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$1.50 

APRIL, 1885 
VOL.5 N0.4 



Journal 



Devoted Exclusively To The Atari Computer User" 




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Published by the Michigan Atari Computer Enthusiasts 



F-IRESXIDE CHAT 



MACE 



Well, folkst it's happened* The temperature is 
rising around the or fireside* As you know, 
MACE has been able to obtain some really nice 
group rates on certain hardware and software 
from Data World Distributing* I'm sure those 
of you who are now using your new Indus 
drives are pretty much happy with them* Aside 
from the OSS ToolKits, the Indus drives are 
the only item that has had any response* Since 
last October, when the Indus drives were first 
offered, approximatley 15 members have 
bought them* 

Now comes the hard part* When a businessman 
calls and says he is prepared to offer 
merchandise to your members at substantial 
savings, do you say "No thank you, we can buy 
them for much more locally" or do you go for 
it? Well, we decided to go for it* 

Data World, located in Tennesee, is a local 
retailer and out of state distributor* So 
what's the big problem? After all, judging by 
other Atari group newsletters we're certainly 
not the only ones who take advantage of such 
offers* However, our local advertisers have 
more or less insisted that we stop 
partdpating in group purchases or they will 
stop advertising* Fortunately, the financial 
impact of such a move would not be significant 
to the publication costs of this newsletter* 
Our three local advertisers cover about 1/5, 
maybe a little less, of its total cost* 

Now then, after RiteWay finished calling all 
the other advertisers, I called them also* Two 
of the three are willing to discuss prices and 
the possibility of bulk ordering our equipment 
for us* So we are going to meet with them and 
discuss products, group wants and needs, and 
cost! MACE would be more than happy to 
continue our group purchases through a local 
dealer if possible* But, we will continue* 
After all, if we can't accept a reasonable offer 
just because it's an out of state source, 
there's always K-Mart and Toys-R-Us* And 
they don't tell us how to run our club* 

Warmly, 

Kirk 



The following purchases are available for 
MACE members until April 10th* 



From Data World Distributing ♦* 

Anchor Volksmodem 300/1200 baud 
Hayes compatible****225*00 

Mpp 64k printer buffer 

for any parallel printer***$ 105*00 

From Sector 1 International* 

Atari 1020 color printer/plotter 
(10 or more)***$59*00 



Send certified check or money order payable to 
MACE to the PO Box. Include your name, 
address, phone number and MACE membership 
number* Orders must be received by April 
10th* 




The MACE Journal is published monthly by the 
Michigan Atari Computer Enthusiasts* Unless 
otherwise noted, material published in the 
Journal is in the public domain and may be 
reproduced for private or user group use 
providing proper credit is given* 

Submissions to the Journal can be mailed to 
the F>0 Box, uploaded to the MACE BBSs or the 
Superboard at (313) 543-4094, or uploaded 
directly to the editor at 646-4455* Where 
possible, submissions should include a disk or 
tape file in AtariWriter or similar format and 
a working copy of the program* Specify format 
for screen dumps (Atari Artist, Koalapad, etc*)* 
Authors whose submissions are published will 
receive a certificate good for a free disk or 
tape from the MACE library* Deadline for 
submissions is the first of each month* 




T|8 PPT S|0P 

BRODERBUND SOFTWARE 
48K CXSK * PRINTER REQUIRED 
REVIEWED BY ANN MCBAIN EZZELL 





don't know about yout but I have 
been getting my computer 
magazines soggy by drooling over 

Print Shop since they started 



since 

announcing last fall that the program was 
available for At^i csimfKilwrfe Print Stmp tmm 
been around for a couple of inconsequential 
other machines for a while^ and the full color 
ads stowing ^rmmtii^^ cmjf^ ottor 

print(»i^ iMSterpitftMlii^iNM^ moi^ tempting « 
Around Christmas, I actually saw Print Shop 
for the Atari listed as available from a 
mail-order (%#«llf you can't buy ALL your 
software locally , you know!) house back East* 
and snatched up the phone to place my order* 
Alas# while they had been promised that stock 
would be available by tti#^^ time^^ ^^ 
appeared, Print Shop had not yet been 
released* I placed an order any way » full of 
taofi» ttot I woi^ be sealing out pcrtonalized 
Valentine's cards this year* Cupid came and 
went# but not the UPS truck* 

hm you tnay have guessed from this month's 

cover, Print Shop was in fact finally released, 
I got my copy, and my printer has been 
humming ever sinos* The prc^ram is all that 
the ads promised, and more* If you own one of 
the supported printers, get your hands on this 
program RIGHT NOW, stock up on computer 
paper^-l^ i^^Mmo sandwichoiH ^^nd have 
yourself a ball* Not convinced? Well, how 
about a few details? 



Print Shop comes with a quality, 28 page 
Reference Manual which immediately tells you 
that .tte program is so mMS^ t& uoo tbat you 
donf^ iii^ to rMif ^ mtfPMli Being thr 
cautious type, I looked through the manual 
anyw^yi and was impressed by its logical 
layout and doir fraphiaif -ftie mmmsmi JMmm 
you step by step ttwough th#^fm}cess of using 
Print Shop, occasionally interjecting boldface 
notes of special interest* There is also a 
^Btfmmmm Cmt4 which shows the built in 



graphics and fonts, and the commands for 
entering text* Rounding out the package are 
samples of colorful (mine were bright blue) 
pinfeed paper and matching envelopes» a flyer 
advertising more paper, envelopes, and color 
printer ribbons, a $10 discount certificate 
good on a purdiaw #f $50 or more of suppttMr 
amfft* 

THE PBIKT SHOP PRCXjRAM DISK 

The manual was right, you know* You don't 
really need to read it to use the program* 
Print Shop options are aH selected from 
menus, with appropriate illustrations 
appearing as you highlight the various choices* 
The main menu of fers: G REBTI MG CARD» 
MGN, LETYfiWifiAD, BANISR, ^REEN 
MAGIC, GRAPHIC EDITOR and SETUP* 
Selections are made with the cursor up and 
cursor down ki^« 

The first step is to SETUP the program to 
work with your particular printer* The back of 
the package states that Print Shop om^^i^ lMi 
used with the following printers^ Apple 
Imagewriter, DMP, & Scribe, C* Itoh 
(Prowriter)f NEC 8023Af Citinn MSPI^ 
Legend 880, BMC» Blue Chip M120/10» 
Mannesman Tally Spirit 80, Admate DP- 100, 
Star Gemini 10x/15x, Panasonic 
KX-P1090/1091f-Centromcs GLP (Axiom SLP>» 
Okidata Microline 92/93, and the Epson 
RX-80/MX-80 & lOO/FX-80 Sr lOO/JX-80 
(older Bifmm^ printer models mmf ^ fiKpiire 
Graftrax)* The choices in the SETUP option of 
the program also include the Radix 10 and 
Didta 10 from Star Micronics* Not listed as 
supported, sadly, are ^le Gemini-10/i9 seri#s 
printers* I have a Gemini-10, and most of the 
functions can be made to work# with some 
^^tMions* I'm sure that wtioever makes the 
decisions at Broderbund had good reasons for 
not supporting this extremely popular machine, 
but I fail to see them* If you have a 
Geff^ii-10/15 printer^ t#s# it to write toS 



'—3 



Broderbund Software ' 
17 Paul Drive 

SwRafMltCA 94903-2101 

and lodge a protest* Then go out and buy Print 
SIKH3 anywayi because it's so fantastic that 
even with the limitations ifrqiowtf by a sI^^Mrly 
different operating system* it's the best 
printer utility around* 

But back to the program*** 
Once you have indicated the printer you will be 
using » you canfirait out a test that tells you if 
your printer i# %iKirkiiig properly and lets the 
program adjust its linefeed controls* (You 
might need to turn off the automatic linefeed 
DIP switch on your printer if you get extra 
spaces between the lines of prints but tha**s 
all covered in the manual*) You can then save 
the pfintiM^ configuration to the Print Shop 
disk so that you won't have to go through the 
SETUP procedure each time you use Print Shop* 

Rpring determined that your printer is ready 
to gOf it's time to design your first creation* 
GREETING CARD is at the top of the menut so 
tet/e etart mitk tluib^ T^am Hrmt choice is 
whether you want to design your own or use 
one of the ready-made cards included on the 
disk (Birthday# Christmas» Season's Greetings^ 
Valentine^ Anniversary^ Thank Yout Invitationt 
or Note Paper)* Most of these "canned" cards 
can be personalized with the name of the 
recipient* Illustrations of these pre-designed 
cards would have made a nice addition to the 
Reference Manual* 

ftNl^yi#step in designing your own card is to 
choose the border for the front cover* You 
have nine from which to choose* or you may 
elefuft iiot>^4iave a border* As you highlight 
your way through the menu selections* the 
border around the menu changes to show you 
what, each border looks like (very nice touch)» 
A idl^'tNrtop ef^#ie«^ track 

of where you are in the design process 
("GREETING card: FRONT")* and a prompt at 
the bottom remiiMte ^ktn.^^^ 
ESCape to go back to the previous menu* This 
last feature makes Print Shop a dream to use* 
since you can sti^^-back throi^t^ tiie menus to 
change one item wflhout destroying yot^ 
creation and having to start over* 



