
tee of seven, consisting of Brother Yanderbilt, Master of 
Trinity Lodge, No. 10; Past Master Glass, of Holland 
Lodge, No. 8; Past Master Mulligan, of Warren Lodge, 
No. 17 ; Past Master Myers, of Washington Lodge; Brother 
McNevin, Master of Erin Lodge; the Eight Worshipful 
Eobert Cocks, and Brother Bodman, Master, of Warren 
Lodge, No. 17, and that they report their opinion thereon 
to this Grand Lodge at their next regular meeting.” 

On the ensuing December 2, a Communication was made 
by the Worshipful Brother Yanderbilt, the Eight Worship- 
ful Brother Cocks, and the Worshipful Brother Myers, as 
to the application for a Warrant to hold a Lodge in the 
city of New York by the name of Le Temple de l’Amitie, 
and other matters submitted by the petitioners to the Com- 
mittee, by which it appeared that the Committee would not 
be likely to agree upon a report. 

Whereupon it was 

“ Resolved , That the said Committee be discharged from 
the further consideration of the business referred to them, 
and that a new Committee be substituted in their stead, to 
consist of the Eight Worshipful Senior Grand Warden 
(James Woods), the Worshipful Brothers Dunham, King, 
and Coffin; and that the said Committee have the like 
powers as the original Committee, with power, also, to call 
upon the Worshipful Brother Mulligan, and receive from 
bim all books and papers in his possession relative to the 
matters which were under the consideration of the said 
Committee.” 

This Committee thus appointed, on March 3, 1808, made 
an adverse report, which was read and accepted ; and there- 
upon, the Grand Lodge 

“ Resolved , That the Grand Secretary be directed to fur- 
nish Brother Joseph Cerneau with a copy of their resolu- 
tions, which conclude the above report.” 



222 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


Subsequently, at this session, a Communication from the 
brethren who had applied for a Warrant for a Lodge to be 
called Le Temple de l’Amitie Lodge, was about to be read. 

On motion duly made, it was 

“ Resolved, That the same should not be read, and that it 
should be returned to them by the Grand Secretary.” 

The Committee then stated that they had been at an 
expense, at St. John’s Hall, of £2 16s., which the Grand 
Treasurer was directed to pay. 

Diligent search fails to reveal, so far as the archives of the 
Grand Lodge are concerned, why this subject was so sum- 
marily dealt with by the Grand Body ; but, from the names 
of the brethren interested in the establishment of Le Tem- 
ple de l’Amitie Lodge, the difficulties evidently centered 
in the intention of those brethren to obtain consent to confer 
degrees that would be antagonistic to the exclusive powers 
of the Grand Lodge. 


1808. 

On the succeeding December 7, 1808, some of those inter- 
ested in the desire to obtain a Warrant for Le Temple de 
l’Amitie Lodge communicated with the Grand Lodge; 
but the records in this, as in so many other instances, are 
strangely missing. The written minutes of the Grand Lodge 
say: 

COMMUNICATION AS TO THE “ HIGHER DEGREES.” 

“A Communication from an association styling itself a 
Sovereign Grand Council, in the sublime Masonic degree of 
P. R. S., announcing to this Grand Lodge, in very respect- 
ful terms, its establishment in this city on October 28 last, 
under patent regularly served from lawful authority, and 
disclaiming any power or authority inconsistent with the 
local supremacy of this Grand Lodge over Master Masons, 
was read and ordered to be filed.” 

A Communication of a somewhat similar nature had been 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


223 


presented to the G-rand Lodge over five years prior thereto, 
emanating from Captain John Mitchell, of South Carolina, 
as to a previously existing organization, which had been 
referred to the Grand Officers for report, but as to which 
either no report had been made, or the papers are now miss- 
ing. (See ante, p. 205.) 

GENERAL GRAND LODGE OP THE UNITED STATES. 

The Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania addressed a Communi- 
cation to the Grand Lodge of New York, which was received 
on December 2, 1807, Grand Master De Witt Clinton in 
the chair, relative to holding a convention for the purpose 
of organizing a Superintending Grand Lodge of the Union, 
in the city of Washington, D. C., and which was read and 
referred to the Brothers Senior Grand Warden and Grand 
Secretary, and Worshipful Brother Yanderbilt, of Trinity 
Lodge, No. 10. The Provincial Grand Lodge of Pennsyl- 
vania had favored action as early as January 13, 1780, for 
the formation of a General Grand Lodge for the United 
States, which, however, did not meet with favor from other 
Grand Lodges. That Provincial Body had now, however, 
become an independent Grand Lodge, September 25, 1786. 

By reference to pp. 368-69, Yol. I., will be found a copy 
of a petition drawn up December 27, 1779, by American 
Union Lodge, at Morristown, addressed “ To the Most Wor- 
shipful, the present Provincial Grand Masters in each of the 
respective United States of America,” touching upon the 
same point^-the establishment of a General Grand Lodge of 
the United States. On the succeeding March 6, 1780, at 
Morristown, a committee* reported to American Union Lodge 
that a large number of delegates, representing the Masons 
in the Military Line of many Lodges and States — Charles 
Graham, F. C., delegated to represent those of the State of 
New York — had assembled on February 7, 1780, elected a 
President and other officers, and prepared an address to the 
several Grand Masters of Grand Lodges, which will be found 
in full on pp. 372-74, Yol. I. 



22 4 


HISTORY OP FREEMASONRY 


All the actions had tended to establish a Sovereign Grand 
Power in the United States, with the purpose of selecting 
General George Washington as the Grand Master General 
of Masons of America. 

For further consideration of this subject in earlier years 
we refer to pages 374 to 385 of Yol. L 

The Officers of the Grand Lodge of New York in 1807-08, 
to whom the subject had been referred, appear not to have 
made a succinct report,* and, in fact, the Grand Lodge of 
Pennsylvania, in 1790, had opposed the proposition of the 
Grand Lodge of Georgia to this, general effect. It is scarcely 
necessary to repeat that the proposed convention to establish 
a Superintending Masonic Power did not meet in 1808, nor 
in 1811, to which it had been postponed ; and that the 
efforts of 1812, 1822, 1845, 1847, and that of New York in 
1848, and the convention to have been held in Boston, in 
1850, when the General Grand Chapter and General Grand 
Encampment were to have been convened, all amounted to 
formalities in preparing plans and General Grand Constitu- 
tions, which finally were shown to be anti-American, as well 
as anti-Masonic, in the opinion of the Brotherhood. 

On March 2, 1808, a Warrant was authorized to be issued 
to Kising Sun Lodge, at Trenton, Oneida County, provided 
the Grand Officers assented. But, upon the application of a 
number of brethren to establish Harmony Lodge in New 
York, and of a number of other brethren to erect a Lodge 
by the name of Manhattan, it was 

“ Ordered , That it is at present inexpedient for this Grand 
Lodge to grant any more Warrants for holding Lodges in 
the city of New York.” 

* But the Committee, October 16, 1811, having the Communications from 
the Grand Lodges of North Carolina and Tennessee before them, reported 
that, inasmuch as the Grand Lodge in which the measure originated had 
not specified the advantage which it was calculated would result from 
the adoption of the plan, and none appearing to the Committee, they accord- 
ingly propose and recommend to decline appointing delegates to the said 
convention. 



IN THE STATE OP NEW YORK 


225 


Warrants were granted on June 1 , 1808, for 

Charity Lodge, at Spencertown, Columbia County. 

Eagle Lodge, to meet alternately at Spencertown and the 
town of Ulysses. 

Angelica Lodge, at Angelica, Allegany County. 

Clinton Lodge, at Clinton, Dutchess County. 

Warrants were also granted, September 7, 1808, for 

Zion Lodge, at Bloomfield, Ontario County. 

Richfield Lodge, at Richfield, Otsego County. 

Charity Lodge, at village of Cookhouse, Delaware County. 

TAMMANY SOCIETY AND BRITISH PRISON-SHIPS. 

The invitation that had been extended by the Tammany 
Society, requesting the Grand Lodge to join in the proces- 
sion and ceremonials that were about to take place at the 
Wallabout Bay, Long Island, and which were incident to 
memorial services over those who had died on board of Brit- 
ish prison-ships, was referred to a Committee consisting of 
Senior Grand Warden James Woods, Grand Treasurer Rob- 
ert Cocks, and Worshipful Brothers Fox, Dunham, and King. 
But this Committee, on June 1, reported that inasmuch as, 
after diligent inquiry, they could find no evidence of any 
Masonic brethren having suffered and died on board of any 
of those vessels, they were of the opinion that it would be 
improper for the general society of Masons to “ associate ” 
upon the occasion referred to. This met the unanimous 
approval of the Grand Lodge. 

On December 7, 1808, the Grand Treasurer reported his 
purchase of a set of Great Lights, as per instruction of Grand 
Lodge. 

PERSONAL DISSENSIONS. 

The records of the Grand Lodge show that in these early 
years, the time and patience of the Grand Body were fre- 
quently taxed to decide personal differences, and it was con- 
tinually appealed to for settlement of disputes pertaining to 
immoral and financial matters. 

VOL. II.— 15 



226 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


Thus, a memorial from Brother James Mallory, of Hiram 
Lodge, Ho. 7, stating that certain differences had taken place 
between him and Brother Henry Waring, Past Master of the 
said Lodge, was presented to, and considered by, the Grand 
Lodge, the Committee making the following report : 

The Committee to whom was referred the memorial and 
complaint of Brother James Mallory against Brother Henry 
Waring, made the following report : 

That your Committee, having minutely investigated the 
controversy between Brother Mallory and Brother Waring — 
the charge was brought by Brother Mallory against Brother 
Waring, stating that Brother Waring had obtained of 
Brother Mallory the sum of fifty dollars or upwards in a 
fraudulent manner — your Committee are of the opinion, from 
all the testimony produced, that Brother Waring, as an 
honest man, but more particularly as a Mason, ought to 
refund the above sum to our Brother Mallory, as we are 
fully convinced that the sum was obtained for services never 
rendered ; we have sent two letters to Brother Waring dur- 
ing our sittings, hoping he would come to a sense of his 
duty without our troubling the Grand Lodge ; to the first we 
received no answer ; the second was answered December 5, 
5808, saying he will not comply with our request. We, 
therefore, from his conduct, recommend to the Grand Lodge 
that he be suspended from the benefits of Masonry, until he 
makes full satisfaction to our injured Brother Mallory. 

We are, with the utmost esteem, 

Worshipful brethren, yours, etc., 

Israel Havarro, ) ~ 

• -p w y Committee. 

it LAM WILLIAMS, ) 

The report being read, it was 

“ Resolved , That the further consideration of the report be 
postponed until the next meeting of the Grand Lodge, and 
that the Grand Secretary give notice thereof to Brother 
Waring, to the end that he may then appear and answer to 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


227 


the matters charged against him and reported upon as afore- 
said.” 

Notwithstanding the Committee reported they were so 
fully convinced that “ the sum of fifty dollars or upwards 
was obtained in a fraudulent manner/ 5 the subject remained 
in abeyance until one year thereafter, December 6, 1809, 
when, an addition having been made to the Committee of 
Brothers John G. Tardy, of L’Union Franyaise Lodge, Gale, 
of St. Andrew’s Lodge, and Myers, of Washington Lodge, 
they supplemented the former report as to a “ state of facts, 
upon which they were of the opinion that Brother Henry 
Waring should refund to Brother Mallory the sum of twenty- 
five dollars, obtained from him under false pretenses, and that 
he be suspended from all Masonic Communication until the 
same be paid.” This report was confirmed, and appears to 
have been the end of the difficulty. 

An attempt was made to have ordered a Grand Masonic 
parade on St. John the Baptist’s Day, in the coming June ; 
but the Grand Lodge, on June 1, 1808, declined to recede 
from its established action of denying all permissions to 
parade. 

SECRET WRITTEN RITUALS. 

A Committee, consisting of the Grand Officers who had 
been appointed on March 3, 1808, to examine a certain 
memorandum in writing that had been made by Worshipful 
Brother Andariese, of Benevolent Lodge, for his own private 
use, to assist him in performing his Masonic duties, and 
which he considered wholly unintelligible by any one except 
himself, but for which he had, notwithstanding, been cen- 
sured, reported through the Grand Treasurer, Robert Cocks, 
on December 7, that the book had been carefully examined ; 
that, without an explanation from Brother Andariese as to 
its contents, it would have been utterly impossible for your 
Committee of their own knowledge to have ascertained the 
same, and that only by the key could the meaning of the 
writings in the book be understood ; from all which it 



228 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


appears, that these letters and abbreviations of sentences of 
a lecture upon the first degree of Masonry are perfectly 
innocent in themselves, intended only for the brother’s pri- 
vate use, and, in the opinion of your Committee, consistent 
with the privileges and usages of the Order ; they further 
recommend a return of the book to our Worshipful Brother. 

Warrants were authorized to be issued to establish 

Temple Lodge, in the town of Guilderland, Albany 
County. 

Sangor Lodge, in the town of Sangor, Oneida County. 

THE SOUTH CAROLINA UNION. 

A gratif} T ing Communication was received from the 
Grand Lodge of South Carolina, stating that the Grand 
Lodges of “ York Masons ” and of the “ Free and Accepted 
Masons ” had become united in one body, under the name 
and title of “ The Grand Lodge of South Carolina.” 

SCHOOL FOR CHILDREN OF INDIGENT MASONS.. 

Worshipful Brother Vanderbilt, on December T, 1808, 
presented a resolution to the following effect, which was 
adopted : 

“liesolwed, That a Committee be appointed to devise and 
report to this Grand Lodge a plan for the education of chil- 
dren of poor Masons, and that such Committee consist of the 
Worshipful Brothers Vanderbilt, Mulligan, Dunham, Prince, 
Sketchley, and the Bight Worshipful Brother Senior Grand 
Warden and Grand Treasurer.” 

1809. 

The Committee reported as follows, on March 1, 1809 : 

That they are of the opinion that a fund may be raised 
sufficient to defray the expense of an establishment for the 
education of fifty children. In order to ascertaiu the proba- 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


229 


ble expense of tuition, including all articles necessary for 
that purpose, your Committee applied to the trustees of the 
free school, incorporated in the year 1805, who have agreed 
to educate in their seminary fifty children for three hundred 
dollars per annum , which is more than one-half less than 
would be required for their education in a separate school. 
The means for defraying this expense, and for providing a 
fund which shall eventually constitute a permanent provision 
for this object, may be raised by the following process : 

First An addition of one dollar to the present fees of 
initiation, to be collected in the Lodges in this city and paid 
with their other dues to the Grand Secretary. 

Second . The addition of twenty-five cents to the quarterly 
dues of each member of the Lodge in this city, to be col- 
lected and paid in like manner. 

Third . A subscription to be opened in each Lodge, and 
particularly recommended by the Chair to the brethren, for 
a gross or annual contribution, or both. 

Fourth . A contribution on every festival of St. John the 
Baptist, to be collected after a sermon or oration, to be deliv- 
ered on such anniversary. 

From these sources and others, which the great importance 
and usefulness of the object and the benevolence of the Fra- 
ternity will not fail to open, funds will be derived which 
will enable the Grand Lodge to provide for the tuition and 
probably the clothing of the number above mentioned, and 
may enable them, in time, further to extend the benefits of 
the Institution. 

Tour Committee recommend that a committee be ap- 
pointed to consist of the Grand Master, the Deputy Grand 

Master, and other members of the Grand Lodge, to 

frame particular regulations for the purpose of extending 
the benefits of education to the children of indigent Masons, 
with power to agree with the trustees of the above-men- 
tioned free school for the tuition of such of the said children 
as may be selected. 

James Woods, 

In behalf of the Committee. 



230 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


The consideration of the subject was postponed until June 
7, when it was referred to the Masters of the different Lodges 
in this city, with full powers to revise and alter the plan 
proposed, or offer any other in lieu thereof to this Grand 
Lodge, and that whenever they shall be ready to report, 
they inform the Grand Master thereof, that a special Grand 
Lodge may be called for the purpose of considering the said 
report, and determining thereon. 

The several Lodges of the city were alive to so important 
a charitable subject, and the discussions in individual groups, 
Lodges, and assemblies were continuous and earnest. 

On the following September 6, 1809, the Grand Lodge 
convened, Martin Hoffman, Deputy Grand Master, presid- 
ing ; James Woods, Senior Grand Warden, Worshipful 
Brother Yan Nostrand, Junior Grand Warden, p. t., Robert 
Cocks, Grand Treasurer, Elias Hicks, Assistant Secretary, the 
representatives of twenty Lodges, and the proxies of eight 
Lodges. 

The Committee composed of the Masters of the respective 
Lodges of the city of New York, to whom was referred the 
consideration of a plan for the education of children of poor 
Masons, reported : 

That, having duly weighed the plan submitted to their 
consideration, they are unanimously of the opinion that, 
under existing circumstances, it is not practicable to carry it 
into effect. The reasons on which this opinion is founded 
they beg leave to state. 

The first proposition was an addition of one dollar to 
initiation fee. Against this your Committee object, on the 
ground, first, that the initiation fee in most, if not all, the 
Lodges in the city of New York, is as high as it ought in 
justice to be, and higher than in any other benevolent insti- 
tution. Second, because this fee is derived as frequently 
from sojourners as from inhabitants, and they hold it not to 
be acting on the square to make the former support an insti- 
tution in the benefit of which they cannot participate. 

The second proposition was u the addition of twenty-five 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK 


231 


cents to the quarterly dues of each member.” It is well 
ascertained, that, of the registered members of a Lodge, 
there is not on an average more than one-half who discharge 
their dues. By this failure, the Lodges are already embar- 
rassed, and, but for the admission of new members, the Lodges 
would find a difficulty in defraying their natural and indis- 
pensable expenses. The individual Lodge is answerable for 
the amount of its return, and every year produces instances 
of quarterages to a considerable amount being paid to the 
Grand Lodge, which never were and never will be collected 
from the individual members. In this proposition, therefore, 
your Committee discern nothing but an increase of taxation, 
without any increase of fund ; and, until a plan can be 
devised for compelling members to discharge their dues, the 
Lodges, they presume, will never consent to this positive 
multiplication of their disbursements. 

The third proposition was “ a subscription to be opened in 
each Lodge, and particularly recommended by the Chair.” 
To this your Committee object, on the ground of its partial 
operation. Those members who are punctual in their attend- 
ance on the Lodge are most generally punctual in the dis- 
charge of their dues. It would be to these alone, then, that 
the recommendation would be addressed, and the burden of 
charity, instead of being borne by those who could best sup- 
port it, or by the Fraternity at large, would rest on the 
shoulders of the partial few, who already fulfill this duty to 
the extent of their means. 

On the last proposition, viz., “ a public collection on the 
Festival of St. John the Baptist,” your Committee will make 
but one remark. Public processions are always attended by 
weighty and extraordinary expense. This has long been 
urged by the Grand Lodge as an objection against gratify- 
ing the wishes of the Brotherhood to celebrate the day in 
a public manner. If the reasoning on this subject be just, 
your Committee do not see how its application to the present 
proposition is to be got rid of. 

Having thus pointed out what appear to your Committee 
the objections to the plan submitted to them, they now pro- 



232 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


ceed to consider what may be effected, provided the coercive 
measures they herein suggest shall be found worthy of adop- 
tion. In the first place, it is essential that measures be taken 
to compel a discharge of dues. To effect this your Commit- 
tee propose the adoption of the following resolution : 

“ All members of Lodges who are or shall be in arrears for 
one year’s dues, may be suspended by their respective Lodges 
from all Masonic communications, and upon report being 
duly made to this Grand Lodge, they shall be notified by the 
Grand Secretary, and enjoined to discharge or commute the 
same within twelve months from date of such notice, on pain 
of being excluded by a formal expulsion from all communi- 
cations with or benefit from the Institution, which penalty, on 
failure and at the instance of the Lodge to which the delin- 
quent belongs, shall be duly inflicted.” 

From the adoption of this measure, or some other similar 
in its operation, your Committee anticipate the most bene- 
ficial results, and if their calculation be not extremely erro- 
neous, the Lodges in the city of New York will speedily be 
placed in a situation to afford, without difficulty, the contri- 
butions in the plan which follows, viz. : 

Plcm for the education of fifty poor children whose fathers 
are , or have been , members of the Ancient and Honorable 
Fraternity of Free and Accepted Masons. 

First Each Lodge in the city of New York, of which 
there are at present twentv-two, to pay $10 per annum, 
making $220. 

Second . The Grand Lodge to contribute, annually, $80, 
making together $300, the sum required. 

The above sums to be paid regularly by the respective 
Lodges, in advance, on or before the quarterly communica- 
tion next preceding the anniversary of St. John the Evange- 
list. Each Lodge thus contributing to have the right of 
naming two children to receive the benefit of this charity, 
which privilege, if not exercised at or before the time pre- 
scribed for making the advance payment, to be considered as 



IN THE STATE OP NEW YORK. 


233 


relinquished and to rest in the Grand Lodge School Com- 
mittee. 

The Grand Lodge School Committee to fill the remaining 
six places, as also all vacancies that may occur from the 
individual Lodges declining or neglecting to recommend as 
aforesaid. 

The general business to be conducted by a committee of 
three, to be chosen by or from the Grand Lodge, and to be 
denominated the Grand Lodge School Committee. 

In this project, it will be observed, the Committee have 
confined themselves solely to the education of the children. 
To clothe them they consider at present impracticable ; and 
as this, in the reference, was made a secondary consideration, 
they have preferred to lay it aside rather than risk the main 
object by its continuance. All ’which is respectfully sub- 
mitted. 

Done in Committee, August 30, 1809. 

J. Y. NT ostrand, Chairman. 

Elias Hicks, Secretary. 

The report being read and discussed, it was, on motion, 

Resolved, That the same be accepted ; it was further 

Resolved , That the appointment of the Grand Lodge 
School Committee, designated in the preceding plan, be 
vested in the presiding officers of the Grand Lodge ; it was 
further 

Resolved , That the Grand Secretary cause one hundred 
copies of the preceding report to be printed at the expense 
of the Grand Lodge, and that he furnish each Lodge in the 
city with four copies of the same. 

The School Committee of the Grand Lodge made the 
following report on March 7, 1810 : 

The School Committee of the Grand Lodge, to whom were 
referred and assigned the particular duties designed in a 
resolution of the Grand Lodge, passed at their last meeting 
relative to the education of fifty poor and orphan children, 
beg leave to report : 



234 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


That, agreeable to the appointment of the Most Worship- 
ful the Grand Master, they proceeded to the duties afore- 
said, and that, on St. John’s Day last (December 27), they 
delivered over to the Trustees of the New York Free School 
the said number of children. 

That the individual Lodges have each furnished the 
number contemplated in the said resolution, except in one 
instance, which vacancy was particularly filled by your 
Committee, but for a short space of time only. Your Com- 
mittee further report, that, from the declaration of the 
teacher of said school, from information obtained from the 
parents and guardians of the children, and from an actual 
knowledge by visiting the said school, they are confident 
that great justice is done them and that they are making 
rapid improvement. Your Committee beg leave, therefore, 
to recommend the sum of $10 in clothing, to be furnished to 
each one of the said children who are under the particular 
care of the Grand Lodge ; all of which is respectfully sub- 
mitted. 

John Vanderbilt, Jr., \ 

Martin Hoffman, > School Committee. 

David Dunham, ) 

New York, March 7, A. L. 5810. 

Which was read and approved. 

The Grand Lodge School Committee reported progress, 
September 4, 1811, which was satisfactory to the Grand 
Lodge, and, on December 4 of same j 7 ear, again communi- 
cated, informing the Grand Body that there were some 
vacancies, which they had given notice to the Lodges to 
fill, and that the children were making very satisfactory 
improvement in their learning. 

On March 4, 1812, the School Committee made the follow- 
ing report, which was read and accepted, viz. : 

The Free School Committee beg leave to report, that they 
have discharged the duties assigned to them in respect to the 
visitation and examination of the school, and with particular 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


235 


pleasure announce to the Grand Lodge that the children are 
rapidly progressing in their education to the entire satisfac- 
tion of the Committee. They further beg leave to mention 
that much praise is due to Mr. Smith, the teacher, for the 
order, regularity, and system in conducting the school. 

There are now forty-five scholars in school, and there are 
five vacancies from the following Lodges, to wit : Indepen- 
dent Royal Arch Lodge, two vacancies; Morton Lodge, 
one vacancy ; Benevolent Lodge, one vacancy, and from the 
Grand Lodge, one vacancy. 

All of which is submitted. 

John Vanderbilt, Jr., ) 

Martin Hoffman, > School Committee. 

David Dunham, ) 

On the succeeding June 3, the Committee again drew the 
attention of the Grand Lodge to the fact that there were no 
scholars from several of the Lodges, and recommended to 
them to fill up their vacancies. 

They further suggested to the consideration of the Grand 
Lodge the propriety of establishing a school on the Lancas- 
ter plan, to be under the entire management of this Grand 
Lodge ; upon which it was 

“ Resolved , That it be referred to the same Committee to 
devise and report to this Grand Lodge, at their next regular 
meeting, a proper plan on this subject.” 

At this time there were arrearages of dues to the Free 
School Fund, from the several Lodges of the city of New 
York, of $380. 

It having been determined in Grand Stewards’ Lodge, on 
November 25, that the books of the Grand Treasurer and 
the Grand Secretary shall be examined quarterly, a Commit- 
tee was appointed consisting of Brothers Elias Hicks, Anda- 
riese, and Witham, to adjust with the respective Lodges the 
Free School account, and demand a settlement of the arrear- 
ages due thereon. On the following May 24, 1813, Brother 
Hicks stated that considerable progress had been made in 



236 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


adjusting the school account, so that in Grand Lodge, on 
March 3, the Committee reported that, of the sum of $515.83 
furnished them by the Grand Secretary as the amount of 
arrearages, they had collected $435.83, and that $20 addi- 
tional shonld be credited Lodge No. 7. 

On December 2, Brother Vanderbilt reported that the 
number of scholars of the different Lodges and of the Grand 
Lodge were entirely filled up, amounting, in the whole, to 
fifty, and recommending the different Lodges to provide the 
children they sent to the school with comfortable clothing. 

It was then 

“ Resolved^ That it be referred to the School Committee to 
take measures for raising money, by individual contribution, 
for the clothing of the Masonic charity scholars, and for that 
purpose, if they should think fit, to convene the different 
Lodges at the Free School on the ensuing anniversary of St. 
John the Evangelist, and that the Worshipful Brother Van- 
derbilt be and he is hereby desired, in that case, to deliver an 
oration on that occasion.” 


A further report was made, June 1, 1814, which was read 
and filed, and was to the following purport : 

“ The Masonic Free School Committee, in conformity to 
the resolutions of the Grand Lodge, beg leave to report that 
the school now consists of forty-four scholars, and that there 
are six vacancies. The Committee flatter themselves that the 
school is in a state of prosperity, ajid worthy the most serious 
attention of the brethren in general. The exhibition on the 
second Monday in May, at the anniversary examination, 
would have done credit to any seminary. The correctness 
of the scholars in reading and in the lower branches of arith- 
metic, was observed with great satisfaction. Much praise 
is due to the teacher for his practical care and attention. 

Jno. Vanderbilt, Jr., ) ~ _ „ 

Martin Hoffman, ’[Committee.” 

The next record appears in the minutes of proceedings of 
December 6, 1815, when 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


237 


The School Committee made the following report, which 
was also accepted and ordered to be filed. 

“ In behalf of the School Committee the subscriber begs 
leave to report : 

That the school consists of forty-six scholars ; of course, 
there are four vacancies. It is with pleasure the Commit- 
tee can announce to the Grand Lodge that, although the 
number to fifty is not filled up, the trustees of the New 
York Free School have given liberal assurance, that if 
even the number of sixty could be applied for, they will 
receive them without any additional compensation. Your 
Committee further inform the Grand Lodge that the New 
York Free School is under a different organization now, for 
it has adopted Lancaster’s plan ; thus, by the aid of an assist- 
ant teacher, hired for the special purpose, from Europe, 
the plan improves much the progress of the education of the 
children. Your Committee would only suggest that, as the 
inclement season of the year is approaching, if every Lodge 
could spare the sum of $16, for purchasing a pair of shoes, 
one pair of stockings, an overcoat, and hat for each scholar, 
it would not only add credit to the Fraternity, but give con- 
siderable relief to those distressed children. 

All which is respectfully submitted. 

Jxo. Vastderbilt, Jr., 

Secretary to the School Committee. 

New York, December 6, A. L. 5815.” 

The Worshipful Brother Vanderbilt then moved the fol- 
lowing resolution, which was seconded and carried : 

“Resolved, in conformity to the report of the School 
Committee, recommending that, if possible, each Lodge 
should raise the sum of $16 for clothing two children, 
that the Secretary of the School Committee shall inform 
the Master of every Lodge of this recommendation, and if 
the amount can be raised, to be paid in the hands of the 
School Committee, and the sum appropriated by them as the 
children might stand in need of.” 



238 


HISTORY OP FREEMASONRY 


March 6, 1816, gave the School Committee the opportunity 
of reporting that the number of Masonic scholars consisted 
of fifty-four ; that nine Lodges had come in to the measure 
recommended of clothing their children, and that it was 
hoped that the other Lodges would follow their laudable 
example. 

The School Charity continued until 1818, when, for the 
year ending May 27, the Grand Secretary reported receipts 
of arrears to the School Fund were $356 ; that there had been 
paid to the Grand Treasurer, for subscription to the New 
York Free School, since abolished, for tuition of fifty children, 
$300; that the total amount remaining due, June 4, 1819, 
was an arrearage of $60. 

Thus ended the educational effort of the Grand Lodge, 
which was accomplishing great good, but, finally, seems to 
have died of inanition. 

FINANCES IN 1809. 

The subject of the financial condition of the Grand Lodge 
had received attention from time to time, with evident desire 
to ascertain in what condition were the accounts; but the 
period that would elapse from the time of the appointment 
of the examiners to the period of examination, and from that 
again till report was made, caused the findings to be of little 
avail, as the receipts and expenditures in the interregnum 
would amount to considerable sums from dues and returns 
received, and grants for charity, loans, legitimate and essen- 
tial expenses, and donations under conditional circumstances 
made by Grand Stewards’ Lodge as well as by the Grand 
Body itself, all of which mystified the Grand Treasurer and 
complicated his accounts. Under the circumstances, com- 
mittees would generally report that examination of the 
vouchers had proved the disbursements and receipts per- 
fectly correct and satisfactory ; and such was the report 
February 10, 1802, as to the accounts of the late Grand 
Treasurer, John Jacob Astor, who was succeeded, June 25, 
1801, by Robert Cocks. And, again, the Committee ap- 



IN THE STATE OP NEW YORK. 


239 


pointed March 6, 1805, reported March 5, 1806, that such 
statement of the funds as they submitted “ was imperfect on 
account of the absence of the Grand Master, General Jacob 
Morton, at Albany. 55 The Committee were directed to 
perfect their report, and furthermore, in the mean time 
that they should “ invest so much of the funds of the 
Grand Lodge as to them shall seem proper in such stock as 
they shall think will be most to the advantage of the Grand 
Lodge. 55 

In the matter of Finances, great dependence was placed 
upon the quarterly reports of the Grand Secretary, whose 
statements covered the money transactions of the quarter. 

We, however, begin to obtain an insight as to the Grand 
Lodge finances, Robert Cocks, Grand Treasurer, upon the 
report of a committee made March 1, 1809, and which was 
as follows : 

The Committee appointed by the Most Worshipful Grand 
Lodge, and to whom was referred the settlement of the 
Right Worshipful, the Grand Treasurer’s accounts, beg leave 
to report : 

“Your Committee respectfully represent that they have 
carefully examined the books, vouchers, and disbursements 
of the Right Worshipful Grand Treasurer, from March 8, 
1806, to February 20, 1809, during which period there has 
been received $8,727.79, and has been for different purposes 
spent out $8,330.40, leaving a balance in the hands of the 
Grand Treasurer of $397.39. That there is also due from 
the Jersey Bank three-quarter dividends amounting to $210 ; 
these two sums together, $607.39. Your Committee further 
beg leave to add, the present funds of ^ the Grand Lodge con- 
sist of $4,134.14, six per cent, deferred stock, nominally of 
forty full, and sixty half shares of the J ersey Bank stock, on 
which $3,500 has been paid at par, and that the present 
stock is worth 110 to 112 per cent. On the sixty half shares 
there require $1,500 more to be paid on May 1 next, for 
which, with due deference, your Committee has recom- 



240 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


mended the appropriation of the present balance, together 
with whatever dividends may be due on May 1 next — the 
deficiency to be made good with the other collections. 

Tour Committee anticipate the days when, with a little 
economy, the interest from the stock of this Grand Lodge 
will be fully adequate for every proper and charitable pur- 
pose. They therefore look to the individual Lodges for a 
prompt and ready discharge of their several dues. Tour 
Committee, without imputing the least charge of neglect or 
inattention to the present 

COMMITTEE OF CHAEITY, 

or of those that have previously acted in that capacity, are 
fully persuaded that great impositions are daily practiced 
upon that mode of distributing the charitable fund. On 
looking over the books kept by the Eight Worshipful Grand 
Treasurer, it will be found that there are several persons that 
have been for many years as regularly relieved as any of our 
Government pensioners, and look and ask for it as a matter 
of right, when, in truth, were their characters a little sifted, 
they would be found, in many instances, not entitled to our 
beneficence, and in several cases it will be found that certain 
individuals have received twenty, thirty, forty, and from 
that to fifty or one hundred dollars, in the space of a very 
short time. 

Tour Committee beg leave, therefore, to suggest for the 
consideration of the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge the fol- 
lowing plan : that the city should be divided into several 
districts, that suitable persons should be appointed in each, 
and that the acting Committee of Charity should not in any 
instance grant an order upon the Grand Treasurer, without 
first having a recommendation from two or more persons so 
appointed, and that the persons so appointed should be par- 
ticularly requested not to recommend any applicant, without 
having first minutely inquired into the several circumstances. 
Tour Committee, therefore, cannot close the present report, 
without urging particularly this or some other mode to be 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


241 


adopted, that shall embrace the ideas here suggested. All 
of which is respectfully submitted. 

John Vanderbilt, Jr., j 
Robert Fox, > Committee. 

David Dunham, ) 

New York, February 21, A. L. 5809.” 

Whereupon, it was 

Resolved , That the said report be accepted ; and it was 
further 

Resolved , That a Committee of five should be appointed to 
carry into effect that part of the foregoing report which 
recommended the dividing of the city into districts for the 
purpose therein mentioned, and that the said Committee 
have full power to divide the city into as many districts as 
they shall think fit, and to appoint suitable persons in each 
district to perform the duties in the said report prescribed ; 
it was further 

Resolved , That the said Committee consist of the Right 
Worshipful Senior Grand Warden, James Woods, the Wor- 
shipful Brother, John Vanderbilt, Jr., the Right Worshipful 
Grand Treasurer, Robert Cocks, the Worshipful Brother 
Prince, and the Worshipful Brother, John O’Neil, and that 
said Committee make report of their proceedings in the 
premises to this Grand Lodge at next meeting. 

On June 7, 1809, the Committee reported to divide the 
city, in accordance with the above resolution, into nine dis- 
tricts, corresponding with the different wards, except that 
the Seventh and Tenth wards should form one district. The 
Committee also nominated the district visitors. The subject 
was postponed until next session, and on September 6, follow- 
ing, was further “ postponed sine die 

On December 5, 1810, the Committee to whom it was 
referred to adjust the difference between the accounts of the 
Grand Treasurer and the Grand Secretary, and to invest in 
stock a portion of the surplus funds not exceeding $1,000, 
vol. n.— 16 



242 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


reported that the Grand Treasurer had, since their last 
report, credited the Grand Lodge with the sum debited to 
him by the Grand Secretary, and that the Grand Treasurer’s 
account is now correct. They further reported, that they 
had purchased thirty-three shares in the Mechanics’ Bank at 
twenty per cent, advance, which cost $990 ; and that the 
same had been transferred on the books of the bank to the 
Grand Treasurer and Grand Secretary. 

On June 5, 1811, the Committee of the Grand Stewards' 
Lodge, appointed to ’report to Grand Lodge a state of 
the funds, in conformity with the duty imposed by the sixth 
section of the act entitled “An act for the establishment of 
Grand Masonic Visitors, and for other purposes therein mem 
tioned,” stated the balance in Grand Treasurer’s hands to be 
$Y25.82 ; that the Grand Lodge holds forty shares of the 
late Jersey, now Union Bank, on sixty shares of which but 
one-half the original subscription had been paid ; thirty- 
three shares in the Mechanics’ Bank ; and $4,131.14 in six 
per cent, deferred debt of the United States. 

A Committee was appointed with power to draw on the 
Grand Treasurer for the sum of $500, to fill up the sixty 
half shares held in the Union Bank, and to draw on the 
Treasurer afterwards, from time to time, to complete the 
filling up of the said shares, and to borrow money on 
account of the Grand Lodge for that purpose, if wanted. 

The Committee appointed to take measures for filling up 
the number of shares held in the Union Bank, reported Sep- 
tember 4, which report was adopted, and is as follows : 

“That they have made such arrangements as seemed to 
them warrantable, under the existing state of the funds, and 
that in so doing they have negotiated a bill of the Grand 
Treasurer for $1,000, which, when paid, will leave the Grand 
Lodge his debtor in the sum of $360.71, as appears by his 
account to the 28th ultimo. The Committee have found 
themselves somewhat embarrassed in this business by not 
having an unrestrained control of the stock as well as of the 
funds ; and being of the opinion that the interests of the 



IN THE STATE OP NEW YORK. 


243 


Grand Lodge generally, and the furthering of this object in 
particular, will be materially advanced by placing in the 
hands of a Committee a full and discretionary power over 
all its property, propose for the consideration of the Grand 
Lodge the following resolutions : 

Resolved, That Elias Hicks, David Dunham, and John 
Mulligan be a Committee for managing the fiscal concerns 
of this Grand Lodge ; that the persons in whose names the 
stock held by the Grand Lodge at present stands shall, on or 
before the sixteenth day of September, instant, transfer the 
same to the said Committee, and that the Grand Secretary 
be hereby directed henceforth and until otherwise directed, 
to pay all moneys that may be received by him, on account 
of this Grand Lodge, into the hands of the said Committee. 

Resolved , That the said Committee be invested with dis- 
cretionary and unlimited power over the said stock and 
funds, having first satisfied the Grand Treasurer for all 
moneys which he may have advanced on account of this 
Grand Lodge, and taking special care to keep him at all 
times supplied with so much money, as may be necessary to 
meet the drafts of the Grand Stewards’ Lodge, and its 
Committee of Charity. 

E. Hicks. 

Master of Holland Lodge. 

John Vanderbilt, Jr., 

Past Master of Trinity Lodge, Ho. 10. 

David Dunham, 

Past Master of Washington Lodge. 

Hew York, September 3, A. L. 5811.” 

December 4, 1811, the Committee on Fiscal Concerns made 
a report, which was read and accepted, and is as follows : 

“ That, in obedience to a resolution of the Grand Lodge, 
your Committee proceeded to receive the books, vouchers, 
and other documents of the late Grand Treasurer, Worshipful 
Brother Cocks, and that, on examination of the said Grand 
Treasurer’s accounts, the sum of $8,285 appeared to his 



244 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


debit, which was settled by receiving his due-bill at sixty 
days. 

Your Committee also received from the late Grand Treas- 
urer a transfer of forty whole and sixty half shares of the 
Union Bank of the city of New York, which half shares have 
been paid up, except $692.65, in a note of hand of one of 
your Committee, at sixty days after date ; they also received 
a transfer of thirty-three shares of Mechanics’ Bank stock, 
and $4,113.14 of the deferred six per cent, stock of the 
United States. 

Your Committee beg leave further to report, that since 
the resignation of Bight Worshipful Brother Cocks they 
have received $547.81, and expended drafts drawn on them 
for charitable purposes, etc., $417, leaving a balance due 
from your Committee of $130.81. 

Your Committee, before closing this report, beg leave to 
suggest to the consideration of the Most Worshipful the 
Grand Lodge, the propriety of appointing a committee to 
examine and report thereon the amount due from each indi- 
vidual Lodge, as far as can be ascertained, and the date of 
their last payment, etc. 

All of which is respectfully submitted by your obedient 
servants. 

John W. Mulligan, ) 

Elias Hicks, > Committee. 

Davtd Dunham, ) 

New Yobk, December 4, A. L. 5811.” 

It was then 

Resolved, That the Committee of Fiscal Concerns, appointed 
on September 4 last, transfer the bank stock and United 
States stock, standing in the names of the said Committee, 
as stated in their report on December 4 last, to the Grand 
Secretary and Grand Treasurer, they providing, on the credit 
of this Grand Lodge, for the payment of a note given by the 
Committee for $700, as is stated in their said report ; and it 
was further 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


245 


Resolved , That so much of the report of the Committee 
for filling up the shares of this Grand Lodge in the Union 
Bank, made to the Grand Lodge and accepted by them on 
the said December 4 last, which directs the Grand Treasurer, 
thenceforth, until otherwise directed, to pay all moneys that 
he may receive on account of the Grand Lodge to the said 
Committee of Fiscal Concerns, and which invests them with 
full power over the stock and funds of the Grand Lodge, be 
and the same is hereby rescinded ; and the Grand Secretary 
is hereby directed to make payments to the Grand Treasurer, 
as heretofore, of all moneys received by him for the Grand 
Lodge. 

Resolved , further, That the said Committee of Fiscal Con- 
cerns be requested to pay over the balance in their hands to 
the Grand Treasurer, and that the said Committee be and are 
hereby dissolved. 

On June 3, 1812, the Grand Stewards 5 Lodge reported as 
to the finances : 


A balance in the hands of the Treasurer of $175.60 

Dues and arrearages 885.63 

Making $1,061.23 

That the debts and dues amounted to 1,225.00 

That the stock belonging to the Grand Lodge was 

In 6 p. c. deferred debt of the United States $4,131.14 

100 shares in the Union Bank 5,000.00 

33 shares in the Mechanics* Bank 825.00 


Total $9,956.14 

The Committee on the State of the Funds made a report, 
which was read and accepted, and ordered to be filed, and 
by which it appeared that 

From May 26, 1813, to May 25, 1814. there had been paid 
to the Grand Treasurer by the Grand Secretary, the 


sum of $2,804.79 

Which, together with a balance remaining in his hands, 
as per report of last year 39.40 


Makes a total of $2,844.19 



24:6 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


That during the same period there had been expended 


For charitable donations $2,141.50 

For support of the Free School 300. 00 

One half year’s salary to the Grand Secretary 125.00 

Grand Pursuivant and Grand Tyler’s fees 43.25 

Interest on accommodation note 25.70 

Postage, etc 3.15 


$2,638.60 

Leaving a balance in the Grand Treasurer’s hands of. . $205.50 


The property of the Grand Lodge does not appear to have 
received any augmentation since the report of last year, but 


still consists of 

Six per cent, deferred debt of the United States $4,131.14 

One hundred shares Union Bank stock 5,000.00 

Thirty-three shares Mechanics’ Bank stock 825.00 

Total $9,956.14 

Deduct from this sum an accommodation note, given for 
the balance due the Union Bank shares of 400.00 


And the actual amount is $9,556.14 


And so the credit of the Grand Lodge stood at the close 
of the year, 1816. 

THE GRAND TREASURER, ROBERT COCKS. 

On October 16, 1811, the Grand Treasurer, Kobert Cocks, 
from his seat, handed to the Chair a resignation of his office 
on account of his advanced age, which was accepted. The 
Committee appointed at the last meeting to manage the 
fiscal concerns of the Grand Lodge, was directed also to 
adjust the accounts of the Grand Treasurer, and to perform 
the duties of that office until a successor should be appointed. 

A resolution of thanks was given to Brother Cocks for the 
long and faithful services rendered by him in the capacity 
of Grand Treasurer, and it was ordered that an appropriate 
jewel, not to exceed $100 in cost, be procured and presented 
to him in token of the approbation and esteem of the breth- 
ren of the Grand Lodge. 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


247 


On December 4, Brother Sampson Simson, Past Master of 
Clinton Lodge, No. 143, was elected Grand Treasurer, and as 
such was installed. 

The Deputy Grand Master, Martin Hoffman, on June 3, 
1812, presented to Brother Bobert Cocks, Past Grand Treas- 
urer, the jewel which had been prepared in pursuance of a 
resolution, and “ clothed him with the same in due Masonic 
form.” 

A Grand Lodge of Emergency was convened November 
13, 1812, in order to communicate the intelligence of the 
death of Bight Worshipful Bobert Cocks, late Grand Treas- 
urer, who had served in that capacity for eleven years, and 
to consult as to the measures proper to be adopted to testify 
the respect entertained for his long and faithful services ; it 
was 

Resolved , That the remains be interred at the expense of 
this Grand Lodge and with Masonic honors. 

At the session, June 1, 1814, the names of Sampson Sim- 
son, who had been Grand Treasurer for three years, and 
John W. Mulligan were put in nomination for Grand Treas- 
urer, and Brother Mulligan was elected. The succeeding 
year, on June 7, the same Brothers were put in nomination 
for the office, and Brother Sampson Simson was elected. 
Simson held the office until September 6 following, when he 
resigned, and, on the thirteenth of the same month, Brother 
Cornelius Bogert, of Lodge No. 3, was elected and installed, 
Brother Mulligan, of Lodge No. 17, being in nomination, as 
also Brother L. Seymour, of Lodge No. 1. 

We now return to March 1, 1809, when the Grand Lodge 
convened, the Grand Master, De Witt Clinton, absent, Mar- 
tin Hoffman, the Deputy, “in the chair;” James Woods, 
Senior Grand Warden ; the Master of Lodge No. 2, Brother 
Boome, Junior Grand Warden, p. t. ; John Wells, Grand 
Secretary, and Bobert Cocks, Grand Treasurer, the officers 
of sixteen Lodges, and proxies of six Lodges being present. 

Subsequent to the transaction of considerable important 



24:8 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


business pertaining to the Finances and the School, a Com- 
mittee was appointed to consider and report whether 

A PAST MASTER OF A LODGE, 

not under the jurisdiction of this Grand Lodge, but who is a 
member of a Lodge under its jurisdiction, is entitled to a seat 
and vote in this Grand Lodge as a member thereof. 

The Committee reported, on the following June 7, that, in 
their opinion, no Past Master is entitled to vote in this Grand 
Lodge, unless he has passed the chair of some Lodge under 
its jurisdiction ; which was unanimously confirmed. 

On March 1, it was resolved that a committee be appointed 
to arrange with the Grand Secretary the 

NUMBERS OF THE DIFFERENT LODGES 

under the jurisdiction of this Grand Lodge. The Grand 
Secretary reported thereon June 4, 1819. 

A petition for charitable relief was presented in behalf of 
Peter Adolph Losman, representing himself as a Mason 
and a member of 

king Solomon’s lodge of perfection, 

held at Holmes’ Hole, Martha’s Yineyard, in the State of 
Massachusetts ; but, it not appearing to the satisfaction of 
the Grand Lodge that he was entitled to their bounty, his 
petition was rejected. 

Petitions for Warrants for eight Lodges were presented, 
and seven were referred to the Grand Officers : 

Western Star Lodge, village of Hew Amsterdam, Hiagara 
County. 

Hamilton Lodge, town of Madrid, St. Lawrence County. 
Cassia Lodge, town of Delhi, Delaware County. 

Freedom Lodge, town of Unadilla, Otsego County. 

Kising Sun Lodge, town of Oxford, Chenango County. 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


249 


Harmony Lodge, town of Potsdam, St. Lawrence County. 

Olive Branch Lodge, town of Massena, St. Lawrence 
County. 

Tates Lodge, town of Schodack, Bensselaer County. 

This last-named application, recommended by Mount 
Yernon Lodge of Albany, was immediately granted. 

The election of June Y, 1809, resulted as follows : 

Hon. De Witt Clinton, Grand Master. 

Martin Hoffman, Deputy Grand Master. 

James Woods, Senior Grand Warden. 

Hon. Philip S. Yan Bensselaer, Junior Grand Warden. 

Bobert Cocks, Grand Treasurer. 

John Wells, Grand Secretary. 

Joseph Jacobs, Grand Pursuivant. 

James Yarian, Grand Tyler. 

The election of a Grand Chaplain was dispensed with. 
The petition for the institution of Philanthropic Lodge, at 
Camden, Oneida County, was favorably referred to the 
Grand Officers. 

THE ANCIENTS AND MODERNS OF SOUTH CAROLINA. 

An important Communication from the Corresponding 
Committee of St. John’s Lodge, Ho. 31, Ancient York 
Masons, of Charleston, S. C., stating that the Grand Lodge 
of Ancient York Masons and the Grand Lodge of Modem 
Masons of that State had formed a union, under the name of 
the Grand Lodge of South Carolina, and protesting against 
the recognition of such union, was read, and referred to the 
Grand Treasurer and Worshipful Brothers O’Heil, Tardy, 
and Williams. 

A Communication was received from the Grand Lodge of 
Georgia, on September 6, relative to the South Carolina 
union of the Moderns and Ancients , disapproving of the 
same, and approving of the course pursued by St. John’s 
Lodge, Ho. 31, as above referred to. This document was 
referred to the Committee having the subject in charge. 



250 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


Immediately following the above, was read a Communica- 
tion from the Grand Lodge of Ancient York Masons of 
South Carolina, stating the re-establishment of that Grand 
Lodge, by those Lodges of Ancient York Masons who had 
refused to join in the union with the Modern Masons. 

This Communication was referred to the Committee here- 
inbefore mentioned, and it enjoyed a diplomatic sleep. 

It was in this year, 1809, that James Madison became 
President of the United States. 

On the same date a Communication was received from the 

GRAND LODGE OF OHIO, 

giving information as to its organization, on January 4, 1808, 
and praying recognition and interchange of correspondence. 
A favorable reply was ordered through the Grand Secretary. 

A Warrant was granted on September 6, 1809, to institute 
a Lodge in Ogdensburg, St. Lawrence County, by the name 
of St. Lawrence. 

A Warrant was also authorized for the establishment of 
Rising Sun Lodge, Northumberland, Saratoga County. 

A LEGAL STATE LOTTERY. 

The Grand Lodge of Maiyland announced, by Communi- 
cation, the passage of an act of the Legislature of that State, 
authorizing the raising of $12,500, by a lottery , for the pur- 
pose of building a 

MASONIC HALL IN BALTIMORE CITY, 

and inviting the Fraternity of New York to further the 
object by adventuring therein. 

The Grand Lodge of New York resolved a reference to 
the Grand Treasurer, authorizing him, if he deemed it expe- 
dient, to purchase not less than five nor more than twenty 
tickets in the said lottery, for and on account of the Grand 
Lodge. 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


251 


GRAND LODGE CHARITY. 

The donations of the Grand Lodge in the line of charity 
were continual and liberal, as to which we may recite the 
case of Miss Jones, an orphan, recommended by brethren of 
Washington County, who came to the city of New York to 
have an operation performed upon her eyes, for she was 
totally blind, and the Grand Lodge authorized one hundred 
dollars, as a donation, on November 29, 1809. 

At the session, ^December 6, Warrants were authorized for 
three Lodges to be instituted, as follows : 

Ark Lodge, at Windsor, in Broome County. 

Meridian Sun Lodge, at New Lisbon, in Otsego County. 

Tioga Lodge, at town of Catharine, then in Tioga County. 

1810. 

On March 7, 1810, the following Warrants were author- 
ized : 

Painted Post Lodge, at Painted Post, Steuben County. 

Yernon Lodge, at town of Snell, Ontario County. 

Mexico Lodge, at town of Mexico, Oneida County. 

Clinton Lodge, at town of Watervliet, Albany County. 

Benevolent Lodge, at town of Hopkinton, St. Lawrence 
County. 

Mount Hope Lodge, at town of Ticonderoga, Essex County. 

The following regulation was made by resolution, affecting 

FUNERAL PROCESSIONS. 

“ That no Dispensation for a funeral procession shall be 
hereafter granted, unless upon the written application of 
the first three officers of the Lodge of which the deceased 
brother was a member, or a majority of them, and signed by 
them.” Favorable action was had on this subject March 5, 
1817, post, which see. 

The subject of 



252 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


WORK AND LECTURES 

also became a matter of interest at this time, and a Commit- 
tee of five was appointed to visit the different Lodges in the 
city, whose duty it shall be, “ by their example and instruc- 
tion, to produce a uniformity of work and lectures among 
the said Lodges, and for that purpose, some one of the 
Committee shall at every such visit take the Master’s chair, 
and perform whatever work there is to be done.” 

This first Committee on Work consisted of Elias Hicks, 
the Master of Holland, Ho. 8 ; Past Master Lowndes, of 
Washington, Ho. 16 ; Past Master Yanderbilt, of Trinity, 
Ho. 10 ; Past Master Coffin, of Abram’s, Ho. 15 ; and Past 
Master Prince, of Adelphi, Ho. 18. On December 8 follow- 
ing, the Committee asked to be discharged, as they evidently 
could not agree ; which was granted. The whole subject 
was then referred to the Grand Officers, with power. 

On June 7, 1810, the Grand Officers were re-elected, 
except in the case of the Senior Grand Warden, wherein 
Cadwallader D. Colden was elected in the place of James 
Woods. 

Scipio Morning Star Lodge was warranted December 8, 
1810. 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


253 


CHAPTEE IY. 
1811-1820. 


1811. 

The Grand Officers were re-elected on June 5, 1811, and 
a Communication was received from the Grand Lodge of 
Pennsylvania requesting the company of the Grand Officers 
of the Grand Lodge of New York, at the consecration of the 

NEW HALL AT PHILADELPHIA, 

on June 24. 

The Grand Secretary was instructed to courteously ac- 
knowledge the invitation, and its acceptance by the Grand 
Officers. 

CERTIFICATES. 

The Grand Secretary, on June 5, 1811, raised the question 
as to granting certificates to brethren who were made by 
Dispensations, as these brethren were not members of' the 
Lodges in which they were made : he requested the consider- 
ation and instruction of the Grand Lodge thereon. 

This matter was referred to Brothers Hicks, Navarro, and 
Miller. 

While the subject was before the Committee, October 16, 
1811, the following resolution was adopted : 

Resolved, That every person, the Grand Officers and 
proxies excepted, claiming a seat in this Grand Lodge, shall, 
before he be allowed to take the same, produce to the Grand 
Secretary a certificate from the Lodge which he claims to 
represent, which certificate, sealed with the seal of such 



254 


HISTORY OP FREEMASONRY 


Lodge, and signed by the Secretary thereof, shall be in the 
words following, to wit : 

CERTIFICATE OF A MASTER OR WARDEN. 

Be it known that our Brother was, on 

the day of , A. D. 181 , at a regular meet- 
ing of Lodge, No. . . , held at 

Town, in the county of , and State of New 

York, duly elected of said Lodge for the 

year ensuing 

In testimony whereof, we, the members of said Lodge, 
have caused the seal thereof to be hereunto affixed, and our 
Secretary to sign the same. 

CERTIFICATE OF A PAST MASTER. 

Be it known that our worthy Brother 

having, in the year 179 , been duly elected and filled the 

office of Master of Lodge, No. . . , held at 

Town, in the county of , and 

State of New York, and being now a member of 

Lodge, No. . ., held at Town, in the county 

of , and State aforesaid, is duly authorized to 

represent the said Lodge in the Grand Lodge in this State. 

In testimony whereof, etc. 

PHYSICAL DISQUALIFICATION. 

Albion Lodge, No. 31, made a Communication to this 
Grand Lodge, that a candidate had been proposed in their 
Lodge for initiation, who had received a wound in his knee, 
which caused a stiffness in walking, and praying to be 
instructed whether he was duly qualified to be admitted a 
member of the Fraternity; whereupon the said Communication 
was referred to the Eight Worshipful Brother Colden, Senior 
Grand Warden elect, the Worshipful Brothers Simson, Mulli- 
gan, Navarro, and Vanderbilt, to report to this Grand Lodge 
their opinion thereon, and also some general rule for deter- 



IN THE STATE OP NEW YORK 


255 


mining the degree of blemish or defect which should be con- 
sidered a disqualification for admission into our Brotherhood. 

The above Communication of inquiry was presented June 
Y, 1810, but no report was made until October 16, 1811, and 
then to the following effect : 

“ That the defect referred to in this application was such 
as to disqualify the candidate for initiation.” 

The report was rejected and the Committee discharged. 

A resolution was then introduced, that the defect referred 
to by Albion Lodge was not such as to disqualify the candi- 
date for initiation. 

Olive Branch Lodge was warranted December 4, 1811, to 
be held at Litchfield, Herkimer County. 

1812. 

The year 1812 was one in which the Sessions of the Grand 
Lodge were mainly devoted to much routine business per- 
taining to the prosperity of the Fraternity, and in adjusting 
many domestic matters. 

A pleasant Communication, and further evidence of amity, 
was received from the Grand Lodge of England ; copies of 
the Annual Keports of 1808-09-10-11 were received from the 
Grand Lodge of Yermont; and a Communication from 
the Grand Lodge of Ohio, accompanied by a Masonic oration, 
delivered at Zanesville on the Festival of St. John the Evan- 
gelist, 1810, by the Most Worshipful Lewis Cass, Grand 
Master of Masons of that State, and a Communication from 
the Grand Lodge of Maryland. All of these were directed 
to be carefully preserved among similar publications. 

Eastern Light Lodge was established at Greene, Chenango 
County; Eising Sun Lodge, at Trenton, Oneida County; 
Geneva Lodge, in Geneva, Cayuga County, on September 
2, 1812. Gilboa Lodge was warranted December 2, and 
located at Blenheim, Schoharie County ; Columbia Lodge, at 
New Paltz, Ulster County. 



256 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


Many applications for Warrants, made by brethren in dif- 
ferent localities of the State, were referred in usual form, to 
the Grand Officers for examination, to wit : Spring Lodge, 
for Herkimer County ; Solomon’s Lodge, for White Plains ; 
Selected Friends’ Lodge, for Camillus, Onondaga County; 
also for Lodges to be named Halcyon, Fidelity, Mount 
Moriah, Fredonia, Harmony, Clermont, and Western Star. 

An Emergency Communication was held on November 13, 
1812, in consequence of the 

DEATH OF ROBERT COCKS, PAST GRAND TREASURER, 

who had served for eleven years, from 1800 to 1811, and 
was known as “ The Faithful Treasurer.” By order of the 
Grand Lodge, the remains were interred at the expense of 
the Grand Lodge and with Masonic honors. 

The political state of affairs throughout the entire country, 
at this period, caused great excitement, which, to a limited 
extent, distracted the attention of the people from all societies 
and fraternities. The culmination was 

THE WAR WITH GREAT BRITAIN, 

which opened in this year, 1812, and was a new trial of 
strength for army and navy. A few of the events should 
here pass in review. The first active operations were in the 
north-west, and brought into service the Indian allies of 
Great Britain. In August, a body of these allies fell upon 
Fort Dearborn, now Chicago, and forcing its surrender, 
killed or took prisoners most of its people. A successful 
attack was made in October from New York upon Queens- 
town, but the town was retaken by the British shortly after. 

In the city of New York, not so far above its limits as can 
be found Marion, Lily, Gavel, and Harlem Lodges, is an 
historic spot made memorable in preceding years, especially 
on September 16, 1776, when Virginians, under Major Leitch, 
and Connecticut Rangers, under Colonel Knowlton— soldiers 
who had formed a body-guard for Washington— met and 







IN THE STATE OP NEW YORK. 


257 


fought British infantry and Highlanders led by General 
Leslie. Along the hill-side and down the valley, from 110th 
to 125th street, and almost from river to river that form 
the bounds of the island, the ground has become memorable 
from this important struggle. Over the rising ground 
beyond what is now known as Morningside Park, came to 
the aid of the Colonists, Marylanders and New Englanders, 
encouraged by the presence of those prominent Masons, 
Generals Washington, Putnam, and Greene, who never 
exhibited their personal courage more ' brilliantly than in 
this battle. The grass on the hill-side was red that day, 
where so many brave men fell, among them Major Leitch 
and Colonel Knowlton. From behind the old Block House 
now in Central Park, the British retreated. 

