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the usef u 1 guide to £GjGM*!)<i]W<§ comput i ng! 




Issue # 7 



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PRODUCTS USED TO 
PRODUCE INFO-64 
ISSUE # 7 INCLUDE: 



inkwell Systems 






daisy wheel 





CONTENTS 



JUNE 



REV EWS 



DEPARTMENTS 



GALLERY (software screen shots of 18 new titles) 6 

EDITOR'S PAGE 19 

the INFORMER (by Buddy Hacker) 20 

SOUND ADVICE on Keyboards (Peggy Herrington) 24 

NEWS & VIEWS: Summer CES edition (Benn Dunnington) 47 

DISK COPIERS COMPARED (Mark Brown) 30 

AT HOME WITH THE C-128 (Benn Dunnington) 37 

LOW COST ROBOTICS LAB (Benn Dunnington) 42 

VIZASTAR (Don Vandeventer) 71 

3 ASSEMBLERS (Mark Brown) 84 

DISK SPEEDUPS (Mark Brown) 86 

CP/M TUTORIAL (Mark Brown) 58 

THE BEST OF CP/M: 150 Good Titles for Starters (Mark Brown) 60 

CP/M VENDOR LIST 67 

COMPUTER SPEECH (Ted Salaraone) 76 

Brian Redman looks at COMPUTER CRIME! 23 

Dealer Index 90 

CONTEST: Win a C-128 ! ! ! 95 

Advertiser Index 96 



SUBSCRIBERS 



for some of youj 1*7 
is the last issue on your current 
subscription. Here's how to read 
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If this is your last issue, and 
you want to renew, please send 
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first issue 

,— - nuMber of issues due 




12' 



Your Nawe 
Your Address 
Your Address 
Yourtown, STATE 12345 



([■roBHWwi ■ mssmm 



i nrr 




lNLMHNa JUNty IN 
THE LOST KINGDOM 



CHIPWITS 



I ***** 



MINDSCAPE INC. 
| 3444 DUNDEE RD. 
| NORTHBROOK, IL 60062 



The idea is great: a set of 
problem-solving games with no 
instructions (you mist use your 
Wits £ logic like Indy" to 
survive and complete the six 
roams) . 

Unfortunately, the packaging, 
Marketing,, concept, and intended 
cinematic associations fail to 
translate into a satisfying 
product. This ga«e is boring, 
roughly animated, and sure to 
disappoint Indiana Jones fans. 
Better title: "Indiana Jones in 
the Kingdom of Lost Causes". 

-BO 



EPVX !|3WS 1 
1043 KIEL COURT 
SUNNWALE, CA 94039 



A fantastic 
educational 
ing. Using 
popular pul 
you choose 
robots and 
one of the 
adventures . 
with pictur 
can be rath 
on trial an 
combined wi 
and animati 
where piayi 
become <as 
the sane . 



program that is as 
as it is entertain- 
the increasingly 
1-down «enu scheme, 
one of 16 CHIPHIT 
program it to solve 
8 varying-di f f iculty 

Programming is done 
es (see inset) and 
er elaborate. Hands- 
el error environment 
th attractive screens 
on create a world 
ng and learning 
they should) one and 
-BD 



ALCAZAR: 

THE FORGOTTEN FORTRESS I ****- 



ACTIVISION, INC : 
I DRAWER 7286 i V ' 
1 MOUNTAIN VIEW, CA 94039 I 



Interesting 
of the ubiq 
adventure, 
and properl 
objects and 
overcome yo 
saries and 
Vou keep th 
pockets, th 
active, fin 
which rooms 
each castle 
guides you 
the next, 
bottomless 



graphic 
uitous du 

Vou must 
y use the 

weapons 
ur variou 
complete 
ree items 
e one in 
on-screen 

you have 

Large 
from one 
Beware of 
pits. . 



variation 
ngeon 

collect 

right 
in order to 
s adver- 
your quest. 

in your 
your hand is 

map shows 

visited in 
overview map 
castle to 

the many 



-BD 



KENNEDV APPROACH 1 1 



§ MICROPROSE SOFTWARE INC. 

I 120 LAKEFRONT DR. 

I HUNT VALLEV, MD 21030 



Best air traffic controller 
simulation to date. This simu- 
lation sports several advanced 
and unique features that help 
make it work: good quality 
software speech synthesis adds 
considerably to the realism Cyou 
will actually hear the conver- 
sations between the pilots and 
the tower!) and a clever system 
for visually indicating the 
altitude of planes gives you 
3-D visual information on a 2-D 
game grid. If you are not 
getting enough tension in your 
life, this should help! -BD 



| THE SERPENT'S STAR I: 



BRODERBUND SOFTWARE INC. 
% IT PAUL DRIVE 
$_ SAN RAFAEL, CA 94903 



This hybrid adventure game 
(pictorial screens accompany 
the interactive text interface) 
is a noticeable improvement over 
Broderbund's last adventure, 
"Mask of the Sun". Vou will 
especially like the toggle for 
fast or slow travel between 
locations. I found the screens 
to be colorful, the action 
smooth, the parser forgiving 
and intelligent, the storyline 
interesting, the puzzles just 
hard enough, the humor refresh- 
ing with a nice beat and easy 
to dance to: I give it a 4. -BD 



COUNTDOWN TO SHUTDOWN !****+ 



i ACTIVISION, INC 
£ DRAWER 7286 
% MOUNTAIN VIEW, CA 94839 | 



One of the better offerings 
from ftctivision since "Ghost- 
busters". Even before you 
figure out the object of this 
game, you will be enjoying the 
delightful 3-D graphics effects, 
well-done animation (with 
shadows), sophisticated sound 
effects, detailed information 
displays, and fluid gameplay. 
I love the way the sliding doors 
glide open and shut with a 
convincing pneumatic "hiss"! The 
object? Vour androids JUST have 
to prevent a nuclear meltdown! 
Piece of cake, -BD 












li a i »■: 





ARCHON II! ADEPT =.": 



ELECTRONIC ARTS 
2755 CAMPUS DRIVE 
SAN MATEO, CA 94403 



!****+ 



If you 
won't b 
(the se 
spells. 
This is 
that pi 
surface 
paced a 
ever co 
the usu 
crisp a 
effects 
from th 
via the 
if you 
»y hine 



liked Ar 

e disapp 

quel) 
wore na 
a Multi 

ays like 

but di 
rcade-gr 
Mbat ens 
ai excel 
nidation 

we have 
e«. With 

joystic 
can win 
y kicked 



chon I, th 

Dinted by 

More Magic 

sty critte 

facetted 

chess on 

ves into f 

ade action 

ues . EA d 

lent graph 

, and soun 

co we to e 

snooth ga 

k. I don' 

this gawe; 

evey tiMe 



en you 

ADEPT 

wore 

rs. 

gane 

the 

ast- 
when- 

el ivers 

ics, 

d 

xpect 

Meplay 

t know 

I get 

-8D 



CRUSADE IN EUROPE 



% WICROPROSE SOFTWARE, INC. 

g 120 LAKEFRONT DR. 

;=; HUNT VALLEY, MD 21030 



FroM D- 
Bulge,, 
to repl 
history 
strateg 
ft large 
terrain 
choice 
gaMe pi 
various 
transMi 
the top 
easy to 
cowplex 
Sound e 
just ri 



Day to 

you wil 

ay the 
in thi 

ic war- 
scroll 
and tr 

of syMb 

eces . 
status 

tted in 
of the 
start 
for cr 

ffects 

ght. 



the Battle 
1 have the 
hands dealt 
s reai-ti«e 
gawe siMUl3 
ing Map sho 
oops with y 
olic or pic 
CoMMands an 
updates ar 
the text a 
screen. V 
playing, bu 
ustier war- 
and graphic 



of the 
chance 

by 

tion. 
ws 
our 

tonal 
d 
e 

per, at 
ery 

t awply 
ga«ers 
s are 
-BD 



6.1. JOE 



% EPYX 

I 1D43 KIEL COURT 

1 SUNNYVALE, CA 94089 



This gaMe surprised 
the few excerpts I' 
with the Mentality 
attendant with such 
fare j My t numbs wer 
twitching toward th 
I got around to tes 
title. Actually., th 
quite decent with s 
including hero/oppo 
Mission selection, 
While the hand-to-h 
are a bit goofy, th 
coMbat is better th 
BLUE MAX or BUNGELI 



Me, Ftom 
d seen, along 
usually 

toy-fad 
e already 
e ground when 
ting this 
e gaMe is 
everai phases 
nent choices, 
and coMbat. 
and sequences 
e equipment 
an either 
NG BAV. 

-BD 



MOQNSWEEPER 



S 1MAGIC 

£ 981 UNIVERSITY AVE. 

1 LOS GATOS, CA 95930 



MOONSWEEPER has somo interesting 
effects, but suffers froM 
repetition, The foreshortened 
scrolling background is perhaps 
the gaMe s strongest feature. 

Basically you shoot the creeps, 
rescue the good folk, and get 
the heck out. Then you do it 
all over and over again with 
increasing levels of both 
difficulty and tedium. 



-BD 



ON-FIELD FOOTBALL 



GAMES TAR 

1302 STATE STREET 

SANTA BARBARA CA 93101 



ON-FIELD FOOTBALL rounds out the 
GaMestar series of animated 
action sports titles. While 
this version of the Great Sunday 
Obsession sends only 6 warriors 
per teaM into the skirMish, 
the action is well-done, with 
GaMestar 's usual attention to 
providing an elaborate range of 
joystick control over gaMe 
options and player actions. 
This can take soMe getting used 
to, especially in FOOTBALL. 
Scrolling screen allows full- 
field play. One or two players 

-BD 



SKY TRAVEL 



I ***** 



COMMODORE BUSINESS MACHINES 
120O WILSON DRIVE 
WEST CHESTER, PA 19380 



Well, CoMMOdore 
again! An educat 
Masterpiece! Th 

SlanetariUM disp 
206 stars and 8 
in their proper 
18,896 year peri 
tracks heavens a 
Mai speed. Celes 
Maps May be disp 
can be dumped to 
line displays id 
visible objects 
not enough, SKV 
with visual joke 
see your shoes!) 



has done it 
ional AND fun 
is electronic 
lays More than 
8 constellations 
positions over a 
od. Clock drive 
t up to 32X nor 
tial and world 
layed. Screens 

printer. Data 
entities of all 

As if this were 
TRAUEL is salted 
s (look down and 

A Must buy! -BD 



V^ 




> I ? I !■ 





VAUDEVILLE 



SHOWBIZ, IUC. * i 



I? ALBUGUERGUE, NM 87106 



Maybe I 'm getting 
old age dm sure 
points with this n 
but I C3n't think 
person whose atten 
held by UflUDEUILLE 
2 Minutes. The pr 
is pretty dry: pic 
spin them on stick 
spinning, duck fly 
What really drags 
tho, is the execut 
sprites, CHARACTER 
a commercial game? 
animation . (nay b 
to insomniacs.) 



jaded in my 
I 'm not makin 
ew advertiser 
of a single 
tion would be 

for more than 
emise itself 
k up plates, 
s, keep them 
ing objects, 
this game down 
ion: blocky 

GRAPHICS (in 
?), & crude 
e of interest 
-BD 



THE POND I***- 



SUNBURST COMMUNICATIONS/ IfKwjJ 
39 WASHINGTON AVE. . 3^ ;;;| 
PLEASANTV ILLE, NV 10570 is a§ 



After titles like THE FACTORV, 
and MISSING LINKS, this edu-game 
is a real disappointment. 
THE POND is a tedius problem- 
solving exercise wherein the 
player must find a pattern that 
will enable a frog to cross a 

6ond on a pathway of lilly-pads. 
sing the awkward menus turns 
out to be the true challenge for 
a youngster's wits and patience 
The game is too dull for normal 
healthy children, and pales next 
to efforts like '"CHIPWITS". The 
fact that it won some awards 
won't impress your child. -BD 



ALPHA -OMEGA RUN 



" NANQSEC CORP. 
g-3544 LINCOLN AVE. 
I OGDEN, UT 84401 



Routi 


ie space-opera number 




lacks 


anything special to 




recommend it over scores of 




prede 


lessors. Line em up, 




shoot 


'em down. Save the world. 


Vou'd 


think that programmers 




would 


get tired of grinding out 


these 


endless shoot-em-up clones 


CI know that consumers are 




gettii 


lg tired of buying them 


.) 






-BD 



QUINK I 



'= CBS SOFTWARE i 

|i ONE FflWGETT PLACE 

1 GREENWICH CT. 06836 WkM 



Each screen presents the player 
with 8 random places, names, or 
things: some items will belong 
together by some associating 
element, while the rest will be 
totaly unrelated. Sort it out 
as fast as you can for maximum 
points. 4SB9 items from 159 
subject areas (like "Birds that 
Can't Fly". "Tools on a Swiss 
Army Knife, and "Two-Word Rock 
Groups"), nice visual and sound 
effects. One or two players. 
One of the most enjoyable word 
games I've seen on a computer. 

-BD 



WARP * 



5 CREATIVE SOFTWARE 

| P.O. BOX 61688 

1 SUNNYVALE, CA 94086 



The 
Tha 
fut 
Cre 

Aft 

the 

uns 

An 

ori 

kee 

but 

to 

COi 

(se 



Warpzo 
t's the 
uristic 
ative S 
er game 

animat 

OphiSti 
obvious 
ginalit 
PS WARP 
not by 
add a C 
lection 
e right 



ids must 
mission 
highway 

oftware. 

S like Pi 

ion seems 
cated, 
attempt 
in the 
outside 
much. I 
reative t 
I 'd rec 
over WA 



be stopped! 
in this 
hugger from 

tStop II, 
pretty 

at variety 3 
game elements 
the kennel, 
f you want 
itle to your 
DNtend TROLLS 
RP! 

-BD 



TROLLS & TRIBULATIONS 



I CREATIVE SOFTWARE 

% P.O. BOX 61688 

% SUNNVVALE, CA 94086 



Watch your step as you skulk 
arround in what appears to be 
the sewer system of some ancien" 
city: your troll must dodge the 
under-city denizens who patrol 
this hazardous but treasure- 
littered maze. 

A familiar game for sure, but 

somehow more playable than the 

Photos would suggest. 

7 levels, 260 chambers, for one 

player, 

-BD 



^ 




CARTRIDGE PORT CONVERTER 

CUSTOMED DESIGNED FOR 

COMMODORE 64 COMPUTER 

• BUILT-IN "WARM RESET" BUTTON WILL ELIMI- 
NATE TURNING POWER OFF/ON TO RESET 
THE C-64 MICROPROCESSOR, THUS ADDING 
TO RELIABILITY. 

• PARALLEL EXPANSION PORT ON L" BOW'S 
BACKSIDE ALLOWS SIMULTANEOUS HARD- 
WARE & SOFTWARE ACCESS. 



GOLD COMMAND PROGRAM RECOVERS 
BASIC PROGRAMS OTHERWISE LOST 
DURING COMPUTER RESET. 

• VERTICAL CARTRIDGE PORT MAKES 
CARTRIDGE USE MUCH EASIER. 



NO MORE STRESS ON THE COMPUT- 
ER'S PRINTED CIRCUIT BOARD FROM 
THE PRESSURE OF PLUGGING IN 
CARTRIDGES SINCE 'LBOW PUTS 
IT ALL ON THE TABLE TOP. 



DEALER/DISTRIBUTOR INQUIRIES WELCOME 



DOUBLES STORAGE SPACE OF MOST 5 1 /<T 
SINGLE-SIDED DISKETTES. COMPATIBLE 
WITH DISK DRIVES FOR COMMODORE, 
ATARI, APPLE, FRANKLIN 





• CUTS A 



PRECISION SQUARE 

NOTCH IN THE DISKETTE 

AT EXACTLY THE RIGHT SPOT 

SO THE "FLIPSIDE" CAN BE USED, 

HIGH TORQUE ROUND ACTIVATOR 
MAKES IT EASY TO USE BY EVERYONE. 

SMOOTH, DEEP-BLUE ENAMELED FINISH 
IS BEAUTIFUL AND EASY TO TOUCH. 



ORDER FORM 

'LBOW(S) AT $19.98 (Wis. Residents S20.88) $ 

DISK DOUBLER(S) AT $9.88 (Wis. Residents $10.88) $ 



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Glendale, Wisconsin 53209 
Telephone: (414) 352-4000 



Ltd. 



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Vaudeville, the only home video game 

capable of making you a STAR. It is up to 

you how soon you want to be one. 



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VALUE 



WHAT IS VALUE 

val-lue (va'l yob) that quality of a thing 
which makes it more or less desirable, use- 
ful, etc. 

Value is something we constantly strive 
for in our role as consumers. But what is it 
really? Is it price? Sure, price is part of it. 
What aboul quality? Quality definitely plays 
an important part. Maybe, good quality at a 
good price? This is a step closer, but still 
not quite all. Useful? Of course. What good 
is quality, even at a good price, if you don't 
have a use for? So then let's say, "Value 
is: A useful, quality product at a good 
price." 

THE GOAL 

Software Value; Useful, quality software 
at a fair price. 

THE PROBLEM 

Every computer owner that progresses 
beyond the early stages, soon begins to add 
to his collection of programs. As soon as a 
disk drive is added, this collection literally 
explodes. Disks are like rabbits; start with a 
couple and soon they're everywhere! Since 
a disk can hold a bunch of programs, 10 or 
20 disks can mean several hundred 
programs. 

HELP!! To keep all those programs in 
order you need help. Programs to help you 
manage your program collection are called 
utilities. 

A utility is a program that fills a specific 
need. Utilities usually concentrate more on 
geting a job done well than on being flashy. 
A collection of utilities is usually one of the 
first things almost every computer owner 
starts. 

No matter what the main interest is 
(music, graphics, games, writing programs, 
etc.) all owners have the same basic needs 
(move files, copy programs, backup disks, 
etc.) to maintain their program library. 

THE PLAN 

We wanted to assemble a collection of 
really good programs that would simplify 
maintaining your program library. Programs 
to cover every phase of this job. A collection 
that would serve as a solid foundation for 
anyone just starting their utilities collec- 
tion, but also allow many people to improve 
the quality of the programs currently used 
for these jobs. 

We also wanted to price the collection so 
that even if you only used 1 or 2 of the 
programs, you would still get your money's 
worth. 



THE PROGRAMS 

FAST FINDER: A fast efficient way to main- 
tain a current listing of all your programs. 

• Alphabetical listing of all programs in 
your program library. 

• Automatically adds the programs you 
choose from a disk. No manual entry of 
programs required. 

• Assign your own 3 digit ID number, or use 
the disk's own ID. 

• Find a program FAST. The first 2 or 3 
letters of a name gets you a list of 
programs that match those letters., Your 
programs will be included. Average time 
- 1 second. 

• List all programs with the same disk ID. 

• List all programs to either screen or 
printer. 

• Printed list is 3 columns wide. A few 
pages for a lot of programs. 

• Add names from disk or from keyboard. 
Keyboard entry allows for adding Com- 
mercial disks that have altered directo- 
ries that can't be listed. Also handy when 
you add 1 or 2 names to an already 
cataloged disk. 

• Delete single programs, or all programs 
with a certain ID. 

• Each list holds 1 000 entries. Up to 5 lists 
available on 1 disk. 

A program that will be of real use for 
anyone who uses a disk drive and owns 
more than a few disks. 

BULLET COPY: A 4 minute disk copier that 
copies the whole disk in only 3 passes, 
using only 1 1 541 disk drive, initializes as 
it copies. This program will save you a LOT 
of time making backup copies. 

HAPPY HOUSEKEEPER: Makes moving 
programs and files from place to place a 
real snap. Move 1 program or a bunch. 
Large buffer. Make multiple copies without 
having to read source disk each time. Takes 
the drudgery out of disk library main- 
tenance. 



ENVELOPE DIRECTORY: Prints the direc- 
tory inside a pattern that fits in the disk 
jacket. Makes it easy to keep the directory 
for each disk where it belongs, with the 
disk. 

DISK MAP: Prints the directory giving Pro- 
gram name, size, load address, ending 
address and Track and Sector where pro- 
gram starts. Output tD either printer or 
screen. 

DIRECTORY DOCTOR: Loads a directory 
from a disk, re-arranges the order of the 
programs, then writes the directory back to 
the disk in this new order. 

All these, plus several other programs will 
make this a disk you will reach for often. It 
will save you many hours to use for more 
important things. 

THE NAME 

The collection: C-64 UTILITY CITY 

THE PRICE 

Less than the price of a single program! 
We think software prices are too high. 
Hardware prices have fallen sharply in the 
last 2 years; software prices need to do the 
same. We have eliminated all the middle- 
men. By buying direct from us, we can 
increase the value even more. We even pay 
the postage.! 

All these programs on one disk, delivered 
to your door for only $19.95. 

WHERE? 

Send ONLY $19.95 
(includes postage) to: 

VALUE PLUS SOFTWARE 

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SPRINGFIELD, MO 65801 



Please sand copies of 

C-64 UTILITY CITY 
@ $19.95 each (includes postage). 


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SERIAL TO IEEE INTERFACE 

E-L1NK: SERIAL TO IEEE INTERFACE for the 
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FULL-FEATURED GRAPHIC PRINTER INTERFACE 
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Optional 4K Buffer for FAST graphic 
printing (kit or installed) additional 29.95 
Business/Word Processor PRINTER INTERFACE 

EASY-PRINT: The ideal PRINTER 

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MULTIPLE— PRINTER SERIAL CONNECTOR 
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INTELLIGENT 4-SLOT BUS EXPANSION 

SMART SLOT: INTELLIGENT 4-SLOT BUS 
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GAIN CONTROL of your PERSONAL FINANCES 

CERTIFIED PERSONAL ACCOUNTANT: 

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times. EASY TO USE! 79.95 

THE COMPLETE C-64 INVOICING SYSTEM 
SUPERSHIPPER 64: COMPLETE INVOICING 
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multi-disk system stores information for up 
to 800 customer, 500 invoices, and 200 
products on each 'account' and 'invoice' 
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SALES, RECEIVABLE & INVENTORY REPORTS 
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invoices paid! 79.95 




SUPPLIES 



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C.O.D. TAGS: Continuous-form tractor-fed 
tags on pre-cut rolls of 500 for easy C.O.D. 
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One roll of500 tags 100.00 

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THE PROFESSOR: A complete Classroom- 
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mountain of orders can seem overwhelming. Make one mistake andyour merchandise or 
invoice could be sent to an in correct address ... even a simple addition error could costyou ! 

With your purchase of the SuperShipper, you've discovered the smart way to organize 
your invoicing, billing and shipping departments. Now you can keep track of your 
customers, set up an organized pricing system and eliminate costly errors and retyping ... 
and all with less time and effort than you ever thought possible! 

SUPERSHIPPER 64: What is it? 

The SuperShipper is a computer program that integrates all the elements of an invoicing 
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SAVE MONEY ... SAVE TIME ... AND BEST OF ALL, SUPERSHIPPER IS EASY TO USE ! 

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The SuperShipper's suggested retail price is only S99 95 . SuperShipper Accountant retails for 
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TRAIN DISPATCHERS 24 displays help you 
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Created by designers of computerized traffic 
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TRAIN DISPATCHER comes complete with 
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^t »miH Color TV Recommended mmmmm ^ 

m t4 a ifc 

_ CHECK ONE: 



Vic 20' Tape □ or Disk D 

[Requires 16 K Memory E*pander| 

Atari - BOO Tape □ or Disk □ 
(Requires Basic| ..... 

Aian" 400 Tape O 
iRequires Basicl 

Commodore* 64 Tape D or Disk U 

Apple II 1 . 11+ and lo Disk D 



(S24 95] 

IS24 95] 

1*24 95 1 
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IS29.95] 



Manual Only G |S4 00 it purchased separately! 
Name . 



City. 



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Zip. 



USA 6 CANADA add $2 50 postage & handling 
I $4 00 foreign| for each game ordered Alt payments 
must be in USA funds all foreign paymenls must be 
agarnst USA banks PA residents add 6'V slate sales 
ta* Or charge to 



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SEND TO: 

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1412) 655-7727 




Correc 1 1 ons 



Subscriber note 



First of all, we bleu it on THE PRINT SHOP review. 
Contrary to Ted's otherwise excellent report, the 
PRINT SHOP is compatible with several other graphics 
packages (Flexidraw & Doodle for starters), and is 
not compatible with the Commodore 802 printer or tRe 
old Star 10 printer (10X and newer are fine). 



Bad ads: WARNING 



We are sad, embarrassed, and angry to learn from 
recent mail and phone calls that two of our previous 
advertisers, PHOENIX RED & DYNAMIC ELECTRONICS INC. 

are apparently accepting and cashing readers' checks 
for products advertised, and either sending no 
product, or defective product in return. Neither 
party will return our calls or letters, and both 
have had their business numbers disconnected. 
Please let INFO know immediately if you have any 
trouble with any advertiser in our publication so me 
can warn others as soon as possible. 



ILL THE 128 FLY? 



There is no doubt that the C-128 is an excellent 
computer and a dynamite value. No one has ever 
offered so much machine for the dollar. Will it be 
a big success like the C-64? That's a hard one to 
call. There are so many unpredictable factors 
involved: Will the production units on the shelves 
be completely debugged and unproblematic, will 
consumer desire for the D version undermine the 
chain store sales, will the AMIGA overshadow the 
whole parade, will the CP/fl vendors respond 
appropriately with re-issued popular titles at 
realistic prices, will third party vendors respond 
quickly with software that takes advantage of the 
128 mode, and last but not least, will ATARI make 
good on their ST promise, and be able to pull sales 
away with their new machine. Hang on £d your seats- 
it should be quite a ride! 



As some of you know, we have only recently offered 
subscriptions to INFO. Prior to iss. #5, you had to 
pick up your copy at a local dealer or newsstand. 
This was our attempt to support the dealers (who 
helped us get started). We finally offered 
subscriptions for two reasons: 1) many readers 
weren't able to obtain INFO locally (and were 
sometimes driving 150 miles or more to check on the 
latest issue I) 2) subscription revenue helps us 
remain financially resistant to the ever-present 
pressures of advertisers. The subscription rate 
structure we have set up is based on 3rd class 
mailing rates, which allow the price to be the 
lowest, but which sometimes causes considerable 
delay in delivery. In the future we will offer a 
dual-rate subscription with a first-class option for 
those who want immediate gratification at a premium 
price, and the third class option for the patient 
and economy-minded reader. For now, if you want 
your subscription supercharged, look at your label 
and send $1.50 (that's what it costs!) for each 
issue left on your subscription. 



New name & look 



Well, it had to happen eventually: we have expanded 
our coverage so much since the introduction of the 
C-64, that INF0=64 just doesn't fit any more. 
Starting with issue #8 (July), we will be changing 
our name to INFO, "the useful guide to Commodore 
computing". We will keep you up on not only the 
world of the C-64, but also the C-128, AMIGA, LCD, 
C-900, and anything else of interest to the 
Cownodore computing community. Only the name & logo 
will change, the quality, honesty, and excitement 
that has always gone into every issue will remain. 



The original announcement by Progressive Peripherals 
of the Comnodore SFD-1001 (SFO for Super Fast Drive) 
at $399 caused quite a stire a couple of months ago. 
Now, after some wheeling & dealing by both 
Progressive Peripherals and Protecto Enterprises, 
this impressive IEEE dual-sided drive is available 
(from either) at an incredible $1991 Highly 
recommended if you need fast, cheap, extensive data 
storage. Not compatible with commercial C-64 
software. Requires IEEE interface (not included). 

Progressive Peripherals: (303) 759-5713 

Protecto Enterprises: (312) 382-5244 




for the: 



C=G4 
C=i28 
AMIGA 
LCD 
C=380 



The useful guide to ®@GC3£^®(?© computing 




[u\m 






bg- Utiddy Ha.ck£r 



Hello out there to all you Info-64 readers and 
welcome to The INFOrmer. Here in this column I'll 
present all those juicy "tidbits" of information 
(including gossip and "hot" rumors) regarding 
Commodore computers and the people who use them; 
you know — the "off-beat" news items that usually 
don't get any attention. I'll keep my "ear to the 
ground to bring you all the news and latest 
scoops" throughout Commodoreland! But I'll be 
depending on you to help me out — after all, I'm 
only one person and I can't be in more than one 
place at a time, so here's your chance to become a 
field correspondent for The INFOrmer. 

If you hear Df anything unusual regarding Commodore 
computers or people using Commodores, let's hear 
about it. The main criteria for inclusion in this 
column is that the information be interesting, and 
that it can be checked out for validity. If your 
scoop is interesting, legitimate and I use it in 
this column, you'll be handsomely rewarded for your 
newshunting with an Erg=board. Of course, be sure 
to include your name, address and phone number with 
your submissions for The INFOrmer. Send them to: 

The INFOrmer 

Box 4125 

Brick, New Jersey 08723 

Attn.: Buddy Hacker 

From time to time I'll also run some contests, and 
winners will be awarded prizes. Here's an unusual 
contest to start you off with this column: 
ODDBALL Cownodore CONTEST — This contest will 
spotlight those curious "mutant" Commodore's that 
somehow manage to get past the quality control 
checkers on the assembly lines. For example, I've 
heard of one user who purchased a 64 and, upon 
unpacking it, found that all four of the function 
keys had "F1" keytops on them! I've also heard 
stories of C-64's and UICs that didn't have serial 
port sockets — the holes were there, but nothing 
to plug-in to I I myself have a Plus/4 that has an 
identifying logo on it calling it a Commodore 264, 
a name it bore early-on during its development. If 
you've had such an experience, please let me know 
about it and supply a photograph if possible. The 
only restrictions are that the submissions must be 
about Commodore equipment, and it must have been 
shipped from the factory in that particular 
condition — no "homebrew" modifications, if you 
pleasel 



TOST UNUSUAL APPLICATIONS — Know of anyone who's 
using a Commodore for a really different purpose? 
Let's hear about it. For example, Walter Lee, the 
chief of engineering for a video card-game 
manufacturer, uses his C-64 to control the overhead 
shades of his outdoor greenhousel Through a series 
of sensors and interfaces, the 64 takes readings of 
the luminosity level of the sunlight, outside 
temperature, inside temperature and other pertinent 
data and either keeps the shades open or closes 
them to regulate the temperature inside the 
structure. He claims his plants love it, and 
they're all thriving. While this story illustrates 
an uncommon application for a computer, I'm sure 
you readers must know of some really strange 
applications, so let's hear about them! 



r umor 



I had heard that the Pliami Police Department was 

installing Plus/4 computers in its patrol cars to 
do "instant" checks on traffic violators and crime 
suspects. I checked it out with the public 
information office of the Miami Police, and 
uncovered these interesting facts: It turns out 
that it is another future-minded Florida police 
department that is getting serious about Commodore: 
the officers of the Lakeland P.O. are working with 



Commodore to install either PLUS/4's or 
squad cars which will communicate 



C16's 



in 

with the 
station-house mainframe via radio link. The idea 
is to allow officers to directly access the 
main-frame without having to swamp the dispatcher 
with the overwhelming and endless requests for 
record checks, daily bulletins, descriptions, etc. 
Commodore is apparently supplying the hardware and 
consulting time "gratis" in the hopes of setting an 
example for other police and community agencies to 
follow. {We'll keep you posted as this project 
progresses.) And what about Pliami??? It seems 
that they are indeed using computers in their 
patrol cars, but they are all part of a Burroughs 
system (!). You might say their taste for such 



expensive 
(ouch) 



hardware is sort of 'Pliami ' s 





A little bird based in San Francisco whispered in 
my ear that OmniWriter/OmniSpell is going to be 
distributed by Solid State Software. This powerful 
word-processor by Kelvin Lacy (who also created 
VizaStar) was formerly distributed by HESware. 
Solid State may decide to market QmniWriter under 
the name of Vizalilriter , which is "EFie monicker it 
carries in the Luropean market, fly source tells me 
that an enhancement package allowing automatic 
pagination is also available for QmniWriter , which 
will make many users ecstatic. Watch this column 
for new developments on this topic. 

Another West Coast source tells me that HESware is 
alive and well — doing better every day, as a 
matter of fact. Apparently the company has been 
able to survive the bad times it encountered, trim 
the fat and now they're making a go of it once 
again. 

Remember that great "trade in your old computer and 
we'll give you $1D0 toward a C-64" promotion that 
Commodore ran a while back? Needless to say, it was 
a huge success for the company, but it did give 
rise to some problems, most notably, what to do 
with all of the brand-x computers received in 
trade. A number of enterprising Conmodore employees 
found that Timex-Sinclair computers sent in on 
trade made excellent doorstops. I know for a fact 
that this is true — I saw it with my own eyes 
while visiting West Chester! 

Also on a recent visit to Commodore I noticed 
certain individuals who shall remain nameless (by 
their own request) modelling the latest in West 
Chester fashions — Jackbuster T-shirts!. These 
shirts, stylishly fashioned in a white and red 
polyester/cotton fabric, sport a picture of ex-head 
honcho Jack Tramiel with a red circle around it and 
a bar going through it ala Ghostbusters logo. I'm 
presently trying to get my hands on one — if I 
can, we'll run a picture of it in a later column, 
and perhaps even offer it as a prize in one of 
these contests. 

While we're on the subject of Jack Tramiel, I 
should mention that Commodore's Jack Attack game 
was named after him and his infamous verbal 
"attacks" on employees who did not please him. Ply 
inside sources at Commodore swear this is the 
truth. 

Synapse Software has been taken over by Broderbund. 

Details of the takeover weren't available at 
presstime, but preliminary reports indicate that 
Broderbund will continue to market the Synapse 
products under their own banner. 



Diane LeBold, Bern Dumington, Tom Benford and some 
other prominent "crazy" Commodore writers have a 
date to go flying at the 1986 Winter Consumer 
Electronics Show in Las Vegas. Not with a plane, 
mind you — that would be too easy for these folk. 
It seems that Benn knows of a place in Las Vegas 
that uses an airplane engine to create a powerful 
updraft, and you just step off a platform into the 
draft; the resultant air pressure keeps you afloat! 

This "date" was made at the Infocom "Murder To Go" 
press reception at the '85 Winter CES. Well, 
different strokes for different folks, and all 
that! 



Commodore is actively courting and supporting 
third-party software developers for the C-128 and 
LCD computers. This is a welcome change of attitude 
on Commodore's part, since the third-party folks 
are the best sources for new and better software 
products. Under Sig Hartmann's rule, Conmodore was 
in the "software business" and third-party 
developers were left out in the cold. The new 
regime at West Chester, however, has decided that 
the best way to go is to concentrate their efforts 
on making superior hardware and leaving the 
software development to the experts in that field. 
This is good news for all of us, and this new 
attitude is sure to attract lots of talented 
programmers. Interested third-party developers 
should contact John Campbell at Commodore, (215) 
431-9180. 

Commodore now has a toll-free customer support hot 
line? The number is 1-800-247-9000, and the folks 
who man this number will be happy to help you out 
with questions on products, where to get service, 
dealers in your area, etc. Don't forget — it's a 
toll-free call. 

You can select any of the 64 levels of Jack Attack 
by simultaneously holding down the shift, ctrl and 
Comodore keys while pressing return. Try it — it 
works! 

Most Commodore cartridge-based games have a hidden 
"title" page. By experimenting with various key 
combinations (try the Commodore key, shift, ctrl 
and return at the same time) you can view this 
hidden page. It usually tells who did what in 
developing the game, and sometimes, there's even a 
hidden message! The key combinations aren't always 
the same, but usually a little experimenting will 
yield the desired results. The keystrokes I've just 
described work with the Lazarian cartridge, for 
sure. 



frf 




QiiM-: 




j$if 



*«S*^tSHfflS*K£]fc. 




continued 



Info Designs at one time tried to thwart the piracy 
problem by putting holes in certain areas of the 
disk; by trying to copy the illegal (protected) 
tracks and sectors, the drive read/write head would 
get stuck in one of these holes and ruin the 
mechanism. Fortunately, this form of capyguarding 
was deemed to be too extreme, and they shelved the 
idea {any company using these brutal methods should 
be severely chastized and given a wide berth I 
beware: vintage copies of Info Designs' software 
are still kicking around - trying to copy these 
disks Mill destroy your drive!!) 

