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Florida Flambeau 



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:^jioyE\1BER 3, 1980 



SER VISG TALLAHASSLt t OR 6S YEARS 



VOL. 68, yVO. 31 



ran agrees to release hostages 



rnnsnmwntmATKmAL 
U , Paflianwm voted yesterday to free the 52 Amman 
.... possibly in stages ~ if the United States UMeit 
ns set by AyatoUah RuhoUah Khomeini, 
nove. Iran said., is 19 ^ the Untol SiMs. It 
at ill fictions ipere in general agfeeaocnt, 
luuit Moslems who telied tlK U^. Eoteaqr in 
a drainatic takeover a ycari^. today i, 
jrrt Carter toM the nation he woidd acocpt only an 
ent that "preserves the natioiMl honor and national 

. back to the White House from the can^Mign 
i dav of conferences on the latest devetopments in 
ong crisis.Cartcr made a brief nationaUy-tdevised 

dany black voters 
emain undecided 

H\ si \RI A VAUGHNS 

H XMH^Al M\K» WRITER 

llool officials fear division of black national leader& will 
EjiinloH voter turn j*ut election day, 
1 If 6 black leadenhip was strong and unanimous; this is 
;asc todav. Lndorsement is split among clergy 
p. and candidates' platforms have not proven. 
>aMvefor minonlies. 

According to William Jones, director of black studies at 
Reagan has involved a subtle process of blaming the 
z, ;his philosophy could prove dan^cious to black 
He has not given black people a bottom line, and 
f-mto hive no recognition- of the gross ineqiiality of 
HRKNial radsm. That is an inadequate quality for a 

M." 

spyt among ctergy leadership has given hiack .people 



television qiipcmnoe 

He said the foor-pmt Iranian proposal for the 32 hoiti^' 
freedom "i9pean to <^er a positive hniis*' for achievh^ his 
long-stated objective — * the honor and vital interests of the 
United States and the earliest potstble safe rctnni of the 
hosti^es." 

He said the adminiar a ti on was following up the Imian 
offer through dgpioiiMtic ftianntlt, but asserted any U.S. 
action "wffl be in full accord with out laws and our 
Constitutiott." 

Carter smd, "I know all Americam wutt that return to be 
on aproper bas^ worthy of the suffering mod sacrMce which 
the hostages have endured. " 

*'The Iranian fovefmnent shai Pdeaie att the 52 U.S. 



aimmais in return for the ftilUMwirHt of theK. KkomtMh 
coMfitioni, by the U.S. govcmaMnt. Shovld mmk of tHat 
e oadlti om requite more tiuK, however, then onoe al the 
coM&ions are aoocp^ by the U.S. govcmnent, a number 
of !■ I iMhMili iihin be reliawd with the appioial <rf the 



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'This b obviously ioii« to be 
said m an^ernew on ABCs "isioei and Answers. 

While the U.S. government can speedily indicate 
"aoceatanoe** of the iheir '*Mlilmeaf** in tone 

cases could take time. 

HojatoUeslam Hasliemi Rafsanjani, the Parliament's 



Tmmm HOSTAGES, 



Rev. Jesse Jackson, although more politkal in regards 
''USH organizatim, is consideiBd a religious figure in 
^ community. Initially Jackson dkl not endorse any 
However, in light itf money appropriated to 



Turn to BLA CKS, page 5 

Carter 




election a tossup 



•YCU^ K RICHARDS 

w PouncAL wuTEa 
Reagan still leads President Carter 
^ m battle for the White House, but 
dent s dramatic surge in the h»t 
'^•ts makes the contest a tossup, 
al 30.state survey shows, 
^rvey shows 24 states with 245 
ire cither probably or kanh^ 
""ith 270 needed for election, 
in 14 states and the DistrKt 
.-'^bia with 1 56 cicrtwal votes. 
l J" ^^^^ wiU be decided m 12 
Jj* sates ^suh 1 37 electoral votes. 
* cy IS based on assessments of UPl 
^ * rs and state capitd reporters in 
t ^ er consulting with top pohtical 
holders, 
in the ctosing week of the 
and showed a draoMtk Carter 

^ ^mc survey three weeks ago, 

*as leading in 34 — 






wnA 36$ 

TcVf r*^' ^cr had 10 states and the 
Columbia with 121 
^^iics with 52 

"^^Caner I 



Carter Reagan 

Reagan in seven stiocs — florida, Louisiana, 
Mississippi, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Vermont 
and Wisconsm — which have all moved intt> 
theiossup cohmm. 

In addition, he has ioqiroved his standing, 
but Ra«an idll leads narrowly, in two other 
key states — Ilhnois and Michigan — and 
holds lends in Ohio and New Jersey. Those 
four states. If they fall to Reagan wiU give the 
Republican candidate a considerable 
ia his search for bhie^ollar votes 
[to win the election. 



Amimom 

to move some other states fikc Connecticut, 
EXelaware, Kentucky, Tennessee and Texas 
out of the tossup column and into his list. 

Reagan did not move any stales out of the 
Carter or tossup columns in the past three 
weeks. Despite slippage in Washington and 
Oregon, the remainder of the coniineniai 
West appears to be sUying solidly in 
Reagan's comer. 

Carter did improve enough in California to 
warrant an cleci.on cvc stop in Reagan's 
home state, but it still looks like the 45 
doctoral votes will go to ihe sute's former 



governor. 

The election boils down to Reagan's ability 
to crack either Carter's southern base or 
carry the northern industrial blue-collar vote. 
A Reagan sweep of Florida, Texas and a 
smaller southern state such as Mississippi or 
Louisiana, or a Reagan victory in Illinois, 
Pennsylvania and Michigan — or some 
combination of the northern and southern 
battlegrounds — would likely tip Ihe election 
in his favor. 

The state-by-state UPl survey breakdown 
of races for president. Congress and 
governor: 

NEW ENGLAND 

Maine — Leaning Carter. Reagan led 
narrowly three weeks ago, but a poU last 
Monday showed Carter with a five-point 
lead. The race is expected to be very close. 
Rebpuhcans should keep the state's two 
House seats. 

New HiBipiiyrr — Prehnhk tiagan Mew 
Hampdiire Sunday News pol shows Reagan 
leading Carter 42 percent to 29 



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Members nj i/u' lailuhusscc tire DeiHinnwni and 
the I i'iHi County ShenlJ \ Detnirimeni worked for 
two htH§r\ I rklay after mntn to unearth a cmtstruetum 
work er fmried uli ve. 

At 12:15 / ruh/y, Michael Boyd suddenly /(fund 
luinsclf covered with eiiihi feet of dirt. 

H<t\(l and a co-worker were workinii on a sewai;e 
/>ro/)/cin /// ufi urea about 200 yards hc/iind fhc new 
I ecd's C aialoiine C 'enier on die corner of tfiiihway 27 
and die AiHtlachee l\irkway when the around 

h,'>u\rh hii'i (■(/r(v//;/ | »/ ijn- ni n/k Cl (iHoWcd Hovd 1() 



_ ■ ft-^j^. 