The ruder military works were improved in after years, 
and again became memorable in 1812; they were then 
known as McGowan’s Pass. In the succeeding year, in the 
western part of the State, Fort Niagara was captured by the 
British and the city of Buffalo burned. 

The battle of Niagara, in July, 1814, was a severe one in 
loss to both sides. The British General, Riall, and his staff 
were captured, and the British driven from the field with a 
loss of nine hundred men, the American army losing eight 
hundred. Active operations during the year extended over 
much of the territory of the northern part of the State of 
New York, which was defended by General Macomb and 
Commodore MacDonough, General Prevost being in com- 
mand of the attacking party. In August, a fleet bearing 
four thousand soldiers entered Chesapeake Bay, against 
which the American fleet was too weak to contend. The 
troops landed, proceeded at once to Washington, defeated 
the militia, and burned the city. They then advanced upon 
Baltimore, but were met and checked by the militia, and 
they withdrew to their ships. 

The final land contest was the battle fought below New 
Orleans, between General Andrew Jackson and Sir Edward 
Pakenham, the latter losing seven hundred men, and the 
former only eight killed and thirteen wounded. 

VOL. II.— 17 



258 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


A treaty of peace was ratified on February 18, 1815, and 
was known as that of Ghent, which had been arranged on 
the preceding December 24. 

1813. 

On March 3, the subjects of 

DISPENSATIONS AND REJECTED MATERIAL 

were reported and disposed of as herein appears : 

The Committee to whom were referred the Communications 
from the Eight Worshipful, the Grand Lodge of New Jersey 
and the Grand Secretary of Pennsylvania, relative to the 
initiation of Masons by virtue of dispensation, reported the 
following resolutions, viz. : 

“ JResolved^ That no Lodge under the jurisdiction of this 
Grand Lodge, sh:Z\ initiate into the mj^steries of the Craft, 
any person of this State or of the United States, or a for- 
eigner, unless, before he be so initiated, he shall satisfy said 
Lodge by a test or otherwise, whether he hath at any time 
made application to a Lodge for admission and been rejected 
or otherwise refused admission into the same, and if it shall 
appear that the candidate has been rejected, then the can- 
didate shall not be initiated, until the Lodge to which the 
candidate applies, is satisfactorily convinced that such 
rejection has not been on account of any circumstances that 
ought to preclude him from the benefits of Masonry.” 

Which was adopted, and the Grand Secretary directed to 
communicate the same to the Grand Lodges in other States 
and the Lodges under this jurisdiction. 

An effort was made, on March 5, 1817, to have the above 
resolution rescinded, bnt the same failed. 

INCREASE IN THE NUMBER OF GRAND OFFICERS. 

The subject of increasing or reducing the number of Grand 
Deacons or of Grand Stewards was introduced at the Ses- 



IN THE STATE OP NEW YORK. 


259 


sion of the Grand Lodge, March 3, 1813 ; also, as to the pro- 
priety of adding officers recognized by other Grand Lodges, 
and defining their duties, rank, and appointment. A refer- 
ence was had to a Committee consisting of the Senior Grand 
"Warden, the Assistant Grand Secretary, and "Worshipful 
Brother Mulligan, of Lodge No. 17. 

The Grand Stewards’ Lodge, on May 26, received a report 
from the Committee on Charity, in which it is stated that 
of $600 expended during the last six months, $20 had been 
paid to three brethren who were seamen on board the 

BRITISH BRIG PEACOCK, 

brought to New York City among the prisoners of that 
vessel, under such needy circumstances, owing to the loss of 
their clothing and baggage, as to require relief. 

A draft was ordered drawn on the Grand Treasurer for 
the balance of amount needed, $48. 

On September 1, 1813, a Lodge was warranted to be held 
at Pleasant Valley, town of Clinton, Dutchess County, to be 
called Valley Lodge. 

On December 1, 1813, a "Warrant was granted to hold a 
Lodge at Manheim, Montgomery County, to be called Wash- 
ington Lodge. Also, one at Ward’s Bridge, Orange County, 
to be called Lawrence Lodge. 

MARQUIS DE MONTSERRAT. 

On the same date a letter was received from the Grand 
Secretary of the Grand Lodge of Maryland, communicating 
a resolution of the Grand Lodge, as follows : 

“ Resolved, That the Grand Secretary be directed to inform 
the Grand Lodges in correspondence with this Grand Lodge, 
that there has lately appeared in this city a man, who pro- 
fesses to be a Mason of the highest degrees, whose immoral 
and dishonest practices render him unworthy of a seat in any 
Lodge. He calls himself Charles De Ceuta Maligne, Mar- 



260 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


quis de Montserrat, is about fifty-four years of age, about six 
feet high, dresses in black, hair powdered and queued, of 
uncommon genteel appearance, and supports the air and 
manner of a well-bred, well-educated gentleman; in his 
speech, mild, soft, and persuasive, with the Spanish accent, 
he professes to have an acquaintance with many of the first 
characters in this country.” 

The Grand Secretary then informed this Grand Lodge that 
he had communicated the same to the Masters of Lodges in 
this city ; which proceeding was approved, and the Grand 
Secretary directed to make a similar communication to the 
other Lodges under the jurisdiction of this Grand Lodge. 

The following authority was granted December 1, 1813 : 

The Warrant for a Lodge to be held in the town of Canis- 
teo, Steuben County, to be known as Evening Star Lodge, 
was granted. Also, one to be held in the town of Monroe, 
Orange County, to be called Corner Stone Lodge. 

Albion Lodge, No. 31, was authorized to change its name 
to Fraternal. 


1814. ( 

COMMUNICATIONS AND “ HIGHER DEGREES.” 

A Communication, dated January 31, 5814, purporting to 
be made in the name and behalf of a body styling itself the 
Supreme Council of Sovereign Grand Inspectors-General of 
the 33d degree, holding its sitting in Charleston, S. C., and 
signed by E. De La Motta, John Mitchell, and Frederick 
Dalcho ; and another Communication in reply thereto from 
a body styling itself the Most Potent Grand Consistory of 
the United States, etc., and holding its sittings in the city of 
New York, were respectively read in Grand Lodge on March 
2, 1814, and on motion it was 

“ Resolved , That inasmuch as the said Communications 
relate to degrees of Masonry not known to, nor recognized 
by, this Grand Lodge, the Grand Secretary be directed to 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


261 


return the same to the bodies by whom they were respec- 
tively sent.” 

The petition of the brethren, officers of the Second Divi- 
sion of the Northern Army, assembled at Plattsburg, dated 
December 23, 1813, praying for a Marchmg Warrant , to be 
called Northern Light Lodge, was read and referred to the 
Grand Officers. 

The election of Grand Officers for 1814 took place on 
June 1, which resulted in the re-election of the Grand Offi- 
cers, with the exception of the Grand Treasurer, to which 
office Brother John W. Mulligan was elected, Brother James 
Thorburn being elected Grand Tyler. 

Brother John W. Mulligan was born in 1768; he became 
prominent by his activity in Masonry, and, finally, was looked 
upon as a venerable patriarch in the Fraternity. He was 
most energetic in committee work, and ever on the alert ; he 
was elected Grand Treasurer in 1814 and served for one year, 
De Witt Clinton being the Grand Master ; and again was 
elected Deputy Grand Master in 1820, and served in that 
capacity for one year under Grand Master Daniel D. Tomp- 
kins. 

Brother Mulligan died on January 17, 1862, at the great 
age of ninety-four years. He appeared to retain his memory 
and faculties until his death, and took great interest and 
pleasure in relating his Masonic experiences and actions in 
older days. 

IMPOSTORS IN OHIO. 

A fraternal Communication was received from the Grand 
Lodge of Ohio, dated Chillicothe, January 28, 1814, stating 
that two persons, calling themselves Antoni Lognito and 
I. Knock, had solicited money on the false pretense of 

RANSOMING EIGHT OF THEIR COUNTRYMEN 

from Algerine captivity; that they were impostors, and 
a strict guard against them suggested. 



262 


HISTORY OP FREEMASONRY 


THE FRATERNITY AND THE FORTIFICATIONS. 

The Most Worshipful Grand Master, De Witt Clinton, on 
August 22, 1814, informed the officers and representatives 
duly convened in a Grand Lodge of Emergency, that they 
had been assembled for the purpose of giving the Fraternity 
an opportunity of evincing their patriotism in the present 
important crisis of public affairs. 

Whereupon, on motion it was 

“ Resolved , That the Grand Lodge will perform one day’s 
labor on the fortifications, at such time as shall be assigned 
by the Committee qf Defense ; that the respective Lodges in 
this city, and the Fraternity in general, be earnestly requested 
to co-operate in this laudable work, and that the Deputy 
Grand Master, the Senior Grand Warden, the Assistant 
Grand Secretary, the Grand Treasurer, Brothers Simson, 
Biker, and Nicholas Eoome, be a committee to make the 
necessary arrangements for carrying the same into effect.” 

On the following 31st day of the month, a further resolu- 
tion was adopted, with a preamble as follows : 

“ Whereas , Sundry expenses have been and yet may be 
incurred by the Grand Lodge in carrying into effect the 
resolution passed at its last meeting, to contribute a day’s 
labor at the fortifications at Brooklyn ; therefore, 

Resolved , That the Assistant Grand Secretary be directed 
to audit the same and draw on the Grand Treasurer for the 
amount thereof.” 


FORTIFICATIONS AT BROOKLYN. 

A Grand Lodge of Emergency was opened on September 
1, 1814, by the Grand Master, De Witt Clinton, with the 
following officers and representatives present : 

Martin Hoffman, Deputy Grand Master. 

Cadwallader D. Colden, Senior Grand Warden. 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


263 


S. L. Mitchell, Junior Grand Warden, pro tern. 

Elias Hicks, Assistant Grand Secretary. 

Sampson Simson, Grand Treasurer, pro tem. 

And the following Lodges in full congregation, viz.: 

St. John’s Lodge, Ho. 1. 

Independent Royal Arch, Ho. 2. 

St. Andrew’s Lodge, Ho. 3. 

St. John’s Lodge, Ho. 6. 

Hiram Lodge, Ho. 7. 

Holland Lodge, Ho. 8. 

Trinity Lodge, Ho. 10. 

Pkenix Lodge, Ho. 11. 

L’Union Frangaise Lodge, Ho. 14. 

Abram’s Lodge, Ho. 15. 

Washington Lodge, Ho. 16. 

Adelphi Lodge, Ho. 18. 

Erie Lodge, Ho. 19. 

Fraternal Lodge, Ho. 31. 

Morton Lodge, Ho. 50. 

Mount Moriah Lodge, Ho. 132. 

Benevolent Lodge, Ho. 142. 

The Committee of Defense had assigned this first day of 
September for receiving the services of the Craft on the for- 
tifications at Brooklyn, pursuant to a resolution passed on 
August 22. The Grand Lodge, having first opened its ses- 
sion in a room in the City Hall, proceeded thence with the 
brethren of the before-mentioned Lodges in grand procession 
to the fortifications, having been joined at Brooklyn by For- 
titude Lodge, Ho. 84, and Hewtown Union Lodge, Ho. 174, 
and having labored diligently through the day, returned in 
like order to the City Hall, when the Grand Lodge retired to 
a room in the building and duly closed its labors. 

The following was the order and its fulfillment, and so 
recorded in the Order of Procession. Lodges Hos. 153, 143, 
and 17 are not noted in the minutes of Grand Lodge >of 
September 1, 5814. 



264 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


“ Ancient and Honorable Society , Free and Accepted Masons , 
Grand Lodge of the State of Hew York . 

ORDER OF ARRANGEMENT FOR SEPTEMBER 1, 5814. 

The several Lodges will assemble at sunrise on Thursday 
morning, September 1, at the Park, and form themselves 
according to the following arrangement, with the least pos- 
sible delay. The first division, headed by Lodge No. 158, in 
front of the City Hall, with its right at the gate opposite 
Frankfort Street. The second division, headed by Lodge 
No. 15, on the west side of the Park, with its right at the 
Bridewell. The Grand Lodge will meet and form in the 
•Hall, and take its place in the procession immediately upon 
the first division having passed it. Every brother will be 
clothed with an apron, and the officers with the jewels and 
emblems of their respective grades. All superfluous decora- 
tions, it is expected, will be dispensed with. When on board 
the steamboat, the brethren will preserve their places so as 
to prevent confusion on disembarking on the other side. On 
arriving at the ground, the body will unclothe and proceed 
to labor, the suspension from which will be ordered by a sig- 
nal from the Grand Lodge. When the labor of the day is 
finished, the members will reclothe, form themselves in the 
like order, and, on returning to the city, proceed to the Park 
and be dismissed. 


ORDER OF PROCESSION. 

New Jerusalem Lodge, No. 158. 

Tyler. 

Members four abreast. 

« 

Stewards. 

Masters of Ceremonies. 

Treasurer. Secretary. 

Junior Warden. Senior Warden. 

Past Masters. 

Junior Deacon. Master. Senior Deacon. 
Woods Lodge, No. 153. 



IN THE STATE OP NEW YORK. 


265 


Clinton Lodge, No. 143. 

Benevolent Lodge, No. 142. 

Mount Moriah Lodge, No. 132. 

Morton Lodge, No. 50. 

Fraternal Lodge, No. 31. 

Erin Lodge, No. 19. 

Adelphi Lodge, No. 18. 

Warren Lodge, No. 17. 

Washington Lodge, No. 16. 

The Grand Lodge 
in the following order : 

Grand Tyler. 

(with a drawn sword). 

Band of Music. 

Past Grand Officers. 

Grand Treasurer. Grand Secretary. 

Grand Standard Bearer. 

Junior Grand Warden. Senior Grand Warden. 
Grand Deacon, j } Grand Deacon ' 

Deputy Grand Master. 

Grand Deacon. The Grand Master. Grand Deacon. 
Four Grand Stewards abreast. 

Abrams Lodge, No. 15. ^ 

L’Union Fran$aise Lodge, No. 14. 

Phenix Lodge, No. 11. 

Trinity Lodge, No. 10. 

Holland Lodge, No. 8. I In the same 

Hiram Lodge, No. 7. j order as No. 158. 

St. John’s Lodge, No. 6. 

St. Andrew’s Lodge, No. 3. 

Independent Boyal Arch Lodge, No. 2. 

St. John’s Lodge, No. 1. J 

Elias Hioks, Assistant Grand Secretary. 
New York, August 29, 5814. 

On September 7, Deputy Grand Master Martin Hoffman 
called the attention of the Grand Lodge to the propriety of 



266 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


offering to contribute another day’s labor on the fortifica- 
tions erected on Brooklyn Heights, and more especially as 
one of the forts had, in honor of the Craft, been called 

FORT MASONIC, 

towards the completion of which, it was understood, when 
the Grand Lodge was at labor on September 1, that they 
would contribute another day of work. Whereupon it was 
unanimously 

“ Resolved , That this Grand Lodge will perform another 
day’s labor toward completing the fort called Fort Masonic, 
and on such other parts of the fortifications as may be 
assigned to them on such day as may be appointed by the 
Committee of Defense, and that the Lodges in this city and 
its vicinity, and the brethren generally, be particularly desired 
to unite their labors with this Grand Lodge, in the manner 
proposed. 

Resolved, further, That a Committee, consisting of the 
Bight Worshipful Deputy Grand Master, the Senior Grand 
Warden, the Grand Secretary, the Grand Treasurer, the 
Past Grand Treasurer, Simson, the Assistant Grand Secre- 
tary, and Worshipful Brothers Eichard Biker and Nicholas 
Eoome, be a Committee to tender the services of the Frater- 
nity to the Committee of Defense, and to take such other 
measures as may be necessary to carry the same into effect, 
and to draw upon the Grand Treasurer for whatever ex- 
penses may be incurred in consequence thereof.” 

Accordingly, a Grand Lodge of Emergency was convened, 
Grand Master De Witt Clinton and his officers present, on 
September 19, the day assigned by the Committee of Defense 
for the employment of the services of the Fraternity, and, 
as on September 1, the Grand Lodge was opened in the City 
Hall, and proceeded thence with the brethren of St. John’s, 
No. 1 ; Independent Boyal Arch, No. 2 ; St. Andrew’s, No. 
3; St. John’s, No. 6; Hiram, No. 7 ; Trinity, No. 10; Phenix, 
No. 11 ; Morton, No. 50 ; Mount Moriah, No. 132 ; and 



IN THE STATE OP NEW YORK. 


267 


Benevolent, No. 142, in general procession to “ Fort 
Masonic,” at Brooklyn, and, having diligently labored on 
the fort through the day, returned in like procession to the 
City Hall, when the Grand Lodge retired to a room in the 
building, and duly closed. 

The brethren returned to their homes in peace, and with 
great satisfaction. 

The Grand Stewards’ Lodge directed, on August 31, 1814, 
that a 


NEW SET OF JEWELS, HANGINGS, AND APRONS, 

suitable to the dignity of the Grand Lodge, be provided 
with all convenient dispatch, and the Assistant Grand Secre- 
tary was instructed to carry the resolve into execution. 

A Warrant was authorized, on September 7, to be issued 
for Oriskany Lodge, town of Whitestown, Oneida County, if 
approved by the Grand Yisitor Brother Enos. 

At this session, the fees of the Grand Pursuivant and 
Grand Tyler were, respectively, increased to four dollars for 
each attendance on the Grand Lodge and the Grand Stew- 
ards’ Lodge. 

Morning Star Lodge was warranted at the Communication 
held December 14, 1814, and located in the city of Albany. 

At the same Session, a Communication was received from 
the Grand Lodge of South Carolina, containing information 
as to the union of 

ANCIENT AND MODERN MASONS. 

A reference was made of this document to the Grand Offi- 
cers, to report thereon at the next meeting of the Grand 
Lodge ; consequently, on March 1, 1815, the Grand Master, 
De Witt Clinton, reported, and likewise on the union of 
Ancient and Modern Free Masons in England, Ireland, and 
Scotland, by which events the Masonic Fraternity through- 



268 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


out the world had been united into one happy family; 
stating that the Committee had carefully examined the 
matter, and that they found that the different sects of Free- 
masonry composed of Ancient and of Modern Free Masons, 
were united in Great Britaiu and also in South Carolina 
under the jurisdiction of one Grand Lodge in each of such 
countries. 

“ The terms of union appear to have been on the footing 
of perfect equality ; but how the precise differences have been 
arranged and adjusted cannot be collected from printed com- 
munications. 

In this State there is but one Grand Lodge ; of course, no 
union is necessary. The only interest we can take in these 
events must refer to the benign influences which they have 
on the general prosperity of Freemasonry ; but inasmuch 
as brethren, who have heretofore been considered Modem 
Masons, may visit our Lodges, it is proper that some general 
rule should be adopted in relation to them; therefore the 
following resolution is proposed : 

Resolved, That all Free Masons who are acknowledged 
as such by any of the Lodges under the jurisdiction of the 
Grand Lodges of England, Scotland, Ireland, and South 
Carolina, shall be considered as legitimate Free Masons by 
the Lodges under the jurisdiction of this Grand Lodge.” 

The report was received, the resolution adopted, and the 
Grand Secretary directed to communicate the fact to all 
Grand Lodges with whom this Grand Lodge is in corre- 
spondence. 


1815. 

The annual election, on June 7, resulted in the re-election 
of all the officers excepting Grand Treasurer John W. Mulli- 
gan, who was superseded by Sampson Simson. He resigned 
on September 7, and Cornelius Bogert was elected on Sep- 
tember 13. 

On September 6, 1815, Warrants were issued to establish 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


2d>9 


Jerusalem Temple Lodge, to be held at Cornwall, Orange 
County ; and Morning Star Lodge, in the town of Bau, 
Albany County. 

A Grand Lodge of Emergency was convened on Septem- 
ber 29, 1815, in consequence of the action had by Trinity 
Lodge, No. 10, in having published the expulsion of Brother 
John Wark. 


EXPULSIONS MUST NOT BE PUBLISHED. 

The Deputy Grand Master stated that this Grand Lodge 
had been convened on the application of five Masters of 
Lodges, for the purpose of hearing the complaint and remon- 
strance of Brother John Wark, against Trinity Lodge, No. 
10, for publishing in a public newspaper his expulsion from 
that body ; and, on the same being read, it was, on motion, 

“ Resolved , That this Grand Lodge highly disapproves of 
the conduct of Trinity Lodge, No. 10, in causing to be pub- 
lished, in one of the newspapers of this city, a notice of the 
expulsion from that body of John Wark. 

Resolved , , That no Lodge within the jurisdiction of this 
Grand Lodge, nor any member thereof, shall publish, or in 
any manner make public, except it be to the Fraternity or 
within the walls of a Lodge, the expulsion of any member. 

Resolved , That the preceding resolution be communicated 
by the Grand Secretary to the several Lodges under this 
jurisdiction.” 

The petition for a Warrant in favor of establishing a 
Lodge in the town of Clinton, Dutchess County, was granted, 
December 6, 1815, providing the petitioners designate to the 
Grand Secretary the name to be given to the Lodge. 

1816. 

On March 6, 1816, Allusion Lodge was authorized to be 
established in the town of Bidgeway, Genesee County. 



270 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


And, also, Mount Hope Lodge was authorized to work 
under a Warrant, in lieu of a Dispensation heretofore 
granted. 

GRAND LODGE REPUDIATES FORFEITED BAIL. 

Among the novelties of Masonic history will be found the 
application of Thomas Machin, of Charleston, county of 
Montgomery, stating that he had become bail for Brother 
Lemuel Clark, who had absconded, and praying the Grand 
Lodge to repay to him $215, for loss by the forfeited bail. 

Brother Machin was informed that it is not in the power 
of this Grand Lodge to afford relief in cases of such nature. 

DISTILLED SPIRITS. DIVERSION OF CHARITY FUND. GRAND LODGE 
DUES. SURRENDER OF WARRANTS. LOAN OF MONEY. 

At the same Session of the Grand Lodge, March 6, 1816, 
the following resolutions were moved and seconded, viz. : 

1st. “ Resolved, That the use of distilled spirits in Lodge 
Rooms at the meeting of Lodges, is of evil example, and may 
be productive of pernicious effects, and that the same ought, 
therefore, to be, and is hereby, expressly forbidden, under any 
pretense whatever. 

2d. Resolved, That the contributions which are due from 
the several Lodges under the jurisdiction of this Grand 
Lodge to the CTiarity Fund thereof, ought not to be diverted 
from the benevolent purposes for which they are intended, 
and that no Lodge shall therefore be at liberty to divide its 
funds among its members, Avithout first paying its dues to 
the Grand Lodge; nor to provide any banquet or other 
refreshments out of their funds, without first paying those 
dues which belong to, and ought to be appropriated to, the 
Charity Fund of 'this Grand Lodge. 

3d. Resolved, That it is the duty of the several Lodges 
under the jurisdiction of this Grand Lodge, to return annu- 
ally to the Grand Lodge a true and correct list of all their 
members, together with their Grand Lodge dues, to the end 
that no regular Mason shall be exempt from contributing to 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


271 


the Grand Charity Fund. That it shall also be their duty, 
whenever any member is suspended by them for the non- 
payment of his dues, forthwith to report the same to the 
Grand Visitor of their district and to the Grand Lodge 
moreover, that it is highly improper for any Lodge, after the 
suspension of a brother, to permit him, until such suspension 
is regularly taken off, to meet with such Lodge, or otherwise 
exercise his Masonic privileges. 

4th. Resolved , That all Lodges that have already forfeited, 
or shall hereafter forfeit, their Warrants, shall forthwith sur- 
render the same to the Grand Visitor of the district within 
which such Lodges were respectively established, on his 
demand for that purpose duly made, together with all the 
books, furniture, jewels, ornaments, money, debts, demands, 
and other property, whether real or personal, belonging or 
due to any such Lodge, and shall cause proper deeds, or other 
instruments in writing, to be executed and delivered to the 
Grand Visitor, for the purpose of vesting the same in him 
for the use of the Grand Lodge ; and it shall be the duty of 
the Grand Visitor of the district to report to the Grand 
Lodge any neglect or refusal to comply with the directions 
of this resolution, to the end that proper measures may be 
taken to enforce the same. 

5th. Resolved, That the practice of lending money by 
Lodges to individuals , especially in small sums, and without 
any security other than the personal responsibility of the bor- 
rower, be, and the same is hereby, prohibited ; inasmuch as 
it is calculated, from the want of punctuality in the bor- 
rower, and his frequent inability to repay the loan, to deprive 
a Lodge of the benefit of its funds for its own charitable 
purposes, and to incapacitate it from a full and regular dis- 
charge of its dues to the Grand Lodge.” 

The said resolutions having been read, it was 

“ Resolved, That the consideration thereof be postponed 
until the next meeting of the Grand Lodge, and that the 
Grand Secretary, in the meantime, send copies of the same 
to each of the Masters of Lodges in this city.” 



272 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


At the session of Grand Lodge held June 12, following, 
the first four resolutions were adopted, and the fifth rejected. 

NOTICE OF SUSPENSION. 

It was 

“Resolved, That it be the duty of the different Lodges in 
this city, upon suspending any of their members for non- 
payment of their dues, or any other cause, and also upon 
suspension being removed, to give notice thereof to the 
other Lodges in this city.” 

ORGANIZATION AND DIVISION OF GRAND STEWARDS 5 LODGE. 

The following resolutions were carried, viz. : 

“ Resolved , That the Grand Stewards' Lodge shall, from and 
after the first Wednesday in June next, be composed of the 
Grand Master, Deputy Grand Master, Senior Grand Warden, 
Junior Grand Warden, Grand Secretary, and Grand Treas- 
urer, ex officio, and of twelve Grand Stewards of Charity, to 
be elected from the Past Grand Officers, Past Masters, and 
Masters of the several Lodges in the city and county of New 
York, who at the time shall be members of this Grand 
Lodge. That the election of the said twelve Grand Stew- 
ards of Charity shall take place at the time of the annual 
election of the Grand Officers ; and immediately thereafter, 
the presiding officers of the Grand Lodge shall arrange the 
said twelve Grand Stewards of Charity into four classes, 
three in each class, numbering them first, second, third, and 
fourth class. That the seats of the members of the first 
class shall be vacated at the expiration of the first year, the 
second class, the second year, and so continually, to the end 
that three Grand Stewards of Charity may be annually 
elected. That the said Grand Stewards’ Lodge shall possess 
and exercise all the powers now vested in the present Grand 
Stewards 5 Lodge, and assemble at the times heretofore pre- 
scribed for its meeting, and whenever the Grand Master may 
specially convene them. 

That the Grand Stewards 5 Lodge shall appoint, from the 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


273 


said twelve Grand Stewards of Charity, a Committee consist- 
ing of three, to be called the Grand Stewards 5 Committee of 
Charity, who shall have and exercise the same powers that 
now belong to, and are exercised by, the Committee of 
Charity of the present Grand Stewards 5 Lodge, to be organ- 
ized as aforesaid ; and the said Committee shall discharge the 
duties of their appointment until the next quarterly meeting, 
and so from time to time in such rotation, as nearly as may 
be, that the whole of the said twelve Grand Stewards of 
Charity shall discharge the said duties three months of every 
year. Provided, however, that, instead of appointing a Grand 
Stewards 5 Committee of Charity for the first three months, 
as before directed, the persons composing the first class of 
the said Grand Stewards of Charity shall be the first Grand 
Stewards 5 Committee of Charity. 

That in case of the death, absence, sickness, resignation, or 
disqualification of any of the said twelve Grand Stewards of 
Charity, the said Grand Stewards 5 Lodge shall, at their next 
quarterly meeting, elect another member or members to fill 
the place or places so rendered vacant, and the Grand Master 
may, during the recess of the Grand Stewards 5 Lodge, fill 
such vacancy until such election shall take place. 

That appeals may be made from the Grand Stewards 5 
Committee of Charity to the Grand Stewards 5 Lodge, and 
from thence to the Grand Lodge. 55 

An effort was made on March 5, 1817, to rescind the above 
resolution, but the same failed. 

ELECTION OF GRAND OFFICERS. SALARY OF GRAND SECRETARY. 

“ Resofaed, That hereafter the Grand Master, Deputy 
Grand Master , and Grand Secretary shall be annually elected 
at the same time, in the same manner, and for the same term 
as the Grand Wardens. 

Resolved, That from and after the first Wednesday in 
June next, the Grand Secretary shall be allowed the annual 
salary of $600, payable quarterly, in full for his services, 
vol. n.— 18 



274 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


and that all moneys he may expend for books, stationery, or 
in any other manner in the discharge of his duties shall be 
allowed and paid by the Grand Lodge. That all the moneys 
he may receive, authorized by the present regulations, shall 
be accounted for and placed to the credit of the Grand 
Lodge. 

THE BOOK OF CONSTITUTIONS. KEPKINT. 

Resolved, That a Committee be appointed to report at our 
next Grand Lodge meeting, if any, and what, amendments 
are necessary to the constitution of this Grand Lodge for the 
better government of the Fraternity generally, and that the 
Committee consist of the Grand Treasurer, Grand Secretary, 
the Worshipful Brothers Vanderbilt, Lewis, Seymour, and 
Telfair.” 

Action on the following resolution was postponed until 
the next meeting of the Grand Lodge : 

“ Resolved , That a Committee be appointed to superintend 
the printing and republishing as many copies of the Book of 
Constitution as they may conceive necessary, and that the 
said Committee have discretionary powers to select and pub- 
lish together with the said Book of Constitution, such of the 
by-laws or regulations of the said Grand Lodge, from Decem- 
ber 5, A. L. 5800, up to the date hereof, having the operation 
of by-laws, as they may judge proper.” 

The above resolution was considered and adopted at an 
Emergent Session, held March 12, 1817, there being added 
the words “ together with a list of the Lodges under this 
jurisdiction.” The Committee consisted of Cadwallader D. 
Colden, John Wells, John W. Mulligan, Elias Hicks, and 
John Leonard. The powers of the Committee were enlarged 
on June 4, 1817, and they were authorized “ to form a new 
Constitution for the government of the Grand Lodge and 
the Lodges under its jurisdiction.” 

The annual June Session, held on June 5, 1816, resulted in 
the election of De Witt Clinton, Grand Master; Martin Hoff- 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


275 


man, Deputy ; Cadwallader D. Colden and Elisha Gilbert, 
Grand Senior and Grand Junior Wardens; Cornelius Bogert, 
Grand Treasurer; John Wells, Grand Secretary; Joseph 
Jacobs, Grand Pursuivant, and James Thorburn, Grand 
Tyler. 

At this Session, Martin Hoffman was in the chair ; Elisha 
Gilbert, Jr., Senior Grand Warden, pro tem.; George D. 
Davenport, Junior Grand Warden, pro tem.; Cornelius 
Bogert, Grand Treasurer; John Wells, Grand Secretary; 
the Representatives of nineteen Lodges, and the Proxies of 
ten Lodges. 

GRAND STEWARDS. 

In pursuance of the resolutions adopted at the last Session 
of the Grand Lodge, an election was immediately had for 
twelve Grand Stewards of Charity, resulting in the election 
of the following Masters: George Carroll, of No. 1 ; George 
D. Davenport, of No. 2 ; Samuel Montgomery, of No. 7 ; 
John J. Boyd, of No. 18; Jonas Humber, Jr., of No. 31; 
Henry Marsh, of No. 142 ; William E. Dunscomb, of No. 143 ; 
and Past Masters, Thaddeus Seymour, of No. 1 ; John Leon- 
ard, of No. 3 ; James Lyon, of No. 6 ; William Carlisle, of 
No. 10 ; Barnard Sprong, of No. 132. 

The presiding officer, Martin Hoffman, then classified the 
Grand Stewards, appointing three each in four classes. The 
record then states, that the reports which had been made by 
the Grand Visitors, Ebenezer Wadsworth, of the Second Dis- 
trict, and Joseph Enos, of the Third District, “were respect- 
ively referred to the Grand Stewards of Charity to audit 
the account of expenses of the Grand Visitors, and to the 
Grand Officers, to settle with them the amount of their 
compensation, and also to give to them such directions or 
instructions in relation to any part of their reports as the 
said Grand Officers may think proper, and to report thereon 
to this Grand Lodge.” 

Philanthropic Lodge, No. 156, was granted a new charter 
in lieu of the one destroyed by fire, and Harmony Lodge, 



276 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


No. 154, was authorized to move to its original home at 
Champlain. Also, at the same date, September 4, the Grand 
Pursuivant and the Grand Tyler were respectively allowed 
an annual salary of $50, payable quarterly. 

1817. 

MASONIC FUNERAL, DISPENSATIONS. 

A resolution as to granting a funeral dispensation was 
adopted on March 5, 1817, as follows : 

“ Resolved, That no Funeral Dispensation shall be issued, 
unless the Master and Wardens of the Lodge to which the 
deceased member shall have belonged shall certify, and the 
Secretary of said Lodge shall countersign the certificate, that 
he for whose interment the Dispensation is requested, has paid 
his Lodge dues until within six months before his decease.” 

At this Session, also, an offer was made by 
st. oeorge’s lodge, 

acting under a Warrant, issued during the Colonial period, 
by Sir John Johnson, and dated September 14, 1774, to come 
under the authority of the Grand Lodge, and stating that it 
wanted its rank accordingly. 

The election of Grand Officers held June 4, 1817, resulted 
in re-electing the officers installed in 1816, with the excep- 
tion that Elias Hicks was chosen Grand Secretary, in place 
of John Wells, declined, and the selection of Kev. James 
Milnor as Grand Chaplain, and Eev. Henry I. Feltus as an 
Assistant. 

SKETCH OF DR. JAMES MILNOR, PAST GRAND MASTER OF 
PENNSYLVANIA. 

Chaplain Gra/nd Lodge , State of New York , 1817. 

Dr. James Milnor was the son of William Milnor, of Phil- 
adelphia. He was born in that city on June 20, 1773, and 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


277 


was by birthright a Quaker. His education was received at 
the public schools in Philadelphia and in the University of 
Pennsylvania. At the age of sixteen, he left the university 
and commenced the study of law, and before he was twenty- 
one years of age, was admitted to the bar. This was in 
1794, and he settled in the practice of his profession in 
Norristown, now a part of Philadelphia. Norristown was 
then a small village, but ten years old. It was in a German 
district, and the inhabitants there, when James Milnor set- 
tled in it as a lawyer, mostly spoke the German language. 
He had acquired a knowledge of that dialect in the schools 
of his native city, and was thus enabled to accommodate him- 
self to the wants of a community where the common busi- 
ness was transacted in German. He soon rose to distinction 
in his profession, and had the confidence of his fellow-citi- 
zens, as an able and honest lawyer. While thus engaged 
at Norristown, he was made a Mason in old Lodge No. 31, 
located there. His initiation took place in August, 1795. 
He was then twenty-two years of age. He was soon after 
elected Master of this Lodge ; but, on removing the follow- 
ing year, he became a member of Lodge No. 3, in Philadel- 
phia. His affiliation with this Lodge was on September 6, 
1796 ; and he was afterward its Treasurer. 

In 1799, he married a lady who was by education an Epis- 
copalian ; and, as the marriage ceremony was performed by 
a clergyman of that denomination, it gave offense to his 
Quaker brethren that he should be married by a “ hireling 
priest,” and this being contrary to their established “ disci- 
pline,” he was “ disowned,” and his membership with the 
Quakers ceased forever. 

In 1805, Brother Milnor was chosen a member of the city 
council, and held the position from 1805 until 1809, during the 
latter year being its president. He was very popular, and 
in 1810, yielded to the earnest wishes of his political friends, 
and consented to become a candidate for Congress. He was 
elected, and was the only Federal candidate on the city 
ticket that succeeded. He remained in Congress until 1813, 
and was a steady opponent of the war and the belligerent 



278 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


measures of the administration. Henry Clay was then 
Speaker of the House, and, taking great offense at some 
remark of Hr. Milnor, he challenged him to a duel. Mr. 
Milnor declined the proffered combat, for he would not 
consent that any one should presume to call him to account 
for words spoken in debate, and he also deemed dueling 
a cowardly practice. Mr. Clay did not press the matter 
further ; and, in after years, they met on the most friendly 
terms. 

On becoming Master of Lodge No. 31, Mr. Milnor became 
a member of the Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania, and, although 
he had at the time been a member of the Fraternity but about 
two years, he was put upon a committee to revise the “Rules 
and Regulations ” of the Grand Lodge of that State. In 
1798, he was elected Senior Grand Warden; in 1799 and 
1800, he was re-elected to the same office ; in 1801 and 1803, 
he was Deputy Grand Master ; and, in 1805, he was elected 
Grand Master of Pennsylvania, and continued to hold that 
office by annual re-election, until the close of 1813. During 
his Grand Mastership, he was also, ex officio , Grand High 
Priest of the Grand Chapter of Pennsylvania. 

No Grand Master of Pennsylvania ever took a deeper 
interest in the welfare of the Grand Lodge and the good of 
Masonry than James Milnor. His charges and addresses 
were full of instruction, and his constant theme was the 
inculcation of charity and brotherly love. During his Grand 
Mastership, the old Masonic Hall in Chestnut Street was 
erected, and on its dedication, June 24r, 1811, he delivered at 
St. John’s Church, a public oration. 

Turning his thoughts to religious subjects, he was ordained 
a deacon in the Episcopal Church in 1814 ; in 1815, he was 
ordained a presbyter. In 1816, he became rector of St. 
George’s Church, in New York City. He was a promoter 
of the Bible Society, the American Tract Society, the Insti- 
tution for the Deaf and Dumb, the Orphan Asylum, and 
kindred associations. 

He was Chaplain of the Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania, 
and was honored by an appropriate jewel. When he 






THE OLD TUN TAVERN, PHILADELPHIA, 

IN WHICH THE FIRST LODGE OF FREE MASONS WAS ORGANIZED IN NORTH AMERICA. 




IN’ THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


279 


removed to New York, he became the Chaplain of the 
Grand Lodge of that State. He died April 8, 1845, in the 
seventy-third year of his age. He was the father of Dr. 
William H. Milnor, Grand Master of Masons of the State of 
New York in 1850. 

The Masters of Lodges Nos. 2, 15, and 16, James Ben- 
schoten, Bush G. Brown, and Jonathan Carlton, were elected 
to fill the vacancies created by the expired term of Brothers 
Sprong, Leonard, and Montgomery as members of the Grand 
Stewards of Charity. 

Jefferson Lodge, No. 164, at its own request, was located 
at Lowville village, in lieu of Martinsburg. 


FINANCES. 

The financial condition of the Grand Lodge, at this time, 
was as follows : 

Receipts $5, 980. 62 

Disbursements for charity $2,417.75 

Invested in stocks 2,438.98 

Contingencies paid 933.58 5,790.31 

Treasurer's balance $190.31 

Value of Grand Lodge stocks 8,335.75 

Total fund $8,526.06 

A Grand Lodge of Emergency was held June 18, 1817; 
the Grand Stewards of Charity reported, that the Grand 
Visitor of the Second District had visited 91 Lodges, and the 
Grand Visitor of the Third District had visited 61 Lodges, 
and that unitedly they had turned in $3,474.56. The Second 
District had increased its receipts from previous years, inas- 
much as on June 12, 1816, the counties of Ulster, Sullivan, 
Orange, Putnam, and Westchester had been taken from the 
First and added to the Second Masonic District. 


At the Grand Lodge of Emergency the following resolu- 
tions were adopted : 



280 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


SALARY OF GRAND TREASURER. 

“ Resolved , That the sura of one hundred dollars per 
annum, to be paid quarterly, and to commence on the first 
Wednesday in June, inst., be allowed to the Grand Treas- 
urer as a compensation for the trouble attached to his office 
by the payment of the numerous orders for charity. 

DONATIONS. 

Resolved , That it be, and hereby is, made the duty of the 
Masters of Lodges in the city of New York, to cause their 
Secretaries to report to the Grand Treasurer, immediately 
after each meeting of their respective Lodges, the amount of 
any charitable donations that may be made, the persons to 
whom made, and the merits, as ascertained by the said 
Lodges, of the respective applicants, together with any other 
information relating to such donations that may be deemed 
important. And that the Grand Treasurer file such reports 
for the inspection of any that may require it. 

OLD ALMSHOUSE. 

Resolved, That an application be made, on behalf of this 
Grand Lodge, to the honorable the Corporation of the city 
of New York, for a grant of the use of such part of the 
building (late the almshouse) now devoted to liberal pur- 
poses, and not already appropriated, as, when fitted for the 
purpose, may make a suitable place for the meetings of this 
Grand Lodge, and the subordinate Lodges within the said 
city, and that the M. W. the Grand Master, the R. W. the 
Deputy Grand Master, the R. W. the Senior Grand Warden, 
the W. Bro. Bush, and the Bro. Tardy, be a committee 
for carrying the same into effect.” 

The number of Lodges that paid dues was 295. 

The publication, annually, of an abstract of proceedings of 
the Grand Lodge became, at this date, a duty of the Grand 
Secretary. The numbering of the Lodges was re-adjusted, 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


281 


and new Warrants were reported issued to the following 
Lodges on June 5 : 

Sprig Lodge, No. 279, at Norway, Herkimer County. 

Northern Light Lodge, No. 280, at Wolcott, Cayuga 
County. 

Lenox Lodge, No. 281, at Lenox, Madison County. 

Wells Lodge, No. 282, at Rochester, Genesee County. 

Humanity Lodge, No. 283, at Lyons, Ontario County. 

Liberty Lodge, No. 284, at Mentz, Cayuga County. 

Meridian Sun Lodge, No. 285, at Middlebury, Genesee 
County. 

Orion Lodge, No. 286, at Ellisburg, Jefferson County. 

Franklin Lodge, No. 287, at Fabius, Onondaga County. 

Fellowship Lodge, No. 288, at Richland, Oneida County. 

Watertown Lodge, No. 289, at Watertown, Jefferson 
County. 

Morning Star Lodge, No. 290, at Marcellus, Onondaga 
County. 

Junius Lodge, No. 291, at Junius, Seneca County. 

Clinton Lodge, No. 292, at Schenectady, Schenectady 
County. 

Harmony Lodge, No. 293, at Gorham, Ontario County. 

Blazing Star Lodge, No. 294, at Willink, Niagara County. 

Morning Star Lodge, No. 295, at Nunda, then in Allegany 
County. 

The following additional new Warrants were reported 
issued on December 3, 1817 : 

Colden Lodge, No. 296, at Middletown, Delaware County. 

Mount Moriah Lodge, No. 297, at Ellicot, Chautauqua 
County. 

Rising Sun Lodge, No. 298, at Scipio and Aurelius, Cayuga 
County. 

Montgomery Lodge, No. 299, at Rhinebeck, Dutchess 
County. 

Schodack Lodge, No. 81, was authorized to change its 
name to Wadsworth and its place of meeting to Nassau. 



282 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


1818. 

On March 4, 1818, new Warrants were reported issued to 
Hoffman Lodge, Ho. 300, at Wallkill, Orange County, and 
to Rockland Lodge, Ho. 301, at Haverstraw, Rockland 
County. 

At this date the Grand Secretary was ordered to 

DESTROY ALL PAPERS NOW ON FILE OVER THREE YEARS OLD, 

in his office, and that are of older date than three years pre- 
ceding the date hereof, as from the unimportance of their 
character it may be deemed of s no benefit to this Grand 
Lodge, or the Fraternity at large, longer to preserve. 

DISPENSATIONS TO CONFER THREE DEGREES. 

The Deputy Grand Master stated that, having received 
information from the Master of Mount Moriah Lodge, Ho. 
132, that a Dispensation had been obtained by Morton 
Lodge, Ho. 50, for conferring three degrees, at one meeting, 
upon a person who then stood proposed on the books of Ho. 
132, as a candidate for initiation, under the false pretense 
that he was about to leave this city, and that for such pur- 
pose a special meeting of said Lodge had been summoned 
for Sunday morning, the first of March, he had thought fit to 
interpose the authority with which he was vested, by inter- 
dicting the proceedings thereon, until such time as the truth 
of the allegations could be proven or refuted ; and, after 
some pointed animadversions on the consequences of one 
Lodge thus interfering with another, on the abuse of the 
privilege of Dispensations, and on the violation of the Sab- 
bath by Masonic meetings for the transaction of business not 
indispensable, the following preamble and resolution were 
proposed and adopted : 

“ Whereas^ The granting of Dispensations to confer three 
degrees at one meeting, was intended for the convenience 
and benefit of the Lodges ; 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


283 


And Whereas, By the ease with which the same are 
obtained, those salutary regulations, framed for the purpose 
of preventing the introduction of improper and unworthy 
characters, are frequently eluded, the Craft brought into 
disgrace, and its harmony endangered ; therefore, 

J Resolved, That the M. W. the Grand Master be earnestly 
solicited, before granting any Dispensation for that purpose, 
to cause strict inquiry to be made into the motives of such 
application, and to withhold compliance, unless the reasons 
assigned are strongly urgent and perfectly satisfactory.” 

The Grand Officers were all re-elected on June 4, 1818. 
Four Grand Stewards and four Grand Deacons were ap- 
pointed. Three Grand Stewards of Charity were elected to 
fill the vacancies in the second class, whose terms of service 
had expired. 

Warrants were authorized to be issued to 

Catskill Lodge, No. 302, at Catskill, Greene County. 

Milnor Lodge, No. 303, at Yictor, Ontario County. 

Concord Lodge, No. 304, at New York City. 

Tioga Lodge, No. 79, held at Binghamton, was authorized 
to change its name to Binghamton Lodge. 

An acceptable Communication was received from the 

GRA ND LODGE OF SOUTH CAROLINA, 

giving information of the re-union of Masons of that State, 
and the final and effectual settlement of all their differences, 
on December 27, 1817. 

Announcement was made September 2, 1818, of Warrants 
having been issued to 

Hicks Lodge, No. 305, at Schoharie, Schoharie County. 

Dansville Lodge, No. 306, at Dansville, Steuben County. 

Mexico Lodge, No. 307, at Mexico, Oswego County. 

Atholl Lodge, No. 308, at Houndsfield, Jefferson County. 

Fidelity Lodge, No. 309, at Ulysses, Tompkins County. 

Bloomingburg Lodge, No. 310, at Mamakating, Sullivan 
County. 



284 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


A LEGALIZED LOTTERY DESIRED BY GRAND LODGE. 

On this latter date the following order was passed : 

“ Ordered , That an application be made to the Legislature 
of this State, at its ensuing session, for permission to raise, 
under the authority of this Grand Lodge, by lottery, a sum 
sufficient for the erection of a Masonic Hall in the city of 
Hew York ; and that the R. W. the Senior Grand Warden, 
the R. W. the Grand Treasurer, the R. W. Brother Wads- 
worth, the W. Brother Riker, and the W. Brother Hatfield 
be a Committee to draft and present the petition.” 

This Committee was discharged September 6, 1820. 

Powers of proxy were received and filed from nine 
Lodges. 

On October 7, 1818, a Grand Lodge of Emergency was 
convened. The Deputy Grand Master stated that he had 
caused a meeting of the Grand Lodge to be called, for the 
purpose of directing its attention to the origin and objects of 
the following advertisement, which appeared in several of 
the newspapers in this city : 

masonic notice (Africans). 

“ ISir* The members belonging to African Lodge of Free 
and Accepted Masons are requested to attend an extra meet- 
ing of said Lodge on the sixth inst., precisely at six o’clock, 
p.m., for the express purpose of receiving additional instruc- 
tions in the sublime and exalted science and mysteries of 
Masonry, and at the same time a general lecture thereon, 
and an inquiry into the proficiency which each member of 
P. Lodge has made since favors have been conferred upon 
them ; as, also, an exhibition and full explanation of the 
working or operating tools of each speculative Mason, with 
the various badges emblematical of their respective orders, 
on the degrees which have been by merit conferred upon 
them; after which a jubilee will be performed by the 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


285 


members of said Lodge. Punctual attendance is solicited. 
Masonic brethren belonging to other Lodges are respectfully 
invited to attend, and will be most graciously received. 

By order of 

Sandy Lattion, B. W. Master. 

October 2.” 

The same having been read, it was thereupon 

“ Ordered , That the B. W. Bro. Coffin, the W. Bro. Hunter, 
the W. Bro. Boyd, the W. Bro. Marsh, and the W. Bro. Ste- 
phens be a Committee to inquire into the same, and to report 
to this Grand Lodge, as early as practicable, the result of 
their investigation.” 

On March 3, 1819, the Committee reported as follows : 

“ The Committee to whom it was given in charge to inves- 
tigate the object and origin of an advertisement published in 
several of the newspapers, and purporting to be a summons 
for a meeting of a Lodge of Free and Accepted Masons in 
the city of Hew York, styled African Lodge, unknown to, 
and hitherto unheard of, by this Grand Lodge, make the 
following report : 

That two advertisements signed ‘ Sandy Lattion/ are ac- 
knowledged to have been inserted in one or more of the news- 
papers of this city, by the individual who has signed them. 
He has asserted to a deputation from this Committee, that 
the institution called together by those notices was actually 
organized, had assembled, and did still periodically meet. 
That proper authority had been furnished him from both the 
States of Pennsylvania and Massachusetts ; that the author- 
ity from the latter State proceeds from an African Lodge 
now in operation there. He has at all times refused to 
exhibit the documentary evidences of such authority, or to 
inform the deputation of the time when, and to designate 
the houses where, the meetings were held. 

The Committee have used all prudent diligence to obtain 
information from other sources respecting the alleged insti- 



286 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


tution, or the designation, of other of the members attached 
to it, but without success.” 

Which report was accepted, and no further order taken on 
the subject. 

On December 2, 1818, announcement was made of the 
issuing of Warrants as follows: 

Newcomb Lodge, No. 311, at Caroline, Tioga County. 

Summit Lodge, No. 312, at May ville, Chautauqua County. 

Union Lodge, No. 313, at Aurelius, Cayuga County. 

Valley Lodge, No. 314, at Elizabeth, Essex County. 

Whitesborough Lodge, No. 315, at Whitesborough, Oneida 
County. 

Mount Morris Lodge, No. 316, at Mount Morris, Genesee 
County. 

CHARITY FUND. 

The following regulation pertaining to the Charity Fund 
was adopted at the December Session : 

“ Hesolved y That from and after the next Quarterly Com- 
munication, the following fees be paid toward the Charity 
Fund of this Grand Lodge, viz. : 

For every Warrant to constitute a Lodge, seventy-five 
dollars. 

For every Dispensation to constitute a Lodge (which sum 
to be deducted from the fees for aJV arrant, provided such 
Warrant be applied for and granted within one year from 
the date of the Dispensation), twenty-five dollars. 

For every Dispensation to confer three degrees at one 
meeting, ten dollars. 

For other Dispensations, five dollars.” 

1819. 

HOLY SCRIPTURES FOR INDIA. 

The Grand Master of Massachusetts having communicated 
the will of the Grand Officers of the Grand Lodge of that 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


287 


Commonwealth, soliciting the aid of the Masonic Fraternity 
within the jurisdiction of New York, in disseminating the 
Holy Scriptures in India, the subject was referred to the 
Grand Officers for an opinion. 

No report was made until June 4, 1819. 

The Deputy Grand Master presented the following report 
from the Eight Worshipful Grand Officers : 

“ The Grand Officers, to whom was referred a proposal by 
the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts, to interest the Masonic 
Fraternity in this State in the distribution of the Bible 
among the heathen nations of the Eastern world, by an 
annual appropriation of a portion of their funds for that 
purpose, considering any diversion of the same from the 
constitutional object of the contribution, as dangerous in its 
consequences, by lessening the means of benevolence, and 
setting a precedent for innovation; and considering, also, 
that the abundant aid furnished by society at large in the 
circulation of the Bible, does not render any support from 
this quarter peculiarly necessary, have felt it their duty, with 
a becoming respect for the motives and opinion of the Right 
Worshipful Grand Lodge suggesting the same, to withhold 
their approbation of its adoption.” 

THE UNION IN ENGLAND OF ANCIENT AND MODERN MASONS. 

The Grand Lodge of England, for reasons unknown, had 
not communicated with the Grand Lodge of New York 
State, the interesting and important fact of the union of the 
Moderns and Ancients in Masonry in 1813. The Grand 
Secretary, Elias Hicks, seconded by Worshipful Brother 
Leonard, submitted to the Grand Lodge at the Session of 
March 3, 1819, the following preamble and resolution, which 
were unanimously adopted : 

“ Whereas , It is known that a union was formed on 
December 27, A. L. 5813, between the Ancient and Modern 
Masons of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ire- 
land ; but that, from the want of an oral Communication of 



288 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


the terms and conditions, the form and manner, by which 
the individuals of either are admitted to a participation of 
the benefits of that union, this Grand Lodge has never pos- 
sessed the means of giving to the Lodges within its juris- 
diction the information and instruction necessary for their 
guidance in the admission of visitors and the relief of appli- 
cants ; therefore, 

Resolved , That the R. W. Grand Officers be requested 
forthwith to take such steps as may seem to them best 
adapted to the purpose for obtaining, either from the United 
Grand Lodge direct, or from some one of its Provincial 
Branches, such information on the subject aforesaid as may 
be important and necessary to be known and promulgated.” 

A new Warrant was issued to West Star Lodge, No. 205, 
as the original had been destroyed by fire. Also, a new 
Warrant to Rising Virtue Lodge, No. 225, in consequence 
of the original having been lost or stolen. 

Warrants were authorized for the establishment of the 
following Lodges : 

Rising Star Lodge, No. 317, at Attica, Genesee County. 

Brownville Lodge, No. 318, at Brownville, Jefferson 
County. 

Peru Lodge, No. 319, at Peru, Clinton County. 

Constellation Lodge, No. 320, at Perry, Genesee County. 

Rising Virtue Lodge, No. 321, at Ontario, Ontario County. 

German Union Lodge, No. 322, at New York City. 

Enos Lodge, No. 323, at Bath, Steuben County. 

At the annual session held at the City Assembly Rooms, 
June 2, 1819, the officers of the Grand Lodge elected were : 

Most Worshipful De Witt Clinton, LL.D. (Governor of 
the State of New York), Grand Master. 

R. W. Martin Hoffman, Deputy Grand Master. 

R. W. Cadwallader D. Golden (Mayor of the city of New 
York), Senior Grand Warden. 

R. W. Elisha Gilbert, Jr., Junior Grand Warden. 

R. W. Elias Hicks, Grand Secretary. 

R. W. Cornelius Bogert, Grand Treasurer. 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


289 


R. W. Rev. James Milnor, D.D., Grand Chaplain. 

W. Rev. Henry I. Feltus, Assistant Grand Chaplain. 

E. W. Elias Hicks, Grand Visitor, First District. 

E. W. Ebenezer Wadsworth, Grand Visitor, Second Dis- 
trict. 

E. W. Joseph Enos, Grand Visitor, Third District. 

W. Alexander S. Glass, 


W. John G. Tardy, 

W. Lewis Seymour, 

W. Wm. T. Hunter, 

W. John I. Sickles, 

W. Thomas W. Garniss, 

W. James Lyons, Jr., 

W. Resolvert Stephens, 

Joseph Jacobs, Grand Pursuivant. 

James Thorburn, Assistant Grand Pursuivant. 
Hosea Dodge, Grand Tyler. 


Grand Stewards. 


Grand Deacons. 


The Worshipful Oliver Rose submitted the following reso- 
lution : 

“ Resoloed, That the jurisdiction of this Grand Lodge be 
divided into 


' EIGHTEEN GRAND VISITING DISTRICTS, 

as follows, namely : 

First District, the city and county of New York, Long and 
Staten Islands. 

Second District, the city and county of Albany and Sche- 
nectady. 

Third District, the counties of Dutchess, Westchester, and 
Putnam. 

Fourth District, the counties of Montgomery, Hamilton, 
and Herkimer. 

Fifth District, the counties of Washington, Saratoga, and 
Warren. 

Sixth District, the counties of Oneida, Onondaga, and 
Madison. 

Seventh District, the counties of Ontario and Seneca. 

VOL. II. — 19 



290 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


Eighth District, the counties of Cayuga and Tompkins. 

Ninth District, the counties of Genesee, Alleghany, and 
Steuben. 

Tenth District, the counties of Chenango and Broome. 

Eleventh District, the counties of Delaware, Schoharie,, 
and Otsego. 

Twelfth District, the counties of Orange and Rockland. 

Thirteenth District, the counties of Columbia and Rensse- 
laer. 

Fourteenth District, the counties of Tioga and Cortlandt. 

Fifteenth District, the counties of Ulster, Sullivan, and 
Greene. 

Sixteenth District, the counties of Niagara, Cattaraugus, 
and Chautauqua. 

Seventeenth District, the counties of Jefferson, Lewis, and 
St. Lawrence. 

Eighteenth District, the counties of Franklin, Clinton, and 
Essex. 

That a Grand Visitor be appointed to each District (a resi- 
dent therein), whose duty it shall be to visit each Lodge 
within his district at least once in each year ; at which visit 
he shall at all times notify the Master to convene his Lodge 
at one o’clock in the afternoon, and shall continue at labor 
eight hours, or until nine o’clock. It shall be his duty to 
collect all dues from the Lodges, and account with the Grand 
Lodge for the same, and at all times to attend the annual 
Communications of the Grand Lodge, and to be and report 
himself at the Grand Secretary’s office, on Saturday, pre- 
vious to its sittings, for the purpose of associating with the 
other Grand Visitors in Masonic labors, till the meeting of 
the Grand Lodge, at least eight hours each day, in order that 
a uniform work may prevail. 

That it shall be the duty of the Grand Secretary to note 
the time of each Grand Visitor’s arrival, and report the same 
to the Grand Lodge ; and if any one shall be found not to 
have arrived at nine o’clock on the Monday morning pre- 
vious to its sittings, it shall be the duty of the Grand Master, 
in open Lodge, to interrogate him on the cause of such inat- 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


291 


tention, and he shall then be disposed of as is proper at the 
voice of the Grand Lodge. 

That the Grand Lodge shall appoint one of the most emi- 
nent and skillful of the Fraternity a Presiding Grand Visitor, 
whose duty it shall be to attend at the opening of the meet- 
ing of Grand Visitors, and preside therein, and whose pre- 
rogative it shall be to instruct in the manner of work, 
and see that each Grand Visitor faithfully attends to 
such instruction and observes order ; and that he shall be 
respected accordingly, and paid for his services from the 
Grand Lodge funds. 

That for the present season the Grand Visitors shall be 
appointed from the Masters or Wardens, now presiding in 
Lodges in their respective Districts, to be named by the 
present Grand Visitors, or others, in open Lodge, and the 
voice of the Grand Lodge. And that, after the present 
year, they shall he elected by the Lodges over which they 
are intended to preside, in the month of April, in the follow- 
ing manner, namely : 

By written ballots, to be canvassed by the Master, War- 
dens, and Secretary, and an entry made in their Lodge min- 
utes ; and then a certificate, stating said votes, shall be made 
out and certified by the Secretary, and returned under seal, 
directed to the Secretary of the Grand Lodge, by the hands 
of the Grand Visitor ; and that the Grand Secretary shall, in 
open Grand Lodge, with proper assistance, proceed to can- 
vass the returns from the several Lodges composing any 
district, and if any one has more votes than all the others, 
he shall be declared to be elected; otherwise, the Grand 
Lodge shall proceed to elect from the three highest a Grand 
Visitor ; and, in case of a vacancy between Grand Lodges, 
the Grand Officers may fill said vacancies, as before, and 
direct their Secretary to constitute him accordingly. 

That the Grand Visitors so appointed, upon receiving infor- 
mation of their appointment from the Grand Secretary, shall 
acknowledge and accept said appointment on or before the 
first day of August; otherwise the place shall be considered 
vacant and a new appointment made as before ; that in those 



292 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


districts where the present Grand Visitors reside, they shall 
be as eligible to the office as if present presiding Masters. 