EasyScript users can enjoy some music while doing 
their word processing! By pressing the "F1" key, 
holding down the "ctrl" key and pressing either the 
number 3 key or the "pound" sign, you'll hear a 
lovely rendition of Ponp and Circumstance. A 
Camnoobre source tells me that EasyScript only uses 
about 8K of memory, so they threw in the tune to 
fill out the remainder of the program control area 
in memory; pretty slick, huh? 



sum 



never 



I recently received a "freebee" promotional item in 
the mail from Handic Software. It's a reset switch 
that plugs into the Conmodore's serial port 
permitting you to reset the internal registers 
without turning the computer off and on again. The 
only problem is that my serial port usually has a 
disk-drive cable plugged into it. What to do here? 
Plug it into the extra socket on the disk drive? I 
tried it that way, but that's no good either; it 
resets the drive then instead of the computer! I'm 

retiring it to the archive of useless equipment, 

along with my other "trophies". Nice thought 
though, Handic, and congratulations on winning this 
month's "Dubious Achievement Award"! (the geniuses 
behind this product must also be responsible for 
the company's reported recent decision to suspend 
further work on Conmodore products and instead 
enter the IBW PC software ring! Good Luck! This 
makes as much sense as Rodney Dangerfield giving up 
on stand-up comedy to pursue a boxing career!) 



Since I do my writing from an office in my home, 
I'm known as an "electronic cottager". I feel it is 
my right as an American citizen to make my living 
this way, if I so desire, and I do. The AFL-CIO, 
however, disagrees with me and other "cottagers" on 
this point and they have issued a blanket 
condemnation of computer work at home! This 
national labor organization claims that computer 
work at home provides the opportunity for labor 
abuse and they are lobbying for a ban of all 
cottage industry work. Needless to say, this 
subject stirs a bit of emotion in me every time I 
think about it. My feelings about this ban, and the 
AFL-CIO too, for that matter, are: 

1) Why don't they mind their own %%&\§l 
business — and — 

2) They'll only stop me from writing at home 
when they pry my cold, lifeless fingers off the 
keys of my C-64. But to do that, they'll have to 
get past one very mean German Shepherd and stop a 
few steel-tipped hunting arrows. 

I'll keep you updated on the "Cottagers Conflict" 
as the story unfolds, and I'd like to hear from 
anyone who has something to contribute on this 
subject. I honestly believe that this AFL-CIO 
blanket condemnation could only be the tip of an 
iceberg and if these extremists have their way it 
could well affect all of us, not just writers! What 
an absolute outrage! Why don't they dedicate their 
efforts to trying to find Jimmy Hoffa and leave us 
computer-folk alone? Buzz-off, AFL-CIO! 
THE-REfl-STATCTENT , . . 

Well, that pretty well wraps it up for this issue. 
Don't forget to contribute your facts, anecdotes, 
rumors, gossip and "curio" news items — I'm 
depending on your input to make The INFOrmer a 
successful column! 'Til next issue... 



Wuddtf Hacker 





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Brian Redman 




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by Peggy Herrington 



Beginning tins issue, 

Peggy Herrington svill 

De Bringing ner 

eensideraDie expertise 
!: as flotii a musician and 
;, Commodore S4 enthusiast ' 
: to a new INTO column, | 





I Peggy, a frequent 
: contributor to several 
* commode re -oriented 
magazines, will Keep 
us up on me latest & 
greatest in t.te world 
of sound 8 sid, music 
& noise in tne months 
to come. 



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Sight & Sound 

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I'm a trained musician and I can program in BASIC but 
in early 1983, when I got the much-touted "SID" sound 
synthesizer, it just seemed to sulk somewhere inside 
that tan computer case. There wasn't anything around 
to help me make music with it then. I could coax a 
sort of huzzy, three-part harmony from it on occasion 
but rather than stroking SID, I had to program it, 
tediously, and that wasn't my idea Df playing" 
anything, music or not. 

The situation differs now and your problem may lie at 
the opposite end of the scale: dozens of products are 
on the market for accessing SID, and whether you (or 
the kids) have any prior musical or programming 
experience is no longer of much consequence. 

Unlike traditional instruments, there are a number of 
ways to approach an electronic music synthesizer, 
with a piano-type keyboard attached to the C-64, you 
CAN simply sit down and play three-part harmony, but 
doing so with facility, as with any musical 
instrument, requires practice - something most of us 
avoid like the proverbial plague. Besides, there's 
nothing that says you have play a synthesizer that 
way unless you want to. 



It's true that synthesizers (SID included) can mimic 
traditional instruments along with making sounds no 
one has ever heard before but that's not the only 
reason they are revolutionizing our music industry. 
Synthesizers are tremendously easy to play as 
compared to traditional music instruments. So easy, 
in fact, that some professional musicians are worried 
about it. They're wondering out-loud if the day of 
the virtuoso, the guy who devoted his life to 
developing technique on a violin or piano, is gone. 
Not only that: an electronic music studio operated by 
one person can produce sound-tracks that used to 
require a group of performing musicians - and do it 
much quicker. 

NDBDOY DOES IT BETTER 

Nobody does it on a typewriter keyboard, either. 
Black-and-white piano keyboards are attached to 
synthesizers because they're familiar and relatively 
easy to manipulate. Six musical keyboards are on the 
market for the C-64. Four offer full-sized piano 
keys (in units of varying numbers) and you'll 
probably have to rearrange your equipment to 
accomodate any of them. A less traditional item is a 
plastic keyboard overlay that snaps onto the C-64 and 
activates the top two rows of the C-64 as you press 
its miniature black-and-white keys. Another is a 
flat, touch-sensitive membrane lap-pad that only 
looks like a keyboard. Any one of these devices will 
transform your C-64 from computer to musical 
instrument. 

A keyboard doesn't add any sound-making capability to 
SID, it simply makes what's there easier to get at. 
But before you dismiss the idea, consider the fact 
that your car doesn't alter topography either: like a 
keyboard, it just makes things more accessible, with 
different models offering different luxuries. 

Actually, it's the program running on the C-64 that 
determines the luxuries a keyboard offers; what it 
can and cannot do. And naturally {in this industry 
anyway), the programming is not interchangable from 
keyboard to keyboard. The software that comes with 
most of them is performance-oriented (for playing 
live) and often you have to buy separate software for 
the luxuries - things like recording what_ you play 
live, sequencing, saving your sounds to disk ^and/or 
combining music with graphics. 




ET 





imeiortian 



I SouncECtiaser 64 j 

With four octaves of (49) full-sized piano-type keys, 
SoundChaser 64 from Passport Designs is the biggest 
keyboard available and offers the smoothest key 
action of the bunch. It plugs into the C-64 
cartridge slot. The software on the disk that comes 
with it displays SID control panels and is 
performance-oriented (which means you can't save your 
music to disk) and has two "modes" of operation. In 
polyphonic mode, the five supplied pre-set instrument 
sounds are changable and you can play three-part 
harmony live, using one instrument sound for all 
three voices. In monophonic mode, you can play only 
one "note" at a time (all three of SID's oscillators 
are being used) but Good Golly t Hiss Nolly! the 13 
pre-set sounds provided are simply fantastic! You 
won't believe it's SID when you hear "echo bells", 
"funkatron", "rain storm" or "fat fifth." 




r 



'mmwmm 



In order to do anything but play live with 
SoundChaser, you will need FbcfJusic (Passport's 

stand-alone software which works with the keyboard or 
accepts joystick input in a less traditional approach 
to music.) Hacflusic allows full access to all of 
SID's special features as well as your disk drive so 
you can save your compositions. On-screen icons and 
pull-down menus (featured on the Apple computer this 
program is named after) guide you through this 
full-featured composition program. Each of SID's 
three voices is recorded separately all the way 
through a piece of music on a "track" (to 
differentiate instrumentation between them) and then 
"overdubbed" to sound with the others. With 
Macfflusic, you can flip recorded tracks horizontally 
or vertically, transpose them to another key, cut, 
copy, insert or replace notation or change 
instrumentation in mid-measure, design your own 
instrument sounds or use any of the 13 pre-sets. The 
on-screen music notation isn't quite standard: 
durations are indicated by the length of colored 
blocks on a traditional music grand staff, and you 
can simply "draw" musical ideas by moving the 
joystick around - a wonderful visual display of voice 
movement. Ten sample songs by popular performing 
artists (Vangelis, Richael Jackson and The Police, 
for example) can be played, studied and/or changed. 
In short, nacTOusic, with or without SoundChaser 64, 
looks like a winner I 



The 
bit 

user 
first 

C-64 
You 



The next biggest keyboard, with three octaves or 40 
black and white piano keys, is from Ptelodian, Inc. 
(A caveat: select a keyboard by the software that 
controls it; the number of keys is of secondary 
importance because where it sounds over SID's 
eight-octave range can be changed during play.) 
case is off-white and oversized - it's a 
cumbersome - and it plugs into both the C-64 
port and joystick control port 2. This is the 
keyboard that made it onto the market for the 
and it's a recording studio "par excellance." 
record voices one at a time on tracks, very slowly 
with an optional metronome, and then adjust the 
overall tempo and instrumentation while listening. 

If you can (or want to learn how to) read standard 
music natation and tranfser sheet music onto the 
C-B4, the software that comes with the mclodian 
keyboard, called ConcertPlaster (which will work 
without the keyboard, too) is a good place to start. 
A single, colorful control screen divided into 
windows scrolls standard music notation as the music 
plays (notes line up vertically between voices 
although the durations are all shown as eighth 
notes) . It also shows a menu for the function keys 
which operate eveything, a track control window where 
you record, mute, playback, etc., a feature window 
where you select and adjust volume, octaves, load or 
save files and see the disk directory, and includes a 
graphic representation of the keyboard upon which 

keys change color as notes sound. There are no 

editing features so if you blow it, you have to 

re-record an entire voice. But the documentation is 
exhaustive and 35 good sample songs are provided. 



iwusicwate 



Editing your music to absolute perfection is the 
strong point with Sequential Circuits' nusicflate 

keyboard provided you have their four extra software 
packages. The keyboard itself is small but adequate, 
offering two and a half octaves of 32 full-sized 
piano keys, and it plugs into C-64 joystick control 
port 1 . Again, the program with it is performance 
only, and shows SID control sliders on-screen and a 
little graphic keyboard. You can record three-part 
music and alter the eight acoustic instrument 
pre-sets during playback but you can't save anything 
to disk. The screen display with this and the 
separate software packages is plain- vanilla and 
utilitarian - it's not designed for fun and games: 
the entire series combines to form an extremely 
versatile, power-packed music composition tool, ala 
professional synthesizer systems. You have full 
access to SIO and your disk drive. 

Sound Raker (separate software from Sequential) lets 
you design complex instrument sounds with Husicflate. 
Song Builder is a sequencer with which you can record 
(from the keyboard) up to eight sections of music 
(with three voices, each of differing tempos) and 
link them together to form a "song" of up to 16 
sections in any order. Song Editor puts all this 
into standard music notation on the screen and allows 
finely-honed music editing, and with Song Printer 
(and a dot matrix printer) you can print sheet music. 
There's only one (I think it's original) sample tune 
provided and it's on each and every disk in the 
series but it kinda grows on you. 




P 





If this sort of music tool doesn't appeal to you, 
take heart. The flusicmate keyboard is compatible 
with another composition package that IS fun and 
friendly: Studio 64 from Entech. Studio 64 is 

composition oriented and was one of the first 
programs available for the C-64 but it has been 
updated so often you'd never know it. (If you have 
an older version, contact Entech for an update - 
they're cheap! the latest version will work without 
the keyboard too, but note input is done by playing 
the C-64 ASCII keyboard like a piano, and that's not 
a very musical experience.) Voices are recorded 
separately on tracks and standard music notation is 
displayed on the screen for only one voice at a time, 
but Studio 64 has so many fine composition features 
that won't bother you. You can make every note a 
different sound if you wish, and, with a utility 
program from Entech called Add Mus'In, Studio 64 
music files can be added as background music to your 
own programs with no effect on animation or timing. 
Over a dozen sample tunes are provided and it offers 
"human" and "swing" timing adjustments to help 
overcome that mechanical feeling of computerized 
music. 






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Music Port 



I wasn't able to play with a production model of this 
2-1/2 octave {32 key) full-sized piano keyboard 
attachment (available with or without light pen and 
appropriate music composition software). I did try 
Tech Sketch's pre-production software without the 







Slip 



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The Music Part keyboard itself is precisely the same 
unit as that offered by Sequential Circuits (but the 
software isn't compatible; this one plugs into the 
C-64 user port.) It comes with bundled performance 
and composition software: the works. The performance 
program includes pre-recorded two-voice rhythm and 
bass sequences you can play along with live, and a 
nifty feature that lets you use the lowest musical 
keys to make the tone center of the bass-line follow 
your melodic progression. (Musicians will know what 
I'm talking about, and non-musicians will find it 
very handy with a little practice.) You can load in 
120 different Instrument pre-sets, acessing 15 at a 
time and use them or design your own for live play or 
when you overdub tracks. In composition mode lots of 
nates are displayed on the screen; only the three 
sounding at one time are displayed during playback. 
You can also play or record three voices at one at a 
time. It has full SID control and disk drive access. 

I should be gaa-gaa over this keyboard... but I'm not 
and I can't say exactly why. It is extremely 
versatile and comes with all the software you'll need 
but a plethora of mismanaged details detract from the 
overall effect: the documentation isn't easy to read, 
the screen displays are stark or cluttered, all eight 
of the music samples are poorly chosen and 
unimaginativly arranged - but, admittedly, I did have 
pre-release product. Maybe the final package with 
light-pen composition will make up for it. I 11 let 
you know in a future column. 



Coiortone KeyDoartll 



This isn't a real keyboard, it's Waveform's flat, 
touch-sensitive lap-pad with shaded graphics of 25 
keys (two octaves) that make it look like it has 
movable keys. It plugs into control port 1 and has a 
"Touch Harp" or sensitive-strip that you can load 
scale patterns into and play by running your finger 
across, and 14 non-sounding function "keys" for 
changing program parameters. The software that comes 
with it is very limited while being lively and 
colorful (my two pre-schoolers adore it) although it 
doesn't allow true music composition or full 
performance. Icons on the screen correspond to the 
14 function keys, which you touch to do things like 
change the two-voice pre-recorded accompaniments 
(which you play along with on the keyboard: the 
underlying premise of the program). You also select 
instrument pre-sets, record and save your melodies to 
disk, slow everything to half -speed or disable keys 
on the keyboard so that only those which lie within 
the scale of the selected accompaniment can sound - 
voila! no sour notes! The rest of the display shows 
scrolling music notation. 



light-pen feature with a "similar" keyboard. I've The Coiortone Keyboard is fully compatible with 



only seen the light-pen composition demonstrated: the 
pen is used to pick up notes, etc., in one area of 
the sreen and drop them onto a musical staff in 
another. It's similar to joystick note entry but 
easier since you don't have to drag an arrow around 
the screen. 



waveform s deluxe but complex PlusiCalc composition 
software which allows full SID and disk drive access 
for single-voice live play with recorded sequences 
and recording of separate tracks with non-standard 
music notation. About a year ago, Waveform announced 
a full-fledged piano keyboard attachment for the C-64 





IIM3- 





called the Colortone Pro - with a Touch Harp and 37 

full-sized piano keys - but it turned out to be 
prohibitively expensive and will not be marketed. 
Too bad: it was a real beaut! 




incretfiflle music Keys o ara 



& Sound's 

software 



This little number is a tribute to the idea that good 
things come in small packages. Rather than plugging 
into the C-64 it perches on top of it, and by 
pressing the 24 miniature black and white piano-type 
keys, you activate the top two raws of the C-64 ASCII 

keys which lie directly underneath. Sight 
Incredible music Keyboard {upgraded 
available to present owners for $7) will never rival 
Stairway for performance but you may be astonished by 
the grand music you CAN make with it. The trick is 
in the software: six separate packages plus four 
"albums" are compatible with it, all from Sight & 
Sound. 

The disk that comes with the keyboard overlay has 
programs on both sides. You also get two books of 
music in standard notation and stickers with note 
letter names you can put on the keys of the keyboard 
overlay. Both programs are performance-oriented and 
the Bonus Program (on side two) gives you five 
preprogrammed rhythm/bass accompaniments to play 
along with: boogie, rock, disco, reggae and samba, 
and 20 pre-set instrument sounds to use. Three notes 
at a time are displayed on the screen, and you can 
change pre-sets while recording but you will need 
additional software to save music or pre-sets to 
disk. 

I demonstrated a number of music and voice products 
at a Commodore user group meeting a while back, and 
the hit of the "show" was the Sight & Sound's 
Kawasaki Rhythm Rocker, with the keyboard overlay. 
There's nothing classical about this 
performance-oriented program by jazz guitarist Ryo 
Kawasaki (which also lets you record music in this 



format and save it to disk). You play one voice 
(either synthesizer, bass or percussion) live against 
pre-recorded two-voice electronic rhythmic sequences 
while (controllable) high-resolution graphic designs 
scroll across the screen. Pitch bend, sustain and 
vibrato effects are easily added during play, and 
several gutsy people at that meeting with no musical 
experience whatsoever were able to make dynamite 
music with it on the spot. The upgraded version 
(available to owners of the original for $15, which I 
didn't have then) is a double-sided disk with a music 
notation system, print utility and other goodies. 

The Kawasaki Synthesizer is a separate two disk 
package with an oriental flavor. It works with the 
keyboard overlay, too. (All of Sight & Sound's 

software can be used without the keyboard overlay by 
playing the top two rows of the C-64 like a piano, 
but I don't recommend it.) The Performer disk lets 
you play along live with one provided sequence or 
play all three voices live from the keyboard at once, 
polyphonically. Twenty-one instrument pre-sets are 
given and you can change them to make over SOD 
altogether - but write down the good ones because you 
can't save them to disk for next time. 

Designing and saving pre-set sounds and composing any 
style of three-part music are both available with The 
Composer (on the second disk in the Kawasaki 
Synthesizer). This is the only music program I know 
of for the C-64 which includes a "split keyboard" - 
which gives you the ability to assign half of the 
keyboard to one range of the SID chip and the other 
half to another for play or recording: a truly 
professional feature. You record in sequences of 255 
notes, one voice at a time (the screen displays 
non-standard alphabetic notation) and then arrange or 
link sequences together in any order for playback. 
Full SID and disk drive access is there. 



C64 MUSiC Videos 



Would you like to create music videos on your C-64? 
You know, high-resolution animated graphic displays 
with music in the background. It's easy to 
the following two software packages from 
Sound. 



do with 
Sight & 



The Music Processor is a music composition program 
that works with the Sight & Sound keyboard overlay 
and an optional joystick. It includes 99 unchangable 
pre-set instrument sounds which you can cycle through 
while the music plays. You create music (and save it 
to disk) either by recording it from the keyboard 
overlay, the C-64 keyboard or typing it in 
alphanumerically in an extensive resident music 
editor (which allows, among other things, musical 
ties, sharps, flats and naturals, staccato or legato 
notes, and lyrics to be displayed on the screen under 
3-note-at-a-time standard music notation) . ^usic 
entered from the keyboard overlay (or any of the 14 
sample songs) can be listed and edited in the edit 
mode. The upgraded disk ($15, if you own an older 
version) offers another music notation system and . a 
utility for printing sheet music. 






MAbVlCt 



Sight 4 Sound's Music Video Kit does for graphics 
what the Music Processor does for music. With the 
prorams on the three disk-sides that come with it, 
you can design and combine music and graphics into 
C-64 music videos. Selecting from a library of 26 
high-resolution screen backgrounds and 60 sprite 
characters (using up to seven at once) you design an 
animated graphics display. You can also design your 
own backgrounds and sprites (or alter theirs) with 
the resident Graphics Editor program. You then 
select the background tune from 17 songs on the Video 
Kit disks, from your original recordings done with 
the Music Processor or one of the 14 sample songs 
with that disk. Music files from Sight & Sound s 
Computer Song Albums (which stand-alone and have 
eight different songs on each) are also compatible: 
On Stage, Rock Concert, Solid Gold and Music Video 
Hits. When you move the sprites (one at a time with 
a joystick) around the background in coordination 
with the music, everything is recorded automatically. 
Your music video could feature a rock group 
performing on-stage, for example. Without creating a 
single thing of your own, you can pick from 26 
(gorgeous) backgrounds, 60 animated sprite characters 
and - counting the albums - 63 songs to use in your 
own music videos. I think THAT'S incredible 1 

Sight & Sound offers yet another package that is 
compatible with the keyboard overlay, 3001 Sound 
Odyssey. Two programs are on one disk: an 
interactive synthesizer tutorial which will help you 
figure out (and let you fool with) waveforms, ADSR 
envelopes, ring modulation, synchronization and 
modulation (and other effects) as they are used in 
the accompanying music composition program, 
Microsynth. The latter' s screen display includes 
current SID settings and cycles through sequences as 
they sound, with 100 available pre-sets which are 
shown visually, too. It's a different breed of 
composition program using the keyboard overlay 
monophonically but you can play (and save to disk) 
sequences of chords (or notes) by pressing a single 
key on the keyboard Dvarlay. 

THAT'S (not) ALL FOLKS! 

Music and voice products for the Commodore-64 have 
been exploding onto the market lately, and I'm gonna 
give you the score on them in future columns, too. 
Distributors are asked to send review copies of new 
products which access SID to my attention at INFO-64 
editorial offices or contact me at (505) 243-0449. 




Covox has come up with a new way to make 
music on the C-64: as you sing or whistle 
into the microphone (which comes with the 
Voice Plaster) your voice is digitized and 
the pitch is extracted. It is used with 
(changable) instrument presets to play 
your tune, and - get this - it happens so 
fast, SID seems to play right along with 
you as you sing. Concurrently, music 
notation scrolls on-screen and can be 
saved to disk or printed out. Voice 
Master will accomodate only one voice now 
but software developers are nuts if that 
isn't changed ASAP. Marvelous musical 
potential in this voice 
digitizer/recognition unit. 

Sour notes; Bank Street Music Writer 
(Mindscape) and Music Construction Set 
(Electronic Arts) have terminal (in the 
dead sense) translation problems. 
Designed for Atari and Apple respectively, 
neither allows access to many of SID's 
special features. Don't waste your time 
and money. If joystick note entry appeals 
to you, get MacMusic or... 

On-screen music composition with a 
joystick is handled superbly by a new 
program from Broderbund: The Music Shop. 
Icons and pull down menus with dialog 
boxes over a display of eight or so 
measures of standard notation, full SID 
and disk drive access, print utility, 
quality documentation and 28 tuneful 
sample songs make The Music Shop one Df 
the strongest programs of its type to come 
along yet. (It will soon be MIDI 
compatible). 

Programmers (hobby and professional alike) 
will be thrilled with Allegro (formerly 
called PASS) from Artworx, which contains 
FORTE, a music composition language 
derived from FORTH with bits of others 
(for good measure?). Music input is 
compiled into interrupt-driven ML files 
which can be added to existing programs 
without interfering with screen action. 
You can do it alphanumerically or in 
"real-time" from the C-64 keyboard (or 
with Sight & Sound's keyboard overlay), 
playing one to three voices at once. 
Design your own or use the 50 marvelous 
instrument presets with preprogrammed 
effects like wah-wah, pulsewidth sweeps, 
sirens, echoes, heavymetal and phaser. A 
separate Sampler disk has 40-plus files of 
gorgeous, "musical" music - you'll hardly 
believe it's SID! 



1 N D EX TO VENDORS MENTIONED 1 N 



S OUNDi 
^AD\> % C E 



ALLEGRO ($39.95) 

Artworx Software 
150 North Main St. 
Fairport NY 14450 
(800) 828-6573 

THE MUSIC SHOP ($44.95) 

Broderbund 

17 Paul Drive 

San Rafael, CA 94903 

(415) 479-1170 

VOICE MASTER ($89.95) 
Covox, Inc. 
675-D Conger St. 
Eugene, OR 97402 
(503) 342-1271 

MUSIC CONSTRUCTION SET ($39.95) 
Electronic Arts 
2755 Campus Drive 
San Mateo, CA 94403 
(415) 571-7171 

STUDIO 64 ($39.95) 
ADD MUS'IN ($39.95) 

Entech 

10733 Chiquita St. 
Studio City, CA 91604 
(818) 768-6646 

MELODIAN KEYBOARD ($199.95) 
CONCERTMASTER (separately $39.95) 

Melodian, Inc. 

115 Broadway, Suite 122 

New York, NY 10006 

(212) 406-5163 

MUSIC PORT KEYBOARD ($149.95) 
Without Light-Pen ($119.95) 
Tech Sketch, Inc. 
26 Just Road 
Fairfield, NJ 07006 
(800) 526-2514 



BANK STREET MUSIC WRITER ($49.95) 
Mindscape Inc. 
3444 Dundee Road 
Northbrook, IL 60062 
(800) 221-9884 

SOUNDCHASER 64 ($199.00) 
MACMUSIC ($49.95) 

Passport Designs, Inc. 

625 Miramontes Street 

Half Moon Bay, CA 94019 

(415) 726-0280 

MUSICMATE KEYBOARD ($99.00) 
SONG BUILDER ($39.95) 
SONG EDITOR ($39.95) 
SOUND MAKER ($39.95) 
SONG PRINTER ($39.95) 

Sequential Circuits, Inc. 

3051 North First St. 

San Jose, CA 95134 

(408) 946-5240 

INCREDIBLE MUSIC KEYBOARD ($29.95) 
KAWASAKI RHYTHM ROCKER ($29.95) 
KAWASAKI SYNTHESIZER ($29.95) 
MUSIC PROCESSOR ($29.95) 
MUSIC VIDEO KIT ($39.95) 
COMPUTER SONG ALBUMS ($14.95 each) 
3001 SOUND ODYSSEY ($29.95) 

Sight & Sound Music Software, Inc. 

3200 South 166th St. 

New Berlin, WI 53151 

(800) 558-0910 

COLORTONE KEYBOARD ($39.95) 
MUSICALC I ($29.95) 
MUSICALC II ($19.95) 
MUSICALC III ($19.95) 
MUSICALC TEMPLATES ($9.95) 

Waveform, Inc. 

418 Buchanan Circle #12 

Pacheco, CA 94553 

(415) 825-1722 



IIM3- 












by: 

Hark Brown Eg 



Armed with a stack of disks containing the latest 
and most heavily copy-protected games known to man, 
I retreated into my sanctum sanctorium to perform 
the most terrifying ritual of the ages. Three 
weeks later I crawled out Df my cubicle, haggard, 
weak, blinking blindly at the unaccustomed 
sunlight. But I had the answer to that question 
which the mystics have pondered since the beginning 
of time: Which Disk Copy Proqran Is Best? 

THE CONTENDERS 

I checked out seven of the most papular disk 
copiers: Ditto, Superclone (ne: Clone Machine), 
Canada A/PI, Ultrabyte, dr. Nibble, Copy Clone XL, 
and Di-Sector. Four others, Copy Q, Copy II 64, 
Apollo (uihich replaces Gemini), and Diskmaker, are 
either in the midst of revisions that are not 
finished yet, or just plain did not show up in time 
for this review for one reason or another. We hope 
to take a look at all or most of these in a later 



THE GAUNTLET 

With the aid of Those Knowledgeable About Such 

Things we selected nine programs with varying 
levels of copy protection against which to pit our 
arsenal of copy programs. In guesstimated order of 
difficulty to copy (from least to most difficult) 
these were: EasyScript (Commodore), Flight 
Simulator II (sublogic), Stealth (Broderbund) , 
Impossible Mission (Epyx), Flock 'N' Bolt 
(Activision), Realm of Impossibility (Electronic 
Arts), Wizard (Progressive Peripherals), Raid Over 
Moscow (Access), and Kwik-LoadI (Datamost). Note 
that most of these are games. Software publishers 
perceive games as the most pirate-prone software, 
so they tend to give them the most sophisticated 
protection. The first three programs use 
previous-generation" copy protection. All the 
copiers tested would copy them. But the rest are 
recent releases incorporating the latest in copy 
protection schemes from a cross-section of the 
Commodore B4 software industry. We also made sure 
we were testing the most recent (and in some cases, 
just updated) versions of the copy programs. Copy 
protection (besides being lamentable in and of 
itself) is a never-ending battle, resembling 
nothing so much as the nuclear arms race. Each 
side is continually expending enormous amounts of 
time, money, and energy trying to outdo the other, 
in a contest that is intrinsically futile. But 
enough editorializing. Suffice it to say that we 
tried to test the best against the best. 




THE CRITERIA 

We looked at copiers not 
only to see if they copy 
(obviously the main 
question), but also to 
see if they're easy to 
use, what the 
documentation is like, 
how fast they work, etc. 
We then distilled this 
information down into 
the handy chart you see 
reproduced here. 
Hopefully, you'll be 
able to tell at a glance 
which copier is the one 
for you. 

THE CAUTIONS 

There are a lot of stone 
walls you can run into 
with disk copiers. The 
most notorious involves 
RDrn incompatabilities. 
The 1541 disk drive has gone 

revisions to correct minor 
programs are sensitive to 




through several ROM 



bugs, and many copy 
this. We ran into 
problems with most of the copiers when we tested 
them on an early 1541 drive with the very first ROM 
version. If you have an older drive, these 
problems may show up with almost everything you try 
to copy, but usually they materialize only when you 
try to copy certain difficult programs, such as 
wizard or Raid Over ftascuu. 





COPYRIGHT LAW 




ALLOWS YOU TO 


. 


IMKE UP TO 5 


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COPIES OF A 


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PR0(3RAiTl FOR 




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SCREED DISPLAYS 
RAT1GE FROm THE 
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CAflABA A/ 



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Other problems involve protection schemes that 
employ half-tracking or extra tracks beyond track 
35. (Never mind that the 1541 is only designed to 
read faithfully out to track 35!) Nany copiers 
will not handle these latest overkill techniques. 
In fact, a slightly out-of -whack 1541 will not 
handle loading them either. There is a simple 
solution to this problem: refuse to buy any 
programs with this degree of protection. (There's 
reportedly a new protection scheme under 
development that will actually wipe out the disk if 
it thinks it's an illegal copy. Of course, if it 
detects a spurious error and misinterprets it, it's 
too bad; your original is wiped out. We haven't 
actually seen this one used yet, and I hope we 
never do. I'll never buy any program protected 
like that I) 

Successful disk cloning also depends on drive 
alignment, getting the drive door latched well, 
using good quality backup disks, the relative 
humidity, the Dow Jones Index, and Kismet. If at 
first you don't succeed, try, try again. Because 
of all these potential problems, you may be able to 
copy stuff we couldn't, and may likewise not be 
able to copy programs we could. There are no 
guarantees in life, only limited warranties. 

PIRACY 

We've said it before, but here it is again: DON'T 
PIRATE SOFTWARE! !l Lest you be confused about what 
piracy is, here is a concise definition: Piracy is 
copying something that somebody else owns the 
copyright to, and then giving or selling the copy 
to somebody else. The U.S. of A.'s copyright laws 
allow you to make up to five (Why so many? I don't 
know.) copies of a program for your own use. Disk 
copy programs exist solely for this purpose. Don't 
abuse them. 

COMPARING THE PROGRAPB 

Disk copy programs break down into just a couple of 
categories. First of all, there are novice and 
expert systems. The novice copiers let you make 
backup copies of disks and that's about all. 5ome 
of them allow you to diddle with the default 
settings a little bit, but you can't do any really 
fancy stuff. You follow the screen prompts to swap 
disks, and when you are done you have a workable 
copy (hopefully). And let's face it, this is most 
of what you buy a copy program for. The expert 
copiers give you more options. They usually let 
you examine disks and display which errors are 
located on what tracks, and then reproduce them on 
another disk. They generally include a track and 
sector editor. They probably have a single file 
copy routine, and other disk utility functions. 
These programs are for people who know what they 
are doing, and want to do more than just backup 
software. 



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CONTINUED, 



Copiers also classify into fast and slow 
categories. The fast copiers use some version of 
the technique used in the widely available Four 
Minute Copy program, and can copy most disks in 
about seven minutes. To gain this speed advantage, 
you have to unplug everything else from the serial 
bus (printers, other disk drives, etc.} while you 
make your copies. Slow copiers use normal data 
transfer rates and take about twenty-five minutes 
to make a copy. This is no big deal if you are 
iust making backup copies of a couple of disks 
(which is all you should be doing). It just gives 
you time between disk swaps to read an article in 
INFO. It's also possible to speed up some of the 
slow copiers with a 1541 speedup cartridge. Ditto, 
for example, runs almost twice as fast with 
Richvale's 1541 Express with Fast Cable, but is 
unaffected by Epyx's Fast Load. If you find other 
combinations that work, let us know and we'll pass 
the information along. In the meantime, here's how 
the copiers we tested stacked up: 



mm 



I 



Ditto, from Cardinal Software, was one of the 
definite surprises in this test. It's a slow 
novice copier, but a very good one. It worked 
well on everything up to and including Realm of 
Impossibility. Only the three most difficult 
programs stumped it, and one of those (Kwik-LoadI) 
stopped them all. Ditto is also unusual in that it 
will back itself up. Ditto's technique for doing 
so is interesting, and one that may have some 
potential for other companies contemplating copy 
protection. Ditto only reproduces for a single 
generation. That is, the original disk will back 
itself up, but the copies won t. This scheme is 
somewhat akin to a software version of a "dongle", 
since the original owner can make as many backups 
as he needs, but stray copies can't go any further. 
The slim documentation is nothing to cheer about, 
but since this is a simple swap-and-go novice 
copier, that's not critical. Ditto will also work 
with two 1541 disk drives, which means faster 
copying for those with more equipment. Future 
upgrades are a pretty reasonable half-price at 
$17. DD. All in all, Ditto is a good, simple disk 
copier from a company with a good enduser-oriented 
philosophy. 



iHH 



Canada A/PI (since everybody wants to know, the A/M 
stands for Archival Maker) from Skylight Software 
is a comedown from Ditto. I'd heard about it for a 
long time, and was looking forward to checking it 
out. Our tests were disappointing, though. Canada 
A/HI copied only the three programs with "last 
generation" copy protection; an update is sorely 
needed here. And since this is a slow novice level 
copier without even any documentation, there is not 
even any way to creatively supplement what it does 
with resident utility programs. The status display 
is probably the best of any of the copy programs 
listed here, but that's it. It was 
state-of-the-art six months ago, but the way copy 
protection schemes change, Skylight needs to be 
making copier upgrades available on a regular 
basis. 




n 



iHilllllll 



:>i 



Di-Sector is a slow expert system from Starpoint 
Software. _ The copy-protection scheme used by 
Di-Sector itself is unique. The master disk will 
make up to three working copies before it 
self-destructs, which should be plenty to last most 
people a long time. The documentation is 
excellent, and the disk is loaded with many useful 
menu-selected utilities. These include a track and 
sector editor, file copier, fast copy program, 
error analyzer, and even a disk monitor. The 
documentation, screen menus, and title displays are 
friendly and easy to get through. As an expert 
disk analysis and utility package, Di-Sector 
shines. Unfortunately, as a copier Di-Sector has 
the same problem as Canada A/PI. With an upgrade to 
make it competitive, this would indeed be an 
excellent program, but right now it's a step 
behind. 



MHliiMIl %L 



Educamp's Copy Clone XL is the latest revision of 
their slow expert copy system. It copies itself 
100^, which is admirable. The disk includes many 
disk utilities, including Zap Load (a 1541 
speedup), a track and sector editor, error 
detection and writing routines, a disk monitor, and 
many others. The copy we tested was a pre-release 
version, so its final appearance may change 
somewhat, but what we saw had much the same look as 
Di-Sector. Many similar utilities are here, and 
the main copy routine provides a similar 
BAM-with-errors display. Copy Clone XL is not as 
slick-looking, however, lacking the friendly 
documentation and title screens. The status 
screens don't tell you as much, either. Also, most 
of the utilities must be loaded and run 
independently. Only the seven-function generic 
Disk Utilities package, the Fast Copier, and the 
Nibble Copier are available from the main menu. 
Unfortunately, this copier also lacks the ability 
to function with the latest and greatest protection 
schemes, but far somebody who wants a Di-Sector 
type program without copy-protection, and who can 
do without the slick presentation, Copy Clone XL is 
a viable alternative. 




rr 



Bill COPISBi CQWABI9 



CONTINUED 



*#* SUPERCLONE U?.8 NOTES **« 



SUPERCLONE has been improved to handle 
Many of the latest protection schemes in 
an even faster and easier way than was 
possible previously. 