After selecting a tNirderf you get to choose 
from among the 60 graphics included on the 
diskt or you can load in your own design 
created with the built in GRAPHIC EDITOR* 
Each graphic is illustrated and numbered on 
the Reference Card* so you can make your 
choice by picture while stepping through the 
memif or simply enter the nufTd)er of the 
graphic* There are 50 detailed graphics for 
many occasions (Christma? tree# bunny* rocket* 
pianof Cupidt birthdii^ ^ori^eiftN etc*) and 10 
background patterns* As with all of the 
options* you may omit the graphics entirely* 

Size of the^sign (small* medium* and largn^ ui 
the next decision* A single large graphic will 
be centered on the page* up to 5 medium or 13 
Miall graphics can be placed in stmB§MBdi 
format* Small graphics can be "tiled"* creating 
a mosaic appearance* The background patterns 
are always tiled* 

Print Shop provides you with eight fonts to 
match the mood of your message* Once you 
have selected a font* the text entry screen 
will appear* The size of this screen is 
determined by the size of the chosen font* 
Print Shop will not let you enter more text 
than will fit on your design* Text twveil 
printed in two sizes and three forms (solid* 
outline and 3-D)* It can be centered or 
justified either right or left* Tliere is a help 
menu available to explain these options* but 
the choices are also indicated on the screen as 
you edit* If you wish* Print Shop will center 
the text vertically for you* 

You repeat the above procedures to design the 
inside of your greeting card* and then you are 
ready to print* I must admit I wondered about 
the first choice on the print menu* GIVE 
YOURSELF CREDIT* Was this a shortcut 
option for users who credited themselves with 
above-average computer literacy? No, it lets 
you put a by-line (or price* if you're going 
commercial) at the bottom a€ the back paget 
just like Hallmark and all the other biggies* 

Tmi sail select tim number irf ct^ies to print 
(default is 1)* then test the paper position 
which is critical to allow proper folding of the 
finished card* The test option prints a line of 
fine #ot# across the page* These dots should 
run directly over the perforations between the 



sheets of paper* The test can be repeated 
until the paper is profiid^ aUgned* Next 
highlight the PRZHT optiofit press <RETURN>, 
and sit back while the presses rolh (Well, you 
do have to flip the d^^ over to Side but 
nobody ever said life was fair*) In just a few 
minutes you will have a masterpiece suitable 
for mailing* Johann Gutenberg» eat your heart 
out 



You can repeat the same design by selecting 
PRINT again (more disk flipping)f or step back 
through the menus to make any desired 
changes. You can also return to the main 
menuy thereby wiping out your design» but you 
Jtmsm tQ tell the program twice to do thist 
which makes for a little added insurance 
against losing your work* 



of the main menu» let's look at the 
other options* Designing a full-page SIGN is 
the same as creating one panel of a greeting 
.card* You can create custom ^ ^'''TEBBFAP 
with a line of large^ decorative type and up to 
three lines of smaller type at the top and/or 
bottom of the page^ and you can embellish your 
stationery with graphics (diff erent or^ie 
same for top and bottom) in assorted 
positions* The BANNER mode lets you print 
i9Mt JLetters and graphics horizontally to 
pradtice banners of any length* You can 
combine different fonts and graphics Jby 
printing banners consecuitiMll}¥« 

Print Shop includes a separate program 
accessed by the SCREEN MAGIC option* This 
mode has 12 kaleidoscopes which allow you to 
freeze* save and print the patterns created* 
You can also overlay solid or outline text in 
any of tbe Print Shqp fonts* The final fcsreen 
can be printed in normal or inverse video* with 
or without a black frame* and covers either the 
t«3p or tottom half of an 8 1/2 by 11 sheet of 
pifi^* Graphics created with SCREEN MAGIC 
are not interchangeable with those from the 
Print Shop files or GRAPHIC EDITOR* To 
iMive files* you must format a ilisk immg^ the 
#int Shop disk* This iltek oMiat then be iiied 
for any files not in the Print Shop format* 



pixels in an 88 X 52 grid* Cursor movement can 
be controlled firom -|he keyboard* a joystick* 
the KoalaPad or the Atari Touch Tablet* I 
found the keyboard method a little tedious* 
but the other devices were reasonably easy to 
control* Mind you* this is by no meMS in the 
Microlllustrator class* but it is certainly 
adequate for the purpose* The menu 
mmmandSf listed on the right mdm of the 
screen* allow you to load or save a picture* 
clear the screen (you must confirm this choice)* 
select the drawing device* return to the main 
menu* or print a sample of your picture to see 
how it will actually look* Another handy 
feature of this editor appears at the bottom of 
the screen* where the X and Y cxxxrdinaibmof 
the cursor are displayed* allowing you to keep 
track of its exact location* This is very useful 
when you are drawing a picture with a regular 
pattern* 

In addition to thoroughly explaining the 

qpiirAtioo the Re^wonee 

Manual indiKles a page of "Creative Ideas" and 

a number of tips about printers* The last page 

explains the limited warranty* if the disk 

faite mutton 2 yeara of pun^tMOf it %i^4Mi 

replaced free when returned with proof of 

purchase* If your dog chomps the disk* or it's 

been more than 2 years* it will cost you *S 

(plus *2*50 postage and handling) for a 

replacement* This seems fair enough* but it 

would have bemk^mm t^J^m able to make a 

single back'-up copy* 

Now that you know all aboiit.lM^ wo^rs of 
Print Shop* I expect that you will all rush 
right out and get a copy of your very own* You 
missed St# Patrick's bay* but Easter is coming 
upr Motherfs Day*** and 4m*i\ ^oiiet Nikola 
Tesla's birthday (July 9th)* The possibilities 
for creativity are endless* You can even 
design fantastic covers for your favorite user 
flroMp newslirtter ^ 



MACEI 



Mi 

m 



MflCEf 




The GRAPHIC EDITOR lets you create and 
save your o^m designs for inclusion in Print 

Shop products* You can also modify designs 
already on the disk* You draw by turning on 



IMACE 





mm 



fly 




iriACEl 



ill 





Ai5 1 mentfoned ih my review of Prtoit €hopt the 
program is not designed to ^pport the 
Gemini-10/15 printers (bc30# hiss!)* Most of 
the functions can to midc^ to work properly^ 
though^ 50 I thought I would let other non-x 
owners know what I have discovered about 
using Print Shop* - 

The first thing you will need to do is turn off 
DIP switch number 4 (located at the left rear 
of the print«f^>#% -l^m m3k^^^^ lirafeeds 
after CR (Carriage Return! code input* 
Remember to turn the switch back on before 
trying to do any other printingt or tht printer 
will not work properly # The switdi setting 
should be changed while the printer is turned 
off* 

When you SETUP Print Shop for the first timet 
select the (jemini-10x/15x printer option and 
perform the pi^ter testf ttien save the 
configuration to diiflil The test Ktill print a 
broken diamond rather than an unbroken one* 
but that's life. 

The major problem in using Print Shop with the 
older (3emini printers seems to come from the 
way they ftificlte Unefeeitev Tlm^^^^M thttt 
you cannot use the automatic paper alignment 
feature^ because the printer will not space 
down to the proper starting point* I have 
found that^ lining up the horizontal 
perforations with the lower angle in the metal 
which is on either side of the platen works 
well* (Remove the printer cover and look to 
the side of the platen just above the ribbon; 
you will see the angle in the metal support*) 

Ifhen printing greiribi9 cards» you will not get 
proper spacing between the front and inside 
panels* The program stops to think and access 
the disk after printing the inner panel* During 
this pause in printing ^ use the ON LINE button 
on the printer to go off line and tap the L*F* 
(Lkie Feed) button 14 times* Put the printer 
Umdk on line and everyttnng stayld line up just 
finst You will have to realign the paper to do 
more printing* To print multiple copies^ you 
will have to realign manually between sheets* 



I have had no trouble printing signs* Line up 
the paper the saiM ms the greirtir^ cards* 

Without automatic linefeeds^ spacing between 
the top and bottom parts of a letterh»^ will 
not be correct with DIP switch 4 set to OFF* I 
have done only a little experimentation ^ but 
letterheadf including graphics^ seems to print 
properly with switch 4 on* (Remember to turn 
off the printer before changing the DIP switch 
settings*) You can use the built in paper 
alignment procBdure if switch 4 is on* 

Banners do not seem to work at all well on the 
iififmm-li^ The spacing on some of the 
graphics is irregular ^ and there is too much 
space between the lines of blocks that form 
the letters* 