That if any Grand Visitor, or any Lodge over which he 
presides, shall think an alteration ought to be made in any 
district, he shall give notice to all Lodges to be affected by 
such alteration, of the object in view, at least three months 
previous to its being acted upon in the Grand Lodge. 

That, in addition to all contained in this resolution, it shall 
be the duty of the Grand Visitors to do all acts and things 
heretofore made the duty of Grand Visitors, and they shall 
be respected accordingly. 

That the several Grand Visitors be, and they are hereby 
considered, the legal proxies of the several Lodges within 
their respective districts, and have the right of voting as such 
in the Grand Lodge, except when a Lodge appoints some 
other proxy, or expresses a sentiment direct by letter to the 
Grand Secretary, in either of which cases the Grand Visitor 
shall have no voice for such Lodge. 

That the several Grand Visitors keep an exact account of 
all distances traveled to and from the Grand Lodge; that 
thirty miles be called a day’s travel ; that eight hours’ labor 
with a Lodge and a visit be a day’s labor ; that eight hours 
of actual labor in lecturing, or other business to promote the 
good of the Craft, after arrival and report of themselves at 
the Grand Secretary’s office, be called one day ; that all nec- 
essary distance they travel while visiting their Lodges over 
ten miles to each Lodge, be called a day to each thirty miles ; 
and that the said several Grand Visitors be allowed as a 
compensation for said services at the rate of two dollars and 
fifty cents per day ; and that, should it be deemed proper by 
the Grand Lodge at any time hereafter to increase or dimin- 
ish the said rate of compensation, such alteration shall not 
take effect until one year after passing the same.” 

Whereupon, it was 

“ Resobed , That the E. W\, J. W. Mulligan ; P. G. T., the 
W\, Matthew L. Davis, of No. 16 ; the W\, John Leonard, of 
No. 3 ; the W., Henry Marsh, of No. 142 ; the W\, Louis Sey- 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


293 


mour, of No. 1, be a Committee to take the same, together 
with the present system of Grand Visitations, into considera- 
tion, and to report at the Quarterly Communication to be 
held in September next, whether any and what alterations 
should be made therein; and that the whole be printed, 
and transmitted to the several Lodges within this jurisdic- 
tion, and that they be requested to forward to the Grand 
Secretary with all possible dispatch (to be submitted to the 
Committee) their opinion thereon, and such alterations, addi- 
tions, and amendments as they may judge that the interests 
of the Craft require to be made in the system of Grand 
Visitations.” 

The Right Worshipful Grand Treasurer then offered the 
following proposition : 

That the fifteenth additional particular rule, passed June 
3, 5793, be amended by striking out the words, “but no 
brother shall be admitted as proxy for more than one 
Lodge.” 

Which proposition was, on motion, referred to the same 
Committee. 

This subject, under a prepared circular by the Grand Sec- 
retary, dated January 3, 1820 (which in a somewhat similar 
form had been considered from 1801 to 1811), was directed to 
be printed and distributed to the several Lodges in the juris- 
diction. On June 8, 1820, after consideration by Grand 
Lodge, it was 

“ Resolved , That it is at present inexpedient to make any 
alteration in the system of Grand Visitations, or to extend 
the powers hitherto allowed to proxies.” 

On June 21, 1820, it was 

“ Resolved , That the resolution of January 1, 1811, by 
which the State was divided into three Grand Masonic Dis- 
tricts for visitation, be repealed.” 

On September 12 following, the Grand Master stated that 
he had caused an Emergent meeting to be called for the pur- 



294 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


pose of consulting with the Grand Lodge on the subject of 
Grand Visitations ; after a full discussion of the same, and a 
variety of propositions being submitted, the following pre- 
amble and resolution were passed by a large majority : 

“ Whereas , The Book of Constitutions of the Grand Lodge, 
as well as the regulation adopted in 5806, and collated in 
5819, provides for the system of Grand Visitations pursuant 
to which two different methods of carrying into effect those 
resolutions were adopted, both of which have been found 
inexpedient and have been abolished, the first in 5814, and 
the second in June, 5820 ; and, 

Whereas , It appears, from the accounts exhibited by the 
Grand Visitors appointed by the resolutions of 5814, and 
audited, that the country Lodges have paid large sums in 
5819 to the funds of this Grand Lodge, that is to say, in the 
Second District, $1,842.87, and in the Third District, $3,- 
572.21, of which, upon the auditing of the accounts of the 
Grand Visitors of the Second and Third Districts, $1,130 
have been allowed to the Grand Visitor of the Second Dis- 
trict, and $1,300 to the Grand Visitor of the Third District, 
for their services and expenses, which appear to be unreason- 
able deductions from the dues of the Lodges within said Dis- 
tricts, without benefiting the funds of the Grand Lodge, or 
contributing to its ability by means thereof, to answer the 
charitable purposes of the Institution ; and, 

Whereas , It is the wish and intention of this Grand Lodge 
to continue the system of visitation by Grand Visitors under 
•its jurisdiction, as essential to the preservation' of that inti- 
mate connection and intercourse between the Grand Lod^e 

o 

and all the Lodges under its jurisdiction, on which the har- 
mony, usefulness, and dignity of the Order in this State, and 
its character and station in the great Masonic family, must 
depend ; therefore, 

u Resolved , That, at the Quarterly Communication in 
December next, the number of Grand Visitors, and the 
determination of their districts, duties, and compensations, 
be submitted to the Grand Lodge for their final disposition ; 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


295 


ai*d that the Grand Secretary cause a copy of this resolution 
to be forthwith transmitted to all the Lodges under the juris- 
diction of this Grand Lodge.” 

On June 4, 1819, the Grand Lodge took up the subject of 

A NUMERICAL ARRANGEMENT OF THE LODGES, 

corresponding with the dates of their respective Warrants, 
and on motion it was 

a Ordered, That the numerical arrangement, as submitted 
by the Grand Secretary at the last Quarterly Communica- 
tion, be adopted.” 

Furthermore, “ That no dormant or surrendered Warrant, 
the number of which may have been employed in the pre- 
ceding arrangement, shall ever hereafter be revived ; and 
that the Grand Visitors cause the alteration to be made in 
the Warrants of all Lodges affected thereby, and situate 
within their respective Districts ; and the Grand Secretary, 
in all others not included in either of said Districts, and 
deriving their authority from this Grand Lodge.” 

As this adjustment affected so very many of the older 
Lodges, changing so materially their status, an exact list 
is here presented : 

LIST OF LODGES 


WHOSE WARRANTS HAVE BECOME EXTINCT, AND, CONFORMABLY 
TO A RESOLUTION OF THE GRAND LODGE, OF JUNE 4, 5819, 
CANNOT BE REVIVED. 


Name. Town. 

Sion Lodge, New York, 

St. John’s Regimental, Amer. (U. S.) Battal. 
No. 210, Registry of] 


England, 

Temple, 

Jerusalem, No. 4, 
No. 212, Registry 
England, 

Sion, 


New York, 


of 


New York, 

57th Regt. of Foot, 


County. 

New York, 
Trav. Warrant, 

New York, 


New York, 
Trav. Warrant, 


Date. 

1773 

July 24, 1775 

Feb. 20, 1779 
June 9, 1789 
Dec. 7, 1789 

Nov. 1, 1780 
Jan. 2, 1783 



296 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


Name. 

Town. 

County. 

Date. 

Hiram (No. 5), 

Regt. de Knyphausen, Trav. Warrant, March 10, 1783 

Concordia (No. 6), 

New York, 

New York, 

March 

13, 1783 

Parr, 

Shelburne, 

Nova Scotia, 

April 

2, 1783 

No. 7, 

Loyal Amer. Regt., 

Trav. Warrant, June 

12, 1783 

Union (No. 8), 

New York, 

New York, 

Nov. 

29, 1783 

Jamaica, 

Jamaica, 

Queens, 

Aug. 

13, 1787 

Hiram (No. 35), 

Lansingburgh, 

Rensselaer, 

Aug. 

16, 1787 

Steuben, 

Newburgh, 

Ulster, 

Sep. 

27, 1788 

Washington, 

Clermont, 

Columbia, 

Sep. 

20, 1790 

New York, 

Island of Curagoa, 

West Indies, 

Oct. 

22, 1791 

La Tendre Amiti6 \ 




Franco Am6ricaine, >-New York, 

New York, 

Dec. 

12, 1793 

L’Unite Americaine, 

j 


Feb. 

17, 1797 

Patriot, 

Pittstown, 

Rensselaer, 

Dec. 

4, 1794 

St. Patrick’s, 



June 

2, 1795 

Temple, 

t New York, 

New York, 

May 

13, 1797 

Schoharie Union, 

Schoharie, 

Albany, 

Aug. 

14, 1795 

Orange, 

Goshen, 

Orange, 

April 

12, 1796 

SteubeD, 

Steuben, 

Herkimer, 

Dec. 

29, 1793 

Montgomery, 

Montgomery, 

Orange, 

June 

6, 1798 

Hiram, 

Mount Pleasant, 

Westchester, 

Aug. 

7, 1798 

Morton, 

Bedford, 

Westchester, 

Dec. 

7, 1798 

Village, 

Marcellus, 

Onondaga, 

Jan. 

8, 1799 

Chosen Friends, 

Island of Demerara, 

West Indies, 

Nov. 

12, 1801 

Morton, 

Walton, 

Delaware, 

Feb. 

12, 1802 

Erin, 

New York, 

New York, 

Nov. 

1, 1802 

United, 

Marlborough, 

Ulster, 

April 

3, 1804 


MILITARY, TRAVELING, AND PROVINCIAL LODGES, 

THAT HAD EXISTED IN NEW YORK, OTHER THAN THOSE MEN- 
TIONED BY GRAND SECRETARY ELIAS HICKS, AS EXTINCT. 


Name. Date. 

Union Lodge, No. 74, 1787 

No. 52, 37th Infantry, 1756 

Lake George Lodge, 1757 

Temple, Trinity, Union, and Hiram, 1758 

Crown Point Lodge, 1759 

No. 90, 32d Regiment, 1761 

No. 7, 55th Regiment, 1762 

No. 399, 1763 

No. 441, 38th Regiment, 1765 

St. Patrick's Lodge, No. 4, 1766 

No. 132, 22d Regiment, Scotch, 1767 



IN THE STATE OP NEW YORK. 


297 


Name. Date. 

King Solomon’s Lodge, No. 7, 1767 

No. 478, 17th Dragoons, 1769-95 

King David’s Lodge, 1769 

American Union, No. 1, and Military Union, 1776 
Washington, No. 10, Army Lodge, 1779 

No. 213, 4th Battalion Royal Artillery, 1781 

No. 215, 2d Regiment of Anspach Berauth, 1781 

No. 232, “ Recton’s Hanoverian Brigade,” 1786 

Lodge of Unity, No. 517, Fort William Henry, 1787 
New Oswegatchie Lodge, No. 520, 1787 


A. L. 5819. 


LIST OF LODGES 

UNDER THE JURISDICTION OF THE GRAND LODGE OF THE STATE 
OF NEW YORK, AS NUMERICALLY ARRANGED JUNE 4, A. L. 5819, 
WITH THEIR PLACES OF MEETING, DATE OF OLD AND RENEWED 
WARRANTS. 


Those Lodges printed in italics , were at that time inoperative. 


Rank. Title. Town. 

No. 

1 St. John’s, New York, 

2 Ind. Royal Arch, New York, 

3 Zion (62), Detroit, 

4 Mt. Vernon (3), Albany, 

5 Master’s (4), Albany, 

6 Solomon’s (5), Poughkeepsie, 

7 St. Andrew’s (3), New York, 

8 St. George’s, Schenectady, 

9 St. John’s (6), New York, 

10 Hiram (7), New York, 

11 St. Patrick’s (9), Johnstown, 

12 Temple (10), Northeast, 

13 Washington (11) Fort Edward, 

14 St. Simon & St. 

Jude (12), Fishkill, 

15 Hudson’s (13), Hudson, 


County. Date of Warrant. 


New York, 

New York, 

Michigan Ter- 
ritory, 

Albany, 

Albany, 

Dutchess, 

New York, 

Schenectady, 
New York, 
New York, 

Montgomery, 

Dutchess, 

Washington, 


j 0. W. Dec. 7, 1757 
{ R. W. June 9, 1789 
J 0. W. Dec. 15, 1760 
/ R. W. June 9, 1789 
O. W. April 27, 1764 
' R. W. Sept. 3, 1806 
0. W. Feb. 21,1765 
i R. W. Dec. 3,1806 
s O. W. March 5, 1768 
1 r. W. 

jO.W. April 18, 1771 
R. W. March 2, 1797 
O. W. July 13,1771 
]R. W. June 9,1789 
O. W. Sept. 14, 1774 
R. W. 

Feb. 5, 1783 
jO. W. March 10, 1783 
} R. W. April 2, 1792 
July 20, 1784 
Sept. 26, 1785 
Sept. 26, 1785 


Dutchess, June 20, 1786 

Columbia, March 7, 1787 



298 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


Rank. Title. 

"KTn 

Town. 

County. Date of Warrant. 

no* 

16 Holland (8), 

New York, 

New York, Sept. 

20, 1787 

17 Unity, 

Canaan, 

Columbia, Sept. 

18, 1788 

18 St. John’s (19), 

Warwick, 

Orange, March 26, 1790 

19 La Fayette (20), 

Armenia, 

Dutchess, July 

23, 

20 Kingston (24), 

Kingston, 

Ulster, Dec. 

8, 

21 Montgomery, 

Stillwater, 

Saratoga, Oct. 

22,1791 

22 Amicable, 

Whitestown, 

Oneida, April 

7, 1792 

28 Ontario, 

Canandaigua, 

Ontario, Oct. 

12, 1793 

25 Aurora, 

Hampton , 

Washington, March 

26 Huntington , 

Huntington , 

Suffolk , March 22, 

27 Hiram, 

Washington, 

Dutchess, May 

10, 

28 Livingston, 

Kingsbury, 

Washington, June 

6, 

29 Freehold, 

Greenville, 

Greene, June 

6, 

30 Union, 

Elmira, 

Tioga, June 

38, 

31 Harmony , 

CatskUl , 

Greene, Sept. 

3, 

32 Rural , 

Cambridge , 

Washington , Oct. 

14, 

33 Federal, 

Hosick, 

Rensselaer, Nov. 

15, 

34 Cortlandt, 

Peekskill, 

Westchester, Dec. 

31, 

35 Howard , 

Hew York, 

New York , March 20, 1794 

36 Amicable, 

Herkimer, 

Herkimer, April 

6, 

37 Franklin, 

Balls ton, 

Saratoga, May 

16, 

38 Columbus, 

South East, 

Putnam, Aug. 

4, 

39 Trinity (10), 

New York, 

New York, March 23, 1795 

40 Phoenix (11), 

New York, 

New York, March 30, 

41 Otsego (40), 

Cooperstown, 

Otsego, Aug. 

14, 

42 Montgomery, 

Broadalbin, 

Montgomery, Nov. 

34, 

43 Orange, 

Waterford, 

Saratoga, Nov. 

35, 

44 Canaan, 

Canaan, 

Columbia, March 26, 1796 

45 St. Andrew’s (48), 

Stamford, 

Delaware, April 

13, 

46 Westchester, 

New Rochelle, 

Westchester, May 

7, 

47 Beekman , 

Beekman , 

Dutchess , May 

13, 

49 Apollo, 

Troy, 

Rensselaer, June 

19, 

50 Coxsackie , 

Coxsackie , 

Albany , July 

6, 

51 North Star, 

Salem, 

Washington, Oct. 

13, 

52 Aurora, 

Fairfield, 

Herkimer, Nov. 

4, 

53 Temple, 

Albany, 

Albany, Nov. 

11, 

55 Granville, 

Granville, 

Washington, Dec. 

7, 

56 Western Star (59), 

Bridgewater, 

Oneida, Jan. 

18, 1797 

57 Suffolk (60), 

Smithtown, 

Suffolk, March 

7, 

58 Scipio, 

Scipio, 

Cayuga, March 22, 

59 Bath, 

Bath, 

Steuben , March 22, 

60 St. Alban#, 

Brooklyn , 

Kings , June 

7, 

63 Morton, 

Hempstead, 

Queens, June 

33, 

64 St. Paul’s, 

Canajoharie, 

Montgomery, Jan. 

5, 1798 

65 James 1 , 

Middletown , 

Ulster, Jan. 

6, 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YOEK. 299 


Rank. Title. 

No. 

Town. 

Connty. 

Date of Warrant. 

66 Montgomery , 

Rhinebeck> 

Dutchess, 

Jan. 

8, 1798 

67 Moriah , 

MarUetown , 

Ulster , 

Jan. 

8, 

68 Rensselaer, 

Rensselaerville, 

Albany, 

March 

7, 

69 Adoniram , 

Franklin , 

Dutchess , 

March 

9, 

70 Sharon Felicity, 

Sharon, 

Schoharie, 

March 13, 

71 L’ Union Fran<jaise (14), New York, 

New York, 

June 

25, 

72 Salem (74), 

North Salem, 

Westchester, 

Dec. 

20, 

73 Walton (75), 

Duanesburgh, 

Schenectady, 

Jan. 

2, 1799 

74 Homer (76), 

Schaghticoke, 

Rensselaer, 

Jan. 

3, 

75 Franklin (77), 

Charlestown, 

Montgomery, 

Jan. 

4, 

76 United Brethren (78), 

Cazenovia, 

Madison, 

Jan. 

5, 

77 Binghamton (79), 

Binghamton, 

Broome, 

Jan. 

7, 

78 Wadsworth (81), 

Nassau, 

Rensselaer, 

Jan. 

9, 

79 Roman (82), 

Rome, 

Oneida, 

Feb. 

13, 

80 Federal (83), 

Paris, 

Oneida, 

Nov. 

23, 

81 Fortitude (84), 

Brooklyn, 

Kings, 

Dec. 

4, 

82 Horizontal 85), 

Carmel, 

Putnam, 

Dec. 

4, 

83 Abrams (15), 

New York, 

,New York, 

Jan. 

18, 1800 

84 Washington (16), 

New York, 

New York, 

March 

5, 

85 Warren (17), 

New York, 

New York, 

March 25, 

86 Hiram (88), 

Aurelius, 

Cayuga, 

March 25, 

87 Morton (86), 

Schenectady, 

Schenectady, 

April 

20, 

88 Asylum (87), 

Westerlo, 

Albany, 

April 

21, 

89 Herschel, 

Hartford, 

Washington, 

June 

30, 1801 

90 St. John’s, 

Greenfield, 

Saratoga, 

Feb. 

12, 1802 

91 Adel phi (18), 

New York, 

New York, 

June 

29, 

92 St. Lawrence, 

Kortright, 

Delaware, 

June 

29, 

93 Military, 

Manlius, 

Onondaga, 

Sept, 

2, ' 

94 Phoebus, 

New Berlin, 

Chenango, 

Sept. 

2, 

95 Friendship, 

Stephentown, 

Rensselaer, 

Oct. 

8, 

96 Farmers’, 

Easton, 

Washington, 

Dec. 

4, 

97 Mount Yemon, 

Yemon, 

Oneida, 

Jan. 

81, 1803 

98 Onondaga, 

Onondaga, 

Onondaga, 

Jan. 

21, 

99 Vernon, 

Hillsdale, 

Columbia, 

June 

4, 

100 Armour, 

Rye, 

Westchester, 

June 

10, 

101 Columbia , 

Claverack, 

Columbia , 

Jane 

30, 

102 Olive Branch, 

Minisink, 

Orange, 

Dec. 

9, 

103 Constellation, 

Mayfield, 

Montgomery, 

Feb. 

11, 1804 

104 Hiram, 

Bern, 

Albany, 

Feb. 

25, 

105 Western Light, 

Lisle, 

Broome, 

March 20, 

106 Malta, 

Malta, 

Saratoga, 

March 22, 

107 Fraternal (31), 

New York, 

New York, 

March 26, 

108 Morton (50), 

New York, 

New York, 

June 

25, 

109 Sullivan, 

Sullivan, 

Chenango, 

June 

29, 

110 Farmers’, 

Turin, 

Chenango, 

June 

29, 



300 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


Rank. Title. 

No. 

Town. 

County. 

Date of Warrant. 

Ill Hampton, 

Sag Harbor, 

Suffolk, 

July 

9, 1804 

112 Mount Moriah, 

Palmyra, 

Ontario, 

July 

9, 

113 Bethlehem, 

Bethlehem, 

Albany, 

July 

27, 

114 Charity, 

Worcester, 

Otsego, 

Aug. 

30, 

115 Chenango, 

Norwich, 

Chenango , 

Nov. 

22, 

116 Friendship, 

Durham, 

Greene, 

Nov. 

38, 

117 Revival, 

Windham, 

Greene, 

Dec. 

5, 

118 Friendship, 

Milton, 

Saratoga, 

March 22, 1805 

119 Ontario , 

Sackett's Harbor, Ontario, 

March 27, 

120 King Solomon’s, 

Dover, 

Dutchess, 

April 

11, 

121 Hamilton, 

Hamilton, 

Madison, 

April 

16, 

122 La Sincerity 

New York, 

New York , 

April 

16, 

123 Oneida, 

Utica , 

Oneida, 

June 

5, 

124 Hopewell, 

Fishkill, 

Dutchess, 

June 

6, 

125 Rising Sun, 

Adams, 

Jefferson, 

June 


126 Rising Sun, 

Greenwich, 

Washington, 

June 

5, 

127 Machin, 

Charleston, 

Montgomery, Nov. 

6, 

128 Union, 

Qharlton, 

Saratoga , 

Dec. 

13, 

129 Friendship, 

Bainbridge, 

Chenango, 

Dec. 

16, 

130 Genesee, 

Avon, 

Ontario, 

Feb. 

13, 1806 

131 Hiram, 

Newburgh, 

Orange, 

Feb. 

19, 

132 Mount Moriah, 

New York, 

New York, 

March 

5, 

133 Sherburn, 

Sherburn, 

Chenango, 

March 

5, 

134 Hamilton, 

Palatine, 

Montgomery, March 

5, 

135 Rising Sun, 

Springfield, 

Otsego, 

March 

5, 

136 Eastern Light, 

Watertown , 

Jefferson , 

April 

7, 

137 Homer, 

Homer, 

Cortlandt, 

May 

9, 

138 Genesee, 

Richmond, 

Ontario, 

June 

14, 

139 Trinity , 

Cherry Talley, 

Otsego, 

June 

19, 

140 Friendship, 

Oswego, 

Broome, 

June 

24, 

141 Washington , 

Stephentown, 

Westchester , 

Sept. 

3, 

142 Benevolent, 

New York, 

New York, 

Sept. 

3, 

143 Clinton, 

New York, 

New York, 

Sept. 

3, 

144 Hamilton, 

Queens bury, 

Warren, 

Oct. 

22, 

145 Whitehall Social, 

Whitehall, 

Warren, 

Dec. 

3, 

146 Champion, 

Champion, 

Jefferson, 

Dec. 

3, 

147 Brothers, 

Fort Ann, 

Washington, 

Dec. 

3, 

148 Northern Constellation, Malone, 

Franklin, 

Dec. 

3, 

149 Farmers’, 

Half Moon, 

Saratoga, 

Dec. 

3, 

150 Orient, 

Denmark, 

Lewis, 

Dec. 

3, 

151 Clinton, 

Plattsbnrg, 

Clinton, 

Dec. 

3, 

152 Essex, 

Essex, 

Essex, 

Feb. 

14, 1807 

153 Mechanic, 

New York, 

New York, 

March 

4, 

154 Harmony, 

Champlain, 

Clinton, 

March 

4, 

155 Warren, 

Columbia, 

Herkimer, 

March 

4, 



IN THE 

STATE OF NEW YORK. 


301 

Bank. Title. 

No. 

Town. 

County. 

Date of Warrant. 

156 Philanthropic, 

Pompey, 

Onondaga, 

March 

4, 1807 

157 Warren, 

Pine Plains, 

Dutchess, 

June 

10, 

158 New Jerusalem, 

Bloomingdale, 

New York, 

June 

10, 

159 Si. Tammany , 

Hudson , 

Columbia , 

Sept. 

2, 

160 Ark, 

Geneva, 

Ontario, 

Sept. 

2, 

161 Louisiana, 

New Orleans, 

State of Lou- 





isiana, 

Sept. 

2 , 

162 North Star, 

North Field, 

Saratoga, 

Sept. 

2, 

163 Northern Light, 

De Kalbe, 

St. Lawrence, Sept. 

2, 

164 Jefferson, 

Martinsburg, 

Lewis, 

Sept. 

3, 

165 Farmers’, 

Burlington, 

Otsego, 

Dec. 

2, 

166 Farmers’, 

Pompey, 

Onondaga, 

March 

2, 1808 

167 Angelica, 

Angelica, 

Alleghany, 

June 

1, 

168 Delaware and Ulster , 

Middletown , 

Delaware , 

June 

1 , 

169 Eagle, 

Spencer and 

Tioga and 




Ulysses, 

Seneca, 

July 

1. 

170 Charity, 

Tompkins, 

Delaware, 

Sept. 

7, 

171 Occelick, 

German, 

Chenango, 

Sept. 

1, 

172 Zion, 

Bloomfield, 

Ontario, 

Sept. 

7, 

173 St. Paul’s, 

Beekman, 

Dntchess, 

Sept. 

30, 

174 Newtown Union, 

Newtown, 

Queens, 

Oct. 

1, 

175 Tompkins, 

Ouilderland , 

Albany , 

Dec. 

7, 

176 Sanger, 

Sangerfield, 

Oneida, 

Dec. 

7, 

177 Hamilton, 

Madrid, 

St. Lawrence, 

March 

1, 1809 

178 Yates, 

Schodack, 

Rensselaer, 

March 

1, 

179 Freedom, 

Unadilla, 

Otsego, 

March 

1, 

180 Cassia, 

Delhi, 

Delaware, 

March 

1, 

181 Le Temple Bienfaisance, Havana, 

Island of Cuba, March 

6, 

182 Richfield, 

Richfield, 

Otsego, 

April 

18, 

183 Clinton, 

Clinton, 

Dutchess, 

June 

1, 

184 Meridian, 

Ovid, 

Seneca, 

Sept. 

6, 

185 Rising Sun, 

Northumberland, Saratoga, 

Sept. 

6 , 

186 St. Lawrence, 

Oswegatchie, 

St. Lawrence, Sept. 

6, 

187 Harmony, 

Potsdam, 

St. Lawrence, 

Dec. 

6, 

188 Philanthropic, 

Camden, 

Oneida, 

Dec. 

6, 

189 Mount Moriah, 

Wallkill, 

Orange, 

Dec. 

6, 

190 Vernon, 

Benton, 

Ontario, 

March 

7, 1810 

191 Meridian Sun, 

New Lisbon, 

Otsego, 

May 

24, 

192 Charity, 

Spencer, 

Columbia, 

July 

13, 

193 Benevolence, 

Hopkinton, 

St. Lawrence, Jan. 

24, 1811 

194 Tioga, 

Catharine, 

Tioga, 

Feb. 

4, 

195 Moriah, 

De Ruyter, 

Madison, 

June 

17, 

196 Scipio Morning Star, 

Scipio, 

Cayuga, 

Nov. 

18, 

197 Ark, 

Windsor, 

Broome, 

Nov. 

20, 

198 Hampton, 

Westmoreland, 

Oneida, 

Dec. 

5 , 



302 HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


Rank. Title. 

No. 

Town. 

County. 

Date of Warrant. 

199 Morning Star, 

Cairo, 

Greene, 

Dec. 

6, 1811 

200 Sincerity, 

Phelps, 

Ontario, 

Dec. 

7, 

201 Pulteneyville, 

Pulteney, 

Steuben, 

Dec. 

7, 

202 Clinton , 

Watervliet, 

Albany , 

Dee. 

12, 

203 Painted Post, 

Painted Post, 

Steuben, 

March 14, 1812 

204 RisingSun, 

Oxford, 

Chenango, 

March 17, 

205 West Star, 

Sheldon, 

Genesee, 

March 17, 

206 Rainbow, 

Chateaugay, 

Franklin, 

March 18, 

207 Columbia, 

New Paltz, 

Ulster, 

July 

10, 

208 Eastern Light, 

Greene, 

Chenango, 

Sept. 

2, 

209 Solomon’s, 

White Plains, 

Westchester, 

Nov. 

13, 

210 Gilboa, 

Blenheim, 

Schoharie, 

Dec. 

2, 

211 Adoniram, 

Pawlings, 

Dutchess, 

Dec. 

16, 

212 Harmony, 

Riga, 

Genesee, 

March 

6, 1813 

213 Genoa, 

Genoa, 

Cayuga, 

May 

3, 

214 Farmers’, 

Verona, 

Oneida, 

May 

8, 

215 Olive Branch, 

Batavia, 

Genesee, 

May 

20, 

216 Hebron, 

Hebron, 

Washington, 

May 

21, 

217 Morality, 

Cobleskill, 

Schoharie, 

May 

23, 

218 Schuyler, 

Saratoga, 

Saratoga, 

May 

25, 

219 Selected Friends, 

Camillus, 

Onondaga, 

June 

8, 

220 Washington, 

Bloomingrove, 

Orange, 

June 

10, 

221 Olive Branch, 

Litchfield, 

Herkimer, 

June 

10, 

222 Clermont , 

Clermont , 

Columbia , 

July 

14, 

223 Morning Star, 

Pittsford, 

Ontario, 

Sept. 

8, 

224 Charity, 

Harpersfield, 

Delaware, 

Sept. 

27, 

225 Rising Virtue, 

Luzerne, 

Warren, 

Oct. 

6, 

226 Western Stat, 

Peterborough, 

Madison, 

Oct. 

7, 

227 Aurora, 

Meredith, 

Delaware, 

Nov. 

25, 

228 Rising Sun, 

Trenton, 

Oneida, 

Nov. 

26, 

229 Sylvan, 

Sempronius, 

Cayuga, 

Nov. 

27, 

230 Lawrence , 

Montgomery , 

Orange , 

May 

16, 1814 

231 Corner Stone, 

Monroe, 

Orange, 

May 

26, 

232 Science, 

Locke, 

Cayuga, 

June 

2, 

233 Augusta, 

Augusta, 

Oneida, 

June 

2, 

234 Washington, 

Manheim, 

Montgomery, June 

11, 

235 Oxford, 

Oxford, 

Chenango, 

July 

7, 

236 Morning Star, 

Albany, 

Albany, 

Oct. 

11, 

237 Hesper, 

Preble, 

Cortland t, 

Nov. 

10, 

238 Milford, 

Milford, 

Otsego, 

Dec. 

19, 

239 Western Star, 

Buffalo, 

Niagara, 

Dec. 

24, 

240 Halcyon, 

Carmel, 

Putnam, 

March 28, 1815 

241 Star, 

Petersburgh, 

Rensselaer, 

June 

2, 

242 Zerubbabel, 

Sandlake, 

Rensselaer, 

June 

2, 

243 Morning Star, 

Argyle, 

Washington, 

June 

2, 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


303 


Bank. Title. 

No. 

Town. 

Connty. 

Date of Warrant. 

244 Olive Branch, 

Warsaw, 

Genesee, 

June 

9, 1815 

245 Mount Moriah, 

Otisco, 

Onondaga, 

June 

23, 

246 Fredonia, 

Murray, 

Genesee, 

Sept. 

8, 

247 Jerusalem Temple, 

Cornwall, 

Orange, 

Sept. 

9, 

248 M’Donough, 

Greenbush, 

Rensselaer, 

Sept. 

12, 

249 Charity, 

Danby, 

Tioga, 

Sept. 

15, 

250 Morning Star, 

Bern, 

Albany, 

Oct. 

3, 

251 Franklin, 

Franklin, 

Delaware, 

Oct. 

13, 

252 Dryden, 

Dryden, 

Cayuga, 

Dec. 

29, 

258 Dutchess, 

Clinton, 

Dutchess, 

Jan. 

5, 1816 

254 Mount Hope, 

Ticonderoga, 

Essex, 

March 

7, 

255 Florida, 

Florida, 

Montgomery, 

March 

8, 

256 Washington, 

Henderson, 

Jefferson, 

March 10, 

257 Alluvion, 

Ridgeway, 

Genesee, 

March 12, 

258 Clinton, 

Schuyler, 

Herkimer, 

March 15, 

259 Evening Star, 

Canisteo, 

Steuben, 

June 

11, 

260 Le Roy, 

Le Roy, 

Genesee, 

June 

11, 

261 Union, 

Lima, 

Ontario, 

June 

11, 

262 Doty, 

Princeton, 

Schenectady, 

June 

11, 

263 Forest, 

Pomfret, 

Chautauqua, 

June 

11, 

264 Widow’s Son, 

Red Hook, 

Dutchess, 

June 

11, 

265 St. Paul’s, 

Auburn, 

Cayuga, 

July 

10, 

266 Mohawk, 

Minden, 

Montgomery, 

July 

15, 

267 Galway, 

Galway, 

Saratoga, 

Nov. 

9, 

268 Prestor, 

Jay, 

Essex, 

Nov. 

9, 

269 Manchester, 

Farmington, 

Ontario, 

Nov. 

20, 

270 Utica, 

Utica, 

Oneida, 

Nov. 

20, 

271 Ark, 

Coxsackie, 

Greene, 

Dec. 

5, 

272 Sullivan, 

Monticello, 

Sullivan, 

Dec. 

13, 

273 Allegany, 

Friendship, 

Allegany, 

Jan. 

22, 1817 

274 Hamilton, 

dean, 

Cattaraugus, 

Jan. 

22, 

275 Rushford, 

Rushford, 

Allegany, 

April 

22, 

276 Cherry Valley, 

Cherry Valley, 

Otsego, 

Feb. 

6, 

277 Allegany, 

Pembroke, 

Genesee, 

April 

21, 

278 Clinton, 

Fort George, 

Warren, 

April 

21,' 

279 Sprig, 

Norway, 

Herkimer, 

June 

5, 

280 Northern Light, 

Wolcott, 

Cayuga, 

June 

5, 

281 Lenox, 

Lenox, 

Madison, 

June 

5, 

282 Wells, 

Gates, 

Genesee, 

June 

5, 

283 Humanity, 

Lyons, 

Ontario, 

June 

5, 

284 Liberty, 

Mentz, 

Cayuga, 

June 

5, 

285 Meridian Sun, 

Middlebury, 

Genesee, 

June 

5, 

286 Orion, 

Ellisburgh, 

Jefferson, 

June 

5, 

287 Franklin, 

Fabius, 

Onondaga, 

June 

5, 

288 Fellowship, 

Richland, 

Oneida, 

June 

5, 



304: 

HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 



Rank. Title. 

No. 

Town. 

County. 

Date of Warrant. 

289 Watertown, 

Watertown, 

Jefferson, 

June 

5, 1817 

290 Morning Star, 

Marcellus, 

Onondaga, 

June 

3, 

291 Junius, 

Junius, 

Seneca, 

June 

5, 

292 Clinton, 

Schenectady, 

Schenectady, 

June 

5, 

293 Harmony, 

Gorham, 

Ontario, 

June 

5, 

294 Blazing Star, 

Willink, 

Niagara, 

July 

31, 

295 Morning Star, 

Nunda, 

Allegany, 

Aug. 

1, 

296 Colden, 

Middletown, 

Delaware, 

Sept. 

3, 

297 Mount Moriah, 

Ellicott, 

Chautauqua, 

Sept. 

4, 

298 Rising Sun, 

Scipio and Aurelius, Cayuga, 

Sept. 

5, 

299 Montgomery, 

Rhinebeck, 

Dutchess, 

Sept. 

10, 

300 Hoffman, 

Wall kill, 

Orange, 

Dec. 

3> 

301 Rockland, 

Havers traw, 

Rockland, 

Dec. 

4, 

302 Catskill, 

Catskill, 

Greene, 

March 

4, 1818 

803 Milnor, 

Victor, 

Ontario, 

March 

5, 

304 Concord, 

New York, 

New York, 

April 

22, 

305 Hicks, 

Schoharie, 

Schoharie, 

June 

4, 

306 Dansville, 

Dansville, 

Steuben, 

June 

5, 

307 Mexico, 

Mexico, 

Oneida, 

June 

6, 

308 Atholl, 

Hounsfield, 

Jefferson, 

June 

7, 

309 Fidelity, 

Ulysses, 

Tompkins, 

June 

8, 

310 Bloomingburg, 

Mamakating, 

Sullivan, 

June 

24, 

311 Newcomb, 

Caroline, 

Tioga, 

Sept. 

3, 

312 Summit, 

Chautauqua, 

Chautauqua, 

Sept. 

4, 

313 Union, 

Aurelius, 

Cayuga, 

Sept. 

5, 

314 Valley, 

Elizabethtown, 

Essex, 

Sept. 

6, 

315 Whitesborough, 

Whitestown, 

Oneida, 

Oct. 

16, 

316 Mount Morris, 

Mount Morris, 

Genesee, 

Oct. 

23, 

317 Rising Star, 

Attica, 

Genesee, 

March 

3, 1819 

318 Brown ville, 

Brownville, 

Jefferson, 

March 

4, 

319 Peru, 

Peru, 

Clinton, 

March 

5, 

320 Constellation, 

Perry, 

Genesee, 

March 

6, 

321 Rising Virtue, 

Ontario, 

Ontario, 

March 

8, 

322 German Union, 

New York, 

New York, 

April 

14, 

323 Enos, 

Bath, 

Steuben, 

May 

29, 

324 Brutus, 

Brutus, 

Cayuga, 

Aug. 

18, 

325 Canton, 

Canton, 

St. Lawrence, 

Sept. 

11, 

326 Oswego, 

Oswego, 

Oswego, 

Sept. 

21, 

327 Salina, 

Salina, 

Onondaga, 

Dee. 

2, 


st. george’s lodge inhibited. 

On a representation of the Grand Secretary, made June 4, 
1819, that St. George’s Lodge at Schenectady, acting under 


/ 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


305 


an ancient Warrant, had not, conformably to its own propo- 
sition, made on June 4, A. L. 5817, and concurred in by this 
Grand Lodge, surrendered the same, it was 

“ Resolved , That St. George’s Lodge at Schenectady, by 
delaying to surrender its Warrant, and thereby denying 
the authority of the Grand Lodge, has forfeited its Masonic 
privileges, and has become an unauthorized and unwarranted 
Lodge. 

Resolved , That all Masonic intercourse with the said 
Lodge and its members, and the Lodges and members of 
Lodges under this jurisdiction, be, and the same is hereby, 
prohibited, and that unless the said Warrant be surrendered 
and a new Warrant taken out before the next quarterly 
Communication, the individuals composing the said Lodge, 
or that may hereafter be initiated in or admitted members 
of the same, be expelled the order and deprived of all the 
benefits and privileges of Freemasonry.” (See under date 
April 29, 1822.) 


LODGE MEMBERSHIP DEFINED. 

“ Resolved , That the 4th Eule, in Section 10, Chapter III., 
of the Book of Constitutions, be so construed as that every 
Mason attending the meetings of a Lodge and participating 
in its deliberations, voting, etc., shall be deemed a member 
of said Lodge, and subject to quarterly dues, as provided for 
in the aforesaid rule. 

Resolved, That it be, and hereby is, enjoined upon the 
Grand Secretary and Grand Yisitors to see that the preced- 
ing resolution be acted upon, and that they be severally 
authorized to require from the officers of Lodges such infor- 
mation and explanations as may appear to them necessary for 
carrying the same into full force and effect.” 

ASSISTANT GRAND PURSUIVANT. OFFICE CREATED. 

“ Resolved , That, in consequence of the deafness of the 
present Grand Pursuivant, and in consideration of his long 
vol. ii,— 20 



306 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


and faithful services, a brother be elected to aid him in the 
discharge of his duties, to be styled Assistant Grand Pur- 
suivant, and to be paid the same salary as is now allowed to 
the said Grand Pursuivant.” 

The Grand Lodge accordingly proceeded to the choice of 
a brother to fill that office, when Brother James Thorburn 
was duly elected Assistant Grand Pursuivant. The office 
of Grand Tyler becoming thereby vacant, Brother Hosea 
Dodge was duly elected Grand Tyler. 

The Right Worshipful Brother Ebenezer Wadsworth, 
Grand Visitor, reported the dissolution of Lawrence Lodge, 
No. 230, and surrendered its Warrant. 


NON-RESIDENT CHARITY. 

The Worshipful Brother Ditchett appealed from a decision 
of the Grand Stewards’ Lodge in the case of Patty Dewitt, 
widow of Levi Dewitt, formerly of a Lodge in this State, an 
applicant for charity, now residing and being in Newark, in 
the State of New Jersey. 

It was held by the Grand Stewards’ Lodge, that to admit 
the principle that it was necessary for the applicant to send 
back to the State in which her husband had been made a 
Mason, in order to obtain relief, was striking at the very root 
of Masonry ; that being necessitous and deserving, her claim 
was equally strong in every part of the world where Masonry 
was known and cultivated ; that it must be made to the Grand 
Lodge, or to some portion of the fraternity within the juris- 
diction under which she resides ; and, that if assistance had 
been refused by the Craft in Newark (as was alleged) on the 
sole ground that the applicant’s right of claim was New York 
and not New Jersey, a communication of the facts on the 
subject ought to be made to the Grand Lodge of that State. 

And, on motion that the decision of the Grand Stewards’ 
Lodge be confirmed, it was carried in the affirmative by a 
large majority. 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


307 


PAST MASTER A MEMBER OF GRAND LODGE. 

A proposed preamble and order was presented on Septem- 
ber 1, 1819, to the following effect: 

“ Whereas , by Section 1, Chapter III., of the Book of Con- 
stitutions it is provided that no Past Master shall be consid- 
ered a member of the Grand Lodge, unless he is a member of 
some regular Lodge under the jurisdiction. 

Ordered , That any Mason who shall have been elected 
Master of any Lodge under the jurisdiction of this Grand 
Lodge, and who shall have performed the duties appertain- 
ing to the Chair for at least one year, shall hereafter be 
deemed a member of this Grand Lodge upon his paying the 
usual dues in advance to the Grand Secretary, although he 
may not be a registered member of a subordinate Lodge. 55 

On June 8th following, this proposed order was called up 
and rejected. In a somewhat modified form this subject had 
been considered on June 7, 1809. 

BOOK OF CONSTITUTIONS AND OLD CHARGES. 

The preparation for publication of a new edition of the 
Book of Constitutions being delayed, the Grand Secretary, 
Elias Hicks, reported that he had collected and digested all 
the particular rules of this Grand Lodge, and he now sub- 
mitted the same. 

Whereupon the Committee on Constitutions was dis- 
charged, and a resolution presented, that the rules as col- 
lected, digested, and submitted by the Grand Secretary be 
declared to form Section 10, Chapter III., of the Book of 
Constitutions ; and that the same be printed for distribution ; 
and, further, that a Committee be appointed to collate and 
correct the same. 

This Committee consisted of Brothers Elias Hicks, Corne- 
lius Bogert, John W. Mulligan, George B. Smith, and James 
Lyons, Jr., who reported on December 15, 1819, as follows: 



30S 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


“ That they have fulfilled the duty assigned to them, have 
approved the arrangements of the Grand Secretary, and 
have authorized their publication. 

That had they been vested with the power, they would 
have directed the entire omission of the three hereafter men- 
tioned regulations : the first two, as having been calculated 
for the infant state of the Grand Lodge, and latterly not 
acted upon; and the last, as impolitic and injurious, bear- 
ing an erroneous construction that a direct and free com- 
munication with the Grand Lodge, other than through the 
Grand Visitors, is forbidden and prohibited to the country 
Lodges. 

The difficulty presented by that want of power being obvi- 
ated by this early Emergent meeting, the Committee take 
the liberty of suggesting to the Grand Lodge the propriety 
of repealing the following resolutions, viz. : 

The 3d Eule of Section 10, Chapter III., of Book of Con- 
stitutions, which declares that ‘every member of this Grand 
Lodge shall pay quarterly into the treasury of the same fifty 
cents, and the same sum on default of attendance at any 
quarterly meeting, without such excuse as the by-laws admit 
to be reasonable.’ 

And the resolution, passed on February 15, A. L. 5783, 
declaring ‘that six guineas be paid for a Warrant, and one 
guinea for a book of By-Laws.’ 

And, also, that section of the act for the establishment of 
Grand Visitors, passed on February 19, 1806, which declares 
‘ that all communications to the Grand Lodge, unless it be a 
complaint touching the Grand Visitor, shall be made through 
him.’ 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

(Signed) Elias Hicks, 

Cornelius Bogert, 

John W. Mulligan, l Committee. 
George B. Smith, 

James Lyons, Jr., 

Hew York, December 15, 5819.” 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


309 


Which being read, was accepted and approved, and the 
ordinances recommended for annulment repealed accord- 
ingly. 

By reference to the early portion of this volume, it will be 
seen that the Constitutions and old charges adopted by the 
Grand Lodge in 1785 and readopted in 1801, are printed in 
full (pp. 136-187). They remained in force and effect. 

A new edition was printed by Grand Secretary Elias 
Hicks, as ordered by Grand Lodge and above noted. The 
rules of the Grand Lodge which had been altered are herein 
printed as they stand at this date, 1819. 

“ SECTION X. 

Particular Pules of the Grand Lodge of New- York. 

Every Grand Lodge has an inherent power and authority 
to make local Ordinances and new Regulations, as well as 
to amend and explain the old ones, for their own particular 
benefit and the good of Masonry in general ; provided always, 
that the ancient landmarks be carefully preserved, and that 
such regulations be first duly proposed in writing for the 
consideration of the members, and be at last duly enacted 
with the consent of the majority. This has never been dis- 
puted ; for the members of every Grand Lodge are the true 
representatives of all the fraternity in communication, and 
are an absolute and independent body, with legislative 
authority, provided (as aforesaid) that the Grand Masonic 
Constitution be never violated, nor any of the old landmarks 
removed. Upon these principles, the following Particular 
Rules have been made, or adopted, in the Grand Lodge of 
New- York, viz. : 

“ 1. The quarterly communication of all the Lodges under 
the masonic jurisdiction of this Grand Lodge, shall be held 
in the Grand Lodge Room, at the city of New- York, on the 
four following days annually for ever : that is to say, on the 
first Wednesdays in March, June, September, and December ; 



310 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


and the different Lodges are to attend on these days by their 
proper officers or deputies, with or without notice for that 
purpose. 

“ 2. None but a Master Mason, who has passed the chair 
in some regular Lodge, and is a resident or honorary member 
of the Lodge he is chosen to represent, can be admitted as 
the proxy of such Lodge ; each proxy shall be entitled to 
three votes on behalf of the Lodge he represents, but no 
person shall be admitted as proxy for more than one Lodge : 
and every proxy claiming a seat shall produce a power, sealed 
with the seal, and signed by the Master, Wardens, and Sec- 
retary of such Lodge, in the words following, to wit : 

“ At a Meeting of Lodge No. held at 

in the County of in the State of New-York, on 

the day of A. L. 58 

“ On Motion, 

“Resolved, That our Worshipful Brother, be 

[ admitted an Honorary Member of this Lodge , and is ] hereby 
appointed to represent this Lodge in the Grand Lodge of 
the State of New York, and fully empowered to act in our 
behalf, in all the transactions of the Grand Lodge, as effec- 
tually as if we ourselves were personally present. 

“ All which we have caused to be certified by 
our Master and Wardens, and the Seal of our 
Lodge to be affixed. 

Master . 
Senior Warden . 
Junior Warden. 

Secretary . 

“ 3. Every person, the Grand Officers and proxies excepted, 
claiming a seat in this Grand Lodge, shall, before he be 
allowed to take the same, produce to the Grand Secretary a 
Certificate from the Lodge which he claims to represent; 
which Certificate, sealed with the Seal of such Lodge, and 


L. s. 



IK THE STATE OF HEW YORK. 


311 


signed by the Secretary thereof, shall be in the form of 
either of the following, to wit : 

“ Be it known, that our worthy Brother was on 

the day of A. L. 58 at a Regular 

Meeting of Lodge, No. held in the town of 
county of and state of New- York, duly elected 

and installed [Master or Warden, as the case may he] of said 
Lodge for the ensuing year. 

“ In testimony whereof, we, the Members of 
| | the said Lodge, have caused the Seal thereof 

* • to be hereunto affixed, and our Secretary to 

sign the same. 

Secretary. 


“Be it known, that our Worshipful Brother, Past Master 
having, in the year A. L. 58 been duly 
elected, and filled the office of Master of No. 

held in the town of in the county of in 

the state of New- York, and being now a member of 
Lodge , No. held in the town of in the county 

of and state aforesaid [or “ said Lodge f as the 

case may be] is duly authorized to represent the said Lodge 
in the Grand Lodge of this state. 


L. s. 


“ In testimony whereof, we the Master and 
Wardens of said Lodge have subscribed these 
presents, and caused the Seal of the same to 
be hereunto affixed this day of 

A. L. 58 


Master. 
Senior Warden. 
Junior Warden. 


Secretary. 


“4. No Past Master shall be entitled to vote in the Grand 
Lodge, unless he has passed the chair of some Lodge under 
its jurisdiction. 



312 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


“ 5. None but members of the Grand Lodge, past or pres- 
ent officers of other Grand Lodges excepted, shall be present 
at the opening of the same, nor shall any person whomsoever 
be admitted into the Grand Lodge after one hour from its 
opening. 

“6. All Rules passed by this Grand Lodge which shall 
have an operation upon the Craft in general, shall be called 
and considered as Ordinances ; and such as are intended 
only to affect the Grand Lodge itself, as to its internal gov- 
ernment, shall be styled Regulations : and no Ordinance shall 
at any time be passed unless the same be proposed and read 
at a previous meeting of the Grand Lodge. 

“ Y. The Grand Master, Deputy Grand Master, and Grand 
Secretary, shall be annually elected at the same time, in the 
same manner, and for the same term, as the Grand Wardens. 

“ 8. None but the Grand Officers and Past Grand Officers 
shall be allowed to wear gold jewels and hangings : officers 
of subordinate Lodges shall wear silver jewels, with such silk 
hangings as they may think proper. 

“ 9. All moneys due, and to grow due, to the Grand Lodge, 
shall be paid to the Grand Secretary, and by him paid over 
to the Grand Treasurer, of which receipts and payments the 
Grand Secretary and Treasurer shall respectively keep reg- 
ular and accurate accounts ; and no money shall be paid out 
of the funds of the Grand Lodge but by the Grand Treasurer, 
on due authority by him received for such payment, accord- 
ing to the laws of the Grand Lodge and the Masonic Con- 
stitution. 

“ 10. The books and accounts of the Grand Secretary and 
Grand Treasurer shall be submitted to the Grand Stewards’ 
Lodge at each Quarterly Meeting thereof, by which the same 
shall be examined, audited, and passed ; and, annually, at the 
meeting of the Grand Lodge for the election of officers, the 
Grand Secretary shall cause an account to be prepared, as 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


313 


passed by the Grand Stewards’ Lodge, which shall show 
each item of expenditure for the year preceding, and the 
receipts of the Grand Lodge for the same time ; a list of all 
Lodges that may be in arrears for dues for two years and 
upwards ; and also the amount of stock or property of the 
Grand Lodge ; which said account the Grand Secretary shall 
cause to be printed, and a copy thereof forwarded to each of - 
the Lodges within the jurisdiction. 

“11. The Grand Secretary shall make an annual commu- 
nication to the several Grand Lodges in correspondence with 
this Grand Lodge, and to the respective Lodges under its 
jurisdiction, immediately after the election of Grand Officers, 
of the persons so elected, and of such matters generally as 
have relation to the craft at large, or may affect the govern- 
ment of such Lodges in particular. 

“12. All moneys that may be expended by the Grand 
Secretary for books, stationery, or in any other manner, in 
the discharge of the duties of his office, shall be allowed and 
paid by the Grand Lodge. 

“13. The Grand Secretary and Grand Treasurer are 
authorized, from time to time, to invest so much of the 
moneys of the Grand Lodge in the purchase of bank, or 
United States’ stock as they may deem expedient. 

“ 14. The Grand Pursuivant and Grand Tyler are to attend 
all meetings of the Grand Stewards’ Lodge, as well as of the 
Grand Lodge, and to the Grand Tyler it especially belongs 
to carry the summonses, and to perform all the out-door ser- 
vices. 

“ 15. The Grand Master shall nominate,, and by and with 
the advice and consent of the Grand Lodge, by warrant under 
his hand, and under the seal of the Grand Lodge, appoint 
discreet and experienced Masons, who are Masters or Past 
Masters of Lodges, under the jurisdiction of this Grand 
Lodge, and who shall be styled and called “ Right Worship- 
ful Grand Visitors and shall assign to each of the said 



314 


HISTORY OP FREEMASONRY 


Visitors the visitation, care, and superintendence of such of 
the Lodges under the jurisdiction, as to the Grand Master 
may appear expedient. 

“ 16. Each Grand Visitor, when he visits a Lodge in his 
official capacity, shall have power to work as Master of that 
Lodge which he visits, so that the brethren may profit by his 
example. 

“ 17. It is the duty of each Grand Visitor, once in a year 
at least, and as much oftener as the Grand Master shall 
direct, to visit each Lodge committed to his care and super- 
intendence, to instruct the members thereof, as well in the 
principles and mysteries of Masonry, as in the operations of 
the Craft ; so that in*their work, the Lodges may conform to 
the precepts and example of the Grand Lodge, and most 
ancient and enlightened members of the Craft : and also, to 
require from each Lodge under their respective visitations 
the annual return of their members, an account of their 
admissions and initiations, and the fees due to the Grand 
Lodge ; which fees shall be paid to the Grand Visitor, and 
transmitted, together with the said return and accounts, to 
the Grand Secretary, as soon as may be after the same shall 
be received. 

“ 18. The Grand Visitors shall be allowed their reasonable 
expenses out of the funds of the Grand Lodge, and shall 
annually render to the same a report of their visitations, and 
an account of their expenses; which account shall specify 
the distance to each Lodge visited by them respectively, from 
their place of residence ; and the said account shall be audited 
by the Grand Stewards’ Lodge, upon whose report it shall be 
allowed and passed by the Grand Lodge. 

“ 19. Any Grand Visitor who shall unduly withhold money 
paid or entrusted to him for, or on account of, the Grand 
Lodge, shall be removed from office, and be suspended from 
the benefits of Masonry, for such time as the Grand Lodge 
shall think proper and decree. 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


315 


“ 20. The Grand Stewards* Lodge shall, from and after 
the first Wednesday in June, 5816, be composed of the 
Grand Master, Deputy Grand Master, Senior Grand Warden, 
Junior Grand Warden, Grand Secretary, and Grand Treas- 
urer, ex officio , and of twelve Grand Stewards of Charity, to 
be elected from the Past Grand Officers, Past Masters, and 
Masters of the several Lodges in the city and county of ISTew- 
Tork, who at the time shall be members of the Grand Lodge. 
The election of the said twelve Grand Stewards of Charity 
shall take place at the time of the annual election of the 
Grand Officers; and immediately thereafter, the presiding 
officer of the Grand Lodge shall arrange the said twelve 
Grand Stewards of Charity into four equal classes, number- 
ing them first, second, third, and fourth class. The seats of 
the members of the first class shall be vacated at the expira- 
tion of the first year ; the second class the second year, and 
so continually to the end, that three Grand Stewards of 
Charity may be annually elected. The said Grand Stewards’ 
Lodge shall possess and exercise all the power hitherto vested 
in the present Grand Stewards’ Lodge, and assemble at the 
times heretofore prescribed for its meetings, and whenever 
the Grand Master may specially convene them. They shall 
also appoint from the said twelve Grand Stewards a committee 
consisting of three, to be called the “ Grand Stewards’ Com- 
mittee of Charity ; ” who shall have and exercise the same 
powers that hitherto belonged to, and were exercised by the 
Committee of Charity of the easting Grand Stewards’ Lodge, 
which may however be limited or extended by the said Grand 
Stewards’ Lodge, to be organized as aforesaid ; — and the said 
Committee shall discharge the duties of their appointment, 
until the next quarterly meeting, and so from time to time, 
in such rotation as nearly as may be, that the whole of the 
said twelve Grand Stewards of Charity shall discharge the 
said duties three months of every year ; provided, however, 
that instead of appointing a Grand Stewards’ Committee of 
Charity for the first three months as before directed, the per- 
sons composing the first class of the said Grand Stewards of 
Charity, shall be the first Grand Stewards’ Committee of 



316 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


Charity — In case of the death, absence, sickness, resignation, 
or disqualification of any of the said twelve Grand Stewards 
of Charity, the said Grand Stewards’ Lodge shall, at their 
next quarterly meeting, elect another member or members to 
fill the place or places so rendered vacant ; and the Grand 
Master may, during the recess of the Grand Stewards’ 
Lodge, fill such vacancy until such election shall take place. 
—Appeals may be made from the Grand Stewards’ Commit- 
tee of Charity to the Grand Stewards’ Lodge, and thence 
to the Grand Lodge. 

“ 21. There shall be paid toward the Charity Fund of this 
Grand Lodge the following fees and contributions, viz. 

“For every Warrant to constitute a Lodge, Seventy fine 
Dollars. 

“ For every Dispensation to constitute a Lodge, [which 
sum to be deducted from the fees for a Warrant, provided 
such Warrant be applied for and granted within one year 
from date of the Dispensation,] Twenty-five Dollars . 

“ For every Dispensation to confer three degrees at one 
meeting, Ten Dollars. 

“For all other Dispensations, Five Dollars. 

“For every Grand Lodge Certificate, Two Dollars and 
Fifty Cents. 

“ For every Member of a Lodge in the City of Hew-York, 
per quarter, Twenty five Cents. 

“ For every member of a Lodge under the jurisdiction and 
out of the said City of Hew- York, per quarter, Twelve and a 
half Cents. 

“For every Member of a Lodge whose name is returned 
to be registered in the Grand Lodge Book, Twelve and a half 
Cents. 

“ For every person initiated in any Lodge in the City of 
Hew-York, Two Dollars and Fifty Cents. 

“ For every person initiated in any Lodge out of the said 
City and within the jurisdiction, One Dollar and Twenty five 
Cents. 

“ For every Master Mason, joining a Lodge other than 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


317 


that in which he was initiated, or had previously belonged 
to, One Dollar. 

“For every Entered Apprentice or Fellow Craft joining a 
Lodge, One Dollar and Twenty-five Cents. 

“22. Every Mason attending the meetings of a Lodge, 
and participating in its deliberations, voting, &c., shall be 
deemed a member of said Lodge, and subject to quarterly 
dues, as provided for in the 6th and 7th specifications of the 
preceding rule. 

“ 23. Each Lodge shall be answerable for the Dues of 
every Brother who, by the Book of Constitutions and the 
Bye-Laws of such Lodge, is considered a member thereof. 

“24. Returns of Members for registry and payment of 
Dues according to the forms hereafter prescribed, shall be 
made to the Grand Lodge annually, by all Lodges under the 
jurisdiction, except the Lodges in the City of New- York, by 
whom the same shall be made quarterly. 

“25. Any Lodge in the City of New-York failing in the 
payment of Dues for six months, and any Lodge out of the 
said City, and under this jurisdiction, failing in the payment 
of Dues for eighteen months, shall be thereby disqualified 
from exercising the right of voting in the Grand Lodge, in 
any case whatsoever. 

“ 26. Any Lodge failing to make returns and payment of 
Dues for three years successively, shall be deemed to have 
forfeited its warrant, and shall surrender the same on the 
requisition of the Grand Lodge to that effect. 

« 27. The contributions due to the Charity Fund from the 
several Lodges ought not to be diverted from the benevolent 
purposes for which they are intended, and no Lodge, there- 
fore, shall divide its funds among its members, nor provide 
out of the same any banquets or other refreshments without 
first paying those dues which belong to, and ought to be 
appropriated to the said Charity Fund. 