Included on this disK are two new files: 

FOUR MINUTE BACKUP 

and 
T0U6H HUTS UTILITY, 

Start first by using the FOUR MINUTE 
BACKUP (FMB). This program will format 
and copy a dish using a single drive in 
just over FOUR minutes' In addition, 
it will indicate which tracks have been 
errored. miien using FMB, always first 
disconnect any second drive or printer. 



u miivanMUAM igE 



mm 



UaitSl 



mm 



Micro-U has upgraded their ponderous and unwieldy 
Clone Machine and come up with a much friendlier 
and more powerful Superclone. It will not back 
itself up, a philosophy that I find somewhat 
contradictory, but at least Micro-bJ has a history 
of reasonable upgrade cost and newsletter support. 
As this is being written, they are even offering 
upgrades at a dscount to purchasers of OTHER copy 
programs! The path taken to upgrade this slow 
expert system s a strange one, but it makes sense 
for this package; they've kept the original 
complex Clone Machine and Unguard programs on the 
disk and added the simple swap-and-go Superclone as 
well as the new Tough Nuts Utility. Unfortunately, 
they haven't upgraded the documentation. It only 
covers the old Clone Machine and Unguard. A simple 
help file gives some clues about Superclone, then 
gives way to a very strange "menu screen that 
makes you cursor down to a preprinted LOAD and RUN 
on the screen for the initial program you want to 
run, From there on out, it is a simple matter of 
following more traditional {and effective) menus. 
Superclone is by far the best slow copier we 
tested, working well on all but the two mast 
difficult programs. It even produced a working 
copy of Wizard, despite Hr. Nibble's propaganda 
claims to the contrary. The arsenal of additional 
utilities is impressive, too. There is a track and 
block editor, error checker and writer, directory 
utility, file copier, and Tough Nuts cracker. 
Right now, Superclone is probably the most 
effective copy program available for those who want 
an expert system. 



ilOBIIBlii 



Ultrabyte is a great copy program. It won't copy 
itself, but backups cost 505? of original cost. The 
documentation is slim, but since this is a 
swap-and-go fast novice system, that's fine; it 
does provide you with some tips on how to make good 
backups. The only input the user has to Ultrabyte 
is to specify how many tracks to copy (up to 38!) 
and how many copies you want to make (up to five at 
a time). From here on out, you just swap disks. 
Ultrabyte tied for most effective copy program with 
Or. Nibble; both copied everything we checked 
except Kwik-Loadl, and they both claim that nothing 
on the market can copy it. Ue believe them. 
Ultrabyte is ten bucks cheaper than mx. Nibble, and 
copies the same stuff. The only thing that 
Ultrabyte does is give you good copies, fast. 






Final Source's Rfc. Nibble fast novice copier costs 
ten dollars more than Ultrabyte. For that, you get 
cheaper upgrades ($12.00) and backups ($10.00), an 
additional four-minute copier for unprotected 
disks, a fast file copier, and a fast formatter 
that will format a disk in nine seconds flat. Rr. 
Nibble's latest revision includes the ability to 
make up to five copies at once just like Ultrabyte, 
and also copies up to 38 tracks. Half- tracking is 
user-selectable rather than automatic, you can 
select the track to start copying from, and you can 
ask fir. Nibble to verify as it copies in exchange 
for a slight delay. Itr. Nibble copies what 
Ultrabyte does in about the same amount of time, 
but includes more bells and whistles. It's also 
got a nicer package, a cuter name, and neat little 
preprinted backup stickers with the mouse on them. 
You get a "Ptr. Nibble Backs Me Up" bumper sticker 
and the "NibbleNotes" newsletter when you send in 
your warranty card, too. Their marketing people 
get an "A+" for sure. 

sumuiuN 

Like I said, copy protection is an arms race. I'd 
like to see everyone throw down their error tracks 
and half tracks and extra tracks and nibblers and 
nutcrackers and biteaters and just learn to live in 
peace, but I don't think it's going to happen. In 
the meantime, it's tough to keep up with things; 
today's supercopier may be tomorrow's also-ran. 
It's one part of computing that changes even faster 
than computing itself does. I hope this comparison 
has helped clear away some of the smokescreen. 








TYPING TUTOR + WORD INVADERS 



REVIEWERS SAY: 

"This is the best typing tutor we have 
seen yet; + ***+" 

INFO-64 magazine 

"Best typing tutor I've seen -Better 
than Mastertype" 
1 Microcomputer Courseware 

Evaluation 

■WORD INVADERS is fantastic-" 
Editors of Consumers Guide 

"Computer aided instruction at 
its best." 

Commander magazine 

Housewife Says; "Now I know 
how my family can get so involved 
with these programs. I, too. would much rather 
play WORD INVADERS than clean my house!" 
12 year old boy wriles: "Very impressed by your program! 
My friends have told me how bad typing class was and I'm 
HAPPY that I don't have to take the class.' 
Another customer writes: " The rave reviews about your 
TYPING TUTOR + WORD INVADERS program are fully 
justified! We recently bought your program and the whole 
family is enjoying it. Congratulations on the program!" 

IN DAILY USE BY SCHOOLS ACROSS THE U.S.A. 

NEWICommodore Plus/4 or 16 TapeS21.95 Disk 524,95 

Commodore 64 TapeS21.95 Disk 524.95 

VIC 20 (unexpanded) TapeS2i,95 




IFR (FLIGHT SIMULATOR) 







REALISTIC AIRCRAFT RESPONSE 

"Has a quality of realism which sets it 
apart from others, even those I've 
tested in flight school." 

Compute's Gazelle 
"Great program!" INFO-64 

1 "It is tremendous fun." 

Compute's Gazette 

"Flight tested by an air traffic 
controller, two skilled pilots and 
an elementary school class. 
Highly recommended by all." 
Midnito Gazelle 

"This is an unbelievably realistic 
nulation of the difficulties facing a 
pilot in instrument flying. I'm a 747 pilot and I 
think that this program could do a lot to improve the 
reactions and instrument scan habits of even very 
experienced pilots," 747 pilot 

NEWICommodore Plus/4 or 16 Tape or Disk 529.95 

Commodore 64 Tape or Disk 529.95 

VIC 20 (unexpanded) Cartridge 539.95 



.gljafi estate JJBrHer 

by James Sullivan 
Old English typestyle print and simple word processing 
package. With this program and a VIC 1525 printer (or other 
graphic printer and a VIC 1525 graphic emulating interface) 
you can automatically print in Old English typeface. Great for 
party invitations, announcements, advertisements, and other 
attention getting notices. The heading above was printed on a 
VIC 1525 printer (original copy reproduced half-size in this 
ad). Use also as a simple word processor for letters, short 
reports, etc. in normal, double width or Old English typeface. 



Commodore 64 



(tape-S16.95) (disk-$21.95) 



Shipping and handling $1.00 pet 
orde: CA residents add 6% tax 



ACADEm? 

SOFTH//RE 

P.O. Box 6277 San Rafael, CA 94903 (41 5) 499-0850 






Tel ♦ Easy 




Terminal Software 



Tel-Easy is an easy-to-use telecommunication 
software cartridge for your Commodore 64. 
Tel-Easy is menu driven, utici supports Auto-Dial 

modems. It also features a real time clock with alarm. 
32K capture buffer, full sending and retrieving of 
information. Saves data as a program file or sequential 
file to the disk drive. 

Tel-Easy terminal software opens the world of your 
Commodore 64 to telebanking and telelearnlng. 

Included with Tel- Easy is a CompuServe's 
Demonstration Package. The Demo Pak gives the user 
FREE access to CompuServe's Consumer or Executive 
menus. 



\*' 



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Also from Computer Outlet of San Diego: 



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Reg. 8129.95 



Sale 



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Amo Dial Modem 
w/Tel-Easv Terminal Software Can ridge. 



MSD Dual Disk Drives* 8469.95 

W/1541 trade-in 8100.00 OFF 

STAR SG-10 8269.95 

includes C64 interface, 100 sheets of paper 
IS" Monitor, Green & White w/ sound* . . . 899.95 

Monitor Cable 86.95 

Upgraded/Serviceable Power Supply** .....849.95 

To place your order call or write 

COMPUTER OUTLET SAN DIEGO 

5861 MISSION GORGE ROAD 

SAN DIEGO, CA 92120 

In California (619) 282-6200 
Toll Free (800) 621-0852 ext. 460 



MasterCard/Visa Accepted 

■.VI. I XI 1.00 for Klil]>plntfK tiumllinu 
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If This Drive isn't plugged 
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* Micro W reserves the fight to cancel this promotion at any time without notice. 

* Commodore is a Registered Trademark of Commodore Business Machines Inc 



T>ierp«re lots of tedwns to irade jour Cotnmodcue" I Ml ar Commodore " compaiibte 
disk drive m on the VfDUS GT the least of *hrch is ihe 5 149 credii that wv will dlfaw 
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1 } Data transfer rates are much fasit-i and with The unique BURST MODE", data 
speed can be improved up to 400^. 

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3 ) A complete control panel with a 2 digit LED track display, protect key. drive type 
switch, busy, protect, and power lights, and additional rear panel configuration 
options. 

4) A free carrying case that will hold up to 80 diskettes. 

5 ) Ready to run software that comes with the INDUS GT. including a Word Processor. 
Spread Sheet, and Data Base Manager 

6) The JNDU5 GT runs all popular software for the Commodore inciuding THE NEW r 
REVISED CLONE MACHINE with TNU 

7 ) Full FCC Class B certification lor EMI and RFI assures you that there will be no 
interference problems 

8 j An accurate low friction metal band head positioner that maintains true tracking for 
accurate read.' write data transfers 

9 } Quality assured by a thorough lest of each and every drive before it leaves the 
factory, 
i ) Each time you BOOT a disk, the nDUS GT conducts its own internal diagnostic of 
RAM, ROM. circuits and basic lunctions. 

When you think of M of the frustrations caused by drive problems, it's easy to sec that the 
mast intelligent decision that you could make is to trade In thai slow unreliable drive and 
put an INDUS GT on your system If you don't, already own a disk drive, call us for our 
special that includes a FREE COPY OF THE CLONE MACHINE with JTiU when you 
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COMVOICE! THE EASY TO USE SPEECH SYNTHESIZER FOR THE C-64 

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**M»**"l**PP^nn^W^^W^^W^WP*pnP»WW»**W*PWWP»*¥h 



fit hone With the: 

<H Ml 

by Benn Dunftington 



\\h\VL\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\W\\\\\WH 



By now you've probably read the ink right off 
the numerous pages published in numerous 
magazines describing Coanoctore's new computer, 
the ^ C=128. You probably have the 
specifications memorized, and have even got 
your lines rehearsed for when the moment comes 
to explain to your spouse, friends, relatives, 
parents etc. why you need to buy this new 
computer even tho you already have a mint 
condition C=5AI So I'm not going to waste your 
time with the by-now-familiar facts and figures 
associated with the C=128. Rather, let's talk 
about what it's like rolling up the old sleeves 
and using the great OFF-WHITE WONDER in "REAL 
LIFE". 



First let me say that, with only a few 
reservations, I am really impressed with the 
C=128, and the "NEW, IMPROVED" Carodore that 
is behind it. We have had the Beta unit here 
since the first week of May, Commodore promised 
it for the last week Df April; only one week 
latel. Coming that close to a promised date is 
absolutely unheard-of from anyone in this 
industry, and could have been rounded-off to 
the nearest year with the Commodore of old! 

DUT OF THE BOX 

The 0=128 comes off the shelf with power 
supply, RF converter box for standard T.U. 
hookup, T.U. video cable, Introductory Guide, 
System Guide, CP/M Plus System Disk, CP/Pl 
Utilities Disk, and a C=1 28 Tutorial Disk (see 
photo right). 

The C=128's power supply (which was a weak spot 
with the 0=64) is larger than the C=64's, and 
stays cooler. Presumably it will handle more 
of a load as well. 

THE MANUALS 

Commodore has really gotten its act together if 
the new manuals are any indication! The System 
Guide is a beautifully constructed and 
illustrated 400+-page tribute to Conrnodore's 
new comittment to doing more than just cranning 
chips in a cheap plastic box". the System 
Guide is a pleasant size, with somewhat larger 
pages than the 0=64 Programmer's Reference 
Guide, allowing a thinner, 




easier to handle format which, combined with 
binding, makes the_ System Guide a ^joy to use. 



the twin-wire 
Remember the 
crude blackboard-look" screen shots and illustrations in 
the C=64 manuals? The C=128 books are illustrated with 
4-color photos, 2-color program side-bars, and quality 
technical illustrations thru-out. As for the contents: the 
material is well-organized, easy to find, with lots of 
sample program listings, appendices, command summaries, 
memory maps, charts, pin-outs, glossary, and 
"get-to-the-point" coverage of the many features Df the 
0=128. 






1 1 a i ■■ 




A LOOK AT THE 
COMMODORE 128 



The Computer 



Physically, the Commodore 1 28 resembles a typewriter keyboard 
enclosed in a light tan case. There are several switches, jacks and 
plug connections located on the right side and back of the case. This 
section identifies all these switches, jacks and connections (often 
called SLOTS or PORTS), and introduces you to the keyboard. For 
detailed information on using the keyboard, see Section 3 of the 
Commodore 128 System Guide (the other book packed in the carton 
with the computer). 



The Right Side 

CONTROL PORTS #1 & #2— Joysticks 
and other peripherals plug into these 
openings. 

RESET SWITCH— Resets computer 
without turning it off. 

ON/OFF SWITCH— Turns the power 
on or off. 

POWER SOCKET— The POWER SUP- 
PLY plugs in here. 



The Back 

CHANNEL SELECTOR SWITCH— 

Set television channel for viewing com- 
puter display (L = channel 3; 
H = channel 4) 

RF SOCKET— Use this to attach cable 
from Computer/TV switchbox. 

RGBI SOCKET— Plug RGBI monitor 
cable in this socket. 

USER PORT — Accessories, such as 
modems, plug in here. 
VIDEO SOCKET— Plug composite 
monitor cable in this socket. 

■SERIAL SOCKET— Connect disk 
drives and printers here. 

CASSETTE PORT— The Datassette 

tape recorder plugs in here. 

EXPANSION PORT— Software car- 
tridges plug inhere. 




Sample page from Cowwodore's excellent ©=; 
(shown full size) 



Introductory Guide, 




a 



d ftt howe with the 
» continued . . . 

iilmmwmumtBamiwmmmr 



A nice touch here is the inclusion of the 
Introductory Guide (see photo of sample page) which 
covers all that "what do I do next" kind of material 
that new owners used to spend hours trying to find 
in the 0=64 books (how to turn it on, make the 
various hookups, load and run software, enter 4 
leave the various modes, use the many keyboard 
features, etc.). The inclusion of a tutorial 
diskette is also a milestone of sensibility which 
will be highly appreciated by all. fly compliments. 

THE KEYBOARD (mostly good news) 

The keyboard is very stylish- I think it looks 
great, and puts the necessary visual distance 
between it and the VIC that the C=64 lacked and to 
some extent kept it from being taken seriously by 
the 16-bit snobs. The keys have a nice feel, with 
finger dimples on the "f" & "j" keys as well as the 
"5" key on the numeric pad for tactile orientation 
(your fingers know where they are without looking 
down.) On our Beta unit (and other people's we have 
spoken with) the left shift key tends to stick. Let 

us not dwell on the utter disaster it would be for 
Comnodore to not have attended to this on the final 
production models. 

One especially nice addition to the keyboard is the 
Reset Switch which enables one to restart the C=128 
without turning the machine all the way off and then 
on again. 

A curious aspect of the keyboard, and one which may 
cause some people trouble initially, is the fact 
that the offset between keys on one row and the next 
is double what it is on the C=64 (3/8" vs. 3/16"). 
It doesn't bother me, but for some people it has 
taken getting used to. 

fly one BIG gripe about the keyboard is that, for 
reasons which have been explained without convincing 
me, the designers chose to lock out the numeric pad 
(along with the other extra keys) when in the C=64 
mode. I'm not electronically literate, but I can't 
believe that there isn't some way to have the 
numeric pad active while still maintaining 100$ C=64 
compatibility. 

OK, I have another gripe: the keyboard is so low to 
the ground and comfortable to type on, that it 
really doesn't need an ERG=B0ARD for comfort's sake 
(although we will probably design an "ERG=something 
or other" to hold ERG=CARDS!) 

PORTS & SOCKETS 

No, Virginia, there is no IEEE port on the C=128 
(considering how often I am asked about this 
particular item, it would seem that Commodore should 
have included it). Yes, all the ports from the C=64 
are there plus an RGBI port for BO-column displays 
in 128 or CP/M modes. The power connector is square 
(like on the PLUS/4), but that is the only plug 
change. 




..-■"V 



o. 



Sears 57 KX 4684C 
RGB/Composite Monitor/Tv" 




Cover art on Sears RGB set 




■ ■ ; ;. ■ 




jpnmia MM i M ii M iiiiii MMin n ii M —iiii m i "'■ ■ ' " ■<■ 



nrnr* 



(BBBlML^Ol 



At hone With the 



frlM 



continued. . . 



While the ports & sockets are the same shape as on 
the C=64, they are NOT in the same locations, & this 
will cause some major grief for certain people 
(minor grief for most) using certain products. For 
instance: the Paperclip word-processor dongle will 
not fit in joystick port #1 (where it must be) 
because of the way the case is recessed. Solution- 
get yourself a "joystick extension cord" and connect 
your dongle via this cord! (it looks silly, but it's 
the only way). Several devices that used to go in 
the Modem or "User" port (like Computereyes) will 
not fit there now if an RGBI cable is plugged in at 
the same time. Also, many expansion port devices 
(like Batteries Included' s Buscard II & BI-80) 
interfere with the new cassette port location (which 
is frequently used for interface power-taps and the 
like). Obviously, manufacturers will be taking 
these factors into consideration as they design new 
products, but there is going to be some grumbling 
and kludging and returning to the place of purchase 
for a while until it all gets straightened out. I 
imagine we will even see whole new product lines 
spring up that specifically address this problem (I 
can see it now; the ACME OCTOPUSS- "connects 
everything to everything. . .only $54.95). 

THE MONITOR PROBLEM 

What monitor problem? Well, if you have a 1701 or 
1702 (I don't think the 1703 ever made it to market) 
you can't access the 80-column world of the 128 and 
cp/m modes (tho they both have (less useful) 
40-column modes). If you have a composite 
monochrome monitor (the kind most of us use for 
BO-column work with our C=64's), you will still not 
be able to use them for 80-colunin CP/M or 12B work 
(but they'll work fine with 80-column boards in the 
C=54 mode). Even with Coranodore' s new RGBI monitor 
(and you'll have to wait a couple months for it) you 
won't be able to use C=64 BO-column output (since it 
doesn't have 80 column composite inputs, only RGBI 
80 column inputs). The bottom line is that there is 
no single monitor (yet) that will handle everything 
that your C=128 can put out! What can you do? The 
least costly approach that I've found (and this will 
get you in business today) is to pick up a Sears 57 
KX 4084C RG8 monitor. For only $340 you get a fine 
13" RGBI monitor, which is also a composite color 
monitor, and an electronically tuned television as 
well! The composite stage is not as good as the 
Commodore 17xx series monitors, but the RGB is 
fantastic (the cover graphic of this issue was shot 
directly from 80-column RGB output on this monitor). 
Be sure to order Sears' RGB cable ($15) while you're 
at it, since the C=128 does not come with this 
particular accessory. Now you have everything 
except 80-column C=64 monochrome capability. If you 
need this too, then get a little Sanyo or Zenith 
green screen for under $100 and you re all set. 
(One thing to consider before you junp in the car 
and head down to Sears: the Conmodore 1902 RGB 
monitor $? has a tricky little switch on it marked 
"RBG Analog". I have heard that this is for use 
with the AMIGA and allows for a very sensational 
display not obtainable thru other types of monitor 
circuitry. So if you think you will eventually own 
an APliGA too, you might want to hold out for the 
Commodore RGBI monitor.) 



GRAPHICS (good news & bad news) 

The good news is BASIC 7.0 which adds numerous 
graphics commands (among other things) to BASIC 
allowing simple (anyone can do it) creation of 
boxes, circles, polygons, lines, fills, etc. and 
simplified creation & control of sprites. This 
version of BASIC only kicks-in in the 1 2B mode, and 
(here comes the BIG RUB) only in the 40-column 
mode! I I was heart-broken to find that as my 
luscious field of 640 X 200 RGB pixels sat there in 
their full hi-resolution 16-color glory, there was 
m way short of MACHINE LANGUAGE to talk to them, 
(so, for me that means NO way to talk to them). 
What a shame! I hope we will see some 3rd party 
graphics software soon that will remedy this 
frustrating shortcoming. 

12B MODE 

Other than the above mentioned graphics let-down, 
the 128 mode is really quite impressive. BASIC 7.0 
is literally dripping with new and powerfull 
commands. I love the way it locates programming 
errors by displaying not only the offending line, 
but even hi-lites the offending word(s)! Proper 
renumbering and auto numbering are but a few of the 
enhancements you'll wonder how you lived without. 
You will also find that many BASIC programs (with 
hi -res graphics even) written for the IBM PC and PC 
JR will translate with little to no modification 
under BASIC 7.0! You will also like the WINDOW 
commands from either direct mode or from program 
control. Another nifty feature in 128 mode is the 
"FAST" command, which puts the 128 into overdrive 
(shifting from 1Mhz to 2Mhz) doubling the speed of 
certain operations. 

CP/M MODE 

Well, it took some time, but after numerous 
revisions and upgrades, it looks like Coranodore has 
been able to get the full CP/PI PLUS side of _ the 
machine operational and compatible with subordinate 
versions of CP/M. This promises to be the real 
killer for the serious business and technical user 
with its 10X disk access, 16-color 80 columns, 
various terminal emulation modes (including ADM-3A , 
VT-52, 4 VT-100). We have been able to load and run 
some CP/M software (Kaypro format) while some titles 
refuse to load (also Kaypro format). One 
explaination from Commodore is that some Kaypro 
disks which will work fine with the Kaypro are not 
truly CP/M compatible programs (having a few 
odd-ball machine-specific routines mixed in) and 
therefore are "illegitimate" and thus won't run. 
OK. Looks like the INFO scouts will have their 
hands full sorting out this latest wrinkle in the 
world of SOFTWARE COMPATIBILITY. 

If the ASHTQN TATEs, MICROSDFTs, and other CP/M 
vendors of yore don't miss the boat, there could be 
tons of good, fast, powerful CP/PI stuff at 
reasonable prices back on the shelves in short order 
(they just need to blow the dust off the boxes and 
remove those ridiculous price-tags). See Mark 
Brown's "Best of CP/M" article elsewhere this issue. 







11$ 





Inside the 1571 disk drive 



W/ff/////M/////////////////////////////^^^^ 




M The enpty ROM socket- 
A Ready for GEM or ""? 



W//////M/////M///////////////M///////////M 



DISK DRIVES 

In the C=B4 mode, we have not found anything that 
isn't completely compatible between the two 
computers. The 1541, PISD, and Indus drives worked 
identically on both machines, the 1571 works just 
like the 1541 in the 0=64 mode, but speeds up by a 
factor of 5 in the C=12B mode, and a factor of 10 in 
the CP/H mode. The 1571 has a set of DIP switches 
in the back so that you may configure it as any 
device § from 8 to 1 1 . It has a dual-sided head 
mechanism, allowing it to read both single and 
double sided disks. In C=64 mode, it only uses one 
side. (I' m just guessing here, but that suggests to 
me the possibility of software routines that would 
allow the C=64 mode to use the 1571 as a quasi-dual 
drive.) Both the C=128 and CP/M modes use both 
sides of the drive for increased storage capacity. 
An interesting note: if you format a diskette in 
C=12B mode and read the directory, you will see 1328 
blocks free. If you then switch to C=64 mode and 
pull a directory on the same diskette, you will see 
only 664 blocks free. I was able to load and save 
simple BASIC programs in each mode to and from the 
other. You can use your 1541 or other current drive 
to save your C=128 programs (tho at the usual slow 
speed) . 

CROSS COMPATIBILITY 

It looks like most peripherals for the C=64 will 
work with the C=128. The exception here is the 
EXPANSION PORT. 64 cartridges (as you should 
expect) will not work in the C=128 mode (their 
presence tells the machine to be in 0=64 mode.) 
Less obvious is the likelihood that most hardware 
devices using this port will also be useless in the 
C=128 mode. The Buscard II, for instance, crashes 
the 0=128 mode, just by being in the socket, and 
will in no way allow, for instance, an MSD drive to 
be used as an IEEE device. We will undoubtedly see 
a new wave of products to fill this need, the most 
popular likely to be those which are functional in 
more than one mode . 

THE MAGIC ROM SOCKET 

Inside the C=128 there is one more surprise. Upon 
opening the C=128 (if you have ever opened up a 
0=64, you'll appreciate the absence of interlocking 
plastic tabs -the ones that always broke off) you'll 
find an empty ROM socket in the 'upper left" corner 
of the machine (see photo). The impression I get 
from various sources at Conmodore is that this 
socket has been provided to allow for substantial 
future enhancements that might become desireable at 
some point in the future. One possibility 
acknowledged is eventually putting a 0=128 version 
of GEM, the MAC-like graphics environment (which has 
been ported to the IBM PC, and may also show up on 
the AMIGA and the Atari ST line), on the 0=128. I 
like that idea. Having that empty socket there 
somehow makes me feel even better about the C=128- 
like it's open to improvement. 

AVAILABILITY 

Conaodore was telling me as late as May 20 that the 
C=128 would be in some stores before C.E.S. in 
Chicago (June 2-5). By the time you read this, you 
will probably be able to pick one up. Should you? 
For under $300 I think it's the buy of the year! 





Him 







( a 



w*wrrv.¥Tt*Mlgmm§B!8IF&&*XWX?* 



the 



FISCHERTECHNIK 
ROBOTICS L AB 

by Benn Dunnington 







The Fischertecbnik robotics kit is a spectacular new 
product which was first shown at the Winter CE.S. 
in Las Vegas last January & INFQ=64 was lucky enough 
to get one of the first evaluation units made 
available for review. 

The kit consists of 3 main parts: the precision 
mechanical parts kit, the interface box, and the 
disk-loaded software. 

THE PARTS KIT 

The first thing that impressed me upon receipt of 
this West German built robotics kit was the generous 
and varied array of small precision plastic and 
metal parts. I have previously worked as an R&D 
instrumentation specialist, and I can tell you that 
the parts kit is of the highest quality, and well 
worth the price of the whole system alone. Hundreds 
of cunning interlocking pieces including blocks, 
clips, gear boxes, motors, gear racks, shafts, 
plates, brackets, variable resistors (pots), an 
electro-magnet and more can be combined in an almost 
endless number of ways to build very strong and 
accurate mechanisms without a single tool (except 
for the little screwdriver, included, which is used 
solely for attaching wires to terminal plugs.) 

THE JWNUALS 

Fortunately, you will not have to expend much energy 
trying to discover what can be constructed with all 
this hardware: the folks at Fischertechnik have 
already worked out the details (and written the 
software) for 10 unique and instructive robotics 
projects. The main instruction book is a pictorial 
step-by-step guide which relies on very few words to 
explain the assembly processes. The excellent 
photographs and diagrams of the 40 page guide are 
easy to follow and prepared with the same careful 
detail as the parts themselves. 

THE INTERFACE 

To link the various motors, switches, lamps, and 
pots _ to the computer, a compact interface box is 
provided with channels for four motors, 8 switches, 
and two potentiometers. The interface also provides 
connections for DC power to the motors and lamps via 
a plug-in ac/dc transformer. The interface (which 
is housed attractively in a clear plastic box) 
connects to the user (modem) port, with a 20-pin 
connector & flat ribbon cable running to the robot 
model. Like the mechanical drawings, the electrical 
circuits are depicted in an easy to follow graphical 
format which even electronics novices like myself 
can follow. 







Parts. Parts. Parts 




Editor's revised "Teach-in Robot" 



. ! More' 



■■» 




nrrW' 




==================== 



^j 



■■PM 




THE SOFTWARE 

A diskette is 
each of the 10 
the kit. The 
be translated 
the preliminar 
guide me thru 
straightforwar 
smoothly with 

HOW IT WORKS 



supplied with programs for operating 
sample robots which are documented in 
review disk I worked with had yet to 
from the German, so I was glad that 
y manual had English translations to 
Nonetheless, the software is pretty 
d, written in BASIC, and worked 
the models we built. 



The first thing I did was lay out all the parts and 
familiarize myself with their appearance (while 
speculating as to their possible uses). I next 
flipped thru the manuals, reading descriptions of 
each of the 10 models, and deciding which one to 
build first. It took me about two hours to assemble 
the variation of the "teach-in robot" pictured here 
(I made the arm horizontal instead of angled down to 
avoid interferences with the platforms after my 
first clumsy program sequence nearly caused the 
robot to destroy itself by trying to move thru 

instead of around a platform! ) . Next you prepare 
the ribbon cable by separating and stripping the 20 
color-coded wires, and fitting them with miniature 
plug ends which make connecting and changing wires 
with this kit a snap. The interface is plugged into 
the modem port, the power supply is plugged into a 
wall socket, and the connections are made to the 
various motors, switches, etc. on the model. 
Finally, the software is loaded & 
particular model, and you are in 
wiring didn't turn out as tidy as 
photos, but everything workedl 



run for the 
business! My 
the publicity 



The 10 documented models included cover a wide range 
of electro-mechanical systems, all of which have 
practical counterparts in the real world. The care 
with which each model has been thought out and 
designed is highly appreciated and commended by this 
reviewer. 

THE POSSIBILITIES 

The Fischertechnik robotics lab is a treasure-chest 
of hands-on learning which has no rival (or 
competition) in the personal computing market. I 
know of no other product which invites the user to 
discover and explore the multiple worlds of 
robotics, electronics, logic, mechanics, 
programming, and the interaction between the 
separate parts in such a stimulating, rewarding, and 
enjoyable way. I think every elementary school, 
high school, and college in the country should have 
at least one of these kits. 



This is a very important product in that it opens up 
a level of involvement, experimentation, and 
interaction with the computer that has not been 
acheived by any other approach. Think of the 
possibilities when you combine several of these sets 
together (you can also purchase more general parts 
kits from Fischertechnik which are compatible and 
can be used to expand the basic robot kit). Imagine 
interfacing your robot with a voice recognition 
system (see Ted Salamone's Speech article elsewhere 
this issue) and controlling your model with voice 
commands! 

EASE OF USE / AGE LEVEL 

While I have mentioned the ease of using various 
aspects of the Fischertechnik robotics lab, and 
would not want to discourage children from 
experiencing such a fascinating tool f this is 
basically an advanced kit often requiring adult 
strength and manipulative skills, along with 
considerable spatial perception during construction 
of the different models (I would place its 
difficulty level at about 3X that of LEGOs!). Kids 
should have access to these kits, but most under the 
age of 12 will need at least some assistance. 

SUmARY 

The Fischertechnik robotics kit is a marvelous 
addition to the world of Commodore computing. From 
concept, to craftsmanship, to documentation, this 
product shines. Very possibly the best product ever 
made for the C=64, we can only hope that more 
companies will be spurred on to similar excellence 
by Fischertechnik 's example. 



FISCHERTECHNIK ROBOTICS LAB 

Fischer America Inc. 
175 Route 46 west 
Fairfield NJ 07005 
(201) 227-g283 



(about $200) 





I I ? I ■' 




COMMODORE 64 



COMPUTER AND SOFTWARE 



SALE 



CI 28 COMMODORE 
COMPUTER 



• with S19.95 Software Purchase 

$ 139 

•170K Disk Drive $149.00* 

• Tractor Friction Printer SI 59.00 

• 13" Hi-Res Color Monitor $179.00* 



" COMMODORE 64 COMPUTER SI 39.00 
You pay only S139 00 (with the S19 95 software 
purchase see below) when you order the powerful 
84K COMMODORE 64 COMPUTER! LESS the value of 
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TRACTION/FRICTION PRINTER $159.00 

You poy only SI 59.00 when you order the Comstor T F 
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80 COLUMN BOARD 579.00 
Now you program 80 COLUMNS on the screen at one 
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when you plug in the 80 COLUMN EXPANSION 
BOARD' ' PLUS 4 slot expander' 

SO COLUMNS IN COLOR 
PAPERBACK WRITER 64 WORD PROCESSOR $39.00 

This PAPERBACK WRITES 64 WORD PROCESSOR is the 
finest ovailable lor the COMMODORE 64 computer! 
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DISPLAYS 40 or 60 COLUMNS IN COLOR or black ond 
while' Simple to operate powerful text editing . 
complete cursor and insert delete key controls line 
and paragraph insertion. automatic deletion, 
centering, margin settings ond output to all printers' 
List S99 00 SALE J34.00 Coupon S29 95 



(Coming Soon 



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BEFORE MAY 

YOU BE 

ORDER LOWER 



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We pack a SPECIAL SOFTWARE DISCOUNT 
COUPON with every COMMODORE 64 
COMPUTER. DISK DRIVE. PRINTER, or 
MONITOR wo sell! This coupon allows you 
to SAVE OVER >$00 OFF SALE PRICES!! 



(Examples) 

PROFESSIONAL SOFTWARE 

COMMODORE 64 



Nanit 


lilt 


Sal. 


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59° 00 


539 00 


529 95 


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524.95 


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510 00 


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544.95 


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539 95 


514 95 


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Deluxe Tope Cassefle 


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Pro Joy Stick 


519.95 


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510.00 


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539.95 


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5 8.95 


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519.95 


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3 Disk Drive Cleaner 

4 HES Games (disk) 

5, Page Joe [tape or disk) 



LIST 

529 95 
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SALE 

119.91 

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119.93 
119.9] 
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' Computer Learning Pad $37.95 

• Voice Synthesizer 549.00 

• 12" Green or Amber Monitor $79.95 

• 12" Daisy Wheel Printer $199.00 



* CT 28 COMMODORE COMPUTER $269.00 

We expect a limited supply the 1st week in July. We 
will snip on a first order basis This all new 
revolutionary 128K computer uses all Commodore 64 
software and accessories plus all CPM programs 
formatted for the disk drive. 
LrSl S349.00. SALE 5269.00. 



SUPER AUTO DIAL MODEM $59.00 

Eosy to use. Just plug into yaur Commodore 64 
computer and you re ready to transmit and receive 
messages Easier lo use than dialing your telephone 
lust push one key on your computer' Includes 
exclusive easy to use program for up and down 
loading to printer ond disk drives. Bett in U.S.A. 
lisl $129,00 SALE 559.00 

COMPUTER LEARNING PAD $37,95 
Makes other graphics tablets obsolete. This TECH 
SKETCH LEARNING PAD allows you to draw on your 
T V. or Monitor and then you can print whatever you 
draw on the screen on your printers. FANTASTIC! ' 
LislS79.95SAlili7.M. 

VOICE SYNTHESIZER $49.00 

For Commodore-64 computers. Just plug it in ond yau 
can program words and sentences adjust volume ond 
pilch make talking adventure games sound action 
gomes and customtied talkies!! f OR ONLY $19,95 you 
can add TEXT TO SPEECH, just type word ond Jieor 
your computer talk - ADD SOUND TO ZORK SCOTT 
ADAMS AND OTHER ADVENTURE GAMES ! » 
(Disk or tape.) 