Pictures printed with the SCREEN ^i^^EC 
mode have a blank line near the top of the 
picture* which may or may not be much of a 
problem depending on the density and shape of 
the design* (I use a felt-tip pen to fill in the 
border when necessary*) 

When printing a sample of an edited shape 
from the GRAPHIC EDITOR^ there is also an 
extra blank line at the top» and trailing 
horizontal lines to the right of the picture. 
The result is reasonably legible* 

Sot if you wanted Print Shop far its 
banner-making capabilities and you own a 
Gemini-10/15f forget it* (There are lots of 
public domain banner programs aroi^» 
anyway*) Otherwise^ I think it's worth it* You 
aren't likely to find another program that will 
do anywhere near what Print Shop can do» even 
though it isn't 100% compatible with your 
printer* Remember^ even a rose has thorns* 

(If anyone else has any advice abQi^-imm§ 
Print Shop with non-supported printers^ 
please let me know» and I will pass the 
information on*) 




FREE.CATALO(» 



SECTOR 




INTERMATIOM<!kL 




A 

ATARI 



37220 TRICIA ORJVE, STERLING HEIGHTS, MI. 48077 
ORDER INFO. Phone: 313-978-2208 9am - 7pin. EST 





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DOM'T SEE IT? PLErtSE CALL - 313-^78-2208 



The MACE Education SIG wiU meet on 
Wednesday t April 17th at Mount Clemens High 
School* This meeting is open to anyone^ 
interested in computers in education* For 
more information or directions ife the high 
schoolt call SIG-ED Chairman Mark Kennedy 
evenings at (313) 465-5849* 

AGENDA 

7*00 pm Greetings 
7J10pm LOGO SAMPLER demo 

7:20 pm SOUND-SPELL demo 
7:30 pm tba 

7H0 pm FubUshfr Project (announcement) 
7149 fim Op#iNliiNSussion 
8:00 pm Free refreshments 
8:i5 pm PRINTWIZ ttook-see-try) 



Atarimusic SIG* Contact Mike Lechkyn at 
978-8432 or leave a message for the Sysop on 
the MACE BBS (313) 973-1685* 



Assembler SIGJ Meeting* the 1st 

Thursday of each month* Contact Todd 
Meitzner at (313) 542-1752 for more 
information* 



Graphics SIG: Did anyone ever get this SIG 
started? Please let us kru}«^ mtmi and where 
you are meeting* 



to anil 
9*30 pm Exchange of user written programs 



DISK CASE SPECIAL 



MACE'S East Side SIG is selling portable disk 
cases for $25*00* These hard cases have a 
carrying iMlijift and^.4P^ 
about 150 disks* To order or for more 
information, call Ron at (313) 778-7832 or Mike 
at (313) 751-7290* 

The East Side SIG meets the 1st Tuesday of 
each month at 7:00 pm at the Italian Cultural 
Community Center, 28111 Imperial in Warren 
(between Hoover and Schoenherr)* 



The Detroit Area Ch^t«^ of the FORTH 
Interest Group (FIG) will have its next 
meeting on Tuesday* March 26th at 7pm at the 
Ford Motor Company Diversified Products 
Technical Center (Meeting Rm* B)t 17000 
Rotunda Drive (NE corner of Southfield Rd*) in 
JDeaid^orn* For more^infomation about the local 
chapter* contact Tom ChrapkieiiiicsL afc-^^^^(^ 
562-8506 or 845-4570 x60* 



If there are any other SIGs currently active* 
send information about your meetings to the 
Journal Editor* If anyontt^would lij|$e to see a 
£E& starl4id» tet as know * 



We have some information from Antic Magazine 
via one of qmt members regarding a typing 
service which formerly advertised in Antic and 
went out of business without fulfilling its 
obligations* The company was AMTYPE* based 
in Las Vegas* If you di^ not receive 
satisfactory service from this company* you 
can contact Stephanie Love at the Joyce and 
Martin Advertising Agency (telephonies) 
382-4008)* That agency arranged the 
advertising for AMTYFE and was Antic's 
contact* Good luck* 

In the October 1984 issue of the MACE 
Journal* there was a review of PRO*PLUS* a 
utility for the ProWriter printer* Information 
about where to obtain the product i#as 
inadvertantly omitted* You can contact Mike 
Yocum* author of PRO^tPLUS* at: 

3118 North Prospect 
Peoria* IL 61603 
(309) 688-1679 

MACE still needs volunteers to run the coffee 
and pop table at our meetings* Contact Kirk or 
Jcott M.yiiu are willing to help out with this or 
at the other tables* 




by Ann McBain Ezzell 



A%lirl% high molution grapMcs fiKide (GR« 8) 

is wonderful for detailed displays* but you are 
normally restricted to a maximum of four lines 
of twt at the bottom of the screen* Tou can 
of course insert lines of Graphics 0 text by 
altering the display list* but you cannot 
display graptuoi on euch lumm* Fortunately» it 
is possible to ifrfx ^ext with W-res graphics by 
copying the Atari character set bit patterns 
into the Graphics 8 display memory* 

Atari characters are printed in an 8x8 matrix* 
The data for each character are stored in sets 
of 8 czmsecutive bytes starting at location 
57344 («E000)« (See page 143 of Ian 
Chad wick's Mapping the Atari for a more 
detailed description of the character set«) The 
patteme^^ of "on" bits in the character set 
bytes form the characters on the screen* Since 
each bit in the screen memory bytes for 
Graphiis 8 controls omi pixf 1 of display^ it is 
poMible to do a one-to-one mailing from the 
character set bits into Graphics 8 screen 
memory and create text on the graphics screen* 

Fetching the data from the character set and 
POKEing it into screen RAM using Atari 
BASIC^iMuld be excrutiatingly slowf but 
ACTION! plots text in Graphics 8 almost as 
quickly as the Operating System prints 
Graphics 0 (HeU» m^ eyes can^t eae^any 

difference***) These ACTION! routines 
also let you plot "tall" letters that are twice 
the height of Graphics 0 characters* Any 
characters you can t^ie in will be reproduced^ 
tm:hiding inverse video* 

To use this program^ type in the routines using 
the ACTIONS Editor and itrite a copy to disk or 

tape* Exit to the Monitor and compile the 
program* then run it* If you have typed the 
routines wttNiiil^MfiMrSf you will see a blank 
Gr^hics 8 scre e n with a prompt in the text 
window. Choose "T" for tall letters or "N" for 
normalf then decide where you want your text 
to start* You can l^}eofy a hiNrizontal starting 
position from 0 to 312* Normal Graphics 0 (40 
column spacing) would have letters starting at 



multiples of 8 (0> 8t 16, etc*), but you can start 
anywhere you wish* Next you choose the 

vertical starting fiositioOf from 0 to 153* 

Again, Graphics 0 spacing would be at 

multiples of 8* 

Toil will next be prompted to enter up to a 

maximum number of characters, based on the 
horizontal starting position* Limiting the 
length of your line of text mil prevent letters 
from wrapping around and overwriting the 
beginning of the line* The routine checks to 
make sure that you have not entered too many 
characters* If you have, you must enter few e r * 
After the program prints your text, you will be 
asked if you want to print more text* If so» 
you can again choose tall or normal characterst 
then specify the starting positions* 

When you have finished entering all the textt 
you tie given a chance to save the screen* 
The program uses BPutO from the ACTION! 
Toolkit to save the screen RAM* If you have 
the ToolKit, INCLUDE the IO«ACT f Ue when 
you compile this program* If you doit^ Mve 
the ToolKit, you will have to write your own 
routine to replace "savescreenO"* (To test the 
rest of the programt make "saves cre e n O* a null 
routine so that it will compile without errors*) 



BYTE max»chr»errorcode»inver5e» 
ifremain^tallf 

e=CO] 

CARD stirMmMNif holderror 

BYTE ARRAY charset(1024)=$E000, 
text(40),filename(15) 

* 

f 

{replacement error processing 
{routine - see ACTION! library 

{procedure Error 

♦ 
# 

PROC traperror(BYTE erronaodv) 

IF errorcode=137 THEN 
Print£<"Too many characters!") 
e«l 

FI 
RETURN 



I 



Uoops until key is pressed 

PROC waitkeyO 

WHILE BMk(764)»255 

DO Oti 
PDke(764,255) 
B£TUBN 



returns upper case normal video 
I- rvjects non-letters 



BYTE FUNC getcharO 
chr-OetD<7) 

IF chr>127 THEN 

chr=»-128 
FI 

IF chr<'A OR (chr>'Z AND chr<'a) 
ORchr>'zTHEN _ , . , 
getcharO 

EL^IF chr>«'« THEN 
chr==-32 

FI 

Putichr) 
PutEO 
RETURN(chr) 



PROC getfileO 
PrintC'Enter filename ") 
PrintEC (including device) I") 
In p utS(f ilename) 