318 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


“ 28. All members of Lodges being in arrears for one 
year’s Dues, may be suspended by their respective Lodges 
from all Masonic communication ; and upon report being 
duly made to the Grand Lodge, they shall be notified 
thereof by the Grand Secretary, and enjoined to discharge 
or commute the same within twelve months from the date of 
such notice, on pain of being excluded by a formal expulsion 
from all communication with, or benefit from, the Institution : 
which penalty, on failure, and at the instance of the Lodge 
to which the delinquent belongs, shall be duly inflicted. 

“ 29. No Lodge within this jurisdiction, nor any member 
thereof, shall publish or in any manner make public, except 
it be to the Fraternity, or within the walls of a Lodge, the 
expulsion of any member. 

“ 30. The use of distilled spirits in Lodge rooms, at the 
meetings of Lodges, is of evil example, and may be produc- 
tive of pernicious effects ; and the same is therefore expressly 
forbidden under any pretence whatever. 

“ 31. All Lodges in the City of NTew-York, on the suspen- 
sion or expulsion of any member for non-payment of Dues 
or otherwise, and also on the removal of any suspension or 
expulsion, shall report the same to the Grand Lodge, and 
also to the different Lodges in the City : — and all Lodges out 
of the said City and under this jurisdiction, shall in like 
cases make report of the same to the Grand Visitor of the 
District, as well as to the Grand Lodge : — and no Lodge, 
after the suspension of a brother, shall permit him to meet 
with such Lodge, or otherwise exercise his Masonic privi- 
leges, until such suspension is regularly taken off. 

“ 32. There shall be paid out of the funds of this Grand 
Lodge to the following officers, as a compensation for the 
services rendered by them in their respective offices, in equal 
quarterly payments as follows, viz. 

“To the Grand Secretary, Six hundred Dollars per 
annum . 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


319 


“ To the Grand Treasurer, One hundred Dollars per 
annum . 

“ To the Grand Pursuivant, Fifty Dollars per annum. 

“ To the Assistant Grand Pursuivant, Fifty Dollars per 
annum. 

“To the Grand Tyler, Fifty Dollars per annum . 

“ 33. In the computation of time relative to salaries 
allowed, or that may hereafter be allowed,' the quarter shall 
be considered as terminating on the day of the regular meet- 
ing of the Grand Stewards’ Lodge, and such salaries paid 
accordingly. 

“ 34. All petitions for Warrants shall come recommended 
by the officers of the Lodge, nearest to the place where the 
new one is to be erected. 

“ 35. No Charter or Dispensation for constituting a Lodge 
shall be granted to any person or persons whomsoever resid- 
ing out of this State, if within the jurisdiction of any other 
Grand Lodge. 

“ 36. All Lodges out of the City of New-York that have 
forfeited or shall forfeit their Warrants, shall forthwith surren- 
der the same to the Grand Visitor of the District within which 
such Lodges were respectively established, on his demand for 
that purpose duly made, together with all the books, furniture, 
jewels, ornaments, money, debts, demands, and other prop- 
erty, whether real or personal, belonging or due to any such 
Lodge, and shall cause proper deeds or other instruments in 
writing to be executed and delivered to the said Grand Vis- 
itor, for the purpose of vesting the same in him for the use of 
the Grand Lodge : and it shall be the duty of the Grand 
Visitors to report to the Grand Lodge any neglect or refusal 
to comply herewith, in order that proper measures may be 
taken to enforce the same. 

“ 37. No Lodge under this jurisdiction shall receive, for 
conferring the first three degrees of Masonry, a less sum 



320 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


than Twenty Dollars , that is to say, for initiating an E. A. 
Ten Dollars; passing a F. 0. Five Dollars ; and raising a 
M. M. Five Dollars . 

“ 38. No Lodge shall initiate into the mysteries of the 
Craft any person whomsoever, without being first satisfied by 
a test or otherwise, whether such candidate hath at any time 
made application to a Lodge, and been rejected or otherwise 
refused admission into the same : and if it shall appear that 
the candidate has been rejected, then, not until the Lodge to 
which he applies is satisfactorily convinced that such rejec- 
tion has not been on account of any circumstances that 
ought to preclude him from the benefits of Masonry. 

“ 39. All candidates for initiation into Lodges within this 
jurisdiction, shall be proposed at a Eegular Stated Meeting 
of the Lodge ; no candidate so proposed shall be balloted for 
before the next (nor at any other than a) Eegular Stated 
Meeting of such Lodge : and in all cases where the Stated 
Meetings of a Lodge occur oftener than semi monthly, two 
weeks’ interval at least shall transpire between the proposing 
and balloting for any candidate. 

“40. No person shall be entitled to a Grand Lodge Certif- 
icate, without a previous certificate from the Master, or, in 
his absence, the presiding officer of the Lodge of which he is 
a member, setting forth his regular behavior, and that he 
hath discharged all Lodge dues. 

“41. All applications for charity shall be made to the 
Grand Stewards’ Lodge, or to the Grand Stewards’ Commit- 
tee of Charity, and not to the Grand Lodge, unless under 
special circumstances, to be stated in the petition. 

“ 42. The Masters of Lodges in the City of New- York 
shall cause their Secretaries, immediately after each meeting 
of their respective Lodges, to report to the Grand Treasurer, 
(who shall file the same for the inspection of any that may 
require it,) the amount of any charitable donations that may 



IN THE STATE OP NEW YORK. 


321 


be made, the persons to whom made, and the merits as 
ascertained by the said Lodges, of the respective applicants, 
together with any other information relating to such dona- 
tions, that may be deemed important. 

“ 43. No dispensation, authorizing a funeral procession in 
the City of New-York, except for a sojourner, shall be issued, 
unless requested by the Master and "Wardens of the Lodge to 
which the deceased member shall have belonged, and who, 
at the same time shall certify, and the Secretary of said 
Lodge shall countersign the Certificate, that he, for whose 
interment the dispensation is requested, has paid his Lodge 
dues until within six months before his decease. 

“ 44. A modern Master Mason, known to be such, may be 
healed and admitted into the mysteries of the Ancient Craft, 
in the manner determined upon : but no Lodge shall heal a 
modern Mason for a less sum than Five Dollars . 

“45. All Free Masons, who are acknowledged as such 
by any of the Lodges under the jurisdiction of the Grand 
Lodges of England, Scotland, Ireland, and South Carolina, 
shall be considered as legitimate Free Masons by the Lodges 
under this jurisdiction.” 


NON-AFFILIATES, 

The following Ordinance, proposed on December 1, 1819, 
was passed June 8, 1820, and ordered to be engrafted in the 
particular rules of the Grand Lodge, to wit : “ Any Lodge 
may take cognizance of the conduct of any sojourning 
brother or brethren unattached to any particular Lodge, 
upon a charge of un-Masonic conduct, committed by such 
brethren while residing or sojourning in the vicinity of such 
Lodge ; and having cited the parties to a hearing and inves- 
tigated the facts in the case, shall make report thereof to the 
Lodge to which the offender belongs, if within the United 
States ; or, if otherwise, shall decide upon the merits of the 
same, and, in either and every case, shall make report of its 

VOL. II. — 21 



322 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


proceedings in the premises to the Grand Lodge, to which, 
as in all other cases, there remains the right of appeal.” 


MASONIC HALL. 

A Committee was appointed December 15, 1819, to look 
for and select a proper and suitable site in the city of New 
York for a Grand Masonic Hall, to ascertain the conditions 
upon which the same may be purchased, and the uses to 
which it may be employed until it be deemed expedient to 
build. 

1820. 


On March 1, the following report was made : 

“ To the Right Worshijpful the Grand Lodge of the State of 
New York: 

The Committee appointed to look out for an eligible site 
for a Masonic Hall and to report the same to this Grand 
Lodge, respectfully report : 

That they have not been able to procure answers from all 
the persons owning ground in situations that might prove 
eligible for the erection of a Masonic edifice. 

That in Grand Street, at the intersection of Elizabeth 
Street, are four lots of ground forming a front on Grand 
Street of about 94: feet, and in length about 30 feet, which 
may be had for about the sum of $4,600, provided it is imme- 
diately purchased, and about half this amount may remain 
on mortgage on the premises. 

That at the corner of Beekman and Nassau streets several 
lots may be had for $20,000, making 48 £ feet on Beekman and 
104 feet on Nassau Street, and about one-half of this sum may 
remain on mortgage for ten or twelve years, if not longer. 

That at the corner of Grand Street and Broadway, there 
a/re several lots comprising a front on Broadway of 107 feet, 
extending in length toward Mercer Street 100 feet, which 
may be purchased for $18,000 cash. 

Cornelius Bogert, ) „ 

~ _ 5 } Committee. 7 

George Hodgson, ) 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


323 


Which being read, it was 

“ Resolved , That the same Committee be requested to con- 
tinue their researches, and make a final report at the next 
Quarterly Communication.” 

On June 9, 1820, the Committee further reported that the 
places referred to in their former report as eligible for a 
Masonic Hall, were not for sale, and that they had nothing 
further to communicate on the subject. 

The importance of 

UNIFORMITY OF WORK 

had been referred to a Committee and considered in 1810, 
when finally the subject had been referred to the Grand Offi- 
cers with power. At the meeting, December, 1820, the subject 
was reintroduced, and referred to a Committee consisting of 
the Eight Worshipful Brothers Elias Hicks, Ebenezer Wads- 
worth, Joseph Enos, John W. Mulligan, and Thomas Lowndes 
to settle a uniform mode of work for the Lodges, and to report 
their proceedings in June next. It will be observed that the 
same chairman was appointed as in 1810, but again the mat- 
ter was allowed to slumber. 

Harmony Lodge, Ho. 154, was authorized to change its 
place of holding meetings from Champlain to Chazy. 

Inasmuch as a letter was received on June 7, 1820, from 
the Hon. De Witt Clinton declining re-election as Grand 
Master, and the Right Worshipful Martin Hoffman having 
announced his declination to a re-election as Deputy Grand 
Master, the Grand Lodge elected Most Worshipful Daniel 
D. Tompkins (Vice-President of the United States), Grand 
Master; Eight Worshipful John Wells, Deputy Grand Mas- 
ter; Eight Worshipful John W. Mulligan, Senior Grand 
Warden, and the remaining officers as in the preceding year. 
On June 21, letters were received from the Deputy Grand 
Master elect, John Wells, declining to serve. Whereupon, 



324 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


John W. Mulligan was elected Deputy, and Hon. William 
Irving, Senior Grand Warden, for the ensuing year. 

BRIEF SKETCH OF HON. DANIEL D. TOMPKINS. 

Hon. Daniel D. Tompkins was Grand Secretary from 1801 
to 1805, and his next official position in Grand Lodge was as 
Grand Master in 1820 ; he was re-elected in 1821. He was 
a famous statesman and jurist. Brother Tompkins was born 
in Scarsdale, Westchester County, in 1774 ; died on Staten 
Island, June 11, 1825. He graduated at Columbia College, 
was elected to Congress, and resigned to become one of the 
Justices of the Supreme Court. From 1807 to 1817 he was 
Governor of Hew York State. In 1816 he was elected Yice- 
President of the United States, and was re-elected in 1820, 
retiring in 1825. He received two hundred and eighteen 
votes, including those of all the States, except Hew Hamp- 
shire, Massachusetts, Delaware, and Maryland. James Mon- 
roe was the President. Daniel D. Tompkins held the high 
office of Yice-President at the same time that he was Grand 
Master of Masons. 

THE “UNION” OF ANCIENT AND MODERN MASONS IN GREAT 
BRITAIN. A NEW DEGREE AUTHORIZED BY THE GRAND 
LODGE OF NEW YORK. 

Eight Worshipful William H. Snelling, Deputy Grand 
Master of the Grand Lodge of Lower Canada, on December 
1, 1819, by letter, had conveyed information to this Grand 
Lodge on the subject of the “ Union ” between the Ancient 
and Modern Masons in Great Britain, and as to which, allu- 
sion had been made and information sought, by means of a 
preamble and resolution, adopted March 3, 1819 ; and con- 
formably to the sanction of the Grand Lodge of the Prov- 
ince of Lower Canada, a Brother had been fully instructed in 
the formula and ceremony of the “Union,” and charged 
with communicating the same to this Grand Lodge, which 
had been done through the Grand Secretary, who was 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


325 


authorized to impart it and to extend the same. Whereupon 
it was 

“ Ordered, That the mystery of the * Union,’ as commu- 
nicated by the Grand Lodge of Lower Canada, be referred 
to the Grand Officers, the Grand Visitors, and the Masters 
of the Lodges of the city of New York (or in the absence of 
the Master of any Lodge, to the Senior Warden, or in the 
absence of both, to some past Master of such Lodge) for 
the purpose of adopting and disseminating the same, if the 
Grand Officers shall deem it proper so to do, after being 
made acquainted therewith.” 

On December 6, 1820, the Grand Lodge being in session, 
the Grand Master, from the Committee of Grand Officers 
and Masters of Lodges, presented a minute of its proceed- 
ings, together with the report of its Sub-Committee, in the 
words following, to wit : 

“ Minutes of the Proceedings of the Grand Officers, and 
Masters of Lodges, convened pursuant to a resolution of the 
E. W. Grand Lodge, of the 8th of June, last, at the Grand 
Lodge room in the City Hotel, in the city of New York, on 
Wednesday evening, November 8, A. L. 5820. 

Present. 

The M. W., His Excellency Daniel D. Tompkins, Vice- 
President of the United States, etc., etc., G. M., in the chair. 

E. W. John W. Mulligan, D. G. M. 

E. W. the Hon. William Irving, S. G. W. 

W. Smith Ovutt, Master St. John’s, No. 1, as J. G. W. 

E. W. Elias Hicks, G. S. 

E. W. Cornelius Bogert, G. T. 

W. and Eev. Henry I. Feltus, A. G. C. 

W. George McKinley, Master of No. 2. 

W. Thomas W. Garniss, Past Master of No. 7. 

W. John C. Fraser, Master of No. 9. 

W. James Bertine, Master of No. 10. 

W. Archibald McCoulm, Master of No. 39. 

W. Daniel Wishart, Master of No. 40. 



326 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


W. James Bouchaud, Master of No. 71. 

W. James A. Moore, Master of No. 83. 

W. Silas Lyon, Master of No. 84. 

W. Benjamin W. Peck, Master of No. 108. 

Brother D. Haselton, Senior Warden of No. 132. 

W. Daniel West, Master of No. 142. 

W. James P. Allaire, Master of No. 143. 

W. Paul Lamson, Master of No. 153. 

W. Edward S. Bellamy, Master of No. 304. 

Brother Alexander Thompson, of No. 2.” 

It being stated by the Grand Secretary, that, in order to 
carry the object of the meeting into effect, it would be neces- 
sary that a Lodge should be opened, the same was done in 
ample form, and with solemn prayer. 

THE UNION COMMUNICATED. 

“ The G. Secretary, assisted by the W. Bro. McKinley, of 
No. 2, the W. Bro. Garniss, of No. 7, and Bro. Thompson, 
of No. 2, then proceeded to initiate the R. W. and W. 
Brethren above enumerated and particularized, in the mys- 
tery of the 4 Union, 5 as communicated by the Grand Lodge 
of Lower Canada ; and the ceremony being ended, a motion 
was made and carried, that the Masters of Lodges here 
present, do advise and recommend to the R. W. Grand Offi- 
cers the dispersion of the same. 55 

The Grand Officers having conferred, the Grand Master 
announced as their pleasure, and gave permission for, the 
free dissemination of the “Union” to all brethren entitled to 
receive the same ; but, on the suggestion of the Senior Grand 
Warden, it was afterward 

“ Resolved . , That a Sub-Committee be appointed to arrange 
and digest the mode in which the c Union 5 is to be used and 
communicated, and to make report thereon at the next quar- 
terly Communication of the Grand Lodge ; and that the said 
Committee consist of the R. W. Brothers Mulligan, Irving, 
Hicks, Bogert, and the W. Brother Ovutt.” 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


327 


The Sub-Committee appointed by the Grand Officers and 
the Masters of Lodges in the city, to digest and arrange the 
mode in which the “ Union ” was to be communicated, sub- 
mitted the following, as the result of their deliberations : 

“ The ‘ Union 5 can only be communicated in a Master 
Mason’s Lodge, and to no brother below that degree. It is 
obligatory on the part of the Master of a Lodge to commu- 
nicate it to any member, being a Master Mason, requiring 
the same ; but it is discretionary with every member to 
receive or decline it. The Masters of Lodges to whom the 
‘ Union 5 has been imparted, forthwith (sic), and those who 
are yet to receive it, as soon as convenient after it shall have 
been communicated to them, are to cause the members of 
their Lodges to be specially notified, that at a given meet- 
ing, to be selected by such Master, the ‘ Union ’ will be 
imparted to all brethren qualified and desirous of receiving 
the same. Afterward the 4 Union 5 shall be communicated 
only in a Lodge of United Masons, that is, in the presence of 
five brethren who have already received it, for which pur- 
pose the Master of the Lodge is authorized and enjoined to 
exclude, during the ceremony, all such brethren as have not 
received, or may decline to receive, it. 

John W. Mulligan. 

William Ieving. 

Elias Hicks. 

Coenelius Bogeet. 

Smith Ovutt.” 

Which was accepted and confirmed. 

Pending the consideration of the revision and reprint of 
the Constitution and Eules, on June 12, 1822, the following 
resolution was referred to a Committee of nine, of which 
Grand Master, Joseph Enos, was one, to wit: 

“ Resolved, That the introduction of the Union Degree, or 
any other degree, into the present Masonic system is unnec- 
essary and inexpedient. . . 



328 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


Further action thereon does not appear until the Grand 
Secretary, on June 13, 1823, from the Committee appointed 
for the purpose of preparing a new Book of Constitutions for 
the Grand Lodge, made a report of their proceedings, and 
stated that, agreeably to the tenor of the resolution by which 
the Committee was appointed, the same had been printed 
and circulated, as therein directed. Which report was 
accepted. 

THE IMPOSTOR, J. DE GLOCK d’oBERNAT. 

At a Convention of Grand Officers and Masters of Lodges, 
a Committee, on December 9, 1820, reported as follows : 

“ A person calling himself Joseph De Glock D’Obernay, 
and styling himself the representative of the Most Worshipful, 
the Grand Master of the United Grand Lodge of England, to 
the Grand Lodge of New Spain, and exhibiting a diploma to 
that effect, has presented himself at the door and claimed 
admission ; but, being a person who for several years past has 
been in the practice of setting at defiance the rules and regu- 
lations of the Craft, contemning the authority of all Grand 
Lodges, and in many cases infringing their rights and pre- 
rogatives; and this Committee of the Grand Lodge, believing 
that the document offered for their inspection is a forgery, 
or, if genuine, that the Most Worshipful Brother from whom 
it has been obtained, has been deceived as to the character of 
the said Joseph De Glock D’Obernay, it was thereupon 

Ordered, That the Grand Secretary detain the said diploma 
until the aforesaid individual shall furnish more satisfac- 
tory evidence of his being what he represents himself to he, 
or until it shall be ascertained from the Bight Worshipful 
Grand Lodge of England, that the same has been rightfully 
obtained, and that it is their wish that it should be returned 
to him.” 

An adjournment of the Committee was then had. 

In response to the letter of inquiry from the Grand Secre- 
tary to the Grand Lodge of England in relation to the above, 



IN THE STATE OP NEW YORK. 


329 


an answer was returned and read to Grand Lodge, on June 
8, 1822. 

The following letter received from the Eight Worshipful 
William H. White, Grand Secretary of the Grand Lodge of 
England, was read, and ordered to be entered on the minutes : 

“ Free Mason’s Hall, London, January 2, 1822. 

R. W. Brother : In answer to your communication of 
the 'Tth of September last, I am commanded by the M. W. 
Grand Master, His Royal Highness, the Duke of Sussex, to 
state to you that the Bro. J. G. D’Obernay was invested with 
powers only to give the Royal Arch Degree in Hew Spain, 
and nowhere in the British Colonies ; but that, intelligence 
having been received of his misconduct as a Mason* while at 
Jamaica, orders were sent out to the R. W., Provincial Grand 
Master of that island (Brother Dr. Clare) to withdraw the 
diploma which had been given him for that purpose. You 
will therefore be good enough to return the document which 
Brother D’Obernay has so abused, and which you have so 
properly detained, in a letter addressed to the M. W. Grand 
Master, ‘to be delivered into His Royal Highness 5 own 
hands, 5 and that letter inclosed in a cover addressed to me 
at this place, in the usual form. 

I have the honor to be, with every sentiment of fraternal 
regard, R. W. Brother, 

Your very obedient servant and Brother, 

William H. White, 

Grand Secretary United Grand Lodge bf England. 

To the Right Worshipful Elias Hicks, 

Grand Secretary, Grand Lodge of Hew York. 55 

CHANGE in the grand offices. 

Action was had on June 9, 1820, pertaining to Grand 
Lodge Offices as follows : 

The Right Worshipful Grand Treasurer from the Commit- 
tee to whom was referred the Communications from other 
Grand Lodges, made the following report : 



330 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


“ To the Right Worshijpful Grand Lodge of the State of New 
York : 

The Committee appointed to investigate the Communica- 
tions from the several Grand Lodges of the United States of 
North America, of Upper and Lower Canada, and from the 
United Grand Lodge of England, beg leave to report that 
they have examined said Communications, and find that the 
most important regulations contained in those documents are 
in operation under the jurisdiction of this Grand Lodge. 

Your Committee observe that the several Grand Lodges in 
correspondence with this Grand Lodge have each a Senior 
and a Junior Grand Deacon only, and many of them have a 
Grand Sword-Bearer, Grand Marshal, and Grand Standard- 
Bearer; we, therefore, respectfully suggest to the Grand 
Lodge the propriety of the appointment of two Deacons, 
which we think will be conformable to the ancient usage of 
the Fraternity; and to appoint a Grand Sword-Bearer, a 
Grand Marshal, and a Grand Standard-Bearer. Should the 
latter offices be created, we recommend that the proper 
insignia be provided for the officers, together with the jewels 
for the Grand Pursuivant and Grand Tyler. 

George McKinley, M. of No. 2. 

Cornelius Bogert, P. M. of No. 7.” 

"Which being read was accepted, and the consideration 
postponed until the next Quarterly Communication. This 
occurred September 12, when, 

On motion of the Worshipful Brother McKinley, of No. 2, 
that part of the report of the Committee on Foreign Com- 
munications which has relation to the creation of additional 
offices in this Grand Lodge, conformable to the general 
usage in other Grand Lodges, was called up for considera- 
tion. Whereupon it was 

“ Resolved , That the number of Grand Deacons be reduced 
to two, viz., a Senior and a Junior Deacon ; that in addition 
to the officers already recognized by this Grand Lodge, there 
shall hereafter be appointed by the M. W. Grand Master, 





WASHINGTON HALL, 

BROADWAY, CORNER OF READE STREET 




IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


331 


annually, at the time and in the manner of making such 
other appointments as are vested in the Chair, a Grand 
Sword-Bearer, a Grand Marshal, and a Grand Standard- 
Bearer, who shall be selected from among the members of 
this Grand Lodge, shall be styled “Eight Worshipful,” and 
shall take rank immediately after the Grand Chaplains, and 
in the order hereinbefore observed. 

Resolved , That the E. W. Grand Treasurer, the W. Brother 
Ovutt, of No. 1, and the W. Bro. McKinley, of No. 2, be a 
^Committee for providing suitable insignia for the aforesaid 
Officers, and also for the Grand Chaplains, the Grand Pur- 
suivant, and the Grand Tyler.” 

WASHINGTON HALL, 

where the Grand Lodge at this time was holding its sessions, 
was celebrated as a social resort. It stood on Broadway, 
between Chambers and Eeade streets, on part of the former 
negro Burying Ground, and whereon now is located the 
“ Stewart Building,” built of marble. 

Sprig Lodge, No. 279, was authorized to change its place 
of Meeting from the town of Norway to that of Newport. 

Also, St. Lawrence Lodge, No. 92, to change its location 
from Kortright to Stamford. 

FEES FOK INITIATION, 

Numerous complaints from Lodges were received in June, 
1820, that the charges for initiation fees were excessive ; a 
Committee to whom the subject was referred, reported in 
December that the following were the prices charged by 
other Grand Lodges : 


New Hampshire . . . 

. . $15 

Vermont 

. .. $15 

Massachusetts 

.. 19 

Ehode Island . . . 

... 24 

Connecticut 

. . 13 

South Carolina. . 

... 29 

Georgia 

.. 15 

Ohio 

. .. 20 

Pennsylvania, no restriction. 

New Jersey, no restriction. 

Kentucky, 

li 

Indiana, 

U 



332 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


And that in their opinion the fee charged in New York 
($20) ought not at this time to be lessened. That the aver- 
age in other jurisdictions was more than in New York. 

At the election held June 21 to fill the office of Deputy- 
Grand Master, Eight Worshipful John Wells having declined 
to accept the office, John W. Mulligan was elected, and 
William Irving was elected Senior Grand Warden, which 
office was made vacant by the promotion of Brother Mul- 
ligan. 

In response to a question as to whether a 

ROYAL ARCH MASON IS RELEASED FROM HIS OBLIGATION TO 
ANSWER SUMMONSES 

sent to him from a Lodge of Masters, the following answer 
was approved : “ This Grand Lodge does not admit a power 
to exist in any order or description of Masons, of absolving 
Master Masons from any of the duties imposed by their Obli- 
gations, the Book of Constitutions, or the By-laws of the 
Lodge to which they may respectively belong.” 

i 

THE GRAND LODGE OF MAINE 

duly announced its first formal Convention on June 1, 1820 ; 
incident to the political separation of that Territory from the 
State of Massachusetts, the general convention of all Lodges 
following the consent of the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts. 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


333 


CHAPTER V. 

1821-1830. 


1821. 

RIGHT OF VISIT. 

A resolution was presented December 16, “that upon 
the application of a visiting brother for admission into any 
Lodge, the Presiding Officer, on receiving information which 
he, or a majority of the members present, may see fit to 
respect, that the admission of such individual will disturb 
the harmony of the Body, or embarrass its work, he is 
hereby authorized, exercising a due discretion, to deny such 
applicant the privilege he claims.’ 5 This resolution was 
adopted March 7, 1821. 

RECOGNITION OF OFFICIAL SIGNATURES. 

At the instance of the Grand Secretary, a preamble and 
resolution were adopted, to the effect that a perfect acquaint- 
ance with the signatures of the Grand Officers of the sev- 
eral Grand Lodges is of material importance in testing the 
authenticity of papers professedly issuing from under the 
hands and by the authority of any of them ; and that 
the Grand Secretary, when communicating with Grand 
Lodges, shall accompany the same with the signatures of the 
Grand Master, the Deputy, and the Grand Wardens, written 
in their own proper hand, authenticated under the hand and 
seal of the Grand Lodge; and that the Officers of other 
Grand Lodges, in responding, be requested to follow the 
same suggestion, especially in the case where Grand Officers 
have changed under election. 



334 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


Eising Sun Lodge, No. 228, was granted permission to 
change the place of its meeting from Trenton, Oneida 
County, to Eemsen, in the same county. 

COMMITTEE EXPENSES TO BE PAID BY CONTENDING PARTIES. 

It was determined by the Grand Lodge, March 9, 1821, by 
an order, that the actual expenses, which may accrue to Com- 
mittees of this Grand Lodge, appointed to settle any differ- 
ence or misunderstanding between Masons, or between a 
Lodge and its members, shall be borne by one or both of the 
parties, if the Committee to whom such difference shall be 
referred shall so decide. 

On the following March 14, it was ordered that the mode 
heretofore pursued, of notifying the members of this Grand 
Lodge of the meetings of the same, be discontinued ; and 
that, in future, all meetings of this Grand Lodge, both regu- 
lar and Emergent, shall be called by advertising the same 
three days next before and including the day of meeting, in 
three of the newspapers printed in the city of New York, to 
be selected by the Grand Secretary. 

The officers elected on June 6, 1821, were as follows : 

His Excellency Daniel D. Tompkins, Grand Master. 

Gen. John Brush, Deputy Grand Master. 

E. W. John Greig, Senior Grand Warden. 

E. W. Eichard Hatfield, Junior Grand Warden. 

E. W. Cornelius Bogert, Grand Treasurer. 

E. W. Elias Hicks, Grand Secretary. 

E. W. and Eev. James Milnor, Grand Chaplain. 

E. W. and Eev. Henry I. Feltus, Asst. Grand Chaplain. 

Bro. Joseph Jacobs, Grand Pursuivant. 

Bro. John Utt, Asst. Grand Pursuivant. 

Bro. Bryan Eossetter, Grand Tyler. 

On September 5, 1821, Thomas U. P. Charlton, Grand 
Master of Georgia, visited and received the honors of the 
Grand Lodge. 



IK THE STATE OP NEW YORK. 


335 


THE PRINTER TO THE GRAND LODGE. 

Worshipful Brother Southwick, appointed on September 
9, 1820, to do the printing, having died, thus creating a 
vacancy, the Worshipful Edward S. Bellamy, Past Master of 
Concord Lodge, No. 304, was elected printer to the Grand 
Lodge. 

GRAND LODGE ESPANOLA. 

A Grand Lodge was established at the city of Havana, 
island of Cuba, on November 30, 1820, which, having been 
communicated to the Grand Lodge of New York, solicita- 
tion was made for fraternal recognition and correspondence; 
whereupon, in June, it was 

“ Resolved , That the establishment of a Grand Lodge of 
Free and Accepted Masons in a country, the policy of whose 
government has ever been to exclude from its domains every 
description of Masonic labor and communion, is an interest- 
ing and important epoch in the annals of the Craft, and can- 
not fail to inspire with the most sincere and animated joy 
the bosoms of every member of our Ancient and Honorable 
Fraternity ; that the Grand Lodge of New York partici- 
pates in an eminent degree in this warm and natural feeling, 
and hereby offers to the ‘ Grand Lodge Espanola 5 its cordial 
congratulations on the auspicious event of its erection, with 
the assurance of that fraternal intercourse and correspond- 
ence which is cultivated and preserved with other Grand 
Lodges of the Ancient Craft.” 

Detroit Lodge, No. 337, was warranted on September 5, 
1821, by the Grand Lodge of Masons of the State of New 
York, to be held in the city of Detroit, Michigan Territory. 

Andre’s REMAINS CONVEYED TO ENGLAND. 

Major Andr6, who had been initiated into the Fraternity, 
was born in 1751. He was an Adjutant General in the Brit- 
ish army, and was taken in disguise on his return from a 



336 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


secret expedition to the traitorous American General, Bene- 
dict Arnold, also of the Brotherhood, on September 23, 1780 
— one of his captors, William Paulding, being a member of 
the Masonic Fraternity. Andre was sentenced to execution 
as a spy by a court of Brother General Washington’s offi- 
cers, at Tappan, H. Y., near where he had been captured, 
and suffered death on the following October 2. The trai- 
tor Arnold was given a commission in the British army. 
Andre’s remains were removed to England in a sarcophagus, 
August 10, 1821, and interred in Westminster Abbey. 


1822. 


APPOINTMENTS OF OFFICERS 


were made by the Grand Master March 6, 1822, and were as 
follows : 


E. W. George Hodgson, Grand Sword Bearer. 

K. W. Samuel Montgomery, Grand Marshal. 

K. W. John G. Tardy, Grand Standard Bearer. 

W. James Lyons, Jr., 

W. Abraham Eider, « ~ , 

„ ^ ^ 0 ’ V Grand Stewards. 

W. George B. Smith, 


W. William M. Price, J 

W. Matthew L. Davis, Senior Grand Deacon. 

W. Henry Marsh, Junior Grand Deacon. 


On the same date the following was. passed 7iem . con . 


LAWFUL AGE. 

“ Ordered , That that part of the Book of Constitutions 
which relates to the qualifications of candidates for initiation 
into the mysteries of Masonry, shall be so construed, as that 
no person shall be entered in any Lodge under this jurisdic- 
tion who shall not have attained the age of twenty-one 
years.” 

A Grand Lodge of Emergency was convened April 29, 
1822, at which Eichard Hatfield, Junior Grand Warden, 
stated, upon a representation by the Grand Secretary, that 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


337 


st. George’s lodge, no. s, Schenectady, 

agreeably to the proposition made by them on March 5, 1817, 
and agreed to by the Grand Officers, to whom the same was 
referred, had now complied with the terms upon which it 
was settled, that the said Lodge should be received within 
the pale of this jurisdiction, and claimed to be received 
accordingly ; he had caused this Emergent meeting to be 
called for the purpose of submitting the case to their consid- 
eration and decision. 

The application from St. George’s Lodge, signed by Timo- 
thy Capin and John McMichael, a Committee duly appointed 
for that purpose, being then read, it was thereupon 

“ Resolved , That the resolutions of this Grand Lodge, passed 
on June 4, A. L. 5819, by which St. George’s Lodge, at Sche- 
nectady, was declared to have forfeited its Masonic privi- 
leges, and the individuals then and since composing the said 
Lodge, expelled the Order, and deprived of all its benefits, 
be, and the same is, hereby repealed. 

Resolved , , That the doings of said Lodge during the contin- 
uance of the said denunciation, be held, and they are hereby 
declared to be, as valid and constitutional as though the same 
had never been decreed. 

Resolved , That a new Warrant of this date be issued to 
Henry Yates, Jr., Master; Samuel Farnsworth, Senior War- 
den ; and John McMichael, Junior Warden, of said Lodge, 
empowering them and their associates to hold a Lodge in 
the city of Schenectady, in the county of Schenectady, by 
the name of St. George’s Lodge, Ho. 8, which said Lodge 
shall take and hold rank from September 14, 1774, the date 
of the original Warrant this day surrendered. 

Resolved , That the said original Warrant be, and the same 
is, hereby allowed to remain in the hands of the said Henry 
Yates, Jr., and his successors in office, for safe keeping only, 
and with the express understanding that it shall not be used 
under any circumstances for Masonic purposes.” 
vol. n. — 22 



338 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


The Grand Lodge assembled on June 5, 1822, with most 
of the Grand Officers in attendance, together with the 
Representatives of fifty-four Lodges and the proxies of fifty- 
six other Lodges. 

The Grand Body, finding itself cramped for want of com- 
modious space, called off in order to assemble in Tammany 
Hall, where the Grand Lodge was called to order, when 
Josiah Randall, Grand Master, and Samuel F. Bradford, 
Past Grand Master, were announced and received with the 
accustomed honors. 

i 

A GENERAL GRAND LODGE. 

The following communication from Brother William S. 
Cardell, conveying the proceedings of an assemblage of 
Masons at Washington, relating to the formation of a Gen- 
eral Grand Lodge for the United States, and a report made 
to the Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania on the same subject, by 
a Committee of that Body to whom the aforesaid communi- 
cation had been referred, were severally laid before this 
Grand Lodge, and referred to Brothers John Brush, D. G. 
M. ; John Greig, S. G. W. ; Joseph Enos, P. G. Y. ; Mat- 
thew L. Davis, of Ho. 84; Henry W. Ducachet, of Ho. 2; 
Simeon Ford, of Ho. — ; John Coffin, of Ho. 83 ; William M. 
Price, of Ho. 16, and Richard Goodell, of Ho. 125. 

PROCEEDINGS HAD AT WASHINGTON. 

“ Masonic Notice . — Those members of Congress who belong 
to the Masonic fraternity, and those visitors of the city who 
are or have been members of any State Grand Lodge, are 
respectfully invited to attend a meeting to be held in the 
Senate Chamber this evening at 7 o’clock, to take into con- 
sideration matters of general interest to the Masonic Insti- 
tution.” 

Pursuant to the above notice, published in the National 
Intelligencer , a number of members of the Society of Free 
Masons from various parts of the United States, composed of 



IN THE STATE OP NEW YORK 


339 


members of Congress and strangers, assembled at the Cap- 
itol, in the city of Washington, March 9, 1822. Brother 
Thomas R. Ross was appointed Chairman, and Bro. William 
Darlington, member of Congress, of Pennsylvania, Secre- 
tary ; and it was unanimously 
% 

Resolved, That in the opinion of this meeting it is expe- 
dient for the general interests of Freemasonry, to constitute 
a General Grand Lodge of the United States. 

Resolved , That it be proposed to the several Grand Lodges 
in the United States to take the subject into their serious 
consideration at their next annual Communications, and that, 
if they approve of the formation of a General Grand Lodge, 
it be recommended to them to appoint one‘or more delegates 
to assemble in the city of Washington, on the second Mon- 
day of February next, to agree on the organization of such 
Grand Lodge. 

Resolved , That if two-thirds of the Grand Lodges within 
the United States concur in the propriety of establishing 
a General Grand Lodge, it be recommended to them to 
instruct their representatives to proceed to the formation of 
a Constitution of a General Grand Lodge, to be subsequently 
submitted to the several Grand Lodges in the Union for their 
ratification ; and which, being ratified by a majority of them, 
shall be considered as thenceforth binding on all the Grand 
Lodges assenting thereto. 

Resolved , That the Most Worshipful John Marshall, of 
Virginia ; Henry Clay, of Kentucky ; William H. Winder, of 
Maryland; William S. Cardell, of New York; Joel Abbot, 
of Georgia; John Holmes, of Maine; Henry Baldwin, of 
Pennsylvania; John H. Eaton, of Tennessee; William W. 
Seaton, of Washington; Christopher Eankin, of Mississippi; 
Thomas R. Ross, of Ohio ; H. G. Burton, of North Carolina ; 
and the Rev. Thaddeus M. Harris, D.D., of Massachusetts, 
be, and they hereby are, appointed a Committee to open a 
correspondence with the respective Grand Lodges within the 
United States, and to take such measures therein as they may 
deem expedient to carry the aforesaid resolutions into effect. 



340 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


The Committee in complying with the above resolutions, 
are aware that a meeting of individual Masons, however 
respectable in number and character, could delegate no reg- 
ular authority in behalf of the Masonic body ; and if they 
could, it would be unnecessary. This paper will, therefore, 
be understood, as it is intended to be, a proceeding, originat- 
ing in the necessity of the case, to adopt some mode by 
which the general views of Masons in the different States of 
the American Union may be ascertained. 

The history of the Masonic institution shows that, though 
established among various nations, it was, in each country, 
confined to a comparatively small number. The jurisdiction 
exercised by Grand Lodges, like almost every exertion of 
power or of moral influence, was concentrated in different 
capital cities. The Subordinate Lodges were few in number, 
and their connection with the supreme head was very direct. 
Till within a recent period, it is believed, no great number of 
Lodges have been united under a single Jurisdiction. The 
art of printing and other causes have produced gr6at changes 
in the condition of the world, and these causes have oper- 
ated in their full proportion on the society of Free Masons. 
The sphere of civilization is greatly enlarging its boundaries ; 
intellectual attainments and the influence of moral opera- 
tions are taking the place of brute force ; known principles 
and laws are recognized ; and the advantages of cultivated 
reason are shared by an increased proportion of mankind. 
Under these circumstances, Masonry has been extended, and 
its Lodges so multiplied as to make their proper conduct a 
subject of much interest to the friends of the Society. 

There are two points which at once present themselves in 
connection with the idea of establishing a General Grand 
Lodge of the United States. The first is to acquire, in a cor- 
respondence with foreign nations, an elevated stand for the 
Masonry of this country ; to unite with them in maintaining 
its general principles in their purity ; and, secondly, to pre- 
serve, between our own States, that uniformity in work, and 
that active interchange of good offices, which would be diffi- 
cult, if not impossible, by other means. 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


341 


The Committee do not presume to instruct their brethren 
in the nature of an institution in which they have a common 
interest. They are governed by a few plain considerations, 
known to all who have attended to the subject. 

The antiquity of the Masonic Society, extending so far 
beyond all other human associations, seizes the attention, and 
the mind is naturally impressed with feelings of interest for 
an institution transmitted to us through the long train of a 
hundred ages. Time, which destroys all perishable things, 
seems to have consolidated the pillars of this moral temple. 
We contemplate the long catalogue of excellent men who 
have been equally the supporters of Masonry and the orna- 
ments of human nature ; and we say, almost unconsciously, 
that the present generation, with all its lights, must not tar- 
nish the name of an institution consecrated by so many cir- 
cumstances calculated to endear it to the mind of a good man. 

Without making invidious comparisons between the United 
States and other portions of the world, there are some great 
considerations of responsibility which our .intelligent citizens, 
accustomed to reflect on the affairs of nations, cannot over- 
look. The Masons of the United States, in character as such, 
have their full share of this moral responsibility. They will 
consider their institution as one of the great social causes to 
allay low-minded jealousies between nations at peace, and in 
war to mitigate the horrors which it cannot avert. While 
they offer their gratitude to a beneficent Providence for their 
own blessings, they will not be regardless of their obligations 
to their brethren throughout the world. 

These reflections, drawn from the external circumstances 
of Masonry, are strengthened by the consideration of its 
intrinsic nature. Its foundation is fixed in the social feelings 
and the best principles of the human mind. Its maxims are 
the lessons of virtue, reduced to their practical application. 
It stands opposed to sordidness ; to a jealous or revengeful 
temper ; to all the selfish and malevolent passions ; it coin- 
cides with the highest motives of patriotism, the most 
expanded philanthropy, and concentrates all its precepts in 
reverence to a Divine Creator and good-will to man. 



342 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


The United States are supposed to contain near 80,000 
Free Masons. They are generally in the vigor of manhood, 
and capable of much active usefulness. Notwithstanding 
the abuses in some places by the admission of unworthy 
members, they are, as a body, above mediocrity in character 
and talent. It becomes an interesting question how the 
energies of this body can be best combined to give effect to 
the benevolent design of their association. 

From causes which need no explanation, the Masonic juris- 
diction in this country has taken its form from the political 
divisions. The modification which it has undergone, from 
the spirit of our civil institutions, has its benefits and its 
defects. Each of our State jurisdictions is supreme within 
itself. Whatever collisions may exist, whatever abuses, what- 
ever departures from the correct standard, in principle or in 
rites, whatever injury to the common cause, there is no mode 
assigned to obviate the wrongs which it is the interest of all 
to prevent. 

There is no provision for a systematic interchange of 
Masonic intelligence. In one or two instances there are 
already two or more Grand Lodges in the same State, each 
claiming superior jurisdiction, and with no acknowledged 
boundaries between them. Will not these evils increase as 
our population becomes more dense, unless means be season- 
ably used to guard against them ? Is the difference now 
prevailing between different States, an evil which calls for 
remedy ? Every good Mason must wish chiefly for the har- 
mony of the general institution ; for the Society is so formed 
that no particular part, however meritorious by itself, can 
continue to prosper if the body at large is brought into dis- 
grace. Is the Masonry of our country at present a great arch 
without a keystone ? Is it not in danger of falling ? Are not 
many of the books which are published in the name of the 
Masonic institution derogatory to its character and interest? 

It is not the design of the Committee to enter into argu- 
ments on this subject, nor to lay down their own opinions as 
a guide for those better able to judge, but to proceed to the 
only duty required of them to perform. 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


343 


According to the preceding resolutions, the Committee are 
to submit the question, whether it be expedient that a Grand 
Lodge of the United States be formed ; and, secondly, to 
request those Grand Lodges which approve that object, to 
appoint delegates to meet at Washington on the second 
Monday of February next, to take such measures as may be 
deemed most proper for the organization of such General 
Grand Lodge. 

It is requested that this letter may not be published in 
newspapers, but submitted to the several Grand Lodges, and 
distributed among Masons, as a subject concerning the affairs 
of their own Body. 

If the information furnished to the Committee should 
render it expedient, perhaps another letter may be for- 
warded, giving a statement of such facts as may be interest- 
ing to be known, previous to a final decision on the course to 
be taken. 

An answer is requested, with a free expression of opinion 
on the subject of this communication. Such answer may be 
directed to any member of the Committee, or, in particular, 
to William W. Seaton, Esq., Washington. 

Henry Clay, 

William H. Winder, 
William S. Caedell, 

Joel Abbot, 

John Holmes, 

Henry Baldwin, 

John H. Eaton, 

William W. Seaton, 
Christopher Rankin, 

Thomas R. Ross, 

H. G. Burton, 

Thaddeus Mason Harris.” 

“ REPORT TO THE R. W. GRAND LODGE OF PENNSYLVANIA. 

The Committee to whom were referred the Communica- 
tion reciting the proceedings of ‘A number of members of 



344 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


the Society of Free Masons, from various parts of the United 
States, composed of members of Congress and strangers, 
assembled at the Capitol, in the city of Washington, March 
9, 1S22, recommending the establishment of a General 
Grand Lodge of the United States, 5 make report : 

That they have considered the Communication referred to 
them, with all the care and attention that the importance of 
its object and the respectability of the source from which it 
emanated would require. By a reference to the proceedings 
of this Grand Lodge, it will appear that, as early as the year 
1790, the Grand Lodge of Georgia proposed the establish- 
ment of a General Grand Lodge throughout the United 
States. On the 7th of June, 1790, the Grand Lodge of Penn- 
sylvania unanimously expressed its disapprobation of the 
proposed measure, which, at that time, appears to have been 
abandoned. 

On June 24, 1799, the Grand Lodge of South Carolina, 
prompted, it is imagined, by its then peculiar situation, 
renewed the proposition of a General Grand Lodge, for the 
purpose of reviving ‘the drooping spirit of the Ancient 
Craft,’ and adopted a number of resolutions similar to those 
contained in the Communication now referred, and declaring 
that they would appoint deputies to meet the Convention at 
Washington, as soon as two-thirds of the different Grand 
Lodges in the United States should approve the measure. 
The Grand Lodge of South Carolina transmitted its proceed- 
ings to the different Grand Lodges, and, among others, to 
that of Pennsylvania. On March 7, 1803, the Grand Lodge 
of Pennsylvania, while the proceedings from South Carolina 
were under consideration, declared, ‘ That a supreme super- 
intending Grand Lodge in the United States is inexpedient 
and impracticable ; but that a convention of deputies from 
the several Grand Lodges, for the purpose of forming a more 
intimate union, and establishing a regular and permanent 
intercourse between the said Grand Lodges, and considering 
other interesting matters, would be conducive to the advance- 
ment and respectability of the Ancient Craft. 5 These sen- 
timents were subsequently approved and adopted by the 



IN THE STATE OP NEW YORK. 


345 


Grand Lodges of New Hampshire, Massachusetts, New Jer- 
sey, Maryland, and Virginia, and by the Grand Lodge of 
Georgia, in which the measure, in 1790, was originally 
brought forVard. 

On March 6, 1809, this Grand Lodge, having the original 
Communication from South Carolina still under considera- 
tion, once more unanimously reiterated their former senti- 
ments upon this subject, and, by the report of the Committee 
of Correspondence made at that time, it appears these senti- 
ments were again, in the years 1807-08, concurred in by the 
Grand Lodges of New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Connecti- 
cut, and New Jersey. 

After a careful review of the whole ground, your Commit- 
tee most fully and cordially concur in the sentiments hereto- 
fore expressed by your body on this subject. Previous to 
the American Revolution, Provincial Grand Lodges were 
established in the Colonies, under the jurisdiction of the 
Grand Lodge of England. After the Declaration of Inde- 
pendence by these United States, the different Provincial 
Grand Lodges declared themselves sovereign and indepen- 
dent. Well-known and established boundaries, whether nat- 
ural or artificial, have always been fixed upon as the limits 
of the jurisdiction of separate Grand Lodges. In this coun- 
try, therefore, we have always been divided by States, and 
such division appears to your Committee to be useful and 
judicious. Under this system, Masonry has continued to 
advance in the United States to a degree of splendor and 
brilliancy hitherto unparalleled, and no longer requires any 
new plan 4 to revive its drooping spirit;’ little or no colli- 
sion has ever existed between the different Grand Lodges ; 
and, so far as the knowledge of your Committee extends, 
the utmost harmony and cordiality now subsist, without an 
exception, between the different Grand Lodges throughout 
the United States. 

In the opinion of your Committee, the reasons that pro- 
duced the present political confederation or union of the 
United States, altogether fail when applied to the interests of 
Freemasonry. The Grand Lodges of England, Scotland, and 



346 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


Ireland are sovereign and independent of each other ; they 
are more contiguous ; their jurisdictions embrace a less 
space of territory than the United States ; and they are 
under one consolidated government, without even the sub- 
division of power peculiar to our State and Federal Gov- 
ernments. We believe, in the mother country, they have 
experienced as few evils from this system as we have; 
and, although the late union of the two Grand Lodges in 
England presented a favorable opportunity of proposing 
to establish one consolidated General Grand Lodge, if 
it had been desired, yet we do not find that it was even 
suggested. 

In the opinion of your Committee, the exercise of a juris- 
diction so extensive and so particular as that proposed, com- 
prehending not only the most important concerns, but the 
most minute affairs of the subordinate Lodges, would be 
attended with innumerable delays, difficulties, and embar- 
rassments, and would produce the greatest confusion and 
disorder throughout the whole Fraternity. The general 
advantage of the Craft requires, that the subordinate Lodges 
should be placed under the immediate superintending care of 
a Grand Lodge, which, by its proximity of situation, and the 
exercise of its legitimate authority, may correct their errors, 
attend to their wants, and inspire them with the sublime 
spirit of otir Order. The establishment of a General Grand 
Lodge would deprive the different Grand Lodges of these 
powers — they would become subordinate bodies ; and not 
only every Lodge, but each individual member of every 
Lodge, would have the right of appeal to the General Grand 
Lodge. The proceedings of the subordinate Grand Lodge 
would, in many cases, be reversed at a great distance from 
the scene of action, where the parties were but little known, 
the circumstances of the case less understood, the Grand 
Lodge appealed from perhaps not represented, and the ulti- 
mate tribunal be operated upon by the perseverance and 
importunities of such of the parties as might attend upon its 
deliberations. 

It is also feared that, in the course of time, many of the 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


347 


Grand Lodges would be nominally represented, and thus the 
attributes of this colossal power, embracing complete and 
universal control over the fiscal and more purely Masonic 
concerns of every Grand Lodge, subordinate Lodge, and indi- 
vidual member in the United States, would be concentrated 
in the hands of a few who would constitute the meeting. 
To prevent this evil, it may be said, the meetings of the 
General Grand Lodge might be less frequently holden ; but, 
in the opinion of your Committee, this would be an insur- 
mountable objection. A prompt decision upon all questions 
connected with Masonry is absolutely necessary; and the 
delay and procrastination consequent upon an appeal to the 
General Grand Lodge, as well in trivial as important con- 
cerns, would be a greater evil than all the advantages to be 
derived from the establishment of the body. The distance 
of many of the Grand Lodges from the seat of government, 
and the inclemency of the season proposed as the time of 
meeting, would be serious difficulties. It is to be appre- 
hended that persons would be selected as delegates rather 
from the circumstance of their attendance upon the seat of 
government, upon public duty or private business, than from 
the knowledge of the principles of the Order and its forms 
and ceremonies. The members of such a body as the one 
proposed ought to be intimately acquainted with the local 
concerns and separate interests of the bodies they represent ; 
not only ought they to have been bright and expert work- 
men in their progression to distinction in the Order, but 
they should continue to be so by constant and uninterrupted 
intercourse with the Lodges, and daily participation in their 
labors. In short, the members of such a body ought to con- 
stitute the Masonic energy and intelligence of the Grand 
Lodges whom they would represent. On the other hand, 
your Committee apprehend many of the members would 
be selected rather from their rank and dignity in political 
life, and the casual circumstances before referred to, than 
the possession of those attainments in the Order which 
ought to be necessary qualifications of its members. These 
remarks are intended to convey our ideas of what would, 



348 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


in the progress of time, be the result of the establishment 
of a General Grand Lodge, and not as reflections upon the 
highly respectable members who were convened at Wash- 
ington. 

Your Committee, however, believe that an occasional Con- 
vocation of Delegates from the different Grand Lodges would 
have a salutary tendency, and would furnish a remedy for 
many of the evils delineated in the communication referred 
to them. The deliberations of such an august and venerable 
body, consulting upon the great interests of the Order, and 
dependent upon the good sense and judgment of the Craft 
for the fulfillment of its wishes, would be received with 
enthusiasm and its recommendations performed with alac- 
rity. Although your Committee are not aware that, at pres- 
ent, ‘ in one or two instances there are already two or more 
Grand Lodges in the same State, each claiming superior 
jurisdiction, 5 as is stated in the communication, yet, as the 
evil has heretofore existed and may occur again, the contem- 
plated convention might propose, as a fundamental princi- 
ple, that not more than one Grand Lodge should exist in a 
State ; and there is little doubt but that the recommendation 
would be adopted by the different Grand Lodges. They 
could adopt measures calculated to promote a uniformity of 
work ; though most assuredly they would find it difficult, if 
not impracticable, to enforce universal obedience to any 
Masonic ritual, whether it be the good old system, as handed 
down to us by our Masonic forefathers, or any of the new 
plans that have been recently adopted in various parts of our 
country. They might also propose measures calculated to 
suppress the publication of improper books on Masonry, an 
evil already of considerable magnitude and rapidly increas- 
ing with the times. 

Your Committee are therefore of opinion that a Grand 
Convocation of Delegates from the different Grand Lodges 
throughout the United States, to meet on St. John the Bap- 
tist’s day in June, 1823, in either of the cities of New York, 
Philadelphia, or Baltimore, would be proper and expedient. 
They would observe some delicacy in fixing upon our own 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


349 


city as the place of meeting.; and if either of the other cities, 
or any other place not yet designated, should be preferred, 
they would abandon their preference and cheerfully abide by 
the views of their other brethren. At the same time, they 
would observe that the central position of the city of Phila- 
delphia and the conveniences afforded by the use of the 
Masonic Hall, render it, in their humble opinion, the most suit- 
able place at which the Convocation should be holden. Your 
Committee believe that any general meeting should not be 
held at the city of Washington, but in one of our large cities, 
where the numbers, wealth, and respectability of the Craft 
would afford the Delegates suitable accommodations, and 
such other conveniences as might render their attendance 
pleasant and agreeable. 

Your Committee, therefore, offer the following resolutions 
for adoption : 

Resolved, That the establishment of a General Grand 
Lodge of the United States, and the calling a Masonic Con- 
vention for the purpose of instituting and organizing the 
same, as proposed, is inexpedient, and, in the opinion of this 
Grand Lodge, impracticable. 

Resolved, That a General Grand Convention of Delegates 
from the different Grand Lodges throughout the United 
States, for the purpose of consulting upon the interests 
of the Order, be recommended to be holden on St. John 
the Baptist’s day in June (the 24th), 1823, at the city 
of Philadelphia, or such other place as may be desig- 
nated by the other Grand Lodges throughout the United 
States. 

Resolved, That this Grand Lodge will appoint Delegates 
to meet such Convocation as soon as it shall appear to be the 
wish of the different Grand Lodges throughout the United 
States that the same shall be holden. 

Resolved , That the Grand Secretary be requested to trans- 
mit copies of the foregoing report and resolutions to the 
different Grand Lodges throughout the United States, and 
one copy of the same to William W. Seaton, Esq., at the city 



350 


HISTORY OP FREEMASONRY 


of Washington, agreeably to the request contained in the 
Communication referred to your Committee. 

Josiah Randall, G. M., 

Samuel F. Bradford, 

Rayse Newcomb, 

James Harper, Jr., 

Thomas Kittera, 

Joseph S. Lewis, 

George A. Baker, 

Edward King, 


Committee. 


Which report and resolutions were adopted. 

Extract from the minutes. 

George A. Baker, Grand Secretary.” 


The Right Worshipful Deputy Grand Master, from the 
Committee to whom was referred the proposal for forming a 
General Grand Lodge for the United States, and the report 
made to the Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania on that subject, 
reported, on June 8, 1822, that, “ having considered the sub- 
ject submitted to them, and with due deference to the cred- 
itable source whence the Communication originated, they 
were of the opinion that it is inexpedient to form a General 
Grand Lodge of the United States ; and, further, that it is 
unnecessary to adopt any measures for an occasional convo- 
cation of delegates from the different Grand Lodges of the 
respective States, as proposed by the Grand Lodge of Penn- 
sylvania.” This proposed action was “ accepted, approved, 
and confirmed.” 

Earlier proceedings of Grand Lodges as to constituting a 
General Grand Lodge, and placing General George Wash- 
ington in the Supreme Chair, will be found in Yol. I., pp. 372 
to 385 of this History. 


A Communication was received on June 8, 1822, from the 

CONVENTION ESTABLISHING the GRAND LODGE OF ALABAMA, 

which was organized June 12, 1821. 



IN THE STATE OP NEW YORK. 


351 


Fraternal intercourse and correspondence were authorized, 
and the Grand Secretary directed to assure the new-born 
Grand Lodge thereof. 

General Andrew Jackson, who became President of the 
United States in 1829, was elected Grand Master of Masons 
of Tennessee in 1822. 

MASONIC PUBLICATIONS CONDEMNED. 

A Communication was received from Kingston Lodge, 
No. 20, informing the Grand Lodge that a printed work, as 
a help to the memory, called the “ Masonic Tablet,” was 
being advertised and sold by the Eev. Daniel Parker, to 
whom the Grand Secretary had written, condemning the 
same. The Communication of the Grand Secretary was 
approved by the Grand Lodge, which added that it decid- 
edly condemned the use of all books or manuscripts, the sup- 
port or tendency of which was to elucidate and explain Free- 
masonry. 

THE CITY AND COUNTRY GRAND LODGES. 

Grand Lodge management for several decades was grad- 
ually culminating in a division of that Grand Body. It will 
readily be observed by the reader of the early history of 
Masonry in New York, that there was an existing love of 
independence and freedom of action on the part of those 
brethren who had lived under Warrants obtained from 
sources other than that of the Grand Lodge of the State ; 
especially in cases where the Warrants antedated that of 
the Grand Lodge. There would crop out the alma mater . 
There was an unwillingness to surrender the original docu- 
ment of authority ; to taking a new number and therewith 
incurring a possible loss of rank ; to subserviency to an 
organized Confederation, in which there was virtual non-rep- 
resentation, consequent upon Lodge distance from the seat of 
legislation, and accordingly partial ostracism from the law- 
making power ; to permitting country representation by city 
proxies ; to submission to taxation without the opportunity 



352 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


of discussion; to giving to Past Masters the right to a 
seat with full powers in the Grand Lodge. Earnest atten- 
tion had been frequently called to the peculiar establishment 
and maintenance of District Yisitors, whose tax collections 
were at times almost half consumed before the balance 
reached the Treasury ; to the necessity of all the twenty 
office-bearers being citizens of New York, and all honors 
thereby being held by city Masonic officials. These mat- 
ters, and other minor ones, were slowly tending to estrange 
the country Lodges from those of the city, and surely lead- 
ing to a disruption of the Grand Body, unless strength and 
wisdom should interpose some plan of re-establishing and 
maintaining harmony. 

It is essential to recount some of the historical facts and 
incidents that immediately antedated the rupture of June, 
1823, whereby there became, for the first time in the State 
of New York, two Grand Lodges, which were known as the 
“ City Grand Lodge” and the “ Country Grand* Lodge” 

Tenacity in holding to an ancient Warrant may be 
instanced in the case of St. George’s Lodge, No. 1, which 
was dated in 1774, and which was not finally surrendered 
until April, 1822. 

It will be necessary to revert to occurrences in several pre- 
ceding years, in stating these causes that led to the creation 
of the two Grand Lodges. The brethren in the country 
were intercommunicating on the subjects of Grand Yisitors, 
Proxies, and of moving the Grand Lodge to the city of 
Albany. The following important circular, distributed in 
1819, ^vill show their activity : 

THE ELMIRA CIRCULAR. 

“ Brethren : 

Agreeable to a resolution of Union Lodge, No. 30 (located 
at Elmira), we transmit for your consideration the report of 
their Committee respecting the circular of the Grand Lodge, 
dated April 22, 5818, and the circular of Clinton Lodge, No. 
292, both of which we presume you have long ere this 
received from the Grand Secretary of the one, and the 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


353 


Committee of the other. Whatever may be your sentiments 
respecting the adoption of the measures proposed by the 
Grand Lodge, we earnestly solicit that your Lodge may be 
properly represented in the Grand Lodge, at their regular 
Communication in June next. 