12" GREEN OR AMBER MONITOR 579.95 
Your choice ol green or omber screen monitor fop 
quality. 80 columns x 24 lines, easy to read onti- 
glare! PLUS S9.95 lor connecting coble. Com 64 ol 
VIC-20 

PRINTER/TYPEWRITER COMBINATION $249.00 

"JUKI" Superb letter quality. daisy wheel 
printer typewriter combination. Two machines in one 
lust a Hick of the switch. 12 extra, large carriage, 
typewriter keyboard, automatic margin control and 
relocote key. drop in cassette ribbon' (90 day 
warranty] Centronics parollel or R5232 serial port built 
in (Specify). List $349.00. SALE $249.00 (Ltd. Oly 

CARDCOG+ INTERFACE 559.00 
For Commodore 64 ond Vic 20 computers. Lets you use 
other printers with Centronics interfaces. This 
interface lets the printer oct like a Commodore printer 
including printing Ihe Commodore graphics {Dot 
morn * with graphic capability printers). 
L.st $109.00 SALE 159.00 



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Commodore 64 



One Megabyte 



*EIV 



$ 



199 Disk Drive $ "» 

Store Spreadsheets, Databases, Wordprocessing Data, Etc. 

• Commodore 64 • PET • 8032 • B128 



The one megabyte disk keeps you from hunting through hundreds of disks for your programs; plus running out of 
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Wi1h the One Megabyte Disk Drive you can store over 5% times the capacity of the 1541. You can store your 
own programs and any back-upable commercial programs plus data from your business programs*. Perfect as a 
second Drive ! ! ! ! Enter the world of professional computers today. C-64 requires IEEE interface. 
List $899.00. Sale $199.00. LIMITED QUANTITIES! Requires 2 drive software 



$ 299 00 Sale $ 299 00 

15Yz" High Speed 
150-170 CPS 

BUSINESS PRINTER 




The inPP-1361 is a highly advanced 136-250 column 15' 3" professional tractor friction printer with full Bit image 
graphics and downloadable characters for custom reports and program listings. The paper feed includes a multiple pin 
troctor for smooth error free operation. With the ribbon rated at 1 million characters (no mess cartridge) and the print 
head at 100 million characters this printer will last a lifetime. Full formatting with near letter quality makes lining up 
decimal points, automatic "$" signs and tabbing look fantastic and easy to use. With out a doubt THIS IS THE BEST 
PRINTER VALUE IN THE U.S.A. List S899.00 Sale $299,00 LIMITED QUANTITIES! 



SPECIFICATIONS 



PRINTING METHOD 

Serial Impact Dot Matrix 
PRINT RATE 

150-170 Characters per 

second (CPS) 

PRINT STYLE 

Near Letter Quality 

PRINT DIRECTION 

Bi-directional 



COLUMN CAPACITY 

136 - 250 

LINE SPACING 

Programmable 

COPIES 

3, including original 

RIBBON TYPE 

Cartridge ($14.95) 



RIBBON LIFE 

1 Million Characters 

PAPER WIDTH 

3" to 1 5' ■>" tractor or 

single sheet friction 

INTERFACE 

IEEE Protocol 

CHARACTER SIZE 

0.1 16" high, 0.08" wide 



GRAPHICS 

Bit Image 

Programmable Characters 
Reverse Characters 



ERROR HANDLING 

Internal 

Self - Diagnostics 

Microprocessor 



Commodore 64 IEEE Interface 



Thi 



s interface plugs into your Commodore 64 Disk Drive port and allows you to hook up the 1 Megabyte Disk Drive and 
MPP-1361 Printer os well as other IEEE devices. Separte power supply insures reliability. Fantastic Interface, (includes 
all cables) List $109.95. If bought with printer or disk drive S69.00. 

(no interface needed for PET, B-l 28. and 8032 computers) 



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Monitors 
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Modems 

Mighty Mo 64" 

Comm 1660 .... 79 95 

Telesontc Call 

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Gemini SG10 209 95 

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t.tpreia 

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I have a prediction to make: the commercial 
software package that will be most used to display 
the APlIGA's power (and which will probably sell a 
MESS of AIHGAs for Conmodore) will be Sublogic's new 
flight masterpieces JET. You just won't believe 
your eyes when you see these two together! (I'm 
sorry I don't have a picture of JET for you here, 
but the display on the IBM PC wouldn't da it 
justice.) 



DATELINE CHICAGO, SUWtER C.E.S., JUNE 2-5 

Well, they broke my heart again: Canmodore (as was 
rumored in advance) was not showing the AMIGA to 
anybody (except behind reporter-proof doors to 
selected big-time retailers). I wouldn't come back 
completely empty-handed tho, would I? 

The picture above is allegedly generated by the 
fabled APHEA. 

I know the it doesn't look like much, but it may be 
the first ever published photo of an AMIGA display! 
We can't prove it because the suspected APUGA was in 
a lacked box! Why Canmodore is so very very 
secretive about this machine is a mystery to me, but 
the waiting Is about over: Conmodore will be 
officially unveiling the AMIGA in New York in late 
July. Ya Pb Be There! (we'll have coverage of the 
big event in the very next issue, along with our 
jumbo Product Roundup, don't miss it II) 

Dh, what is the picture of? It's a spinning 3-D 
colored cube that approaches, receeds, and bounces 
around in response to 5oniture's sonic Space Pen. 
The speed and fluidity of the animation of even this 
simple demo was quite impressive. 




Conmodore 's Booth 



c 



IHFP's Booth 



J9fy ' r«»si»»« 

1* e ■ "•':■■ 




n 



nrrs- 






NEWS & VIEWS 

SPECIAL CES EDITION 




ATARI'S economy exhibit 
was right across fron 
INFO's, so we got to see 
a lot of Software chief 
Sig Hartftan (above), and 
the nan himself, Jack 
Tra»iel (below, right). 
If Jack was worried, he 
wasn't showing it to we 





The Commodore 900 Business Computer 



ATARI was also at the show. After cancelling their 
spot several weeks before, ATARI made a brilliant 
face-saving, money-saving move, and booked in again 
at the last minute (it is speculated that they got a 
huge discount on the space, and because it was in a 
room, instead of on the floor, ATARI was out from 
the costly obligation to keep up with the JONESES 
(or more to the point, SMITHS) by erecting the usual 
type of display that can often hit close to 1 
million bucks for a major exhibitor.) This type of 
maneuvering suggests two things to me; 1) that Jack 
Tramiel and his merry band are "buns to the wall" 
with a company that may have little mare than 
cab-fare for the chief in its coffers, 2) that Jack 
Tramiel and his merry band are crafty survivors who 
can't be counted out until the last byte is bit, and 
that if anyone can pull ATARI out of an impossible 
situation, this guy can. Note, ATARI was saying at 
the show (June 5j that the new ST's would be 
shipping within 2 weeks. The chips are on the 
table, and the discards are down 

Commodore, on the other hand, was saying that the 
C-128 was already in transit to major retail chains. 
Look for it. 

Caresodore had a few (not many) surprises of its own: 
the C-900 (UNIX compatible, 10 Vhz Z8000, 
multi-user/ multi-tasking, 1Q24 X 800 resolution 
bit-map display, with a 20 Meg hard drive standard) 
is available in Europe only for the time being, with 
a rumored 4th quarter US introduction (expected 
price: $270D!) 




fnm 





UJ 



HOT AS HANDY- TAPING THEN TO YOUR MONITOR). INSTRUCTIONS! CAREFULLY REMOVE CENTERFOLD FROM STAPLES, CUT AL0N6 COLORED BORDERS, 
HELL, BY NOW YOU ALL HAVE YOUR ER5B0ARDS, RIGHT? (NO? SEE INSIDE BACK COVER FOR DETAILS ON THE AHAZIN6 ER6BOARD... BE THE FIRST POSITION IN ER6B0ARD REFERENCE WINDOW. USING THE ORIGINAL CARDS FOR SUPPORT (OR TAPE 'EH TO YOUR MONITOR). USE THE BLANK 
IN YOUR USER GROUP TO OWN ONE... ORDER YOURS TODAY!) ACTUALLY YOU CAN USE THESE REFERENCE CARDS WITHOUT THE ER6BOARD (IT'S JUST BACKSIDES FOR MAKING YOUR OWN REFERENCE CARDS. KEEP SENDING YOUR SUGGESTIONS FOR ERG-CARDS YOU'D LIKE TO SEE. -THE EDITOR. 




IM^liM^LhfB^ gpe mm WM"Mm 






H^i (THE CP/H PLUS PROMPT) 

iProflpt Character 
lLogged Drive (fl-P) 
User Number (1-15) 
(Default User not displayed) 



CTRL/Ecrsr key] scrolls virtual 
80 column screen left and right 



virtual mim VE 



Drive E is an imaginary drive 
implemented on drive A to 
allow two-drive functions. 
When drive E is accessed, you 
Hill swap disks in drive A. 



Cursor left 
Beginning of line 
Reboot CP/M 
Continue on next line 
Cursor right 
Delete char, under crsr 
Delete char, left of crsr 
Tab to next stop 
Return 

Delete to end of line 
Carriage return 
Toggle printer on/off 
Resume output 
Repeat line 
Pause output 
.... 4^ f Cancel comnand 
|| ID Recall coamand 




CP/M is a tradewark 

of Digital Research Inc 




Delete all left of crsr 



COMMAND dsfilenaae.typ [OPTIONS! 

! ! file type (3 char, tax) 
! ! file naie (8 char, max) 
drive specifier (A to P) 

[OPTIONS] lay be oiitted 

PASSWORDS (optional): 
djfilenaae.typjpassword 
If a password is used in the creation of 
a file, it must be used to access the file. 

WILDCARDS: 
? Substitutes for character 
1 Substitutes for remainder 
of file name or file type 



RESIDENT COMMANDS 



DIR difilename.tvp [OPTIONS] 
Display DIR for current user t 
DIRSYS d:filename.typ [OPTIONS] 
DIR tor svstei files 
ERASE d:filenaie.typ [CONFIRM] 
Erases matchinn file 
CONFIRM for wildcards 
RENAME d: newname, tvp=oidname. typ 
Renames file 

TYPE difilename.tvp [OPTIONS] 
Types named file 
OPTIONS: 
NO PAGE 
PAGE 
USER n 
Specifies 
d 

drive 



L*oas 



Continuous 
Single screen 

user 1(0 to 15) 
(A to P) 



TRANSIENT COMMANDS 



COPYSYS 

Copies system track; to new disk 
DATE C Display date and tiae 
DATE SET set date and time 
DEVICE [OPTIONS] 

Display or set devices 
DUMP d: filename. typ 

Displays file in he;; and ASCII 
ED dsfilenaae.typ 

Edit naaed -file. 
GET FILE filename. typ 

Redirects input from 
HELP topic .subtopk [OPTIONS] 

Display Help 
INITDIR d: 

Initiates tiae and date stamping 
LIB dsfilenaae.typ 



r: 



[OPT 
file 



IONS] 



LINK d:filena»e.typ 



m 



Makes MAC file executable 



IONS] 



J K. 



MAC filename [OPTIONS] 

Assemble named source file 
PATCH 

Custoaize CP/M PLUS system 
PIP d:neHtile,typ=d:oldfiie, 

Copies naaed file 
PIP E:newfile.typ=A:aldfile.typ 

sinole drive file copier 

PUT NORMAL NEW [OPTIONS] 

Redirect output from normal 

device to new device 
SET [OPTIONS] 

Set file and disk options 
SETDEF [OPTIONS] 

Sets svstea defaults 
SHOW [OPTIONS] 

Displays disk information 
SID d: filename. typ 

symbolic Instruction Debuooer 
SUBMIT dsfilenaie 

Executes batch filenaae.SUB 



FILENAME EXTENSIONS 



ASCII File 

Assembler Source 

Backup 

BASIC Source 

C Source 

COBOL Source 

Executable Prograa 

Data 

Document text 

FORTRAN Source 

Intel Hex Object 

Help 

Language Library 

Machine Code Object 

Overlay 

Pascal Source 

Assembly Print Listing 

Relocatable M/L Object 

SUBMIT file 

Assembler svabol file 

System file 

Document Text 

Unusable Temporary 



TT 



\ 









anna 



mm 



liA^iMlE9s deb mm MUt MJ 



colored 
are new 




keywords 
to 7.6 



MMANDS AND STATEMENTS 



) tlogical file nuaber, "filename" 
[,Ddrivei][<0N,)Udevice3 
AUTO Clinei] 
BACKUP source Ddrive TO dest. Ddnve 

[(ON.)Udevice] 
BANK bank nuaber 
:6IN/BEND IF condition THEN BEGIN 
statement 

statement BEND: ELSE BEGIN 
statement 
stateaent BEND 
'filenaie"[,Ddrive][,Udev] 



BLQAD 



t,Bbank#]t f Pstart address] 



BOOT "filenane"[,Ddrive#K<ON,>Udev#] 
BOX [color source], XL Y1C ,X2, ¥23 

[,angle][, paint] 



BSAVE MilenaiBe u [,Ddrive][,Udev][,Bbank3, 
Pstart address TO Pend address 

CATALOG [Ddrive][<aN,)Udevice][,wildl 

CHAR [color source], k , yC, string K , RVS] 

CIRCLE [color saurceM,YIJrK,YrJ 
[,sal[,ea][,angleJ[,inc3 

CLOSE file nuaber 

CLR 

CHD looical file nuaber I, write list] 

COLLECT [Ddnve][<QM,)Udevice] 

COLLISION type t. statement] 

COLOR source nuaber, color nuaber 

CONCAT 'file 2 f [, Ddrive] TO 'file 1" 
[,Ddrive][<ON,>Udevice] 

CONT 

COPY 'source filenames, Ddrive] TO 

■dest filenaae , [.Ddrive][<ON,)Udev] 

DATA list of mngtanK 



DCLEAR [DdriveH(ON,)UdeviceJ 
DCLOSE [logical file IH<QN, >Udevice3 
DEF FN name (variable) = expression 
DELETE [first line] [-last line] 
DIM variable (subscripts) [,var (subs)]... 
DIRECTORY [DdriveH(OM,)Udevice][,wild] 
DLOAD ■filenaie'LWrivell.Udevl 
DO/LOOP/WHILE/UNTIL/EXIT 

DO [UNTIL cond. /WHILE cond.] statements 
[EXIT! LOOP [UNTIL cond. /WHILE cond. 3 
DOPEN logical file #, "f ilena»e[,<S/PM* 
[,Lrecord length ] C , Ddrive] 
[(0N,)UdeviceJ[,w3 
DRAW [color source], Xl f Yl [TO 11. Y23... 
DSAVE 'f ilenaae"[,Ddrive][<ON, >Udevice] 
DVERIFY 'filenaae 1 [,Ddrive][<ON,)Udev] 
END 



■\ 






en vi[, attack]!, dec ay 3 [.sustain 3 
[, releaseH, wave][, pulse wdth] 

FAST 

FETCH tbytes,intsa,expb,expsa 

FILTER [freqlC.lpK.bplt.hpK.res] 

FOR/TO/STEP/NEXT 

FOR variable=start value TO end value 
[STEP increment) 
GET variable list 
GETKEY variable list 
GET! file nuaber, variable list 
5064 

60SUB line nuaber 
GOTO/60 TO line nuaber 
GRAPHIC aode [,dear][,s] 
GRAPHIC CLR 

HEADER 'disknaae"[,Ddnve][<ON, >Udevice) 
HELP 
IF/THEN /ELSE 

IF expression THEN stateaents 

t:ELSE else-clause] 
tfUT E'oroaot s tri ng':] var i able list 



INPUT! file nuaber, variable list 

KEY [key nuaber, string] 

LET 

LIST [first lineH-last line] 

LOAD "filenaae't.dev l][. relocate flao] 

LOCATE x,y 

MONITOR 

HOVSPR nuaber, x,y 

HOVSPR nuaber, +/-x,+/-y 

HOVSPR nuaber,x;y 

HOVSPR nuaber, x angle ly speed 

NEW 

ON expr.(GOT0/GOSUB>line*l[, line!2, .. . ] 

OPEN If n, devicet , secondary add] 

t,"f ilenaae,! iletype,aioc!e"]/[cad$] 
PAINT [color source], s,y[, aode] 
PLAY 'Vn,On,Tn,Un,Xn,eleaents" 
POKE address, value 
PRINT [print list] 
PRINT! file nuaber, print list 
PRINT USING 

FRINKfile!] USINS'foriat': orint list 



PUDEF "nnnn" 
READ variable list 

■CORDI lfn, record nuaber [, byte nuaber] 
REM aessage 
RENAME 'old filename'TO'new filenaae" 

[,Ddnve][,Udev] 
RENUMBER [new starting line nuaber] 

[jincreaent] 

[,old starting line number] 
RESTORE [line I] 
RESUME Eline I / NEXT] 
RETURN 
RUN [line !] 

RUN ■filenane'I.DdriveH.UdevJ 
SAVE [■filena«e'][,dev][ f EQT flag] 
SCALE n[,saax,yaax3 
SCNCLR aode nuaber 
SCRATCH *filenaM'[ l Ddrive][,Udev3 
SLEEP n 
SLOW 
SOUND v,f.d[,dir3[,a3[,s][,w][,p3 



Nv^tiillfTl?^ ura mm M&M $J 



H colored keywords 
are new to 7.6 



COMMANDS AND STATLMLN1S 



|SPRDEF£>uii t-in sprite editor: 
key result 

Ft, .....SHecTs sprite I 

A ..Toggle automatic crsr. 

CRSR KEYS. ....Move cursor 

RETURN Start on next line 

RETURN Exit editor at the 

SPRITE NUMBER? prompt 

HOME Crsr to top left 

CLR .....Erases entire grid 

1-4 Selects color source 

CTRL 1-8 Sprite frgrnd color 1-8 

C= 1-8 Sprite frgrnd color 9-16 

STOP.. ....... .Cancels changes 

SHIFT RTRN Saves sprite 



; <#>[,on/off][,fqnd][, priority] 
t,x-exp][,y-expJt,aode] 

S arateter description 
UMBER... sprite nuaber 11-B 

ON/OFF sprite on (1) off (0) 

FOREGROUND foreground color (1-16) 

PRIORITY...... Q=in front / l=behind 

X-EXP l=on / 0=off 

Y-EXP l=on / 0=off 

MODE..... 0=noraal / Uaultkolor 

SPR5AV (origin), (destination) 

SSHAPE string variable,Xl,Yl[,X2,Y23 

5SHAPE string variable [X,Y3[,mode3 

STASH thytes,intsa,expb,expsa 

STOP 

SWAP ibyte5,int5a,expb,expsa 

SYS address[,a][,x][,y][,s3 

TEMPO n 



'.;.- ■ CHne*] * 

TROFF 

TRON 

VERIFY 'filenames, devl][, relocate flag] 

VOL volume level 

WAIT (Location), (aask-t)[,aask-23 

WIDTH n 

width l=single width lines 
width 2=double width lines 

WINDOW xain t vain, xaax,ymax[, clear 3 



FUNCTIONS 



ABS (X) 
ASC (X$) 
ATN (X) 
BUMP (N) 
CHR! (X) 
CDS (X) 

(todeciBal string 



ERKI IN) 
EXP (X) 
FNxx (x) 
FRE (X) 

HEX* (X) 

INSTR (string 1, string 2 [.start pos.]) 

INT (X) 

JOY IN) 

LEFT* (string, integer) 

LEN (string) 

LOG (X) 

MIDI (string, start position [.length]) 

PEEK (X) 

PEN (n) 

POINTER (variable naae) 

POS (X) 

POT (n) 

RCLR (N) 

RDOT (N) 



R6R (X) 



RIGHT! ((string). (nuaenc)) 
RND (X) 




RSPC0L0R (register) 

? P0S (sprinte nuaber, position/speed) 
RSPRITE (sprite nuaber, characteristic) 
RWINDOW (n) 
SGN(X) 
SIN(X) 
SPC(X) 
SCR(X) 
STR* (X) 
TAB(X) 
TAN(X) 
USR(X) 
VAL(X$) 
X0R(nl,n2) 



ESCAPE CODLS 



Erase froi crsr. to end of window 

Autoaatic insert aode 

Set bottoa right corner of window 

Cancel insert and quote aodes 

Delete current line 

Set cursor to non-flashing »Dde 



Set cursor to flashing mode 

6 Enable bell (by Ctrl-G) 

H Disable bell 
Insert a line 

J Move to beginning of current line 

K Move to end of current line 

L Turn on scrolling 

H Turn off scrolling 

Return to norm, display (80 col. only) 
Cancel autoaatic insert aode 
Erase froa beginning of line to crsr. 
Erase froa crsr. to end of line 
Reverse video screen (80 col. only) 
Change to block cursor 

T Set top left corner of window 

U Change to underline cursor 

V Scroll screen up one line 

W Scroll screen down one line 

X Toggle between 40 and 80 coluans 

Y Restore default TAB stops 
I Clear all TAB stops 



<DO-n-vouRsc!.r sidd 



<DO-IT-VOURKELF RIDE) 



NEWS & VIEWS 

SPECIAL CES EDITION 




■ 



64 


64 


64 


64 


64 


64 


64 


64 


64 


64 


64 


64 



C-989 can display the equivalent 
of 12 C-64 screens at one tine! 






Trio of IBM PC clones are nice 
to look at, but you won't be 
buying one stateside for awhile. 


















1 1 1 



i/2 megabyte ramdisk 


(big white 


box in 


expansion 


port) will 


enable sensational 


real-time animation 


as well as 


put a fire 
DBMS !!! 


under your 

< 



Conmodore also showed their IBM PC clones (see 

photo), but stated that they were back-ordered in 

Europe for months, with 8 times the anticipated 

demand, and would not euen consider US production in 
the near future. 

One thing you will be able to acquire before too 
long and which will help blow things open for the 
C-128 is the 1/2 Meg Connodore ramdisk (see photo). 
This little puppy is capable of loading in graphics 
screens so fast, that you must actually slow down 
the normal transfer rate to keep the animation 
viewable I We heard some ball-park guesses as to the 
price: about $20Q-$250, with availability as soon as 
early fall. 



I 





1 1 a i ■■: 




NEWS & VIEWS 

SPECIAL CES EDITION 




157; 



a nice set of 



drives for the 
serious user. 




;qW:l i] : Dealers will 
get this nifty 
version of the C-idv 
later this year. 
Transportable and 
respectable looking. 



Another product that didn't show was the LCD, which 
has gotten such rave reviews from all who have seen 
her. Coranodore top brass has apparently decided to 
sit on this number (not even showing it) until 
sufficient orders are in hand to justify production. 
How can you drum up orders for a machine if you 
don't show it? The real news about the LCD tho, is 
the new display which Comnodore engineers have 
developed in-house: the original 80 X IB display was 
already considered the fastest, most readable 
display in the industry, and now Conraodore has 
developed a replacement that is said to be "like 
jet-black letters on a snow-white background with a 
120 degree viewing angle, and faster refresh than a 
CRT" I ! 1 I think the LCD would sell like hot-cakes 
on the strength of this display alonel (and the 
built-in software has been greatly improved since 
its debut in Vegas last Jan.). 

what else was hot? OK, there is the new 1572 dual 
version of the 1571 which should be along in a 
while. Looks sexy, right? 



Speaking of "sexy", get a load of the picture (to 

the left) of the C-128 D! The "D" is supposedly for 

"Dealer" since the C-128 D 

to the problem of how to 

while mass-merchandising 

K-flart, Sears, etc. So, 

albeit wonderful, version 



is Cofrmodore 1 s solution 
keep the dealers happy 
the regular C-128 thru 
the dealers get this, 
of the C-128 with 



detachable, stowable keyboard, built-in drive and 
powersupply, whose system housing doubles as a 
monitor stand; you bet I want one, but the rumored 
price ($700) may slow sales, depending on the system 
price at K-Mart for the equivalent component set-up. 

One last item, not directly related to Caanodore 
(but cute): below is a wrist terminal of sorts, 
made by SEIKO which interfaces with your C-64, and 

stores a couple hundred phone numbers, appointments, 
etc. and can beep to let you know when to do what! 

Well, bye for now,., next stop- AWGAland. 




COMPUSOFT PLUS 

FREE SHIPPING FOR INFO-64 SUBSCRIBERS* 
ALL PROGRAMS ON DISK UNLESS OTHERWISE INDICATED 



INFO-64 RATED FOUR STARS OR BETTER 



Costle of Dr. Creep 


23 


Fle*idraw 


122 


Mirage DE 


Manager 




Spelunker 


23 


Championship Lode Runner 


26 


Gumboil 


23 


& Report Writer 


67 


Spy vs. Spy 
SpellPocIt 


23 


Chipwits 


23 


IFR Flight Simulator 


23 


Murder by the Dozen 


26 


35 


Combat Leader 


26 


Institute 


26 


PaperClip 


60 


PoperClip/SpellPack 


86 


Consultant 


67 


International Soccer 


20 


Print Shop 


32 


Superbose-64 


55 


Dragonnders of Pern 


29 


Raid on Bungeling Boy 


23 


Raid Over Moscow 


29 


Zaxxon 


29 


Easy Script 


3B 
29 


Pitslop II 
Fleet System II 


29 


Scrabble 




29 
35 


Zork 1, II or til 

Racing Destruction Set 


29 




INFO-64 NON-RATED 






Adventure Construction Set 


55 


Movie Maker 


25 


Boll Blazer 


29 


Fast Load (cart| 


29 


Music Construction Set 


19 


Return of Herocles 


25 


Beach-Headll 


29 


Felony 


26 


NATO Commander 


26 


Sorgon III 


35 


Beyond Castle Wolfenstem 


25 


Gemstone Warrior 


26 


Nevada Cobol 


40 


Seven Cities of Gold 


26 


BI-80 Column 


170 


Ghost Busters 


23 


Nevada Fortran 


40 


Sky Trovel 


26 


Blazzing Poddies 

Cave of the Word Wizard 


26 


Home-Pok 


35 


PFS: File 


54 


Space Shuttle 


23 


26 


Moil Order Monsters 


25 


PFS: Report 


49 


Stunt Flyer 


27 


Concn 


29 


Mask of the Sun 


29 


Pitfall II 


23 


SwiftCalc 


35 


Crime and Punishment 


26 


Millionaire 


35 


Print Shop Library I 1 


20 


Typing Tudor 111 
Whistlers Brother 


29 


Cutthroats 


26 


Mind Prober 


23 


Questprobe: Hulk 


26 


23 


Evelyn Woods Dynamic Rea 


der 


Simon s Basic 


24 


Insta-Speed 








(speed reading) 


35 






(basic language compiler) 


48 







Send Orders To: COMPUSOFT PLUS, P.O. Box 91155, Los Angeles, CA 90009-1155 



Add S3.00 shipping per order (S5.00AK, HI, APO.fPO). INFO-64 subscribers no shipping charge". No foreign orders. NO COD. CA residents add 6.5% sales tax. We 
accept VISA, MC (include name, card 8, exp. dote), M.O., or cashier's check. Personal checks delay shipping 4 weeks while clearing. Include ship to name, address 
(sorry no P.O. boxes). All soles final. Defective items replaced with some item if return authorization requested within 2 weeks of shipping date. No returns accepted 
without RAff. Prices and availability subject to change without notice. 

NO ADDITIONAL CHARGE FOR VISA OR MASTERCARD. 

"Send us the INFO-64 address fabe) (offer expires October 31, 1985). 



:r f ^i?A\ifr«w^rr^:*YkY<fc»«*ri'«w«^^ 



ATTENTION COMMODORE 64 OWNERS 
DID YOU BUY THE WRONG PRODUCT? 



WELL PAY YOU FOR YOUR MISTAKE! 



PRINTER INTERFACE BLUES 



No graphics, doesn't work with your software, Bad aspect ratios, no 
available buffer, well you wouldn't have these problems with the Micro- 
World M W-350. We'll give you $59. off the list price of $129. for that 
strange interface that's causing you trouble. 



LAST YEARS BACK UP SOFTWARE 



Everyone has Back-up software that reproduces errors, but will it back up non-standard 
sectors, reproduce density frequency alterations alter the number of sectors, copy single 
sync bits, and reformat a single track? We don't think so. Send your antique back and 
recieve $25. credit toward the "New Revised Clone Machine" at $49.95. We've added an 
MSD dual drive Clone Machine also available for only $39.95. Upgrade your products to 
the latest state of the art today. 

Other software products available from Micro-W Include: Mr. Tester diagnostic software. 
Fantastic Filer data base and report generator. Screen Dumper 64, Font Factory/Sign 
writer for custom type and Jot- A- Word educational software, watch for our $49M!DI 
interface that will connect vour Commodore 64 to musical instruments. 



' y 1342B Route 23 

CALL - 201 ■ 838-9027 MffTO-Vr '''"'" N J ' '' 

or write us at distributing inc * 

NOTE Micro W reserves I he right lociince! (his j| lei at any lime withuul notice 



JWJlifteV»/ilk»^»>tJlV^ 





Dealer Dist. Inquires 



janjmjmjmjfiJKJixjmjB&xaBa&MA 



• * SMALL BUSINESS RETAILERS * * 



ENHANCE PROFITS AND RETURN ON INVEST- 
MEN! GAIN FAR GREATER CONTROL OF YOUR 
RETAIL OR MAIL ORDER BUSINESS with the 
64 CPU and the program, 

CCI MERCHANDISE R/tm. 

• GET accurate recording of all cash, 
check, charge and credit card sales and 
cash payouts. 

• PRINT sales receipts. 

• SECURE maximum control of inven- 
tory. PRINT merchandise price labels. 

• RECEIVE valuable salesanalyses and 
management reports. 

• RECORD check disbursements and 
deposits. 

• PRODUCE P&L, balance sheet, and 
ledger, and accts. rec. reports. 

• COSTJUSTIFIED-saveupto10%on 
operational and accounting costs. 

• MANY OPTIONS provide much more 
capability. 

Available on INV/TRANS, and accounting 
disk for CBM 8050 and SFD 1001 disk 
drives at $529. Specially designed com- 
puter controlled cash drawer is available 
at $374. 

• * * HOME/SMALL BUSINESS * * * 

• * * ACCOUNTING * * * 

GAIN VALUABLE CONTROL OF SEVERAL PER- 
SONAL AND BUSINESS ENDEAVORS, with the 

CCI BOTTOM LINE R/tm. 

• DEFINE up to 100 endeavors such as 
small business corporations, home im- 
provement, land/real estate, and chil- 
drens education. DEFINE ACCOUNTS 
you need for budget, actual income, ac- 
tual expense, assets, liabilities and equi- 
ty. RECEIVE full detailed reportson each 
by quarter, month and year to date. PRO- 
DUCE trial balance, balance sheet, P&L 
and Ledger. BALANCE CHECK BOOKS 
for up to several banks and PRINT 
CHECKS. 

• THIS FULL FEATURED FLEXIBLE 
ACCOUNTING SYSTEM for home and 
small business management and tax data 
preparation is available on disk for only 
$74.95 (1541 disk drive) or for $124.95 
(8050 or SFD 1001 disk drives). 

• * * SUPPORT/DELIVERY/TERMS* * * 

Full manuals are included. Support and 
help is available from CCI. 
Delivery in approximately 10 days via UPS. 
American Express charge cards are ac- 
cepted, as well as UPS COD, and checks. 



IOCKWORK 

OMPUTERS 

4612 Holly Ridge Road 

RockvNIe, MD 20853 

301-924-5509 





S«c ir.iiwi In: Midnight Gjimtlr 111, If 84 p. 49 

RUN, J»n, 1M5 p. 122, 

Ah«y! Misuse *pnl 1913 p. J* 



w s 



St** 



*** 



«s9 



as 



THE BANNER MACHINE'*' for the Commadore 64 



Mdktt ngns HD to 10" tflJI by any fcngttv 

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0H£ NEW COMMODOR E C-128 
HAS IHKfE OPERATING MODES 
UHIS GRIICLE MILL HELP 
GET YOU STARTED USING 
THE CP/H PLUS MODE . 



A TUTORIAL BV: CQSEK (So I@S«K) 



V 



First of all, let's review what CP/PI is: it's an 
operating system. I doesn't do anything for you 
except manage the computer. CP/PI sits there and 
waits for you to ask it to run a program, list a 
directory, Dr edit a file, just like BASIC does. It 
just does it better. It only works with an 8080 Dr 
Z80 cpu chip, so the C128 has one that switches in 
just for CP/PI mode. CP/PI works with either the forty 
column or the eighty column VIC chip, and can run the 
SID chip, too. Since the Z80 clock runs at 4PHz, 
CP/PI should run rings around the C128's other two 
The new 1571 drive even runs faster 
more data. My guess is that 
of choice on the C128 for 




operating modes, 
under CP/PI and stores 
CP/PI will be the mode 
serious software developers. 



BOOTING UF CP/M PLUS 



So how do you turn on all this power? CP/PI does not 
reside in memory, but is loaded in from disk. Insert 
the CP/PI disk in the 1571 drive and turn on the 
computer. The C128's power-on ROfl routine checks to 
see if there's a Commodore 64 cartridge plugged in 
(you did unplug TANK ATTACK first, didn't you?) and 
then checks the drive to see if the CP/PI disk is in 
it. If it is, it boots up CP/PI and quits. 
Otherwise, it will go on to resident C128 BASIC 7.0 
mode. If you forgot to put CP/PI in the drive first 
and ended up in C128 mode, don't start all over. 
Stick the CP/PI disk in the drive and type BOOT in 
direct mode. It does the same thing as the power-up 
routine. You fire up with forty columns; if you 
want eighty, use the ASSIGN statement to switch over, 
as explained in the C128 manual. 

The CP/PI version you get with the C128 is called CP/PI 
PLUS by Digital Research, though Commodore is fond of 
calling it CP/PI 3.0. It is a very powerful, very 
confusing system. You are faced with a plethora of 
commands and a multitude of options to go with them. 
Fortunately, you can get by with just a few commands 
at first and add what you need as you go. Refer 
often to Commodore's manual and the Erg-Card in this 
issue. If you want a good third-party handbook to 
help you along, there aren't many to choose from; 
most only cover CP/PI up to Version 2.2. The third 
edition of The Osborne/PlcGraw Hill CP/PI User Guide by 
Than Hogan is recent enough to cover CP/PI PLUS very 
well, however. I recommend it highly. 



The first thing you will notice an the C128's screen 
is the CP/PI PLUS prompt. It looks like this: A> 
This tells you that you are lagged into drive "A". 
CP/PI PLUS allows you to have up to sixteen disk 
drives (including hard disks), designated by the 
letters "A" to "P". (Since I don't have a C128 in 
hand yet, and this is all based on preliminary 



Commodore 64 
configure a 

you to swap 

thing, 
and on 



Look 
the 
just 
B: 

the 



information, I can't be sure, but the 
CP/PI system includes the ability to 
single drive as two drives by allowing 
disks. The C128 should allow the same 
for a CONFIGURE program in the manual 
disk.) To log to another drive if you have one, 
type its designated letter followed by a colon: 
. All of the commands you give CP/PI will use 
currently logged drive unless you designate another 
drive specifically. The prompt is also telling you 
something else, though it's telling you by not 
shouing it. The CP/PI PLUS system allows you to 
designate up to sixteen seperate users for the 
system. All of the commands you give to CP/PI will 
work only on files designated to your current user 
number (1 to 15). You change users by typing: USER 
n . The user zero area is common to all users of 
the system, and so is not shown by the CP/PI prompt. 
For any other user, it is displayed preceding the 
prompt like this: 3A> . This way you don't mess 
up somebody else's data on the same disk. This is 
especially useful for hard disk systems, where the 
disk directories can become huge and unweildy, and 
where the potential for disasterous mistakes is much 
greater. 