RETURN 



f setup procedures 

CARD FUNC getvalue(CARD val) 

CARDc 

c=InputC() 

IF c:; val THEN 

Put<253) ;buzzer 

Print("(0-") 

PrintC(val) 

Fyint<"), pleaseJ ") 
' getvalue(val) 
FI 

RETURN<c) 



PROC findstartO 
BYTE scrlo=»58,scrhi=$59 

CARD xstart»ystart " 

Put(125) 

Print("(T)all or (Ntormal? ") 
chr=getchar() 
IFchr='TTHEN 
tallsl 

ELSEIF chrO'N THEN .;: 

findstartO 
ELSE 

tall=0 
FI 

Print("Enter starting column ") 
Print("(0-312)J ") 
X5tart=getvalue(312) 
Print("Enter starting row ") 
Print("(0-153K -) 
ystart=getvalue( 1 53) 
scareen=scrlo+256*scrhi 
start=screen+xstart/8+40*ystart 
{avoid text wraparound 
max=(320-xstart)/8 

remain=xst^t MQP 8 
RETUSp 



PROC gettextO 
PrintC'Enter up to ") 
PrintB(max) 
Print(" character") 
IF max>l THEN 

Print("s") 
FI 

PrintEr of text: ") 
holderror=Error 
Error=trap error 
InputMDCOftext^max-i- 1 ) 
Error«holderror 
IF e THEN 
e=0 

gettextO 
FI 

JBETURN 



PROC setup 0 
findstartO 
gettextO 

RETURN 



i 



iCDnvert ATASCU tg character code 



# 



5?- •-. t-V- 



BYTE FUNC convert(BYTE asdi) 



IFasai> 127 THEN 

Mcu«=-128 

inverse=l 
ELSE inver5e=0 
FI 

IP ascu>95 "mm^ 

ccDde=ascii 
ELSEIF «sdi>31 THEN 

ELSE 

ca3de»ascii+64 
FI 

R£TURN(ca3de) 



;f etch the data from charactirr set 

J- XOR with 255 to invert bit pattern 
#f or inverse video printing 



# 



BYTE FUNC fetchbyte(BYTE ctr,code) 
BYTEdjyte 

cbyte=charset(8*code+ctr) 
IF inverse THEN 



FI 

HETURN^^yte) 



f 



Jput proper values into screen RAM 
^ for tall letterst put each byt% 
fin tvi^icB 

if letters are offset horiz* 
iftjom QM) positionsf spread bits 
;out over two bytes of screen RAM 



t 



PROC putb(CARD offset,BYTE newbyte) 

- • h- ' i 

BYTEb.J,b2,si,s2 



IF tail THEN 
offsft==*2 
FI 

loc>^tart-K)fFset 

IF remain THEN 
bl=newbyte RSH remain 
b2«newbyte LSH (S-remain) 
sl=bl%Peek(loc) 
s2=b2%Feek(loc+l) 
PokeUocisl) 
Pokeaoc«-l»s2) 
IF tall THEN 
Poke(loc+40,sl) 
Pokeaocf41»62) 
FI 
ELSE 
PokeUocinewbyte) 
IF tall THEM 

Poke<loo-40»newbyte) 
FI 
FI 
RETURN 



♦ 

ffar each character^ get each of 8 

kbytes from character set and put 

finto sisreen RAM 
« 

PRCX: eachchar(BYTE c) 

BYTEbfCbyte 

c=convert(c) 

' FORb=0 to 7 
DO 

^yii^fctcfcitiyte^lttG) 
putb(b«40,cbyte) 

OD 
RETURN 



PROC printtextO 
FOR i»l to text(O) 

DO 

eachchar(tezt(i}) 

start*«+l 

OD 

RETURN ' 



CARDlCN^ 



11 — 



PROC printloopO 
Graphics(40) 

setup 0 

printtextO 

Ptit(125) 

Print("More text? (Y/N)") 

chr=getchar() 

IF c:hr=89 THEN 

printloopO 
FI 

RETURN 



- uses BPutO from ACTION! ToolKit 



PROC savescreenO 
Prxnt("Save screen? (Y/N) "I 

IFchr=89THEN 
getfileO 
CloseCZ) 

Open(2>filename»8t0) 
BPut(2t5creen,6400) 
CloseCZ) 
FI 

Print("Fyess any key to continue") 
waitkeyO 
RETURN 

PROC mainO 

Graphics<8) 

printloopO 

savescreenO 
RETURN 



Here is a sample procedure to load in a screen 
saved with the above prograim It uses BGetO 
from thirJtaBTKWf ToolKit* 

PROC loadpicO 



BYTE scrlo=*58,scrhi=*59 
Graphics(8) 

screen»scrkH*256«scrhi 

Close(2) 
getfileO 

Open(2»filename»4»0) 
BGet(2^screen f6400) 
Clo5e(2) 
waitkeyO 
RETURN 



Kl 



UTIL-I 



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ACTION! TOOLKIT 
Reviewed by Ann McBain Ezzell 



The ACTION! language from Optimized 
Systems Software is a programmer's dream» 
providing a structured^ high-level language 
that compiles to run at near-machine language 
speedSf but trying to learn to program in 
ACTION! by reading the supplied reference 
manual is like trying to learn conversational 
English from i?oget's Thesaurus* The 
introduction dearly states that it is mil a 
tutorial^ but rather a reference manual^ an 
admission which is admirable for its honesty 
but not much help to someone wanting to learn 
the language* tl heard a rumor to the effect 
that the authors of the ACTION! manual 
attended the Marcel Marceau School of 
Doaimefitationft) 

So what do you do while waiting for Berlitz to 
cofnti eirt with a six week crash course in 
ACTIOH!? For starters^ you might want to 
invest in the ACTION! ToolKit, The ToolKit 
provides you with some useful routines for 
^uidling such things as player/missile 
graphics and real (non-integer) numbers* plus 
demo programs shpw^g ACTIONI's strength in 
sound and gripMcs« Tou can of course simply 
include the provided routines in your own 
ACTION! programs* but you can also study the 
source listings (most of the routines are 
written in ACTION!^ with a few machine 
language enhancements where warp speed is 
essential) and pick up some ideas that will 
help ^Ki freate your own masterpieces* 

There are twelve files of routines on the 
ItekJCit disk» five stand-alone demo files* and 
assorted short demos* It struck me that some 
of the routines might have been included 
simply to fill up the disk* perhaps I was being 
unchmn^Mm* Vm mm certainly judge for 
yourself* but it seems to me that anyone who 
would understand the meaning of "absolute 
value" would be able to write a rcxrtine to 
return the absolute value of a iHjmtHnr* 
Nevertheless* there are certainly enough truly 
useful routines on the disk to make it a 
worthwhile purchase* whether or not you take 
the time to study them as programming 
examples* 



In addition to the ABS*ACT file* the following 
rputines are provided* 

ALLOCATE«ACT - to allow dynamic runtime 

memory manipulation* These routines could 
stand more documentation* specifically an 
explanation of why one would wai|t use 
them* 

CHARTEST*ACT - to test single characters to 
see if they are alphabetic* numeric* upper case 

or lower case* also to change letters to upper 
case or lower case* 

CIRCLE*ACT - to draw a circle of specified 
center* radius and color* Very f§st* 

CONSOLE«ACT - to hook the *«ncution of a 

specific routine to the pressing of one of the 
console keys (OPTION* SELECT* START)* 
These routines would be very useful for 
anyone writing a menu-driven program* 

IO*ACT - to do "advanced disk file 
manipulation"* Hidl*** Five of these roi^es 

simply hold your hand through the XIO 
procedure in the ACTION! Library (included in 
the SuperCvtridgel to iCMr«Mt a disk* rename* 
i^ase* protect or unprotect a file* The last 
two routines* BGet and BPut* are useful and 
advanonil* They make use of Atari's CIO 
routines to read and write blocks of data with 
a specified device* These make saving and 
retrieving screen displays a piece of cake* a 
fact which could have been pointed out on the 
blank half page at the end of this section of 
the manual* 

J0YSTIX*A£:T - to return the horizontal and 
vertical position of a specified joystick* 
These are improvements on the Stick function 
in the ACTION! library and are certainly very 
easy to use* 

PMG*ACT - to allo«# easy implementation of 
Atari's player/missile graphics (PMG) 
capabilities* These commands should should 
be part of any language for the Atari* With a 
BYTE ARRAY de^iuration and four simple 
procedures* you can set up your PMG system* 
then use the other functions and procedures to 
move the P/Ms* keep track of their horizontal 
and viHTtical positions and handle collisions* 
(There is a small documentation error in this 



section} a procedure actually called PMColor is 
refenred io as PMSetColor*) 

PRINTF»ACT - extensions of the Library 
PrintF routine^ to allow control of field size 
4liul justification in printed output* When 
neatness counts» these routines will be a big 
help* 

^^JffiAL*ACT ^low access to the ROM 

floating point routines* A big sigh of relief is 
heard from the hard core number crunchers*** 
Using these routines isn't trivial> but you can 
dust off your decimal points and rejoin the 
real world* These routines plus the PMG set 
would make the ToolKit a worth^fhi^ packd^e 
jkxr any serious pragcmflMir* . k - ^^^ - 

SORT*ACT - to sort byte* cardinal* integer or 
string ij^itf; 4^ Quicksort algorithm* 

Now you can wiritm a mailing Uak program in 

ACTION! 