PlioiobyBobO'Unr 

talk to his eo-setprker, wfw called rescue workers to 
the scene. Oxygen was pi/ml in to Bayd as rescue 

()/)eration.s conimued. 

The crews worked for two Iwurs before B<jyd, 
talking* intermittently, could be lifted out. He was 

treated at Tallahassee Memorial Reiiional Medical 

Cenier for minor m juries and released. Dick 
Simpson, spokesperson Jor die SlieriJJ \ Depart ineni 
said, ''The fire depart mem did an outstandm^i job, 
however, he is very lucky to he alive. " 



Supervisor's race draws a crowd 



IHflMMU-f RIPfNtiS 

III inosi cfcciions, wrirc- 
iii candidates arc t»f the 
tiinaiic Irinuc variciy. Bui Tor I he Leon Coutiiy Supervisor 
off clcciit»ns race loinorrow, II write-ins offer viable 
alicmai i\ es lo ihe only name officially on ihe ballot . 

• I homas I. Bates, 67, hopes u> encourage voter 
rceisiraiion by excluding non-registrants from the 
iuHuesicad cxeiupt ion. 

• Richard Black. 37, is Wind and running to make voiing 
iiu>rc accessible for the disabled. His blindness, he says, will 
lUM impair his abiliiy lo run the office. 

• Refha R. l orman, 46, wants to give drive-in voting 
h*H»ihs a try. She promises never to hire members of her 
*mn fitmily. 

• I rwin JohriMm. 30, wants to improve accessibility for 
disuhlcil \t»iers and will lobby for amaidments in the 
elect it>iis code to present any future qualifications a la 
Sif|li\;m. 

• l)i>i .li»ycc, 3K, fi>rmer manager of the Democratic 
I \cciiii\c C onHniiiee, would establish branch registration 
lHn>ihs in mil lying areas of tlu.* county. 

• An Moblcy, 29, is the only black running. He wants to 
in> lo sclu»i»ls and community clubs lo encourage 
rciiisiiaiion. He also plans to lobby for closing kmpholes in 

ate election laws. 



CAMPAIGN W 



•Camp Peavy, 53, a 

former businessperson, 

promises to use the news media to better educate the voting 
public and increase voter turnout . 

• Jan Pietrzyk, 33, is former chairperson ot ihc coiiiify 
Republicans. He wants to make ilic ol t icc non-part isan and 
give part of his monthly salary to general otiiee funds. 

• Karen Roberts, 24, says she will hold public seminars 
on how to vote and mtensily voter registration. 

• Bob Ryon, 44, is maintenance director of the county 
school system. He is running because of the "uneihical" 
way Sullivan registered for the race. 

• John Sullivan, 32, is Deput\ Supervisor of elections 
and the only official name on the ballot. He has experience 
in the office and will expand programs ahead) put into 
action by his mother. 

• Jack Todd, 26, pr(.>niises to gi\e back pan ol his salary 
to the office's general budget, and wants to study the ottice 
before rceommendini: ehanees. 



Student raped, but assailant caught 



m C l RT HKLDS 
ri \\mt %i H r \¥¥ w m r»:R 

A Florida State student was raped early Saturday 
morning bui the victim's alenness led to the arrest of her 
alleged attacker within hours of the incident. 

The victim reported she became lost on her way home 
after leaving a friend at an apartment around 5 a.m. Her 
car I lien became stuck on the railroad tracks located west of 
l ake Bradford Road on Gaines Street. Unable to move her 
car. the woman decided to look for a telephone. 

She could not find one and started to return to her car. 
Before reaching her car. a man stopped her. 

.After entering the man's car. he said that the would take 
her to get some help, according to the woman. However, 
after driving a short distance, the man allegedly assaulted 
her repeatedly. The woman was then driven to West 
Tennessee Street where the man put her out ai a restaurant. 

The woman then called police, gave them the tag number 
of the man's car and a detailed description of her assailant. 

Officers traced the tag number to a rental aeenev and 
contacted an official of the agency. The official 
remembered renting the car and gave a description that 



matched the one given by the woman. 

As a result, ai approximateh 10 a.m., Victor Robinson. 
23. ot 1017 W. Do\er Street, was arrested and charged with 
sexual battery. Robinson is a student at Florida A&M 
L ni\ersii\ . As of Sunday afternoon, Robinson was being 
held ai the Leon County Jail without bond. 



A murder investigation and a search for a stolen car 
began early Saturday morning according to Tallahassee 
police reports. 

Robert Blanton was found dead in his room by a maid at 
the Southernaire Quality Inn on West Brevard Street 
Saturday morning. Blanton way lying in the middle of the 
floor with wounds to his neck and head. 

The walls of the room and several items in it were stamed 
with blood. One item was a chair investigators speculate 
may have been used in striking Blanton about the head. 

Missing from the parking lot mas a new beige 
Volkwagen Dasher that Blanton had recently bought. 

There are no suspects in the case btti tft^ imestigaticm is 
continuing. 



Jhe Shoe Box 

is 

Foot Quarters For 



Western Boots 
(for men & wom«i) 
Work Boots And Oress Im. 

All Sizes Up To 14 

Wnest Selection Of 
BootsinTojn 

2533 S. Acar-: 
Soothside Shoppif^c.. 





Authentic Chinese 
& Japanese Cuisine 




Serving coRtiiioi> 
i«l.-Ffl.1150fl«" 
Slt12lMHM 



• Michelob Beer 65c 

• Egg rolls 70c * Wontons 3 for ^< 
S • Egg drop soup 60c • Wofifon soup 

• Daily Entree Specials w/ Fned Rice$ 

• Combination Plate 
whicti includes 1 entree, fried rtct 

1 egg roll & 3 wontons S2i5 

4 to 5 different entrets 
available daily 

666 West Tenn. St. 222 7551 



Prim Trim 

Big Bend's Largest 
Trim Shop 

*AUTOS* 

• seat covers 

• convertible tops 

• door panels 

• headliners 

• carpet 

Also: 

Boats, Campers, Tents, 
Awnings, Cushions, Furnn" 

701 w. Brevard 222-55^ 

Servino the Big Bend SW* 

// ir IS fahr < 



1811 



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Go 



vcr i] 



vma fr 

Pi Sig 

dpplir 



'Uese c 



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PhiM, 

Chor 

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Mr: . . 



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[Box 
ters For 

Isoots 
women) 
js And Dress Boot^ 
Up To U 

»etectionor 
>ts in Town 

224-9948 

2533 S. Adams 
Ihside Shopping Centf r 



Serving contlnuouslY 
•FrL11:S0A.M.8PJ 

Beer 65c 

• Wonfofis 3 for Mc 
• Wofiton soup 70c! 

w/ Fried Rice $1.63 

ion Plate 
ntree, fried nee, 
rontons $2.45 

nt tntrttf 
daily 

I. St. 222-7551 



rim 

Largest 
Shop 



tops 



o: 

I, Tents, 
ns, Fornitur< 

d 222-5501 

lor vtnvl- 
\ike It! 