Yours, etc., 

D. E. Brown, 

O. Chapman, 

L. Hudson, j- Committee. 

E. Jones, 

J. Bobinson, 

Elmira, Ttoga County, April 25, 5819.” 


At a regular Communication of Union Lodge, Ho. 30, on 
April 10, 5819, the Committee appointed for that purpose 
made the following report, which was accepted: and it* was 
ordered that the Secretary should transmit a copy thereof 
** to the It. W. Grand Secretary and to the several Lodges 
under the jurisdiction of the Grand Lodge of Hew York. 

“ To the Worshipful Master, Wardens , and Brethren of 
Union Lodge , No. 30 : 

Your Committee, appointed on March 11 last, to take into 
consideration the circular of the Grand Lodge on the subject 
of collecting dues from the country Lodges, and of the com- 
pensation to Grand Visitors, dated April 22, 5818, and a 
Communication from Clinton Lodge, Ho. 292, on the same 
subject, dated Hovember 25, 5818, respectfully report : 

That, as Free and Accepted Masons, they view the 
Masonic Institution as one of the most sacred, the rights of 
which cannot be infringed, except by such as are so degen- 
erate as to be unworthy the appellation of ‘ Brother ; J and, 
with due deference, would appeal to the feelings and princi- 
ples of all those who have been accepted as Master Masons, 
to review with us the benefits which have been enjoyed for 
ages past, and anticipate that which may in the greatest 
degree govern the welfare of generations yet unborn, and 
the influence of the benign principles of Masonry, which we 
vol. n.— 23 



354: 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


sincerely hope may be perpetuated to the latest ages, in their 
pristine purity. 

The reports under consideration, your Committee would 
beg leave to state, are of the utmost importance to the wel- 
fare of Masonry in the final issue, and we cannot indulge the 
idea but that the intentions of the Grand Lodge and the 
subordinate Lodges would at all times be for the promotion 
of the best interests of the Institution. Your Committee 
acknowledge the high veneration due the Grand Lodge of 
this State, but still feel the highest obligation to the Frater- 
nity in general to dissent from the rules and requirements 
laid down in the circular of April 20, 5818, and, at the same 
time, claim the preference of reviewing the several para- 
graphs and resolutions contained in their report or circular 
for consideration. In the second paragraph we find it stated : 
1st. That there are many inconveniences and much expense 
attending the visiting and collections of the several differ- 
ent Lodges ; 2d. They being very numerous, some making 
returns, but paying no dues; 3d. Some several years in 
arrears ; 4th. Some not acknowledging the authority of the 
Grand Lodge, some making no returns and paying no dues; 
5th. The Grand Lodge admits the paying of large sums 
of money collected by the Grand Visitors, etc. 6th. That 
members of country Lodges pay but half the sum collected 
from those of city Lodges, which their Committee consider 
as improper; 7th. Their Committee recommended the imme- 
diate abolition of the present system. 

In reply to the several positions taken in the second para- 
graph of the report of the Grand Lodge Committee, your 
Committee feel themselves in duty bound to remark : 

1st. That country Lodges on receipt of their charters have 
to pay a considerable sum therefor, which is not through the 
medium of the Grand Visitors, and that 179 new Lodges 
have been chartered since the adoption of the system of 
Grand Visitors ; that the Lodges have to pay fifty cents 
annually for each of their members, which is frequently paid 
to the Visitors. That these sums of money are expended in 
the immediate vicinity of the Grand Lodge, and from which 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 355 

the country Lodges can derive but little benefit, except the 
satisfaction of being visited by persons well instructed in the 
art and of introducing a uniform system of work. 

2d. It is true that the State is large and the Lodges very 
numerous, and some very remote from the sittings of the 
Grand Lodge, all which strongly suggests that policy and 
principle require the removal of the Grand Lodge to a more 
central part of the State, so that the Lodges remote from the 
city of New York (whose privileges are as dear to them as 
those in its vicinity) may have it in their power to be repre- 
sented without having to travel from three hundred and fifty 
to four hundred and fifty miles, as many now have to do. 
Your Committee can see no necessity of the Grand Visitors 
staying from three to seven days ; and should they stay at 
some places even that length of time, we confidently believe 
that the information which can be derived from other sources 
for a future benefit, would not justify them in so doing. 
One of your Committee, from his own knowledge, can say 
that he has known a Grand Visitor not to be under the 
necessity of staying more than six hours before the Lodge 
was assembled, dues paid, returns prepared, and a lecture 
given. That the dues at that time paid was about thirty-six 
dollars. 

3d. That seventy-eight Lodges who are from three to twelve 
years in arrears, your Committee would suppose ought to be 
called to an account for neglect of duty, and that through 
the medium of Grand Visitors, who should be clothed with 
discretionary power to commute and settle with such, and 
take away their charters and silence them if they refuse to 
comply with Masonic rules. The defaults of this nature 
ought not to be chargeable to the system of Grand Visitors, 
but to the neglect of the Grand Lodge whose duty it is to 
enforce compliance. 

4th. Your Committee very much regret that any one 
Lodge should neglect to acknowledge the authority of the 
Grand Lodge. It will be seen by the proceedings of the 
Grand Lodge of September 3, 5817, that there are four 
Lodges, one in the island of Cuba, one in the island of 



356 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


Demerara, one in Louisiana, and one in Michigan, who prob* 
ably might have some doubt where they ought to report them- 
selves, although they received their charters from the Grand 
Lodge of this State. Tour Committee heartily Goncur in the 
report of the Committee of the Grand Lodge in disapproving 
the neglect of many Lodges ; but, at the same time, would 
be very unwilling to have the source of information entirely 
cut off from such a vast number of Lodges in consequence of 
the neglect of a few, who undoubtedly ought to be dealt with 
for such improprieties. 

5th. Your Committee, in reviewing the circular of April 
20, 5818, of the Grand Lodge, find that the sum of $3,474.56 
has been paid to the Grand Lodge, and, after deducting the 
expenses of the Visitors, leaves a surplus in the Treasury of 
$1,779.56. From this statement, it appears that the expenses 
of collecting dues through the Grand Visitors amounts to 
almost one-half of the sum collected from the country Lodges * 
and we with confidence submit to your body and to that of 
the Grand Lodge, whether this plan of receiving money, 
crude and undigested as it now is, is not better than to put 
the burthen on each Lodge of transmitting its own dues, 
which would cost, your Committee believe, at least one-third 
more than the amount of each, thereby indirectly burthening 
each Lodge with more than double the sum they now have 
to pay. Tour Committee think, however, that the mode of 
Grand Visiting may be beneficially amended so as to save at 
least one-half the expense now attending it. Tour Commit- 
tee would suggest that it be made the duty of each Grand 
Visitor (by a rule of the Grand Lodge), on making his annual 
report to the Grand Lodge, to give notice to every Lodge in 
his district of the time (as near as may be) that he will visit 
each Lodge. That a Lodge on receiving such notice, if in 
default and not ready to settle with its Visitor, shall pay all 
expenses out of its own funds over and above the time be 
would otherwise be detained with such Lodge, according to 
the rate which may be hereafter allowed by the Grand 
Lodge. 

6th. In reviewing the sixth section of the second para- 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


357 


graph, your Committee would take the liberty of introduc- 
ing that part verbatim. 4 That, as the members of the 
country Lodges pay only half the sum annually that the 
members of the Lodges in the city pay, your Committee 
cannot see the propriety of being obliged to pay such an 
enormous sum for the collecting of their dues ; but that 
every Lodge in the country is bound by every sacred tie 
to make a prompt remittance to the Grand Lodge of their 
dues, or they are unworthy the name of Brother, and ought 
to be forever excluded from the benefits and privileges of 
Masonry.’ As to this part of the paragraph, your Com- 
mittee would beg leave to reply that, as a single member 
in the city pays double the amount of a member in the coun- 
try, provided they were equal in number, it would be 4 an 
enormous sum 5 indeed ; but as there are but 15 Lodges in 
the city of New Tork, leaving the number of 294 in the 
country, and these same Lodges in the city have been repre- 
sented in the Grand Lodge, together with only 6 more, and 
these by proxy (according to the report of the last meeting 
of the Grand Lodge), to recommend the adoption of the said 
resolutions contained in the said report ; and, as it further 
appears in the latter part of the report of the Grand Lodge, 
which bears date, September 2, 5818, that all this business 
was called up and acted upon in a 4 Grand Lodge of Emer- 
gency, 5 your Committee cannot but state that they view the 
proceedings thus far as rather strained, and as tending mate- 
rially to affect the rights and interests of the country Lodges ; 
but feel much gratified that the consideration of the report 
was laid over until the Quarterly Communication in June, 
when they hope the country Lodges may be generally repre- 
sented, or, in case of a failure on their part, that it may be 
adjourned until after Communication, and not acted upon in 
a 4 Lodge of Emergency. 5 

7th. Your Committee take the liberty of considering the 
seventh and last part of the said paragraph, which they con- 
sider a little singular and somewhat hasty, but which, per- 
haps, may have arisen more from warmth of feeling than a 
liberal view of the very numerous Lodges situated in every 



358 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


part of the State, and the place of sitting of the Grand Lodge 
being so far from the territorial center. 

From many considerations which might be urged, your 
Committee think it a duty respectfully to remonstrate 
against the ‘ immediate abolition of the present plan’ as 
they conceive that the abolition of these privileges would be 
striking a vital stab to the very principles of Masonry, and 
have many reasons to fear that, in a short time, a much less 
sum would be received into the treasury of the Grand Lodge, 
and the brightness of Masonry would inevitably be on the 
decline. As to the ultimate consequence, your Committee, 
from delicacy, would withhold any further opinion. 

Your Committee, in reviewing the resolutions of the Grand 
Lodge of June 3 (or which appears to be, on an extra of June 
6), find a hasty recommendation for revoking the powers of 
the Grand Visitors — we say hasty, as it is an old maxim 
that large bodies move slowly — and, in further summing up 
the substance of the said resolutions, we find them highly 
tinctured with the same spirit, which we cannot reconcile 
with the generally acknowledged principles of the Masonic 
Institution. We further observe a recommendation that the 

Grand Secretary be compensated with dollars for his 

services, to be paid out of the funds of the Grand Lodge, 
which will be an increase of pay, without any benefit to the 
country Lodges for the tax laid on them ; and at the close it 
is recommended, that if the Grand Visitors are continued, 
the members of country Lodges shall pay a sum equal to 
the members of the city Lodges of New York, which we 
acknowledge we would not object to, provided the Grand 
Lodge could be situated as near to us as it is now to them. 

Your Committee would introduce many other remarks, 
but conclude with referring to the general principles con- 
tained in the circular of Clinton Lodge, No. 292, dated 
November 25, 5818, on the subject of that of the Grand 
Lodge of April 20, 5818. 

It will be found, by reference to the report of the Grand 
Lodge of September 30, 5817, that there are 309 Lodges 
under the jurisdiction of the Grand Lodge ; and, by further 



IN THE STATE OP NEW YORK. 


359 


examination, we find that out of this number, there are 213 
Lodges (117 majority), which, in a territorial point of view, 
might claim Albany for their center, or the more proper 
place for the sessions of the Grand Lodge. From this esti- 
mate it might be inferred that a majority would carry it still 
further northwest. But we confidently believe that no other 
place in this State would be more central in point of conven- 
ience. 

And now, for innumerable reasons, your Committee 
would respectfully recommend (for the better enabling the 
Craft to meet on the level and part on the square) the 
removal of the Grand Lodge to the city of Albany ; and 
that no alterations in its rules or regulations be made, except 
at its annual Communications, say in February. We would 
therefore recommend that measures be ^aken by this Lodge, 
to urge a general representation (at the next Communication 
of the Grand Lodge in June) to the several Lodges in this 
District, either by their proper officers or by proxy. 

Your Committee beg leave to submit the following resolu- * 
tion for consideration : 


Resolved , That the Secretary transmit to the R. W. Grand 
Secretary, and to the several Lodges in this State, a copy of 
the foregoing report. 


All which is respectfully submitted. 

D. E. Brown, 
L. Hudson, 

O. Chapman, 

E. Jones, 

J. Robinson, 

April 10, 1819.” 


Committee. 


The direct action, however, out of which grew the division 
in the Grand Lodge, was the memorial prepared by a Com- 
mittee of the representatives of sundry Lodges in the ten 
Western counties of the State, assembled by previous notice 
at Canandaigua, January 10, 1821, complaining of certain 
regulations and measures of the Grand Lodge. 



360 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


This was read in Grand Lodge, March 9, 1821, when it 
was 

“ Resolved , That the R. W. John W. Mulligan, Deputy 
Grand Master ; the R. W. Cornelius Bogert, Grand Treas- 
urer ; the W. Brother Smith Ovutt, of No. 1 ; the W. Brother 
McKinley, of No. 2 ; the W. Brother Coffin, of No. 83 ; the 
W. Brother Marsh, of No. M2, and the W. Brother Smith, 
of No. 304, be a Committee to take the same into considera- 
tion, and to report thereon to this Grand Lodge on Wed- 
nesday next, the 14th instant ; and that the said Committee 
be particularly instructed to report at the same time a reso- 
lution expressive of the sense of this Grand Lodge at the 
mode adopted by the memorialists in bringing the subject of 
their grievances before them.” 

On March 14th following, the Deputy Grand Master, for 
the Committee, reported, first taking up the subject of creat- 
ing eighteen Grand Visiting Districts, which had been intro- 
duced into the Grand Lodge by Brother Oliver Rose, in 
June, 1819. The report was as follows: 

“ That by the said Communication a renewal of the propo- 
sition formerly made by the W. Brother Rose, and rejected, 
is virtually brought before the Grand Lodge for its consid- 
eration. Prudence and experience dictate the propriety of 
yielding with caution to the introduction of radical altera- 
tions, and show the salutary effect of not adopting, without 
proper deliberation, even a partial modification of existing 
systems. But it is equally the characteristic of wisdom to 
consider with carefulness the change produced by circum- 
stances in the state and relations of any collective body, and 
to provide for such alterations as those circumstances may 
render necessary, when that necessity is shown to exist. It 
is certainly one of the most interesting characteristics of our 
Order that its principles, though free and simple in them- 
selves, are of such extensive operation as to adapt themselves 
readily and effectually to the universal Masonic institu- 
tion, or to the parts into which it is from necessity sub- 
divided ; and thus the strength and symmetry of the whole 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK . 4 


361 


is established by the effect of those principles, in promoting 
the union and harmony of all its parts. 

The necessity of any material alteration does not appeal to 
your Committee so strongly as to the brethren who have from 
time to time applied for it, either on account of the peculiar 
situation of the Lodges under this jurisdiction, or on account 
of any material difference between the Constitutions of this 
and* those of other Grand Lodges. But while these consid- 
erations should influence the Grand Lodge to act with delib- 
eration and caution, it is right that the opinions of those 
who, though at a distance from the place of its deliberations, 
constitute equally with those who can attend there with 
greater facility, the great representative body, should have 
their proper weight ; and it is obvious to every one that, in 
all matters of weight and importance, the Grand Lodge has 
endeavored to obtain the opinions of the individual Lodges 
under its jurisdiction. 

Your Committee, therefore, on a general view of the sub- 
ject before them, are of opinion that, while the Grand Lodge 
should discountenance that spirit of innovation which is at 
variance with the principles and hostile to the prosperity of 
the Order, it ought to adopt such alterations as are sanc- 
tioned by those principles and calculated to promote that 
prosperity. To do this well, when the occasion requires, it 
should be done gradually; so that each step taken should 
have the test of experience of its usefulness and tendency to 
promote a more perfect system, before it be followed by 
more important deviations from the old one. 

Two striking and, perhaps, the most material of the 
amendments which have required the consideration of the 
Grand Lodge, are the increase of the number and powers of 
the Grand Visitors, and the modification of the restriction 
on proxies. Your Committee, influenced, therefore, by the 
above considerations, propose the adoption of the following 
resolution, viz. : 

Resolved , 1. That it be, and is hereby, recommended to 
the M. W. Grand Master to proceed without delay to the 



362 


HISTORY OP FREEMASONRY 


division of the State into districts for visitation, not exceeding 
five, and to appoint for each a Grand Yisitor, residing in the 
district for which he is to be appointed, which Grand Yisitor 
shall perform the same duties, be liable to the same penalties, 
and have the like powers, as those heretofore appointed, and 
shall be nevertheless subject to such instructions as shall from 
time to time be given him by the M. W. Grand Master. 

Resolved , 2. That the 2d Eule, 10th Section, 3d Chapter of 
the Book of Constitutions, be amended by striking out the 
words 4 one Lodge, 5 and inserting the words ‘ three Lodges 7 
(in the matter of proxies). 


In relation to that part of the resolution by which your 
Committee were appointed, and which requires of them to 
report a resolution expressive of the sense of this Grand 
Lodge on the mode adopted by the memorialists in drawing 
its attention to the subject of their complaint, the Committee 
cannot refrain from expressing their regret that the course 
pursued does not correspond with that which ought to regu- 
late the intercourse between the Grand and subordinate 
Lodges ; and in conformity with the said instructions they 
submit the following resolution: 


Resolved , 3. That the subordinate Lodges under the juris- 
diction of this Grand Lodge have, in their Lodges, and by 
their Masters, Past Masters, Wardens, and Proxies, a full, per- 
fect, and constitutional right to make any communication or 
representation to this Grand Lodge ; and that while this right 
exists, it is improper and irregular to adopt any other mode 
of making such communication or representation. 


In concluding this report, the Committee would barely 
remark, that the circular referred to in the communication 
before them was not presented therewith, but is presumed not 
to differ materially from the substance of the memorial itself. 
John W. Mulligan, D. G. M., 

Cornelius Bogert, G. T., 

John Coffin, 

George McKinley, 


Committee/’ 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


363 


The second resolution having been rejected, the report and 
remainder of the resolutions were accepted and approved. 

Brother Oliver Bose, Past Master of Zion Lodge, No. 172, 
then presented the following notification (sic ) : 

“ To the Most Worshipful Grand Master , Right Worshipful 
Deputy Grand Master , and Grand Wardens , and the 
Worshipful Brethren composing the Grand Lodge of the 
State of Mew York, greeting : 

Beloved Brethren : As a member of the Grand Lodge, 
and believing the interest of Masonry requires it, I deem it 
my duty, and hereby submit to the Grand Lodge the follow- 
ing notice, and pray the same to be entered in your minutes, 
and information of the same to be sent by the*Grand Secre- 
tary to the several subordinate Lodges in this jurisdiction : 

NOTICE. 

i By permission of our Supreme Grand Master in Heaven, 
and circumstances occurring so as to render it practicable and 
proper, in the opinion of many brethren, at the next June 
Communication of the Grand Lodge, I, or we, shall move 
the Grand Lodge to so have the Constitutions, Buies, Laws, 
Begulations, Edicts, etc., of the Grand Lodge amended, 
that a system of Bepresentation, Grand Visiting, Labor, etc., 
similar to, or having the same leading features as, the one 
proposed by me in June, A. L. 5819, in Grand Lodge, be 
embraced. 

And, further, I give notice that, at said June Communica- 
tion (if thought proper) I shall propose to have the rep- 
resentatives from those subordinate Lodges situated at a 
distance from the city of New York, attending said Commu- 
nication, paid their reasonable and moderate expenses for 
traveling to, and returning from, the said Grand Lodge. 

I wish to be distinctly understood in this Notice, that, as 
every Lodge has been furnished with a copy of the system 
above alluded to, this proposition is, and will then be, consid- 
ered so full and explicit, that it will be constitutional and 
proper to act upon it at the said June Communication.’ ” 



364 


HISTORY OP FREEMASONRY 


Inasmuch as several subjects before the Grand Lodge were 
agitating the Masonic mind, and unusual interest therein was 
being evinced, an Emergent Session was called in March, 
1821, partly to make such arrangements for the next Quar- 
terly Communication as might be deemed expedient, from 
the extraordinary number of representatives likely to be 
present. 

Hence the adoption of the following : 

“ Resolved , That, in order to facilitate the proceedings of 
the Grand Lodge at the approaching Quarterly Communica- 
tion, a Committee be appointed to examine the credentials 
and rights of all brethren claiming seats and a vote therein ; 
that said Committee meet for that purpose at some conven- 
ient place, to be fixed upon by themselves, on the day next 
preceding said meeting ; and that, in the event of any 
vacancy occurring in said Committee by absence or other, 
wise, the place or places so vacated shall be filled by the 
appointment of the M. W., Grand Master. 

Resolved , That the Committee consist of the W. Bro. 

Stearns, of No. 43, the W. Bro. Cardell, of No. , and the 

W. Bro. Purdy, of No. 209. 

Resolved , That, if it meet the concurrence of the M. W., 
Grand Master, the ensuing Quarterly Communication be held 
in the large room at Tammany Hall, and that he be hereby 
requested to cause the same to be convened at the hour of 
four o’clock, p.m., instead of the usual hour, for the purpose 
of hearing the appeals, if any should be offered, against the 
decision of the Committee on Credentials.” 

The Grand Lodge convened on June 6, 1821, the Deputy 
Grand Master, John W. Mulligan, being in the chair, and 
immediately proceeded to the election of Grand Officers, 
which resulted in the re-election of Grand Master, Daniel D. 
Tompkins — generally mentioned in the record as the Yice- 
President of the United States — and of General John Brush, 
Deputy Grand Master, in lieu of John W. Mulligan, the 
remaining officers being re-elected. 

An u adjournment ” was then had to Jnne 9, 1821. 



IN THE STATE. OF NEW YORK. 


365 


In pursuance of previous notices, the Grand Lodge, hav- 
ing convened, proceeded to consider amendments and addi- 
tions, proposed in and to the Particular Rules ; and, after 
due discussion, the following resolutions were passed, viz. : 

“ Resolved, That the 21st Rule, 10th Section, 3d Chapter, 
of the Book of Constitutions, be amended by striking out of 
the 4th and 5th lines the words 4 seventy-five,’ and inserting 
c thirty-two ; ’ and also by striking out the words, ‘ For every 
member of a Lodge in the city of New York, per quarter, 
twenty-five cents,’ from the 16th and 17th lines ; the words, 
4 and out of the city of New York,’ from the 19th line ; the 
words, ‘ For every person initiated in any Lodge in the city 
of New York, two dollars and fifty cents,’ from the 24th and 
25th lines ; the words, 4 out of the said city,’ in the 26th and 
27th lines ; the words, 4 and twenty-five cents,’ from the 28th 
line ; an$ the words, ‘ and twenty-five cents,’ from the 33d 
line. 

Resolved , That the 32d Rule, 10th Section, 3d Chapter, of 
the Book of Constitutions, be amended by striking out the 
word 4 six,’ and inserting ‘ five.’ 

Resolved, That the 37th Rule, 10th Section, 3d Chapter, 
of the Book of Constitutions, be, and the same is, hereby 
repealed. 

Resolved, That the 2d Rule, 10th Section, 3d Chapter, of 
the Book of Constitutions, be amended by striking out the 
word 4 one,’ and inserting ‘ five.’ 

Resolved, That a Past Master of regular standing, and 
who, by the existing Rules, is entitled to a seat in this Grand 
Lodge, may be represented by proxy ; provided, that such 
proxy be of equal grade with the brother whom he repre- 
sents, and that no proxy represent more than five Past 
Masters. 

Resolved, That every subordinate Lodge situate out of the 
city of New York, and at least ten miles distant therefrom, 
being represented in this Grand Lodge, or the proxy repre- 
senting any Lodge, being a non-resident in said city, and 
coming a distance of at least ten miles, shall be entitled to 



366 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


receive one dollar and fifty cents per day, for attendance at 
the June Communication of the same, and a like compensa- 
tion for every forty miles’ travel, coming and returning, to 
be paid such representative or proxy, out of the moneys 
received from such Lodge as the annual return of dues 
for the year preceding ; provided, that said compensation 
does not exceed the amount so due and paid ; and further 
provided, that no proxy receive compensation for more 
than one Lodge, although he may be the representative of 
five. 

Resolved , That no ordinance or regulation affecting the 
interests, or obligatory upon the Lodges out of the city of 
New York, shall be passed at any other than the Quarterly 
Communication in June of each year. 

Resolved , That no alteration or amendment of the Consti- 
tution shall be made at any other than the June Communi- 
cation ; and any such alteration or amendment, in order to 
be then considered, must have been proposed and entered on 
the minutes of the Grand Lodge at a like previous June 
Communication, and, within three months thereafter, trans- 
mitted to the several Lodges of the jurisdiction ; nor shall 
any such alteration or amendment be then made, unless the 
same be approved by two-thirds of the votes present when 
the question is taken thereon. 

Resolved , That the 15th Eule, 10th Section, 3d Chapter, 
of the Book of Constitutions, be, and the same is, hereby 
repealed. 

Resolved, That the 10th Section, 3d Chapter, of the Book 
of Constitutions, be referred to the consideration of a Com- 
mittee, who shall report thereon at the Quarterly Communi- 
cation in December next, which report shall be printed, and 
transmitted to all the Lodges within the jurisdiction, in order 
that the brethren may be prepared to act upon the same at 
the June Communication, A. L. 5822. 

Resolved, That the E. W. John Greig, the E. W. Elias 
Hicks, the E. W. Oliver Eose, the W. Matthew L. Davis, and 
the W. William M. Price, constitute the Committee. 

Resolved , That the country Lodges, and the non-resident 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


36? 


proxies of country Lodges, represented in and attending this 
Communication, shall be paid their expenses out of the Grand 
Lodge funds, at the rate of one dollar and fifty cents for 
every day’s attendance, and a like sum for every forty miles’ 
traveling ; provided that such compensation does not exceed 
the amount paid by any such Lodge for, and on account of, 
returns made for the last two years of payment. 

Resolved, That the E. W. D. G. Master, the W. Brother 
Telfair, of No. 143, and Brother Edward Seaman, S. W. of 
No. 16, be a Committee to adjust the amount of compensation 
due to the representatives and proxies of the country Lodges; 
and that said Committee meet for that purpose, at six o’clock 
on Monday morning at Tammany Hall.” 

1822. 

A letter from Grand Master Daniel D. Tompkins, declin- 
ing renomination or consideration as a candidate having 
been received, the Eight Worshipful Brother Joseph Enos, 
Jr., of Eaton, was unanimously elected Grand Master, 
the other officers being re-elected. This occurred June 6, 
1822. On the succeeding day, a Committee of three was 
appointed to audit the accounts of the officers and proxies 
of the respective country Lodges attending this Quarterly 
Communication. On June 7 a preamble and resolution was 
offered and referred, setting forth that Brother Oliver Eose 
drew compensation for traveling both in his capacity as 
Grand Visitor of the Fifth District and as the proxy of 
Selected Friends’ Lodge, No. 219, and requiring him to make 
refund of one or the other amount. The Committee, on J une 
10, reported unanimously the opinion that Brother Eose had 
not received more than he was entitled to, under the existing 
constitution. 

A resolution was unanimously adopted, on June 11, 1822, 
thanking Grand Master Tompkins for the services rendered 
by him as Grand Master during the last two years, and 
then Brother Joseph Enos was duly installed and proclaimed 



368 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


Grand Master. On "Wednesday, June 12, Grand Master 
Enos presiding, the following preamble and resolutions were 
adopted : 

COMMITTEE TO REVISE THE CONSTITUTIONS. 

“ Whereas, It is considered that great inconveniences exist 
in the manner of doing business, as at present prescribed by 
the Book of Constitutions of this Grand Lodge ; and, 

Whereas , By reason of ambiguities, doubts are entertained 
of the true meaning of some parts of the same ; and, 

Whereas, The interests of the Fraternity demand that the 
provisions of the Book of Constitutions should be clear, une- 
quivocal, and easy to be understood ; therefore, 

Resolved , That a Committee of nine members of this 
Grand Lodge be appointed, to whom shall be referred the 
Book of Constitutions and all Buies and Begulations of the 
said Grand Lodge, for the purpose of revising, amending, 
and completing the same ; and that the said Committee shall 
meet in the city of New York on the second Monday in 
November next, and may adjourn, from time to time, until 
they shall have prepared a new Book of Constitutions for 
this Grand Lodge ; and that it shall be the duty of the said 
Committee to hand the same over to the Grand Secretary, 
whose duty it shall be to cause it to be printed, and a copy 
thereof transmitted to each subordinate Lodge under the 
jurisdiction of this Grand Lodge, on or before the first day 
of January next ; and that at the annual Communication of 
this Grand Lodge in June next, the same shall be considered, 
altered, or amended, if required ; and if, after such consider- 
ation, alteration, or amendment, it shall be accepted by a 
majority of two-thirds, to be ascertained by ballot, then it 
shall become the Book of Constitutions of this Grand Lodge. 

Resolved , That the said Committee shall be nominated and 
located as follows: The Most Worshipful the Grand Master 
shall be one ; the members attending this Grand Lodge from 
the late Western Senatorial District shall select two; the 
members from the late Eastern Senatorial District shall 
select two ; the members from the late Middle Senatorial 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


363 


District shall select two; and the members from the late 
Southern Senatorial District shall select two ; which nomi- 
nations shall be approved by the Grand Lodge. 

Resolved , That the members of this Committee be allowed 
for their services and attendance, while in the actual dis- 
charge of their duties, at and after the rate of two dollars 
and fifty cents per day, and a like sum for every thirty miles ! 
travel to and from the place of meeting of said Committee. 

j Resolved, That the Grand Treasurer be, and he is hereby* 
authorized and directed to pay to the order of the Chairman 
of the Committee, the amount of the compensation allowed 
the members for their attendance and travel, as well as all 
other bills and accounts for contingent expenses, which shall 
have been presented and audited by said Committee. 

Resolved , That the Grand Secretary be, and he is hereby, 
directed and required to place in the hands of said Commit- 
tee all books, papers, and records which may be deemed 
necessary for their use.” 

The selected Committee of Nine was composed of Most 
Worshipful Brother Joseph Enos; Bight Worshipful Elias 
Hicks; Worshipful Brothers John Greig, Thomas Walker, 
Ebenezer Wadsworth, Benjamin Chamberlain, Augustus F. 
Hayden, Welcome Esleeck, Matthew L. Davis, and W. S. 
Cardell. 

PRECEDENCY IN GRAND LODGE OFFICE. 

No report appears to have been made on the following, 
which was referred to the same Committee : 

“ Resolved, That from and after the first Wednesday in 
June, 1823, the manner of calling members to fill stations pro 
tern, in this Grand Lodge, as now practiced, in the absence 
of those elected, be abolished ; and that the Constitution or 
Begulations be so altered, that, in the absence of the Grand 
Master, Deputy Grand Master, Senior or Junior Grand War- 
dens, or Past Grand Officers of those grades, or either of 
them, the Grand Secretary, or person acting as such, shall 
call upon the W. Master of No. 1, if present, to take the first 
vol. ii.— 34 



370 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


vacancy; in his absence, the Senior Past Master of that 
Lodge present ; if neither Master nor P. Masters be present, to 
call upon the W. Master or Senior P. Master of No. 2 in like 
manner ; and also upon the numbers next in the order to the 
end, that the vacancies may be filled. At the next meeting, 
either regular or emergent, the next Lodge in number to the 
one last called upon to officiate, shall be called upon by the 
Grand or Acting Grand Secretary, to fill any vacancy which 
may occur, and so on, in regular order, that all the Lodges 
represented may be placed upon the same footing as to their 
eligibility to fill those offices.” 

DUES THREE YEARS IN ARREARS. 

At the J une session, it was 

“j Resolved, That all Lodges in arrears for dues for three 
years and more, be summoned to make returns, and pay the 
same, or to show cause, at the Quarterly Communication in 
June next (1823), why their Masonic labors should not be 
suspended and their Warrants surrendered.” 

TWO GRAND LODGES PROPOSED. 

The Worshipful Brother Henry Marsh, conformably to the 
56th Rule, 10th Section, 3d Chapter of the Book of Constitu- 
tions, laid the following resolutions upon the table : 

“ Whereas , Serious dissensions have arisen in this Grand 
Lodge, calculated to impair the dignity and respectability of 
our Order ; and, whereas , , these dissensions are wide spreading 
in their direful consequences and are fraught with mischiefs, 
the termination of which cannot be foreseen ; therefore, 

j Resolved, That it is expedient to form in the State of New 
York two Grand Lodges ; one to be located in the city of 
New York, and the other in such town or place as a majority 
of the Lodges out of the city may designate. 

Resolved , That the Lodges out of the city be permitted to 
select the Grand Lodge from under whose jurisdiction they 
will hail. 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


371 


Resolved , That the mode and manner of dividing the 
funds be submitted to the decision of the Grand Lodge of 
the State of 


REVISION OF PROXIES. 

In order that the loose manner of using proxies might be 
regulated and restricted, notice was given in December, 
1822, that an amendment to the rule relating thereto would 
be called up for consideration, and the following preamble 
and resolutions were accordingly submitted : 

“ Whereas , By the 2d Buie, 10th Section, 3d Chapter, of 
the Book of Constitutions, it is provided £ That every proxy 
claiming a seat, shall produce a power, sealed with the seal, 
and signed by the Master, Wardens, and Secretary of such 
Lodge, in the words following, viz. : 

At a meeting of Lodge, No. , held at , 

in the county of , in the State of New York, on the 

day of , A. L. 58 . 

On motion, 

Resolved , That our Worshipful Brother be (admit- 

ted an Honorary Member of this Lodge), and is hereby ap- 
pointed to represent this Lodge in the Grand Lodge of the 
State of New York, and fully empowered to act in our behalf, 
in all the transactions of the Grand Lodge, as effectually as 
if we ourselves were personally present. 

All which we have caused to be certified by our Master and 
Wardens, and the seal of our Lodge to be affixed.’ 

And whereas , The form of this Certificate clearly and dis- 
tinctly shows, that the appointment of a proxy must be 
in open Lodge, regularly and constitutionally convened, in 
order that the members of each Lodge may have an oppor- 
tunity fairly and fully to express their approbation or dis- 
approbation of the person selected to represent them. 

And whereas , It has been reported that, on some former 
occasions, the above salutary regulation has not been com- 



372 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


plied with ; but, on the contrary, that blank proxies have been 
issued, and, it is to be apprehended, improperly used, thus 
perverting the intentions of this Grand Lodge in authorizing 
the Lodges to be represented by their proxies. 

And whereas, It is the intention of this Grand Lodge, that 
the above regulation shall be literally and faithfully complied 
with, believing, as they do, that it is the most certain and 
safe mode of ascertaining the opinions of distant brethren ; 
therefore, 

Resolved , That the name of every person appointed a proxy 
to represent any Lodge in this Grand Lodge, shall be filled 
up, in open Lodge, at the time of his appointment. 

Resolved , That, accompanying the proxy, there shall be a 
certificate, signed by the Master, Wardens, and Secretary, 
stating that such proxy was chosen at a regular meeting of 
the Lodge he was selected to represent, there being present 
a constitutional number of members duly qualified to vote at 
such election, and designating by name such constitutional 
number of members of said Lodge as were personally present 
at the time said proxy was appointed.” 

The above preamble and resolutions were approved and 
adopted, March 5, 1823. 

1823. 

Matters had now been brought into a definite form for a 
contest, as to the wisdom of dividing the Grand Lodge. On 
June 3, 1823, the Grand Officers and a large representation 
of the subordinate Lodges — 112 in number — by Masters, Past 
Masters, Wardens, and Proxies, were present. The room 
being inadequate for the attendance, an adjournment was 
had to Tammany Hall. 

SYNOPSIS OF DIFFICULTIES OF 1833. COMPROMISE IN 1827. 

Difficulties resulting from an unwillingness to surrender 
old original Charters to the Grand Lodge of New York, 
which was instituted under the Provincial Warrant from 
England, and the manner of establishing and maintaining 



IN THE STATE OF NW YORK. 


373 


Grand Visitors of Lodges, as well as the system of Represen- 
tation of country Lodges by proxies to the Grand Lodge, 
slowly but surely were estranging the country Lodges from 
the Grand Lodge Organization, which was solely a city insti- 
tution so far as Office Bearers and many local matters were 
concerned. The proxy power was specially claimed as an 
abuse by the Grand Lodge, for on March 5, 1823, it 

“ Resolved, That the name of every person appointed a 
proxy should be filled up imopen Lodge at the time of his 
appointment, and at a regular meeting.” 

In June the clash came. The day before the Grand Lodge 
Session, the country Delegates caucused for Grand Officers, 
which excluded every city member as an officer. The exam- 
ining Committee of Credentials were instructed to consider 
as regular only those holding under the above resolution. 
This was vehemently opposed, and an appeal asked from the 
decision of the Chair, upon a question of order. The Chair 
declared there was no appeal, and adjourned Grand Lodge 
till next morning, when city Lodges could not attend. 

But the Grand Lodge, on the demand of at least one-half 
of the number present, was convened by the Junior Grand 
Warden, who reopened the Grand Lodge and proceeded with 
business, elected Grand Officers, and adopted the resolution 
of June, 1823, which declared that it was expedient that two 
Grand Lodges be formed in the State of New York, viz. : 
the one already in the city, and the other to be out of the 
city, as a majority of the Lodges consenting to form a part 
thereof should designate. 

In time the city and country Grand Lodges compromised, 
under a “Compact ” of 1827, and united on June 7, declar- 
ing that the records should remain in New York City; that 
the Grand Treasurer and Grand Secretary should be chosen 
from the city ; that the Grand Master or the Deputy should 
be chosen from the city, the other officers, including the 
two Wardens, from outside the city ; that the number of 
Lodges which one Master or Past Master may represent 



374 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


should not exceed three ; that Past Masters should not be 
represented by proxies. 


PROCEEDINGS. 

On June 3, 1823, the Deputy Grand Master offered the 
following resolution : 

“ Resolved , That be a Committee to examine the 

Credentials of representatives of the Subordinate Lodges, 
either in person or by proxy, agreeably to the constitutional 
regulations of the Grand Lodge, and that they make report 
stating the number of votes such representatives are respect- 
ively entitled to, at this Communication.” 

Brother Matthew L. Davis, of Washington Lodge, No. 84, 
moved to amend the resolution by inserting after the word 
“Lodge” the words “as explained in the resolutions of 
March 5, 1823 ” (quoted above). 

This proposed action seems to have immediately created a 
commotion. A debate ensued, and “ an appeal from the 
decision of the Chair on a question of order was made, and 
refused by the Grand Master, who declared that there should 
be no appeal from his decision.” 

Brother Davis then rose to offer a protest against the 
decision, and (as it was alleged) against other and various 
objectionable measures, “ when the Grand Master authorita- 
tively stopped the same by declaring the Grand Lodge to 
be adjourned until to-morrow at ten o’clock. The brethren 
who dissented to these decisions, thereupon withdrew in a 
body, repaired to the Lodge room in St. John’s Hall, and 
reorganized the Grand Lodge,” on June 3, 1823, as follows : 

The R. W. Richard Hatfield, Esq., in the chair. 

The W. James E. Betts, Master of St. John’s, No. 1, as 
D. G. Master. 

The W. Joseph Hoxie, Master of St. Andrews, No. 7, as 
S. G. Warden. 

The W. Robert Phillips, Master of Hiram, No. 10, as J. G. 
Warden. 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


375 


The It. W. Elias Hicks, G. Secretary. 

“ Cornelius Bogert, G. Treasurer. 
The W. Henry Marsh, S. G. Deacon. 

“ ¥m, F. Stevenson, J. G. Deacon. 

Bro. Joseph Jacobs, G. Pursuivant. 

“ Bryan Bossetter, G. Tyler. 


Lodges present by their Officers and Past Masters . 


St. John’s, Ho. 1. 
Independent Royal Arch, 
Ho. 2. 

St. Andrew’s, Ho. 7. 

St. John’s, Ho. 9. 

Hiram, Ho. 10. 

Holland, Ho. 16. 

Trinity, Ho. 39. 

Phoenix, Ho. 40. 
Westchester, Ho. 46. 
Suffolk, Ho. 57. 

Morton, Ho. 63. 
Rensselaer, Ho. 68. 

L’ Union Frangaise, Ho. 71. 
Homer, Ho. 74. 

Fortitude, Ho. 81. 


Horizontal, Ho. 82. 
Abrams, Ho. 83. 
Washington, Ho. 84. 
Adelphi, Ho. 91. 

Morton, Ho. 108. 

Mount Moriah, Ho. 132. 
Benevolent, Ho. 142. 
Clinton, Ho. 143. 
Mechanic, Ho. 153. 

Hew Jerusalem, Ho. 158. 
Hewtown Union, Ho. 174. 
Concord, Ho. 304. 

German Union, Ho. 322. 
Hohenlinden, Ho. 338. 
Hibernia, Ho. 339. 
Philipstown, Ho. 352. 


This being the day appointed by the Book of Constitutions 
for the election of Grand Officers, the Grand Lodge pro- 
ceeded to the performance of that duty, and the following 
brethren were unanimously elected Grand Officers for the 
ensuing year, viz. : 

The M. W. John Wells, Esq., Counselor at Law, Grand 
Master. 

The R. W. Martin Hoffman, Esq., Deputy Grand Master. 

“ Richard Hatfield, Esq., Senior Grand Warden. 

“ Matson Smith, M.D., Junior Grand Warden. 

“ Elias Hicks, Grand Secretary. 

“ Cornelius Bogert, Grand Treasurer. 



376 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


The R. W. and Rev. Henry L feltus, D.D., G. Chaplain. 

“ “ Evan Malbone Johnston, G. Chaplain. 

Bro. Joseph Jacobs, Grand Pursuivant. 

“ Bryan Rossetter, Grand Tyler. 

“ Gerrit Lansing, Assistant Grand Pursuivant. 

The resolutions offered in June, 1822, were then taken up 
and unanimously adopted, in the following form : 

“ Resolved , That it is expedient that two Grand Lodges be 
formed in the State of Hew York, viz. : the one already 
located in the city of Hew York, and the other to be located 
in such town or place out of said city, as a majority of the 
Lodges out of the said city consenting to form a part of the 
same, may designate. 

Resolved , That the * Lodges in good standing out of the 
city be permitted to select the Grand Lodge from under 
whose jurisdiction they will hail.” 

An adjournment was then had, to meet at the City Hotel, 
June 6 (Friday), at 7 p.m. ; but it being found that the Lodge 
L’Union Fran§aise, Ho. 71, was holding its regular conven- 
tion at the same time and place, the Grand Lodge proceeded 
to St. John’s Hall, and opened in due form, with Right 
Worshipful Richard Hatfield, Junior Grand Warden in the 
chair, and twenty-four Lodges present by their officers and 
Past Masters. 

The Grand Officers, with the .exception of John Wells, 
Grand Master elect, were duly installed, and the Grand 
Lodge adjourned until the following Friday evening, June 
13 ; on which occasion a communication from Brother Wells 
was read, declining the proffered honor of the Grand Master- 
ship, in consequence of its being inconsistent with his profes- 
sional duties. 

The upper Lodge room of St. John’s Hall was then per- 
manently engaged, at a rental of “ sixty dollars per annum, 
including lights and fire.” 

Thus, in brief, it will be perceived that the country dele- 
gates had amply prepared for a continuance. The day 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


377 


before the Grand Lodge session, at which Grand Officers 
were to be elected, a caucus had been held, when it was 
determined to exclude every city member from election as 
an officer. The voting was to be strictly in pursuance of the 
new law as to proxies, which would give the country mem- 
bers, who had come to the city in force, a majority of the 
votes. The question of the appeal brought on the crisis, and 
the Chair declared Grand Lodge adjourned until next morn- 
ing, when the city representatives could not attend. But 
the Grand Lodge, on the demand of at least one-half of the 
members present, was re-convened by the Junior Grand 
Warden, reopened, proceeded to business, elected Grand 
Officers, and adopted the resolution of June, 1822, as to 
the establishment of two Grand Lodges in the State. 


ARREARAGE OF DUES. 

As instructed in June, 1822, the Grand Secretary reported, 
June 13, 1823, that he had summoned 118 Lodges that were 
in arrears for dues to Grand Lodge for three years and 
upwards; that 16 had complied with the summonses, and 
that 24 had prayed for partial or total remission of the 
amounts due ; from the remaining Lodges no reply had been 
received. Whereupon the subject was referred. 

LEGAL PROTECTION OF GRAND LODGE PROPERTY. 

The following resolution was adopted : 

“ Resolved^ That the B. W. Elias Hicks, G. S., and the B. 
W. Cornelius Bogert, G. T., of the Grand Lodge of the State 
of Hew York, in their official capacities or as individuals, be, 
and are hereby authorized, in case they shall deem the same 
necessary, to employ such solicitors or counsel for the pur- 
pose of defending any suit that may be instituted against 
them, touching the stock, mortgages, money, or other prop- 
erty now in their possession or under their control belonging 
to this Grand Lodge ; and for their indemnity against all 



378 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


damages, cost, or charges the funds of the Lodges here rep- 
resented are pledged.” 

Right Worshipful Martin Hoffman was elected Grand 
Master on June 25, 1823, and Elisha W. King, Deputy Grand 
Master, who were severally installed into office on July 7. 

FEALTY OF LODGES. 

On the succeeding day, in regular session, two resolutions 
and an order were read and confirmed, to wit : 

“ Resolved , That the R. W. Elisha W. King, the R. W. 
Richard Hatfield, the R. W. Elias Hicks, the R. W. Henry 
I. Feltus, and the W. Matthew L. Davis, be a Committee to 
draft a circular to be transmitted to the respective Lodges in 
the State of New York, detailing the causes which have led 
this Grand Lodge to declare it expedient that two Grand 
Lodges should be formed within the State, and requiring 
from said Lodges to decide and declare to whose jurisdiction 
they will in future severally belong. 

Resolved^ As the sense of this G. L., that every subordinate 
Lodge acknowledging its jurisdiction has a right to suspend 
any member of such Lodge who may treat with contempt 
the authority of this G. L. or deny its jurisdiction. 

Ordered , That the preceding resolutions be forthwith 
communicated to the respective Lodges acknowledging this 
Grand Lodge.” 

The circular above authorized was duly prepared, sub- 
mitted, approved, and a thousand copies printed for distri- 
bution among the Lodges and the several Grand Lodges. 
Among the purposes in view was to require the Lodges to 
decide to whose jurisdiction they would in future belong. 

THE CIRCULAR LETTER OF THE GRAND LODGE AS TO FEALTY. 

The Grand Lodge of the State of New York having been 
reduced to the painful necessity of dissolving its connection 
with certain of the Lodges subordinate to its jurisdiction and 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


379 


located beyond the limits of the city of New York, owes to 
the purity of the motives by which it has been influenced, to 
the individuals who are immediately affected thereby, and 
to the Masonic community at large, whose favorable opinion 
it is solicitous to deserve, an explanation of the causes which 
have gradually led to this lamentable alternative. 

Several Lodges, some of them long since removed or 
extinct, but others still operative, located in the city of New 
York, all deriving their authority, mediately or immediately, 
from the Grand Lodge of England, met in General Convoca- 
tion in 1781, and unanimously agreed to petition the Grand 
Lodge of England for a Warrant for opening and holding a 
Grand Lodge in the said city, which application was favorably 
received, and a Warrant granted “ authorizing and empower- 
ing the Free and Accepted Ancient York Masons, inhabitants 
of the province of New York, in North America, to congre- 
gate, form, and hold a Provincial Grand Lodge in the city of 
New York and province of New York, independent of any 
former Dispensation, Warrant, or Constitution,” etc. 

Under this Charter the Grand Lodge was established and 
organized on December 2, 1782, and under this Warrant 
continued to act until March, 1787, when a Committee was 
appointed to consider and report upon the propriety of hold- 
ing the Grand Lodge under said Warrant, and the proper 
measures to effect a change, if it should be thought consistent 
and expedient. What report that Committee made does not 
appear on the minutes ; but from the passage of a resolution 
at the next Quarterly Communication, directing “ the same 
Committee to draw up a form of Warrant to be granted to 
Lodges making application,” it is to be inferred that they 
reported in favor of acting independently of the Provincial 
Warrant, and that the Grand Lodge confirmed and adopted 
the report. 

Previous to this, and while acting under the authority of 
that Warrant (March 2, 1785), the Book of Constitutions 
was, by direction of the Grand Lodge, revised and published, 
whereby it was ordained, “ that the Quarterly Communica- 
tion should be held in the Grand Lodge Eoom, at the city of 



380 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


New York, on the first Wednesdays of March, June, Sep- 
tember, and December, annually, forever ; ” that every mem- 
ber of a constituted Lodge under the Grand Lodge should 
pay twelve and a half cents quarterly to the Charity Fund 
of the same, except the members of the Lodges in the city of 
New York, who should pay quarterly twenty-five cents ; that 
every person initiated should pay one dollar and twenty-five 
cents to the Charity Fund, except those initiated in Lodges 
in the city of New York, who should pay each two dollars 
and fifty cents. 

The Lodges whose Warrants are of subsequent date to the 
Book of Constitutions, must be considered as bound by its 
ordinances ; and being so bound, may it not with reason be 
contended that no right exists of altering the place of its meet- 
ings, or of passing any regulations by which the contribu- 
tions thus exacted for charitable purposes shall be wasted in 
compensation for the attendance of delegates ? etc., etc. 

Very great irregularity on the part of the Lodges out of 
the city in making their returns, and a general neglect in the 
payment of their dues, led to the appointment, from time to 
time, of Grand Visitors; an injudicious selection of which 
constantly defeated the object proposed, and was productive 
of little else than disappointment. In 1814 a new plan was 
proposed and adopted, which, though attended with better 
consequences, so far as the receipt of moneys went, was 
still deemed defective, from the compensation for collecting, 
amounting to an average of nearly fifty per cent, upon the 
moneys received. 

Confiding in the purely benevolent feelings of the country 
brethren, who had spontaneously admitted that the excess of 
want must necessarily be felt in a populous city, and promptly 
provided for its relief ; and believing that a diversion of so 
large a portion of moneys, intended for charity, from that 
sacred purpose was neither compatible with their duty as 
faithful stewards, nor consonant to the views of the contrib- 
utors to that fund, the Grand Lodge proposed, on the sugges- 
tion of its Committee, to discontinue the practice of collect- 
ing the dues through the medium of Visitors, and to have 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


381 


them transmitted by mail, or otherwise, as circumstances 
might suggest. 

It is not here intended, nor is it perhaps essential, to exam- 
ine the motives which originated the loud and active oppo- 
sition to this proposal. Such an opposition, however, arose ; 
circular letters were written and distributed; conventions 
called and resolutions passed ; and the country Lodges, 
instead of viewing it as designed to save the contributions 
made by them from waste and misapplication, were taught to 
consider it as an effort to exclude them from a rightful par- 
ticipation in the benefits of the fund. 

Under this feeling, delegates were appointed by a few 
Lodges to attend the Quarterly Communication in June, 
1819, for the purpose not only of securing to the country 
Lodges the right and the advantages of Grand Visitors, but 
also of changing and improving the system. An entire new 
plan, dividing the State into eighteen districts, with a Visitor 
in each, was laid upon the table for that purpose ; but the 
’Grand Lodge, opposed to every system of visitation that 
combined with its execution the expenditure of moneys 
expressly bestowed for charitable uses, and alarmed at the 
undue influence claimed for the country Lodges, by making 
a Grand Visitor the proxy for every Lodge not otherwise rep- 
resented within his district, rejected it as alike objectionable 
and inexpedient. The subject was not suffered to rest here, 
but revived in a formidable and imposing shape, by “ a com- 
munication from the representatives of a number of Lodges, 
met in convention at Canandaigua, on January 10, 1821,” 
which communication, though unnatural in its birth, and 
misshapen in its form, was treated by the Grand Lodge with 
all the courtesy of a regular constitutional production, sub- 
mitted to the consideration of a Committee, which Commit- 
tee reported against the proposition, and which report the 
Grand Lodge confirmed. 

Upon this last rejection, notice was given that at the next 
Quarterly Communication (June, 1821) a motion would be 
made to have the Constitution so amended as to embrace 
Brother Rose’s plan of Visitation, and also to provide for the 



382 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


payment, out of the Charity Fund, of the expenses of the 
delegates who might attend that and all future annual (June) 
Communications of the Grand Lodge. Stimulated by this 
notice, or by some portion of it, and by which portion it is 
left to be inferred by what ensued, above fifty delegates from 
the country Lodges attended that Communication ; and not- 
withstanding the said notice — notwithstanding all that had 
been urged about the importance and advantage of Grand 
Visitors, the subject, when brought up, found scarcely an 
advocate; and the motion for their abolition, by a repeal of 
the regulation under which it had been conducted, passed 
almost unanimously. The satisfaction which this coincidence 
was calculated to afford to the city Lodges was, however, 
greatly diminished by the appropriation of near $1,300 from 
the Charity Fund for the compensation of the members 
attending that Communication from the country Lodges ; 
and not only that, but the passage of a regulation providing 
for the compensation of all delegates from the country 
Lodges, who might in future attend the Quarterly Commu- 
nication in June, out of the same fund; another, destroying 
all equality of representation, by authorizing any delegate 
to represent five Lodges and five Past Masters, whereby a 
single individual might give, on any question, twenty-one 
votes; and several other regulations, all bearing the same 
unfriendly character. 

So extraordinary and undue an acquisition of power could 
not be sought without a proportionate object, and what 
that was it was not difficult to divine. The removal of the 
Grand Lodge, which had been repeatedly threatened in the 
various circulars, exciting disaffection in the country Lodges, 
and arraying them in hostility against the city, was evidently 
to be attempted whenever it should be found that the same 
could be done with certainty of success. But the hour for 
this had not yet arrived. By the Book of Constitutions, the 
meetings of the Grand Lodge were fixed to be held in the 
city of New York forever; and little as the provisions of 
that Constitution had, in some other points, been attended to, 
here they commanded respect. Upon this the city Lodges 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


383 


rested for their safety ; and it was not until the appointment 
of a Committee, consisting of six country and two city mem- 
bers, for the purpose of revising and altering the Constitu- 
tion, that they were made sensible that that object was not 
only still persevered in, but was to he effected by their 
apparent co-operation and concurrence. The opposition to 
the appointment of this Committee and of its component 
parts, on the ground of the inequality of representation of 
interests, proving unavailing, it only remained for the city 
Lodges to wait for its report, and to determine therefrom 
whether they were not mistaken in their conclusion, or 
whether the Grand Lodge was to be left undisturbed, and 
the moneys contributed for charitable uses bestowed alone 
upon charitable objects, and in that place where the calls for 
assistance were the most loud and frequent. 

The Committee met pursuant to their appointment, and 
after a long sitting repealed sundry amendments, the prom- 
inent features of which were: depriving all Past Masters 
(excepting one from each Lodge) of a seat in the Grand 
Lodge, compensating delegates of Lodges and non-resident 
Grand Officers for their attendance, allowing one proxy to 
represent five Lodges, limiting the Stewards of Charity to an 
expenditure of $1,000 per annum, etc., etc. 

From these reported amendments, as well as from the 
provision made in the resolution under which the Committee 
was appointed for their irregular adoption, it was manifest 
that the interests of the city Lodges were totally disregarded. 
The principles against which they had contended were main- 
tained in their most obnoxious form ; and the avidity with 
which every occasion was seized for invading the Charity 
Fund, intimated that possession was all that was required 
to seal its total extermination. The location of the Grand 
Lodge, to be sure, appeared to be left undisturbed ; but the 
city was not to be deceived, for the veil was too flimsy to 
cover the real intention. If the proposed amendments were 
liable to alteration, it was an easy thing to strike out New 
York, and insert any other place that six or eight delegates, 
thus armed with votes, might choose to select. 



384 y 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


Anticipating such an issue, a resolution, in conformity to 
the Constitution, had been laid upon the table in June pre- 
ceding, declaring it expedient, under existing circumstances, 
that two Grand Lodges should be formed in the State ; the 
one to be and remain located in the city of New York, and 
the other at such place, out of said city, as a majority of the 
Lodges submitting to its authority might select and resolve 
upon. But before resorting to the alternative proposed by 
that resolution, it was determined to make a last effort for 
the preservation of unity. Accordingly, after maturely con- 
sidering the rights and interests of all parties, and the weight 
and influence of the Funds in the views and wishes of the 
country delegates, the following protocol was drawn up and 
submitted : 


“New Yore:, May 20, A. L. 5823. 

Whereas , Difficulties and difference of opinion have for 
some time existed, and do now exist, between the delegates 
from the country Lodges and the delegates from the 
Lodges in the city of New York and its vicinity, touching 
the mode and manner of the government of the Grand 
Lodge of the State of New York, and also as respects the 
disposition of the Funds thereof; and whereas the dele- 
gates from the Lodges in the city of New York and its 
vicinity are firmly of the opinion that, as the Grand Lodge 
aforesaid was located in the city of New York, by patent, 
forever, there to be and remain unmoved, any attempt to 
remove the same would be a violation of the powers and 
rights vested in them ; and whereas certain alterations in the 
Constitution of the said Grand Lodge have already been 
made, and further alterations and provisions have been pro- 
posed, which, if carried into effect, would partially, if not 
altogether, destroy the original intentions therein contem- 
plated, and above all, that harmony and friendship so essen- 
tially necessary for the well-being of the Fraternity at large. 

Now, therefore, we, the delegates from the Lodges in the 
city of New York and its vicinity, with a desire of restoring 
harmony and reconciling the existing difficulties and differ- 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


385 


ences of opinion as aforesaid, do hereby agree to offer for the 
consideration off the Grand Lodge (at the ensuing June Com- 
munication) the following 

PROPOSITIONS FAVORING A REUNION. 

First To repeal the following alterations and additions 
to the Book of Constitutions, as passed on June 9, 5821, 
whereby the Grand Lodge will be placed in the situation it 
then stood, excepting that the fees for Warrants, which were 
$75, will remain at $32 ; and the lowest fees for the first 
three degrees, which were $20, will remain at $14, viz. : 

Resolved, That the 21st Rule, 20th Section, 3d Chapter, of 
the Book of Constitutions, be amended by striking out the 
words, ‘For every member of a Lodge in the city of New 
York, per quarter, twenty-five cents,’ from the 16th and 17th 
lines: the words, ‘and out of the city of New York,’ from 
the 19th line; the words, ‘For every person initiated in any 
Lodge in the city of New York, two dollars and fifty cents,’ 
from the 24th and 25th lines ; the words, ‘ out of the said 
city,’ in the 26th and 27th lines the words, ‘and twenty-five 
cents,’ from the 28th line ; and the words, ‘ and twenty-five 
cents,’ from the 33d line. 

Resoloed) That the 32d Rule, 10th Section, 3d Chapter, of 
the Book of Constitutions, be amended by striking out the 
word ‘ six,’ and inserting 6 five.’ 

Resolved^ That the 2d Rule, 10th Section, 3d Chapter, of 
the Book of Constitutions, be amended by striking out the 
word ‘ one,’ and inserting ‘ five.’ 

Resolved) That a Past Master of regular standing, and 
who by the existing rules is entitled to a seat in this Grand 
Lodge, may be represented by proxy ; provided that such 
proxy be of equal grade with the brother whom he repre- 
sents, and that no proxy represent more than five Past 
Masters. 

Resolved) That every subordinate Lodge situate out of the 
city of New York, and at least ten miles distant therefrom, 
being represented in this Grand Lodge, or the proxy repre- 
vol. ii. — 25 



386 


HISTORY OP FREEMASONRY 


senting any Lodge being a non-resident in said city, and 
coming a distance of at least ten miles, shall be entitled to 
receive one dollar and fifty cents per day, for attendance at 
the June Communication of the same, and a like compensa- 
tion for every forty miles’ travel, coming and returning, to be 
paid such representative or proxy out of the moneys received 
from such Lodge, as the annual return of dues for the year 
preceding; provided, that said compensation does not exceed 
the amount so due and paid ; and further provided, that 
no proxy receive compensation for more than one Lodge, 
although he may be the representative of five. 