U12MI 



'TING COHHftNI'S 



When you start typing stuff in from the keyboard, you 
will discover that besides the normal cursor and 
editing keys, CP/PI allows many extra line-editing 
functions. These are accessed by using control key 
combinations. The full set of CP/PI PLUS CTRL/key 
combinations is listed on the Erg-Card in this issue, 
but the most useful are probably: 



CTRL/B Go to beginning of line 

CTRL/C Reboot CP/PI 

CTRL/K Delete to end of line 

CTRL/P Toggle printer on/off 

CTRL/S Pause output 

CTRL/Q Unpause output 



The others either repeat functions already provided 
by the keyboard's editing keys, or are seldom needed. 




continued. . , 



by the user and 

differentiate types of 
called POGO.BAS is a 
There are many more or 



RESIDENT COMMANDS 



CP/m has two types of commands, RESIDENT and 
TRANSIENT. Resident commands are in memory at all 
times; transient commands are actually programs that 
load and run only when you need them. You can add 
your own transient commands to CP/PI; whenever you 
type something that CP/n doesn't understand, it first 
checks to see if it's the name of a program on disk. 
This is the way you load and run programs in CP/P1: 
just type the name of the program you want, and CP/PJ 
does the rest. Of course, if it's not on the disk, 
you'll hear about it! If you mistype a normal 
command, such as typing DOR instead of DIR, CP/n will 
first look for DOR on disk before it gives you an 
error message. Be careful typing; it will save you 
a lot of time waiting for disk accesses. 

There are really only about five resident CP/n 
commands. USER you have already met. The other four 
have to do with disk file manipulation. These 
commands use the format: COMMAND drfilename.typ 
The d: is an optional drive designation. If it's 
left off, the command will assume the currently 
logged drive. The filename can consist of up to 
eight alphanumeric characters. The type (typ) 
consists of up to three alphabetic characters 
following a period. This is used 
sometimes by the system to 
files. For example, a file 
BASIC source file named POGO. 

less standard CP/n file extensions around. The only 
critical ones are those that transient programs 
expect to be there, like the .ASM expected by the PWC 
assembler. These are few and far between. You'll 
find out about them as you need to. Filenames and 
types can be partially designated in most commands by 
using the same wildcards you are used to in BASIC, 
the ? and the *. The only difference is that they 
are used for both the filename and the type. For 
example, DIR *.9AS will find all the BASIC source 
files on a disk, and DIR KUMQUAT.* will find all 
the files named KUNQUAT of any type. Likewise, DIR 
?????.* will find all the files with five letter 
names of any type, and DIR CA?.SAS will display 
CAT.BAS, CAD.BAS, CAN.BAS, etc. 

We seem to have introduced the directory command 
there, too. DIR displays all the files on the 
current drive for the current user if typed by 
itself. Wildcards give you more flexibility, and you 
can use the option Df designating which drive you 
want a directory of. There are many additional 
options that can be used with DIR, most having to do 
with how much information you get about your files 
and how that information is formatted for output. 
You don't really need all the bells and whistles for 
now, though. 

ERASE and RENAME do exactly what they say they do. 
ERASE d:filename.typ is the format for that command, 
and if you use wildcards you will be prompted to 
confirm that you want those files erased, RENAflE 
d:newname.typ=oldname.typ Is nearly identical to the 
1541 DOS command it resembles. Notice that if you 
designate a drive, you don't do it twice (once for 
each filename) since you are renaming a file on one 
drive only. 



TYPE dtfilename.typ is used to display an ASCII file 
on the current output device {usually the screen or 
printer), flake sure you only use TYPE with valid 
ASCII files and not with program files. At best, 
TYPEing a program file will give you a garbled 
screen. At worst, it could crash your system. Be 
careful. 



TRANSIENT COMMANDS 



There are a whole handful of transient CP/M commands. 
Here are the most useful: 

COPYSYS. You will use this to copy the CP/n system 
to new disks. Just type COPYSYS and follow the 
prompts. 

DATE C. Displays the time and date continuously. 
DATE SET lets you set it in the first place. You 
will be prompted for input. 

ED d:filename.typ. ED is the standard CP/M text 
editor for creating text and program source files. 
It is an antique dating back to the teletype terminal 
days and nobody ever really uses it unless they are 
terribly desperate. I suggest you find a copy ofVDO 
(in the public domain, available from Cardinal 
Software for $10.00), or the ACE Text Editor from 
Adequate Software ($35.00) which has many 
Wordstar's commands, or something similar. You 
be much happier with CP/M if you do. 
HELP. This is a great addition to CP/M PLUS 
none of the previous versions had. Keep your 
disk in the drive as much as you can, and when 
get stuck, type HELP. You can add topic and subtopic 
requests to your help request as you become more used 
to the system. If in doubt, shout HELP! 
PIP d!newfile.typ=d:oldfile.typ. Copies a file from 
disk to disk. You must designate both drives _ or 
you'll get a copy on the same disk you started with. 
PIP has many options, and has likewise been 
superseded by newer COPY programs. There is probably 
one on the C128 CP/M disk. If so, use it instead. 
SHOUI. Displays information about your disk and 
drive. SHOW has many options. Study up on this one 
in the manual before you use it so you know what all 
that information means. 

There are others, but these should get you going. 
When a transient command (or any program, for that 
matter) is done, it will expect the system disk 
containing CP/M to be mounted in the drive so it can 
reboot the CP/n operating system. A CTRL/C from the 
keyboard does the same thing. Hake sure the disk is 
there for it to find. 



of 
will 

cp/n 

you 



NOW WHERE TO? 



There are thousands of public domain programs out 
there. The 1571 drive will read standard IBM 34 
format disks, which include Osborne and Kaypro and 
others. It will also read Commodore 64 CP/M format. 
Clast of the generic public domain stuff should run on 
the C12B under CP/n PLUS. Check out the bulletin 
boards listed in the last issue, Dr the public domain 
sources listed in this one. Read your manuals and 
study your Erg-Cards. Experiment. Go to college. 
Win the Nobel Prize. You will have to put as much 
effort into it as you need, to get as much out of it 
as you want, but for most of us that won't be an 
overwhelming amount. You will find that you'll learn 
most of it as you go. Good luck. 




n 



K M I» 








* WHAT'S AVAILABLE 

* WHO HAKES IT 

* WHERE TO GET IT 

* WHY YOU WAI1T IT 

* WHAT IT DOES 

* WHAT IT COSTS 



(KSEKCO 



l 



Commodore's C128 computer has three cpu chips: the 
new 8502, the 6510 for the C84 mode, and a 4PHz Z80A 
for the CP/PI mode. (See Benn's CES report in the 
last issue for details.) The C128's CP/PI mode would 
have made an impressive machine on its own. It's got 
128K of RAM, twice as much as most CP/PI machines, 16 
colors where most are monochrome, 40/60 columns 
sui tenable, and superfast disk access with the new 
C1571 drive. But what about software? What can you 
run on the C128 under CP/PI? 

The answer for right now is that nobody knows for 
sure, but the outlook is encouraging. Any CP/P) 
program written to be transportable should run 
without modification on the C128. Two of the best 
CP/P1 programs, Wordstar and dBase II {see sidebar), 
have been tested by Commodore and run fine. The 
transportability and compatability of other packages 
depends on several factors. 

The first problem that can arise is disk format 
incompatibility. This was the biggest single factor 
in the death of the CP/PI cartridge for the Commodore 
64. It could not read any CP/PI disks but those in 
its own (very peculiar) format. Someone had to take 
existing CP/PI disks and port them over to the C64, a 
task that took time and special equipment. this 
problem has been properly addressed in the CI 28. It 
can read IBPI System 34 5.25" disks, which is more or 
less an industry standard; included are Osborne and 
Kaypro disks and others. It will even read the 
strange Commodore 64 CP/PI disk format, so if you are 
building a Commodore 64 CP/H library it will not be 
made obsolete by the CI 28. 

Another problem comes from the difference between 
standard CP/PI and machine-specific CP/PI programs. 
This is akin to the trouble encountered when moving 
Microsoft BASIC programs from machine to machine. As 
long as the programmer uses standard BASIC commands, 
the program transfers fine. But when he uses peeks 
and pokes, or machine-dependent features, the program 
won't run. Likewise, CP/PI programs that are written 
using standard BOOS and BIOS calls will run fine on 
the CI 28. Any that use machine-specific functions 
won't. This problem is not as bad for CP/PI as it is 
for BASIC, though. Because of the abundance of 
different CP/PI computers, it became prudent for CP/PI 
programmers to allow for maximum transportability 
early on. Many CP/PI programs even feature a 
configuration menu that allows you to set up the 
program for your specific hardware. Programs with 
this degree of flexibility will probably run without 
a hitch on the C128. 




Something else to watch out for is confusion over 
what CP/PI is. It is not a language, but an operating 
system, and it has gone through several incarnations. 
The CI 28 runs the most recent CP/PI revision, 
CP/PI-PLUS (also called CP/PI 3.0), which is upwards 
compatible with CP/PI 1.4 and CP/PI 2.2 (sometimes 
collectively called CP/PI-ao) . C128 CP/PI is not very 
compatible with CP/PJ-86, PP/PI, or CP/PM58K, which are 
versions for 16-bit cpu chips or multi-user systems. 
A program should say it was written for CP/PI-PLLIS, 
CP/PI 2.2, CP/PI 1.4, or CP/PI-80 for it to have a 
chance to run on the C128. CP/PI was originally 
written for the 8080 cpu chip, which was the direct 
ancestor of the Z80A in the C128. All CP/PI programs 
that work on an 8080 will work on a Z80, but some 
specify a Z80-based CP/PI system, which of course 
includes the C128. 

Other restrictions you may run into relate to 
hardware requirements. Very few CP/PI programs 
require more than 64K of memory, but some may require 
more than 128K. Obviously, these few will not run on 
an unexpanded C128. Some CP/PI programs still require 
8" disk drives, too, and these will be incompatible. 
Still others need a hard disk to operate, or at least 
to operate effectively, and C128 users will have to 
await the successful entrepreneur who first 
introduces a hard disk for this machine. (See Benn's 
note in issue #6.) The final hardware consideration 
concerns graphics capabilities. Since computers 
differ so much in how they handle graphics, most 
graphics-oriented programs will probably not run. 

Remember that besides commercial software, there is a 
lot of public domain CP/PI software out there. Much 
of it will run an the C128. This includes languages, 
word processors, database managers, terminal 
programs, utilities, etc. Almost every commercial 
application has a public domain counterpart, and many 
public versions are actually superior to their costly 
commercial cousinsl Check out CP/PI users' groups, 
both national and local, and CP/PI bulletin board 
systems for help. We'll try to cover this exciting 
software source in a future article. 





You might not be abls to run dBase II on your 
new Commodore 128 computer; Ashton-Tate has 
quit supplying dBase II in any 5.25" CP/M 
formats. They are following the industry and 
concentrating strictly on IBM-PC compatible 
software. Many other software companies are 
doing the same thing, in defiance of common 
sense and general economic sanity. The last 
industry poll I saw said that only 5% of all 
personal computers out there were IBfls. Even 
with all the compatibles, the installed base of 
MS-DOS and PC-DOS machines is still mUCH less 
than the number of CP/M computers in use. In 
spite of this, manufacturers are abandoning 
CP/M in droves to compete for the IBM market. 

Sure, I realize that MS-DOS is the wave of the 
future. It has no real technical merits over 
any other operating system, but the IBM 
initials have seen to its enduring position in 
the microcomputer marketplace for the next few 
years, anyway. The point is that manufacturers 
and software houses seem too eager to abandon 
proven markets for the future wave. Before a 
machine or an operating system is dead, they 
kill it by abandoning it. Witness the VIC-20 
and the TI99/4A; both have an installed user 
base of a million or more units, but who's 
supporting those users now? Just a couple of 
small, wise, profitable companies. CP/M seems 
to be headed in the same direction, despite the 
introduction of occasional solid (even 
spectacular!) new machines like the Commodore 
128. The MS-DOS wave seems to be carrying all 
the new software introductions with it, and is 
washing away even old standards like dBase II. 
The momentum is building; I'm sure that it 
would take a lot to get Ashtan-Tate to overcome 
their flS-DOS chauvinism and re-release a 5.25" 
version of dBase II for CP/M. 

The smaller companies seem to still be 
friendly, even enthusiastic, towards the 
introduction of a new CP/M computer like the 
C12B. They will, I'm sure, provide ample 
support for it. I hope that Ashton-Tate and 
the other large companies rethink their 
position on CP/M so that dBase II and 
comparable quality programs do not disappear 
from the marketplace prematurely. If nothing 
else, I hope that Commodore realizes the 
position this puts their new machine in. For 
their own good, they should put pressure on the 
software companies to keep their 5.25" CP/M 
offerings available. Better yet, Commodore 
could license these titles and offer them at 
vastly reduced and more realistic prices. You 
can help to influence their decisions; write to 
Commodore and voice your concern. 




CONTINUED. 



There are many companies that are heavily involved in 
porting and translating their CP/M programs to new 
machines, so even if a program you want won't run on 
the C128 right away, the number of C128's on the 
market is sure to influence some of these 
manufacturers to move in fast. Be patient. In the 
meantime, we've made some educated guesses and 
compiled a list of CP/M programs that PROBABLY WILL 
RUN on the C128. 



These were our criteria for 
this list: 



selecting programs for 



(1) A history of transportability. If it runs on a 
lot of machines with little or no translation, it 
will probably run on the C128, or at least may be 
quickly and easily translated by the software 
publisher. 

(2) Format compatibility. If it's available in the 
proper CP/M version in many disk formats, especially 
Kaypro or Osborne, it seems a likely candidate for 
the C128. 

(3) Hardware requirements. It has to be able to run 
in 12BK or less, and need no hard disk or B" drive. 

(4) Generality. We included no graphics or 
telecommunications programs because of the 
hardware-specific nature of these applications, 

(5) Utility. We didn't list every program we 
thought might run. There are over 5000 CP/M programs 
out there! This is meant to be a list representative 
of the best and most useful programs available that 
met with our other criteria. 

The key to this list is the word PROBABLYI Without 
testing, there is no way to know which will work and 
which will not. Those which have been tested by 
Conmodore and are known to work have been marked with 
an asterisk (*). Happy Hunting! 



OUTSIDE SOURCES USED IN THE COMPILATION OF THIS LIST: 

LIST MAGAZINE 

BYTE MAGAZINE 

COMPUTER LANGUAGE MAGAZINE 

CREATIVE COMPUTING MAGAZINE 

COMPUTER SHOPPER 



"THE BEST OF CP/M SOFTWARE" 
BY JOHN D. HALAMKA 
SYBEX COMPUTER BOOKS 




-J 



M—M Bwamwi i- 








continued, 



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files with daisywheel printer. 

Propstar CCC 49.95 

Stand-alone proportional printing 
program for Wordstar and daisy wheel 
printer. 

Punctuation & Style DAS 125.00 
Punctuation and style checker for 
wordprocessor files. 

Sensible Speller SSI 125.00 

Random House Dictionary spelling checker 
for Wordstar. 

Spellbinder LEX 495.00 

Integrated uordprocessor with mail list 
management, math functions. 



Spellguard 

Wordstar spelling checker. 



ISA 295.00 



Spellstar MPI 

Spelling checker for Wordstar. 



250.00 



Synonymn Finder 



WRC 149.95 



A Thesaurus for Wordstar and Multimate 



[mm 



use 

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i nd 

of 
i 


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this 


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find 
in the 

the end 
article. 



TransText IRR 99.00 

Translates wordprocessor text formats. 

yordPatch RMS 49.95 

Wordstar improvement modification 
program. 

Wordstar" MP I 495.00 

The original CP/M word processor, 
against which all others are judged. 



injffitEi^nmaaim: 



Cardbox CPC 245.00 

Electronic filing system that emulates a 
card file. 

Condor CON 650.00 

Relational database creation program 
along the lines of dBase II. 

Database 3 H0L 50.00 

Inexpensive database and filing program. 

dBase II* ASH 700.00 

The quintessential programmable database 
system generator. 

dBase II Templates IIS 39.95 
Templates to use with dBase II for 
receivables, payables, inventory, etc. 

dBase II Utilities HCS 30.00 
Utilities to decode, modify, and speed 
up dBase II applications, $30 and up. 



DBPack II 

Advanced relational DBMS. 



CSH 395.00 



DBPLUS SWB 125.00 

Inexpensive DBMS writes DIF files. 

Filebase EWD 125.00 

Menu-driven DBMS with good value. 

FilePro CP/P1 SCC 199.00 

DBMS applications generator. 

Filer CSH 49.00 

Filing and cataloging program. 



Friday! 

Electronic filing system. 



ASH 295.00 



Infostar MPI 495.00 

Off-the-shelf DBMS. Files compatible 
with Wordstar. 



List Plaster PSC 

Wordpro-compatible information 
organizer. 



179.95 



£3 





CONTINUED 



Ms 


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:;-.. ::.:'::::::::::::■;::::::■' 



'ftTftBftSE*MANAGEf1ENT 



List-J«laster PSC 179.95 

Information manager and organizer 
compatible with Wordstar, 

Notebook WE 150.00 

Free- form database manager. 

Palintir Filer PAL 145.00 

DBMS compatible with Palintir 
wordprocessor. 



Personal Pearl 

Relational DBMS. 



PRL 295.00 



R:base 4000 MIC 495.00 

Extensive relational database manager. 

SeekEasy COR 235.00 

Intelligent error-free-input freeform 
filing system. 

Selector V MAP 450.00 

Relational DBMS with report writer. 



Unifile 

DBMS with report writer. 



UNI 195.00 



SPREADSHEETS 



Zl 



CalcStar MPI 145.00 

Wordstar-compatible spreadsheet. 

Plultiplan MST 250.00 

An excellent spreadsheet program. 



P1YCALC 
Easy-to-use spreadsheet. 



STW 



59.95 



SuperCalc S0R 195.00 

Well-established spreadsheet program. 

SuperCalc 2 SOR 295.00 

Spreadsheet and data manager compatible 
with Wordstar, DIF files. 

Tax Planner TCS 150.00 

Tax templates for popular spreadsheets. 



caamro: 



The Accounting Partner 5TR 395.00 
G/L,A/R,A/P, billing, payroll system. 

Audit EFH 187.50 

Auditing tools for CPA or in-house use. 



BCA General Accounting 

Full accounting system. 



Bookkeeping System FAR 

Small business G/L accounting. 



BCA 350.00 
300.00 



Business Package VAN 

Business accounting system. 



295.00 



The Champion DBR 495.00 

Full accounting system written with 
dBase II. 

Client System CSI 995.00 

Full professional accountant's system. 



Desktop Accountant RMS 

Integrated accounting system. 



495.00 



Desktop Inventory RMS 295.00 
An inventory management system. 

Fund Accounting System IMS 850.00 
Budgeting for non-profit institutions. 

G&G 1040 GGS BOO. DO 

Professional tax preparation system. 



Itagicheck MGC 

Checkbook accounting package. 



59.95 



PBA Accountant MBA 595.00 

Complete accounting w/Supercalc 
interface. 

Plini-Ledger PDM 150.00 

Ledger program for small businesses. 

Oil & Gas Distributor ALP 1195.00 
Accounting and inventory for oil & gas 
distributors. 



Peachtree Accounting PCH 

Modular accounting system from 
Peachtree. 

Real World Accounting RWS 650.00 
Complete accounting system. 

Series 9000 PTA UNI 995.00 

Time & expense billing for 
professionals. 

Software Fitness Program 0PN 525.00 
Fully integrated general ledger and 
accounting system. 

Solomon TLB 595. DO 

Flexible full accounting package. 

104D Plus PLS 550.00 

Full income tax package with videotape 
tutorial. 

UersaBusiness Series COM 149.95 

A full-featured general ledger 
program. Receivables, payables, avail, 
seperate. 





QUM 




63 




CONTINUED . 



nnmnm 



Ambulance Billing System CPR 995.00 

Billing system for ambulance 
companies. 

Application Interpreter CEC 599.00 
Estimates, accounting, for 
contractors. 

Cardio VET 195.00 

ECG analysis for Veterinarians. 

CI System LIT 395.00 

Legal firm client tracking system. 

Critical Path Analysis SSP 70.00 

Business efficiency tool, up to 200 
activities and 300 dates. 

Daily Reminder & Calendar ICP 39.95 
Notebook and appointment calendar. 

Daymaster EDS 100.00 

Office administration program. 

Financial Analysis System VSC 125.00 

Collection of real estate analysis 
programs. 



Financial Pak GEN 

Financial planning package. 



149.00 



Forestry management CPR 1500.00 
Forestry harvest & delivery management 
system. 

The Forty-Niner ESI 295.00 

Sales prospect management system. 

LBS TRI 995.00 

Legal billing system for attorneys. 

Flailing List ADS 19.95 

Requires two drives and 132 column 
printer. 



On-line Order Entry UNI 

Point-of-sale order entry system with 
inventory control 

Post Card Billing ALP 295.00 
Third-party billing system handles 
thousands of customers far several 
clients. 



Priorities HUL 

Project management system. 



39.95 



The Prospector 

Sales prospect database. 



EDS 300.00 



Statistical and Business LEO 100.00 
Statistical and business program 
series, PERT, Monte Carlo, etc. in $100 
range. 

Sundial Docket & Calendar SBS 149.00 
Docket and calendar with client and 
date searching. 

Systat 2 SYS 495.00 

Full statistics package with DBMS and 
graphics. 



~ INTEGRATED SOFTWARE . 



H 



Personal Planner NMld 99.00 

Home DBMS, mail list, letter writer, 
expense tracker. 

Starburst MPI 195.00 

A utility which integrates Wordstar, 
Infostar, Calcstar, and MailFlerge. 

T/naker TMK 275.00 

lilordprocessor, spreadsheet, graphics. 
One of few integrated packages for 

cp/m. 



JNUESTMEN 



Fund-Plaster GEN 

Mutual funds investment aid. 

Investment-Waster GEN 
Annuity investment calculations. 

Stock 4 Trend Analyzer NT I 

Stock charting and analysis. 

Stock Option Planner TCS 

Cost and results of covered call. 



59.95 



49.95 



99.95 



1D0.00 



Stock Pricing Hodel KUS 

Supercalc overlays for stock market. 



ftXL&n^: 



-\ 



AMX KAD 800.00 

Multitasking executive with language 
interfaces. 

ConIX DOS CHI 165.00 

Shell-like front end for CP/Pi— like 
UNIX. 



Data safe 

Data security encryption. 



TRG 139.00 



-^/ 



c 



1 1 a i !■ 





I 



CQHTIHUED. 



Diagnostics II 

Checks out your system. 



SUP 125.00 



DSKNURSE WDS 15.00 

Disk file maintainence and recovery 
utility. 

Eureka I DIS 75.00 

Disk file organization and management. 

G/L/Supercalc Interface MBA 595.00 
Lets Supercalc read and use general 
ledger files. 



INF0-8O TSS 

Application development system. 
(Hmmm... catchy name!) 



395.00 



Media Plaster MDC 29.95 

Disk format conversion program. Might 
not work on C128 unless translated. 

Nevada EDIT ELC 29.95 

Full-screen text editor for program 
development, etc. Vast improvement on 
ED. 

Pack & Crypt STW 24.95 

Encrypts and packs disk files. 



P/C Privacy 

Data encryption program. 



MCT 140.0D 



Power! CMP 99.95 

Adds a powerful menu-driven front end to 
the CP/M system. 



SCG31 

Source code generator. 

Supermit 

CP/M utilities. 



CCS 75.00 
RDY B5.00 



TUTORI/0 ROY 31 .00 

Animates, debugs, and unleashes BD05. 

Virtual Volume manager MTI 44.95 
Disk file management and maintainence 
package. 



Xtrakey XPS 

Keyboard redefinition utility. 



ZED 

Improved text editor. 



39.95 
50.00 



CSEtHkEGEiffa: 



Public domain library 

SASE for list. $8.00/disk. 



CRA 



B.00 



Public domain library EL A 7.50 
6000 programs an 300 disks. Catalog is 
$7.50. 

Public domain library NPD 45.00 
Rent disks for 7 days to copy yourself: 
$45/92 disks. 




wamBi*: 



Aztec C II MAN 349.00 

C compiler for CP/M with utilities, 
library, UNIX-type 1/0, etc. 

BDSC BDS 150.00 

A well-established and excellent version 
of C for CP/M. 

CBASICCompiler DRC 500.00 

Advanced structured BASICcompiler 
supports Digital's GSX graphics & maybe 
GEM. 



C/BO 

Inexpensive C compiler. 



STU 



49.95 



C/BQ PIATWAK STU 29.95 

Add floats and longs to C/B0 compiler. 



CBD ZD5 

Another inexpensive C compiler. 



45.00 



Cross-assemblers AVD 250.00 

A full line of cross-assemblers for most 
cpu's on the market, from B085 to BB000. 

Janus ADA RRS 300.00 

Several ADA subsets available. 

LISP/80 Interpreter STW 39.95 
Inexpensive LISP interpreter. 





131 




illlllllllllll 65 




CONTINUED,.. 



LHI FORTH LMI 

FORTH-83 for CP/M systems. 

niasterFORTH MMO 1 0Q . DO 

micromotion's F0RTH-B3. 

Masterful Disassertbler CCS 45.00 
Machine code disassembler. 

microsoft BASIC MST 395.00 

Combination BASIC interpreter and 
compiler. 

PTTBASICCoBpiler SOF 49.95 

Multitasking BASIC compiler w/recursion, 
windows, etc. for Z80. 

IWP FORTH MVP 150.00 

The quintessential FDRTH implementation. 



Nevada BASIC ELC 

BASIC interpreter with BCD math, 
built-in editor. 



Nevada COBOL 

COBOL for CP/M. 



ELC 



29.95 



29.95 



Nevada Fortran ELC 29.95 

Inexpensive introduction to ANSI-66 
FORTRAN. 



Nevada Pascal 

Pascal for CP/M. 

Nevada PILDT 

PILOT for CP/m. 



ELC 

ELC 



29.95 
29.95 



PL/I 80 DRC 500.00 

A subset of the mainframe language for a 
micro environment. 

RATFOR STW 39.95 

Inexpensive FORTRAN implementation. 

RUNIC-BO STE 50.00 

Threaded language similar to Forth, but 
claimed easier to learn. 

68000 Assembler QUE 595.00 

Cross-assembler for program development 
for 6S000-based systems (like Amiga). 



Supersoft A SUP 300.00 

Subset of Ada includes approximately 2/3 
of Ada. 

Supersoft C SUP 350.00 

Optimized C compiler with 130 library 
functions included. 

Turbo Pascal* B0R 49.95 

Highly praised Pascal for CP/M systems. 
Toolbox, tutorial packages available. 

U0-LISP NCA 49.95 

LISP interpreter and compiler. 

WALTZ LISP PRO 169.00 

Formidable LISP system for CP/M. 



misc. & GAPES 

Adventure ADV 25.00 

The original computer adventure in 
Colossal Cave. 



Best of Wok Talk 

200 Chinese recipes. 



STW 



Card-Claster GEN 

Credit card management program. 



Computer Chef 

Personal recipe filer. 



STW 



29.95 
39.95 
29.95 



ELIZA AIR 45.00 

The classic computer psychiatrist. 



What's For Dinner 

200 family recipes. 



STW 



19.95 



Zork et. al IF0 49.95 

Many of the Infocom adventures are 
available for CP/M. 

Fancy Font SCI 180.00 

Create typeset-quality fonts in a 
variety of styles and point-sizes for 
print-out to Epson-compatible printers. 




ADS 



ADV 



AIR 



ALP 



ASH 



AVD 



BCA 



BDS 



BOR 



ccc 



CCS 



CEC 



CET 



CHI 




Able Data Software 

PO Box 86923/Station B 

North Vancouver BC 

Adventure International 
PD Box 3435 
Longwood FL 3275D 
305-B62-6917 

Artificial Int. Research 
921 N. La Jolla Ave. 
Los Angeles CA 90046 
213-654-2214 

Alpine Data 
635 flain St. 
Montrose CA 81401 
303-249-1400 

Ashton-Tate 

10150 W. Jefferson Blvd. 

Culver City CA 90230 

213-2D4-5570 

Avocet Systems Inc. 

PO Box 490/10 Summer St. 

Rockport ME D4856 

207-236-9D55 

BCA 

#104/874 Van Nuys Blvd. 

Panorama City CA 91402 

B18-891-0849 

BDSoftware Inc. 
PO Box 2368 
Cambridge PtA 02238 
617-576-3828 

Borland International 
4113 Scotts Valley Dr. 
Scotts Valley CA 95066 
408-438-84D0 



Civil Computing Corp. 
Suite 1/2111 Research 
Livermore CA 94550 
415-455-8086 



Dr. 



C.C. Software 

Suite 106/2564 Walnut Blvd. 

Walnut Creek CA 94596 

415-939-B153 

Construction Estimating Co. 
1713 Sutter St. 
Vallejo CA 94590 
707-552-5476 

Computer EdiType Systems 
Suite 10A/509 Cathedral Parkway 
New York NY 10Q25 
212-222-8148 

Computer Helper Inc. 

P0 Box 680 

Parkchester Station NY 10462 

212-652-1786 



CMP Computing! 

2519 Greenwich St. 
San Francisco CA 94123 
415-567-1634 

COM Computronics Inc. 
50 N. Pascack Rd. 
Spring Valley NY 10977 
B0O-431-281B 

CON Condor Computer Corp. 
2051 S. State St. 
Ann Arbor mi 48104 
800-221-8479 

COR Correlation Systems 
81 Rockinghorse Rd. 
Rancho Palos Verdes CA 90274 
213-833-3462 

CPC Caxton Publishing Co. 
10-14 Bedford St. 
Covent Garden 
London England UJC2E 9HE 

CPR Communications Professionals 
Suite 1-238/701 E. Bay St. 
Charleston NC 29403 
803-722-7572 

CRA Cramer 

P0 Box 28606 
Columbus OH 43228 

CSH CamPU-DRAW Software House 

1227 Goler House 

Rochester NY 1462D 

716-454-3188 
CSI Cyberian Software 

Suite 140/11222 Richmond 

Houston TX 77082 

713-558-8090 

DBR Data Base Research Corp. 

Suite 310/12687 West Cedar Dr. 
Lakewood CO 80228 

DIS Disco Tech 

PD Box 1659/600 8 St. 
Santa Rosa CA 95402 
707-523-1600 

DF1C Digital marketing Corp. 

Suite 6/23633 Boulevard Circle 
walnut Creek CA 94595 
415-938-2880 

DRC Digital Research Corp. 

P0 Box 579/160 Central Ave. 
Pacific Grove CA 93950 

EDS Executive Data Systems Inc. 

Suite 116/290 Interstate North 
Atlanta GA 30339 
800-272-3374 




More> 




[ i a 1 1«: 










C0KT1KUED. 



EFH E.F. Haskell & Associates 

Suite A-131/528 E. Missourt Ave. 

Phoenix AZ 85014 

602-277-2534 

ELA Elliam Associates 
24000 Bessemer St. 
Woodland Hills CA 91 367 
81B-348-4278 

ELC Ellis Computing 
3917 Noriega St. 
San Francisco CA 94122 
415-753-0186 

ESI Excalibur Systems Inc. 
1512 Katella Ave. 
Anaheim CA 92805 
714-385-1211 

EWD EUDP Software Inc. 
P0 Box 40283 
Indianapolis IN 46240 
317-B72-8799 

FAR Farmer & Associates 
#406/401 21st St. 
Sacramento CA 95816 
918-441-0554 

FYI FYI Inc. 

P0 Box 26481 
Austin TX 78755 
512-346-0133 

GEN Generic Software 

P0 Box 790/Dept 20/190 Timber 
Marquette MI 49855 
906-249-9801 

GGS G&G Software Inc. 
610 Park Blvd. 
Austin TX 78751 
512-458-5750 

HCS Hilco Software 
304 N. 17th St. 
Mount Vernon WA 98273 
206-428-0475 

H0L Holiday Software 
4807 Arlene St. 
San Diego CA 92117 
619-292-7766 

HUL Hula Software 
P0 Box 69 
Puunene HI 96784 
808-877-5162 

ICP International Computer Products 
346 N. Idestern Ave. 
Los Angeles CA 90004 
213-462-8381 

IF0 Infocom 

55 Wheeler 
Cambridge MA 02138 



IIS Impact Information System 
11205 Alpharetta Hwy. 
Roswell GA 30076 
404-475-3114 

IMS International Micro Systems Inc. 
6445 Metcalf 

Shawnee Mission KS 68202 
913-677-1137 

IRR Information Reduction Research 
1538 Main St. 
Concord MA 01742 
617-369-5719 

ISA Innovative Software App. 
P0 Box 2797 
Mento Park CA 9D066 

JIC Jupiter Island Corp. 
14 Rock Lane 
Berkeley CA 94708 
415-528-5285 

KAD KADAK Products Ltd. 
206-1847 W. Broadway 
Vancouver BC 
604-734-2796 

KU5 Kustom Software 

665 Pacific View Dr. 

San Diego CA 92109 

519-483-7119 
LEO Lionheart 

P0 Box 379 

Atburg VT 05440 

514-933-4918 

LEX Lexisoft Inc. 
PO Box 1950 
Davis CA 95617 
916-758-3630 

LIT Litek 

4326 Fish Hatchery Rd. 
Grants Pass OR 97527 
503-479-6533 

LMI Laboratory Microsystems 
PO Box 10430 
Marina del Rey CA 90295 
213-306-7412 



MAN Manx Software Systems 
PO Sox 55 

Shrewsbury NY 07701 
800-221-0040 

MAP Micro-Ap 

Suite 2D6/7033 Village Parkway 

Dublin CA 94568 

415-828-6697 

MBA Micro Business Applications 
12281 Niccolet Ave. S. 
Minneapolis MN 55337 
612-894-3470 

MCT Microcomputer Telecom. People 
3 Bala Plaza E./Suite 505 
Bala Cynwyd PA 19004 
21 5-668-0983 



[wor e) 




CONTINUED 



MDC 



MGC 



1*1 1 C 



mmo 



MOU 



1*1 PI 



1*1 ST 



1*1 T I 



roup 



NCA 



NMW 



JPD 



NTI 



MDC and Associates 
4573 Heatherglen Ct. 
Moorpark CA 93021 
803-529-5073 

Magicamp 

2710 111. Country Club Rd. 

Philadelphia PA 19131 

215-473-6599 

l*licror im 

33B0 146 Place 5.E. 

Belleuue 111 A 98007 

800-547-40Q0 

l*l i c r o l*l o t i a n 

Suite 506/12077 Wilshire Blvd. 

Los Angeles CA 90025 

213-821-4340 

Mark Of The Unicorn 
222 Third St. 
Cambridge l*IA 02142 
617-576-2760 

MicroPro International 
33 San Pablo Ave. 
Ballevue WA 98004 
415-499-4024 

Microsoft 

10700 Northrup Way 

Bellevue 111 A 98004 

l*lictaTASK Inc. 

Suite 345/6040-A Six Forks Rd. 

Raliegh NC 27609 

919-851-9045 

Mountain View Press Inc. 

P0 Box 4656 

Mountain View CA 94040 

415-961-4103 

Northwest Computer Algorithms 

P0 Box 9D995 

Long Beach CA 90809 

213-426-1393 

National Microware 

Suite 110/2102 Business Cent. Dr, 

Irvine CA 92715 

714-752-2344 

National Public Domain 
1533 Avohill Dr. 
Vista CA 92083 
619-941-0925 

NewTEK Industries 

P0 Box 46116 

Los Angeles CA 90046 

213-874-6669 



OAS OASIS Systems 

No.F/7907 Ostrow St, 
San Diego CA 92111 
619-279-5711 

OPN Open Systems Inc. 
430 Oak Grove 
Minneapolis l*lN 55403 
800-328-2276 

PAL Palintir Software 

Suite 110/7701 Wilshire Place Dr, 
Houston TX 77040 
71 3-520-8221 

PAS Pascal 4 Associates 
PO Box 350 

Chapel Hill NC 2751 4 
80D-972-7225 

PCH Peachtree Software Inc. 