Ibrida FUmbiJu Mondav, November 3, IfSO / 3 



NDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 1980 



HEALTH INSURANCE 

. .^nt Government is sponsoring a 
- dent Health Insurance program for 
This is a major medical policy 
I. the student $92.(X) for one ^^or's 

,c<^QS For more information call 644- 
or Ray Burton 222-0 1 1 1 . 



WANTEDlfl 

Art-Graphics-Photos 

IVouidn t you like your black and white 
a;uyiing. sketch, graphic, photo, etc. 
published and circulated to over ten 
>and F S.U. students? Of course you 
uld! Of Course'* is a Student 
u*jvernment course description booklet 
ihat will be published this winter. If you 
would like your work(s) published in this 
quality publication please contact Jerrod 
Levine. the editor, at 644-181 1 . 



COME JOIN US 

Government Majors-We are on our 

There will be a meeting of the 
government Students Association 

^ursdavat 7pm in Rm 66 Bellamy. Pizza 
Subway will follow. Money matters 
discussed. 

^igma Alpha, The National Political 
^.tfnce Honor Society, is now accepting 

applications for new members. 

-dtions include 18 hours of Political 
^liixv. with at least a 3.2 average for 
'^«S€ classes. Applications may be picked 
"^'^ Rm S70 Bellamy through Nov. 7 



SrudeNT Govern/went Page 




VOLUME 1 NUMBWyVYVt 



Governor s intern Program 

The Governor s Internship Pro-am. a concept 
that combines academic training with professional 
job experieru:e at the state's capitol, is now 
conducting interviews for Flcnrida State students 
through the month of November. 

Applicants must be upperclassmen or graduate 
students with at least 3 () GPA. A resume, writinq 
sample and a photograph are needed when 
applying. 

Interns under the program are required to work 
at least 20 hours per week, but are encouraged to 
work a 40 hour a week schedule for a 10 week 
period. Undergrads 2Bre paid a $200 tuition stipend 
and ^aduate students are paid a $4(K} tuition 
stipend to help defray tuition costs. 

Students are awarded academic credit for their 
work at the capitol on an individual case basis and 
are generally graded on a pass/fail scale. 

Anyone intere^ed in the program shoukl cont£K:t 
Bill Kirsh for appointments to interview at 488- 



MEETINGS, MEETINCS 

The American Association of Textile 
Chemists and Colorists will hold a 
meeting Wednesday, Nov. 5, at 3:30 pm 
in 212 Sandels Lounge, featuring John 
Martin, director of the Office of Safety and 
Risk Management. The general topic will 
be radioactive waste disposal and will be 
specifically related to chemicals used iii 
textile evaluation. All interested persons 
are wekome to attend. 
Tlie FSU Women's Center Board Of 
Directors will meet on Tuesday, Nov. 4, 
at 6:30 pm to interview applicants for the 
Women's Center Director /Assistant 

Director pn«;itions 



FOR YOUR INFORMATION 

Student Legal Services has new hours: 

M-W-F, 8 am to 6 pm; T-R, 8 am to 12:30 

pm and 2 pm to 6 pm. Stop by for some 
free preventive legal advice. 
Bfsta Alpha PsI is sponsoring a free 
tutoring service for ACC 2001, 3101, 
3301. For appointment see Brian in Rm 
103-1 Business Bldg. on Tues. and Thurs. 
between 10 and 12 am, or call Tom at 
386-5289 on Mon. and Wed. between 
7:30 and 8:30 pm. 

Beginning this weekend Montgomery 

Gym Rm 208 will be available for students 
with validated ID's to play basketball. 
Hours will be 1-5 on Saturday and 12-4 on 
Sunday. A supervisor will be on hand to 
check ID s, so don't forget yours. This 
program will continue only if interest 
warrants. 



IF YOU DON'T KNOW... 

...how to appeal a grade, 

. . .where to get help with a tough course, 

...how to get involved in leadership 
training, 

. . .how to economize on telephone costs, 
...how to get involved in Student 

Government, 

...where to buy tickets-and what's going 
on, 

...where Tallahassee's most historic sites 
cire, 

...about nearby camping, canoeing or 

fishing spots, 

or HUNDREDS of other useful items of 
information, ^ your FREE copy of the 
FSU Student's Survival Handbook in the 
Union Information Office or the Dean of 
Students Office. 

Use it- You'll be glad you did! 



SPECIAL EVENTS 

^*Mu Alpha and Sigma Alpha Iota announce their Collegiate 
• ^^nipetition-CampuaSing. Campus Sing will be held Feb. 
12. 1981. All groups which can draw from their memberships 

*«'amale or female chorus are invited to enter. Applications 
■ obtained by calling 644-1992 or writing to Campus Sing, 
\,[ Mu Alpha-Sigma Alpha lota. School of Music, Campus 

^cchus presents Alcohol Awareness Week, Nov. 3-7. Look for: 
'^d^y Friday. 10-2, information table in the Union Courtyard, 
^ Breathalizer Demonstration on Wednesday. Also on 
_^^nesciav: Dr. Diana DiNilto will give a lecture on "AkohcJ and 
^/amilv at 3 30 pm in Rm 117 Bellamy; and Bacchus meeting 



30 



'-n Rm 226 Bellamy 



The Theatre Departn^ent will perform the full versk>n of 
"Waiting for Lefty," Tuesday, Nov. 4 at noon, as part of the 

Student Government-UPO Cultural Affairs Program. This will be 
the last performance until Spring Quarter, so be sure to attend. 

The College of Social Sciences and Pi Gammu Mu are 
sponsoring a ^Career Day in the Social Sciences. ' The program is 
Tuesday, Nov. 4, from 3:30-5:00 in the Leon -Lafayette Room of 

the Union. All Eco., Geo.. Gov . PAD. S.S., Soc, Int Affairs and 
Urban and Regional Planning majors are ui:ged to attend and learn 
of job opportunities and Grad school placement. Dean Mazek and 
a representative from the Placement Office wiB speak. 

• 

FSU Department Off Anthropology and the FSU 

Anthropological Society are sponsoring guest speaker George 
S. Gummcrman, arcnaeologist from So. Illinois Univ., on Nov. 7 
from 3-5 pm in the R.A. Gray Bldg. Auditorium. Topic will be 
"Social Adaptation to Environment." 



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Florida Flambeau 



The Honda Flambeau is puhiivhcd by the Florida Flamhcau Foundation. Inc. an independeni, non- 
profit corporation which iv mmcIv responsible for the contents of the paper. 

Honda Hambcau Founduiiun. Inc. Newsroom. 204 N. Woodward Avenue, phone 644-5505; Mailing 
address, P.O Box U 70(Jl . Florida Stale University, TaMi^sce, Florida 32306. 