Resolved, That no ordinance or regulation, affecting the 
interests or obligatory upon the Lodges out of the city of 
New York, shall be passed at any other than the Quarterly 
Communication in June of each year. 

Resolved , That no alteration or amendment of the Consti- 
tution shall be made at any other than the June Communi- 
cation ; and any such alteration or amendment, in order to 
be then considered, must have been proposed and entered on 
the minutes of the Grand Lodge, at a like previous June 
Communication, and within three months thereafter trans- 
mitted to the several Lodges of the jurisdiction ; nor shall 
any such alteration or amendment be then made, unless the 
same be approved by two-thirds of the votes present, when 
the question is taken thereon. 

Second . The Grand Lodge having been located by patent 
in the city of New York, no motion for its removal, except 
by- unanimous consent of the Lodges therein, shall ever be 
agitated. 

Third . Hereafter the Grand Lodge shall consist of a Grand 
Master, Deputy Grand Master, Senior Grand Warden, Junior 
Grand Warden, and all past officers of these grades, all pres- 
ent and past Grand Chaplains, all present and past District 
Grand Masters, and the Masters, Past Masters, and Wardens 
of all the regular Lodges in the counties of New York, 
Richmond, Kings, Queens, Suffolk, Westchester, Putnam, 
Dutchess, Ulster, Orange, Sullivan, and Rockland. 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


387 


Fourth. The residue of the State to be divided into Dis- 
tricts, not more than four, as follows (the division and the 
place of meeting of the District Grand Lodges to be settled 
by the country Lodges) : in each of which a District Grand 
Lodge shall be established by Warrant from the Grand 
Lodge, to be composed of a District Grand Master, District 
Deputy Grand Master, District Grand Wardens, etc., etc., 
and the Masters, Past Masters, and Wardens of all the regu- 
lar Lodges within the District. 

Fifth. The Lodges in that portion of the State under the 
immediate superintendence of the Grand Lodge, and those 
without the State, to make returns and pay dues as hereto- 
fore ; the Lodges within the respective Districts to make 
duplicate returns annually and payment of dues, one of the 
returns to be sent to the Grand Secretary, and the other to 
the District Grand Secretary, with an equal half of the 
amount of said returns to each, to be applied to their respec- 
tive Charity Funds. 

Sixth . The Grand Lodge shall alone have the power of 
granting Warrants, with this understanding, that no new 
Warrant shall be granted for holding a Lodge within the 
limits of any District Grand Lodge, unless accompanied by 
a recommendation from the said District Grand Lodge ; of 
passing new regulations, and of altering old ones, provided 
that such regulations as may affect the Fraternity at large, 
and be binding upon the Lodges in the several Districts, 
shall, after being proposed, be printed at the then or next 
immediate annual June Communication, and without delay 
submitted to each Lodge within the jurisdiction ; and if, at 
the next June Communication, the said regulation shall not 
appear to be objected to by a majority of the Lodges within 
the jurisdiction, the same shall then be considered as adopted, 
and become one of the regulations of the Fraternity ; of hear- 
ing appeals, where the decisions of a District Grand Lodge 
shall not be acquiesced in, and of hearing and settling differ- 
ences that may arise between a District Grand Lodge and 
any one or more of the Lodges within said District, and 
between any two or more District Grand Lodges ; and of 



388 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


exercising all those powers not specially delegated to the 
District Grand Lodges. 

Seventh . The District Grand Lodges shall meet on the 

Monday in January of every year, at which time the 

election of officers shall be held, and the returns of the sub- 
ordinate Lodges, and the payment of the dues, made. The 
main business shall be to hear and decide upon appeals from 
the decision of any Lodge within the District ; to suggest 
alterations of, or additions to, the existing particular rules of 
the Grand Lodge ; to pass all necessary regulations for its 
own government, not inconsistent with the ancient land- 
marks and the Book of Constitutions; to direct the mode 
in which the District Charity Fund shall be disbursed ; to 
grant Dispensations for conferring the first three degrees of 
Masonry at sight ; correct errors, reform abuses, superintend 
the labors, and afford the requisite instruction to the Lodges 
within its limits ; and generally to watch over the interest 
and advance the prosperity of the Craft. They may adjourn 
from day to day, until the business before them be disposed 
of, and may hold Emergent meetings, whenever the same 
shall, by the District Grand Master or his Deputy, be 
deemed necessary. 

Eighth . The District Grand Masters, being members of the 
Grand Lodge, shall each, while in office, be entitled to four 
votes, and have the right at all times to attend its meetings ; 
but it is made their particular duty so to do at the June 
Communication of every year, or, if it be inconvenient for 
them to attend in person, then to cause a written report to 
be made by the District Grand Secretary of the state of 
Masonry within such District, and such other matters as it 
may be important to the Grand Lodge, and for the benefit 
of the Craft to know. The expenses of the District Grand 
Master for every day’s attendance at the June Communica- 
tion, and for every forty miles’ traveling from his residence 
to New York and back, shall be estimated at one dollar and 
fifty cents, and be defrayed out of the Grand Lodge funds. 

Ninth. The present invested permanent fund shall be 
equally divided, one-half to remain as the fund of the Grand 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


389 


Lodge, and subject to its sole control; and the other half 
to be equally apportioned among the said District Grand 
Lodges, to constitute a separate and distinct fund for, and 
subject to the sole control of, each. 

Smith Ovutt, St. John’s, No. 1. 

J. Van Benschoten, Independent Boyal Arch, No. 2. 
James Herring, Jr., “ “ “ 

Bichard Pennell, u “ “ 

John Leonard, St. Andrew’s, No. 7. 

J. Wilkie, St. John’s, No. 9. 

B. Philips, Hiram, No. 10. 

S. Montgomery, Hiram, No. 10. 

Harris Blood, Holland, No. 16. 

B. IT. Lang, 

J. G. Finn, Trinity, No. 39. 

George Hodgson, Phoenix, No. 40. 

Patrick Mott, Morton, No. 46. 

Joseph Bouchaud, L’Union Fran§aise, No. 71. 

S. S. Birdsall, Fortitude, No. 81. 

N. Green ard, Abrams, No. 83. 

Mokdecai Myers, Washington, No. 84. 

Matthew Lr Davis, “ “ 

John P. Garniss, Adelphi, No. 91. 

W. F. Piatt, Morton, No. 108. 

George W. Hyer, Mount Moriah, No. 132. 

Henry Marsh, Benevolent, No. 142. 

J. T. Bellany, Clinton, No. 143. 

Bichard Ellis, Mechanic, No. 153. 

James Flanagan, New Jerusalem, No. 158. 

Lebbeus Chapman, Concord, No. 304. 

Henry Willet, German Union, No. 322. 

Edward Hamilton, Hibernia, No. 339. 

Matthew L. Davis, Chairman. 
Lebbeus Chapman, Secretary.” 

Beasonable as these propositions must be considered, they 
were, nevertheless, silently rejected; and from no counter 
proposition being offered, it was understood that the country 



390 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


delegates, possessing, as they supposed, the power, were bent 
and resolved upon exercising it. To remove all doubts, how- 
ever, if doubts remained with any, a caucus, composed solely 
of delegates from the country, was held on the day preced- 
ing the meeting of the Grand Lodge, for the purpose of nomi- 
nating the Grand Officers. At this meeting a list was made 
out, which, as it was well understood, excluded every person 
resident in the city ; at all events, the Grand Secretary and 
Grand Treasurer were selected from Albany and its vicinity, 
by which it was evident that the removal of the Grand Lodge 
had been previously settled. 

The Grand Lodge having, from its first organization, held 
its meetings in the evening, had, as usual, been summoned at 
7 o’clock r.M., at or near which hour the Grand Officers 
took their seats, and the same was opened. The privilege 
of the country Lodges, and no less of the Past Masters, of 
being represented by proxy, having in the exercise of it, and 
through the instrumentality of interested individuals to pro- 
mote their sinister designs, been grossly perverted and abused, 
an explanatory regulation had been passed at the Quarterly 
Communication in March, defining the manner in which 
proxies ought to be appointed, and upon a motion for the 
appointment of a Committee to examine the credentials of 
the delegates claiming seats, it was proposed to consider as 
regular such credentials only as had been made out conform- 
ably to that explanatory regulation. In the course of the 
debate which ensued upon this proposition, an appeal was 
made from the decision of the Chair upon a question of 
order, when the Grand Master decided that there should be 
no appeal from his decision ; and without the consent, and 
contrary to the wishes of, the Grand Lodge there assembled, 
declared the meeting to be adjourned until the morning of 
the following day. Viewing this measure as arbitrary in its 
bearings, and calculated to render the representatives of the 
great Masonic body subordinate to the will, and subject to 
the perpetual domination, of any individual, who, being once 
placed in the chair, might, if the principle were admitted, 
prevent by adjournment the election of a successor; and 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


391 


considering that as the Constitution prescribes (page 38) 
that “ the Grand Lodge must meet in some convenient place 
in order to elect new, or re-appoint the old officers ; and 
such election or re-appointment shall be held or made on the 
first Wednesday in June,” such election, in order to be legal, 
must at least have been opened or begun, if not closed and 
completed, at such meeting ; the following Lodges, to wit : 
St. John’s, No. 1 ; Independent Eoyal Arch, No. 2 ; St. 
Andrew’s, No. 7 ; St. John’s, No. 9; Hiram, No. 10; Holland, 
No. 16 ; Trinity, No. 39 ; Phoenix, No. 40 ; Westchester, No. 
46; Eensselaer, No. 68 ; Homer, No. 74; Fortitude, No. 81 ; 
Horizontal, No. 82; Abrams, No. 83 ; Washington, No. 84; 
Adelphi, No. 91 ; Morton, No. 108 ; Mount Moriah, No. 132 ; 
Benevolent, No. 142; Clinton, No. 143 ; Mechanics’, No. 153; 
New Jerusalem, No. 158; Concord, No. 304; German 
Union, No. 322 ; Hohenlinden, No. 338 ; Hibernia, No. 339 ; 
and Phillipstown, No. 352, after entering their solemn pro- 
test against the procedure, repaired forthwith to St. John’s 
Hall, and re-forming the Grand Lodge, resumed the business 
for which they had been assembled, and proceeded to an 
immediate election of Grand Officers, according to the char- 
ter, when the following brethren were unanimously chosen, 
viz. : 


M. W. John Wells,* Grand Master. 

E. W. Martin Hoffman, Deputy Grand Master. 

“ Eichard Hatfield, Senior Grand Warden. 

“ Matson Smith, Junior Grand Warden. 

“ Elias Hicks, Grand Secretary. 

“ Cornelius Bogert, Grand Treasurer. 

“ and Rev. Henry I. Feltus, ) Q d Chat > lains 
“ “ Evan M. Johnston, \ toand Cha P lains - 


The resolutions laid upon the table in June last were then 
called up and, without a dissenting voice, it was 

* Most Worshipful John Wells having refused to accept, the Most 
Worshipful Martin Hoffman was subsequently elected Grand Master, and 
the Right Worshipful Elisha W. King, Deputy Grand Master. 



392 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


“ Resolved , , That it is expedient that two Grand Lodges be 
formed in the State of New York, viz. : the one already 
located in the city of New York, and the other to be located 
in such town or place out of the said city as a majority of 
the Lodges out of the said city, and consenting to form a 
component part of the same, may designate. 

Resolved , That the Lodges in good standing out of the 
city be permitted to select the Grand Lodge under whose 
jurisdiction they will hail.” 

Upon a review of the preceding statement of facts, the 
inquiry will naturally suggest itself, What were the objects 
contemplated by the measure adverted to, and what has 
resulted therefrom ? 

The system of visitations was expected to produce regu- 
larity in the form of making returns, punctuality in their 
discharge, and uniformity in labor. In the first particular, 
little improvement has resulted; the Lodges, instead of 
making out annual returns, still combining one year with 
another, and the two remote districts (viz., second and third) 
each using a totally different form. In the second, a larger 
amount has been received than heretofore, but attended with 
an expense that seemed to render its continuance unjustifi- 
able; the average amount of compensation being nearly 
fifty per cent, on the moneys received, and that taken by the 
Grand Visitor of the Second District for the last year of his 
service, to nearly seventy-five per cent, of the moneys col- 
lected by him individually. In the third, so great was the 
neglect of performance, or so imperfect and unsatisfactory 
the lecturing, that the motion for the abolition of the sys- 
tem scarcely found an opponent. 

In vain shall we look for more happy consequences from 
the annual assembly of the delegates. What might not 
have been expected from the united wisdom of the Masonic 
family, drawn from all parts of the jurisdiction and collected 
in one body, had that body been actuated by brotherly love 
and the sole desire of contributing mutually to support the 
dignity and advance the prosperity of the Craft? Yet what 



IN THE STATE OP NEW YORK. 


393 


measure has been proposed, what plan suggested, what reso- 
lution adopted that had this most desirable end for its 
object? None. On the contrary, acrimonious feelings have 
been indulged, bitter resentments cherished, and sectional 
divisions created that have set at variance our hitherto 
united and happy family, and left us no alternative but 
separation. 

Appealing to the Searcher of hearts, the great Architect 
of the Universe for the purity and disinterestedness of the 
motives which have guided it to the course now taken, the 
Grand Lodge submits to the various subordinate Lodges to 
consider and decide to whose jurisdiction they will hereafter 
belong ; claiming from each and every one an unequivocal 
expression of their adhesion or withdrawal on or before the 
Quarterly Communication in March next ; offering to those 
who can still feel the weight of an obligation and respect 
for that Constitution which they have vowed to maintain ; 
who love Masonry, not for the advantage which they may 
personally draw from it, but for the means which it affords 
of lightening the burthen of human misery, their frank coun- 
sels, their protecting arm, and their ardent affection. 

Maktin Hoffman, Grand Master. 

Elisha W. Kino, Deputy Grand Master. 

Kiohasd Hatfield, Senior Grand Warden. 

Matson Smith, Junior Grand Warden. 

Elias Hicks, Grand Secretary. 

The consideration of this subject was resumed the follow- 
ing year, which see. 

The Grand Secretary was ordered to procure a new set of 

JEWELS, HANGINGS, AND APKONS 

for the Grand Officers. 

1824. 

The Committee having the subject of arrears of dues in 
charge, reported that there was some reason why the indul- 
gence of the Grand Lodge should be exercised in relation 



394 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


thereto ; that some Lodges may have transmitted their dues 
by delegates or proxies, who, from the existing state of things 
last June, may have felt themselves authorized to withhold 
payment for the time being. The Committee recommended 
that no decisive measures be adopted at present. 

The following Memorial of Delegates from the Lodges 
and other Masonic Bodies in the city of New York, praying 
the Grand Lodge to unite in the building of a 

GRAND MASONIC HALL, 

was received and read, and referred to the Eight Worshipful 
Elisha W. King, Kichard Hatfield, Elias Hicks, Worshipful 
Brothers Lebbeus Chapman, Henry Marsh, John Leonard, 
and Lewis Seymour : 

“ To the H. IF., the Grand Officers and Members of the Grand 
Lodge of the State of New York : 

The undersigned delegates from the Lodges and Masonic 
Bodies from which they respectively hail, appointed by the 
same a Committee to confer on the expediency and practica- 
bility of building a Grand Masonic Hall in the city of New 
York, suitable for the accommodation of the Grand Lodge, 
the subordinate Lodges, and other Masonic bodies affiliated 
therein, having met pursuant to notice, on Saturday evening, 
the 21st inst., and again, by adjournment, this evening, and 
decided that such a measure was both expedient and practi- 
cable ; and having heard read a report from a sub-committee 
of the said meeting suggesting a plan, which has for its 
foundation the purchase by the Grand Lodge of the ground 
or site upon which to erect such building, upon an engage- 
ment being entered into, by the trustees of the said building, 
to pay to the Grand Lodge, or its agent, seven per cent, per 
annum for all the moneys so by them expended in the said 
purchase, do hereby unite in respectfully recommending to 
and entreating the Grand Lodge to give to the said subject 
a deliberate and serious consideration ; and if it shall not be 
considered as infringing the rights of any of its branches, or 



IN THE STATE OP NEW YORK. 


395 


impairing the security which the present investment of the 
funds now affords, that they will direct, authorize, and 
empower the Grand Secretary and the Grand Treasurer, by 
and with the advice of the Grand Master, Deputy Grand 
Master, and Grand Wardens, by a sale and transfer of the 
whole or part of the property by them jointly held as trus- 
tees for the Grand Lodge, to become the purchasers of a lot 
suitable for that purpose, or otherwise, that Eight Worship- 
ful Body will adopt such proper necessary measures as in 
your wisdom may be conceived better calculated to advance 
and secure the attainment of an object to the Craft so hon- 
orable and praiseworthy, to the Fraternity in the city so 
useful and indispensable, and to the city itself an ornament 
and convenience. 

New York, February 28, 1824.” 

This Memorial was signed by thirty-two representative 
symbolic Masons, and the representatives of three Eoyal 
Arch Chapters and two Commanderies of the Order of the 
Temple. 

The Committee to whom was referred the Memorial as to 
building a Free Masons’ Hall, composed of the Deputy Grand 
Master, Elisha W. King, and other Grand Officers, reported 
favorably on March 25, and concurred in deeming the project 
expedient and practicable. That the permanent fund might 
with safety and propriety be invested with less liability to 
fluctuation in the income. The Committee disapproved of 
the proposition of retaining the power to redeem the stock 
at pleasure, that any doubt of the yielding at least six per 
cent, was imaginary, and that there was a possibility of a 
yield of ten or twenty per cent., which should be shared by 
those who consent to take the stock. The plan proposed was 
to raise by subscription the sum of fifty thousand dollars ; that 
from subordinate Lodges, individual brethren, or others, the 
sum of forty -five thousand dollars. This was to be done by 
two thousand eight hundred shares of twenty-five dollars 
each. The interest to be paid half-yearly, as the rents, issues, 
and profits of the said Hall will permit, after deducting six 



396 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


per cent, oil the amount invested by the Grand Lodge for 
the purchase of the lot, and the amount necessary to meet 
taxes, repairs, insurance, etc. The site to be selected by the 
Grand Officers and paid for by the Grand Lodge ; and, upon 
the completion of the Hall, the Grand Secretary and Grand 
Treasurer shall execute the necessary deed and instruments for 
vesting the right and title in fee to the said ground and build- 
ing in the trustees of the said Hall. A bond and mortgage 
in return to be executed for the sum that may be expended 
in the purchase of the same, bearing an interest, to be paid 
semi-annually, at the rate of six per centum per annum. 

The recommendations of the Committee were approved, 
and so rapidly did matters progress, that on St. John’s Day, 
in 1826, the Grand Master, Grand Officers, and others pro- 
ceeded in line to the site of the proposed Free Masons’ Hall 
in Broadway, where the Grand Master, Elisha W. King, 
assisted by the Deputy Grand Master, Richard Hatfield, and 
the Senior and Junior Wardens, performed the ceremony, 
agreeably to ancient custom, of laying the foundation stone. 

On April 14, 1827, a Committee on rent of new Masonic 
Hall reported as follows : 

That they had been “ appointed by the Grand Stewards’ 
Lodge on the subject of procuring a suitable room for the 
meetings of the Grand Lodge and Grand Stewards’ Lodge 
for the ensuing year, and that they recommend the hiring 
of the Lodge Room in the Masonic Hall in Broadway, at the 
yearly rent of one hundred dollars, that is to say, for the 
four Quarterly Communications, and that twenty-five dollars 
be paid for each extra meeting. 

Your Committee also recommend that the Grand Stewards’ 
Lodge meet the following year in St. John’s Hall, and also 
that the Committee of Charity meet at St. John’s Hall, and 
that one hundred dollars be paid therefor.” 

An election for officers of the Grand Lodge being held on 
June 2, 1824, resulted in the re-election of Martin Hoffman 
as Grand Master and of all other officers. 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


397 


VARIOUS MATTERS PERTAINING TO ONE GRAND LODGE CONSIDERED. 

The Committee appointed to report what course the 
Grand Lodge should adopt as to subordinate Lodges select- 
ing under what Grand Lodge Jurisdiction — the city or the 
country — they will hail, favored the granting of more time. 
That the Grand Officers of the country Grand Lodge, not 
having, conformably to the Book of Constitutions, held 
Quarterly Communications, etc., may be considered as having 
relinquished the pretensions to the control and management 
of the Fraternity, by them heretofore assumed, therefore, 

“ Resolved , That the Lodges within this Jurisdiction be, 
and they are hereby, allowed until the Quarterly Communi- 
cation, which shall be in June, 1825, to make returns and 
payment of dues conformably to the rules on that subject 
prescribed in the Book of Constitutions. 55 

This course was pursued and the resolution adopted. 

The following resolutions were also adopted, which affected 
the standing rules of the Grand Body : 

COMPENSATION FOR ATTENDANCE. 

“ Resolved, That the following rules be, and they are 
hereby, repealed, viz. : 

That every subordinate Lodge situate out of the city of 
New York, and at least ten miles distant therefrom, being 
represented in this Grand Lodge, or the proxy representing 
any Lodge, being a non-resident in said city, and coming a 
distance of at least ten miles, shall be entitled to receive 
$1.50 per day for attendance at the June Communication 
of the same, and a like compensation for every forty miles 5 
travel, coming and returning, to be paid such representative 
or proxy out of the moneys received from such Lodge, as the 
annual return of dues for the year preceding ; provided that 
said compensation does not exceed the amount so due and 
paid ; and further provided that no proxy receive compensa- 



398 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


tion for more than one Lodge, although he may be the rep- 
resentative of five. 

CONSTITUTION HOW AMENDED. 

That no ordinance or regulation affecting the interests of, 
or obligatory upon, the Lodges out of the city of New York, 
shall be passed at any other than the Quarterly Communica- 
tion in June of each year. 

That no alteration or amendment of the Constitution shall 
be made at any other than the June Communication; and 
any such alteration or amendment, in order to be then con- 
sidered, must have been proposed and entered on the minutes 
of the Grand Lodge at a like previous June Communication, 
and within three months thereafter transmitted to the sev- 
eral Lodges of the Jurisdiction ; nor shall any such alteration 
or amendment be then made, unless the same be approved 
by two-thirds of the votes present when the question is taken 
thereon.” 

The following regulation was then adopted as one of the 
particular rules of this Grand Lodge, viz. : 

“ All alterations or amendments of the Constitution affect- 
ing the interests or obligatory upon the Lodges out of the 
city, shall, after being proposed, be printed at the then or 
next immediate June Communication, and without delay 
submitted to each Lodge in good standing within the Juris- 
diction ; and if at the next June Communication the said 
regulation shall not appear to be objected to by a majority 
of the Lodges within the Jurisdiction to whom the same has 
been submitted, it 6hall then be considered as adopted, and 
become part of the Regulations of this Grand Lodge.” 

DUES. SALARY OF GRAND SECRETARY. PROXIES. 

It was then further 

“ Resolved , That the 4th Rule be so altered as that the 
dues of the members of Lodges in the city shall hereafter be 
twenty-five cents per quarter, and the contribution from the 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


399 


city Lodges to the Charity Fund for candidates for initiation 
twenty dollars. 

Resolved, That the Grand Secretary, as an equivalent for the 
perquisites of his office, which are now paid into the Charity 
Fund, shall hereafter receive $350, which, added to his salary 
of $250, will make his gross compensation $600 per annum. 

Resolved , That the 2d Rule be amended by striking out 
the words ‘ but no person shall be admitted as proxy for 
more than five Lodges,’ and inserting ' but no person shall 
be allowed to vote as proxy for more than one Lodge.’ ” 

GRAND LODGE OF HAYTI. 

A Committee reported September 1, 1824, that, inasmuch 
as Hayti was now assuming an independent position in the 
political world, a brotherly Communication should be opened 
with the Grand Lodge established there. 

A Warrant for a Lodge was authorized to issue to Robert 
Irwin and others, to be located in the town of Green Bay, 
Brown County, in the Territory of Michigan, to be known 
by the name of Menomania Lodge ; it having been recom- 
mended by Zion Lodge, No. 3. 

Fraternal Lodge, No. 107, chartered in 1804, under the name 
of Albion Lodge, and which had changed its name, by permis- 
sion of the Grand Lodge, when the war between Great Brit- 
ain and America was proclaimed — was by further permission 
allowed to resume its original name of Albion Lodge, No. 107. 

THE RECEPTION OF BROTHER MARQUIS DE LAFAYETTE. 

It was 

“ Resolved, That a Committee be appointed to wait upon 
Brother Lafayette immediately on his return from Boston, 
and tender him, on behalf of this Grand Lodge, its congrat- 
ulations on his safe arrival, and to invite him to honor the 
Craft by partaking of a public dinner.” 

A Grand Lodge of Emergency was convened September 
20, 1824. All the Grand Officers present, and the officers 



400 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


and Past Masters of thirty-six Lodges. Brethren generally 
were permitted to the floor of the Grand Lodge. 

The Most Worshipful Grand Master announced that the 
Grand Lodge had assembled to welcome Brother Lafayette, 
who had kindly accepted their invitation to partake of a pub- 
lic dinner. 

The Bight Worshipful Mordecai Myers, Grand Marshal 
and Chairman of the Committee of Arrangements, reported 
that over five hundred seats for the dinner had been disposed 
of among the brethren, the receipts from which, together 
with the liberal contributions received by the Committee, 
had enabled them to anticipate all necessary requirements 
and expenses of the occasion. 

Brother Lafayette being announced in waiting, was 
escorted into the presence of the Grand Lodge, the brethren 
unanimously manifesting the most intense enthusiasm by 
plaudits of heartfelt welcome. After a partial abatement 
thereof, and the reception by the Most Worshipful Grand 
Master, Martin Hoffman, Brother Lafayette, the nation’s 
guest, was introduced to the assembled brethren, when a 
renewal of the deep and sincere appreciation of the Craft 
was most heartily expressed. After the warm and fervent 
congratulations and greetings, the Grand Lodge was formed 
in procession, and accompanied by their honored guest, the 
members of the subordinate Lodges and visiting brethren, 
proceeded to Washington Hall, where a sumptuous repast 
had been prepared, and the festivities continued until nearly 
low twelve . 

On the following December, one thousand dollars was 
authorized to be contributed by the Grand Lodge for the 
purpose of 

ERECTING A MONUMENT AT THE GRAVE OF GEORGE WASHINGTON, 
AT MOUNT VERNON, 

whenever the sum of ten thousand dollars should be appro- 
priated in unison with this object, by the other Grand Lodges 1 
of the United States. 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


401 


Fireman’s Lodge, No. 368, petitioned for a change of name 
to that of New York Lodge, in consequence of a very incon- 
siderable number of firemen making application for initiation, 
contrary to the expectation of the originators. 

1825. 

CREATION OF A MASONIC LIBRARY DENOUNCED. 

At the instance of Silentia Lodge, No. 360, the subject of 
the formation of a Masonic Library was referred to the 
Grand Officers, in April, 1825. 

The communication is worthy of preserving, and was as 
follows : 

“To the Most Worshipful Grand Master and others : 

Agreeably to a motion made by Brother Elias Wolf, and 
seconded by W. Past Master Hampton Dunham, of Silentia 
Lodge, No. 360, it was 

‘ Resolved , That a Committee be appointed to recommend 
to the notice of the Grand Lodge of the State of New 
York, the propriety and importance of forming a Masonic 
Library.’ 

We, the Committee nominated and appointed for this 
purpose, beg leave to address your Honorable Body on this 
subject. 

On the other side of the Atlantic, many Lodges devote a 
part of their revenue to the purchase of books concerning 
Freemasonry ; and the circulation of these works contributes 
to spread instruction among the brethren, to make them 
acquainted with the origin, history, and tendency of our 
Order, to give them information of the Lodges in various 
parts of the globe, and, by promoting light and knowledge 
among the Fraternity, excites a greater interest for further 
inquiry, and a livelier attachment to the great chain of 
which they are members. 

Masons who travel in their own or foreign countries, may, 
vol. n. — 26 



402 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


from such a source, derive still other advantages. They 
may, by the aid of it, before they set out, without trouble or 
expense, make themselves acquainted with the situation of 
their brethren in those parts they intend to visit. 

Believing that the same advantages would necessarily 
result from such an establishment in our city, and as we feel 
sensibly the want of it, we deem it superfluous to enlarge 
on the eminent usefulness we expect from this contemplated 
establishment, in addressing a Body who, deriving their light 
from the pure source of the East, are the better qualified to 
form a correct opinion of this matter, and give the object a 
better direction to accomplish the views of this Committee. 

We therefore add only the following, to give a short 
explanation of our ideas of this subject : 

That a Masonic Library should be established in this city, 
under the care and direction of this Grand Lodge, for the use 
of every member of the Masonic family. 

That the Lodges be respectfully, and the brethren gener- 
ally, invited to contribute, either in books illustrative of 
Masonic science, or money, for this purpose, by which means 
we hope to save from destruction many valuable Masonic 
works and documents that now lie in the hands of individ- 
uals, almost useless to the Craft, and may ultimately be 
destroyed, from not having a repository for their preser- 
vation. 

By realizing the above proposition, we hope and expect to 
see the increased diffusion of Masonic information, and an 
enlightened Fraternity, whose science of the Order will not 
be inferior to that of any other country. 

In submitting a subject which we deem to be of so much 
importance, and which may be realized (as we think) with 
comparatively small expense, to your mature and deliberate 
consideration, we indulge an expectation that we shall soon 
be so happy as to see the great desideratum supplied. 

Hampton Dunham, 
Henry Batterman, 
Elias Wolf. 


Hew York, April 6, A. L. 5825.” 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


403 


This was referred to the Grand Officers, who disposed of 
the matter as follows : 

“The Grand Officers, having given the proposition emanat- 
ing from Silentia Lodge, N o. 360, relating to the formation 
of a Masonic Library, the consideration due to the importance 
of the subject, are of the opinion that, if the object of the 
proposition is the collection and preservation of rare and val- 
uable works, connected with, or relating to, the arts and 
sciences generally, the necessity of the measure is superseded 
by the numerous public, as well as private and professional, 
libraries, which already abound in this extensive and grow- 
ing city, and to which every member of the Fraternity, in 
common with others, may obtain access; or, otherwise, if 
thereby is contemplated the collection of the histories, tracts, 
charts, monitors, illustrations, or by whatever name may be 
distinguished the various developments of the Masonic mys- 
teries, and consequent violation of Masonic obligations, the 
Grand Officers are of opinion, that, so far from contributing 
in any shape to their preservation, the Masonic body ought 
to unite to a man in discountenancing their use as destructive 
of that simplicity and uniformity which make Freemasonry 
* the same, meet it in whatever part of the globe you may. 
Under these impressions, the Grand Officers are constrained 
to express dissent from the plan proposed, and to recommend 
that it be discharged from further consideration. 

Martin Hoffman, 

E. M. King, 

Elias Hicks, 

Richard Hatfield, 
Cornelius Bogert. 

Hew York, June 3, A. L. 5825.” 

The selection of Grand Officers, held June 1, 1825, resulted 
in the re-election of the Grand Master, Martin Hoffman ; 
Right Worshipful Elisha W. King, declining re-election as 
Deputy, was succeeded by Richard Hatfield ; Rev. Henry I. 
Feltus was chosen Senior Grand Warden; Matson Smith, 



404 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


Junior Grand Warden; George W. Hyer, Grand Treasurer, 
over his opponent, Cornelius Bogert; Elias Hicks, Grand 
Secretary ; the Reverend Brothers, James G. Ogilvie, F. C. 
Schaeffer, Archibald McClay, and J. M. Wainwright, Grand 
Chaplains ; Joseph Jacobs, Grand Pursuivant ; Robert 
Young, Grand Tyler; Gerrit Lansing, Assistant Grand Pur- 
suivant. 

MOST WORSHIPFUL MARTIN HOFFMAN, ORAND MASTER, 

was one of the most ardent Masons in his day, devoted to 
the interests of the Fraternity, and deeply imbued with the 
principles of humanity taught within its walls. He was 
Grand Treasurer during three terms of Robert R. Livingston 
as Grand Master, to wit, 1795, *96, *97 ; Junior Grand Warden 
in 1798, and Senior Grand Warden in 1799 and 1800, under 
the same Grand Master; and then at an election in 1804 
he became Deputy Grand Master, and was successively 
ohosen to that office for sixteen terms, i.e., until 1820, and 
was elected Grand Master for the years 1823, *24, *25 ; or, as 
the story may be more briefly stated, he served the Grand 
Lodge in various capacities as a Grand Elective Officer for a 
quarter of a century. 

On a petition from Brother Samuel. H. Rogers and others 
for the establishment of a Lodge to be known as Hoffman 
Lodge, a Dispensation was granted January 25, 1825, and a 
Warrant was ordered March 2d following. In course of 
time the Lodge became poverty stricken, and its number was 
surrendered to Oswegatchie Lodge, Gouverneur, St. Law- 
rence County. 

MOST WORSHIPFUL ELISHA W. KINO, ORAND MASTER. 

On June 7, 1826, the Most Worshipful Martin Hoffman, 
declining a re-election to the position of Grand Master, 
Brother Elisha W. King was duly elected and installed 
under most flattering circumstances. Brother King had 
been Deputy Grand Master under Martin Hoffman during 
the years 1823 and 1824; it was, therefore, with much 



IN THE STATE OP NEW YORK* 


405 


earnestness he presented to the retiring Grand Master a series 
of handsomely engrossed resolutions in acknowledgment of 
his long and appreciated active services in the Grand Lodge. 

Most Worshipful Grand Master King had the gratification 
of receiving, in behalf of the Grand Lodge, an exquisite vol- 
ume containing the memoir on the New York Canals, and 
the account of the ceremonies attending the celebration of 
the opening of the canal by Eight Worshipful Cadwallader 
D. Colden, who had been Senior Grand Warden for fifteen 
years. 

Brother King had become somewhat familiar with the 
duties of Grand Master, he having served for two terms as 
Deputy Grand Master. He was a counselor at law in the 
city of New York, and a Past Master of Abrams Lodge, 
No. 83. 

It was mainly under the supervision and the trustworthy 
force of Most Worshipful Martin Hoffman, Grand Master, 
Eight Worshipful Elisha W. King, Deputy Grand Master, 
and others, that a subscription book was directed to be 
opened on March 25, 1824, for the purpose of raising from 
such subordinate Lodges, individual brethren, or other per- 
sons as might be disposed to subscribe to the same, the sum 
of forty-five thousand dollars, to be exclusively appropriated 
to the erection of a Free Masons’ Hall in the city of New 
York. This scheme was approved and adopted by the Grand 
Lodge, but like many another soon slept among hopes and 
postponements. 

On June 1, 1825, a letter was read from Brother Elisha 
W. King, declining a re-election as Deputy ; and in the suc- 
ceeding year he was placed in the Grand Master’s chair. 

the “ quakek” affirmation. 

What may be conceded as the commencement of the now 
much wrought process of “ Eeport of Committee on Foreign 
Correspondence” in the Grand Lodge of New York, may 
be dated December 7, 1825, wherein five of the principal 
Grand Officers reported upon Communications received from 



406 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


foreign Grand Lodges. The first topic discussed was the 
power of conferring degrees by affirmation, in lieu of by 
the solemn oath , as favorably decided upon by the Grand 
Lodge of Maine, but dissented to by Pennsylvania, and in 
which the Grand Lodge of New York agrees. 

TERRITORIAL JURISDICTION. 

And again, there was discussed the universally admitted 
principle, not to grant Warrants, and ex-more , not to exercise 
jurisdiction within a country or territory wherein any other 
Grand Lodge is established. This subject came up, in re 
the Lodge La Mejor Union, No. 365. A Communication 
had been received from the Grand Lodge of the Republic of 
Colombia, giving information of its establishment and regu- 
lar formation. Should the Grand Lodge of New York 
acknowledge its independence and enter into correspondence 
with it, the question would be raised as to the propriety of 
allowing La Mejor Union Lodge, No. 365, which had been 
warranted by the Grand Lodge of New York, December 27, 
1823, authorizing Mario Radonieck, Master, and others, to 
hold a Lodge in the city of Panama, Republic of Colombia, 
to continue its allegiance to New York, or to transfer its 
allegiance to the Republic of Colombia. 

The Grand Officers commended the purely Masonic con- 
duct pursued by the brethren of La Mejor Union Lodge, in 
refusing to shake off their allegiance to the Grand Lodge of 
New York without first obtaining its approbation and con- 
currence, a circumstance which the Grand Officers took 
peculiar pleasure in noticing, and which it was thought 
ought of itself to entitle them to every courtesy, not incom- 
patible with the true interests of the Craft, that this Grand 
Lodge had it in its power to show. 

1826. 

Martin Hoffman having declined re-election as Grand 
Master, on June 7, 1826, Elisha W. King was elected to such 
position, and the remaining officers were re-elected, and 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


407 


installed on St. John’s Day following, by Most Worshipful 
Martin Hoffman, who in return was presented by the Grand 
Master, in behalf of the brethren, with a handsomely 
engrossed series of resolutions in acknowledgment of his 
appreciated active services. 

Elias Hicks having resigned his office of Grand Secretary, 
the Grand Master, by Communication dated December 1, 
1826, appointed Oliver M. Lowndes to fill the vacancy. 

CERTIFICATE OF MEMBERSHIP, 

The Grand Officers were requested to prepare for adoption 
an economical and uniform Certificate of membership for 
the brethren, under the jurisdiction of this Grand Lodge. 

The language was agreed upon by the Grand Officers, and 
the entire form was submitted March 7, 1827. This was 
adopted and ordered printed on parchment of a small and 
convenient size. 

The following resolutions were also adopted : 

“ Resolved , That from and after the first day of April next, 
no person who shall hail from any Lodge under the jurisdic- 
tion of this Grand Lodge shall be examined for admission 
as a visitor in any of the Lodges under the said jurisdiction 
unless he shall produce such certificate. 

Resolved^ That every Mason receiving such certificate 
shall be entitled to have his name enrolled in the register 
of the Grand Lodge. 

Resolved , That the price of such certificate shall be 
seventy-five cents. 

Resolved^ That the Committee of Charity shall be author- 
ized to direct the Grand Secretary to issue certificates gra- 
tuitously to such as they may deem unable to pay for the 
same.” 

MASONIC PROCESSIONS PROSCRIBED. 

On the same date it was 

“Resolved) As the sense of this Grand Lodge that the 
frequency of Masonic processions in this city is highly preju- 



±08 


HISTORY OP FREEMASONRY 


dicial to the interests and respectability of the Order, and 
ought to be prohibited. 

Resolved , That it be respectfully recommended to the M. 
W. Grand Master not to grant Dispensations for processions, 
only upon very extraordinary occasions, such as may render 
such procession necessary.” 

THE REUNION OF THE CITY AND THE COUNTRY GRAND LODGES. 

On a representation, made in 1825, by the Worshipful 
Brother Henry Marsh, that Ezra S. Cozier, L. Howard, 
Joseph Cuyler, Joseph 0. Cole, and P. Adams had been 
appointed by the country Masons a Committee to confer 
with any Committee* that this Grand Lodge may appoint, 
upon the means to be adopted for terminating the existing 
division and misunderstanding, it was, on motion, 

“Resolved, That a Committee be appointed to meet the 
Committee of the country Masons, and to receive from them 
in writing such propositions as they may see fit to make on 
the said subject, and to report the result of the conference to 
this Grand Lodge.” 

This was on June 1, 1825, and Brothers Matthew L. Davis, 
Henry Marsh, Mordecai Myers, Oliver M. Lowndes, and John 
Ditchett were appointed. 

This Committee reported on June 8, that their Chairman, 
Worshipful Brother Davis, had received the following propo- 
sition : 

“ We, the Committee appointed by the Eight Worshipful 
Grand Lodge of the State of Hew York to confer with the 
Lodges in the city of Hew York, propose the following prop- 
osition for their consideration, as being in their opinion the 
best mode of settling the unhappy difference existing in the 
great Masonic Family in this State : 

To divide the State in two distinct Grand Lodges, the 
jurisdiction of the first to consist of the counties of Long 
Island, the county of Eichmond, the city and county of 
Hew York, and the county of Westchester, to be called the 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


409 


Southern Grand Lodge of the State of New York. The 
jurisdiction of the other to consist of the residue of this 
State, and to be called the Northern Grand Lodge of the 
State of New York. 

If the above proposition is agreed to, in that case the funds 
to be equitably divided between the two Grand Lodges, 
agreeably to the sums paid by each subordinate Lodge into 
the Treasury of the Grand Lodge. 

E. S. Cozier, Chairman. 

New York, June 3, 5825.” 

To which the Committee had replied, in acknowledging 
its receipt : 

“That, pursuant to the tenor of their instructions, they 
should report the same to the Grand Lodge ; but that, in the 
interim, they considered it their duty to remark for them- 
selves, that they never, in the event of a division, could 
consent to a jurisdiction more limited than the county of 
Albany, and that part of the State which lies south of the 
said county.” 

The papers were ordered to lie upon the table, and the 
functions of the Committee to continue in force. 

In due course the subject came up again, and, finally, a 
Committee was appointed, with power to receive and discuss 
any proposition for restoring the harmony of the Masonic 
Body in this State, and to confer with any of that Body 
relating thereto, and to devise and provisionally agree on a 
plan for that purpose, subject to the ratification of the Grand 
Lodge. A report was made on June 7, 1827, at Tammany 
Hall, to wit : 

1827. 

“ The Committee appointed on the 23d ultimo, in relation 
to the restoration of harmony in the Masonic Body in this 
State, respectfully report, that in the execution of their 
duties they have had communication with brethren of that 
Body, as a Committee in relation to the same object, on 
behalf of those usually designated as the country Masons. 



410 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


In the intercourse with them, your Committee have consid- 
ered themselves as authorized rather to regard the manner in 
which the general interests of the Masonic Order, especially 
in this, State, were to be affected by their proceedings, than 
by any local or partial principles, and are most happy to 
state that the course adopted by the Committee of the breth- 
ren from the country, bears the fullest testimony that they 
have been actuated by the same considerations. 

Under the influence of this principle the two Committees 
have united in a free and frank communication of their 
respective views, and in a result produced rather by their 
unanimous assent to the propriety of their mutual suggestion 
as necessary to the unity and prosperity of the Order, than 
by any views of concession or accommodation to inferior 
considerations. 

This result your Committee have the favor to report to 
this Most Worshipful Grand Lodge in the substance of the 
propositions unanimously adopted by the brethren who have 
met, consisting of the Brethren John O. Cole, Freeman B. 
Hicks, Daniel Sherwood, George C. Herman, and E. Mack, 
and the members of your Committee who have signed this 
report, who regret that they have been partially deprived of 
the assistance of the W. Bro. Scoville, in consequence of his 
official engagements. 

THE PROPOSITIONS AGREED ON 

are as follows, viz. : 

That there ought to be but one Grand Lodge in the State 
of New York, and that it ought to be held in the city of 
New York, and be considered as a continuation of the old 
Grand Lodge. That all allusion to former differences shall 
be avoided as far as possible. 

That the proceedings of the bodies known by the name of 
the Grand Lodge shall be confirmed, and that the Warrants 
granted to subordinate Lodges by the two bodies, and the 
proceedings of the said bodies shall be deemed regular. 

That the records and archives of the Grand Lodge being 



IN THE STATE OP NEW YORK. 


411 


in the city of New York, the Grand Secretary shall be chosen 
from the city. 

That the Grand Master or Deputy Grand Master shall be 
chosen from the city of New York, the other from the 
country, the two Wardens from the country, the Grand Sec- 
retary and Grand Treasurer from the city. 

That the permanent Fund be managed by five Trustees, 
viz. : The Grand Master, the Deputy Grand Master, the two 
Wardens, and the Grand Secretary, whose duty it shall be to 
invest all funds over $3,000 agreeably to the resolution pre- 
sented to this Committee. 

That for the present session the representatives of Lodges 
shall be entitled to all the rights and privileges to which they 
are at present ; but that it be recommended for the future, 
that the number of Lodges which one Master or Past Master 
may represent shall not exceed three, and that Past Masters 
shall not be represented by proxy, and that representatives 
be paid as heretofore. 

That a Committee ought to be appointed to revise the 
Constitution, 

Your Committee report their opinion that it is advisable 
that the Grand Lodge adopt the above propositions. 

John W. Mulligan, 

M. Myers, 

H. Marsh, 

J. Sprague. 

New York, June 6, 1827.” 

It was 

“ Resolved, That the foregoing propositions recommended 
by the Committee be, and are hereby, ratified and con- 
firmed.” 

The Grand Lodge then proceeded with the annual election 
of officers under the Union. 

On June 7, 1827, the Most Worshipful Elisha W. King, of 
the city of New York, for the interest of harmony, and as 
an evidence of good faith toward the country, declined a 



112 HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 

renomination, and made the personal nomination of the Hon. 
Stephen Yan Rensselaer, of Albany, who was thereupon 
unanimously elected Grand Master of Masons in the State 
of New York. 

Then the election proceeded as follows : 

Richard Hatfield, of New York City, D. G. Master. 

Ezra S. Cozier, of Utica, S. G. Warden. 

Welcome Esleeck, of Albany, J. G. Warden. 

Oliver M. Lowndes, of New York City, G. Secretary. 
George W. Hyer, of New York City, G. Treasurer. 

Rev. J. M. Wainwright, D.D., of N. Y. City, G. Chaplain. 
Rev. John Reed, of Poughkeepsie, G. Chaplain. 

Joseph Jacobs, G. Pursuivant. 

Gerrit Lansing, Asst. G. Pursuivant. 

Robert Young, G. Tyler. 

The usual honors were given, and a Committee, consisting 
of Most Worshipful Elisha W. King, Right Worshipful John 
W. Mulligan, and Right Worshipful Elisha Gilbert, were 
appointed to communicate to the Most Worshipful Stephen 
Yan Rensselaer the fact of his unanimous election to the 
office of Grand Master, and request his acceptance thereof. 

The Grand Lodge then adjourned until 10 a.m., Friday, 
June 8, 1827. 


1823. 

THE COUNTRY GRAND LODGE. 

The fraction of the former Grand Lodge which received 
the name of “The Country Grand Lodge,” met in the Grand 
Lodge room at the City Hotel, June 3, 1823, to hold a Quar- 
terly Communication. 

There were present, as officers : 

R. W. John Brush, Deputy Grand Master, in the chair. 

“ John Greig, Senior Grand Warden. 

“ Elisha Gilbert, Junior Grand Warden, p. t. 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


413 


R. W. Elias Hicks, Grand Secretary. 

“ Cornelius Bogert, Grand Treasurer. 

W. Matthew L. Davis, Senior Grand Deacon. 

“ Henry Marsh, Junior Grand Deacon. 

Bro. Joseph Jacobs, Grand Pursuivant. 

“ Bryan Rossetter, Grand Tyler. 

The Grand Lodge being in order, the Most Worshipful 
Joseph Enos, Jr., Grand Master, entered and assumed his 
position. 

Immediately, however, the Grand Lodge adjourned to 
assemble at Tammany Hall, where an examination of creden- 
tials became the subject of serious debate ; and the Grand 
Lodge, near midnight, adjourned to meet the following day, 
at 11 a.m. A Committee, at this session, was appointed to 
examine the credentials of representatives of subordinate 
Lodges in person or as proxy, according to the Constitu- 
tional regulations of the Grand Lodge, and that they report 
the number of votes such representatives are respectively 
entitled to, at this Communication. 

An adjournment was then had until the morning of June 
5, when the following Grand Officers were elected : 


M. W. Joseph Enos, Jr., Grand Master. 

R. W. John Brush, Deputy Grand Master. 
r ‘ Nathaniel Allen, Senior Grand Warden. 
u Thomas Barker, Junior Grand Warden. 

“ Charles G. Haines, Grand Secretary. 

“ Welcome Esleeck, Grand Treasurer. 

“ and Rev. Hooper Cummings, ) „ , n . 

“ “ “ Wrn B. Lacy, ( Grand Chaplains. 

Wm. Whipple, Grand Sword Bearer. 

“ Joseph Cuyler, Grand Marshal. 

W. David S. Yan Rensselaer, 
u Grove Lawrence, 

“ James White, Senior Grand Deacon. 

“ Daniel E. Brown, Junior Grand Deacon. 

“ Jedediah Benjamin, Grand Pursuivant. 

“ James Gardner, Grand Tyler. 


Grand Stewards. 



414 


HISTORY OP FREEMASONRY 


JOSEPH ENOS, JR., OF EATON, 

was Grand Master of Masons during 1822, J 23, ’24, and pre- 
sided for two years over that division of the Body known as 
the Country Grand Lodge, which arose from the troubles 
of 1823. He was best known in connection with Brother 
Ebenezer Wadsworth, as Grand Yisitor, with whom he 
served, whose functions embraced those that are now known 
and separately exercised by a District Deputy Grand Master 
and a Grand Lecturer. He was an earnest and zealous 
Mason, and for many years filled a large space in our 
Masonic history. In later years, his attention was more 
particularly given to Royal Arch Masonry, the highest 
honors of which had been awarded to him, and in which, 
too, he had long rendered efficient service as instructor in 
the ritual. His financial difficulties in connection with the 
Grand Lodge will be found duly recorded, and were unfor- 
tunate. 

GRAND TREASURER CORNELIUS BOGERT AND GRAND SECRETARY 
ELIAS HICKS SUMMONED AND SUSPENDED. 

Copy of the First Summons ; of the Preamble and Resolution 
adopted by the Grand Lodge / and of the Final Summons 
to show Cause why Suspension should not be declared, as 
enacted by the Coxmtry Grand Lodge. 

Right Worshipful Brothers Bogert and Hicks had cast 
their Masonic fortunes with the City Grand Lodge. 

To Elias Hicks , R. W. Grand Secretary of the Grand 
Lodge of the State of New York : 

“You are hereby summoned forthwith to attend this 
Grand Lodge now in session at the Lodge room in Tammany 
Hall in this city, with the books, papers, funds, and vouchers, 
of said Grand Lodge, now in your custody or power. 

Joseph Enos, G. Master. 


Hew York, June 5, 1823.” 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


415 


“ Whereas, A summons was issued by the Most Worship- 
ful Grand Master on the fifth inst. directed to the Eight 
Worshipful Elias Hicks, G. Secretary of the Grand Lodge 
of the State of New York, directing him to appear at the 
Grand Lodge room in Tammany Hall, with all the books, 
papers, funds, and vouchers of said Grand Lodge, now in his 
custody ; and 

Whereas, The above summons was duly and personally 
served on the said Bro. Elias Hicks, by the W. Bro. Joseph 
Cuyler, a member of this Grand Lodge ; when the said 
Brother Elias Hicks returned for answer, that he did not 
acknowledge r the authority by which the within summons 
was issued, and should not attend to the said summons ; and 

Whereas, The non-attendance of the said Bro. Elias Hicks, 
on the said summons, is a high contempt of the said Elias 
Hicks against the K. W. Grand Lodge, and the answer 
returned by him to the said summons is a direct insult to 
this Grand Lodge and the Most Worshipful, the Grand 
Master; therefore, 

Resolved , That a summons be issued directed to the said 
Brother Elias Hicks, commanding him to appear forthwith 
before the Grand Lodge, to show cause why he should not 
be suspended from this Grand Lodge for his contempt and 
un-Masonic conduct in not answering the summons of this 
Grand Lodge, and the insult offered by his answer to the 
summons, to the Most Worshipful, the Grand Master, and 
through him to the Grand Lodge .’ 5 

The following summons was then ordered to be served : 

“ To the Right Worshijpful Bro. Elias Hicks : 

You are hereby summoned to appear on the ninth inst. 
at four o’clock in the afternoon, in the Lodge room at Tam- 
many Hall, in the city of New York, to show cause why you 
should not be suspended from the Grand Lodge of the State 
of New York, and from all Masonic communications, for your 
un-Masonic conduct in not answering the summons of this 
Grand Lodge, and the insult offered by your answer to the 


i 



416 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


said summons, to the Most Worshipful, the Grand Master, 
and through him to this Grand Lodge. Given under my 
hand at the city of New York, this 7th day of June, 5823. 

Joseph Enos, Grand Master.” 

Similar process was taken in the matter of the former 
Grand Treasurer, Cornelius Bogert. 

The following resolution was adopted on June 9, 1823 : 

“ Resolved , That the R. W. Elias Hicks, late Grand Sec- 
retary of this Grand Lodge, be and is hereby suspended from 
this Grand Lodge and all Masonic communication, for the 
space of ten years; and also, that the R. W. Cornelius 
Bogert, late Grand Treasurer, be and is hereby in like man- 
ner for the like term suspended.” 

Past Grand Master D. D. Tompkins, Vice-President of 
the United States, and Brother Erastus Root, Lieutenant 
Governor of the State of New York, were invited to attend 
the session, and accepted. 

There had been much consideration given at previous 
Communications of the Grand Lodge, as to alleged discrep- 
ancies in the accounts of Right Worshipful Ebenezer Wads- 
worth, when Grand Visitor ; and a counter-claim made by 
him as to moneys advanced for the honor of the Grand Lodge 
in a special case. Brother Wadsworth for many years had 
been a prominent factor in the affairs of the Eraternity, 
and it was with much concern the brethren learned of the 
action had in March, 1823 (before the division of the Grand 
Lodge). 

The following is the resolution adopted at that session : 

THE EBENEZER WADSWORTH DIFFICULTY. 

“ Resolved , That Ebenezer Wadsworth, late Grand Visitor 
of the Second District, having, by an order of this Grand 
Lodge, of the 5th of December, 5821, been enjoined forth- 
with to pay in all moneys received by him in his capacity of 
a Grand Visitor ; and having, from his neglect so to do, been 



IN THE STATE OP NEW YORK. 


417 


summoned to show cause at the Quarterly Communication in 
June last why he should not be suspended from Masonic 
communication for unduly withholding moneys so received 
by him in his said capacity ; and he having at that time in 
his hands the aforesaid sum of forty-two dollars, so received 
from Temple Lodge, and instead of paying the same, pur- 
suant to the tenor of the before-mentioned injunction, con- 
cealed the fact of his having received it, has thereby shown a 
marked contempt of the authority of this Grand Lodge, and 
incurred the penalty prescribed in the 19th Rule, 10th Sec- 
tion, 3d Chapter, of the Book of Constitutions. 

Resolved , That the said Ebenezer Wadsworth be and he is 
hereby suspended from all Masonic communication for and 
during the period of ten years, from the date of this reso- 
lution. 

Ordered , That the preceding resolutions be forthwith com- 
municated to the respective Lodges under the jurisdiction.” 

The Country Grand Lodge, which had always been partial 
to the Grand Visitors, and with whom Eight Worshipful 
Brother Wadsworth was a favorite, believing that he had 
been wronged, on June 5 accepted the report of an examin- 
ing Committee, .and adopted the following preamble and 
resolution : 

“ Whereas , At a Quarterly Communication of this Grand 
Lodge in March, 5823, E. W. Ebenezer Wadsworth was 
suspended from all Masonic communication for and during 
the term of ten years from the date of the said resolution, 
and 

Whereas , It appears by the minutes of this Grand Lodge 
that Bro. Wadsworth has been suspended without any notice, 
or evidence of notice, to appear and show cause, which is 
secured to every brother by the Constitutions of this Grand 
Lodge; therefore, 

Resolved , That this Grand Lodge do not ratify the said 
Quarterly Communication of March last in the premises 
above mentioned, but this Grand Lodge do declare the said 
suspension unconstitutional, irregular, and void. And it is 
vol. ii.— 27 



418 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


also ordered, that; the said resolutions and recitals preceding 
the same be expunged from the minutes of this Grand Lodge, 
and that the Grand Secretary transmit a copy of the above 
resolution to all the subordinate Lodges under the jurisdic- 
tion of this Grand Lodge, and to the several Grand Lodges 
of the United States.” 

Brother Wadsworth was invited to return to the Lodge, 
and the Committee on Auditing Accounts reported there 
was a balance of $24.50 due said Wadsworth. Which report 
was accepted. 

THE ENDEAVOR TO OBTAIN THE RECORDS. 

The following resolutions were adopted on June 9 : 

“ Resolved , That the B. W. Charles G. Haines, Grand Sec- 
retary, and R. W. Welcome Esleeck, Grand Treasurer of the 
Grand Lodge of the State of Hew York, be, and are hereby, 
authorized and directed, without delay, to demand and receive 
from the R. W. Elias Hicks, P. Grand Secretary, and of and 
from R. W. Cornelius Bogert, P. Grand Treasurer of the said 
Grand Lodge, and of and from every and all other person or 
persons and corporate body or bodies, all the books, records, 
vouchers, parchments, and papers, together with the seal and 
all the moneys of every description in the hands or posses- 
sion, or under the control of any such Past Grand Officer, or 
any person or persons, or corporate body belonging to the 
said Grand Lodge, and receipt therefor proper discharges 
and receipts, and to execute, seal, or not to seal the same, as 
may be deemed advisable, and to deliver the same in behalf 
of this Grand Lodge. 

Resolved , That a Committee of three be appointed for 
the purpose of securing the legal and equitable rights of the 
Grand Lodge of the State of Hew York in relation to the 
conduct of the late Grand Secretary and late Grand Treas- 
urer, and that they be authorized to see such judicial proceed- 
ings instituted as they may think proper, and to employ such 
counsel as they may deem proper, after finding judicial pro- 
ceedings necessary and expedient.” 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


419 


The Constitution, rules, and regulations were taken up, 
discussed, and laid over until June, 1824, when “ the plan of 
the Constitution ” was adopted. 

The attending representatives were authorized to receive 
from the Lodges which they represent the amount of their 
respective compensation allowed by the Constitution, and 
that the same be credited as dues to such Lodges by the 
Grand Lodge. 

MAKING MASONS AT SIGHT. 

A Grand Lodge of Emergency was opened in ample form 
on June 12, 1823, the Most Worshipful Joseph Enos in the 
chair, who announced that the meeting was called to make 
a Mason of the Rev. Dr. Hooper Cummings : 

Whereupon: The three degrees of Entered Apprentice, 
Eellowcraft, and Master Mason, were conferred on Hooper 
Cummings by the Grand Master, according to the power 
vested in him by the Constitutions of the Grand Lodge of 
the State of Hew York. 

Chas. G. Haines, Grand Secretary. 

On June 23, A. L. 5823, the Right Worshipful, the 
Deputy Grand Master, John Brush, with the assistance of 
Brother Randall S. Street, Past Master of Solomon’s Lodge, 
Ho. 6, Poughkeepsie, at the house of the Deputy Grand 
Master at the place aforesaid, conferred the degrees of 
Entered Apprentice, Fellowcraft, and Master Mason, on the 
Rev. Dr. John Reed, according to the power vested in the 
Deputy Grand Master by the Constitutions of the Grand 
Lodge of the State of Hew York. 

1824. 

The Session of 1824 was mainly devoted to routine busi- 
ness. The former Grand Officers were re-elected except in 
the case of the Grand Chaplains, wherein the two newly 
made Masons at sight were elected to fill the positions, and 
John W. Oakley was elected to fill the place of Charles G. 



420 


HISTORY OP FREEMASONRY 


Haines as Grand Secretary, he having declined a renomina- 
tion. 

A new set of jewels and Regalia became essential, and the 
Grand Treasurer was authorized and directed to procure the 
same. 

“ Healing the differences ” between the two Grand Lodges 
was the subject of several resolutions and of the appointment 
of committees, but without definite result therefrom. The 
Fraternity in the State became deeply concerned in the mat- 
ter of Grand Lodge dissensions. 

1825. 

MASONIC DEMANDS FOR A UNION. 

A large and influential meeting of Master Masons, con- 
sisting of forty -seven representatives from different sections 
of the State, seven only of whom were from the city of 
New York, was held at the Hall of Temple Chapter, in 
the city of Albany, February 4, 1825, and having elected 
Clarkson Crolius, Chairman, and John O. Cole, Secretary, 
adopted this preamble and resolutions : 

“ Whereas , This meeting deeply deplores the unhappy dif- 
ferences which at present exist between the Lodges and 
Masons in this State, therefore, 

Resolved, unanimously, That Clarkson Crolius, Elisha Gil- 
bert, Jonathan Eights, Joshua Bradley, Jacob Yan Benthuy- 
sen, Lebbeus Chapman, John F. Sibell, and John B. Scott 
be, and they are hereby appointed, a Committee for the pur- 
pose of conferring together upon the aforesaid unhappy 
differences, and, if practicable, devise such measures as may 
be necessary and proper to be adopted in order to restore 
union and harmony among the Masonic family of the State. 