8th Floor/3445 Peachtree Rd. 
Atlanta GA 30326 
B00-554-89Q0 

PDM Paradigm Consultants 

Suite L/39243 Liberty St. 
Fremont CA 94538 
415-796-0543 

PER Perfect Software 
71 I*lurray St. 
New York NY 10007 

PLS 1040 Plus 

6730 E. McDowell/0103 
Scottsdale AZ 85257 
602-941-3407 

PRL Pearlsaft Inc. 
P0 Box 638 

Wilsonville OR 97070 
503-682-3636 

PRO ProCode International 
15930 Sill Colony PI. 
Portland OR 97224 
800-547-4000 

PSC Palace Software Cd. 
Route 1 Box 320 
Moundsville WV 26041 
304-B43-1600 

QUE Quelo 

Suite 173/2464 33rd Ave. III. 
Seattle WA 98119 
206-285-2528 

ROY Roy Lipscomb/Logic Associates 
1433 Thome 
Chicago IL 60660 

RMS Rocky Mountain Software 

Suite 1292/1280C Newell Ave. 
Walnut creek CA 94596 
415-680-8378 

RRS R.R. Software Inc. 
P0 Box 1512 
Madison MI 53701 
608-244-6436 



one 



Hj 




I J I II" 




Rlil 5 



SBS 



SCC 



SQF 



SQR 



SSI 



SSP 



STE 



STR 



STW 



SUP 



SbJB 



SYS 



TCS 



CONTINUED, 



RealWorld Corp. 
Dover Road 
Chichester NH 03263 

Sunbear Systems 

Suite 404/1095 Market St. 

San Francisco CA 941 D3 

415-986-3184 

The Small Computer Co. 
Suite 1200/230 111. 41st St. 
New York, NY 1003B 
800-847-4740 

Softaid, Inc. 
P.O.Box 2412 
Columbia BO 21045 
301-792-8096 

Sorcim 

2195 Fortune Dr. 

San Jose CA 95131 

408-942-1727 

Sensible Software Inc. 
Suite 229/210 S. Woodward 
Birmingham mi 48011 
313-258-5566 

Siem Software Products 
P0 Box 17684 
Tampa FL 33682 

Starside Engineering 
P0 Box 3306 
Rochester NY 14618 

Star Software Systems 

Suite 103/20600 Gramercy Place 

Torrance CA 90901 

213-538-2511 

Software Toolworks 

Suite 1118/15233 Ventura Blvd. 

Sherman Daks CA 91403 

B18-986-4885 

Supersoft, Inc. 

PO Box 1628/1713 S. Neil St. 

Champaign IL 61820 

800-762-6629 

Software Banc 

661 Massachusetts Ave. 

Arlington MA 02171 

8D0-451-2502 

Systat Inc. 
600 Main St. 
Evanston IL 60202 
312-864-5670 



TLB 



TMK 



TRG 



TRI 



TSS 



UNI 



VAN 



VET 



VSC 



WD5 



WRC 



XPS 



ZDS 



TaxCalc Software Inc. 
4210 111. Vickery Blvd. 
Fort Worth TX 6107 
B17-738-3122 



TLB Associates 
PO Box 414 
Findlay OH 45840 



T/Maker Co. 
2115 Landings 
Mountain View 



CA 94043 



Trigram Systems 
Suite 68/3 Bayard Rd. 
Pittsburg PA 15213 
412-682-2192 

Tri-L Data Systems Inc. 
1 538 Makaloa St. 

Honolulu HI 96814 
808-945-7876 

The Software Store 

708 Chippewa Square 

Marquette MI 49855 
906-228-7622 

Univair Systems 

9024 St. Charles Rock Rd. 

St. Louis MO 63114 

314-426-1099 

Vandata 

Suite 1D7/17544 Midvale Ave. N. 

Seattle WA 98133 

206-542-7611 

VetSoft 

1716 Pomona Dr. 

Davis CA 95816 

916-75-7022 

Valuation Systems Co. 

Suite E 236/7130 S. Lewis St. 

Tulsa DK 74136 

918-496-7655 

Webb Data Systems 
PO Box 20S8 
Topeka KS 66601 

Writing Consultants 

Suite 304/11 Creek Bend Dr. 

Fairport NY 1445D 

716-377-0130 

Xpert Software 
8865 Polland Ave. 
San Diego CA 92123 
619-268-01 12 

Zeighty Data Systems 
PO Box 28355,6/0 JC 
Columbus OH 43228 
614-279-8271 




J II W M M WIIMII II I "~~ TL-_ 



QUI 




i 



j 




GETTitiG INTEGRATED 



BV DQH UflrtOEUEnTER 



JltTEGRATEO SOFTWARE! 



Integrated Software! This has become a very 
important feature of the larger computer systems. 
But what is Integrated Software anyway? 

Stated in its simplest form, Integrated Software is 

a combination of software programs such as a 
spreadsheet and database that share information 
(Lotus 1-2-3 being the most famous of the lot). 
This is not just two separate programs sharing the 
same information, but two separate parts of the same 
program. Until now it was held by many critics that 
the Commodore 64 could not really handle an 
Integrated Software package, but a new program by 
Kelvin Lacey has changed that. 



A DREAM CAME TRUE 



That was the headline of the ad that first caught my 
attention last January. The real eye catcher for 
me, however, was the name of the author of VTZASTAR. 
Kelvin Laceyl For those of you who read Info 64, 
you know that I bought my Commodore 64 because of 
Kelvin's word processor Omniwriter" . (See review 
of Dmniwriter, issue #4). After a call to the 
distributor, Solid State Software, I was jumping up 
and down wanting a copy of this new program. 
However, I had to wait until the West Coast 
Coonodore Shaw in February before I finally had a 
copy of the program in my hands. 



mart's ha at 



Before we can really look at VIZASTAR, there are 
two words that we need to define. The first 
Spreadsheet i 



a 
is 



A spreadsheet is one of the most powerful business 
tools available on a computer. To understand a 
spreadsheet think of a columnar pad of paper. The 
lines down the page are columns, and across the page 
are rows. The boxes created by this format are 
called cells. Most of us have seen this format in 
ledger sheets. A spreadsheet is a large electronic 
ledger. In the case of VIZASTAR, a ledger with 64 
columns, and 1000 rows. With a paper ledger sheet, 
existing figures in the cells must be recalculated 
everytime a new figure is entered or changed. The 
power of the spreadsheet is that the math formulas 
are entered first, and when new figures are added, 
calculations are automatic. Saving hours of 
recalulations. Spreadsheets can be used for 
management or accounting purposes either at home or 
in business. 




FIG. i 

The second of our words to define is Database: 
imagine a file cabinet with file folders. Each file 
folder has a sheet of paper with places for 
information such as name, address, city, state, zip, 
etc. The file cabinet is our database. A single 
file drawer becomes our file. Within the file 
folders are the individual records. Each line of 
entry In the file (name, address, etc.) is called a 
field. Just as you can design your file cabinet 
with any type of information you want, the same 
applies to a file in a database. But the advantages 
of a electronic database are: speed, ease of use, 
and "if-then-or else" types of analysis. Say you 
need to find all of the people that own both a C-64 
and a 1702 color monitor in a local user group file: 
a good database will look though each record and 
find only those that qualify. 

Now we come to Integrated Software. Imagine being 
able to combine information from the two types of 
programs we just discussed. For example, you have 
used your spreadsheet to create an invoice. Your 
database contains two files, the first is your 
customer mailing list, the second your invoice 
information. By using the power of both spreadsheet 
and database, the customers' information can be 
merged with the invoice information to be calculated 
and printed. Two difficult jobs handled by one 
program. 

Kelvin Lacey has taken this idea several steps 
further. First by creating a program that permits 
the use of the Commodore graphics to create bar 
graphs, line charts, pie charts, or multi-bar charts 
of your information, then by allowing any of your 
information to be merged with a word processor. 





QUE 






EfHMnB! 



CDHTlflUED. 




1 



i mi be vizmrm 



It took over 15 months for Kelvin to write VIZASTAR. 
The program is written entirely in 6502 machine 
language and resides completely in memory. Since 
the program is quite large, over 48K, the program 
requires a cartridge to provide addition memory for 
the C64. 

There are two versions available of VIZASTAR. The 
first is VIZASTAR XL4 providing a work space of 10K 
(the same as Nultiplan) . The second version is the 
XL8 providing 40$ more workspace a total of 14K. 
(Note: for the small difference in price, I 
recommend the XLB version) 

Solid State Software markets VIZASTAR with two 
copies of the program, a well indexed manual, the 
extra memory cartridge and a complete step by step 
tutorial. In addition, on the disk is an second 
tutorial, a demo worksheet, and a simple cashbook 
format that can be used instantly. 

The documentation is extensive, but there are some 
flaws in the material. The most recent copy I have 
has a page added to showing about 15 corrections 
(most minor) which still need to be made in the book 
and tutorial. 

There are also a few problems with screen dumps. 
Most printer and interface combinations work, but it 
has taken some fooling around with my Star SG10 and 
Easy Print interface to set the dip switches right. 
Upon dumping the first screen, the printer sends too 
many line feeds, following screen dumps are fine. I 
often just reset my interface to emulate a Commodore 
printer and that solves the problem. This quirk 
only appears in screen dumps; the normal print menu 
works fine and I can use all of the special features 
of my printer and interface. Both Solid State and 
Progressive Perphirals (distributors of Easy Print) 
are both working on the compatibility issue. 



THE POWER OF VIZflSTflR 



In figure 1 the top section contains information 
about the worksheet you're working on. The first 
line gives the name of the worksheet, in this case 
it is called 'complete 1 . The second line gives the 
format of the cell where the cursor is. The cell 
formats can be: General (displaying the entire 
number), Integer (rounding the number off to a whole 
number), Currency (displaying two decimal places and 
rounding up if needed), Date (displaying day, month, 
year and if the cell is large enough, even the day 
of the week), or Scientific (displayed in scientific 
natation as a power of 10. 

On the same line you will find the amount of memory 
left in your worksheet. In our example I have 53? 
of my worksheet free. (Remember you're only seeing 
a small window of the whole worksheet). This line 
also tells you whether the program is calculating or 



G 



72 



G 1 1 !■ 



not. Here the worksheet is ready for the next step. 
The bottom line gives both the cell location of the 
cursor as well as the contents. In our example we 
have a formula. The formula simply says "add all of 
the cells from N104 to N1Q8 and place the total in 
cell N110". 

The Main Menu is reached by pressing the Commodore 
key. If you're familiar with Lotus 1-2-3 you will 
see a similar menu in figure 2. The first line 
shows the main commands 'Cell, Sheet, File, Print, 
Data, Graph' Below that is the secondary command 
line. For Cell there is Format, Calc, Protect, etc. 



BBMM Sheet 

erwa » Calc 
D 


F«ie Print tfafi" WrtpJT 
Pr-ute< t , H»«lth, SK.pto 
ispljy, 1 

HUH HKlBbML 










Rj. Jon. 


JH 29 JUL-8-1 


g!B. Bur t AUG 84 


Pj~i:atV X-38-ftPR-34 


|\ * 3 r» ei Sftl I fKW-8-4 




potii $ 


imCHKH 








>>in t i, Ni M [n i '<• IIS 




♦ Paw^N; 




♦ etoday J*_ 







FIG. 2 



The command 'Cell* is currently highlighted, and if 
you press return the second line of commands will 
move up to the first line and a whole new line of 
commands will appear at the bottom. 

An easy way to understand the command line is think 
of the limbs of a tree, the first line (limb) takes 
you to the next limb or line of commands. Commands 
may be chosen by pressing the space bar to move the 
cursor or by pressing the first letter of any 
command. For example; pressing the commodore key 
and 'c' for cell, then 't' for tone takes you to the 
Color Menu. Then you can adjust the color of the 
text, background and border of your worksheet. 
After working with programs like Practicalc II where 
only the first letter of the commands are given I 
found the commands of VIZASTAR easy to learn. 

Notice the location of the cursor in 'N110'. I have 
changed the program using one of its functions to 
display the formulas. Due to the width of this cell 
the entire formula is not displayed. However, it is 
the same formula that is shown in figure 1. _ The 





MMikM^! 



CQNT4NUE0. 



formula below It says to count the number of entries 
between 'N104' and 1 N108" and display. In figure 1 
you will see the answer is five. The next formula 
says to average the figures between 'N104' and 
' N10B' and display. Figure 1 shows the number to be 
1B81 .748, This cell could have been set to currency 
and the figure would have been rounded off 
automatically. The next formula is to display 
today's date. The program will keep track of all 
dates including leap years from January 1, 1900. fit 
the beginning of using the spreadsheet you can enter 
today's date and it can be used in any formula where 
dates are needed. For example, a customers record 
that is due in 30 days could automatically display 
the due date. 

Several different functions can be used in formulas. 
First there are the standards like add, subtract, 
multiply and divide. Others include: abs 
absolute value, cos - cosine; log - value is a 
natural logarithm base; max - the maximum of all 
values in a supplied range, min - the minimum of all 
values in a supplied range; pi - for a value of 
3.14159265359 for radius; and tan - tangent. These 
are just a few of 32 different functions in addition 
to equal, not equal, less than, less than or equal, 
greater than, greater than or equal, logical OR, 
logical AND, logical NOT, true, false, and if-then 
statements. 

Before leaving figure 2 notice the different sizes 
of the cells. Cells can vary in width from 3 to 36 
characters. Up to 120 characters can be typed in a 
cell 



Cm t <ti. y i 



Fxpec tie*: *V tuai. " 


l'j f Mr ( » a ,;, 


• 




■ : 
fotaT" i73iT88"T jj H 





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24 ' 



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FIG. 3 



UitlDQU flftYBQDV? 



Figure 3 shows yet another powerful feature of 
VIZASTAR. The ability to show windows. This 



permits you to see various parts of the spreadsheet 
at one time. For example in the first window you 
see the cells from 'A23' to '031', and in window 2 
from *H25' to 'H29'. Window 3 has a graph taken 
from the figures in window 1 . A total of 9 windows 
may be opened. This permits you to temporarily look 
at another part of the worksheet. 

Another nice feature is titling. With this feature, 
it is possible to lock any row, or column (or both) 
in any window. By using this feature, cells may be 
moved and the title of the cell is still displayed. 
However, using titling reduces the number of windows 
that can be displayed. Text within a cell can be 
left or right justified or centered. This helps in 
producing better looking copy when printing reports. 
In the print mode, a set of options permits the use 
of headers, footers, auto page numbering, and 
printing of specific ranges of cells. In addition, 
special print commands such as condensed printing 
(if your printer supports it) can be used. 

One of my complaints about the program is its 
inability to save only a portion of a worksheet. On 
the plus side, all of your system parameters are 
saved along with your worksheet including tone, 
windows, graphs, print commands, and last commands 
used. Worksheets can be merged together, and you 
can also merge text created by a word processor or 
sequential files directly into the worksheet. 




VIZASTAR provides an additional graphics function to 
print on screen full color pie charts Dr multi-bar 
graphs. Figure 4 shows an example of the multi-bar. 
There are two scales that can be displayed and the 
number of bars that can be displayed range from 33 
if only one row is used to 13 in each tdw if bars in 
all four rows are used. Heading, as well as labels 
can be included in the chart for better appearance. 



&. 











G)C@ 



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III 


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III! 


III 


Hi 


.11 


nil 


hi 

Hill 


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-WiiaStar Pie Chart = 



FIG. 5 

On screen the cursor keys are used to move around 
the multi-bar chart. Figure 5 shows a sample of 
the print-out of both the Die chart and the 
multi-bar chart (most printer, including the MPS 801 
can be used to print the charts) 

In figure 6 you will see a sample of the information 
in the database. Up to 9 screen pages can be used 
with up to 64 different fields. A total of 120 
characters per field or 8000 characters per record. 
The key field (only one allowed) can only handle 30 
characters. The maximum number of records a 1511 
disk can handle is 1200. Other drives, including a 
hard disk can be used with the program for a maximum 
of 65535 records. The maximum number of databases 
per disk is 120, and 15 different files per 
database. 

In laying out your database, all of the spreadsheet 
calculations can be used. This includes the date 
functions, making invoices easy to handle. 
Information in the database can be used in the 
spreadsheet permitting a large assortment of 
applications. Sequential files created by other 
databases or word processors may be imported into 
the database. This saves time in transfer ing 
information you may have already stored in another 
database. UIZASTAR is also one of the few database 
programs that will permit you to redesign you 
database format. This includes the ability to 
insert information into the middle to the record (a 
difficult task for most databases). 





FIG. 6 




n a i !■ 



LQQK w, ffl HflHOS! 



The last feature I want to mention is one of the 
most powerful; the Exec function. Exec gives you 
the ability to write a macro command that will 
permit the program to run itself I Lets say you 
design a spreadsheet for employees to use, and you 
want them to enter information in only in certain 
cells. You can write an Exec function that will 
permit them to enter information only in the 
appropriate cells, with the cursor moving to each of 
the selected locations automatically. Writing Exec 
functions is not hard: as you perform each function 
write down the first letter of the command used or 
the cell location. You then transfer this 
information to an empty area in the first column. 
When the Exec function is used the commands will 
follow the same order, 

I could go on and on talking about this program, & I 
realize that I have only told you about a few of its 
many features, but I promised Benn that we would 
keep it short, and besides I want to stop working on 
this review and get back to Uizastarl 




Don Uandeventer is a consultant for small and home 
businesses. He is on the board of the Association of 
Electronic Cottagers and author of the Small 
Business Guide to the Commodore 64. 



UiZflSIflB I 

SiiB.97 
2 Solid State Software ; 
M 1253 Corsica Lane 
'A Foster City. CA 94484 
I <4±5) 341-5586 

mm 





SOLID STATE SftVS, "UERY SOON" 



1-2^ FOR THE 64?? 



by Ernest Miller 

It sure looks a lot like LOTUS. But is it 

really destined to become the spreadsheet 

benchmark for the Commodore that 1-2-3 has 
become for the IBM PC world? 

The similarities start with the 
tree-structured COMMANDS. This approach 
gives the user the same visibility of 
available COMMANDS and SUB COMMANDS, with 
the same step-by-step command execution 
process. Like LOTUS, you can point to the 
desired function, or execute it by typing 
the initial. 

The worksheet manipulation power is 
impressive, when compared with any 
spreadsheet program. Cell formatting, 
recalculation choices, range 
move/insert/delete operations, copying, 
titling, column width adjustment, windowing, 
and cell protection provide all the 
worksheet options that are desirable. 

Formula and function power is equally 
impressive. Besides standard mathematics 
operations, VIZASTAR has a full range of 
higher level functions, such as WIN, MAX, 
SUm, AUG, LOG, etc. There are 3D of these 
formula functions, which include table 
lookup capability and DATE manipulation. 



Both 1-2-3 and VIZASTAR have database 
management processes. To the user, VIZASTAR 
looks more like a dedicated database 
program, rather than just another way to 
manipulate data contained in a spreadsheet. 
Record layout can be designed and 
manipulated without direct reference to the 
underlying spreadsheet, which is what is 
really doing the work. 

The graphics displays, both on-screen and 
printed, are superior to any other I've 
seen. Several varieties of bar and pie 
charts are available. 

While the documentation is somewhat less 
comprehensive that LOTUS it's adequate. With 
any powerful spreadsheet or integrated 
program, a lot of practice is needed tD 
master the full range of capabilities, and 
VIZASTAR is no exception. 



VIZASTAR would do 



anything 



I found that 

1-2-3 could, and then some. It's my 
Commodore choice to become the standard 
against which the others will be judged. 



Note: Mr, Miller is a computer instructor in 
□cala, FL and teaches LOTUS 1-2-3. He was 
also a major contributor to The Small 
Business Guide To The Comnodore 64 by Don 
Vande venter. 




|l»IWl«f II II I llll !!■■!■ I 

(Till 





Dg: Tea salamone 




Almost since the inception of the modern computer 
engineers have been trying to develop the right 
combination of software and hardware; the one that 
would both produce and recognize human speech. 

The major drawback to designing the needed 
algorithms and devices is the complexity of 
mankind's utterances. Not only are there millions of 
words in hundreds of languages; the technical types 
also have to deal with local accents and personal 
inflection. Also, there are many times when a 
specific word can be understood (by humans & 
computers alike) only because of the context in 
which it is used. 

The technical challenges notwithstanding, both 
speech (voice) synthesis and recognition are now 
coming into their own. Numerous design teams have 
spent, and are continuing to spend, untold hours 
refining and advancing the most promising methods, 
while it's true that the major advances are made on 
hardware costing megabucks, the nuts and bolts of 
the research soon trickle down to end users equipped 
with nothing more than mere ( 1 ) home computers like 
the still unequalled Commodore 64. 

First of all, computer speech can be approached from 
two different angles, the rule or the analysis 
method. In the former, a set of phonetic guidelines 
directs pronunciation; while the latter plays back 
digitally recorded vocabulary when required. 

The first approach is by far the more flexible of 
the two, though the results are somewhat less than 
optimum.,. -Often words are reproducible (or can be 
understood) only after repeated exposures (training, 
as it's known in the business). On the other hand, 
synthesis by analysis creates amazingly lifelike 
speech. The main problem, and the reason it s not 
the more prevalent method, is that it requires 
massive amounts of memory. Personal computers wit 
64K or less just don't have what it takes, 
meager amount of memory would be gone in a flash, 
leaving room for nothing else. Now, that's not my 
idea of a fun program. 



Besides the obvious need for hardware and software 
development knowledge, synthesis/recognition 
developers need to understand the basic structure 
underlying all human languages, allopnones. These 
universal phonetic symbols are to human languages 
what zeros and ones are to computer languages, 
allophones recognize no barriers; utilizing the full 
range of symbols you could create computer speech 
(or recognition capabilities) in any dialect of any 
language ever spoken, currently spoken, and 
(probably) any yet to be spoken! 

Before we discuss the pros and cons of specific 
haroViare and software I'd like to provide you with a 
little background on the more esoteric of the two 
subjects covered in this article, speech 
recognition. This procedure allows a computer to 
identify (and act upon) words which the system is 
trained to understand. It's somewhat like teaching 
your pet collie to fetch the evening paper. It is 
not to be confused with verification procedures 
where computers are used for security, giving people 
access to information or locations based on a match 
between preprogrammed voice data and "live" samples 
of the same words or phrases. Speech recognition is 
concerned with what was spoken, verification with 
the person behind the sound. 

Recognition procedures can be broadly classed 
accordingly: speaker dependent, speaker independent, 
discreet utterance or continuous utterance. Each 
method has its pluses and its minuses. 

Speaker dependent systems need to be trained to 
acknowledge particular words from a particular 
speaker. Repeated input of the same word allows the 
computer to average the samples, theoretically 
permitting greater recognition accuracy. Just resist 



@2BflMM£ 




the urge to do 
system! On the 
systems understa 
spoken by the ma 
great, but there 
These systems 
manufacturer in 
Secondly, the v 
severely limited 
situations where 
factories, milit 



imitations while cranking up the 
other hand, speaker independent 

nd a preselected set of words as 

jority of the population. Sounds 
are flies in this ointment too! 

can only be "trained" by the 

his factory at considerable expense. 

ocabulary of any such system is 
in scope. They are most useful in 
single word commands can be issued, 

ary installations, etc. 



The discrete versus continuous matter merely 
addresses how much time is needed between each word 
far proper recognition. With a discrete (think 
digital) system you must speak in a slightly stilted 
manner as a pause (we're talking milliseconds here) 
is required between each utterance. Continuous 
(analog) recognition permits more realistic/lifelike 
input, though it will cost you a pretty penny to 
achieve. One thing's for sure, it won't be around 
for the 64 until those recently announced 20 and 80 
meg hard drives become staple items. 

Today's market for Commodore 64 speech synthesis is 
divided into software only and software/special 
hardware offerings. The software only side of the 
coin utilizes the 64 's internal SID chip. The 
combination approach makes use of an additional 
piece of hardware specifically designed to improve 
upon SID's capabilities or to provide ones it (he ?) 
can]t supply. Simple enough. The software side is 
divided into mass marketed and second party (do it 
yourself) programs; of which the latter are 
primarily written for specific pieces of hardware 
like Votrax's Type 'n' Talk or their Personal Speech 
System. There is actually quite a variety of 
commercial software which will make a micro speak 
without hardware. Most of it runs on the Commodore 
64, mainly because of its aforementioned dedicated 
synthesis chip. 

ftjse has been at the forefront here; when adapting 
their smash Apple hit (Castle litolfenstein) to the 
64, they added voice output. This is probably the 
first example of speech synthesis (in a foreign 
language) on a home computer! Nazis bark ten 
different statements, including "Achtung!" and 
"Kaputt". The normally harsh intonation associated 
with software driven synthesis only adds to the 
flavor, for German is a very guttural language. 
Remember that "Kamerad". While Fluse repeated their 
feat in the sequel, Beyond Castle Molfenstein, their 
greatest verbal achievement is, without a doubt, 
Space Taxi. This game offers the clearest, crispest 
voice this side of Michael Jackson. A soprano-like 
voice hails cabs (Taxi, hey taxi!) and gives 
directions to gamers by stating the desired 
destination (as in "Pad 5, please."). 



Another leading software firm, Tronix, offers an 
educational game entitled Chatterbee. It's a 
computerized spelling bee where the target word is 
pronounced singly, then in the context of a simple 
sentence. As responses are typed in, each letter is 
read aloud. Completely software driven, it uses 
procedures developed by Don't Ask Software. As with 
most of its competition, careful attention must be 
paid to it, for some of the words are difficult to 
comprehend at first. 

S.A.PI. (Software Automatic Mouth), also by the Don't 
Ask/Tronix team, is a voice synthesis utility 
program. With it, budding programmers can easily add 
speech to their own masterpieces. While not a game 
in its own right, it has been used in several, and 
is responsible (to no small degree) for the 
heightened awareness of the availability and quality 
of inexpensive voice synthesis software for the home 
market. The audio output from this program rivals 
that from any of the special hardware devices 
discussed later in this article. 

The hardware side of the universe is, without a 
doubt, a more expensive proposition. Without 
software telling them what to do however, these 
devices are nothing but mute testimony to the art of 
making plastic from the remains of long dead 
reptiles. 

One of the more readily available, and affordable, 
speech synthesizers is the Alien Group's Voice 
Box. This tiny wonder also works with computers 
other than the Commodore 64. A nice touch is its 
inherent ability to sing. While it will never be a 
feature soloist at the Met, it does add charm and 
whimsy to synthesis, an output that has historically 
been considered cruel, harsh and mechanical. (Just 
think of all the mock synthetic voices that issued 
forth from alien devices and robots in B movies done 
in the Fifties!). Whether you write your own 
software (using the demo program for suggestions), 
or purchase the singing software package entitled 
When I'm 64, the Voice Box will amaze. 

A rudimentary graphics editor allows you to change 
an on-screen sing-along face which mimes the words 
spewing from the speaker. With some tweaking here 
and there you might get the lips to move with the 
words, or perhaps even turn it into a portrait of 
the most handsome/beautiful person you know 
yourself! (What an ego you must have!). 




a 







continued. 



The machine, which plugs into the user port, is 
sturdily constructed, is compact in design, and is 
supported by its manufacturer. Besides a volume 
switch and an external speaker jack (eighth of an 
inch), the Box also has a unique pitch dial for 
direct manual control of that ever so important 
function. Putting it through its paces speeds up or 
slows down the output, making words run the gamut 
from bass to soprano in one quick hurry. 

Though its manuals, and those of compatible software 
from Alien, are a chore to decipher, they offer 
valuable tips and insight on how to achieve the 
device's maximum potential. Be prepared for unclear 
sentence structure, typos, and the look of second or 
third rate printed matter. While this ancillary 
material is important, it doesn't lessen the value 
or considerable capabilities Df the machine itself. 
A little TLC will go a long way with the Voice Box. 
Recomended. 

Mewer, less expensive, and intended strictly for the 
Conmodore 64 we have Commodore's own Magic Voice 
Speech Module. This unit, which plugs into the 64 's 
cartridge port, works with special carts as well as 
user written programs in BASIC or assembly language. 
When operating under second party software control 
it produces a pleasing female voice. Its 
preprogrammed library of 235 utterances is too small 
for any serious work however. Another problem is the 
need to repeatedly issue the BASIC command SAY for 
each spoken word. Luckily, the former problem will 
all but disappear when (if) additional (disk based) 
vocabularies hit the market. To alleviate the other, 
learn assembly fast. 

Currently Commodore sells four compatible carts, 
Magic Desk I, A Bee C's, Gorf, and Wizard of War. 
The last two titles make good use of the 
synthesizer's exceptional range by spewing forth a 
variety of threats, warnings, and insults. This 
output appears to be more random in the Wizard than 
in Gorf, where some of the statements are heard only 
after certain conditions are met. Either way, the 
speech (in a voice befitting each scenario) adds new 
freshness and enjoyment to these old standards. 
"Beware, you are now in a Warlord Dungeon!". "Some 
galactic defender you are Space Cadet I 

I didn't have a copy of Magic Desk I on hand for 
this review so I can't discuss the pros and cons of 
its speech synthesis features. Some users have found 
it to be a practical icon-based office management 
tool without verbalization, so (with any luck at 
all) the added vocals will only improve its 

usefulness. Commodore's A Bee C's is an educational 
product which, unfortunately falls into the same 
untested category as Magic Desk I. 




speech hardware 




A: 
,B: 

D: 

[E: 



Voice Master 
Magic voice 
Alien Voice Boxf 
Recognizer 
Voice Messenger! 



Just by the head count above you can see that the 
device is not heavily supported. (There are no third 
party products whatsoever!). There haven't been any 
recent compatible software releases and, worse than 
that, the additional text libraries are nowhere to 
be found. This seeming lack of support is more the 
pity because the device itself is solidly built and 
a bargain at its (widely) discounted price. Its 
covered, spring loaded cartridge port is designed to 
prolong the life (and goad health) of your 
investment. RCA input and output jacks make it 
possible for you to connect it to any number of 
external audio devices. (I run all my audio through 
a Panasonic RX-F3 AM FN stereo cassette for some 
awesome audio output. The $120. OD (list price) 
portable unit has built in RCA jacks, a one eighth 
inch (micro) headphone jack, two internal condensor 
mikes and operates on 6 "C" batteries or a 
(provided) plug in power supply). 

Last but not least, the 26 page manual is logically 
organized, easy to read, and full of useful 
information. If Commodore makes a more meaningful 
commitment, then by all means add the Magic Voice 
Speech Nodule to your system. 




in 



QUI 



y— ^ — — ■■ —■ — ram .. 



®2R&M*Jut=& 



AVViViVtvWiVi\ , iVi 1 i , i l 




Our next entrant in the synthesis sweepstakes has 
journeyed 'crass the Atlantic from Jolly Ole 
England. Having set up an American base of 
operations in Massachusetts, Currah Technology (and 
its Voice Ptessenger Speech 64) are set to take on 
all comers. 



'Mm** 





A compact device not much larger than a standard 
game cartridge, the VPI operates from the 64 's 
expansion port. A 5 pin DIN connector on a short 
lead emerges from the backside. Thanks to a supplied 
adaptor cable you can hook it up to a monitor or 
your home TV. using a monitor with its own audio 
capabilities you can then direct the speech through 
your stereo. 

Judging this device by its size is a mistake for it 
packs quite a punch. (Reminded me Df David against 
Goliath). Once the cart's plugged in and the 64 's 
fired up, a keyboard voice mode takes over. Pressing 
any key (9B# of them anyway) produces vocal output 
identifying the selected key. Hit RETURN and you'll 
hear "return"; press ± and you'll hear "pound". 
Don't wait for a cockney accent however, it's not 
there. The Voice messenger offers something better 
instead, two easy to access voices. One's high 
pitched, the other low. Male and female if you 
please, though they're never referred to in that 
manner. 

As with every function offered, the voices can be 
programmed in BASIC or machine language. Five 
commands are added to BASIC when the system is 
running, though machine language expands your 
horizons even farther. You just need the additional 
language experience to tap in. 

Like the other devices, allophones can be used 
instead Df plain English to create speech, while 
non-vocalized characters are inserted to control 
intonation and inflection, allophones once again 
produce the best output. 

A 256 character speech buffer is standard, enough 
space for approximately twenty five seconds of 
computerized chatter. Its secrets are unlocked in 
the small yet comprehensive manual accompanying the 
likewise diminutive yet powerful hardware portion. 
The manual concludes with a sample program, the 
additional BASIC commands and a 
decimal/hex/allophone conversion table. The latter 
is quite valuable indeed. 

Despite its recent arrival on our shores, the Voice 
Ptessenger already has picked up some third party 
software support. (Pay particular attention to the 
programs mentioned under the R.I.S.T. portion of 
this article). I like this onet 



The next two machines come from the same stable, 
Votrax. Both are sleekly styled units which emulate 
printers as far as the 64 is concerned. The Type 'N 
Talk has an RS-232 serial interface, while the newer 
device, the Personal Speech System (PSS), has both 
serial and parallel ports. Ready made, Commodore 
specific interface cables are available from Votrax, 
making installation a snap. Naturally, you must pay 
extra for them! 

Neither unit comes with any software, though most 

programs with output to a printer work just fine. 

For example, adventuring takes on new meaning when 
play by play commentary has been added. 

Infocom's Witness, Infidel, and Cutthroats, etc. go 
one step beyond the usual. As a matter of fact, the 
entire series works with the Type 'N Talk. They also 
work with the PSS, though this isn't specifically 
mentioned in the manual. The speech makes you feel 
safer, better able to handle the dangers that lurk 
ahead because it seems as if there's really a 
companion at your side. 

These machines probably produce the best speech 
(S.A.P1. is close though) of all the items reviewed 
here. At just under $200 for the T-'N-T and $395 for 
the PSS they should. (The latter also has numerous 
other capabilities, including generation of musical 
notes). 

There are hardware devices available now which can 
create more lifelike speech than either, but they 
cost 9 to 10 times as much as the Personal Speech 
System alone. Thus, for affordability and 
performance, the PSS is near unbeatable. Let's 
out why. 



find 



Votrax has opted for broad horizons as they've based 
its workings on the synthesis by rule system. 
They've also managed to include a number of 
non-speech functions in the PSS, most of which are 
related to musical output. While there's plenty for 
novices to sink their teeth into, advanced 
computerists will find it exciting too. The 
combination of expandable onboard ROM, Z-80 software 
download capabilities, and an SC-01 phoneme (read 
allophone) synthesizer chip allows the PSS to 
operate in conjunction with modems. 





nil §t" 





mM& 



mmi 



continued. 



Besides the parallel and serial interfaces (one 
each) standard features include a 3500 character 
buffer and an internal speaker. The rear panel 
sports an 1/8" external speaker jack (Walkman type 
headphones work, though the output is strictly 
mono), a 5 pin DIN power connector, an on/off push 
button switch, and eight configuration dip switches. 
The volume control knob and a power-up red LED are 
located on the front panel 
metal case. The PSS, with a 
weighs in at a mere 2.6 
portable! 



of the sleekly styled 

12.25" x 5.2" footprint, 

pounds. It's actually 



A vinyl clad, three ring mini manual contains system 
particulars as well as operating commands and user 
instructions. A separate quick reference card and 
Phonetic Speech Dictionary round out the paperwork. 
The main manual, though generally well organized and 
all encompassing, does present some pitfalls for 
first time users. The examples for non-speech output 
are listed in the context of speech creation as far 
as programming (BASIC) conventions are concerned, 
but nowhere is this plainly stated. Just remember to 
include PRINT commands and both sets of quotes 
whenever you want any audible output. Since the 
device is purchased without software users either 
write their own or run commercial proqrams which 
output to a printer. (Computers think the PSS is a 
printer. See, they can be fooledl) 

Once beyond startup there is an air of excitement 
about using the PSS. Exploring and experimenting 
with its many functions is an outrageous experience. 
Delving into the speech functions can be 
particularly captivating. 

For speech data the PSS accepts text or phonetic 
input. Inflection, amplitude, and rate of 
verbalization are all independently controllable. 
The non-speech functions include music, sound 
effects (white noise is possible), customized 
alarms, and a programmable clock. Until you learn 
the command structure (it really shouldn't take 
long), the reference card comes in very handy. 
Normal English text can be spoken if it's programmed 
like output to a printer: 

20 PRINT "Vatrax does it right." 

30 PRINT "It took me two hours to write this 

program." 