Sidney Bedmglicld Editor Mary Tebo Associaie Editor 

Bob O'Lary Photo Editor Steve Dollar Associate Editor 

Brad Lision News Editor Chris Farrell Associaie Editor 

Chris Brockman Sports Editor Melissa Beckham Art Director 

Voodoo Polling 

rh4»sc who saw the presidential debate can judge tor themselves who won. But tor 
iiillions or AiTKricans who did not, ABC News did a great disservice by declaring 
ionald Reagan the winner, based on a ridiculous telephone poll conducted 
innicdiiiicly alter the debate. 

ABC News concedes thai the poll was unscientific. That leads us to question why 
ihcA sl.oukl prcscni ii ai all. The nicihod of '^polling** the public was certainly 
slaiiicci louarci Kcagan supporters in ihc Western United States. 

Viewers were asked to eall a special telephone number to giveiheir impression ot 
who won the debate. This method did not allow for a valid cross-section of the 
public .to respond. Viewers even had to pay tor the call. Because the debate ended 
earlier in the West than in other regions of the country, the results heavily rellecied 
I he opinions from persons in Reagan's strongest region. 

Political polls and instant analysis are two highly suspect forms of news gathering 
t hat t he news media has overused in this presidential campaign. 

Political memories may be short, but one has to think only as far back as the state 
primaries to remember that polls tauting winners in those state races proved to be 
ritihi only half the lime. These were polls subjected to much more stringent scientific 
standards than those chosen by ABC. 

As lor instant analysis, television commentators had barely enough time to tell us 
why the elccioraie voted a certain way during the primaries before a new election 
prt)\ed them entirely wrong. 

ABC News has chosen to combine these two forms of wasted air time to give us a 
meaningless result to a legitimate news event that may effect tomorrow's vote 
enough to swing the election. 

Not only has ABC News given a bad name to political polling, a profession that is 
having a tough enough time establishing its credibility, but also to presklential 
debates themselves, which may be the best way many of us have to hear the 
candidates speak for themselves. 



mmm i don't mm 

INMMOl^yOF 

EraiON.'NOW.(OMt 
AlDN6,CilllD(^/ 





Florida Flambeau Foundanon. Inc. Business and Advertising Office, 206 N. Woodv^ard A\enue. 
phone M4 4075; Mediatype lab. 314 University Unkm. phone 644-5744: Classified Ad Office. 306 
Univcrsuy Union, phone 644-5785. 

Rick Johnson General Manager Amy Arl>osast Production .Manager] 

Traccy Rowe Ailvcitising Manager lane Duncan Vkdiatype Manager] 

Laurie Jones. Business Manager 



m9i 

AMY 




AisawiiEN>ai6Er;jOML 




letters 



Flambeau decadent? 



Editor: 

Too bad the Flambeau didn't even 
mention in its endorsement another real 
alternative to the Carter/ Reagan/ Anderson 

standoff: Ed Clark. 

It did devote almost an entire column 
to the Libertarian Party, however — an 
editorial based on a misunderstanding of 
free-market economics and a naive faith in 
the ability (and desire) of the government to 
**improve lYnt lot of people as a whole'*. 

Sam Coiey contends that the Libertarian 
Party would **(kstroy whatever guarantees of 
economic sercurity are now enjoyed." What 
"guarantees"?! Don't fool yourself: Uncle 
Sam's bureaucrats can't guarantee anything, 
except keeping their own pockets stuffed. 
Ask the elderly widow down the street, who 
has been paying her share of the tax burden 
faithfully for 40 years, if she can reasonably 
expect to live off of dwindling Social Security 
benefits. Or what about the people who are 
paying into Social Security now, but won't 
have it when they need it, due to gro^ 
inefficiency in its management? 

Coley then goes on to make the erroneous 
claim that "power only falls into the private 
sector, which need not answer to the putilic.'' 
(emphasis added.) Where did he learn 
economics? Without being propped up, 
padded, and supported by government, (as 
was Chrysler), private industry has only the 
public to answer to. Where else does it get its 
money — it can't prim more, like the 
government can Moreover, it can't take 
voiir money unless you voluntarilv buy 
so ' e'hing from it, whereas the government 
can lorcibly take your money, or even your 
life (the draft), and give you nothing in 
return. If a private company is corrupt and 
wasteful in the free market, the public will 
stop doing business uith it. and it's replaced 
by a better company. But forget about 
replacing the inefficient, wasteful U.S. Postal 
system; that would be illegal, even though 



somebody else might vers wdi d 4 
job. 

As to * 'business, bank in 
interests" manipulating the economy 
your eyes; they're doing ii nth! no* i 
help of bribable congressmcr v*h.^ 
elected, iloas they please v*!ih \m t 
and government agencies, which y: 
responsible to the public. 

Libertarianism is a **dccaden( pt 
a rejection of any fufurc hope 
the lot of people as a whole ' 1 
enlightening me. Sam • 
along I've believed thai HohK 
Mill, Camus and Thorcjii r 
really had something valid 
under the misimprevsion fh.. 
are intelligent. s«>.i 
resourceful enough i • 
and their interact 
without the need t 'l \H 
for them. I rcalK hclic^-..; 
something inherent l\ nohi. j 

If it be the case, however. • 
a president who vmI! mana.'- 
think for us. and wipe our n. 
all means go ahead and supr"' 
really thing the free market ^'^'^ 
are such fearsome fhinL'^. .mJ 
is bencvoleni. ideali-'^ "''"^^^^^^^ 
support Commoner; \e^. ("u'"^^ ■ ' 
a stand' Ai least that .^'^ 
the right place, it vu>u!d seen: 
unlike Carter Kea. An^e-- 
distinct social philosoprr. 

But I'm disappointed I 
(o rhink that the / A;/' w*^^ " 
(he .lits to endorse a candidate^ 
pnnap'e. I should have known 
the middle road by endor^«l 
popular candidate, even ^ 
admit he's not the man fof 
Libertarian, am "decadenf • 
inicgriiy?1 ^J. 



HpotMe. Ihty sh«*l be type^ien. double spaced, and no lo i ^ ^ 

wiH be mn «itb cadi Icner unless the author has a valid reason 

TlK«dtorsicscr\edK rigin toedit dieicittrs for lengtli and tomecc standards of food 



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hankinv: uid milusir 

I he econom). 
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conuKssmcii who. on 
lease with vour mom 
•encics, which are noi ai ;i 

N a "decadeni philoM>ph\ 
tiiture hope of improvn 
A whole?" Thank ytHit« 
Sam — 10 ihink that a 
i thai Hobbcs, Locke. I ^ 
Thorcau, among oihcf 
ining valid to say! t'vc Kx' 
ression that hunian bcm 
socially minded a» 
hio manage their o» nils 
ion of their own tree 
for Big Brother lo do 
lly believed that iherc 
ilynoWe about freal 

however, that wc do ik 
will manage our m '"^^; 
wipe our nose, then Ict sh 

id and supp**'' om 
ee market and cimI l'^ 
0 things, and wHai 
Jealisiic soi.ial.^" 
,er; yes, e^di^ ^'n, 
hat candidate s hc.rn 
, would seem. At ica^ 
Reagan/Anderson 

iosophy. ,^ 
,.„,ed: I would h 

' se a candidate on du 
,d have kno.n so^J^^^ 

^ *"'Ter. u 
e. even w»i<^" / 

; man tor the ^ 
decadent-? 