Resolved , unanimously, That the Committee named in the 
preceding resolution be requested to meet at Washington 
Hall, in the city of New York, on the Monday next preced- 
ing the first Wednesday in June next, at 12 o’clock at noon ; 
and in case any member of said Committee does not attend 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


421 


said meeting, that the members of said Committee then pres- 
ent shall fill such vacancy. 

Resolved , That this meeting will use all their individual 
influence and exertions to bring about a union of the Masons 
of the State of New York.” 

In pursuance of the above the Committee met at Washing- 
ton Hall, in the city of New York, on Monday, May 30, 1825, 
and approved of the following : 

“ Whereas , This Committee, feeling a deep interest in the 
prosperity of the Fraternity throughout the world, and more 
especially in the restoration of harmony among the great 
Masonic family in the State of New York, do profess and 
pledge themselves to be actuated by the pure motives of 
brotherly love and friendship in the discharge of the high 
and responsible duties which devolve upon them ; and while 
they recommend the following resolutions to the unbiased 
consideration of their brethren in general, and more particu- 
larly for the consideration of those brethren who are mem- 
bers of and compose the Grand Lodge of the State of New 
York, this Committee would earnestly beseech that, what- 
ever may heretofore have been the cause of dissension and 
disagreements, out of which have grown so many difficul- 
ties and conflicting interests, the brethren should now lay 
aside for a moment all improper feelings, if any exist, and 
endeavor, by the united exertions of every brother, to place 
the Fraternity and its concerns on its true foundation, which, 
if accomplished, will not only be the means of producing 
love and harmony at home, but of conferring honor and 
respectability on the Fraternity abroad. 

Resolved , That it is desirable that all animosities hereto- 
fore existing among the great body of Masons in this State 
be forever obliterated. 

Resolved , That a general meeting of the representatives of 
Lodges be held to-morrow evening, Tuesday, May 31, at 8 
o’clock, at Tammany Hall. 

Resolved , That we cordially and respectfully recommend 
to that meeting, that a Committee, to consist of four mem- 



m 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


bers from the city of New York and four from other parts 
Df the State, be appointed for the purpose of nominating 
suitable persons for Grand Officers for the ensuing year. 

Resolved, That, in the opinion of this Committee, the place 
Df meeting of the Grand Lodge should be permanently fixed 
in the city of New York. 

Resolved , That this Committee has viewed with feelings of 
the most anxious solicitude the attempts to reconcile the con- 
flicting differences that unhappily exist in the Masonic family 
3f this State, and do earnestly desire that every brother will 
ise his best exertions and influence in putting an end thereto.” 

The meeting of representatives of Lodges from different 
parts of the State was held at Tammany Hall, on the even- 
ing of May 31, 1825 ; and the following were adopted : 

“Resolved, That it be recommended to the two Bodies 
styling themselves the Grand Lodge of the State of New 
Fork, to appoint a Committee of Conference on the subject 
ff the differences now existing; that the said Committee 
consist of five from each Body. 

Resolved, That the proceedings of this meeting be pre- 
sented to each of the said Bodies by the Committee of 
fight.” 

GRAND LODGE ACTION PRECEDENT TO A UNION. 

The Grand Lodge opened its Communication at the Lodge 
room of Tammany Hall, city of New York, on Wednesday, 
Tune 1, 1825, Bight Worshipful Elisha Gilbert, Past Senior 
3-rand Warden, temporarily in the chair, he being the oldest 
Past Grand Officer present. Shortly, the Bight Worshipful 
John Brush, the Deputy Grand Master, entered and took the 
East. 

Subsequent to the appointment of Ebenezer Wadsworth, 
John 0. Cole, and the Grand Secretary, as a Committee on 
Credentials, the Grand Lodge adjourned till 4 p.m, when it 
re-convened and proceeded with a large amount of routine 
vork. 

A motion was made and carried, to the effect that, in 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


423 


order to “ maintain good order and harmony in our election 
of Grand Officers, 

Resolved , That a Committee of eight be appointed — one 
from each Senatorial District — to make out a ticket of nom- 
ination, for Grand Officers for the ensuing year.” 

This was carried ; and the following morning, June 2, the 
Committee was appointed, to wit : Isaac Trumpour, Eobert 
Grant, Elisha Gilbert, Timothy F. Cook, Joshua Bradley, Ben- 
jamin Enos, Nicholas G. Cheesebrough, and Samuel King. 

The Grand Lodge adopted a resolution appointing a 
special Committee to invite the three Past Grand Masters, 
De Witt Clinton, Daniel D. Tompkins, and Jacob Morton, 
to honor this Grand Lodge with their attendance during the 
present session. 

Subsequently, the Grand Lodge adjourned until 9 a.m., on 
June 3. 

Incident to passing events relating to existing difficulties, 
it may be mentioned that two cases needing investigation 
and report, the one pertaining to North Star Lodge, No. 51, 
versus Hebron Lodge, No. 216, and the other, the suspension 
of Brother Joseph E. Bloomfield, of Camden Lodge, were 
referred to Grand Master Joseph Enos ; but as it was alleged 
he had not complied with the direction of the Grand Lodge 
in certain matters, the subjects were discharged from his 
consideration and otherwise disposed of. 

The Committee appointed to nominate Grand. Officers 
reported : 

John Brush for Grand Master. 

Clarkson Crolius for Deputy Grand Master. 

Nathaniel Allen for Senior Grand Warden. 

Jonathan Eights for Junior Grand Warden. 

Ebenezer Wadsworth for Grand Secretary. 

Welcome Esleeck for Grand Treasurer. 

Eev. Dr. John Eeed for Grand Chaplain. 

Eev. Leland Howard for Grand Chaplain. 

Philip Chase for Grand Pursuivant. 

James Gardner for Grand Tyler. 



4:24 


HISTORY OP FREEMASONRY 


The Grand Lodge then proceeded to the election of offi- 
cers, when Brother Stephen Van Rensselaer, of Albany, was 
elected Grand Master. Whereupon an adjournment was 
had until 4 p.m. ; when the election was proceeded with, and 
John Brush, of Poughkeepsie, was elected Deputy Grand 
Master; Ezra S. Cozier, of Utica, was elected Senior Grand 
Warden ; Elias T. Foot, of Utica, was elected Junior 
Grand Warden. 

The Grand Lodge then adjourned until 9 a.m., on June 4, 
1825 ; when it was unanimously resolved to elect a Grand 
Treasurer by “show of hands,” and Welcome Esleeck was 
so elected. In like manner, Rev. John Reed, of Poughkeep- 
sie, and Rev. Leland Howard, of Troy, were duly elected 
Grand Chaplains ; and Philip Chase, Grand Pursuivant. 


SKETCH OF STEPHEN VAN RENSSELAER. 

Grand Master from 1825 to 1829 inclusive . 

Stephen Van Rensselaer, known as the “Patroon,” an 
American statesman, and patron of learning, was born in 
Hew York, November 1, 1769, the fifth in descent from Kil- 
lien Van Rensselaer, the original patroon or proprietor of 
the Dutch Colony of Rensselaerwick, who in 1630, and subse- 
quently, purchased a tract of land near Albany, forty-eight 
miles long by twenty-four wide, extending over three counties. 
He was educated at Princeton and Harvard colleges, and mar- 
ried a daughter of General Philip Schuyler, a distinguished 
officer of the Revolution. Engaging early in politics, at a 
period when they were the pursuit of men of the highest 
social position, he was, in 1789, elected to the State Legisla- 
ture ; in 1795, to the State Senate, and became Lieutenant 
Governor, president of a State convention, and Canal Com- 
missioner. Turning his attention to military affairs, he was, 
at the beginning of the war of 1812, in command of the 
State militia, and led the assault of Queenstown ; but the 
refusal of a portion of his troops, from constitutional scruples, 
bo cross the Niagara River, enabled the British to repulse 



IN THE STATE OP NEW YORK. 


425 


the attack, and the General resigned in disgust. As presi- 
dent of the Board of Canal Commissioners for fifteen years, 
he promoted the New York system of internal improve- 
ments ; as Chancellor of the State University, he presided 
over educational reforms ; and as president of the Agricultu- 
ral Board, aided to develop the resources of the State. At 
his own cost, he employed Professors Eaton and Hitchcock 
to make agricultural surveys, not only of his own vast estates, 
but of a large part of New York and New England, the 
results of which he published in 1824; he also paid Professor 
Eaton to give popular lectures on geology through the State. 
In 1824 he established at Troy an institution for the educa- 
tion of teachers, with free pupils from every county. Widen- 
ing the sphere of his political interests, he went to Congress 
in 1823, and served several terms, exerting a powerful influ- 
ence, and securing the election of John Quincy Adams as 
President of the United States. After an active, useful, and 
honorable career, worthy of his high position, he died at 
Albany, January 26, 1839. 

Now followed the 

MEETINGS OF REPRESENTATIVES AT ALBANY AND NEW YORK. 

On motion of Brother Ezra S. Cozier, 

The proceedings of a meeting of sundry Masons held at 
Albany, in February, 1825, and the doings of a Committee 
appointed by that meeting, held in the Grand Lodge room, 
New York City, on the evening of June 5, were read, where- 
upon the following was unanimously adopted : 

u Whereas , Certain differences exist between the Lodges in 
the city of New York and this Grand Lodge; therefore, 

Resolved , That Brothers Ezra S. Cozier, Leland Howard, 
Joseph Cuvier, John O. Cole, and Platt Adams be a Com- 
mittee to confer with such brethren as may be appointed on 
behalf of the said Lodges, respecting the said differences, 
with a view to a settlement of the same.” 

Which Committee subsequently reported : 



426 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


“ The Committee appointed by the Grand Lodge to confer 
with certain Brethren in behalf of the Lodges of the city of 
New York on the subject of the existing differences between 
them and the Grand Lodge, respectfully report : 

That in the discharge of their duties they have had several 
conferences with the said Brethren on the subject of the said 
differences, but have been able to make no progress toward 
a settlement of the same, and therefore beg leave to be dis- 
charged from the further consideration of the subject. 55 

Ordered , That the Committee be discharged. 

Thus, for the time being, summarily ended the efforts for 
a union in the government of the Fraternity in the State. 
But what had been done in this direction was not without 
fruit, as the future showed. 

KEEP THE SABBATH HOLY. 

“ Resolved^ That no Lodge under this jurisdiction shall con- 
vene upon the Sabbath day or evening, for the transaction 
of any business, except upon funeral occasions. 55 

RECEPTION OF OFFICERS OF GRAND CHAPTER, ROYAL ARCH 

MASONS. 

The Most Excellent Ezra Ames, Grand High Priest, and 
Most Excellent Bichard Pennell, Deputy Grand High Priest, 
of the Grand Chapter of the State of New York, being 
announced, were received with due honors . 

THE COUNTRY GRAND LODGE RULES AND REGULATIONS. 

The Committee appointed to digest and arrange the exist- 
ing Buies and Begulations of the Country Grand Lodge for 
publication, reported, on Tuesday, June 8, 1825, the following, 
which were adopted : 

“ Every Grand Lodge has an inherent power and authority 
to make local ordinances and new regulations as well as to 
amend and explain the old ones for their own particular 



IN THE STATE OP NEW YORK. 


427 


benefit, and the good of Masonry in general; provided always 
that the ancient landmarks be carefully preserved, and that 
such regulations be first duly proposed, in writing, for the con- 
sideration of the members, and be at last duly enacted with 
the consent of the majority. This has never been disputed; 
for the members of every Grand Lodge are the true repre- 
sentatives of all the fraternity in communication, and are an 
absolute and independent body, with legislative authority, 
provided (as aforesaid) that the Grand Masonic Constitution 
be never violated, nor any of the old landmarks removed. 
Upon these principles the following Particular Kules have 
been made and adopted in the Grand Lodge of New York, 
viz. : 

I. The Grand Secretary shall make an annual communica- 
tion to the several Grand Lodges in correspondence with 
this Grand Lodge, and to the respective Lodges under its 
jurisdiction, immediately after the election of Grand Officers, 
of the persons so elected, and of such other matters generally 
as have relation to the Craft at large, or may affect the 
government of such Lodges in particular. 

II. All moneys that may be expended by the Grand Sec- 
retary and Grand Treasurer, for books, stationery, or in any 
other manner, in the discharge of the duties of their offices, 
shall be allowed and paid by the Grand Lodge. 

III. All members of Lodges who are or shall be in 
arrear for dues for two years and upwards shall be sus- 
pended by their respective Lodges from all Masonic com- 
munication ; and if they do not discharge the same within 
one year from the date of their suspension, they may be 
expelled. 

IV. Any subordinate Lodge may, in aggravated cases, 
publish in the newspapers the expulsion of a member, after 
the same shall have been confirmed by the Grand Lodge, 
provided all the members present of such Lodge shall be in 
favor of such publication. 

V. The Grand Master shall be elected immediately after 
the reading of the minutes at the annual meeting, and 
before the transaction of any other business, except the exam- 



428 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


ination and admission of members, representatives, and 
proxies. 

VI. No Warrant shall be granted for the establishment 
of a Lodge, except on the petition of at least seven Master 
Masons, in good standing, which petition shall be recom- 
mended by the Lodge nearest to the place where such Lodge 
is intended to be established, signed by the Master and 
Wardens, with the seal of the Lodge affixed thereto, and 
certified by the Secretary. 

VII. No Warrant or Dispensation shall be granted for 
constituting a Lodge out of this State, within the jurisdiction 
of any other Grand Lodge. 

VIII. Each Lodge, forfeiting its Warrant, shall surrender 
to the Grand Lodge all its books, jewels, furniture, funds, 
and property. 

IX. No person shall be entitled to a Grand Lodge Certifi- 
cate, without a previous certificate from the Lodge of which 
he is a member, setting forth his regular behavior, and that 
he hath discharged all Lodge dues. 

X. Refreshments with ardent spirits at the meetings of 
Lodges, is of evil example, and may be productive of perni- 
cious effects, and the same is therefore expressly forbidden 
under any pretense whatever. 

XI. No subordinate Lodge shall, at any time, initiate any 
candidate for Masonry who has been rejected in another 
Lodge, without the recommendation of, the Masters and 
Wardens of the Lodge rejecting such candidate. 

XII. It shall be the duty of each subordinate Lodge, 
under the jurisdiction of this Grand Lodge, immediately 
after the annual election in such subordinate Lodge, to 
transmit to the Grand Secretary of this Grand Lodge, a cer- 
tificate of such election of Master and Wardens, subscribed 
by the Secretary in form as follows, viz. : 

(Here follow, in Sections XII., XIII., XIV., the forms of 
certificates of election of Master and Wardens of a Lodge, 
the Proxy for a Lodge, and the Proxy for a Past Master.) 

XV. The return for dues from subordinate Lodges shall be 
in the form following, viz. ; 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


429 


Eeturn of Lodge, No. , held at , county 

of , in the State of New York, from , A. L. 

58 , to A. L. 58 . 


Members’ Names. 

Date of 

Amount of 

Total. 

Remarks. 

Initia- 

tions. 

Mem- 

bersbip. 

Initia- 

tions. 

Annual 

Dues. 












XYI. All returns of dues, reports of proceedings, and all 
other papers made to this Grand Lodge, by subordinate 
Lodges, shall be signed by the Secretary, with the seal of 
such Lodges thereto affixed. 

XYII. The proxies of subordinate . Lodges and of Past 
Masters under the jurisdiction of this Grand Lodge shall be 
annually appointed. 

XYIII. On the opening of the Grand Lodge, at each 
annual Communication, it shall be the duty of the presiding 
officer to appoint the following Standing Committees, to be 
composed of three members each, viz. : 

1. A Committee on Claims. 

2. A Committee on Warrants. 

3. A Committee on Grievances. 

4. A Committee on Accounts, to be denominated the 
Auditing Committee. 

5. Two members, who, together with the Grand Secretary, 
shall constitute a Committee on Credentials. 

Resolved, That all rules and regulations heretofore adopted 
by this Grand Lodge be, and the same are hereby, repealed, 
excepting such regulations as are embodied in the Book of 
Constitutions.” 

On June 8, 1825, the Grand Lodge determined to take 

LEGAL PROCESS TO RECOVER FUNDS. 

Thus: 

“ Resolved , That E. W. Welcome Esleeck, Grand Treasurer, 
be a Committee to take such measures as he shall think 



430 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


expedient to recover the funds, and all property and furniture 
which of right belong to this Grand Lodge, and to employ 
such counsel and institute such proceedings as he shall think 
proper for the recovery of the same ; and that the Commit- 
tee appointed on this subject at the last June Communication 
of the Grand Lodge be discharged from the further consid- 
eration of the same.” 

This resolution appears to have been rejected, and the reso- 
lution in the same language, making the Eight Worshipful 
John Brush, Deputy Grand Master, the Eight Worshipful 
Welcome Esleeck, Grand Treasurer, and the Eight Worship- 
ful John W. Oakley, Grand Secretary, the Committee, pre- 
sented in June, 1824, was adopted. 

It was evidently the desire of the Grand Lodge to have 
the ceremony of the installation of the Grand Master elect, 
Stephen Yan Eensselaer, performed by Past Grand Master 
De Witt Clinton, and a resolution to that effect had been 
adopted. Accordingly, when Brother Yan Eensselaer signi- 
fied his acceptance of the office, great preparations were 
immediately commenced to make the ceremony most impos- 
ing. 


THE INSTALLATION OF STEPHEN VAN RENSSELAER. 

A Grand Lodge of Emergency was convened at Temple 
Chapter Hall, Albany, September 29, 1825, for the purpose 
of installing the Most Worshipful Brother. Most of the 
Grand Officers were present, and De Witt Clinton presented 
himself. 

A great procession of Master Masons was formed, pre- 
ceded by members of the Order of the Temple, and followed 
by a concourse of Companions and Officers of the Grand 
Chapter of Eoyal Arch Masons. Then followed the Grand 
Officers, preceded by music and followed by a Division of 
Knights Templar. 

The procession moved down State Street, through South 
Market to Montgomery Hall, up Lydius Street to Pearl 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


431 


Street, up Pearl Street to State Street, and so to the Capitol, 
where the Installation Service transpired. 

The address delivered on this occasion by Most Worshipful 
De Witt Clinton was so admirably adapted to the times and 
the condition of the Fraternity, that the same should be pre- 
served in this record. 

THE ADDRESS OF DE WITT CLINTON. 

“Worthy and Much-respected Brethren: This solemn 
and interesting occasion demands from this place an illustra- 
tion of the principles, the objects, and the tendencies of Free- 
masonry. Many volumes have been written, and numerous 
discourses have been pronounced, on this subject. If we were 
to follow the gratuitous assumptions and fanciful specula- 
tions of visionary men, in attempting to trace the rise and 
progress of this ancient Institution, we would be involved in 
the inextricable labyrinths of uncertainty, and lost in the 
jarring hypotheses of conjecture. Better is it, then, to sober 
down our minds to well-established facts, than, by giving the 
rein to erratic imagination, merge the radiance of truth in 
the obscurity of fable. History and tradition are often adul- 
terated by misrepresentation : beyond them, the age of fable 
commences, when no reliance can be placed on the writings 
of the ancients. All history, except the Divine records, 
before Thucydides, is apocryphal, and' oral tradition is almost 
entirely distorted and perverted, after the lapse of three gen- 
erations. At certain periods of human affairs, and in certain 
stages of society, it occupies the place of written history ; 
and there is even an end to the reign of fable, when all that 
relates to this 4 great globe and all which it inherits,’ is 
enveloped in the mysterious gloom of unexplored and impen- 
etrable antiquity. 

Enthusiastic friends of our Institution have done it much 
injury, and covered it with much ridicule, by stretching its 
origin beyond the bounds of credibility. Some have given it 
an antediluvian origin, while others have even represented 
it as coeval with the creation ; some have traced it to the 



432 


HISTORY OP FREEMASONRY 


Egyptkn priests ; and others have discovered its vestiges in 
the mystical societies of Greece and Rome. The erection 
of Solomon’s Temple, the retreats of the Druids, and the 
Crusades to the Holy Land, have been at different times 
specially assigned as the sources of its existence. The order, 
harmony, and wonders of creation, the principles of math- 
ematical science, and the productions of architectural skill, 
have been confounded with Freemasonry. Whenever a 
great philosopher has enlightened the ancient world, he has 
been resolved by a species of moral metempsychosis or intel- 
lectual chemistry into a Free Mason ; and in all the secret 
institutions of antiquity, the footsteps of Lodges have been 
traced by the eye of credulity. Archimedes, Pythagoras, 
Euclid, and Yitruvius were, in all probability, not Free 
Masons ; and the love of order, the cultivation of science, the 
embellishments of taste, and the sublime and beautiful works 
of art, have certainly existed in ancient, as they now do in 
modern, times, without the agency of Freemasonry. 

Our Fraternity has thus suffered under the treatment of 
well-meaning friends, who have undesignedly inflicted mote 
injuries upon it than its most virulent enemies. The absurd 
accounts of its origin and history, in most of the books that 
treat of it, have proceeded from enthusiasm operating on 
credulity and the love of the marvelous. An imbecile friend 
often does more injury than an avowed foe. The calumnies 
of Barruel and Robinson, who labored to connect our society 
with the illuminati, and to represent it as inimical to social 
order and good government, have been consigned to ever- 
lasting contempt, while exaggerated and extravagant friendly 
accounts and representations continually stare us in the face, . 
and mortify our intellectual discrimination by ridiculous 
claims to unlimited antiquity. Nor ought it to be forgotten 
that genuine Masonry is adulterated by sophistications and 
interpolations, foreign from the simplicity and sublimity of 
its nature. To this magnificent temple of the Corinthian 
order, there have been added Gothic erections, which dis- 
figure its beauty and derange its symmetry. The adoption, 
in some cases, of frivolous pageantry and fantastic mum- 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


433 


mery, equally revolting to good taste and genuine Masonry, 
has exposed us to much animadversion ; but our Institution, 
clothed with celestial virtue, and armed with the panoply of 
truth, has defied all the storms of open violence, and resisted 
all the attacks of insidious imposture ; and it will equally 
triumph over the errors of misguided friendship, which, ; like 
the transit of a planet over the disk of the sun, may produce 
a momentary obscuration, but will instantly leave it in the 
full radiance of its glory. 

Although the origin of our Fraternity is covered with 
darkness, and its history is to a great extent obscure, yet we 
can confidently say that it is the most ancient society in the 
world ; and we are equally certain that its principles are 
based on pure morality, that its ethics are the ethics of 
Christianity, its doctrines the doctrines of patriotism and 
brotherly love, and its sentiments the sentiments of exalted 
benevolence. Upon these points there can be no doubt. 
All that is good and kind and charitable it encourages ; all 
that is vicious and cruel and oppressive it reprobates. That 
charity which is described in the most masterly manner by 
the eloquent apostle, composes its very essence, and enters 
into its vital principles ; and every Free Mason is ready 
to unite with him in saying : ‘ Though I speak with the 
tongues of men and of angels, and have not charity, I am 
become as sounding brass or a tinkling cymbal. And 
though I have the gift of prophecy, and understand all mys- 
teries and all knowledge, and though I have all faith so that 
I could remove mountains, and have not charity, I am noth- 
ing. And though I bestow all my goods to feed the poor, 
and though I give my body to be burned, and have not 
charity, it profiteth me nothing. Charity suffereth long and 
is kind ; charity envieth not ; charity vaunteth not itself, is 
not puffed up ; doth not behave itself unseemly ; seeketh not 
her own ; is not easily provoked, thinketb no evil ; rejoiceth 
not in iniquity, but rejoiceth in the truth ; beareth all things, 
believeth all things, bopeth all things, endureth all things : 
charity never faileth, but whether there be prophecies, they 
shall fail ; whether there be tongues, they shall cease ; 



434 


HISTORY OP FREEMASONRY 


whether there be knowledge, it shall vanish away? How 
happens it, then, that our Institution has created so much 
opposition, excited so much jealousy, encountered so much 
proscription, experienced so much persecution ? 

The mysteries which pertain to this Fraternity have been 
the source of much obloquy ; and its entire exclusion of the 
female sex from its communion has been considered an 
unjust and rigorous, rule. In former times, the arts and 
sciences had their mysteries. The inventions of the former, 
and the discoveries of the latter, were either applied by indi- 
viduals to their own benefit, or thrown into a common stock 
for the emolument of select associations. In the early stages 
of Freemasonry, its votaries applied themselves with great 
ardor to architecture and geometry. This will account for 
the exclusion of women. Such laborious pursuits were not 
adapted to their destination in life and their station in civil- 
ized society. A measure, then, that has been deemed a cen- 
sure, was the highest eulogium that could be passed on the 
sex, and, in evincing this distinguished respect, our ancient 
brethren exhibited that refinement and courtesy which are 
always accompanied with a just appreciation of female excel- 
lence and delicacy. The secrets of the arts and sciences, 
which were elicited by the researches and employments of 
the Fraternity, were cherished for their common benefit ; 
but the art of printing having thrown open the gates of 
knowledge to all mankind, and the rights of invention hav- 
ing been protected by government, the utility of secrecy, so 
far as it related to intellectual improvement and the enjoy- 
ment of its fruits, was in a great degree superseded. There 
are, however, secrets of importance to the brotherhood, which 
are entirely innocent, neither touching the concerns, nor 
affecting the interests of, the uninitiated, nor impugning the 
doctrines of pure morality, nor the precepts of our holy 
religion. 

Secret institutions were not uncommon among the ancients. 
The Eleusinian, Dionysian, and Panathenaan mysteries, the 
associations of the Pythagoreans, the Essenes, and of the 
architects of Ionia, were concealed from the uninitiated ; and 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


435 


even the women of Borne celebrated the mysteries of the 
Bona Dea in a state of entire seclusion. The Druids had also 
their mysteries; and our Indians have secret institutions. 
As secrecy may be enjoined with pure views and for good 
objects, so it also may be observed with pernicious inten- 
tions and for bad purposes. The doctrines and observances 
of Christianity were in the last century ridiculed and cari- 
catured by a secret society in the vicinity of London, com- 
posed of choice spirits of wickedness ; and, under the cloak 
of mysterious associations, conspiracies have been formed 
against freedom and social order. As nothing of this kind 
can be imputed to Freemasonry, it ought to have been 
patronized, instead of being persecuted ; but the suspicious 
eye of tyranny, always on the watch for victims, affected to 
see combinations against legitimate government, and the 
sanguinary hand of vengeance was soon uplifted against us. 
In every nation in Europe, Masonry has passed the ordeal 
of persecution. The Inquisition has stained it with blood. 
Hierarchies have proscribed and interdicted it. Despotism 
has pursued it to destruction. And everywhere, except in 
this land of liberty, it has felt the arm of unjust and tyran- 
nical power; and even here, and in this enlightened age, 
fanaticism has dared to fulminate its anathemas. 

The precepts of Freemasonry inculcate abstraction from 
religious and political controversies, and obedience to the 
existing authorities ; and there can be no doubt of the good 
faith and sincerity of this injunction. And accordingly the 
most enlightened princes of Europe, and among others, 
Frederick the Great of Prussia, have been members of our 
Fraternity, and have not considered it derogatory to their 
dignity nor dangerous to their ascendency, to afford it official 
protection and personal encouragement. But the truth is, 
that the principles of Freemasonry are hostile to arbitrary 
power. All brethren are on a level, and, of course, are on 
an equality with respect to natural rights. The natural 
equality of mankind and the rights of man, are not only 
implied in our doctrine, but the form of our government is 
strictly republican, and, like that of the United States, repre- 



436 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


sentative and federal. The officers of the private Lodges are 
annually chosen by the members, and all the Lodges are rep- 
resented in the Grand Lodge by their Presiding Officers and 
Past Masters, who elect annually the Grand Officers, and 
who, together with the existing and Past Grand Officers, 
constitute the Grand Lodge. The Lodges are thus the mem- 
bers, and the Grand Lodge the head of a society, which, by 
a combination of the representative and federal principles, 
constitutes a federal republic as to the government of Free 
Masons. 

It must be obvious, then, that an institution so republican 
in its elements, so liberal in its principles, so free in its impar- 
tial and concentrated combinations, must have excited the 
apprehensions of arbitrary power, which has constantly 
sought to propitiate it by kindness and condescension, or to 
annihilate it by fire and sword — by banishment and extinc- 
tion. 

The celebrated philosopher, John Locke, was much struck 
with a manuscript of Henry VI., King of England, deposited 
in the Bodleian Library. It is in the form of questions and 
answers, and to the interrogatory, whether Masons are better 
than others, it is answered, ‘ Some Masons are not so virtu- 
ous as some other men ; but in general they are better than 
they would have been if they had not been Masons.’ This 
is unquestionably correct. Masonry superadds to our other 
obligations, the strongest ties of connection between it and 
the cultivation of virtue, and furnishes the most powerful 
incentives to goodness. A Free Mason is responsible to his 
Lodge for a course of good conduct, and if he deviates from 
it he will be disgraced and expelled. Wherever he goes he 
will find a friend in every Brother if he conducts well, and 
will be shielded against want and protected against oppres- 
sion, and he will feel in his own bosom the ecstatic joys of 
that heaven-born charity, which, 

decent, modest, easy, kind, 

Softens the high and rears the abject mind, 

Lays the rough path of peevish nature ev'n, 

And opens in each heart a little heav’n. 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


437 


All doubts on the exalted principles and auspicious ten- 
dencies of Freemasonry must be dissipated, when we retro- 
spect to Washington and Franklin. The former was the 
principal agent in establishing our independence, and secur- 
ing to us the blessings of a national government. The latter 
was the great patron of the arts that administer to the hap- 
piness of individuals and the prosperity of States, and the 
head of the philosophy and useful knowledge of the country. 
Both were patriotic and virtuous men, and neither would 
have encouraged an institution hostile to morality, religion, 
good order, and the public welfare. 

Washington became at an early period of his life a Free 
Mason, and publicly, as well as privately, he invariably evinced 
the utmost attachment to it. In answer to a complimen- 
tary address, when President of the United States, from the 
Master, Wardens, and brethren of King David’s Lodge, in 
Rhode Island, he had no hesitation in saying, "Being per- 
suaded that a just application of the principles on which the 
Masonic Fraternity is founded, must be promotive of private 
virtue and public prosperity, I shall always be happy to 
advance the interests of the society, and to be considered by 
them as a deserving Brother. 5 And in a reply to the Grand 
Lodge of Massachusetts, he explicitly declares that ‘ The 
milder virtues of the heart are highly respected by a society 
whose liberal principles are founded on the immutable laws 
of truth and justice. To enlarge, 5 continued he, ‘ the sphere 
of social happiness is worthy the benevolent design of a 
Masonic institution, and it is most fervently to be wished that 
the conduct of every member of the Fraternity, as well as 
those publications that discover the principles which actuate 
them, may tend to convince mankind that the great object 
of Masonry is to promote the happiness of the human race. 5 

Freemasonry owes its introduction into Pennsylvania to 
Benjamin Franklin. On June 24, 1734, a Warrant was 
granted by the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts, for holding 
a Lodge in Philadelphia, and appointing him the first Master. 
He cultivated Masonry with great zeal, and his partiality 
suffered no diminution during his long and illustrious life. 



438 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


Lafayette, the good Lafayette, the patriot of both hemi- 
spheres, was always the devoted friend of Freemasonry. He 
saw in it a constellation of virtues, and wherever he went he 
took every opportunity of demonstrating his attachment and 
of expressing his veneration. His countenance has done 
much good, and has imparted to it no inconsiderable portion 
of his immense and deserved popularity. Freemasonry, like 
all other institutions, has its days of prosperity and adversity 
— its seasons of revivals and depressions — and it is believed, 
that when Lafayette left this country it had never attained 
a greater altitude of usefulness and general regard. 

After these illustrious witnesses in favor of our Frater- 
nity, let not the dissensions which sometimes prevail, the 
vicious conduct of some of its members, and the perversions 
of the institution, be adduced as proofs of its intrinsic vices. 
Although it has received the countenance of the good and 
the wise of all ages, let it be understood that the character 
of an institution does not necessarily form the conduct of its 
members. Good societies may contain unworthy members, 
and bad societies may enroll good men among their mem- 
bers. Christianity is often degraded by profligate professors, 
and the heathen religion has had a Socrates, an Aristides, 
and a Cato. 

It cannot be expected that in any society there will be a 
perfect accord and congeniality of minds, of tastes, and of 
morals. Hence, differences will sometimes arise, and if con- 
ducted with good temper and candor, will rarely expand into 
violent convulsions. Wolves will sometimes intrude into 
the flock, and bad men under the cloak of goodness will 
frequently insinuate themselves into the most excellent 
associations. 

For neither man nor angel can discern 
Hypocrisy, the only evil that walks 
Invisible, except to God alone, 

By His permissive will, through heaven and earth. 

And oft though wisdom wake, suspicion sleeps, 

At wisdom’s gate, and to simplicity 

Resigns her charge, while goodness thinks no ill 

Where no ill seems 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


439 


In all associations of men there are perturbed and uneasy 
spirits who scatter discord and whom ‘ no command can rule 
nor counsel teach,’ and who, like the fabled Enceladus, create 
disturbance and convulsion whenever they move. It is no 
easy task to withstand the arts of hypocrites and the acts of 
incendiaries. If our Society has suffered under such influ- 
ences, it participates in the fate of all assemblies of men, and 
the feuds which sometimes distract its tranquillity are as 
often the offspring of well-meaning and overweening zeal, 
as of perverse and evil designs. 

That Freemasonry is sometimes perverted and applied to 
the acquisition of political ascendency, of unmerited charity, 
and to convivial excess, cannot be disputed ; but this is not 
the fault of the institution, for it inculcates an entire exemp- 
tion from political and religious controversy. It enforces 
the virtues of industry and temperance, and it proscribes all 
attempts to gratify ambition and cupidity, or to exceed the 
bounds of temperance and convivial enjoyments, under its 
shade or through its instrumentality. In lifting the mind 
above the dungeon of the body, it venerates the grateful 
odor of plain and modest virtue, and patronizes those endow- 
ments which elevate the human character and adapt it to the 
high enjoyments of another and a better world. 

Freemasonry has flourished exceedingly in the United 
States, and especially in this State. In 1781 a Grand 
Lodge was established in the city of New York under a 
charter from the Grand Lodge of England. A few years 
afterward an independent Grand Lodge was instituted, and 
there are now in the State near five hundred Lodges, and 
more than one hundred Chapters. Owing to causes which 
I am unable to explain, and in which I have had no partici- 
pation, two Grand Lodges have been in existence for a few 
years. And it will now require the utmost wisdom, mod- 
eration, and forbearance of the c good men and true/ who 
adorn both establishments, to accomplish a reunion on just 
and reasonable terms. That there are faults, and great 
faults, involved in this schism, I am fearful, and that it is a 
lamentable commentary on our system of brotherly love, is 



440 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


too obvious. In consequence of my public duties, I have 
for a considerable time withdrawn from any active concern 
in. the affairs of our Fraternity, and I have had, of course, 
no personal knowledge of the causes of, and the actors in, 
the prevailing division. In censuring it, I have, therefore, 
no reference to particular individuals or Lodges, and I hope, 
most sincerely hope, that before the return of another anni- 
versary, this stain may be removed from our Society. Per- 
haps a new arrangement of the supreme authorities might be 
advisable, by the creation of provincial or subordinate Grand 
Lodges under a controlling head, composed of Deputies 
selected by the different Grand Lodges. There have been 
two opposing Grand Lodges in England, and, I believe, in 
Scotland and Ireland, and also in South Carolina and Mas- 
sachusetts, in consequence of the distinction of ancient and 
modem Masonry. Notwithstanding this serious contro- 
versy, the schism has been healed, and a most cordial and 
complete union has taken place in all these cases, so that we 
have no reason to apprehend a long duration of a separation 
which has probably originated from more trivial and eva- 
nescent causes. 

Most Worshipful Grand Master elect : Accept my cor- 
dial congratulations on your elevation to the highest honor 
in Masonry. You are now, in this region, the head of the 
most ancient, benevolent, and distinguished society in the 
world. And I am rejoiced to see such exalted authority 
deposited in such worthy hands ; and I feel assured that no 
exertion will be omitted on your part to realize the anticipa- 
tions of your usefulness and to justify the high confidence 
reposed in you. 

I am persuaded that you will use every proper endeavor 
to reunite the great Masonic family under one government, to 
confirm and to extend the influence and reputation of Free- 
masonry, and to propagate those virtues which are identified 
with its character and essential to the cause of benevolence, 
charity, and philosophy. 

Your duties are certainly arduous, but important and hon- 
orable stations always imply great labor, and require much 



IN THE STATE OE NEW YORK. 


441 


industry and exertion. You will be assisted in your labors 
by the enlightened officers associated with you, and every 
worthy brother will raise his voice and his hands in favor of 
your efforts and in support of your measures. 

To preside merely over the forms of a public assembly 
requires no uncommon display of intellectual vigor ; but the 
duties of a Grand Master involve higher topics and more 
momentous considerations. He must be employed in devis- 
ing ways and means of doing good, in inculcating the virtues 
of our Fraternity, and in illustrating by practical demonstra- 
tion the beauties of benevolence. His eyes must be vigilant 
in discerning any inroads on our ancient landmarks, and his 
arm must always be ready to protect the Institution against 
intestine convulsions and external hostilities. 

Your life has hitherto been distinguished for its accordance 
with Masonic virtue. If you carry into your high office that 
benevolence which adorns your private character, and that 
experience as a member and Master which you acquired in 
a respectable Lodge in this city, you will unquestionably 
reflect back on the Fraternity the luster which you derive 
from it. 

I shall now proceed to discharge a duty which has been 
required from me by the Grand Lodge, and I perform it with 
no common pleasure, as evidence of my personal esteem for 
you, of my high respect for that distinguished body, and of 
my sincere devotion to the cause of Freemasonry. I shall 
now invest you with the insignia of your office, and I most 
humbly supplicate the Supreme Architect of the heavens and 
of the earth to smile on the proceedings of this day, and to 
render them auxiliary to the holy cause of benevolence, 
morality, and religion, and subservient to the best interests 
of the human race.” 

The Most Worshipful Stephen Yan Rensselaer then rose, 
and addressed the Grand Lodge as follows : 

“ I accept the distinguished honor conferred on me by the 
Grand Lodge of this State with emotions of profound respect 
and gratitude. To be selected by the members of this numer- 



442 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


ous, ancient, and respectable Fraternity, to preside over its 
deliberations, to guide its councils, is a mark of confidence 
which I shall ever highly appreciate. And, although I can- 
not bring to the station the talents or the learning which in 
former years have adorned it, I still may venture to promise 
that, on my part, no exertions shall be wanting to reunite 
the brotherhood into one bond of union, to illustrate the 
virtues and to extend the influence of Masonry. 

The lucid, judicious, and eloquent exposition, which the 
brethren have this day heard, of the nature of our asso- 
ciation, the interesting narrative of its varied fortunes in 
foreign countries, and the striking eulogiums on the departed, 
as well as the living ornaments of our Craft among the 
[Revolutionary patriots of our own nation, must leave a vivid 
impression on every mind. 

Such a statement cannot fail to correct much of that mis- 
conception which has assailed our best endeavors, and to 
remove many of the prejudices which have affected the 
utility of Masonry. 

Supported by such testimony, we may proceed with con- 
fidence in our efforts toward its extension, always keeping 
in our recollection that the virtues which are the object of 
cultivation in the Fraternity should appear and shine in the 
life of every one of its members. 

In entering on the duties of the high office with which I 
have this day been invested, I rely with assured confidence 
on the cordial aid and co-operation of the officers associated 
with me. Residing in various parts of the State, they will 
be enabled to render all useful information as to the progress 
and welfare of the Craft. They should watch with great 
care that its honors be not tarnished, or its utility impaired ; 
and, above all, they should enforce, with prudence and judg- 
ment, the discipline which all deviations from its institution 
and duties imperiously require at the present time. 

It is not among the lea&t gratifying circumstances attend- 
ing this occasion, that the Grand Lodge have directed the 
present ceremony to be performed by one of its most distin- 
guished members, who has filled its highest offices, and who, 



IN THE STATE OP NEW YORK. 


443 


amidst the duties and honors conferred on him by his coun- 
try, has cheerfully appeared at this time as the friend and 
patron of the Order. The thanks of the Fraternity will be 
tendered, and I should indeed be insensible were I not to 
add my own, for the kindness and partiality thus evinced. 5 ’ 

A further parade and its dismissal then followed. The 
imposing display, and the occurrences of the day, had a great 
tendency to hasten the desired union of the Grand Lodges. 

1826. 

In 1826, the sessions of Grand Lodge over which Most 
Worshipful Stephen Van Rensselaer presided, commenced 
at 9 o’clock, on the morning of June 7, and continued for a 
number of days, during which much routine business was 
transacted. 

DEFALCATION OF FAST GRAND MASTER JOSEPH ENOS. 

At Grand Lodge meeting, June 4, it was 

“ Resolved , That the Grand Secretary demand and receive 
of M. W. Joseph Enos, all moneys in his hands belonging to 
the Grand Lodge, and pay the same to the Treasurer. 55 

Shortly thereafter the Grand Lodge adjourned until 9 
a.m., Monday, June 6. 

The following preamble and resolution were adopted on 
June 9 : 

“ Whereas, Brother Joseph Enos, P. G. M. of the Grand 
Lodge of the State of New York, during his continuance 
in office, received certain moneys belonging to the Grand 
Lodge; and 

Whereas, The said Joseph Enos, in a communication 
made at the last annual meeting of this Grand Lodge, stated 
that, for certain causes, he could not attend the meeting, and 
that he would attend the present Communication, and make 
a satisfactory settlement therefor ; and 

Whereas, Brother Enos has not appeared, nor complied 



444 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


with the request of the Grand Lodge by paying over the 
said moneys ; therefore, 

Resolved , , That the Grand Secretary and Brother E. S. 
Cozier be authorized to demand from Brother Enos the 
moneys in his hands belonging to the Grand Lodge, or make 
such arrangements with them as to secure the same ; and, in 
case such arrangements cannot be made satisfactorily to the 
Grand Secretary and Brother Cozier, that Brother Joseph 
Enos be summoned to appear before this Grand Lodge at its 
next Annual Communication, to show cause why he should 
not be expelled the same.” 

The Grand Officers installed in 1825 were re-elected in 
1826. 

A SECESSION REPORT SUPPRESSED. 

The subject of city Lodges and country Lodges was con- 
tinually before the Grand Lodge in different shapes ; at one 
period were presented the following resolutions : 

“ Resolved, That Brothers Asa Fitch, Jonathan Eights, 
Eliel T. Foote, Ezra S. Cozier, and Hiram Steele be a Com- 
mittee to confer with a similar Committee from the Lodges 
in the city of New York, respecting the existing difficulties 
between this Grand Lodge and the said city Lodges, and 
that the Grand Secretary notify the city Lodges of the 
appointment of said Committee. 

Resolved , That the distribution of the report of the Com- 
mittee of the Grand Lodge, on the subject of the secession of 
the Lodges in the city of New York, be suppressed, and that 
the members who have received the reports be requested to 
return them to the Grand Secretary.” 

Subsequently, Brother Fitch reported that the Committee 
had not effected the object for which they were appointed ; 
and the Committee was accordingly discharged. 

1827. 

The sessions of 1827 commenced on the morning of June 
6, at Tammany Hall. Credentials were examined, and an 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


445 


adjournment had until next morning. When “all business 
was ordered to be suspended for the purpose of considering 
the subject of the differences between the Grand Lodge and 
the Lodges in the city of New York.” 

A statement was made by Brother John O. Cole that a 
Committee appointed by an assemblage of brethren from 
the country Lodges had met on Tuesday, June 5, a sim- 
ilar Committee, appointed by the city brethren, consisting 
of Brothers John W. Mulligan, Mordecai Myers, Henry 
Marsh, J. Sprague, and Harris Scoville. That they had 
unanimously agreed to recommend 

A COMPACT 

for adoption by the two Bodies of Masons in this State, 
each styling itself the Right Worshipful Grand Lodge, and 
that the body called the City Grand Lodge had already 
adopted it. That a meeting had been held on the previous 
evening at St. John’s Hall, and — anticipating that this Body 
would do the same — had adjourned, to meet again at the 
Lodge room at Tammany Hall, this Thursday evening, June 
7, 1827, at 7 o’clock, for the purpose of carrying the same 
into effect, namely, of uniting the two Bodies, and electing 
Grand Officers under the propositions submitted, which were 
denominated a compact. 

The proposed agreement having been read (see p. 410, 
ante), the same was taken into consideration and the com- 
pact approved. 

Brothers John O. Cole, Daniel Sherwood, George C. Sher- 
man, Ebenezer Mack, and Freeman B. Hicks, were appointed 
a Committee to make arrangements for carrying the forego- 
ing into effect. 

An adjournment was then had until 7 p.m., when the 
Grand Lodge met at Tammany Hall, where also met the 
members of the Grand Lodge of the city of New York, 
and where was harmoniously and unanimously consummated 
the 



446 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


UNION OF THE TWO GRAND LODGES. 

The Officers of the United Body were then duly elected 
and installed. (See ante, p. 412.) 

The Grand Lodge as a unit in sentiment met on June 8, 
1827, and resolved, that the Committee through whose 
agency the union had been accomplished should convene 
instanter to enter upon the duty of preparing a Constitu- 
tion for this Grand Lodge and report to-morrow morning 
at 10 o’clock; that they should “take as their guide the 
resolutions upon which this happy union has been effected, 
the old Constitution, and the existing regulations of the 
Grand Lodge.” 

On the ninth day of June the Committee reported that 
they had made some progress, but required more time ; they, 
however, submitted, to meet the present emergency : 

“ The 1st Chapter and the 1st, 2d, 3d, and 4th Sections of 
the 2d Chapter of the old Constitution for adoption. 

In the place of Sections 5th, 6th, 7th, 8th, and 9th of Chap- 
ter 2d, the following rules were proposed : 

SUBORDINATE LODGES. 

1. A subordinate Lodge shall consist of a Master, a Senior 
and Junior Warden, Secretary, Treasurer, Senior and Junior 
Deacon, Tyler, and as many members as may be convenient. 

2. No Brother shall be eligible to the office of Master of 
a Lodge unless he has been a Warden of some regularly con- 
stituted Lodge ; except, in case of the formation of a new 
Lodge, no past or former Warden can be found among the 
members, or such Warden shall decline serving. 

3. The Master of every Lodge shall be annually chosen by 
ballot at the regular meeting next preceding the festival of 
St. John the Evangelist. Each member in good standing 
shall have one vote ; and when the number of votes happens 
to be equal, the Master shall have two votes. 

4. When the election is closed the Secretary and Treasurer 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK 


447 


shall carefully examine. the ballots, and report the same to 
the Lodge, and the Brother having the majority of all the 
votes shall be duly elected. 

5. The Senior Warden, Junior Warden, Secretary, and 
Treasurer shall be elected at the same time, and in like 
manner as the Master ; and all other officers shall be elected 
or appointed in such manner as may be prescribed in the 
By-Laws of each Lodge respectively. 

6. The Master of a Lodge shall have the right of congre- 
gating the members of his Lodge upon any emergency which 
in his judgment may require a meeting. 

7. Every motion for the removal of a Lodge shall be made 
at a stated meeting, and lie over until the next stated meet- 
ing. The Master or presiding officer shall, immediately 
upon the making of the said motion, order summonses to be 
issued to the members of the Lodge, in which shall be speci- 
fied the business and time of meeting, which said summonses 
shall be served at least ten days previous thereto. And no 
Lodge shall be removed unless the motion for that purpose 
be decided in the affirmative by at least two-thirds of the 
members present. 

8. The Senior Warden shall succeed to all the duties of 
the Master in his absence; and in the absence of both, the 
Junior Warden shall succeed to said duties. 

9. The Secretary, under the direction of the presiding 
officer, shall record the proceedings of the Lodge, which shall 
be read and corrected, if necessary, and approved by the 
Lodge before it is closed ; also receive all moneys paid into 
the Lodge, and pay the same to the Treasurer. 

10. It shall be the duty of the Secretary, on or before thp 
first Wednesday in June, to transmit to the Secretary of 
the Grand Lodge an annual return of all the members of 
the Lodge, agreeably to the form prescribed by the Grand 
Lodge. 

11. It shall be the duty of the Treasurer to receive all 
moneys paid into the Lodge from the hands of the Secre- 
tary ; keep a just and regular account thereof, and pay them 
out by direction of the Master and consent of the brethren. 



44:8 


HISTORY OP FREEMASONRY 


12. The Tyler shall be subject in all things relating to his 
official duties to the direction of the Master or presiding 
officer. 

IN PLACE OF CHAPTER III. 

Of the Grand Lodge in General. 

1. The style of this Grand Lodge shall be “ The Grand 
Lodge of the Most Ancient and Honorable Fraternity of 
Free and Accepted Masons of the State of New York.” 

2. It shall be composed of all the Grand Officers, the 
Past Grand Masters, Deputy Grand Masters, Senior Grand 
Wardens, Junior Grand Wardens, Grand Secretaries, Grand 
Treasurers, the Grand Stewards of Charity for the time 
being, and the Past Masters, Masters, and Wardens of all 
Lodges under its jurisdiction, and representatives appointed 
according to the rules herein prescribed. 

3. The representatives of ten Lodges, convened on due 
notice, shall be a quorum for the transaction of business. 

4. The Grand Officers shall be elected annually, and be 
styled and take rank as follows : 

The Most Worshipful Grand Master. 


The Eight 

u 

Deputy Grand Master. 

u 

a 

Senior Grand Warden. 

u 

a 

Junior Grand Warden. 

u 

u 

Grand 

Secretary. 

u 

a 

a 

Treasurer. 

u 

a 

U 

Chaplains. 

u 

a 

U 

Marshal. 

a 

a 

a 

Standard-Bearer,, 

a 

a 

a 

Sword-Bearer. 

u 

a 

u 

Stewards. 

a 

a 

Senior 

Grand Deacon. 

u 

u 

Junior Grand Deacon. 


Grand Pursuivant, and 
“ Tyler. 

5. The Grand Lodge shall meet in the city of New York, 
annually, on the first Wednesday in June, at which Commu- 
nication the Grand Officers shall be elected. And Quarterly 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


449 


Communications shall be held on the first Wednesdays of 
September, December, and March. Special meetings may 
also be called by the Grand Master ; but no regulation affect- 
ing the general interest of the Craft shall be changed or 
adopted, except at the meeting in June. 

6. The Grand Master, Deputy Grand Master, Senior 
Grand Warden, Junior Grand Warden, Grand Secretary, 
Grand Treasurer, Grand Chaplains, Grand Pursuivant, and 
Grand Tyler shall be chosen by ballot, unless a special resolu- 
tion shall be unanimously passed at the time to take the vote 
by show of hands. A majority of all the votes shall be neces- 
sary to make a choice, and in case of a tie, the ballot must 
continue until a choice be made. All other Grand Officers 
shall be appointed by the Grand Master during his pleasure. 

7. Each regular member of the Grand Lodge, as such, 
shall have one vote, and each proxy or representative shall 
have the number of votes to which he is entitled, on all ques- 
tions. 

Grand Officers. 

1. The Grand Master has the right to convene any Lodge 
within the Jurisdiction, to preside therein, to inspect their 
proceedings, and require their conformity to the rules of the 
Fraternity. He may require the attendance of any one 
of the Grand Officers, and demand from him information 
respecting his office. He may make Masons at sight, and 
for this purpose may summon such Brethren as he may deem 
necessary to assist him. He may, by written dispensation, 
delegate this power to a private Lodge, on any emergency 
which, in his opinion, may render such measure proper. 
During the recess of the Grand Lodge he shall have full 
power to grant Dispensations for holding new Lodges, on 
proper application for that purpose. 

2. In case of the death, absence, or inability of the Grand 
Master, the Deputy Grand Master, Senior or Junior Grand 
Warden will, in succession, assume his prerogatives and 
duties for all regular and necessary purposes. 

3. The Grand Wardens are to assist in the affairs of the 

yoL. ii.— 29 



450 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


Grand Lodge, and diligently to preserve the ancient land- 
marks throughout the Jurisdiction. 

4. The Grand Secretary shall record the transactions of 
the Grand Lodge. He shall enter in a suitable register all 
Warrants, Dispensations, Certificates, and the name of every 
member of a Lodge under this jurisdiction, returned for reg- 
istry. He shall, as soon as possible, furnish the first named 
person of every Committee with a copy of the records and 
papers which relate to the business of such Committee. He 
shall receive and duly file or record all petitions, applications, 
and appeals, and sign and certify all instruments in writing 
from the Grand Lodge. He is to receive, regularly credit, 
and record all moneys, of the Grand Lodge, and pay over the 
same without delay to the Grand Treasurer. He is charged 
with the correspondence of this Grand Lodge, under its 
general rules, the directions of its presiding officer, and the 
established usages of Masons. It shall be his duty to attend, 
with all necessary writings under his control, on all meetings 
of the Grand Lodge, or the requisition of the acting Grand 
Master. He shall receive such compensation for his services 
as the Grand Lodge shall from time to time direct. 

5. The Grand Treasurer shall have charge of all the funds, 
property, securities, and vouchers of the Grand Lodge, and 
pay all orders duly drawn, under general regulations or 
special directions of the same. It shall be his duty to attend 
on the Grand Lodge or its presiding officer, when required, 
with the books and all necessary documents relating to his 
office, and also to meet with any Grand Committee whose 
general or special duty it may be to act in relation to the 
fiscal concerns of the Grand Lodge. Upon going out of 
office he shall forthwith pay and deliver to his successor in 
office, or to such other person or persons as the Grand Lodge 
may appoint to receive the same, all moneys, securities, evi- 
dences of debt, books, writings, and property of the Grand 
Lodge, in his keeping, or under his control, with all proper 
assignments where the same shall be necessary. He shall 
receive such compensation for his services as the Grand 
Lodge shall from time to time direct. 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


451 


6. It shall be the duty of the Grand Chaplains to attend 
the Grand Lodge, and to perform the religious solemnities. 

7 . The Grand Marshal is to proclaim the Grand Officers 
at their installation, and to conduct processions of the Grand 
Lodge. 

8. The Grand Sword-Bearer shall carry the sword in pro- 
cessions, and perform such other duties as by ancient usage 
pertain to his office. 

9. The Grand Stewards are to have the immediate super- 
intendence in the provisions to be made for festivals. 

10. The duty of the Grand Deacons is to assist within the 
body of the Grand Lodge. 

11. The duty of the Grand Pursuivant is to communicate 
with the Grand Tyler, and announce all applicants for 
admission by their names, Masonic address, and connection ; 
as also to take charge of the jewels and regalia. 

12. The Grand Tyler must be a Master Mason, but shall 
have no vote during his continuance in office. It shall be 
his duty to guard the door of the Grand Lodge on the out- 
side, to report all persons claiming admission, and to see that 
none enter but such as may be duly authorized. He shall 
summon the Grand Lodge when required, and attend to 
such other duties as may be required of him by the same. 
He, together with the Grand Pursuivant, shall receive such 
compensation as the Grand Lodge shall from time to time 
deem proper. 

Funds . 

1. The revenue of this Grand Lodge shall be derived from 
the following sources : 

For every Warrant or Dispensation to form a new Lodge. . $82 00 


For every Dispensation to confer three degrees at one 

meeting 5 00 

For every Grand Lodge Certificate 75 

For every person initiated in a Lodge 1 00 

For every Entered Apprentice or Fellowcraft from without 

the jurisdiction of this Grand Lodge 1 00 

Every Lodge shall pay annually for each of its members. . 50 

For every Master Mason joining a Lodge other than that in 

which lie was initiated or had previously belonged to. . 1 00 



452 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


2. The management of the permanent funds shall be 
vested in a Board of Trustees, to be denominated the 
Trustees of the Permanent Fund. The Grand Master, the 
Deputy Grand Master, the Senior Grand Warden, the Junior 
Grand Warden, and the Grand Secretary for the time being, 
shall compose the said Board of Trustees. All the funds of 
the Grand Lodge shall be placed in the hands, and stand in 
the names, of the said Trustees, whose duty it shall be to take 
the best measures for its security and increase, and to invest 
from time to time, as a majority may decide upon, all 
money which shall come into the hands of the Grand Treas- 
urer after paying representatives, salaries, and rents, and 
after leaving in his hands at the disposal of the Grand 
Stewards’ Lodge, for charitable and contingent purposes, 
the sum of three thousand dollars annually. The said Trust- 
ees shall deposit in the hands of the Grand Treasurer the 
securities and vouchers of the said invested funds, and shall 
not have the power to transfer, sell, dispose of, or appropriate 
any part of the said invested fund without a vote of the 
Grand Lodge at the annual June Communication. 

3. The Grand Secretary and the Grand Treasurer shall 
each of them, previous to entering upon the duties of their 
offices, execute to the Grand Master and the Deputy Grand 
Master for the time being, a bond with two sufficient sureties, 
in such sum as the Grand Master and Deputy Grand Master 
shall determine, not less than five thousand dollars each, con- 
ditioned for the faithful performance of their several duties. 

The Grand Lodge holding its meetings in the city of New 
York for the convenience of transacting its business, and also 
for the purpose of having every portion of this Grand Body 
fairly and equally represented in its Grand Officers, it is 
deemed proper that the residence of certain officers shall be 
permanently located. 

The Grand Master or the Deputy Grand Master shall be 
chosen from the members residing in the city of New York, 
and one or the other of those officers shall be chosen from 
members residing in other parts of the State. The Senior 
Grand Warden and the Junior Grand Warden shall be 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


453 


chosen from members residing in some other part of the 
State than the city of New York. The Grand Secretary 
and Grand Treasurer shall be chosen from the members 
residing in the city of New York. 

Each subordinate Lodge shall be entitled to three votes in 
the Grand Lodge : a Master or a Warden may represent the 
Lodge of which he is a member ; a Master or Past Master 
may represent any number of Lodges, not exceeding three. 
One representative from each Lodge out of the city of New 
York, shall be entitled to receive from the funds of the 
Grand Lodge, one dollar and fifty cents for every thirty 
miles’ travel going to and returning from the Grand Lodge 
at the annual meeting in June ; provided, that none shall be 
entitled to more travel than is actually and necessarily per- 
formed, nor for a greater distance than from the place of 
meeting of the Grand Lodge to the Lodge he represents ; 
and also one dollar and fifty cents per day for attendance ; 
and, notwithstanding he may represent three Lodges, he 
shall receive pay for only one, nor more than he pays for 
the dues of the Lodges he represents. Grand Officers, resid- 
ing out of the city of New York, and not representing a 
Lodge, shall be entitled to the like compensation from the 
funds of the Grand Lodge. 

All which is respectfully submitted. 

John W. Mulligan, Chairman. 

John 0. Cole, Secretary. 

M. Myers. 

Daniel Sherwood. 

Ebenezer Mack. 

George E. Sherman. 

T. B. Hicks. 

J. Sprague. 

H. Marsh. 

Harris Scoville.” 

Whereupon, it was 

“ Resolved , That the amendments to the Constitution pro- 
posed by the Committee appointed for that purpose be 
adopted by this Grand Lodge ; that the said Committee be 



454 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


directed to collate and put in form the said amendments, 
and cause them to be printed and transmitted to the several 
subordinate Lodges for approval ; and, if the same be 
approved by two-thirds of the said Lodges, the same shall 
be the Constitution of this Grand Lodge. 

Resolved , That all votes of expulsion and suspension, aris- 
ing out of the late controversy existing in this Grand Lodge, 
be, and the same are hereby, rescinded.” 