TURTLEi4CT^?- to implement (sort of) turtle 
graphics in any graphics mode which supports 
Plot and Drawto* You can set the turtle's 
pa^i^^ turn it tef t or right a 

specified number of -degrees^ and mMi it 
forward a specified length* Not much for 
diehard Logo fans* but an easy way to draw 
regular geometric figures without doing a lot 
of calculations of vertices* 

The demo programs consist of three games 
<Gem* Snails' Trails and Harp Attack)» a 
graphics demo (Kaleidoscope - what else?) and 
a sound demo which produces an organ played 
frofii the keybo«rd«^ j;^ imrn^Mi^ last program 
to be the most impressive* partly because it 
taught me something about the Atari which I 
hadn't tcnown (how to determine how long a key 
is pressed)* The authors could have indlyded 
documentation for the source listings of these 
pirograms* even without this #dded help they 
are useftd is «Mip^ of ACTION! 
programming techniques* 

So siwad you buy the ACTION! ToolKit? 
Are you going to use your ACTION! cartridge 
for more than keeping the dust out of the 
cartridge slot in your Atari? By all means* 
buy tte TocilKitt and when you send in your 
Warranty ctrd* tell them you want to see an 
ACTION! tutorial*** : * 



OMlSriVIETXr jAlIMO 
Newell Industries 
Reviewed by Mike Taylor 

If you've ever worked with a professional 
word processor or even a word processing 
program on an 80 column computer* you're 
probably disappointed with the 40 column 
Atari word processors* Although 40 column 
word processors can be very functional* they 
have one major problem* The way the text 
looks on the screen is almost never the way it 
will look when you print it* Some word 
processors* such as AtariHriter* have supplied 
a windowing method to "preview" the text 
before you print it* Still* flipping between 
preview #l^,^t mod%ji;an be cumberi^ie* 

Thanks to Newell Industries' Ramrod and 
Omniview* the Atari computer can now produce 
a 24 row by 80 column display* ^im dfi column 
mode will work with any program that uses the 
normal non-split-screen editor such as Atari 
BASIC* Programs that use custom screens 
such as MEDIT* VISICALC, and AtariHriter, 
will not function correctly in 80 column mode* 

Using 80 column word processing has two 
distinct advantages over 40 column* First* 1^ 

text on your screen will always look very 
much* if not exactly* like the printed version* 
No more problems lining up columns* Second* 
about twice as much text is displayed at one 
time* whichi^^uces^ ffw^^ 

Newell Industries claims that 80 column mode 
can be used on a normal color TV for what they 
call "casual" 80 column work* I've found that 
" unless you want a headache and sore eyes* a 
monitor must be used to see text clearly in 80 
column mode* 

The Omniview manual supplies modifications 
te^jmfcti Letter Perfect and D^ti^ JPerfiect 
compatible with the Omniview 80 column mode* 
Modifying Data Perfect and Letter Perfect 
took me about 15 minutes* but if patching 
programs is not yoir cup of tea* COY 
Consulting (214-235-2146) will make the 
^^modifications for you for a $10*00 fee* I will 



personally make the modifications for MACE 
members free (call 31 3-574- 

Letter Perfect version 6*05f in 80 column 
modet is one of the test ^notd proammarm I've 

ever used with the Atari* I have an IBM PC at 

work with Multimate and Word Star which are 
two of the liest «#ord processors made for the 
IBM* So far# I haven't seen any advantages to 
word processing on my $5000 IBM system as 
opposed to my inexpensive Atari at home* 

This wonderfull piece of equipment comes in 
two flavors* Ramrod for the 800t and 
RamrodXL for Atari XL systems* Ramrod is 
simply a circuit board that replaces the OS 
cartridge in the back of the 800 computer* 
RamrodXL is installed by removing the old 
c^erating system chip from inside the 
computer and plugging the RamrodXL board 
into the same socket* The old operating 
system chip can then be plugged into an empty 
socket on the RamrodXL board* A switch is 
included to toggle between the old 0S» 
Ramrod (XL)» and Omniview* Omniview is a chip 
whi^ ateo plugs into the RMurod<XL) board 
and allows 80 column mode* 

MORE ADVAHTAOES ' 

No translator is necessary with RamrodXL* 
The Ramrod operating system is compatible 
with the old 800 OS* 

The keyboard response is twice as fast as 
with the old Atari OS* This is a welcome 
feature for people who type faster ttwi normal 
or use the cursor control keys a lot* The 
cursor moves across the screen two times 
fMter than the old Atari OS will allow* 

The cassette interface has been improved to 
transfer data 2*5 times faster (1500 baud) than 
norrfiiai /^^^ 

For an additional $29*95 the "Fastchip" math 
€e-proGMsor CM^te instalkid^ Fastchip will 
automatically speiNf up any rtwrth functions* 
The documentation claims speeds up to four 
times BB fast* 

Omnimon^ a tool for machine language 
programming, comes standard with Ramrod or 
RamrodXL* Onrviimon allows ]^ to interupt 



any program at any time, programmably or by 
pressing the OPTION imt^StESET teeys* Once 
Omnimon has started ^ memory locations can be 
examined^ changed^ disassembled* or written 
to disk* even without DOS! 

Other features of Omnimon include hex 

conversion* hex arithmetic* single step 

program execution* lockup recovery* line 

assembly* search memory for a sequence* move 

blocks of memory* ram disk handling* load 

binary files without DOS* display duOc 
directory and much morer^'- - 

Ramrod(XL) sells for $119*95 list* Omniview 
costs an additional «59t95* I wm aUe to 
purchase Ramrod* Omniview* and FairttSKi^ '#eir 
$154*40 through a mail order service* If 
Ramrod and Omniview are ordered together* 
they come preassembled and ready to plug in* 



MACE XJIMCLASSlF^IEOe 

(These ads are avaii^le at no charge to MACE 
mettitiers* Only mm•'iE&mmllm^^^^mkl^t please* 

Call (313) 646-4455 to place your ad*) 

#«# FOR sale: Atari Tap#^lectteilM 

1 1 Atari Program Cassettes* 
Intro to Programming* 
Graphics 
Sound 

Writing Programs I ^ 

Writing Programs II 
101 Programming Tips 
Algecalc (APEX) - 
Polycalc (APEX) 
SCRAM (Atari) 
Blue Max (Synapse) 
Dimension X (Synapse) 
$45*00 or best offeri^^^kifitast William Hughes 
at (313) 535-5508* ^ ^ ..^^ 



*** Brother Dynax liedel DXIS^^hht 

Daisy Wheel Printer 

4 months old 
Still Under Warranty 

$275*0a - 

CaU Leonard «U: (313) 545-4651 



— 16>— 



? ^ by SCDtt Gvland 



TMs program will create a bmmmr in normal or 

inverse video format* You can choose the 
height and width of the characters* 

* *"% 

The program is written for Gemini-type 
printers* The commands in line 35 set up the 
printerJ^jaMj^nay need to change them for your 
particular prinim^ Chedc ^3iur mmmm^ 
commands are as follows* 

CHR«(27}K:HR«(48}^ * Mts linefeed to 1/8" 
> CHR$(27)JCHR$(69) - emphasized printing 
CHR$(13) - prints out buffer and does CR 

When typing in the DATA statements^ 
remember the Journal listing conventions* 
Underlined characters are to be printed in 
iiiveree video* The DATA wMnigB^^mm 
cominations of inverse video sfMSBs and 
asterisks* Since the listing is printed in 38 
Gcdumn format just as it HwiU appear on your 
vitfeir scr e en » you can €h#iic the alignment of 
the asterisks to make sure you have typed in 
the strings correctly* It might be a good idea 
to print out a sample alphabet banner after 
saving the program to check for errors* 



0 DIM I1ESSAGE$ (200) , ASCIIS <1) ,LETTER$( 
34) ,LlN&$(8e),NI$(l),B$(l) ,F$(1), SPACE 
$(80) 

10 ? "{CLEAR}- -^-^^--^ 

20 6RAPH1CS 0:S£TCOLOR 2,0,0:SETCOLOR 

30 POKE 82, 5: POKE 83,38 

35 LPRINT CHR$<27);CHR$(4a);CHR$(27);C 

HfMK69>ieHR$(l3) 