on for 

ofgoodiatf*- 




\ixon gone, but his people live on 



g> SIP^I ^ »^ l)|N(.HKLl> 

earlier in this presidential campaign; 
ending memos to the Reagan camp. 
, (>ress Secretary Lynn Nofzinger who 
pracncc and the disgraced former president, 
hem.' Not/mger said at the lime. **Nixon 



. hccti a long!! me Nixc^n Ian, and once 
inianioij^ C ommaiee to Re-elect the 
'Hiurmg Ni>'»^>n"s '72 campaign. 
iMiicd m the Washington Post that he 
> !rom C RhfcP in 1972 and funneled the 
( ,,iitt)rnia branch of the American Nazi 
, )i tempi to negate George Wallace's 
, Nazi's were to use the money to attract 
la uppcriers in Calitornia; Nixon feared a 
;,,'ii|lcr ihcrc would erode his support. 
>n c i iK in C alitomia, and Nofzinger was 
r ! V li seems John Dean recommended 
; 1 1 lan to Nixon as a co-or<toiator of the 
A !ann)us political hit sqCiad. In a memo 
he Senate Watergate committee entitled 
) ilinii with our Political Enemies: How Wc 
Available Political Machinery to Screw Our 
iiiicN. Dean recommended Nofzinger for the 



' all those I have discussed this wiih^ Lynn Nofzinger 
- ..Mhemmi interested.*' Dean wrote, 'if Lynn had 
1^)^ he vkould enjoy undertaking this activity at the 

.\! iivordinaior. 

^(»u arc aware of some of Lynn's successes in the 

.;J Dean concluded. 

[hsvomos in fhe wake of Richard Allen's resignation 
AC I Mien, who was linked to some less-than-ethical 
ji ngs during (he Nixon reign, served as Reagan's chief 



Hostages 



/rampage 1 



lo iJ.a I "a message to the American nation" 

k- ihai il there is any further delay in releasing the 
jiics, "It is no longer our fault. . .it is the fault of the 

^ ancrnmcnl." 

The conditions endorsed by Parliament were: 

• The United Slates must promise to refrain fsom all 
hw and indirect interference in Iranian affairs. 

• The U.S. government must rescind Carter's order of 
V'\ 14 freezing Iranian assets in American banks at home 
Hi abroad. It must guarantee the security and free trans<<pr 
'lonfiscaied Iranian property, and ensure that no U.S. 
!i/fn or resident make further claims on Iranian assets. 

• The U.S. government must cancel all legal and 
«nml claims against Iran. It must itself pay damages or 
>PcnNcs it legal action is brought against Iran or any 
Julian ciii/en as a resuh of the seizure of the U.S. 

• The United Slates must recognize Iran's claim to the 
!h ot the late shah and his immecHate family, and make 

cnienis lor its return to Iran. 

aid Reagan refused to commeiM yesicfday. but 
niaie George Bush and formw^ President Gerald 

J! i the hostages should be released before America 
'^'piicN mth the conditions set down by Iran. 
I and Bush said they did not think the administration 



Blacks, 



from page I 

for cii\ progression. Jackson and Mayor Jane 
j^of Chicago have endorsed Carter as a candidate, 
^"f Black comnuintis is considered partial to religious 
^•*n«ations and attiiiaiions. as opposed to political 
Since Ralph Abernaihy ol the Southern Christian 
-'^^*^ip Association singly endorsed Reagan, there is 
^^abullc vote for Reagan in this election. According to 
commentator Roy Woods, the Black Data, a national 
^^organization, has given statistics of 75 percent of 
V*ck vote going to Carter as opposed to 90 percent in 

^ ^ n Angelo of the Government department at FSU, 



'^^^ Recession has hit blacks disproportionately 
^ ^^er had promised assistance to blacks, however it 
^ adequate. This could prove disastrous for Carter. 



SMALL CHANGE 

foreign affairs ad\ isor. 

But if Nof/inger is any indication, Allen ^ departure 
hasn't removed the odious Nixon stench lingermg over the 
Reagan campaign — and future presidency. 

• • • 

Standing on the same political ground with Ellen W illis is 
comforting; the Village Voice writer is one of the most 
clear-headed, resonant voices of the Women's Movement, 
and her endorsement of Jimmy Carter this week makes 
sense. 

Though Carter's record concerning women is not good, 
Willis accurately identifies a Reagan victory as an 
afftrmitive nod to anti-feminists nationwide. 

**l believe that the cuhural right's '*pro-family" crusade 
is an extremely serious threat to women's rights, to 
everyone's personal and sexual freedoms, and to 
constitutional liberties. . .Just as the ideology of fiscal 
conservatism provides an economic rationale for ignoring 
the needs of the cities, blacks, w<HiKn and the poor, **pro- 
family" propoganda serves as a social rationale for 
attacking feminists, gays, single people, working women, 
poor people, blacks, Jews, New Yorkers — in ^ort, 
anyone who deviates from the White/ 
Christian/middle-class/surburban/married-with-children- 

wife-at-home/mtssioaary-position ideal. 

**. . .So if I can bring myself to flip the lever without 
throwing up," Willis concludes. **l will vote for Jimmy 
"Life is Unfair" Carter. And throw up afterwards." 

Pass the airbag, Ellen. 



Small ( haniie runs vNei kK in the tlumhcau. 

should agree to a deal if military spare parts are included 
and if by shipping them the United States is perceived as 
siding with Iran in its war with Iraq. 

U.S. agreement to return more than $8 million in 
**frozen" assets to Iran in exchange for the 52 American 
hostages could touch off a protracted legal battle. 

The assets were ordered frozen by President Carter last 
Nov. 14 after Iran threatened to transfer billions of dollars 
of funds to other countries in retaliation for Carter's ban 
on oil imports from Iran. 

Some of those assets were used by banks holding them to 
cover losses on outstanding loans to Iran. A move to force 
the return of that money, might make the U.S. government 

liable for those loans. 

There also is debate about whether the money must be 
repaid with interest, which could amount to a total of some 
$12 billion. 

The freeze did not affect deposits made by private 
Iranian companies or individuals, including the deposed 
shah whose family is being sued by Iran in U.S. District 
Court in Manhattan for $20 billion plus $26.5 billion m 
damages. 

The frozen assets include some $1.34 billion m securities 
and $1 billion in gold on deposit with the Federal Reserve; 
$400 million deposited with the U S Treasury; more than 
$1 billion in domestic banks; $4 billion in foreign branches 
and subsidiaries of U.S. banks, and some $500 million held 
by U.S. companies. 



Conditions will not change — it is a question of turn-out, 

notconvcrsi<Hi." 

Blacks all over the country are making efforts to insure 
and reinforce the importance of the black vote. They are 
urging minorities to make the decision for themselves. 