Don't overlook the use of Phonemes either. The SC-01 
synthesis chip contains 64 of these language 
building blocks. {Think of them as atoms.) Proper 
combinations of these mighty mites is all it takes 
to create speech. The phonetic sequences are input 
as standard ASCII characters. Approximately 1400 
English words and their phonetic equivalents are in 
the Speech Dictionary. Couple this knowledge with 
the phoneme to ASCII table in the reference card and 
you're set. Phonemes permit crisper speech and 
(usually) faster response time as the data doesn't 
have to be translated prior to output. 



Non-alphabetic, printable ASCII characters serve as 
command and control characters. Among these are the 
question mark and exclamation point. Others, ($, S, 
i) are treated as spoken punctuation marks. This 
organized structure seems to cover all the bases. 

The Personal Speech System is actually a misleading 
moniker because of the ease with which it generates 
musical tones. Capable of reproducing 96 notes, 
sporting three sound channels, and able to handle 
user selectable duration it is useful as a companion 
piece to the 64' s SID chip. For example, note A#2 
on channel two would look like this: 

20 PRINT "!2230." 

Though simple to do, the results can be simply 
fascinating! 

The programmable clock feature is useful for many 
tasks, including incorporation of alarms into custom 
programs. Once set, an easy process by the way, the 
Automatic Time Annunciator chimes every quarter 
hour, with or without voice. This can be a real 
lifesaver for hackers who tend to forget about the 
rest of the world. (For some reason wives don't 
appreciate being picked up an hour late just because 
you have a new toy to play with.) Alarms!, they're 
another matter altogether. Users can not only set 
from one to eight at a time, they can even add text 
statements for output at the specified time(s). 
Message size is limited only by the amount of 
available memory. These prompts can be made to 
address a wide range of situations in the home or on 
the job. 

The inflection, rate , and amplitude commands fine 
tune the verbal output of any words or phrases they 
precede, ("lore lifelike speech can be created through 
skilled combinations of these parameters. A little 
practice is all it takes. 

Other commands allow computerists to change the baud 
rate, in predetermined steps, from 75 to 9600 bps, 
create an amplitude envelope for non-speech 
generation, and alter filter settings for various 
voice and sound effects. The envelope feature is 
particularly complete as users can define the attack 
and decay rates as well as the sustain and release 
levels of any of the three channels. There's even an 
attack delay option! 

Z-80 code can be loaded and executed with just a few 
keystrokes, pronunciation exceptions likewise. 
Prompts (toned down alarms), noise generation, and 
tempo are some Df the other easy to master features. 
Most of these can be made more flexible by the wait 
(delay execution) command. The true depth of the PSS 
isn't readily apparent, it takes time to discover 
its true colors. Advanced users can redefine 
pre-set characters (like % and &) or allocate memory 
in 256 byte blacks while anyone can perform warm 
starts or quit execution through software control. 





a 



BIS- 



=EE5Er=EEEEEEEEEEE§§ 




iSm 

^¥^ 



Numerous appendices provide information ranging from 
adjusted spelling examples (elocution exceptions) 
and a phoneme conversion chart to error code 
listings and a musical note chart. Cable wiring 
diagrams, dip switch settings, and programming 
samples (in BASIC) for various computers are also 
included. Default settings, Z-80 memory and 
input/output maps, and a hex to decimal conversion 
listing pretty much round out these tables. 

There's more to the PSS than I can possibly squeeze 
into this critique. Suffice it to say that 
application of your time and effort can yield big 
results. You can even program it to pat you on the 
back for a job well done. Just try that with your 
boss or teacher I Using the Personal Speech System 
has been an enjoyable, educational experience. Its 
uses are bounded only by your imagination. Certainly 
the new worlds it opens for the visually impaired 
cannot be overlooked. 

The Type N' Talk provides the same high quality 
speech synthesis output as the PSS, though it does 
not have the extended musical and alarm features of 
its bigger brother. The 3500 character buffer and 
the modem download features aren't included either. 
However, the same phonetic synthesis by rule 
algorithms are employed, the SC-01 and Z-80 chips 
are present, and front mounted frequency and volume 
dials are provided for quick and easy adjustment. 
Tho its design is a little less inspiring than that 
of the PSS, the T N" T is still compact and 
streamlined. 

Now that we've covered synthesis only software and 
hardware we'll move on to two devices which go one 
step_ beyond - voice recognition. Though their 
physical appearances are dissimilar they work in the 
same manner. However, the fruits of their labors are 
different. 



First out of the batter's box is Couox's Voice 
Plaster, a device actually smaller than the floppy 
disk supplied with it. Besides the "magic" box 
itself, purchasers of the Voice Plaster receive 
cables for TV or monitor hookup and a no-hands, 
combination microphone/headset that fits snugly 
around one's head, freeing your hands for other 
duties. The advantage to this setup is more 
accurate, consistent recording quality. That's 
right gang, the VN must be trained before it will 
recognize words. Several banks of words can be 
stored, altered, or otherwise manipulated with just 
a few keystrokes; once you've waded through the 
horrendously organized, prepared and written manual. 



5etup and connection is rather straightforward. Even 
the units which must be calibrated (like mine), can 
be up and running quickly. The calibration is no big 
deal, a sliver of aluminum is supplied to reach into 
the box for fine tuning; a program on the disk aids 
you in finding the correct setting, {it will take 
you longer to read about the adjustment than it will 
take you to do it). 

The vocabularies created with Voice Plaster can be 
imbedded in your Dwn BASIC or machine language 
programs though the instructions on how to 
accomplish this feat leave something to be desired. 
The additional BASIC commands permit you to alter 
the playback speed, change sampling rate density 
(bits per second), manipulate amplitude level, and 
blank out the screen. All speech data can be cleared 
(without affecting the application program) with the 
CLEAR command. Besides the record and playback 
instructions, the unit's programs provide the 
wherewithal to save or load files to disk or tape. 
There is even a turbo load feature, but it doesn't 
function unless certain hardware parameters are met. 

Additional information is provided in the form of 
memory locations for specific placement of the 
device's main controlling program. Unless you're 



really into substantial 
will read like so much 
beneath the convoluted 
otherwise twisted means 
appears to be some solid 



programming the material 
gobbledygook. Somewhere 
operating system and 

of doing business there 
substance to the Voice 



Plaster. Because of the poor set of instructions 
you'll spend an inordinate amount of time trying to 
find nuggets in the stream. 

Cutting through all the preliminary nitpicking, 
let's move an to the acid test, quality of the voice 
reproduction. Through the supplied headset the 
playback was tinny and hollow sounding. Figuring the 
problem was the inexpensive equipment pressed 
against my temples I ran the audio through my 
reliable Panasonic. This actually verified the poor 
reproductive qualities I'd endured before. Though I 
didn't scientifically measure it, the S/N (signal to 
noise) ratio was incredibly high. Repeated uses 
yielded the same results. This device really needs 
Dolby, B and C by the sound of it I 

Summing up the Covox entrant I found middle Df the 
road construction (it plugs into the joystick port), 
woefully inadequate documentation, overcomplicated 
ways to perform simple tasks, and the worst output 
of all the devices and software reviewed for this 
article. 





OTTlJ- 





MM&: 



gj@HB 



continued. . 



Yet there's hope for 64 owners yearning for speech 
recognition. Relief, in this instance, is spelled 
R.I.S.T (Research in Speech Technology). Their 
Recognizer device is as small, if not more so, than 
Covox's; yet it beats the West Coast entry in every 
category. 

The manual, while it won't win any aesthetic awards, 
is head and shoulders above Covox s. The information 
is presented in a logical manner, the flow building 
on fundamentals before delving into the heart of the 

issue. The author, fir. Steven Veltri, even takes the 
time out to provide a mini-primer on the different 
approaches to speech recognition. The additional 
information promotes good will and piques the user's 
curiosity that much more. {Perhaps he's trying to 
get you to buy his computer oriented speech books; 
they re listed in the manual's preface). 

Installation and setup is a snap. Speaking into the 
unit's built in microphone can be a hassle though. 
Luckily any mike with a one eighth inch male plug 
fits into the front mounted jack. There's also an 
RCA jack for external output to a monitor, stereo Dr 
TV. Ruggedly constructed Df heavy gauge steel, The 
Recognizer appears built to last. Unfortunately 
there is a contradiction here, a board mounted chip 
lies at the end of a ribbon cable protruding from 
the rear casing. This fragile arrangement negates 
the "tank-like construction of the main unit. Be 
careful when handling the card, even if you're not 
inserting or removing it from the cartridge slot. 

Besides the ability to interface with your own BASIC 
or machine language routines, The Recognizer works 
with canned software like those produced by Infocom. 
Instead of reading the on-screen descriptions as the 
Votrax units do, RIST's device activates the 
adventure according to vocalized commands. Of course 
you have to train the vocabulary, a bit difficult to 
do before knowing all the valid commands in a new 
adventure. On the other hand, most text adventures 
have a core of similar commands (take, inventory, 
directional statements, etc.) so typing time and 
effort can still be reduced. The supplied disk has a 
resident Zork I vocabulary. All you have to do is 
train it. 

Let's take a detour for a moment. It's possible 
(with a switch selectable cartridge expansion slot 
like the SmartSlot from Progressive Peripherals 4 
Software) to have The Recognizer operational, an 
Infocom game loaded, and Currah's Voice Messenger 
working, all at once! This means you can have the 
Voice Messenger read the location settings and 
descriptions while the Recognizer accepts your audio 
input I lilhat a may to party! 



Mow back to more mundane (?) matters. In addition 
everything mentioned already, The Recognizer's 
software enables disk access (save/load), buffering, 
file linking, and entry creation, erasure, and 
editing. Though this is an impressive list in its 
own right, there's even more. 

I could probably go on about The Recognizer until 
you were ready to retire so I'll cut it short by 
simply stating, "Job well done, RI5T". 
Before I wrap this up, there is one thing I promised 
you, mention of third party software for Currah's 
Voice Messenger. RIST makes a program called Easy 
Speech (formerly Advanced Text-to-Speech) . It 
supports adventure games and home made software 
equally well. Text strings or single words can be 
entered, edited and saved for future use. Allophones 
are displayed on-screen as characters are typed. 
With a flick of the wrist the decimal values for the 
Allophones can be displayed, an easy way to produce 
data statements for your BASIC programs. Though the 
edit procedure is a little uncommon, a few minutes 
with the keyboard is all you'll need to become a 
pro. The program resides in normally untouched 
memory areas so it can be active even when you're 
not developing speech synthesis text. It easily 
accepts text from any source, the serial bus, 
keyboard, screen, tape deck, disk drive, printer or 
modem. The modem feature works only if the optional 
Talking Terminal Software program is also loaded. (A 
copy of this was not supplied so I hadn't the 
opportunity to review it). 

There are other features to be found, some standard, 
some not so standard. Easy Speech is a nicely 
executed, well documented program; a perfect match 
for the workhorse Voice Messenger, 

So, where does all this leave us? For the time being 
youcan add another sensory experience to adventure 
gaming or to programs born through your own time and 
toil. In a humanitarian vein you can develop 
routines beneficial to the blind. The huge installed 
base of the 64 makes this one of the best 
applications possible for speech synthesis and 
recognition. 

That's fine far now, but what does the future of 
this leading edge technology hold for us? Several 
things, as you're about to learn. 



G& 










continued. 



As the technological barriers crumble under the R & 
D onslaught there will be low cost speaker 
independent systems available which understand 
continuous speech. Already there are at least two, 
if you're prepared to spend hefty bucks for 
specialized equipment. With the continual drop in 
the price of memory, these advances will find their 
way to the 64 or its descendant (s) . Voice activated 
typewriters and word processors are high on the 
development list. Just imagine how much the market 
for these products will expand when people with 
little, no, or poor typing skills can manipulate 
them easier than current high speed typists can. 
lilell, there goes typing class in every high school 
across the land! The military applications are as 
endless as they are mind boggling. Probably the only 
advance beyond vocal input would be direct machine 
control through a mind link I 

There are probably as many uses as there are 
permutations to every whole number in existence, 
□nly time will tell just what applications the power 
of computers will bring to this exciting technology. 
Perhaps you will be the one to design the ultimate 
breakthrough or suggest the be-all, end-all use. 




BRIAN ft«[>mfiN-"* 




f 




is£D^£S^ 



TE^niNAL ILLMESS 



A Bee C'S 

Gorf 

Magic Voice Speech Module 

Magic Desk I 

Wizard of liter 

Commodore Business Machines 

1200 Wilson Drive 

West Chester, PA. 19380 



Alien Voice Box 
When I'M 64 

The Alien Group 

27 West 23rd Street 

New York, New York 10010 



The Personal Speech System 
Type N' Talk 

Votrax 

500 Stephenson Highway 
Troy, Michigan 4B084 



Beyond Castle Wolfenstein 
Castle Wolfenstein 
Space Taxi 

Muse Software 

347 N. Charles Street 

Baltimore, M0 21201 



Chatterbee 

S.A.B. (Software Automatic Mouth) 

Tronix 

B925 South La Cienga Blud. 

Inglewood, CA 90301 



The Voice Bessenger 

Currah Technology 
50 Milk Street 
15th Floor 
Boston, f!A 02109 



Voice Plaster 

Covox Inc. 

675-D Conger Street 

Eugene, OR 97402 



Easy Speech 
The Recognizer 

R.I.S.T. (Research in Speech Tech.) 

P.O. Box 499 

Fort Hamilton Parkway 

Brooklyn, New York 11209 




[\i\ZL 



s 





* » 

EE AiSElitltS 



bjj Hark Brown 




7f 



W 




Assembly language programming can be a very 
rewarding or a very frustrating experience. The 
programs you produce using assembly language will be 
as fast and compact as it is passible for computer 
programs to be, if you have written them well. On 
the other hand, assembly language requires an 
intimate understanding of not only assembly syntax, 
but of the inner workings of your computer. (see 
related article last issue.) 

Most of your positive or negative feelings about 
assembly language will come from your experiences 
with the editor/assembler package you use. Some 
assemblers are powerful and friendly, and some are 
almost useless. Of course, most fall somewhere in 
between. What makes a good assembler? There are 
three things to look for: 

1 ) The editor should have most of the features of a 
good word processor for maximum flexibility. The 
best will allow for free-format input of code with 
automatic formatting of the output for clarity. It 
should print to the screen, printer, or as a 
word-processor compatible file to disk. And, it 
should allow you to link files together for editing. 

2) The assembler should provide for all the 
standard mnemonics, obviously. But it should also 
allow imbedded assembler directives, to give you 
flexibility to assemble to memory or to disk, to 
link files together, and to perform conditional 
assemblies (in which some code is only generated 
depending on certain predefined circumstances). 
Macro definitions should also be supported. This 
allows you to define much-used portions of code only 
once and assemble them by name. The number of 
labels allowed should be large, and the assembler 
should be capable of generating relocatable code, so 
you can reposition your finished program in memory 
if need be. It would also be nice if a disassembler 
were included, so you could include previously 
written machine code in your assembly programs. 

3) Last, but not least, the documentation should be 
thorough and accurate, with an index to help you 
find facts faast, and examples to get you started. 
The disk should also contain the manual's examples 
and a predefined macro library for such things as 
input and output routines and math functions that 
you can use in your own programs. 

And it would be nice if all of these things existed 
in memory at once, along with a good monitor program 
and the DDS wedge, so you wouldn't have to keep 
swapping programs back and forth. Of course, this 
ideal system does not exist, so we'll take a look 
at three popular "real-world" assembler/editors. 



display 
inside 
syntax 
proper 

control 



Gloucester Computer Company's Codefax assembler is 
the newest of the three we'll look at. It was 
developed to support the company's Pronqueen eprom 
burner, but is also promoted as being more user 
friendly than traditional assemblers for program 
development. It's true that the columnar 
format makes it easy to see what's going on 
the computer, and the one-line-at-a-time 
checking could be helpful in learning 
assembler syntax. However, the number of 
keystrokes one must learn to control display, data 
entry, and assembler modes may overwhelm first-time 
users. The tight affinity between the code entered 
and workspace memory also makes it difficult to 
insert modifications, though this can be done by 
moving code around. There is no support of 
conditionals or macros or any other advanced 
assembler functions, either. You can't even include 
comments! The excellent disk support is one of the 
few real plusses of this package; even such 
esoterics as block-reads and executes are supported. 
In the long run, however, I'm afraid that all 
Codefax turns out to be is a fancy machine code 
monitor that supports address labels. As a 
monitor/eprom burner support package Codefax may 
work, but it is not powerful enough to qualify as a 
true assembler/editor. 



3. 



Most of gour positive 
or negative feelings 
ah out assembly language 
will come from gour 
experiences with tne 
editor/asseraoler pacKage 
gou use. 



The other two assemblers we'll examine, Pal and HAE, 
are tried-and-true veterans. Both have come up to 
the C64 from various incarnations on the Commodore 
PET series of computers. Most of the Commodore 
"old-timers" use one or both of these two 
assemblers. 





■ ■ 


1 GLOUCESTER COMPUTER 1 C 


-64 I 


:DDEFAX 6502 1 


[ BV i TEVE 


BOLQER | 


CDPYRIBHT 1983 1 


1FFE 




00 




BRK 




1FFF 




00 




BRK 




2^«l 
2.' 1 


2000 


A9 




LDA 


#*04 


2001 


04 








2002 


2'«2 
2.*.3 


BD 




STA 


SCRNCLR 


2003 


21 








2004 


2004 


3] 








2005 


2005 




RTS 




2006 


2006 


A9 


TBTPROG 


LDA 


•»>TSTPR06 


2007 


2007 


FF 


4 






200S 


200B 


4B 


PHA 




2009 


2009 


09 




LDA 


#*<TSTPROG-l 


200A 


200A 


FF 




5 




200B 


200B 


20 




JSR 


TSTPRQG-6 


200C 


200C 


FF 






6 


200D 


200D 


FF 






200E 
r— lOt 


200E 


00 


*» 


BRK 




(A/'yftlE | ORIGIN 


END A1°. 3FFF 1 


7 LINK DDE 


END at: 


ENDCDE C2100 

J 



The Pal assembler was written by Brad Tenpleton in 
1979 and is distributed for all Commodore computers 
by Canada's Pro-line Software, which also markets 
the Power basic utility and the Uordpro 64 word 
processor. Pal is relocatable and takes up only 4k 
of memory. It supports free-format entry of cods 
with comments, conditional assembly, and many 
assembler options. It can link files for assembly 
and store code in memory or to disk files. It also 
allows for coresident BASIC and assembly (in the 
same filet), which allows you to write BASIC 
programs with callable machine code subroutines. 
(This is the application where Pal outshines all the 
others: if you are adding machine code to BASIC 
programs.) The Supermen machine code monitor is 
included on the disk, and the two of them can 
comfortably co-reside in memory along with the DOS 
wedge, though the wedge is not supplied. The disk 
includes a relocating loader also, as well as some 
sample programs and a disassembler (the disassembler 
is undocumented, so good luck). The only major 
feature missing from Pal is macro definitions. You 
will not miss this at first, but later on you might. 
The editor is the major weakness of Pal: it has 
none! Believe it or not, you have to use the C64's 
built-in BASIC editor. The best way to comfortably 
edit a source file is to use Pal in conjunction with 
Pro-line's Power support package. This adds 
word-processor type search and replace features, 
auto line numbering, and all the other editing 
amenities you will wish you had otherwise. 
Unfortunately, this doubles your cost. But together 
they make a powerful package, and Power can be used 
by itself to make BASIC program entry more 
tolerable, too. The documentation included with Pal 
is decent, and tells you lots about how Pal works. 
It will not, however, teach the novice how to 
program in assembly language. Prior knowledge of 
assembly is assumed. All in all, Pal is a very good 
investment, especially in conjunction with Power 
(they are available together as a packaqe called 
Toolbox B4). 



Carl Noser's PHAE (macro assembler/editor) is a 
classic assembler package, and besides being 
available for all Commodore machines is also 
marketed for Atari and Apple II. This gives you a 
degree of source code portability among those 
machines. The box proclaims "used by more 
programmers than any other assembler!", which may 
well be true. RAE gives you co-resident DCS 
support, monitor, editor/assembler, and word 
processor capabilities, and you can easily jump back 
and forth from one to another. All are better than 
the usual comparable packages. The DOS support 
allows for standard wedge commands plus two-stroke 
load-and-run, cold-start, and warm-start of all WAE 
modules. The monitor gives you all the basics plus 
base conversions and offset calculations. 
(Complaint: the other Commodore versions include 
trace with breakpoints and single-step capabilities, 
and I see no reason why the 64 version couldn't have 
had these features, too.) The word processor has 

all the standard commands, plus it will justify, 
allow format shape definitions (print your copy in 
the shape of a Christmas tree, for example), and let 
you run machine code routines (for things like fancy 
printer control codes or font downloading) from 
within the text. The assembler supports macros 
(hence the name), conditional assembly, and lots of 
assembly options. Files can be linked for assembly, 
and source files can be appended for editing. There 
are many useful sample files on the disk, and a 
relocating loader is provided. The manual is 
complete, albeit a bit hard to find your way around 
in ("getting started" is on page 53!). There is 
good phone support (evenings only) and a user's 
group, and updates are only $10 (a 65C02 version is 
in the works). There is no unassembler, but the 
user's group has one available (without 
documentation) on one of many inexpensive support 
disks. The manual assumes some knowledge, but the 
PIAE package is a complete assembly language 
development system that you will never outgrow. 

There are dozens of assemblers on the market, and 
all of them will allow you to produce executable 
machine code programs from assembly language. It is 
the features and ease of use that seperate the 
really useful packages from the ones that will make 
you throw up your hands and abandon assembly 
language before you have given it a fair trial. 
Hake sure the assembler/editor you buy is one you 
can live with. 



Codefax $69. Q0 

Gloucester Computer Co. Inc. 
1 Blackburn Ctr. 
Gloucester, MA 01930 

Pal $49.95 (with power as toolbox B4 $89.95) 
Pro-Line Software 

755 the Queensway East, Unit 8 
Mississaugua, ON Canada 14y-4c5 

P1AE $59.95 

Eastern House Software 
3239 Linda Drive 
Winston-Salem, NC 27106 





GUM" 




v.^^^^v^^^^^^v.^^^^s\^^^^v,^^s^v^^^^^^^^^^sv.v,w.^^^^vA\v/A^\s^^^vA^^v.^;,^^•.<.'.•,;.■.',•,^;.■ 



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With its 300 character per second transfer rate, 
Commodore's 1541 disk drive is the slowest drive on 
the market. Even some cassette tape units can beat 
it in a race. The 1541 is the one real obstacle you 
encounter when using the Commodore 64 for serious 
applications. But now there's good news (and some 
bad news) for disk users who are tired of waiting on 
their 1541 's. Several new products are available 
which will speed it up. 

Because the 1541 operates serially (one bit at a 
time) instead of in parallel (a byte at a time) like 
everybody else's disk drive, it will never set any 
land speed records no matter what you do to it, short 
of tearing everything apart and wiring together your 
own parallel disk controller. However, Commodore 
didn t make full use of the speed available on the 
serial bus when they designed their disk operating 
system. They chose, as they often do, to take the 
cautious approach and allow for slower transfer rates 
and intensive error checking to assure reliable data 
acquisition. Their approach, though commendable in 
theory, really amounts to overkill. The 1541 is 
still very reliable even with reduced error checking 
and faster transfer rates. Software can be written 
to change how the drive goes about these tasks, and 
this is the approach that 1541 speedup programs take. 
Note that reduced error-checking means that some 
heavily copy-protected software, or old and "iffy" 
disks may have trouble loading, and may not even load 
at all, when using a disk drive speedup program. The 
rule is: if it's hard to load normally, it probably 
won't load fast. 

Speedup comes at a cost. Because the 1541 is an 
intelligent device with its own on-board 6502 
processor and DOS in ROM, changes must be made in the 



disk drive's operating system as well 
computer's. The 1541 has 2k of RAM that is 
used for file buffer area, 



as the 
usually 
and some of this must be 
taken up by new DOS routines. When you use up RAM 
for a wedge into 005, you lose buffer space. The 
1541 usually has three buffers available, allowing 
you to have three sequential files open at once, or 
one sequential and one relative file. But the 
creation of a new relative file requires all three 
buffers. This means that if one buffer is occupied 
by a speedup DOS routine, you will not be able to 
create relative files (though you should still be 
able to read them). Some programs, notably database 
management programs, require the ablility to create 
and use relative files. That's right: the one 
application that would benefit most from faster disk 
access times is the one that can't use a 1541 speedup 
option. Unless you replace the ROMs in the 1541, 
speedups won't work with a database program. 



You can't speed up disk access for a cartridge-based 

program like Calc Result, either. Why? Because (1) 
you can't have two cartridges plugged in and active 
at the same time, so you can't use a cartridge-based 
speedup program, and (2) a cartridge program takes 
over the C64 so that you can't load a disk-based 1541 
speedup. You can use some disk-loaded speedup 
programs with a system enhancement cartridge like 
Simon's BASIC, though. Both of the disk-based 
speedup packages we tested worked just as well with 
Simon's as they did with resident CB4 BASIC. 

This might be a good place to emphasise that 1541 
speedups generally only affect serial bus access 
times. All the DOS functions are initiated by giving 
the drive a command and letting it take 
newing a disk or scratching a file won't be 
by a speedup program unless it uploads 
function code to the disk drive. Verifying 
file IS faster, however, because the Commodore 64 
uses the same routine for both saving and verifying. 
Now on to more positive stuff. 



over, so 
sped up 
new DDS 
a saved 



- TURBO 64! 



The four 1541 speedup options we'll be looking at are 
all software solutions, though one has an optional 
hardware component. Two come on cartridge, and two 
are disk-loaded. Each approach has its advantages 
and disadvantages. Cartridges are more expensive, 
but they are there every time you turn on your 
computer. They are also less likely to interfere 
with the software you want to use them with. 
Disk-loaded versions are cheaper, but must be loaded 
in every time you power up, and they occupy space in 
RAM. This uses up some computing power and increases 
the possibility of interacting and interfering with 
the programs you hope to be able to run. Actually, 
since Compute's Gazette has now published a fine 
disk-loaded speedup program that's free with the 
price of the magazine, the wisdom of purchasing a 
commercial disk-loaded speedup package becomes 
questionable. Though I haven't tested it yet, CG 
claims their TurboOisk program speeds up disk 
accesses by a factor of three. If it's as good as 
TurboTape was, it'll be hard to beat for the price. 




pT TttM 




BISK; 



continued. 



Kuik-Loadj ($19.95 from Datamost) is currently the 
best-selling 1541 disk-loaded speedup enhancement. 
Since the disk is copy protected (and is currently 
IMPOSSIBLE to back up, by any means known), the first 
thing you will probably want to do with the 
Kuik-Load! disk is to stick on a write protect label 
so you don't accidently destroy your twenty-dollar 
investment. Kuik-Load! occupies the Commodore 64 's 
unused upper 4K of RAM, the same memory space the DOS 
wedge uses. There are actually two versions of 
Kuiik-LoadI on the disk. The second is compatible 
with Commodore's DOS wedge, though the wedge is not 
included on the Kuik-Load! disk. Because it resides 
in RAM, Kuik-Loadl will not load and run all 
software. It works well with BASIC programs, but the 
number of commercial programs it will work with is 
very limited. For example, it loads Paperclip (in 15 
seconds versus 77 seconds normally, which is five 
times faster), but will not speed up the loading of 
Easy Script, Suspended, or Doodle I In fact, it 
crashes when you try to load Doodle! If you try to 
load a _ program with Kuik-Load! and it doesn't work, 
there is no way to switch it out and try to load 
normally without turning the computer off and on to 
reset it. It doesn't disappear when you use RUN/STOP 
and RESTORE, either, which can be a positive thing. 
As a rule of thumb, if a program works with the DOS 
wedge, it will probably work with Kuik-Load! 

The Kuik-Loadl disk also includes a nice utility 
program called _ Kwik-Copy. Kwik-Copy expects 
Kuik-Loadl to be in memory and will not run without 
it. This program is menu-driven and has the 
capability to copy unprotected disks (full copy, BAM 
copy, or file copy), edit disk sectors, perform DOS 
functions, check disk drive speed, and alphabetize a 
disk directory. There are disk utility programs 
being sold with less capability for more than the 
cost of this whole package. Kwik-Copy is also the 
only program tested that affected DOS function times; 
it will NEW a disk in 1D seconds. Not bad for a 
bonus program! 



Turbo 64 from Final Source Software is a lot like 
Kudk-Load!; it also costs $19.95 and occupies the DOS 
wedge memory. Turbo 64 even includes the wedge as an 
integral part of itself, which is handy. The wedge 
portion of Turbo 64 can be disabled with the usual >Q 
command, but the speedup part can't be shut off. 
Despite Final Source's claims that Turbo 64 is 
superior to Kuik-Load!, the benchmark tests we ran on 
it came out exactly the same. In fact, most of the 
comments made about Kuik-Load! apply directly to 
Turbo 64; their major difference is in philosophy. 
Turbo 64 can be copied onto all of your disks so it's 
always available, but Kuik-Load! is copy protected. 
(Bravo and accolades, Final Source!) There is a 
handy little bonus program included with Turbo 64, 
too, though it's not as impressive as Kwik-Copy. 
It's called "Bootmaker", and creates an autorun 
loader for your BASIC or machine code programs. 






—umiimml 



■w 



P-55 




fofSIT 3PEEEPF3I 



continued , 



Both Turbo 64 and Kuik-Load! gain same additional 
speed by blanking the display screen while loading 
files. This keeps the VIC II chip from stealing 
processor time with screen refresh interrupts, saving 
about 1 5% additional time. It may also interfere 
with your sanity since it makes disk accesses as 
annoying as cassette tape loads (but faster!). Turbo 
64 also keeps the drive activity light from coming 
Dn, which can make you wonder if anything is really 
going on or if the drive motor is just spinning 
There's no way to tell until it's 
just minor annoyances, though, 
worth the price to a 8ASIC 
programmer. Someone who wants 



loading of commercial software 
cartridge speedup programs. 



done. These are 
Either package is 
or machine code 

to speed up the 



should look at the 



Fast Load, recently introduced by Epyx, is a very 
popular 1541 speedup product. It comes on cartridge 
and retails for $39.95. It could also be called 
"Fast Start"; the first thing you notice when you 
power up Fast Load is that initialization of the 
computer is instantaneous. Fast Load is compatible 
with lots of commercial software. In our tests it 
loaded Suspended in 20 seconds, as opposed to a 90 
second normal load time, or 4.5 times faster. 
Suspended is a disk-read intensive program, and Fast 
Load made it seem almost as if the adventure's data 
were stored in memory, not on disk. Doodle! loaded 
3.5 times faster and Doodle! pictures loaded in just 
7 seconds, not their normal 25. It's very impressive 
to watch a Doodle! picture slam onto the screen so 
rapidly. Epyx also lists some of their games that 
Fast Load will work with, such as Impossible Mission 
and Robots of Dawn. Dn the other hand, Easy Script 
was unaffected by Fast Load; the Easy Script boot 
program uses a strange load vector and is unaffected 
by most speedup packages. Paperclip loaded in just 
15 seconds, but disk file access was unaffected, just 
as it had been with Turbo 64 and Kuik-Load! At least 
there is an option to kill Fast Load from the 
keyboard if it interferes with proper loading, though 
you have to power up to restart it again. 

The Fast Load cartridge also contains three valuable 
utilities. First is the DOS wedge, which is handy to 
have in ROM. This version of the wedge has one 
annoying difficulty, though; you can't pause or halt 
directory listings. If the directory Is long, you 
may watch helplessly as the entry for the program you 
want scrolls off the top of the screen. The second 
feature is a machine code monitor. This Is a nice 
addition, but Epyx, for some strange reason, invented 
their own commands for the monitor functions rather 
than fallowing established form. If you are used to 
Extramon or Supermen you will have to learn a whole 
new monitor syntax. The third and nicest feature is 
a complete menu-driven disk utilities package. You 
can edit disk tracks, perform DOS functions, and copy 
whole unprotected disks, BAM records, or single 
files. The full disk copy will backup a whole disk 
in three passes in about eight minutes, which is not 
too shabby. Despite its shortcomings, Fast Load is 
probably one of the best enhancements you can buy for 
your Commodore 64. 



This brings us to the 1541 Express cartridge from 
Richvale Telecommunications. It has been around for 
about a year, which makes it the first of the 1541 
speedup programs. It's unique in many ways, some bad 
and some good. Let's go far the bad first and finish 
on a positive note. 

First of all, it costs twice as much as Fast Load. 
Secondly, you don't just plug in the 1541 Express 

cartridge. It has a wire with two clip leads that 
you must attach inside your Commodore 64, which means 
you have to open the case. I'm sure Richvale lost a 
lot of potential customers there. It's not a hard 
job, and the documentation steps you through it well, 
but you do have to be careful. You also should 
realize that opening the case voids your warranty. 
Once it is connected internally and plugged into the 
cartridge port, it fires up nicely when you power on, 
and you can unplug it and leave it dangling by its 
wire when you need to plug in another cartridge. The 
1541 Express speeds up disk loads, but generally only 
by about half as much as the other products tested. 



SPEED COMPARISONS OF 1541 DRIVE SPEEDUP PROGRAMS** 



[TIME IN SECONDS] 
PRODUCT 



NORMAL SPEED 

1541 EXPRESS/CABLE 24 

FAST LOAD 

TURBO 64 

KWIK-LOAD! 



MONQPQLE* 


DOODLE! 


(24.5k) 


PICTURE 


LOAD SAVE 


LOAD SAVE 


75 69 


25 27 


24 52 


9 21 


24 69 


7 27 


24 69 


N/A N/A 


24 69 


N/A N/A 



* MONQPOLE IS JOE O'HARA'S PUBLIC DOMAIN BASIC 
VERSION OF MONOPOLY. IT OCCUPIES 93 BLOCKS ON DISK. 



And as you read the manual you discover some 
disconcerting restrictions on its use. You cannot 
have anything else active on the serial bus while you 
are in fast mode; other disk drives and serial 
printers must be turned off. If you have a parallel 
printer hooked up through a serial bus interface, 
such as the Cardco/+G, you have to unplug the 
interface to use fast mode! This is so restrictive 
that I feel the 1541 Express is unusable by itself if 
you own any other serial peripherals. To make the 
1541 Express really usable, you have to add 
Richvale s Fast Cable. This plugs into the user port 
(bye-bye modem) and attaches (get out the screwdriver 
again I } internally to the 1541 drive. The Fast Cable 
essentially makes your 1541 a PARALLEL DRIVE, thus 
eliminating serial bus Interference problems. It 
should be noted that all disk commands are still sent 
over the serial bus, and just the data is transferred 
in parallel. The 1541 Express cartridge senses 
whether or not the Fast Cable is present, and makes 
the proper adjustments automatically. The Fast Cable 
also brings the 1541 Express up to about the same 
speed as the other speedup programs we tested. Once 
you have everything installed, you have invested four 
times as much money and much more effort than you 
would have in any other 1541 speedup device, giving 
you about the equivalent investment (if you include 
the price of the 1 541 ) of having purchased a more 
expensive third-party disk drive, which is really 
just about what you've done; you've changed the 1541 
enough to almost make it a third-party drive. 







1 2 1 a- 





Close-up of l>:'MjKir;l:TWI installe 
piggy-back on 1341 circuit boar 
Cable feeds out thru back. 