40 ? "INPUT YOUR MESSAGE": INPUT MESSA6 
E$ 

41 BS»" "**aM*"»" 

43 ? »li9»IAL OR INVERSE" ;: «iriff HI«j IF 
NI$=»I" THEN B$="<":F$=- * 

44 SPACE$=B$: SPACE$ (80) =SPACE$: SPACE$( 
2) MAKE S A STRING OF SPACES 

FOR NORMAL, ASTERISKS FOR INVERSE 

45 ? -HEIGHT OF BLOCK ( 1-10) INPUT H 
:? "WIDTH OF BLOCK (1-10) ";: INPUT W 

47 MAR6IN«(S«-{Tt«>y/l-'t*f«ff BORDE R 



49 POKE 559,0: REM TURN SCREEN OFF TQ 
SPEED THINGS UP A BIT 

50 FOR L=LEN(MESSAGEtt) TO 1 STEP -1 
60 RESTORE 1000+ASC (MESSAGE$ (L,L) ) 
70 READ LETTERS: CTR=l 

ae FOR Lla7 TO 0 STEP -1 

90 FOR L2=0 TO 6 

100 ASCII$=LETTER$(L2*8+Ll+l) 

110 IF ASCI I$»"^" THEN ASCIIf»Bf 

120 IF ASCII$="i" THEN ASCII$=F$ ' 

130 FOR L3=l TO H 

140 LlNE$(CTR,CTR)=ASCII$iCTR=CT«4'l 
4 150 NEXT L3 ^ ; 

160 NEXT L2:LINE$(7»H+1)="":CTR=1 
165 FOR L4=l TO W: LPRINT SPACE$ (80-MAR 
6IN) aiN£$;SPACE$(8e-riARGIN) :NEXT L4 
170 NEXT LI: FOR L4=l TO W: LPRINT SPACE 
$:NEXT L4 
180 NEXT L 
20t POKE 559,34 



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99 999999 999999 








DATA 99999 99999 


44 




* * 


99 94 444444 4444 


- - - 






DATA 99 99 99 99 9999 




• tir * 


V 


99 99 99 99 99 449 






1976 


DA FA -^94 99 44^ 




99 




99 999999 999999 






1^/7 


DATA 999 999 9999999 94 4 


99 


99 


1 1 4 


99 99 99 99 99 99 






1978 


DATA 44 44 444 99 9999 


99 


94 


# % # % 


99 999 99 99 99 99 








DATA 9999 999999 99 


94 


JUL 




99 99 44t||# ^ 






1989 


DATA 4499 449999 99 


44 


999 


15 1 


99999 99 99 






1981 


DATA 999949 9999444 9 


44 


9 


V V 


4 49 44 4 449 9944 44 






1^^82 


DATA 99999 999994 99 


44 


A ilr A 

999 


* 1 


99 99 99 99 99 94 






4 /i 0 "T 

1983 


DATA 9994 999999 99 




1! 




99 999999 9999 






1984 


DATA 999999 999999 44 




9 




44 44 44 






1985 


DATA 44 44 44 99 44 


99 


94 




99 99 999999 9999 






1 Uoo 


DATA 99 99 99 99 99 


99 


99 




94 44 . i4«4 44 








SATA^ 44 91 99 99 99 


9« 


99 




99 9 99 99 99 99 99 






1988 


DATA 91 99. tt tt 4944 . 


.1 


< 


4449 99 99 99 99 






1989 


DATA 99 99 «9 99 99 


99 


94 




91 99 99 ... 






4999 


DATA. 999999 999999 99 


9 



9 99 999999 999999 



Allen Macro%#Mr 
Reviewed by Kirk Revitzer 



After many frustrating bouts with various 
translators for the XL GSimpu^t I finally 
decided to install ttm Xh ^s%3 by Allen 
Macroware# So far the results have been very 
favorable* Just about everything will run on 
the XLf with no more translator ^sks* The 
only problem so far has been with older 
Electronic Arts Software which checks at 
memory location $C000 and thinks there is a 
cartridge plugged in« QtWgr ^^^ltHin ^ that 
everything, even things that wouldn't work 
with a translator will now run* 

The XL Boss is actually easier to install than 
the instructions make it look* Simply remove 
the. tafi^^nf the r,fl«p yfejg. M ifcimps screMS 
( ar i dern#atti > f^no^^ftm IV shiekN^isiite 
(1/4" nut driver)* The chip to remove is on the 
right hand side of the board and is the smaller 
of the two toGftted there* fbe XL Bom is 
mounted on a small 'piggy back' board so that 
once installed you can plug the original QS in 
the empty socket provided for it« 

Now, to switch back to the old Atari OS (what 
for??) there is a small toggle switch with 
about 4-5" of wire« Acairding to the 
-documentation, this should be installed in a 
hole that you must drill inside the cartridge 
slot door« I didn't* The wire is more than long 
enough to reach the rear panel and I simply 
drilled through the plastic between the I/O 
port and the (oh so useful) expaqifion port* 
The total installation time im %fbmi| 30 
minutes* 

For all you serious yewrs «tfho are intii inachine 
language (I'm not), there is also a built in 

monitor* The documentation explains how to 
use the monitor an4 there is disk software to 
go with it, but, having no kno«#ledge of 
assembly (not that I wouldn't want to), I'll 
stop here* All in all, I would say this is a 
very useful and practical mg^tfigjition for the 
800XL! The XL Boss is available for *79*95 
from J 

Allen Macroware, PO Sox 2205, Redpndo 
Beach, C A 90278 - t.^ - - ' 




Network up to 8 ATARI computers 

Allow sharing of Printers, Disk Drives, 
and Modems 

Works with all ATARI computers 

Provide enormous saving for school 
systems and computer labs 

Comes with modified ATARI DOS 
2.5 to support busy disk retry 



ATARI 
COMPUTER 



ATARI 
COMPUTER 



ATARI 
COMPUTER 



ATARI 
COMPUTER 




DISK 
DRIVE 



PRINTER 
BUFFER 



ATARI 
COMPUTER 



ATARI 
COMPUTER 



ATARI 
COMPUTER 



ATARI 
COMPUTER 



MPP-1150 
Printer Interface 



^MPP MicroStuffer 




_miCROBITS PERIPHERAL PRODUCTS 

RvAiliibl# from your loc4.l deaUr 
or for wor# informM.tion CJikll'' 

<613) 691-2011 



Corf^P 




Exciting new "real" 3D Graphics on 48K Disk. 
Includes Super Charger Power Booster 
cartridge for fast realistic 3 dimensional 
graphics. Weave your way through a maze of 
pyramids and radar dishes as you fight against 
an onslaught of jets and helicopters. But, 
remember to keep an eye out for more fuel in 
this fast paced game. 



MtcroPortxL 

Parallel Buss Board-$49.99 



For Advanced 
Experimenters 



This unit is designed as an experimenter's PIA 

board for the Atari XL computers . 

All vital parts are common chips that are socketed for 

easy replacement. 
Powered by an external source that also gives a 5 volt 

lead foi ^periments. 
Switch Sttlectabie to btoeM $D5, $06, and $D7. 
Provides 16 t/#^^N»iM# 4 tts^^ that can^ 

. douNeasfiO's. 
tesad on tha^0f6821 chip. 
Will do interrufits. 
Uses the parallel buss. 

Over 10 sq. in. of drilled area for wire wrap prototypes. 



Suggested uses include: 

VCR-Video Disk Controller 
BSR Home controller 
EPROM Programmer 



Monitor and Control Home 

Environment 
Music Synthesizer Control 



LISTINC3 
COIMVEMTIONS ^ 

To reduGB our readers' eyestrain » we have 

adopted a special method for listing programs* 

Programs will be lifted in 38 column format^ 

and certMfi characters will be replaced by an 

abbreviated form of their function^ printed 
within curly braces (see below)* Any 

characters to be typed in inverse vi^eo wiU be 

ur^nrltned» and control characters will be 

represented by their respective letters within 

curly braces* If a character within braces is 

also underlined^ toggle the inverse video on 

and then hold down the control key while 

typing the character* 

This fnettfbd may seem awkward at firsts but 
you should quickly get used to it^ and the 
listings will be much easier to read* The 
special characters which will be spelled out 
are as follows* 



Hhen ^ see* You should i'jpel 



<XLEAR> 


ESC SHIFT < 


ap> 


ESC CTRL - 


<D(NO 


ESC CTRL » 


<LEFT> 


ESC CTRL + 


{RffiHD 




<BACX S> 


ESC DELETE 


^DELETD 


ESC CTRL DELETE 


ONSERD 


ESC CTRL INSERT 


(DEL LBO 


ESC SHIR 0ELE1E 


ONS UND 


ESC Stm INSERT 


amy 


ESC TAB 


<siR im 


ESC CTRL TAB 


{SET TAB> 


ESC SHIFT TAB 




ESC CTRL 2 


<gSG> 


ESC ESC 


<aam 


CTRL t (coma) 