Fredddie Grooms, special assistant to the president at 
FSU, said, "By and large I think black people will not 
ignore the situation; they will and shoukl vote in large 
numbers in this election." 

Grooms organized a telephone conference called Voter 
Blitz OB Nov. I. Sptcial sessions were held all over the 
country to communicate with churches, community 
organizations — any large gathering of people, to stress the 
importance of the black vote 

"Black people should become more political." said 
Grooms. "The blood, sweat and tears shed for the vote 
should not be ignored." 



r 



FlorMt FliwIiM Monday. November 1. 1900 / 5 

LARGE p"Luncheoii Buffet 

Ellgfl^'W I Mon Fri 1 1 00 2 00 

liTD^l f ^" Sicilian Deep Oish Pma 

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6 / Monday. I^vember 3. 19S0 FlorMa Fhankem 



^1 




If 



it*. 



ml 



f1f !! 






letters 




Seeds of bigotry 
planted at FSU 

I sec that Homecoming is still a seething issue and 
therefore would like to throw in my two cents, even though 
the sum total of the effects may fall short of that value. 

This is my first quarter at FSU and already I find 
knowledge oozing from every direction. I may also add that 
some of the sources were quite astonishing. Let me goon to 
review my rece'ni education. 

Democracy is a really nice word and even nicer concept, 
hui in practice is something far less. Someone cleverly, 
pointed out that historically, organized groiq^s have always 
had more power than the silent majority — which is basically 
true. Another historical fact is that when a small group rules 
or dominates the larger, this breeds contempt, hatred, and 
rcfaliation. This is what we saw in the election of Bill Wade. 
Small potatoes here on campus, but what about in the real 
world? 

An(iihcr important lesson: Money talks, no money 
Shouis\ Alter ihc silent majority had retaliated they were 
quickly subdued by the thoughts ot dollars out the windows. 
(Not necessarily their own f Meanwhile, equal rights; the 
democratic process, and other noble gestures are 
* 'compromised" and put on the back burner. The jump from 
money talks (which everybody knew) to shouts is significant 
only because it so clearly reflects where our society's 
priorities lie. 

And last, but most important, I stress Owr society. Greek, 

non-Greek: why such controversy? What happened to the 
live-and let live principle? And the different strokes for 
dii lereni folks concept? Are these dead and gone also? If the . 
C ireck system is right for you, join it. And if it is not, then 
don'i. But why criticize, Greek or non-Greek? What has 
been planted here are of bigotry and racism. And these,- 
if we so clu)ose. will grow with us to adulthood only to 
become our worst enemies. 

Fit her consciously or unconsciously these are the values 
and modes of behavior v\e are being taught. To bring some 
more historical facts in and maybe provoke some thought on 
the matter, it is well known that today's students with these 
values l irnily inipianted, will be tomorrow's leaders. 

Mark Loezd 

Teach, don't ridicule 

Kdifor: 

Now that the Billie Dahling' incident has passed, let's 
take some lime to look at it and its implications more 

objectively. 

1 irst, we must lake into consideration that the incident was 
not a protest against homecoming activities; rather, it was a 
:nockery of them. A moment's reflection will show that 
ridicule, like violence, creates more problems than it solves. ' 
When you punch someone, they instinctively strike back. 
SimilariK , \\ hen an institution and those who believe in it is 
ridiculed, ilieir instinct is not to reflect upon the evils 
uiluMcni ui that nisiitution. Rather, they will go out of their 
wax lo strengthen it at the expens'e of those who ridicule it. 
1 unher. the election of 'Dahhiing' doesn't simply make a 
sham of the rituals of C hief and Princess. It also degrades 
those parts of homeconimg that are good, valid fun, not to 
mcniton making those who elected 'Dahhling' look much 
more foi>lish than those against whom his election 
supposedK protested. Finally. 'Dahhling's' election and the 
publiciiN gi\en to it make the entire" university look more 
ridiculous than a multitude of iradiiionai se.xist homecoming 
ever could. 

If we sincerely believe that the election of Chief. Princess, 
and their courts is sexist, as many conscientious students do, 
then the proper reaction is outrage, protest, and education: 
not ridicule. Ridicule puts us on the same level of 
mimaturiiy and immoraIit\ as sexism does, and accomplishes 
nothing positive in the process. Perhaps next year when 
elections for Chief and Princess come up again, as they will, 
we can react b\ protesting the sexism inherent in these 
elections, and boycott both the elections and the 
homecoming activities. B> acting maturely and rationally on 
the belief that these activities are sexist and immoral, these 




Bill Wade, during Homecoming Week 



beliefs will be reflected upon by those we oppose, and 
perhaps, just perhaps, these people will come to accept them. 



The mnioniv jre oHmousK t^-- people wh»^ 
Wade, as he won V,,/ ihc r.(it>i> ptvpj,. 
to say anything about it as ihev did nat 
That IS whar I believe m anx k.>ui o\ eil-L^ 
care enough to v ote then vou ha\ ; nih: \,^ 
1 did vote for him, and yes I would voic I^vr * 

True there were •'independents- nmnmg h,.^ 
domination" was not the only point he «as 
There was at least one other pom-. .*w 
superficiality of the whole thiruv I jhmk C 
elect a Homecoming Chief and Pnnc^Ns. h.n/ 
that the candidates chose to go about it h «ha 
Jike. Yes, like many people here 1 am neu 
which is why I really don't like it. because 1 4,. 
of them. All I knov% is a picture and a njr 
supposed to decide w hich person 1 1 hmk in Kite- 
Well I would like to apdogi/c for m>t Kh k- J^ 
But I think it is a rather shallow wav of gtMne 

Now as far as the Florida Ftamheau K i . . 
getting him elected with their f ront page icj; j . 
think that is absurd. I only saw from page .irtt, 
election. Now, true I found oui ahi>ut his p. . 
the Flambeau^ but it was someplace m\uk ihc p i.-v 
it wasn't even that eye catching because j Mn\ 
was looking through it about the third time 

You sound like a very violent person, huf rhcn m 
thousands of ai^ry demonstrators, according \ 
it was from watching too many cop sht^us ^hcfi v,% » 
child. Or should I just sayyounf cr, as you arc vt»ll ic- 
SL child. You and so many students, alumm. and 
are so upset over the controversy, not that Bill \l^ad( * 
because he is a homosexual. People like you mic "< 
and ashamed of Fhjrida State University, been 
have elected a young man, who happens to he a h(v» ^ 
but because of the way he is being treated by pet>pic \ 
I would like to add one more thtni! bciorc d»'N % 
you brought up the Bible what does it say abotr 



Bundy a Greek? Representing Ga) 




Editor: 

To "protect" the sacred traditions of homecoming 
princess selection, along with the dignity of those who revere 
such trivia, rocks bottles and obscenities have been thrown, 
tires and reputations slashed. It seems that the dignity of 
Greeks and Alumni lies not in their own qualifications, but in 
their ability to stomp non-believers into obedience. My guess 
is that any minority (racial, ethnic, or sexual) would be the 
focus of such a violent tantrum on being elected. That was 
the case when blacks broke the lilly white tradition back in 
*72; things haven't changed. Perhaps any imagined injustice 
will do for an excuse to attack. It is more than a little scarey 
especially when the administration backs them up (birds of a 
feather...). 