TMMh % 



fhis is a 1 
the cartrid 
SiMilar to 
$5 less), 
single-key 
built-in (i 
a<LW" and " 

included wi 

on it: "UT" 

"HLMi 

up an addit 

Mewjpy . 




ate addition to 
e_ speedups. 

mm <for 

also has 
coMMands 
ncluding "liLU>H 

disk is also 
th two programs 

fflffiKfeP" and 
A h which frees 
ional 4K of BASIC 



f 



FROM: ACCESS SOFTWARE 
925 E. 900 SOUTH 
S.L.C. UT 84105 



In our tests, the 1541 Express with the Fast Cable 
option was compatible with more software than any of 
the other packages. It was the only product tested 
that worked with Easy Script, loading it in 36 
seconds us. the usual 1:06. It also sped up Easy 
Script file access by a factor of about 3.5:1 . Like 
the others, though, it did not speed up Paperclip 
access times. Despite the parallel cable, the 
Express seems to be a few percent slower than the 
other speedup packages in some situations, though 
it's still quite fast. It's also able to do some 
strange things, like allowing sprites to move around 
and interrupt-driven music to play while reading disk 
files. It will load Doodlel in 24 seconds, and load 
a Doodlel picture in nine. Suspended zooms along, 
too. It still doesn't work in fast mode with a 
database program, though, because of the DOS buffer 
it must use. The Express has one extremely nice 
feature missing from the other speedup programs 
tested. If you cannot load something in fast mode, a 
CONTROL / F3 keypress will switch you over to normal 
load speed. Once you have successfully loaded the 
problem file, you can switch back to fast mode with a 
CONTROL / F1 . This works even from within programs, 
unless the program traps the CONTROL keypress. 
Switching back and forth works fine with Easy Script, 
Suspended, Doodle!, and most other programs. There 
is one last bit of goad news: the 1541 Express is 
the only speedup package tested that also sped up 
save times. Though not as impressive as the load 
speedup, the Express shaved about 25J6 off the time 
needed to save a file. This is definitely a 
noticible if not spectacular savings. The 1541 
Express with the Fast Cable option is an expensive 
solution to the slow speed of the 1541 drive. Though 
it brings the cost of a faster 1541 up near the price 
of a speedy third-party drive, it has the advantages 
of retaining full compatibility with all Commodore 
software, and of being an upgrade product rather than 
a full investment in a new drive. 

Are speedup programs worth the investment? Yes, they 
are. Even with their limitations, they can remove 
some of the aggrevation associated with the slow 
speed of the 1541 drive. The key to success with_ a 
speedup program is to find one that will work with 
the software you want to use it with. Try before you 
buy! 





QUI 




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SPRINGFIELD 



NC 



TRIAD COMPUTERS 
SOFTWARE CITY 
TRIANGLE DATA SYSTEMS 
THE COMPUTER CONNECTION 
C2 BOOKSELLER 



WINSTON-SALEM 
EREENSBOR0 
CARRBQRO 
ROCKY MOUNT 
HICKORY 



NE 



MICRO CONNECTION INC. 

— NJ 

WAYNE COMPUTER STORE 
IGOR RECORDS & SOFTWARE 
SOFTWARE CITY 
SOFTWARE CENTER 

UM 

PA6E ONE SOFTWARE 



OMAHA 



WAYNE 
TEANECK 
CHERRY HILL 
EAST BRUNSWICK 



ALBUQUERQUE 



IC ELECTRONICS 



NV 



NY 



LAS VEGAS 



EARTHRISE MICRO SYSTEMS 
SOFTWARE CITY 
COMPUTER CONNECTION 
COMPUTER SITE 
FRIEND CHIPS INC, 
VI DEO 'I COMPUTER PLACE 
DAYPROH COMPUTER INC. 
SOFTWARE CITY 



INC, 



DELAWARE 

COLUMBUS 

LORAIN 

STRONGSVILLE 

CUYAHOGA FALLS 

MEDINA 

DAYTON 

DAYTON 



SECOND HAND SOFTWARE 
TEACHER'S PET 
COLONEL VIDEO 



SOFTWARE PLUS 



OK 



OKLAHOMA CITY 

MIAMI 

BARTLESVILLE 



,' 



SOFTWARE PLUS » ATTN/ B. PALME GRAND RAPIDS 616 942 7780 
HOMEDATA PERSONAL COMPUTER STO GRAND RAPIDS 616 241 209? 
CADILLAC NEWSCENTER CADILLAC 616 775 3151 



COMPUTRON 

D&R SUPERSOFT 

SUPERSOFT 

SOFTWARE EXPRESS 

BLIND BEORGE'S NEWSSTAND 

THE COMPUTER PLACE 

PA . 



PORTLAND 
PORTLAND 
SALEM 
EUGENE 

GRANT'S PASS 
KLAMATH FALLS 



503 224 2220 
503 760-2796 

503 342 1298 
503 476 3463 
503 882 9603 



612 631 3580 
612 825 2674 
612 922 5808 



0390 



SOFTWARE CITY 

DATA SOFTIQUE COMPUTERWARE 

ABACUS COMPUTER SHOPPE 

COMPUTER SERVICES I INFORMATIO 

SHEARER DISCOUNT RADIO SALES 

THE FLOPPY DISK 

8*2 

SHADETREE SOFTWARE 

SOFTWARE CITY 

SOFTWARE UNLIMITED 

SOME HOLE IN THE WALL 

PERIPHERALS COMPUTERS I SUPPLI 



BETHEL PARK 

PITTSBURGH 

LEBANON 

MECHANICSBURS 

HECHANICSBURG 

MECHANICSBURS 

MT. HOLLY SPRINGS 

WILLIAMSPORT 

WHITEHALL 

LEVITTOWN 

PHILADELPHIA 

MT. PENN 



TX 



201 836 5755 
609 424-8155 



505 294 3054 
702 870 7901 



LEIGH'S COMPUTERS NEW YORK 212 879 6257 

SOFTWARE LINK, INC. WHITE PLAINS 914 683 2512 

MEIZNER BUSINESS MACHINES PELHAM 212 671 7400 

CODEX GREATNECK 516 829 5155 

VIDEO COMPUTER BIN BROOKLYN 718 241 1993 

THE 6.A.S, STORE FLUSHING 212 357 5522 

PASTIMES FOREST HILLS 718 263 4747 

GREAT ESCAPES COMPUTER CENTER HOLBROOK 516 567 0716 

COMPUTER PALACE PATCHOGUE 516 654 8573 

INNERLOGIC COMPUTER CENTER HICKSVILLE 516 931 5055 

SOFTWARE 4 SUCH BALLSTON LAKE 518 399 7573 

SOFTWARE CITY ALBANY 315 445 2577 

DUANE'S TOYLAND SCHENECTADY 518 

VIDEO COMPUTER CENTER ROME 315 336 0266 

THE SOFTWARE-HOUSE FAIRPORT 716 223 7658 

ROSE CITY COMPUTER ASSOC. NEWARK 

HOME COMPUTER & SOFTWARE CENTE ROCHESTER 716 647 2328 



VA 



WA 



614 88B 6660 

216 572 3580 

216 929 3227 

216 722 0770 

513 299 8555 

513 439 1251 



SOFTWARE CITY BELLEVUE 

MEDIA MAN LYNNWOOD 

DISCOUNT COMPUTER SOFTWARE SEATTLE 
SOFTWAIRE CENTRE INTERNATIONAL TUKWILA 

COMPUTER SUPPORT PRODUCTS EVERETT 

COM-SOFT EVERETT 

BELLIN&HAM COMPUTER CENTER BELLINGHAM 

COHPULIT DISTRIBUTORS INC. BLAINE 

CENTSABLE SOFTWARE EATONVILLE 

NYBBLES k BYTES TACOMA 

CENTRALIA COMPUTER CENTER CENTRALIA 

MEGASOFT BATTLEGROUND 

THE COMPUTER MART VANCOUVER 



405 946 2BBB 
918 542 6198 



OREGON CITY 



503 657 5215 



HI 

STARTING COMPUTERS BROOKFIELD 
COMPUTER SOFTWARE CENTER MILWAUKEE 
TMW SOFTWARE WAUSAU 
CANADA 

OWENS I SONS CASH REGISTER VICTORIA 

ATLANTIC NEWS HALIFAX 

KDBETEK SYSTEMS LTD, NEW MINAS 

RDMARO ENTERPRISES INT'L MISSISSAUGA 

R tt M SOFTWARE ST. THOMAS 



412 854 1777 
412 327 1850 
717 272 7115 
717 697 5755 
717 766 5185 
717 697 6813 
717 486 3274 
717 

215 434-3060 
215 493 1372 
215 533 1211 
215 779 0522 



314 394 

314 727 3420 

314 361 8825 

314 272 2462 

816 232 4778 

417 887 7373 .. 

SOFTWARE CONNECTIONS WARWICK 401 738 3430 

919 765 0433 ICS JOHNSTON 40! 273 1001 
919 852 3109 cr 

919 979 4W "" ^ 

919 977 6566 CONCURRENT TECHNOLOGIES CORP. TRAVELERS REST 803 834 9035 

704 322 6560 TN 

PER-I-SOFT TULLAHOMA 615 454 9394 

40? TO 79^ yiD E0 HOME LIBRARY OAK RIDGE 615 482 3893 

COMPU-CENTERS MEMPHIS 90! 683 6079 



VIDEOLAND CARROLLTON 214 242 9505 

C R SOFTWARE MESQUITE 214 681 9595 

REGENCY EDUCATIONAL SYSTEMS DALLAS 214 931 5787 

PROFESSIONAL COMPUTER ASSOC. WACO 817 662 1114 

MICRO SEARCH HOUSTON 713 98B 281B 

COLONEL VIDEO HOUSTON 713 728 5002 

COLONEL VIDEO LOREDO 512 727 4445 

COLONEL VIDEO HOUSTON 713 486 5288 

COLONEL VIDEO HOUSTON 713 444 1694 

SMALLCOMP SYSTEMS FRIENDSWOOD 713 482 0890 

THE COMPUTER EXPERIENCE SAN ANTONIO 512 340 2901 



FAMILY COMPUTER CENTER FAIRFAX VA 703 385 2758 

SOFTWARE CENTRE SPRINGFIELD 703 455 3202 

CRYSTAL VIDEO ARLINGTON 703 486 3388 

METRO VIDEO 1 ELECTRONICS ARLINGTON 703 525 4460 

SOFTWARE PLUS RICHMOND 804 747 7263 

SOFTWARE CITY RICHMOND 804 740 8400 

SOFTWARE CITY RICHMOND 804 320 2244 



206 451 1141 
206 775 8544 
206 431 0180 
206 575 2222 
206 355 3181 
206 338 0934 

800 552 2606 
206 832 3900 
206 475 5938 
206 330 2225 
206 687 5205 
206 695 1005 



414 543 5123 
715 845 7638 



BC 

NS 

NS 

ON 416 820 5235 

ON 519 631 8071 



COMAL INFO 

If you have COMAL— 

we have information. 



BOOKS: 

COMAL From A TO Z, S6.95 

COMAL Workbook, S6.95 

Commodore 64 Graphics With COMAL, S1495 

COMAL Handbook, $18.95 

Beginning COMAL, S22.95 

Structured Programming With COMAL, 526.95 

Foundations With COMAL, S19.95 

Cartridge Graphics and Sound, S9.95 

Captain comal Gets organized, S19.95 

Graphics Primer, S19.95 

comal 2.0 Packages, S19.95 

Library of Functions and Procedures, S19.95 

OTHER: 

COMAL TODAY subscription, 6 issues, S14.95 
COMAL 0.14, Cheatsheet Keyboard overlay, S3.95 
COMAL Starter Kit (3 disks, 1 book), $29.95 
19 Different COMAL Disks only $94.05 
Deluxe comal Cartridge Package, $128.95 
(includes 2 books, 2 disks, and cartridge) 

ORDER NOW: 

Call TOLL-FREE: 1-800-356-5324 ext 1307 VISA or MasterCard 
ORDERS ONLY. Questions and information must call our 
info Line: 608-222-4432. All orders prepaid only— no C.O.D. 
Add S2 per book snipping. Send a SASE for FREE info 
Package or send check or money order in us Dollars to: 

COMAL USERS CROUP, U.S.A., LIMITED 
5501 Groveland Ten, Madison, Wl 53716 

TRADEMARKS: Commodore 64 of Commodore Electronics Ltd.; 
captain comal of comal users croup, U.S.A., Ltd. 



DISK MECHANIC ~ 



PEEK A BYTE 64 Now with the DISK MECHANIC is 
the most powerful disk editor and memory utility av- 
ailable for the Commodore 64 and 1541 disk drive. 

• Read or write sectors hidden by DOS header errors 

• Read or write up to track 40 - half tracks too! 

• Fast format single or multiple tracks up to track 40 

» Over 50 functions - includes all PEEK A BYTE features 

■ Compiete manual for beginners and pros 

• Disk copy program included at no extra charge; 

• Continuing program update policy. 



To order tend check or money Older, US fundv. 
foreign orders add Si lor shipping and handling. 
Florida retideim add 5% (or G' tales lax, COD 
orders add S2 plus postage and COO chary 
Phone COD orders call: 13 DEI 840 0249. 

PEEK A BYTE is a trademark of Quantum Software, 



ALL THIS FOR 
ONLY 



U.S. Post Paid 



QUflilTUiH SOFTWARE 

P.O. Box 12716, Oept. 64, Lake Park, Florida 33403 



THE AMAZING VOICE MASTER 




Three Exciting Products in One: 

• Speech Synthesizer — Your Computer can talk to you in 
your own voice. 

• Word Recognition — Make your computer respond to 
your spoken commands. 

• Voice Harp — A totally new musical instrument that you 
play and compose by humming. 

Based upon new technologies invented by COVOX. Per- 
formance is equal to other systems costing thousands of 
dollars more. One low price buys the entire system. 

ONLY $89.95 (.ugge.ted retail) 
Available from your dealer or by mail. When ordering by mail, please 
include $4.00 shipping and handling ($10.00 for foreign orders). 

Call (503) 342-1271 for a telephone demonstration and ordering 
information. VISA or MC accepted. FREE brochure available. 



COVOX INC 

675-D Conger St., Eugene, OR 97402 
Telex 706017 (AV ALARM UD) 




AutoPrint Microconneetion Modem 

with Printer Interface 
for Commodore 64/Vic 20® Computer 




300 baud autodial, autoanswer modern with Cen- 
tronics compatible printer interface and functional 
aluminum enclosure. 

Cables supplied for computer, printer, and telephone 
connection. Terminal program supplied. 

Compatible with EASY SCRIPT© for word processing 
on the Commodore 64. 

AutoPrint Microconneetion retails for S179.95. 

Distributor, Dealer Inquiries Welcome. 

©Commodore Business Machines 

tha micropanpharal corporation 

2565 ■ I52nd Aveni* NE, Redmond" WA 98052 
(206) 88I-7544 





o w to enter 



he contest is quiet simple: 
We are looking for sone great 
original graphics from the 
electronic artists hiding out 
there. Black fi white., color, 
hi-res, lo-res, whatever. 
Entries will be Judged by the 
editor based on what grabs hit*, 
Send photo or screen dunp to: 



INFO graphics contest 

box 2366 

Iowa City, If) 52244 



Be sure to include your name, 
age, S a phone # where we can 
reach you. Contest deadline is 
SJHDEftSEJ. Winners will be 
announced in issue **8 . 
Uoid where prohibited. 



1st prize: commodore C-128 

5 runners up win each receive 
a shiny new ERG=BOfiRD £ CARDSET. 



The Plus/4 Sweepstakes winner 



The lucky winner of last 
issuers Plus/4 sweepstakes 
is : 




bhauna nclntosh 
Skull Valley, Arizona 




Sha 

and 

at 

nay 

sat 


una is IB years old 
uses CoHHOdore cdmpu 

school . Good luck S 
you enjoy Many years 

isfying computing! 


ters 
of 



PLUS/4 computer 

ie 

>y 



generously donated 



i:ifH:;iBJ;TH «™n;ijii<a^i:rm 
with a complete line 
of coHModore products 
and service. 

(these folks have it all!) 

1-868-362-9653 



INFO contest director 
testing the winning 
entry for edibility. 





ii a 1 1«: 




D-Compiler $ 59.95 



The first D-Compiler to give you back your source code 
after your program has been compiled with 'Blitz. 



'Blid it i trademark ol Skyies Elactnc Works 



1541 Super ROM 



»39.95 



• Fast Save Load Verify 

• Fast Scratch and Validate 

• 10 Second Format with Verify 



also Save with Replace is 
Improved 



• Two times faster, Eight times faster 
when used with Turbo 64 which is included 
No more Drive Head rattling 
during Format or Error Reading • 1541 Super ROM is 100% Compatible 




Easily installed in Minutes 



APALLO COPIES IT ALL 



APALLO Does it All. This program is the latest generation of 
copy programs. It will do everything the $39.00 and $49.00 pro- 
grams will do and more. It Copies ALL drive errors, bad tracks 
and sectors, non-standard format, bad syncs, and half tracks. 
We feel this is the best program of its kind available... 




$29.95 



MSD Sure Copy 

At last a complete utility package for the MSD Dual Drive. This 
is the first MSD utility program that does it all. The main 



• Copy Protected Disk 

• Copy Files 

• Format a Disk 

• Change Disk Name 

• Quit 



menu options include: 



Copy Unprotected Disk 
Scratch a File 
Rename a File 
View Directory 



$39 95 



Sure Copy will put all errors automatically on disk: 20, 21, 23, 27 and 29's. 



D-CODER 



Translates any machine language program snto easy- 
to-read English descriptions with complete explana- 
tions ot each command! 

Makes complete notations ol all important memory 
locations accessed by the program! (SID. VIC, MOS 
KERNAL. etc.) 
Gives you three ways ot accessing programs 

1) Will read and Hit programs tram DISK 

2) Will read and Hit programs Irom MEMORY! 

3) Direct titer input (from magazines, etc.) 

Can be used to locate and examine any machine 

language program's protection routines 1 

Can be used to easily break apart machine language 

programs tor study and examination! 

Printer option for complete hard copy listings! 

Yog no longer 
need to be an i 
EGGHEAD to I ^W 
read Machine ^ *" 
Language. 



$1995 




N-CODER $19.95 




the machine 
language manipulator... 

The perfect companion 
program to D-CODER! 



Allows you to easily make changes in ma- 
chine language programs... right on the disk! 

• Rewrite ability allows code to be altered 
and then rewritten directly to the diskl 

• Features sector-by-sector scrolling 
assembly language display ol machine 
language programs' 

• Notation ol ASCII text equibalents tor easy 
spotting of embedded text strings! 

• Handy reference display ol all assembly 
language commands and their ML 
numerical equivelents! 

• Byte splitter for easy splitting of decimal 
addresses into low byte-high byte mat! 



Super Loader 

Super Loader is a Kartridge that plugs into 
your expansion port, thai allows the 
computor, on power up start the disk drive 
and load the first preselected program on 
the disk. 



• Change colors 

• Load wedge 

• Works with more drive 

• Takes up no memory 

• Reset switch included 



$Mj& 






Only 



*29 



95 




This Disk has over 100 routines, 
some of them are routines for 
protection, smooth scrooling, modem 
routines, and sound and color 



routines. They can easily be 
incorporated into all of your programs. 
It is also fully documented 



$19.95 



Slik Load 



s 29.95 

Slik Load is a Kartridge for the C-64. 

Slik Load is the most reliable, effective and thought out Kartridge of it's kind. 

The options include: 

• 6 times fatter load • Statui key will give you information on 

• Eliminates drrve rattle whan errors device number, byte)* free and statu* of the 
are encountered. drive. 

e Old and un-new • Silk Load is also fully compatible with the 

Will restore a basic program 1S41 Super Rom 





§19.95 



0«5-Errors 20. 21. 22. 2% 21 & 23 

Formal Singl* Tracks 

Raid Dilk Errors 
'* Track Readvr-reid and select to (rack 
Vi Track Formatter-Format a duk with ^ 
(racks. This is where the next protection 
schemes are coming from. 
Drive Mon-Disk Drive assembler/dis- 
assembler For your 1541 
The Doc-Disk Doctor thai reads code 
under errors 

Sync Halter- Place a sync mark on any 
i rack out to 4 1 Also used tor protection 



Sync Reeo*T-Ch*ck tor Sync bits on any 

track out to 41. 

Change Drive No, -Changes drive 

numb*' (7-30) 

Dish Logger-Finds starting track sector. 

start and end addresses 

Disk MalcrvCompare any two diskettes 

Byte lor byte 

New Wedge-Easter to use DOS wedge 

ID Check-Check IDs on any Irack 

Untcratch-Flestore a scratched tile 

Vie w-B AM- Visual display of the free and 

used sectors on a diskette 



Heed/Write Teal- 154 i performance test 
Repair a Track Repair a track wilh 
checksum errors Reads code under 
errors and restores track 
Fast Format-Formal a disk in just 10 
seconds (with verily!). 



This is the only utility 
of its kind . It even has 
a 3 min. copy on it. 



WAR GAMES 
AUTODIALER 




-r 



l-Auto Dial will automatically dial a sei of numbftrs you choose 
2-Revlew Numbers will review numbers that were answered by a computer 
.3 -Save Numbers will save numbers where a computer answered 
4-Hardcopy of Numbers will print out list of numbers where a computer answered 
S-LOAD Numbers will load in numbers to continue where t left off 
6-Contknue wfll pick up dialing where it was interrupted 



$29.95 



5DFQ1JF.R& 
•HRNDBDar- 



3rd 

Edition 



THIRD EDITION! NOW AVAILABLE! 
If you're tired ol being harassed by protected software and too many copy 
programs, then (his is the book for you! Thi$ 224 page manual covers the 
gambit from legalities to protection methods to step-by-step back up pro- 
cedures Now you can learn both how to protect and unproiect software 1 
The techniques cowered include copying cartridges lo tape Of disk, tape pro- 
tection, and disk prolection. Disk protection covers error no. 'a 20. 21 . 22. 23. 
27 and 23 plus single Irack formatting, header modification, header swapp- 
ing, half track reading and writing, reading and writing modified bit densities, 
formatting illegal tracks/sectors, sync writing and more! The Third edition ex- 
plain*, tells how to detect and haw to write them with included software. 
Eleven usefuf utilities and many prolection listings! Our disk analysis programs 
reveal the protection methods used on your originals A diskette with all soft- 
ware is available for a minimum extra charge. This may not be the only book 
your should have lor the C-6<1. bul it is certainly the one book you should 
not be without! 



C64 Book only 

Book & Disk of alf programs 

Vic 20 book . Cart, & Tapes only 



$19 95 US 

$29.95 US 

$9 95 US 



THIS MANUAL DOES NOT CONDONE PIRACY 
•SHIPPING: $2 00 



KARTRIDGE KRACKER 

NOW you can own this unique and powerful tool 
which will allow you to dump the contents ol 8K 
and 16K cartridges onto disk! But what's really 
great is that you can also RUN the cartridges pro- 
grams without plugging in the cartridge! the 
KRACKER gets YOU INSIDE the cartridge! Put 
all your favorites on disk and get rid ol the clut- 
ter. This package provides your with the software 
and hardware needed to get started. Program on 
disk included. (Some cartridges require use ol ex- 
ternal RAM not included) 




$44.95 



TOP SECRET STUFF II 

All C128 Compatible 



Split Screens (Horizontally) 
Smooth Scrolling 
Save Ram From Under Roms 
No Drive Rattle On Errors 
Triple Drive Head Speed 
Autoboot Maker 
Koala Screen DUmp 
Display GCR 
Fast Disk Eraser 



Protect Scheme For Your Disks 

Write Protect Disk 

Unwrite Protect Disk 

Mini D.O.S. Wedge 

Fast Diskmatcher 

Data Statement Maker 

Unnew 

3 Minute Copy 

D.M.S 



// you have TSS#1, You'll 
Like This One! All on one disk 



*19 



95 



Bulletin Board 

$61 up end operete your own bulletin bond with one 
or r*o disk drives. This one hts ill the features end 
you enn customize it essity yourself. 



1-RUN MEGASOFT-BBS 
2-CREATE MEGA FILES 
3-ADO TO SYSOPS CORNER 
4. NEW SYSOPS CORNER 
b ill-All MESSAGES 
6 SCRATCH MESSAGE 
7-CYCLE MESSAGES 



BREAD SYS0P MESSAGES 
9-WRITE OPENING MESSAGE 
ID-READ LOG 
1 1 CYCLE LOG 
1Z-READ DOWNLOAD FILE 
13-SCRATCH DOWNLOAD FILE 
14- ADD TO OTHER SYSTEMS 
15-CREATE OTHER SYSTEMS 



*59.95 BBS 

• Leveled Access • Expert Mode 

• Private Message Base • Open Chalk Board for 
. Up to 300 Passwords Highest Level Access 




Enclose Cashiers Cnec* Money Oder or Personal 
Check Allow 14 days lor delivery ? 10 7 days lo* 
phone orders Canada orders must be m u 5 
Dollars VISA - MASTER CARD -COD 



s MegaSoft 



Programs I or C-W 



%2 00 S & H on an orders 




Limited 



Software S jtmsi ;j-is Invited 



P.O. Box 1080, Battle Ground. Washington 98604 

Phone (206) 687-51 16 • BBS 687-5205 Aner Hours Compuier.ro Compuier 



STARPOINT SOFTWARE proudly presents 




n+n+nnn-nn=n 

[say Icepick], a revolutionary new concept in 
software de-protection for the Commodore 
64. ISEPIC is not a disk duplication system, 
but an extraordinary hardware/software 
combination that actually bypasses any disk 
protection scheme. ISEPIC captures and 
saves the protected program as it runs in the 
64's memory, this "snapshot" becomes ac- 
cessible to the user for complete inspection 
and alteration. From this image, ISEPIC can 
automatically create a compact, auto-booting, 
fast-loading file which is completely un- 
protected and self contained. 
it Copies ALL memory-resident software 

it ISEPIC'd programs load many times 
faster than originals 

& ISEPIC is invisible to software— cannot 
be defeated 

it Eliminates drive "knock" due to antique 
protection schemes — adds years of life 
to your drive 

it Automatically "cracks" protected pro- 
grams into single, auto-booting, super- 
fast loading files 

it Place multiple programs on a single 
diskette 

•& Create auto-booting, fast-loading 
versions of your own programs 

it Cracked programs are completely self- 
contained and run independently of the 
ISEPIC adapter 

it Copies software with a flick of a switch 

it ISEPIC comes complete and ready-to- 
run, just plug into expansion port 

-& Programs cracked by ISEPIC may be 
used on MSD or 4040 drives as well 
as hard disks regardless of original pro- 
tection schemes 

When ordering by mail: 

* $64.95 + 3.00 shipping 

* 564.95 + 4.00 COD orders 

* Calif, residents add 6% sales tax 

* VISA or Mastercard accepted 

* Shipping out of USA $6.00 
Please allow 4-6 weeks for delivery. 



WRITE OR PHONE 



SKVRPOINT SOFTWARE 



Star Route 1 



Gazelle. C A 96034 



[916)435-2371 



ADVERTISERS 



Academy Software. 35 

Artificial Intelligence Group 97 

Cardco Ire C4 

Cardinal Sof tware 55 

Central Point Software 55 

Clockwork Computers Inc 56 

Comal User's Group 92 

Compusof t 55 

Computer Outlet .35 

Computer Centers of America 46 

Covox Inc. . 92 

Qynamax 57 

FS! 57 

Genesis 36 

Info Publications (ERG-BDARD) C3 

Info Publications subscriptions.... C2 

Info Publications back issues 13 

King flicrouare 98 

Megasof t 93 

Megasof t 94 

Microperipheral Corp. 92 

Micro-Pace 97 

Micro-Ill 36 

ffiicra-W, 55 

Micro-Id 96 

Progressiva Peripherals 16 

Progressive Peripherals ...17 

Protecto Enterprises 44 

Protecto Enterprises 45 

Quantum Software 92 

Q-R&D 3 

Shoubi z 14 

Signal Computer Consultants 18 

Starpoint Software .96 

T.I.E 12 

UltraByte 18 

Value Plus .15 

Xetec 97 



commodore owners 

DON'T 

THROW YOUR PRINTER* OUT! 






^ s 29 9 t1 




Micro** 

DISTRIBUTING INC 

1 342 B Routt- 23 Butler, N J 



You can now custom design 
your own printer fonts or choose 
from one of the different varieties 
already on the disk. Mot only that 
but you can read in any standard 
commodore ASC II sequential 
file and change the typeface. 

All THIS PLUS: 

1 . Mix up to 15 fonts in 
one document. 

2. Design custom fonts 
including symbols, foreign 
language, math 
symbols ect.. 

3. Includes font to give you 
descenders on your 1525/ 
801 printer, 

4. Convert most popular word 
processing files to custom 
fonts. For special effects. 

5. Also includes the signwriter 

64 program to print signs 

and banners W^^MI^^^D 
VISA 1 1^R,^3 

[dhhiiimki.t ^mmmm^ ^KttfBr 

FACTORY JHCNWSITEHCAU: ^^^' ! ^^. 

201-838-9027 

4= Requtresl52!j 801 or any olher printer with 
graphics interface (MW-350. Ty mac 
Connection ect ) 



PRO-LINE SOFTWARE 



• WORDPRO 64 (Steve Punter) THE MOST POWERFUL WORDPROCESSOR AVAILABLE FOR THE COMMODORE 64 
Features: Double column printing, automatic wordwrap, 40/80 column display, special characters, true proportional print- 
ing, works on MSD single and dual drives. THE LEVEL OF WORDPROCESSOR THE OTHERS ONLY TRY TO 
ACHIEVE! $49.95 

• PRO FILE (Steve Punter) EXCELLENT MAILING LIST AND MUCH MORE! 

Handles 4000 records on a disk. Done in machine language, it's FAST! Handles the new 10 digit zip code. Does text 

fc urit" ,nvoicin 9- Stands ty ltself and mer 9 es witn other wordprocessors. FINALLY THE ULTIMATE MAILING LIST 
IS HERE! $49.95 

• SPELLPRO 64 (Jim Butterfield) THE SPELLCHECKER! 

Contains 25,000 word expandable dictionary. Also compatible with Speedscript. ALL THE QUALITY YOU WOULD 
EXPECT FROM THE JIM BUTTERFIELD NAME! $49.95 

• PAL 64 (Brad Templeton) THE FASTEST AND EASIEST ASSEMBLER! 
Designed for beginners or experts. $49.95 

• POWER 64 (Brad Templeton) THIS IS SIMPLY THE PREMIERE PROGRAMMING AID ON THE MARKET TODAY' Adds 
dozens of BASIC commands to the Commodore 64 $49.95 

• ]]2S™. 6 fJ?? cl Tem P leton ) THE PROGRAMMER'S DREAM! It's PAL and POWER in one integrated kit! $8995 

• NOW AVAILABLE: C-POWER - A TRUE C LANGUAGE COMPILER! 

Includes: shell program, manager, editor, syntax checking editor, compiler, linker, function libraries and 531 paqe C 
Primer plus guide. SEE A DEALER NEAR YOU... 

DEALERS CALL GARY SCHULT2 1-800-362-9653 or in ILL. 1-217-356-1885 
(WE HAVE EVERYTHING IN STOCK!!!) 
"SPECIAL DEALER DISCOUNTS ARE AVAILABLE" 
MICRO-PACE COMPUTERS INC 






CONVERSE WITH 
YOUR COMPUTER 



AT LAST! A FULL IMPLEMENTATION of the original ELIZA pro- 
gram is now available to run on your Commodore 64' 
CreaM at MIT in 1966. EUZA has become the world's mosi 
celebrated arlilicratintelligencedemonslraliGo program, ELIZA is a 
non-directive psychotheraprsl who anal>zes each statement as 
you lype H m and |hen responds with her awn comment or 
question — and her remarks, are often amazingly appropriate? 
Designed to run on a large mainframe, ELIZA has newer before 
been available io personal computer usees except m greatly 
skipped down versions lacking the sophistication which made the 
original program so fascinating. 

Now. our new Commodore 64 version possessing ihe FULL power 
and range of expression of the original is being offered at ihe 
introductory price ol only $25. And if you want tfj find oul how she 
does tl (of teach her to do more) we will include the compiele 
SOURCE PROGRAM tor only £20 additional. 
Order you r copy ot ELIZA today and you'll never agatn wonder how 
to respond when you hear someone say. 'Okay, lets see what this 
computer ol yours can actually do'' 

READ WHAT THE EXPERTS SAV ABOUT OUR VERSION OF ELIZA: 
"Much more than a mere game...You'H be impressed with 
ELIZA .A convincing demonstration of Ariiticial Intelligence." 
-PC MAGAZINE 
"Delightful entertain men I , An ideal medium lor showingi off rattf 
system." - MICROCOMPU TING MAGAZINE 

"ELIZA isan astounding piece of software A fascinating program 
to use and study " — BARON'S MICROCOMPUTER REPORTS 
"ELIZA is a great way tg introduce your Inendsto computers A 
very lunny party game.' —PETER A. McWiLUAMS 

"ELIZA is an exceptional program, one that's fun 10 use. shows oft 
your machine, and has great hislorrcal interest " 

-POPULAR COMPUTING MAGAZINE 
"This version ol EUZA is the best we have seen. As a party game, d 
is unmatched" -HOME APPLICATIONS FQR THE C-6* 

ELIZA IS AVAILABLE IN THE FOLLOWING FOfl HATS: 
[Please specify Disk or Cassette) 

1 Protected Version , $25 

{Protected Version can be run but not listed or modified) 

2. Un-protected Commodore 6* BASIC Source Version , . + . . $4S 

(Source Version can be listed and modified as well as run| 

Both versions include a six page user manual 

Please add $2.00 shipping and handling to all orders 

(California residents please add 6^% sales lax) 

ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE RESEARCH GROUP 

^^^^ 921 North La Jolla Avenue, OepLf _ 

^■■a* Los Angeles. CA 90046 

•J** [2:3)556-7368 (213)654-2214 

^^^^ MC. VISA and checVs accepted 





$39.95 



Copyri&hTSi; 



On Screen Status Display 




Cursor location 

Scroll Indicator 

Print features currently being used 

Filename ol text 

Percentage of RAM (memory) uaed 

Ruler (also message line} 

Word wrap/justification flap; 

"Block rrarteecT flag 

Insert mode flag 

Characters per Inch 

Number of the current font 

Name of the current font 



Overview of FONTMASTER 
word processor features: 

t) Powerful block manipulation 
commands (Cut, Paste, Move, Overlay). 

2) User - friendly ellects include (fonts, 
super/sub scripts, underlining, bold face, 
etc.) 

3) Up to eight different fonts can be used 
simultaneously. 

4) Many printing options such as page number- 
ing, titles, word-wrap, right justification, and 
more. 

5} Eight disk I/O commands (Save, Load, Verify, 
Erase, Etc.). 



Create Your Own or choose from over 15 type styles provided in this 
unique program. 

Including: Gauhaus English 

■look Italic 

^^ M Bold Hairpin 

rudaw Mino-3 



&}HillOL\ Uarfiattan 
itop Sc^Lftt 

BVTE JitopbolcJ 

urtopap-rsdri tc**Tti2> 



ii 



inc. 



(913) 827-0685 
3010 Arnold Road Salina, KS 67401 



COMPLETELY MENU DRIVEN . VERY USER FRIENDLY 
BETTER INTEGRATION THAN LOTUS 1-2-3 * OR SYMPHONY* 

VIRTUAL DISK OPERATION 




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Technical 



Breakthrough 



Number 27 




Only CARDCO would dare improve on its own 
best seller (the + G has far out-sold any other 
printer interface, and has set the industry 
standard by which competitors are judged). 
The G-Wiz is even better — and costs 
30% less.* Our 27th major innovation in 
Commodore accessories has all the + G's 
features, and more... 
Built-in Buffer for More Speed 
The G-Wiz buffer dumps high-resolution 
screens up to 18 times faster than competitive 
interfaces without buffers. No more waiting! A 
complex 50-minute printout now takes just 2.5 
minutes with the G-Wiz. 

Exclusive! Aspect Ratio Selection 
Only the G-Wiz matches graphics characters to 
standard characters on Okidata, Epson, Star 

' Actual price *nay vary according lo dealer and region. 



Micronics, Prowriter, Smith Corona, C-ITOH, 
Gorilla Banana, and many other dot matrix 
printers. Now you can perfectly align high 
resolution graphics characters within text 
blocks, or in columns. 
CARDCO excellence triumphs again! The 
G-Wiz is the "best bang for the buck" on the 
printer interface market today — and it's 
backed by CARDCO'S exclusive lifetime 
warranty! G-Wiz: another distant target for the 
competition to shoot at. 

CARDCO, lnc.300S.Topeka/Wichita,KS 67202 




The Wizards from the Land of Qz Have Cone It Again!