<PERI0O> 


CTRL . (period) 


<:SEHI-COLOM> 


CTRL ; imi-seit 


OOFT «> 



It yiu see* T«#e« 

(A> CTRL A 

A IW. VIDEO A 

<k> W. UIDED CTRL A 



Pa^JEC:^.@JBIL.L. AIR? 

by Dave Heinrich 
Manaaer# FamUy Computer Center 



We in the retail world live and die by the new 
^products* Every time a new product is 
I mmmmcmif it takem jixxn four weeks to NEVER 
to get to the store's shelf* Every time you 
see a review for the newest piece of software 

in a magazine# it Jiiis tayN^ 
four months eirlii^« The editenrs are given a 
projected release date> rarely accurate* 
PRINT SHOP is a good exaoiple* It has been 
out for other mKhineSf reviewed for other 
machines, but not for the Atari* Only as of 
this writing (3-7-85) has it been released* 
But that doesn't mean il^ is^ on ^ shelf « It 
still has to go through my distributor » which 
adds another two to four weeks* 

^ This is alM^iyye of the new machines* I have 

read the reports from CES and the Atari 
magazines* I admit they look nice and 
^ powerful but every hour wasted talking ^out 
the new machines is money out of the store's 
pocket (which is my pocket)* Don't take me 
wrong» I love Atari^ but look at their track 
record* Where is the 1450XLD? And 1400XL? 
I did not earn anything from the people who 
told me they would wait for the new machines* 
AiHi 1 cannot pay the employees' wages by 
- selling air* 

So don't blame the salespeople* We are not 
any closer to the source than you mrm Mm^ 
to be fair in dealing with the public? be fair to 
us* When the new product comes in we will 
talk about it and sell it* But until the^^Ican 
only sell what is on the shelves^ not what is in 
the air* 

** Amateur Night/Gong St^w 
Open to any member* Bring your w^Uial 
programs, any language, disk format only* 
Limit presentations to 10 minutes^ please* 

Reviews* Home Energy Analysis 

Checkbook Checker ^ -^ ^ 
Bridge Pro 

DecMiiofi Software J3emi 













GREETINGS 
FROM YOUR EDITOR... 



As you look through this month's Journal* take 
a minute to note how many of the articles are 
written by yours truly* Noi I don't throw away 
submissions by other people just to see my 
name in print; I simply get very few 
mtumMiofis* (And I am EXTREMELY grateful 
to those people who do care enough to send 
things in#) 

Remember «!• story of The Little Red Hen? 
Well, I can't see myself reading all 900-plus 
copies of the Journal myself just out of spite* 
but I am getting a tired of having to do the 
majority of the writing for this Journals There 
are hundreds of MACE members who are 
perfectly capable of witw^g programs, 
raviewsf imt ather mrWi^ suitable for 
publication* At each meeting, one or two 
people come up and tell me about an article 
which th^ mre ^3iiig to write, but I seldom see 
the finished product* 

I en jc^ writing for and editing the Journal, but 
J ilont have the time to produce several 
articles each month* If you want to continue 
to receive a 24 to 28 page quality newsletter, 
you had better start thinking about what ypu 
can do to contribute* So ycm tm*t program - 
you must use your computer for something* 
Review your favoritii .|3iece of software^ eyen 
if it's old* There are a lot of new userm n^ 
would appreciate learning about useful 
software that has been around for a while and 
probably isn't being advertised any longer* If 
you program at all, in any language, send in 
one of your programs and share it with^ ygur 
fellow members* 

I can understand that it's hard to come up with 
ideas for Journal articles* (I face that each 
and every month*) To take that excuse away 
from you, I have some suggestions for future 
articles and programs* Who knows? Fame and 
glory may be just a 22 cent stamp away! 



— Evaluations of languages other tlwi AtiW 
BASIC. Forth, Pascal, Logo, Action!, 
Microsoft BASIC, BASIC XL, C - there are a 

lot of them out there* If you use «iGther j 
language, consider writing a short description | 
of the strengths and weaknesses of the 
language, with perhaps some examples of 
equivalent coding in Atari BASIC and your 
language* 

— A comparison of magazines which cover the 
Atari* Look over some back issues of Antic 
and Analog and evaluate their contents* Which 
one has the best games? The best product 
reviews? Editorialize about the changes in 
COMPUTE! over the past couple of years* 
(Except for trusty Bill Hilkinsofi» does anyone 
there even remember Atari?) What about 
other, lesser known publications? 

1¥ue tmiieeions of a BBS sysap« Hhat's it 

like being "YELL'^ed for at all hours? How do 
you feel when some jerk breaks into your 
l^M»m^ crashes your data disk? Do you 
have any i^out keeping a clean message 
base? 

— Useful programming tedviiques and hints 

(not necessarily complete programsK Do you 
have a special crash-proof way to handle user 
input? A nice trick to format screen output? 
It doesn't iMPife to bt fancy* It just ha« totie 
subijiitted* 

I don't like to make threats, and I'm not going 

to say that if the submissions don't pick up 
you're going to have to find yourselves a new 
Editor, but I will say that the size and quality 
of the Journal will definitely be endangered if 
more of you don't start helping out* Don't be 
concerned that you're not an expert? we have 
room for articles at all levels from beginner to 
advanced* The important thing is that you care 
enough about YOUR user group to make a 
contribution* ^ ^ 



T3EIE SHELL GAME 
CRACKING ATARI LOGO 

by Ann McBain Ezzell 



Atari Logo's primitive PX^ which puts down 
the "reversing" pen» can create some 
interesting graphics effects* This reversing 
pen will draw if it is over background and 
erase if it is over, a drawn point* Used in a 
recursive procedure# PX can repeatedly ^^ibw 
and erase a shape! 

TO FLICKER 
PX 

REPEAT 4CFD 20 RT 90] 

FLICKER 

EMD 

I was experimenting once with PXf drawing 
different shapes^ when I discovered an 
interesting result* Type in the. following 
procedures and watch the screen for a while* 

TO SPI {STEP {ANGLE 
FD{STEP 
RT {ANGLE 
SPZ4STEP 6 {ANGLE 
END 

TO WEAVE {STEP 

WRAP 

FS 

HT 

]PX ^-*> ■ 

SPI {STEP 90 

END 

You can choose any value for iSTEP in WEA VE» 
but a small value such as 10 works best* As 
the procedure runs^ the lines will wrap around 
the screen start overlaying each other* 
Because the reversing pen is used» some of the 
original lines will be erased as new ones are 
drawn^ and the dynamic picture resembles a 
four-way loom driven by a mad weaver* If you 
watch long enough^ you Will wem the picture 
erase itself back down to the original point* 
then f tart rebuilding* 

After watching WEAVE for a while» I decided 
to add a couple of extra features. 
WEAVEPAUSE will aUow you to halt the 



display and restart it by pressing any key. 
COLORHEAVE changes the pen OBlor Mch tiam 
a key is pressed (it cycles through the three 
colors). You could rewrite the procedures to 
use pen and background colors ta suit your 
taste* 

TO PAUSE 

IF KEYP [ J}EPOSIT 764 255 STOP] 

PAUSE 
END 

TO SPIPAUSE tSTEP ^NGLE 

IF KEYP [.DEPOSIT 764 255 PAUSE] 
FD JSTEP 
RT JANGLE 

SPIPAUSE STEP + 6 iANGLE 
END 

TO WEAVEPAUSE {STEP 

WRAP 

FS 

HT 

PX 

SPIPAUSE {STEP 90 
TO COLR 

IF PN = 2 CSETFN 0 STOPl _ 

SETPN PN + 1 

END 

TO COLORSPI {STEP {ANGLE ' 
IF KEYP [.DEPOSIT 764 255 C0LR3 

FD {STEP 

RT {ANGLE ' ' 

COLORSPI {STEP •«- 6 {ANGLE 
END 

TO COLORWEAVE {STEP 
WRAP 

FS "j, 

HT 

PX 

COLORSPI {STEP 90 
END 

COLORSPI and SPIPAIJ^ totN chei* for a 

keypress and exit to the appropriate routine 
when one occurs* COLR changes the pen color 
and then returns to COLORSPI} PAUSE waits 
for another keypress to resume the drawing 
procedure* The ^DEPOSIT to 764 prevents a 
chvacter from being printed to the screen* 




: Jteyiewed by Scott Garland 

Bridge is a popular card game which involves a 
lot of strategy* It takes some time to play 
and foijr iSHMpte^ and therein lies bridge's 
drawback: what if you cannot find three other 
people who have the time and knowledge to 
play with you?. Computer Management 
Corporation's "BridgePro" solves this problem 
by allowing one or two people to play^ with the 
computer assuming the other roles* There is 
#ven a demonstration modei so if you don't 
have time* you can let your computer have 
some fun # 