The obvious pleasure and the degree of viciousncss with 
which the Greeks struck out at those who displeased them 
suggests to me that Ted Bundy would be an ideal member of 
FSU's Greek community. 

Sarah Valentine 

Well's and the Bible 

Editor:. 
To Chris Wells: 

I just read your letter in the Flambeau today, October 23. 
Though I am not Bill Wade I would like to give yew and 
anyone else who feels like you do, my opinion on the turmoil 
that you and peop/e like you have caused. In your second 
sentence you made it very clear why you don't like him. And 
it wasn't because he was elected Homecoming Princess, but 
becuase he is a homosexual. You obviously have appointed 
yourself God and are passing judgement on homosexuals. I 
never knew so many narrow minded people could congregate 
in one place at the same time. 

Now I did not realize that one of the things he was trying to 
accomplish was an "act against normal heterosexuals." In 
fact I don't believe he realized that was one of the things he 
was trying to accomplish either. 

Nqw I only have the number you used so I will go by them. 
If there are over 22,(XX) students currently enrolled that 
means that there were 22.000 possible voters. And that 
doesn't say much for the 1",00(3 students who did not care 
enough to vote, as only 5.000 did. According to the 
information in your letter you have the majority mixed up. 



Editor: 

To Chris Wells: 

While we cannot speak for Bil! vvadc. n»c he > 
Metropolitan Community Church in Tallaha ^ • 
with some of your comments about the coniftncf. 
election hascmised. 

First, let us say to you that vnc are Chrtsiun 
most of us are gay. We believe Jesus 
we accept his Lordship over this world, and o\ 
Second, we believe that the rc\cla!um o\ (- 
through prayer and through the Bible aii r ? 
accept the homosexuality that v^as given 
choose to be homosexual; who would m 
Instead of denying the love ot ( h: 
accepted His forgiveness and Hh c : 
terms with our homosexuality. d ' 
define being gay as joyfully accepting a ^aIr.c 

Third, the specific New T estament iniun 
refer is Roman 1:24-27. This passage 
hoiyiosexuaHty; rather, it condemns the it^ 
sexual practices that interfere with one"^ 
God, and which are essentially at Nanana v 
sexual orientation. The other passages I ^ 
scholarly examination; we refer you to C'-j. 
Tolerance, and Homosexuality ( 1 ' ' . 
of Yale. As Father Gerard S. Sloyan ^*ruic 
are meant to allay madness, not to mdu 
We regret that you seem to revel m tf 
We regret that you condemn ever\ l i 
Tallahassee, for the courageous, il nut Ut-^ 
one of our number. -i 

To many of us. Bill Wade did ac^^"^P^\; ; ^. 
running, and by winning. He f^affirmc^J 
tradition that anyone can present b 
state his case, and accept the vms? 
many of us. Bill Wade, in a striking 
you that until he is free to live ^ -tf^ 

none of us -- gay, straight, bia.k. ^bite. ^ 
WASP - are free. Not ev er> ga> man a , , 
with Bill's flamboyance, but v^e tee! ^ ^.j, 
of us a hope that one day you. thi. ^^^nio, .^^^ 
see that we are people derserv ing of ci ii n 

- Re>.Jo*"- 

Mciropoliwn^^' 



- .i' 



\« . 1 



Ml \ \ I 



Kl I 



P II Ml 



Si* 



» for 

! this 



people XX ho v,M,.< 



XV h 

caf t 



id nof 

^ of dcciKMi 

vole for him again 
running houcva c^^. 

|r poini, ^huh 

1 think ii iv grcai uu * 
iPrince^s, houc\cr ihv »a 
poul if is what I rr v 
I "am new lo ti 
because I don . 
|re and a fianu 

ihinkis bcttci n ,1 
|i not being able t<i j., 

y of goinx; .th. 
vheau being rcsp 
|i' piifc •'Iciiliitc , 

01 11 page ariick , • 
!iH>ui his i;amp.tii.'i, 
ice inside the pa[Xf l;r 
cause I didn't caich »i till i 
Ihirdtime. 

cTson, but then apin vod« 
, according 10 you. Ma^r 
ri>p sho\AS when you »crc j 
, as you are si ill acting liU 
|s, alumni, aiKi faculty «^ho 
not that Bill Wade won but 
[>lc like you make mc vicl 
inivcrsity, not because wt\ 
tippens to be a homosexua 
treated by people here 

I King before closing. Shwc 
ICS it say abouiyowr kind 

Slit A. Thrihii 

f.ng Gay; 

II Wade, we the pcopk ^ 
h in Tallahasse take 

I bout the conlroversy Bill 

ise are Christians, and ■ 
lesus to be the Chnsi, anu 
lorld.andot ourlncN 

lelalionot CiiHl s^'l' 
Bible affirms our chi' v^ 
was given us. N^c d.d -oil 
.ould in our prcscn! 
if Christ for uv 
iiis guidance m v 
Ive do choose 10 be 
[iiing a same-sex OTK'H 
lient injunction to *hKHu> 
Ipassage docs not o-n .mn 
Tins the idolatry of 
.ith one^ rclatior^t' i- ^ 
,1 variance >^"h oiu-^ 

1080) by 1> ^^>h^Ho^«t| 
rwr<^e.;TheScnrH- 

jo induce it." „ „ M,k 
L I inihe threats to B.11, 

1 V gay person ai » ^^ - .^ 
, if not detiant. aJ'^ 

^ n^c ^' ' 

I reaffirmed ° ,>raK. 
L himself to t 

wishes ot ^^^'^"^ .j -.' 

av man and ' ^^foi*^ 
. homophobic cuw-^ 



1 Ipv 



•mil"** ' 



'LANEf 



\ 



Waves 



World 



!il>\i> 



Iraqi forces 
ininisicr and five other 
hoseigcd oil rellning 
![k1 arc holding them 
i,^ . ,ii said yesterday. 

Radu) >aid Oil Minister 
mt^ii .la«»ad Bai|ir TuafSttyan, a 

; ni>uf and tour other oil officials 
kjdnappvd contrary to international 

u'riv" 

„j ihi yrciip ^^as "traveling on a 
,.,ad It' il»e besieged city of Abadan 
ouragc and commend the brave 
, oi ihc o\\ nisiallations when they 

lacked." 

■ill I, Icbanon — Actress VanesMi 
tefiu said in an interview published 
]j\ ihai Israel must be wiped out and 
cJ never tt> abandon her support for 

inians. 

ioiu think that there is any room for 
,.| Israel. * said the British actress, 
c Niaic t>l Israel was established not 
inicrest ol Jews or the Arabs or the 
iinans, but in the interest of 
lalism. aggression, death, 
anon, mass demolition of houses — 
r\ nicihods used by the fascist 
Hi rci'mk- ai^ainst the Jews/' she told 
Jtuiyine Monday Morning. 