GRAND LODGE OF MICHIGAN RECOGNIZED. 

Brother J. A. Spencer, from the Committee on the subject 
of the Grand Lodge of Michigan, many of the Lodges of 
which were instituted by this Grand Lodge, made the fol- 
lowing report, which was accepted, and the resolutions 
therein contained were unanimously adopted : 

“ The Committee to whom was referred the Communica- 
tion addressed to the Grand Secretary by a Committee of 
the Grand Lodge of Michigan, bearing date September 11, 
1826, report ; that by the said Communication it appears that 
delegates from the several Lodges in the territory of Mich- 
igan met in convention at the city of Detroit, on June 24, 
5826, and continued their meetings, by adjournments from 
day to day, until the 28th of the same month, at which time 
they agreed upon and signed a Constitution, and that, on the 
31st day of July thereafter, the brethren contemplated by 
the Constitution met, agreeable to notice, and made choice 
of the following Grand Officers, viz. : 

M. W. Lewis Cass, Grand Master. 

E. W. Andrew G. Whitney, Deputy Grand Master. 

“ Seneca Allen, Senior Grand Warden. 

“ Leonard Weed, Junior Grand Warden. 

“ John L. Whiting, Grand Secretary. 

“ Henry J. Hunt, Grand Treasurer. 

Eev. Smith Weeks, Grand Chaplain. 

Bro. John E. Schwarz, Grand Pursuivant. 

“ Samuel Sheerwood, Grand Tyler. 



IN THE STATE OP NEW YORK. 


455 


The Committee request a recognition of the Grand Lodge 
of Michigan by this Grand Lodge, and that some qualified 
person may be authorized to install the officers of said 
Lodge. 

The Committee also inform us, that the M. W. Bro. Cass is 
Past Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of the State of Ohio, 
and therefore request that he may be authorized to perform 
this duty. 

Your Committee are peculiarly happy to learn that the 
interest of our ancient Order has been committed to the pre- 
siding care and superintendence of our distinguished citizen 
and Most Worshipful Brother Lewis Cass, and they enter- 
tain the most joyful anticipations that, under him and his 
worthy associates, the privileges and benefits of the Craft 
will be made to penetrate the western wilds, convert the 
moral wilderness into fruitful fields, and cause brotherly 
love, relief, truth, and charity to bud and blossom as the 
rose. 

In the opinion of your Committee, the M. W. Lewis Cass 
is, in virtue of his office of Past Grand Master of the Grand 
Lodge of Ohio, fully authorized to install the officers elect of 
this new Grand Lodge, and that he is, in virtue of his former 
installation, qualified to take upon himself the discharge of 
the duties of the office to which he is elected, without 
another installation. 

Your Committee, therefore, beg leave to submit, for the 
adoption of this Grand Lodge, the following resolutions : 

Resolved, That the Grand Lodge of Michigan be, and the 
same is, hereby recognized by this Grand Lodge. 

Resolved , , That the M. W. Lewis Cass is, in virtue of his 
office of Past Grand Master, fully authorized to install the 
officers elect of the Grand Lodge of Michigan, and that it 
be recommended to him to perform that duty. 

Resolved , That this Grand Lodge feel a lively interest in 
the prosperity of the Grand Lodge of Michigan, and promise 
it our fraternal aid, and invite the most friendly interchange 
of communication.” 



456 


HISTORY OP FREEMASONRY 


CHARITY FOR THE COUNTRY. 

The Junior Grand Warden was authorized to draw on the 
Grand Treasurer for the sum of one thousand dollars, to be 
distributed to such applicants for charity as may reside out 
of the city of New York. 

The financial condition of the Country Grand Lodge, after 
all liabilities were discharged, appeared to be 


A credit in the hands of the Grand Treasurer $ 605.02 

Grand Secretary 1,224.06 


St. George’s Lodge, No. 8, which was the last Lodge to 
surrender its Provincial Charter, sent a Communication 
through Brother Giles F. Yates, acknowledging neglect of 
duty, but presented no returns. The Lodge asked for grace 
and consideration. It was ordered to make full and complete 
returns to this Grand Lodge at the next annual session. 

CENSORSHIP ON MASONIC LECTURES. 

“No subordinate Lodge under the jurisdiction of this 
Grand Lodge shall encourage, promote, or permit the deliv- 
ery of any lecture, said to be Masonic, without authority 
from the Grand Lodge, or a Dispensation from the presiding 
officers thereof ; and before such authority or Dispensation 
shall be granted, such lecture or course of Masonic instruc- 
tion shall be delivered in the presence of the Grand Lodge, 
or of the officers thereof, with such other enlightened and 
intelligent Masons as may be invited or appointed for the 
purpose. And if any Lodge shall so encourage, promote, or 
permit such lecture, or course of Masonic instructions, to be 
delivered without such authority or Dispensation, such Lodge 
shall be suspended from their work or be deprived of their 
Warrant, as the Grand Lodge in their wisdom may think 
proper to direct ; and any Free Mason so lecturing without 
the authority of the Grand Lodge, or the presiding officers as 
aforesaid, shall, on due proof thereof before the Grand Lodge, 
be expelled from the Masonic order, and his name and offense 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


457 


transmitted to every Grand Lodge with whom a correspond- 
ence is interchanged.” 

THE PERMANENT FUND. 

“ Resolved , That the management of the Permanent Fund 
shall be vested in a Board of Trustees, to be denominated 
the Trustees of the Permanent Fund, and that the Grand 
Master, the Deputy Grand Master, the Senior Grand War- 
den, the Junior Grand Warden, and the Grand Secretary, 
for the time being, compose the said Board of Trustees. All 
the funds of the Grand Lodge shall be placed in their hands, 
and stand in the name of said Trustees, whose duty it shall 
be to take the best measures for its security and increase, and 
to invest from time to time, as a majority may decide upon, 
all moneys which shall come in the hands of the Grand 
Treasurer, after paying representatives’ salaries and rent, and 
after leaving in his Sands, at the disposal of the Grand Stew- 
ards’ Lodge, for charitable and contingent purposes, the sum 
of three thousand dollars, annually. The said Trustees shall 
deposit in the hands of the Grand Treasurer the securities 
and vouchers of the said invested fund, and shall not have 
the power to transfer, sell, dispose of, or appropriate any 
part of the said invested fund, without a vote of the Grand 
Lodge at the annual June Communication.” 

Subsequent to further routine business the Grand Lodge 
closed its eventful Session of 1827. 

THE GRAND LODGE (UNITED) OF THE MOST ANCIENT AND HON- 
ORABLE FRATERNITY OF FREE AND ACCEPTED MASONS OF 
THE STATE OF NEW YORK 

assembled in the new Hall October 30, 1827. Eichard 
Hatfield, Deputy Grand Master, in the chair, and the repre- 
sentatives of forty-three Lodges and three proxies being pres- 
ent. Oliver M. Lowndes, Grand Secretary. 

The Eev. Henry L. Feltus delivered a preliminary address 
of dedication of the 



458 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


NEW MASONIC HALL, 

alluding to the building as an ornament to the city and an 
honor to the Fraternity. It was located on the east side of 
Broadway, between Duane and Pearl streets. The Grand 
Master dedicated the building. A procession was formed 
and conducted to the main hall, where the architect, Brother 
Eenagle, in a brief address turned over the building to the 
Grand Lodge. The address was responded to by the Grand 
Master, and the consecrating prayer was pronounced. The 
building Avas rented by the Grand Lodge for two hundred 
dollars a year. The name of the building was changed to 
“ Gothic Hall 55 during the anti-Masonic excitement, and the 
structure was torn down in 1856. 

THE DEATH OF BROTHER DE WITT CLINTON 

caused the Grand Lodge to be convened in Emergent Session 
March 4, 1828, when a consolatory letter was directed to 
be addressed to Mrs. C. Clinton. The funeral services were 
held at St. Stephen’s Church: Eight Worshipful Eichard 
Hatfield, Deputy Grand Master, delivered the eulogy ; the 
Eev. Henry L. Feltus conducted the services for the dead. 

The Eev. Henry L. Feltus died on the following Sep- 
tember. The Grand Lodge directed its members to wear 
mourning for six months, and the brethren of the Lodges 
generally for three months. The Eev. John M. Wain wright 
pronounced the eulogy. 

THE UPRISING AGAINST MASONRY. 

In all ages there are times when society is more sensitive 
than at others, when the community seems to pant for an 
uprising, for an excitement, which, if the opportunity is pre- 
sented, is grasped and the cause readily magnified. So, 
in the years 1826 and 1827 and those following, the people 
throughout the land appeared aroused and thoroughly pre- 




■ - « *d '* ■ ■ 

tVs r • 

r!4rs# , -tv ;j$p, j >.! >/: , 





NEW MASONIC HALL. BROADWAY, 1830. 





IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


459 


pared to enlarge any emergency that would give satisfaction 
or gratification to their morbid and undefined expectancy. 
Masonry, like politics and religion, was in a very feverish 
state ; in fact, there had been more or less dissatisfaction 
within the Fraternity about trivial or more important affairs, 
from the time the State Grand Lodge had assumed suprem- 
acy till now, the hour of proposed harmony between the 
country and the city Grand Lodges. Rivals in politics indi- 
rectly looked to Masonry for preference ; sectarianism was 
watching for an opportunity to use its feather shafts and 
pierce some unguarded opening in the, to them, terrible 
secret organization that should attempt to preach God and 
humanity without doing so from the pulpit under their 
ordained ministry. Some sects were more given to this sen- 
sitiveness than others, and the ebullition of feeling finally 
cropped out among the Baptists, who could not longer con- 
tain their pent-up feelings toward what they asserted was 
their belief of the sacrileges performed and uttered by the 
Masonic Brotherhood. 

The western part of New York State seemed to be grad- 
ually glowing with a fervor of hatred. A convention of the 
Saratoga Baptist Association was convened at Milton, Sep- 
tember 12 and 13, 1827, at which were put forth fifteen 
reasons for their ' “ disfeUowshiping Freemasonry.” The 
Association had met in June, and by vote determined to 
assemble at Milton, to confer as to certain grievances in ref- 
erence to active Freemasonry, as intimated to the Association 
by the churches at Battenkill and Milton. There were rep- 
resented sixteen churches, by fifty-five delegates of the Sara- 
toga Association, and by invitation, six other churches were 
represented by five delegates. 

The origin of the call was an expression, in 1826, in rela- 
tion to Battenkill church, which was upheld by the Milton 
church, u that they utterly disclaimed any hostility to Masons, 
and condemned that proscription of them in general which 
had prevailed in some parts of the State ; and that, as men 
holding property by the same tenure, and possessing similar 
unalienable rights with others, Masons were entitled to 



460 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


respect, and tully qualified, when possessing integrity and 
talents, to hold all civil offices of power and trust.” 

This led to the anathematicaJ resolution, with fifteen sec- 
tions, which was read twice and adopted on September 13. 
The resolution declared “ that we have no fellowship for or 
with the Institution of Freemasonry; and so declare because : 

First. Freemasonry professes to have its origin in and 
from God. 

Second. It professes to correspond with, and bears an 
affinity to, the ancient Egyptian philosophy. 

Third . It adopts a novel and unscriptural manner of 
instructing men in the doctrines, promises, and consolations 
of the Gospel, and draws its lessons of morality from stone 
hammers, mallets, chisels, and other working tools. 

Fourth. It publishes to the world songs, etc., of such a con- 
trariety of character, as to serve the purposes of profanity, 
revelry, the worship of the true God, and heathen deities. 

Fifth. It pretends that its religion and morality are the 
same as those taught in the Bible. 

Sixth. That the ancient Egyptian philosophy, with its 
hieroglyphics and mysteries, and the religion of Christ can- 
not correspond or bear affinity to each other. 

Seventh . It perverts and degrades the meaning of Scripture 
passages, and, by their use and application to Masonic cere- 
monies, dishonors God the Son. 

Eighth. It unwarrantably and irreverently employs the 
name of Jehovah in the dedication of Masonic Halls. 

Ninth. It dedicates Lodges, Chapters, etc., to St. John 
and Zerubbabel. 

Tenth . It authorizes the practice of religious rites, cere- 
monies, and observances, not commanded or countenanced 
in the New Testament, such as observing St. John’s days, 
wearing garments in imitation of those worn by the Jewish 
high-priests, making and carrying in procession a mimic rep- 
resentation of the ark of the covenant, making and wearing 
similar representations of the breast-plate, inscribing on 
miters, £ Holiness to the Lord, 5 and sundry other ceremonies 
and observances. 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


461 


Eleventh . It imposes obligations of a moral and religious 
nature, which cannot be communicated to any other than 
Masons or candidates of the Order, not even to brethren of 
the church of Christ. 

Twelfth . It affixes new names and appellations to both 
God the Father, and God the Son, and those which are 
immoral and irreligious to men. 

Thirteenth . It amalgamates in its societies men of all reli- 
gions professing to believe the existence of a Supreme Being 
of any description ; thereby defeating all its pretensions to 
the morality and religion of the Bible, and sapping the foun- 
dation of Christian fellowship. 

Fourteenth It authorizes forms of prayer accommodated 
to the prejudices of the Jews ; thus rejecting the only Medi- 
ator and way of access to the Father. 

Fifteenth It receives and adopts Orders of Knighthood 
from Popery.” 

Immediately succeeding the above was adopted a resolve, 
“ That we do not fellowship our Baptist brethren, unless 
they completely abstain from Freemasonry.” 

' In support of the assertions made in the above fifteen sec- 
tions to the original resolution, quotations were made in each 
case from such works and authors as Calcott’s “ Disquisi- 
tion,” 1772; Town’s “ Speculative Masonry,” 1818; “Brad- 
ley,” Albany Edition, 1821 ; “ Monitor,” 1805 ; “ Masonic 
Minstrel,” 1816, and its “Appendix,” by Yeriton; “Masonic 
Chart,” 1824 ; “ Ahiman Kezon,” New York, 1825. 

Fourteen churches voted to accept the report. Eight waived 
expressing a decision, until they could consult their churches. 

The proceedings and action were ordered published. 

Much of the disturbance in the Baptist Church was insti- 
gated by the publication of 

william Morgan’s book, 

a professed exposition of the esoteric and exoteric portions 
of Masonry. The work was entitled “ Illustrations of 



462 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


Masonry.” Its proposed issue was the ready tocsin to arms 
against the Brotherhood ; and the brethren were no less on 
the alert to defend themselves and their Institution against 
the calumnies that were as senseless as those quoted above 
by the Baptist Convention. "What grew out of the proposed 
publication of this book was a tidal wave, that well-nigh 
swept the great Fraternity from the land. The comparatively 
puerile act, intended for gain, by William Morgan, compiler, 
and David Cade Miller, printer, at Batavia, in Genesee 
County, 1ST. Y., rocked the country politically, morally, and 
religiously, affecting not only towns and States, but the 
nation. While political parties are essential to a republican 
form of government, there are ever those ready to seize even 
upon the most trivial occurrence to take self-advantage ; 
hence an expression, hereinafter explained, that became a 
by-phrase for political purposes, “ He is a good enough Mor- 
gan until after election.” 

The alleged deportation to Canada, the kidnapping, or the 
taking of the life of William Morgan is not a matter affecting 
the principles of the Fraternity — however great a disgrace to 
manhood such an act, done by misguided men, may be — as 
Freemasonry is an institution founded on the “ Love of God 
and Love of Neighbor.” Humanity and Freemasonry bow 
humbly, if so vile a deed was committed, but the blot upon 
manhood should not deter us from standing up for humanity 
and its consort Freemasonry. That which is and should be 
the highest and strongest arm of the Heavenly Father, the 
Church, is borne down with myriads of instances of inhu- 
man acts, that were not excusable even on the ground of 
self-protection. Under the guise of religion, the Church 
has assumed to be inquisitor, judge, and executioner of 
Free Masons, while Freemasonry, the handmaid of religion, 
has not one proven instance of the blood of its fellow-man 
upon its escutcheon. 

Charges against certain brethren were made, in the case 
of William Morgan, and a manly defense set up. But some 
mistaken men, believing they were serving the right and 
justice, acted fanatically. 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YOEK. 


463 


The several committees of citizens of the counties of Gen- 
esee, Livingston, Ontario, Monroe, and Niagara reported in 
1829, producing numerous depositions and other documents 
and evidence, tending to prove the abduction of Morgan, if 
not his violent death, by the hands of fanatical Masons. 
Therein the committees reported, “ that when the demon of 
fanaticism is at work, there is no knowing to what extent of 
mischief and turpitude he may lead his disciples. 55 From 
time to time, ever since, innumerable queries have been made 
as to the facts in the complicated case, and as to the beliefs 
of prominent Masons in relation thereto, until Brother Bob. 
Morris, LL.D., issued a 400 page, 12mo, book, in 1883, 
entitled, “ William Morgan ; or, Political Anti-Masonry, its 
rise, growth, and decadence, 55 by which it was endeavored to 
show the innocence of our Brotherhood, with a zeal almost 
as great as the fanatics of 1829 exercised to condemn the 
Institution for the acts of a few over-zealons, unworthy 
members of the great Brotherhood. The occurrences per- 
taining to so momentous a question were so important that 
they affected the Fraternity of the State for more than one 
decade, and deserve an unusual share of space in history; 
hence are herein quoted. 

Several accounts agree that William Morgan was a native 
of the State of Virginia, born in Culpeper County, August 
7, 1774, and by trade was a brick and stone mason. Subse- 
quently he was a trader in Bichmond. He married Lucinda 
Pendleton, the oldest daughter of Bev. Joseph Pendleton, a 
Methodist minister and whilom planter in Washington 
County, Va., in October, 1819. Morgan moved from Vir- 
ginia in 1821, and his companion, David C. Miller, printer, 
of Batavia, swore, became a small brewer near York, Upper 
Canada. The brewery was destroyed by fire, and Morgan 
moved to Bochester, N. Y., with his wife and two children, 
and resumed the business of a stone-mason. Thence he went 
to Batavia, Genesee County, a town of 1,400 inhabitants, and 
shortly thereafter he strangely disappeared. 

Morgan has been represented as an idle and very disso- 
lute man. With that, in this connection, we have little to 



464 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


do. He was continually placed within the jail limits, in con- 
sequence of debt. This is subject of proof, and was his mis- 
fortune. It, however, justified no wrong on the part of any 
man, or our Fraternity. Notwithstanding all allegement 
to the contrary, he must have possessed some ability, or what 
followed could not have occurred ; and, if he was known as 
so miserable a wretch, so much the less should any proposed 
exposure of the esoteric portions of Freemasonry have been 
feared, for he would not have had the confidence of the 
community. 

Rumor became a certainty in 1826, that William Morgan, 
in conjunction with other persons, had nearly prepared for 
publication his book, that would expose the secrets and mys- 
teries of Freemasonry, and that David 0. Miller, a printer in 
Batavia, was putting the same to press. Rumor further had 
it that certain Free Masons had united to suppress the work, 
even had they to resort to violence. 

Mr. Miller was the publisher of a newspaper called the 
Republican Advocate , established in 1811 ; and very many 
of his subscribers withdrew their patronage, in consequence 
of the rumor. Miller declared to his friends that he 
believed his personal safety was in danger, that an attack 
was contemplated upon his office, and he prepared to defend 
himself accordingly. 

In what Lodge, if any, William Morgan received his 
degrees in Masonry is not known ; but he certainly was a 
visitor in Wells Lodge, No. 282, at Batavia, established in 
1817. He received the Royal Arch Degree at Le Roy, 
N. Y., May 31, 1825. 

It was openly asserted that two motives governed Morgan 
in his intention to publish his book of exposure : one was 
revenge, in consequence of his not being permitted by Blan- 
chard Powers to be one of the petitioners of the revised appli- 
cation to obtain a charter for a Royal Arch Chapter, in 1826, 
to be located at Batavia ; and the other, an abnormal greed 
for money, which he anticipated he would obtain from the 
sale of the book which he was to write, but which was to be 
revised and printed by David C. Miller. It appears that 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


465 


Miller never received any Masonic degree beyond that of 
Apprentice. 

Before presenting numerous affidavits, procedures of socie- 
ties, and acts and doings of the legislature and of public offi- 
cers, it may be well to state that rumors were innumerable 
as to what became of William Morgan subsequent to his 
abduction — such as that he had been seen about Smyrna, in 
Asia Minor, interested in a mercantile way in the fruits of 
that country ; that he had become an Indian chief in Ari- 
zona, dying about 1876 ; that he was hung in Havana about 
1838, as a pirate ; that he dwelt, under the name of Wana- 
maker, in a shanty near Albany, supported by Thurlow 
Weed and Governor W. H. Seward, until he rebelled, when 
they strangled him. 

W. Morgan’s signature is still visible, and attached to the 
by-laws of the Boyal Arch Chapter in Batavia. 

An advertisement appeared in a Canandaigua newspaper, 
on August 9, 1826, to the following effect : 

“notice and caution. 

If a man calling himself. William Morgan should intrude 
himself on the community, they should be on their guard, 
particularly the Masonic Fraternity. Morgan was in this 
village in May last ; and his conduct, while here and else- 
where, calls forth this notice. Any information in relation 
to Morgan can be obtained by calling at the Masonic Hall, 
in this village. Brethren and Companions are particularly 
requested to observe , marh , and govern themselves accord- 
ingly. 

H^fT* Morgan is considered a swindler and a dangerous man. 

USIT" There are people in this village who would be happy 
to see this Captain Morgan. 

Canandaigua, August 9, 1826.” 

Several papers of that day quoted the advertisement, the 
People's Press and the Spirit of the Times being among the 
number. 


vol. n.— 30 



466 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


The announcement of the publication of the “Illustra- 
tions, by William Morgan, still continued, when, about the 
middle of August, 1826, a man calling himself Daniel Johns, 
a fur trader, who afterwards was discovered to be a Knight 
Templar, appeared in Batavia, and offered D. C. Miller any 
amount of money needed for the publication of the book. 
His offer was accepted, and he thereby became acquainted 
with whatever manuscript had been prepared. Daniel 
Johns and others finally got possession of most of the manu- 
script, which they took to Rochester, and which was thence 
sent to the General Grand Chapter of Royal Arch Masons, 
in session at Hew York City. 

Prior to July, 1826, Morgan had been sued in the Supreme 
Court for a considerable sum due a Rochester gentleman, 
when Hahum Loring and Orange Allen became his bail. On 
July 25, of same year, Morgan was committed to the custody 
of the sheriff of Genesee County, at the suit of Hathan Fol- 
lett, and gave bail for the jail limits. At this time Morgan 
and his family boarded at Mr. Stewart’s in the midst of 
the village ; but, for personal safety and to avoid interrup- 
tion, Morgan personally spent most of his time in the upper 
room of John David’s house, out of the business portion of 
the town, across the Tonawanda Creek. It is in testimony 
that, on August 19, Kelsey Stone, John Wilson, and John- 
son Goodwill, with Daniel H. Dana, a constable from Pem- 
broke, went to David’s house. They inquired for David 
and the other house resident, Towsley, who were found not 
at home. The visitors proceeded to Morgan’s room, arrested 
him, took his writings, upon which he was engaged, and 
conveyed him to jail, without granting him opportunity to 
obtain bail. As the day was Saturday, and the sheriff 
could not be found until after 12 p.m., Morgan could not be 
released until Monday, when he was bailed by Miller. The 
suit was at the instance of Thomas McCully. It appears 
that, as soon as Morgan was imprisoned, Goodwill, McCully, 
and the constable, Dana, repaired to the boarding-house of 
Mrs. Morgan, and stated to her that they had an execution 
against Morgan, and were looking for his property, of which 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


467 


she declared he had none. Goodwill and Dana, however, 
made search, and finally seized a small trunk of papers. 
Mrs. Morgan was then informed of her husband’s confine- 
ment in jail. 

On the night of Sunday, September 10, the printing 
offices of D. C. Miller were discovered to be on fire, but the 
flames were soon extinguished. The cause of the fire was 
never satisfactorily explained. 

The two following affidavits are of interest in connection 
with this incidental circumstance : 

“ Oenesee County , ) John Mann, of Buffalo, blacksmith by 
ss . ) trade, deposeth and saith that, in the lat- 

ter part of August last, or early in September, and very 
shortly before he heard that an attempt had been made to 
burn the printing office of David C. Miller, at Batavia, he 
was riding with one Richard Howard, of Buffalo, a book- 
binder, who then worked with Mr. Haskins ; and, in the 
course of the ride, he, said Howard, asked deponent to pur- 
chase or procure a keg of spirits of turpentine (as he thinks), 
saying he wanted to switch Miller’s office with it, avowing 
at the same time his object to be to destroy the building, for 
the purpose of suppressing a publication, which he said Mor- 
gan and Miller were about making, relating to Freemasonry. 
This deponent declined to assist in the act, intimating to him 
(as he believes) that he had no money to do it with. After 
he heard that such attempt had been made on the office of 
Miller, said Howard told this deponent that he had, with 
others who aided and assisted him, attempted to burn 
said office — that he had called at a store west of Batavia 
and bought a broom or brush to spread the turpentine 
with, and with his dark lanthorn 'had set fire to it ; that 
the fire was lighted up and he ran off ; that some person 
ran after him, and he supposed was about to overtake 
him, when he turned and dashed his dark lanthorn into his 
face, which stopped the pursuit ; that, upon reflection since, 
he concluded that it was a friend who ran after him, but 
had never found out. He believed then and still does 



468 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


believe, that said Howard’s object was to implicate him in 
the transaction. 

John Mann. 

Sworn the twenty-first day of February, before me, 

William H. Tisdale, First Judge of Genesee.” 

“ State of New York, ) Thomas G. Gkeen, late of the town 

Genesee County ss. f of Henrietta, in the county of Monroe, 
and State aforesaid, carpenter, being duly sworn, deposeth 
and saith that, during the summer and until November in 
the fall of the year 1826, this deponent resided in the village 
of Buffalo. Sometime between the twentieth day of August 
and the seventh day of September last, he, this deponent, 
was requested by Bichard Howard, of Buffalo, aforesaid, to 
attend the Lodge of Free Masons in that place ; but Howard 
did not state to this deponent for what purpose the Lodge 
was requested to meet — said there would be but a few there. 
In the evening this deponent started to go to the Lodge, 
and on the way fell in with said Howard, and went to the 
Lodge with him. After the Lodge was organized and had 
proceeded to business, it was openly alleged that William 
Morgan and David C. Miller, of Batavia, were about to 
publish at that place a book purporting to be a disclosure of 
Masonic secrets. This deponent was in the chair, and pre- 
sided for the time. Howard proposed that something should 
be done to prevent the publication of said book. B. Wilcox, 
of Buffalo, who was present, opposed the use of any rash or 
violent means for that purpose. Wilcox wished to know 
what measures it was intended should be adopted. Howard 
proposed that he and one other person, not now recollected 
by this deponent, should be a committee to attend to the 
business, and that they should be left to use such measures 
as they should think proper, so that the book should be 
suppressed. Wilcox proposed that they should be restricted 
from the use of any violent measures ; and it was so con- 
cluded, at that time, that no rash or violent measures should 
be used to suppress the book. 

A short time afterwards, Howard requested that this 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


469 


deponent should go to the Lodge with him that evening — 
that a few were to meet there. In the evening this depo- 
nent started to go to the Lodge room, and on the way fell 
in with Howard, but did not go to the Lodge room. They 
walked together as far as the Franklin House, thence to the 
terrace back of the village, where Howard and this deponent 
had the following conversation. Howard asked this depo- 
nent if he was willing to aid him in suppressing the book 
above alluded to. This deponent said he was willing to 
assist as far as was reasonable and proper, or according to 
what was proposed by Wilcox. Howard said he wanted a 
decisive answer one way or the other ; he wanted to know 
whether he, this deponent, was for them, the Masons, as this 
deponent supposed, or against them. This deponent said he 
was for them, and was willing to aid in suppressing the 
book, if it were to promote the interests of the Masonic 
Institution ; and asked Howard what plan he intended to 
pursue. Howard said they intended to go to Batavia and 
get the papers, which this deponent understood to mean the 
manuscript papers of the book ; and they were to get them 
peaceably, if they could, if not, by force ; and, if they could 
not get them without, they would take Morgan and Miller, 
and carry them off too. This cleponent finally consented to 
join the party and go to Batavia, for the purpose of getting 
the papers as aforesaid. The time for this expedition was not 
agreed upon at this time ; but Howard afterwards informed 
this deponent that it was arranged to be in Batavia, for the 
above purpose, on the Friday evening following, being the 
eighth day of September last. This deponent does not recol- 
lect how many were going from Buffalo. This deponent 
accordingly got into the stage at Buffalo, on Thursday even- 
ing, the seventh of September, for Batavia, and arrived in 
Batavia on Friday morning. During the day, this deponent 
remained in and about Batavia, but conversed with none on 
the subject of his being at that place, except James B'. Tows- 
ley, to whom he communicated the plan of attacking Miller’s 
office. In the early part of the evening, this deponent was 
informed that Towsley had told George W. Harris of the 



470 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


contemplated attack upon Miller’s office, and that this depo- 
nent was the author of this information. This threw many 
obstructions in the way of the expedition, and was a principal 
cause of its total failure ; and for which Howard blamed this 
deponent. In the evening, a number of men were assembled 
in the village of Batavia — how many this deponent cannot 
say. There might have been forty or fifty, and perhaps more ; 
but they were mostly strangers to this deponent ; nor did he 
know where they came from. This deponent understood 
from some of them that it was expected that there would 
have been twenty -five from Fort George and its yicinity ; 
but, as he understood, they did not come. Eight or ten 
were put under the immediate direction of this deponent, 
and the remainder were in different parts of the village, and 
directed by different persons. The whole party did not get 
into the village till nearly two o’clock in the morning of 
Saturday ; and they remained about two hours, and till the 
western stage came in, when the whole company dispersed 
in different directions. This was about four o’clock in the 
morning. During the time they were in the village, no 
attack was made upon Miller’s office. It was understood 
that Miller and Morgan, in consequence of the information 
communicated to them by way of Towsley, had been 
alarmed, and were on the watch ; which caused some con- 
sultation and consequent delay, until the stage came in. 
When the party dispersed, this deponent made his best way 
to Buffalo : went west to the brick tavern, about fourteen 
miles ; thence south to what is called the South Pembroke 
Road, and pursued his way to Monroe’s tavern, about five 
miles from Buffalo. At this place, this deponent saw Col. 
Joseph Shaw, who spoke to this deponent, and asked him 
what he was doing there. This deponent then took Shaw 
one side and requested that he would not call him, this depo- 
nent, by name again, or mention to any one that he had seen 
him at ‘that place, for he, this deponent, had been in a bad 
scrape, and wished him not to. speak of it. Shaw asked this 
deponent what it was; but this deponent refused to tell him ; 
but said he would at some future time, and that Shaw would 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. Oil 

hear about it. From this place, this deponent went to 
Buffalo, where he arrived the same evening. And this depo- 
nent further saith that he has never been personally con- 
cerned, otherwise than above stated, in any measures to sup- 
press the publication of the book, or for the carrying away 
or disposing of Morgan. And further saith not. 

Thomas G. Greek. 

Subscribed and sworn to, this sixteenth day of July, 1827, 
before me, 

C. Carpenter, 

One of the justices of the peace in and for Genesee Co.” 

On the morning of September 10th, Nicholas G. Chesebro, 
Master of the Lodge at Canandaigua, and one of the coro- 
ners of Ontario County, obtained from Jeffrey Chipman, Jus- 
tice of the Peace, a warrant against William Morgan, on a 
charge of stealing a shirt and cravat, in the previous May, 
from inn-keeper Kingsley. Chesebro, Henry Howard, Harris 
Seymour, Moses Roberts, and Joseph Scofield then hired a 
stage and started for Batavia, taking with them on their 
way Asa Nowlen, an inn-keeper at Avon, John Butterfield, 
and Ella G. Smith. When arrived at Stafford, on Sunday 
evening, Dr. S. S. Butler was sent to Batavia to inform 
Nathan Follett and William Seaver, Master of Batavia 
Lodge, that they were coming with a warrant for William 
Morgan. Being joined by James Ganson, the party started 
for Batavia, but meeting Dr. Butler returning, they separated 
on the way, a portion returning in the carriage and the others 
proceeding on foot to Batavia. The next morning Morgan 
was arrested and taken to the inn at Stafford. Notwith- 
standing D. Q. Miller was on the bail that Morgan would 
not leave the jail limits, the driver was over-persuaded, and 
finally the party arrived at Le Roy. Morgan appears to 
have consented to go to Canandaigua, fifty miles from 
Batavia, saying he could convince Mr. Kingsley, the prose- 
cutor, that he did not intend to steal the shirt and cravat. 
Morgan was examined by the magistrate, Loton Lawson 
appearing for him, and he was discharged. 



472 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


Morgan was immediately rearrested on a claim against 
him for $2.68, due Aaron Ackley, an inn-keeper. Morgan 
admitted the debt, confessed judgment, took off his coat, and 
told the constable to levy on that, or take it as security. 
This was refused and Morgan locked up. 

This was on September 11, 1826. On the succeeding 
evening Morgan was released by a person claiming to be 
from Pennsylvania. 

The two following affidavits, the first by William Morgan’s 
wife and the other by the wife of the jailer at Canandaigua, 
tell much of the story and are interesting legal documents in 
the case : 

“ Genessee County , ) Lucinda Morgan, aged twenty-three, 

ss : f the wife of William Morgan, of Batavia, 

in said county, being duly sworn, deposeth and saith — that 
on Monday last, about, or a short time before sunrise, her 
said husband left his house, and went into the street of the 
village; that finding he did not come to his breakfast 
as usual, she made inquiries for him, and was told that he 
had been forcibly taken away by six men, and put into a 
carriage and taken to Canandaigua. That during the whole 
of Monday she remained in ignorance of which way he had 
been taken, or who had taken him, excepting by loose infor- 
mation, that an officer from Canandaigua had taken him. 
That on Tuesday morning soon after breakfast she sent for 
William B. Thompson, the sheriff, and requested to know of 
him if he knew on what pretext her husband had been taken 
away. Said Thompson told her he understood he had been 
taken under a charge of having stolen a shirt and cravat, 
and that he presumed it was merely a pretext to get him 
away, or carry him away; that thereupon this deponent 
asked him if he thought Mr. Morgan could be got back, or 
brought back, if she gave up to the Masons the papers she 
had in possession ; said Thompson answered that he thought 
it was very likely that Mr. Morgan would be brought back 
if she would give them up ; but he would not obligate him- 
self, or undertake to say that he should be brought back. 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


473 


That thereupon said Thompson proposed that this deponent 
should go to Canandaigua, and take the papers, and give 
them to Morgan, or to them, or give them pp ; and deponent 
agreed to go and take the papers accordingly. Thompson 
then asked this deponent if there was any person or friend 
whom she would like to have go with her. She mentioned 
Mr. Gibbs (meaning Horace Gibbs), and asked if it would do 
for him to go ; said Thompson said it would not do for him 
to go, as he was not a Mason, and added, it would not do for 
any person to carry her there but a Mason. She asked him 
twice if Mr. Gibbs was not a Mason, and he said he was not, 
and then asked deponent if she was acquainted with Mr. Fol- 
lett ; deponent said she was not. Thompson said he was a 
nice man, and a gentleman with whom she could safely trust 
herself. Said Thompson departed, and soon returned, and 
told deponent that Mr. Follett was not willing to go, unless 
she would let him (Follett) and Mr. Ketchum see the papers ; 
he did not want to go on a Tom-fool’s errand. This depo- 
nent then objected to the papers being seen by them ; Thomp- 
son then said it was useless ; he should do no more, and he 
could not send her out there unless they could see the papers. 
Deponent then, with great reluctance, finally consented to 
let them see the papers, if they would take her to see her 
husband. This second visit lasted about twenty minutes, 
during which time Thompson urged the deponent to let the 
papers be seen. Deponent told him she was afraid they 
would take the papers away from her, if she let them see 
them. Thompson said they would not. She offered to let 
Mr. Thompson see the papers ; he said that would not an- 
swer, they would not take his word. Thompson then told 
her he would go to Humphrey’s and stay until she had got the 
papers, and she must then make a sign to him when she was 
ready. Accordingly, a short time afterwards she made a 
sign to Mr. Thompson, then standing on Humphrey’s stoop, 
and immediately after he, with Mr. Follett, and Mr. Ketchum, 
came to her apartment, when Thompson introduced Follett 
and Ketchum, and said they had come to see the papers, 
which this deponent then handed to them. They all looked 



474 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


at them a short time, and Thompson then asked her if she 
was ready to go, saying Mr. Follett was ready to take her. 
Follett then said he would go home with the papers, and look 
them over, and told Ketchum to stop for him at his gate. 
Accordingly, about four o’clock in the afternoon of Tuesday, 
deponent started with said Follett and Ketchum in a small 
wagon, and proceeded to Stafford, where they stopped at a 
house, where she was conducted into a back room, into which 
Follett and Ketchum came, and were joined by one Daniel 
Johns, and by James G-anson; all of whom immediately pro- 
ceeded to examine the papers with much earnestness, and 
held much low conversation with themselves in under voices. 
Gan son appeared to speak the most. One of them then 
asked Johns if those were the papers that were in the office 
when he was there. Johns answered there was one degree 
back, and then took a piece of paper, and folding it up, said 
the papers that were back were folded so. They then held 
considerably more conversation in voices too low to be heard. 
Follett then turned to deponent, and told her he did not see 
that he could go with her ; that Mr. Ketchum was going to 
Rochester, and would be willing to take her to Canandaigua 
to see Mr. Morgan ; said he was not much acquainted with 
him (Ketchum), but took him to be a gentleman, — and 
Ketchum then said he called himself a gentleman, and she 
need not be afraid to trust herself with him. Ketchum then 
took the papers, and tied them up in his pocket-handkerchief, 
and took them with him into the wagon in which they rode. 
Johns then got into the wagon and rode to Le Roy, when 
he got out and bid Ketchum good-by, saying, ‘ I hope I shall 
see you day after to-morrow . 5 They then proceeded to Avon 
and stayed all night. The next day they again started for 
Canandaigua, when Ketchum put the papers into this depo- 
nent’s trunk. They arrived at Canandaigua about twelve 
at noon, and stopped at a tavern at the corner of the main 
street. After being there some time, this deponent asked 
Ketchum if he had heard of Mr. Morgan. Ketchum said 
he had not ; that the Masons could not talk to him ; he could 
not see them ; they seemed jealous of him : thought him a 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


473 


friend of Mr. Morgan, and was afraid he had come to get 
him away from that place. Then asked her where the papers 
were ; he took them and said he would go and make further 
inquiries for Mr. Morgan ; and if he could find him, or where 
he was, or where they had taken him, he would let her know 
all he could find out. This was about dinner time. He 
returned again a short time before night, and told her he 
had heard Mr. Morgan had been there ; had been tried for 
stealing a shirt, and cleared, had been then put in jail for a 
debt of two dollars; and that Tuesday night a man had 
come from Pennsylvania, who said he had a warrant against 
him for a debt he owed there ; that he, the man, had paid 
the two dollars, and had taken him away in a private car- 
riage on Tuesday night, and he had no doubt he was gone ; 
and asked this deponent when she would go home again. 
The deponent then expressed her anxiety to return speedily 
on account of having left her child of two years old, and 
having with her a baby of two months old. Ketchum then 
went out, as he said, to take a passage in the stage, and 
returned after candle-light. This deponent was then walking 
the room in great distress and in tears. She asked him if he 
could hear nothing of Mr. Morgan. He then seemed to pity 
deponent, and told her not to be uneasy, and after looking 
at her a short time, told her to come and sit down by him, 
and asked her if she would feel any better if he told her 
what he knew. Being answered yes, he then said that 
Mr. Morgan would not be killed — that he would be kept 
concealed until they could get the rest of the papers. She 
asked him what papers were back. He said there were some 
sheets on the Mark Master’s degree back ; and they wanted 
also to get the printed sheets that Miller had printed on the 
three degrees. He then said he wanted to take the papers 
he had received from this deponent to Eochester, and he 
thought through the means of them he could find out where 
Mr. Morgan was ; it was a secret where he was. Said he 
had paid her passage, and then gave her two dollars to bear 
her expenses home. He then wrote his name with a pencil 
on a scrap of paper, hereto annexed, as follows : ‘ George 



476 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


Ketchum, "Rochester , 5 and promised to write to her if he 
could hear of Mr. Morgan ; he then told her if she would, 
by any means, get hold of the papers that Miller had, or 
find out where they were deposited, so that he could get 
hold of them, he would give her twenty-five dollars out of 
his own pocket, and he had no doubt the Lodge would give 
her one hundred if she could get what Miller had now. 
Deponent told him she would not try to get the papers that 
Miller had, and would take no money, and would not let 
him have the papers she had delivered to him, but on condi- 
tion he would try and find out where Mr. Morgan was, and 
let her see him. He then repeated his promise to try and 
find out, and said he would write to her as soon as he got to 
Rochester, and urged her to write to him immediately on her 
return, and let him know about the papers, and what the 
people were doing generally in Batavia, and whether they 
were making a great rumpus about Mr. Morgan. Deponent 
then expressed her fears, that if she did give him any infor- 
mation about the papers, he would not keep his promise 
about letting her see him, but would keep him concealed 
until they got all the papers, and finally kill him. Ketchum 
then said, ‘ I promise before my God that I will not deceive 
you, but will do all I can to find out where he is, and let you 
see him. I have no doubt when I get back to Rochester I 
can find out more, and I think I can find out where he is . 5 
He then again urged her to find out where the papers were, 
and let him know. In the course of his conversation he 
said, that if Mr. Morgan had managed rightly he could have 
made a million of dollars, if the work had been published. 
Ketchum then departed for Rochester, leaving this deponent 
at the tavern ; she, the same day, started for Batavia. The 
papers taken away by the said Ketchum were numerous, and 
formed a very large bundle ; they were written in the hand- 
writing of her husband, excepting a few, which were written 
by a person who sometimes assisted her husband by copying, 
or taking down, as he dictated to him. The deponent 
further says she has no knowledge of the place where her 
husband now is, or what is his situation, and feels the most 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


m 


anxious fears for his life ; that she was born in Virginia, and 
is a stranger, without any intimate friends and relations in 
this country, and is left with two infant children, without 
any money, except what is left of that given to her by said 
Ketchum, and has no property nor any means of supporting 
herself and her children, her constitution being very feeble, 
and her health being bad most of the time. 

L. Morgan. 

Sworn the twenty-second day of September, 1826, before 
me, 

Daniel IT. Chandler, J. P.” 

“ State of New York, Ontario | Mary W. Hall, of Canan- 
Gounty , ss : ) daigua, in said county, being 

duly sworn, deposeth and saith — that she is the wife of 
Israel It. Hall, keeper of the common jail of said county; 
that she, this deponent, the said keeper, her husband, and 
family, reside in the jail of said county ; that she, this depo- 
nent, and her husband, had been absent, and returned home 
on the twelfth of September instant, in the afternoon ; that 
in the early part of the evening of the said twelfth day 
of September, her husband went out from the jail; that 
soon after her husband left the jail, and about seven o’clock 
in the evening, or a little past, a man, who afterwards and 
during the same evening said his name was Lawson, called 
at the jail and inquired for Mr. Hall, the keeper, and she, 
this depondnt, informed the said Lawson that Mr. Hall was 
not at home, and that she did not know where he was ; that 
the said Lawson then said that he wanted to see Morgan, 
alluding, as this deponent supposed, to a man in prison by 
the name of William Morgan ; that this deponent then went 
to the door of the room in which the said Morgan was con- 
fined ; that the said Lawson requested to go into the room 
where Morgan was, but this deponent told him he could not, 
for it was against the rules of the prison ; that the said Law- 
son said he wished to have a few moments’ private conversa- 
tion with Morgan, but this deponent told Lawson he could 
not say anything to Morgan but what this deponent should 



478 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


hear ; that the said Lawson then spoke to Morgan through 
the grates of the door, and said he wished to have some 
private conversation with him, the said Morgan, but this 
woman, alluding to this deponent, would not let him ; that 
this deponent said to Lawson, ‘ Who be you ? do you live in 
the village ? 5 to which the said Lawson made no reply, but 
the said Morgan said, ‘He is a neighbor;’ that the said Law- 
son told Morgan he had come to pay the debt for which the 
said Morgan was committed ; and Lawson asked Morgan if 
he would go home with him ; to which Morgan answered, 
yes ; that Lawson then said, when Mr. Hall, meaning the 
said keeper, came in, he (Lawson) would satisfy the execu- 
tion, and take him, the said Morgan, out, and carry him 
home; that the said Morgan answered, it was no matter 
about it that night, he could wait till morning ; that Law- 
son said no, he would rather take him, the said Morgan, 
out, and carry him home with him that night, for he had 
been running all day for him, and he was so tired he could 
hardly stand on his feet ; that the said Lawson then went 
away, and said he would look for Mr. Hall, the said keeper ; 
that in about half an hour the said Lawson returned, and 
said he had been to the hotel, conference room, and every 
other place in which he thought he should be likely to find 
Mr. Hall, but he could not find him ; that the said Lawson 
then requested that this deponent should receive the amount 
of the execution on which Morgan was committed, and 
discharge him; but this deponent refused to do this, and 
told Lawson she did not know the amount; that Lawson 
told her it was a small sum, and he (Lawson) would leave 
five dollars, which he knew was more than sufficient ; that 
this deponent then told Lawson that she, this deponent, had 
understood that Morgan was a rogue, and that she did not 
like to liberate a rogue ; that she, this deponent, understood 
great pains had been taken to secure Morgan, and that the 
public or individuals were interested in having him kept 
secure ; that what she (this deponent) should do would be 
considered the same as if it had been done by her husband, 
the said keeper ; and if she (this deponent) should discharge 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


479 


Morgan, she was afraid her husband would be blamed ; that 
Lawson said no, Mr. Hall would not be blamed, and repre- 
sented to this deponent that Mr. Hall understood it perfectly, 
and if he was at home would discharge Morgan ; and further, 
he, Lawson, said he would pledge himself that Mr. Hall 
should not be injured or blamed ; that he, Lawson, would 
pledge himself to the amount of fifty or an hundred dollars 
that Mr. Hall should not be injured if this deponent would 
discharge Morgan ; but this deponent refused, and told Law- 
son she valued public opinion more than money ; that Law- 
son then asked this deponent if she would discharge Morgan 
if Col. Sawyer (meaning, as this deponent supposes, one 
Edward Sawyer, of Canandaigua aforesaid) would say she 
could safely do it, and that it would be right, or if he would 
pledge himself that Mr. Hall should not bejnjured, or would 
run no risk in discharging Morgan ; that she, this deponent, 
answered that she did not know Col. Sawyer any better 
than she did him (Lawson), and that Col. Sawyer was not 
plaintiff in the execution upon which Morgan was commit- 
ted, and that he, Col. Sawyer, had nothing to do with it ; 
that, however, Lawson then went away, and said he would 
go and see Col. Sawyer ; that Lawson then went away, and 
was gone but a few minutes when he (Lawson) returned, and 
Col. Sawyer with him; that Col. Sawyer requested that 
this deponent would discharge Morgan, and said there could 
be no kind of risk in doing so ; that Mr. Hall should not be 
injured ; that Lawson would pay the debt, and there could 
be no harm in discharging the prisoner when that was done ; 
that this deponent said she did not wish to keep a man in 
jail who ought to be let out, but she did not wish to liberate 
a rogue, as she understood Morgan was one ; that nearly the 
same conversation again took place as had before passed 
between this deponent and Lawson ; that Col. Sawyer and 
Lawson appeared to be offended that this deponent would 
not discharge Morgan ; that Lawson said the debt for which 
Morgan was committed was assigned to Chesebro (meaning, 
as this deponent supposed, and afterwards learned, Nicholas 
G. Chesebro) ; that Lawson said to Sawyer, ‘ Let us go and 



480 


HISTORY OP FREEMASONRY 


find Chesebro ; ’ that they both went to the door, and this 
deponent also, and saw two men a few rods from the jail 
coming towards it; that this deponent observed that, per- 
haps, one of them might be Mr. Hall, upon which Lawson 
went towards them, and directly one of the said men came 
to the door of the jail where this deponent and Col. Sawyer 
were standing ; that this deponent asked if it was Mr. Chese- 
bro, to which the man answered yes ; and this deponent 
immediately recognized him to be the said Nicholas G-. 
Chesebro ; that this deponent said to Chesebro, 6 There is a 
man in jail that these men 5 (meaning Lawson and Col. Saw- 
yer) 4 want me to liberate, and they say you are interested, or 
that you have bought the debt;’ that Chesebro said, ‘ Let him 
go ; these men will pay the execution ; I don’t want to see 
him ; I have no demands upon him ; ’ that this deponent, in 
the early part of the evening, and before Mr. Hall left the 
jail, had observed Mr. Hall and Chesebro in low conversa- 
tion, and supposed that probably it was understood between 
them; she, this deponent, then consented to receive the 
amount of the execution, and discharge Morgan ; that dur- 
ing the evening a man had been to the jail with Lawson, 
whom Lawson called Foster, but unknown to this deponent ; 
that Lawson, after this deponent consented to receive the 
amount of the execution, and discharge Morgan, paid to this 
deponent the said amount of execution, or laid it on the 
table ; that then this deponent took the keys and was going 
to liberate Morgan ; that Lawson spoke to this deponent and 
said, "Wait, and I will go with you ; 7 that Lawson then 
stepped to the door and whistled, and then followed this 
deponent ; that when they came to the outer door of the 
prison, Lawson said to this deponent, i You need not fasten 
this door after us ; ’ but this deponent said she should, for 
there were other prisoners in the room ; that this deponent 
and Lawson went into the hall adjoining the room where 
Morgan was, and Lawson spoke in a low voice to Morgan 
through the grates, ; Get yourself ready to go with me — 
dress yourself quick;’ that Morgan was soon ready, and 
this deponent let him out, and Lawson took Morgan by the 



IN THE STATE OP NEW YORK. 


481 


arm and went out of the prison to the outer door; that 
while this deponent was fastening the prison door she heard, 
at or near the outer door of the jail, a most distressing cry 
of murder; that this deponent ran to the door, and saw 
Lawson and the man that he called Foster, one on each side 
of Morgan, having hold of Morgan's arms; that Morgan 
continued to scream or cry in the most distressing manner, 
at the same time struggling with all his strength, appar- 
ently, to get loose from Lawson and Foster ; that the cry of 
Morgan continued till his voice appeared to be suppressed 
by something put over his mouth ; that during the time that 
Morgan was struggling, and crying murder, the said Col. 
Sawyer, and the said Chesebro, were standing at a short dis- 
tance from the jail door, near the well, and in full view and 
hearing of all that passed, but offered no assistance to Mor- 
gan, nor did they attempt to release him from Lawson and 
Foster ; but one of them struck with a stick a violent blow 
upon the well-curb, or a tub, standing near ; that soon after 
this deponent saw a carriage pass the jail in the direction that 
Lawson and Foster took Morgan ; that the evening was quite , 
light in consequence of its being about the full of the moon ; 
that she, this deponent, could distinguish from the jail door 
the horses in the carriage which passed to be gray ; that this 
deponent supposed the striking upon the well-curb, or tub, by 
Chesebro or Col. Sawyer, was a signal for the carriage to 
come, as it came immediately after ; that when the carriage 
passed, Lawson and Foster could not have got but a few rods 
with Morgan ; that immediately after the striking upon the 
well-curb, or tub, Col. Sawyer, and, as this deponent thinks, 
Chesebro also, passed the jail door in the direction that Law- 
son and Foster took Morgan, but not apparently to render 
Morgan any assistance towards being released from Lawson 
and Foster ; but Col. Sawyer, however, picked up Morgan’s 
hat, which had fallen off in the struggle ; that when Mor- 
gan was taken from the jail it was about nine o’clock in the 
evening, ora little past; that this deponent has since been 
informed that Lawson lives about two or three miles from 
the jail ; that this deponent has never seen Morgan since he 
vol. n. — 31 



482 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


was taken from the jail as aforesaid, and knows nothing 
about where he was taken to, or where he now is, and 
further saith not* Mary W. Hall* 

Subscribed and sworn to, this twenty-third day of Septem- 
ber, 1826, before me, Jeffrey Chipman, J. P.” 

Corroborative affidavits by the neighbors as to what they 
heard and saw were collected, and freely published through- 
out the western counties. 

It is assumed from testimony subsequently taken before 
officers of the State, that Morgan was carried, willingly or 
otherwise, hy relays of horses, through towns and villages 
designated Yictor, Rochester, Clarkson, Gaines, Wright’s 
Tavern, Molineux Tavern, Lewiston — a thickly populated 
country, within twenty-four hours, a distance of over a hun- 
dred miles, and securely lodged in the magazine of Fort 
Niagara* 

About the time this was occurring, there was in Batavia a 
large street assemblage of excited citizens and strangers, 
when Constable Jesse French led the way to Col. David 
Cade Miller’s printing-office, where French arrested Miller, 
who was subsequently placed in a wagon, accompanied by 
seven others, and driven to Stafford, a village about six 
miles from Batavia. He was there detained several hours 
in an upper Masonic Lodge room, guarded by the constable’s 
assistants. Here Miller was visited by Daniel Johns, his 
financial partner, but with no friendly result. Towards even- 
ing the entire party proceeded four miles further, to Le Roy. 
Miller finally obtained access to the justice who had issued 
the warrant, but as neither constable, warrant, nor plaintiff 
appeared, Miller was granted his liberty* Daniel Johns 
appeared to have been the plaintiff, and he, with Constable 
French, finding their former prisoner released, attempted to 
make forcible seizure of him, but he escaped and returned to 
Batavia the same evening, September 12. The above act 
led to the indictment of James Ganson, Jesse French, Ros- 
well Wilcox, and James Hurlburt, for riot, assault, and false 
imprisonment at the October Session of the County Court. 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


483 


French received a sentence of one year in the county jail, 
Wilcox escaped with six months, and Hurlburt with three 
months, which sentences they served. Ganson was acquit- 
ted, but two other indictments were found against him, one 
for conspiracy with Daniel Johns and George Ketchum, to 
obtain Morgan’s manuscripts ; the other for conspiracy with 
sixteen others to destroy Miller’s office. 

The first part of Morgan’s “ Illustrations ” was issued, 
greatly to the surprise of members of the Fraternity, who 
deemed that the manuscript they had obtained had sup- 
pressed the work, and that the abduction had defeated any 
attempt to replace it. George Ketchum had obtained from 
Mrs. Morgan the original manuscripts of the three degrees, 
which had been delivered to her by Miller, in order that she 
might thereby recover her husband, but Miller had not done 
this until he had a portion printed and secreted in an old 
straw bed, and the remainder duly copied. 

The persons directly charged with the abduction of Mor- 
gan were Nicholas G. Chesebro, Col. Edward Sawyer, Loton 
Lawson, Eli Bruce, and John Sheldon, who were tried for 
kidnapping, whereat Burrage Smith and John Whitney, two 
witnesses, declined in part to answer questions, lest they 
might criminate themselves. 

Upon the arrival of the party with William Morgan at 
Fort Niagara, that structure was found to be unoccupied, 
save by the keeper, Col. E. Jewett, and his wife. Near it 
was the ferry house, directly on the bank of the river, in 
charge of Edward Giddins. The magazine of the fort was 
a strong structure, secured by two doors — the inner one of 
white oak, iron faced. Near the roof were two small win- 
dows, about fifteen feet from the floor. In consequence of 
broken locks, doors, and other surroundings, it was not 
charged that the keeper was privy to the incarceration of 
^Morgan ; in fact, from the debris within, violence would 
seem to have come from the inside. It is clearly established 
that Morgan was subsequently taken to the British side of 
the river by four men, where it was alleged he was seen by 



48 4 


HISTORY OP FREEMASONRY 


Mr. McBride, M. P., but this was denied by him in solemn 
manner. The Masons of Upper Canada in and about Fort 
George did not, at least then, enter into the spirit of the 
abduction, and the party recrossed to the fort with Morgan, 
where he was still known to be on September IT, 1826. The 
towns and villages were somewhat alive with rumors, and 
the strange proceedings that were occurring mainly after 
nightfall ; and Niagara, Lewiston, Youngstown, and even 
Lockport gave evidence of unusual Masonic excitement. 
Eli Bruce, sheriff of Niagara County, and Samuel Barton, of 
Lewiston, Jeremiah Brown, Jared Darrow, Corydon Fox, 
Paul Mosher, David Hague, Col. William King, and William 
Moline ux, all well-known residents of that section of the 
State, were continually in consultation and activity. 

The exertions of the Governor of New York, and of the 
Governor of Upper Canada to trace Morgan beyond Fort 
Niagara proved unavailing; pecuniary rewards and the 
Governor’s pardon failed to produce any information. Five 
citizens, more or less implicated, left the State ; many wit- 
nesses disappeared ; two witnesses before the Grand Jury of 
Monroe County at Eochester, Edward Doyle and Simon B. 
Jewet, refused to testify, on the ground that they would 
criminate themselves. 

The following is the report of the trial of Eli Bruce and 
others, for conspiracy to kidnap William Morgan, and carry 
him from the county of Ontario : 

ONTARIO GENERAL SESSIONS, AUGUST 20, 1828. 

Present, Hon. Nathaniel W. Howell, Hon. Chester Loomis, 
Hon. John Price, and Hon. Samuel Eawson, judges of the 
county courts of Ontario County. 

The indictment against Eli Bruce, Orsamus Turner, and 
Jared Darrow, for a conspiracy to kidnap and carry away 
William Morgan from the county of Ontario to parts 
unknown, was brought on for trial at the opening of the 
court in the afternoon. 



IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 


485 


Counsel for the people : Daniel Mosley, Esq., special com- 
missioner ; Bowen Whiting, district attorney of Ontario 
County ; and Charles Butler, Esq. 

Counsel for the defendants : Hon. Dudley Marvin and 
Mark H. Sibley, Esq., of Canandaigua ; William H. Adams, 
Esq., of Lyons ; and Vincent Matthews and Ebenezer Griffin, 
Esqrs., of Eochester. 

The following persons were sworn as jurors : Hiram 
Anson, Nathan Cary, Jasper W. Peet, Levi Smith, Amasa 
Spencer, John Stults, Everet Green, Abraham Dodge, Henry 
Lincoln, Daniel Short, John Pennal, jun., and Samuel Eeed. 

Mr. Whiting having opened the case to the jury, on behalf 
of the people, the following testimony was introduced : 

Israel i?. Hall, sworn. — The witness was jailer of Ontario 
County in 1826. He knew William Morgan, who was com- 
mitted to the jail of said county, on the tenth of September, 
in that year, and discharged on the twelfth of the same 
month, as this witness has been informed. Witness was 
absent from the jail at the time of Morgan’s commitment 
and discharge. 

Jeffrey Chijpman, sworn. — Witness was a justice of the 
peace in Canandaigua, in September, 1826. On the morning 
of the tenth of that month, it being Sunday, Nicholas G. 
Chesebro came to the witness’s house and requested him to 
go to his office. He did so. Chesebro came in soon, and, 
shortly after him, Ebenezer C. Kingsley, who made a com- 
plaint against William Morgan, for larceny. Chesebro stated 
that Morgan had come from Batavia, and was, at that time, 
about six miles west of Canandaigua. Witness issued a war- 
rant against Morgan, directed to the sheriff or either of the 
constables of Ontario County, or to Nicholas G. Chesebro, 
one of the coroners thereof, by virtue of which he was appre- 
hended, brought before witness on Monday evening, and by 
him discharged, for want of sufficient proof to convict him. 
Chesebro then requested of witness a warrant against Mor- 
gan, on a demand which he held against him as assignee of 
Aaron Ackley. A warrant was accordingly issued, Morgan 
arrested, judgment entered up against him by his consent, 



486 


HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 


execution thereon taken out and given to Holloway Hay-* 
ward, then being a constable in Canandaigua. 

Holloway Hayward, sworn. — The witness was a constable 
of the town of Canandaigu