You have four plajiiig optionet^ - - : ^ 

* "SOLO" " one perscm playing agiurist three 
computer opponents 

* ••TWO PLAYER" - two people alternating 
playt each getting a different hand 

« "DUPLICATE" - tMG pMple alternating^ each 

getting the same hand 

* "DEMONSTRATION" - computer assumes all 
four playersf and displays the game on screen 

I expect the solo option is used by most 
peoplet although the other two are useful* 
You are then^^ gt^ifi tiie choice of reoiivkig ttie 
best hand alwa^^ or leaving it up to chance* I 
like to take my chances* since that is what 
happens when playing against people* You may 
^eo Mt tlie speed of the somfM^er's actions 
on a scale of 1-9* Since the computer will 
always wait for you to enter your dedsions* it 
is best to set the program for full speed 
ahead* If you use the demonstration mode* or 
the "Auto-finish" option* which converts a 
solo game to demonstration at any time* you 
might want a slower speed* so you have time 
to observe the computer's actions and 
comprehend them* 

(One note about the speed* bridge is a 
strategy game* so computations can take a 
while if programmed in BASIC* BRIDGEPRO is 
in machine language* so its fastMt speed is 
FAST!!! Those of you who have bridge 
programs written in BASIC would do well to 

purchase BRIDGEPRO*) 

.1 



The program plays according to the rules* as it 
should* but it aliiaaiccepts nocne "conventions"* 
When bidding in bridge* you are iratcmg a 
contract with your partner on how to play 
against the other team* according to what 
cards you hold* The problem is that you don't 
know what is in your partner's hand* and vice 
versa* and you cannot tell him* lest the other 
team find out what you are up to* therefore 
the "conventions" were invented* they are 
dues as to what you have* and whether you 
agree to what your partner is saying* These 
conventions are standard in bridge* and 
BRIDGEPRO recognizes quite a fewJ no-trump 
responses* opening bid* pre-empt* two in a 
suit* two no-trump* overcalU take-out double; 
and Blackwood* AH in all* the program plays 
the way a good bridge player would* 

HMle ffiSIXIEFRQ te^^i^«^^cMrial on how to 
play bridge* there are a few features which 
help novices* The manual* if a bit short* does 
give a good accxmnt of what bridge ie about* 
what the conventions are* and how to play* As 
the closing remarks say* however* it is not 
intended to teach you every thingi so you might 
«Nkit^ to purdtasi^^ book on 
you more* Since bidding is a confusing 
process* you can ask for help at any time* 
Atno* while playing eokir you may begin the 
hand again* or let the computer finish it* 
After completing a hand* you can have the 
ampyter play it again* and see how your score 
rates with that of the "perfect player"* You 
can recieve the best hand* as I mentioned 
above* making it a bit easier to play* All 
these make for a well-designed program which 
is good for both novices and the more 
advanced. (In fact* I pretty much learned how 
to play from the program* and although I'm no 
expert* I can play a decent game*) 

BRIDGEPRO is not without its faults* though 
there are few* Most user prompts are 
accompanied by the ringing of the console bell* 
which can become mildly annoying* When 
asking for help in the bidding* you must accept 
it* so you have no chance to experiment* When 
playing solo* you cannot ask for help for just 
one card-play* it will automatically finish the 
hand for you (I suspect that "Auto-finish" was 
included to finish only when the card choices 
are obvious* and a waste of time to play)* All 
the hands are not displayed when the round is 



'25 



overt which is a nice fmmtun found in oUmr 

programs* Overall^ thought BMDGEPRO is a 
goodf fast» and helpful way to play bridge 
whenever the urge strikes yoUf and I 
recommend it strongly for the experts^ and 
those who would like to become experts* 

Hmse fdsh^g to pixrehMe SRZDGEPRO should 
call me at (313) 351-9453, so I can arrange for 
some good prices* Otherwise! write toi 

Computer Management Corp* 
2424 Exbourne Court 
Halmit^reektCA 94596 



SXTMIMER GAMES 

Epyx Software 

^ Reviewed by Scxitt Men^^ 



Summer <james is a sports geme based on the 
Olympics* It requires 48K of fMmaryf a disk 

drive and a joystick* Summer Games sells for 
$27*99 at most discount stores> and from $28 
to $32 at computer stc»res* ls\ tMs prografii 
you compete in 8 key events* two swimming 
eventst two track eyents» gymnastics, skeet 
shooting» |mle ¥aiillifi|| and divii^ Up to 8 
people can play, picking from 18 countries to 
represent* Summer Games even has an opening 
ceremop)^ .wtMire JLigi^^g of the torch 
takes place* - t 

After the opening ceremonies, you have 5 
optiom ^ctaose from* You can compete in all 
events, compete in one event, practice one 
event, see world records, or repeat opening 
ceremonies* 

The first event, the pole vault, requires 
coordination and superb timing if you are to do 
mU* This is one of Ihe harder events» 
because you must be ahlm to do a series of 
maneuvers which require perfect timing, or you 
will not dear the bar* After a few games you 
begin to m« a pattern wMc^ helps with the 
timing* 

The next eventt divingf requires a quick hand* 
You coff^ete by perfGHrimng 4 dives (forward, 



backward, reverse and inward)* After each 
dive the judges' scores appear in boxes across 
the center of the screen* A perfect dive will 
receive scores of 10» but your diver must enter 
the water vertically and fijlly mAmnOmd. Your 
total score is computed by multiplying the 
judges' scores by the difficulty of the dive« 

The 4 X 400 relay is the next event* This is 
probably the easiest event in Summer Games, 
but you must know how to pace your rumiers or 
it won't be so easy for you* 

The next event is the worst onet the 100 
meter dash* It requires you to jiggle tlie 

joystick right and left or up and down like a 
madman* This events gets very tiring and you 
just can't wait until it ends* 

Gymnastics is the next event and the hardest 
of all. You compete in the vault, which is very 
difficult* You must do a series of moves by 
pressing the fire btittoi? and eioving the 
joystick* Your score depends on the number of 
moves performed in mid-air* The final score is 
t hetuM fimm two vmMm* 

The freestyle swimming relay is the next 
event in the Summmr Games* To move yow 
swimmer you must press the fire button every 
time his arm enters the water* When he 
reaches the far end of the pool he must make a 
flip turn* Hhen your swimmer completes liie 
return lap, the next swimmer starts* This 
goes on until all 4 swimmers have completed 
their laps* The following event* Um^QO^mmlm 
freestyle, is basically the same as the 
freestyle relay # with only one swimmer* 

Skeet shooting is the next end final evef^#lMit 

it is not really difficult* Once you learn the 
patterns of the targets it's easy to hit them* 

After each event there is an awards^osremony, 
which tells you the final standings and the 
medal winners* If you participate ii^ of tbt 
events there is a special cerenicmy te c^ioose 

an all-around champion* 

I ttenk Summer Games is a great program* The 
graphics are great and it's very realisticcr^-fte 
only thing they could do to make it better is to 
add more events* I think every sports fan 
would ei^c^ tMs ^gaMK 



ivr TOTHT TO A ISr ATARI C OlytT^^^TTTTnlF? EISTT- I^TJSI AST S 



O. Box: 2^-7&'5, Soujirh^^ield ^ IMI 43037' 
BULLETIN boards: MACE 978-1685/MACE WEST 582-0657 
MACE HOTLINE (Information - Voice Line) 882-7104 



PRESIDENT 
Kirk Revitzer 
Detroit 
882-9109 
Compuserve?: 70346,1642 
BBS: 882-5909 



VTCE-PRESIDENT 
Alva Thomas 
Detroit 
535-3748 
Compuserve: 74065^334 
BBS: 538-0197 



TREASURER 
Burt Gregory 
Southfield 
552-0273 



PROGRAM CQQRDTNATOR 
Scott Garland 
West Bloomfield 
851-9453 



CORRESPONDING SECRETARY 
Sharie Middlebrook 
Dearborn 
581-5560 
BBS: 582-0657 



RECORDING SECRETARY 
Dino Roggero 

Red ford 
BBS: 531-1701 



DISK LIBRARIAN 

Dave Zappa 
St. Clair Shores 

773-8551 
BBS: 771-4126 

MEMBERSHIP CHAIRMAN 
Paul Wheeler 
Detroit 
538-3649 



CASSETTE LIBRARIAN 
Mike Landis 
Clawson 
589-1789 
Compuserve: 72675,1023 

M.A>C.E> JOURNAL EDITOR 
Ann McBain Ezzell 
Birmingham 
646-4455 



-a^xi4S/85 -7:00 F^Jyl 

Southfield Pavilion — Ten & a Half Mile Road and Evergreen 



I.A.C.E. 
P.O Box 2785 
Southfield, Ml 48037 



$20,00* FOR A ONE YEAR ilEBffiERSHIP 
(♦Payable to M.A.C.E.) 



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If a Renewal: 
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