Nation 

Mi \M \ Police found the body of 
■ M\a black Atlanta youngster yesterday, 
J noi knov\ if it was one of the 14 
Alio have vanished from their 

' ilk p.iNi I ^ iiu>nths. 
10 o! 'lie 14 missing children have 

'WHNsBOKO, N.( - The 
! Uoikers Party held a memorial 



service yesterday for five members who 
were killed a year a^o in a guntlght with Ku 
Klux Klansmen and n . 

The ceremony at Maple Wood Cemetery, 
where four of the five are buried, came a 
day before the first anniversary of the 
shootings on Nov. 3, 1979, during a CWP- 
sponsn- ! "Death totheKlan'* rally. 

DLIKOIT — Average costs of owning 
and operating a new car rose a record 18 
percent or 6 4 cents per mile in 1980, 
making it costlier to operate a typical 
subcompact than it did a luxury model eight 
years ago, a surv e\ showed ^lerday. 

LINDEN, Mich. — Two small planes 
preparing to land at a nearby airport 
collided in flight and crashed in a cornfield 
yesterday, killing two men and a young 
child, and injuring two other people, state 
police said. 

The conditions of the injured — a man 
and a child — were not immediately known 
and none of the victims* identities v/as 
immediately available. 

BOSTON — A tentative agreement on 
all but one issue has been reached between 
striking school bus drivers and a bus 
contracting firm for a breakthrough that 
both sides hoped yesterday could end the 
25-day-old strike. 

PHOENIX, Ariz. — Scattered picketing 
across the. country by Greyhound bus 
drivers, mechanics and terminal workers 
was reported yesterday despite llih-hour 
negotiations to avert a nation-wide strike at 
midnight. 

A news blackout was imposed on the 
talks betv\ een representatives of Greyhound 
Lines and ihe Amalgamated Transit Union. 

WASHIN(.TON — Richard Queen, the 

American hostage released from captivity 
last July, yesterday called the action by the 
Iranian parliament "tantasiie." 

But he warned, "It's not over yet," and 
said there certainly will be some "ups and 
downs" before the 52 American hostages 
come home. 



IN BRIEF 



'NIWl DOMHOFt, WILL 

I'-uate I'mser and Public 
^ "J'ly ai 1:30 p.m. in room 576 



MUUM LOl M) A I ION IS 

■ tomo,u,u ai 9 p.m. at the Hecht 

Kmirs Kll M VI RSION OF 

''^•'•ihevk\ novel The Grapes of 



H ralli will be shown tonight in Moore Aud. 
at 7:30 p.m. onK . Admission is one dollar. 

SIRS FORMS SHOULD BE 
administered to classes between Nov. 3, and 
Nov. 19. Completed forms are due in 
tvaluatiiMi Services on Nov . 24. 

THLRL Will BL \ LRAILRNITY 
manager's meeting ti>day at 4 p.m. in room 
214 Tully. A sororitv manager's meeting 
will immediatelv follow. 

THERE WILL BE A SCHEDULED 
meeting tor Hag toot ball referees today a« 4 
p.m. in room 212 Tully. 



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8 / MuiKJay, November 3, 1980 FbrMa FlamkeMi 



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Election 



from pa^L I 

kacf bciwccn Sen. John Durkin ami Republican Warren 
Kudman iv uh> cIc»vc i<> call. House dclcL-ai ion is cxptxicti lo 
remain spin l-l. IX'mocra'K (ion. Hugh Ciallen narnm 
lavorire owir l(»rmer Ciov. Mciiinni Th«»ms4>n. rhe teisiy 
umscrv alive he ousted lUo years ago. 

Massachusetts - A !aic surge ol IXiiiocratK lo\al!> 
appears lo pui this indusirial sinie imo the ••jeaning Carter** 
column. 

C iNiiiecticirt — Tossup. Both fmrxy chairmen are predicting 
a larger percentage lor lohn Anderson than they did several 
^cx*ks ago and that is hurting Carter. Reagan has a narrow 
edge in Hartford Courant poll to be published Sunday. 

Rh<»di' Islaild — Probable ( ancr. 

IM)l SIKI \| NOKIHl \S| 

Ni w \ork — I caiimt' C arlcr. New Vork rinK">-C BS poll 
L-ivcs Caller 38 percent, keatian 29, Anderson 20, vMih 23 
pcrceni MiukMded. Harf is dUo sIkuvs Carter ahead. 

New .Krsey — Leaning Reagan. 

Penns>Uaiiia — Tossup, 

Kenlttcky — Tossup. Reagan holds small edge. Canei^ is 
hurl bcxause ol the economy — miners out of work in 
souilieasiern Kentucky and auto workers laid off in 
I ouisville. 

renne^see — Tossup. "I'd say we'd barely win," says Ned 
Ray McWherter, stale House speaker and probably state's 
nn)st powerful Deniocrat. **To be very truthful, they are not 
exicted about Carter, but they are afraid of Reagan.*' 

SOUTH 

Viruinia — leaning Reagan. 

North Carolina — Probable Carter. The Charlotte 
Observer poll gave Carter 47-35 percent margin over Rea^ui. 

South CaroKiia — Leaning Carter. Carter is slightly ahead 
with the latest University of South Carolina poll showing 
Carter 42 percent, Reagan 40 and 16 percent undecided. 

Fhirida — TiMsiip. Retfean has slight lead hirt momentnin 
5»et*ms to be shifting to Carter. Poll^^ last week showed Reagan 
with a 41.18 matti§m, hut the professor who supervised it said 
the results aM showed Carter cutting into Reagan's lead. In 
SewHr race, Demoerar BW Ganler, who heal Sen. Richard 
SHine in the pHmary, is expected to defeat GOP candidate 
Paula llawkifis. But it wiN he a dtfRnnger. Republicans hope 
to gam three seats in IS-memher congressional delegation, but 
muM lose one other. Delegation now has 12 Democrats and 
three Republicans. 

Mississippi — Tossup. Trailing in the early weeks of the 
campaign. Carter appears to have narrowed the gap. "We 
have an excellent chance of taking Mississippi, but it is not 




UPl 50 STATE ELECTION SURVEY 

I Probable Leaning toward 
Reagan L_J Reagan ininn 

rpi Probable Leaning toward IIuIIIlTos 
ti-i-iVi-ii Carter Carter 




W 






i.7\'./!;i 

0 







Reagan _ i^S 
Carter , is* 

Tost-up - 137 

needed to win _ m 



going to be any kind of romp," says Reagan coordinator An 
Jackson. 

Alabama — Leaning Carter, but very close. Three recent 
polls had contliciing results on who is ahead. 

Louisiana — Tossup. Polls show Reagan and Carter nearly 
even, but officials from both parties agree the state has a 
tradition of last-minute surges for Democrats thai could 
push Carter over the top. 

INDUSTRIAL MIDWtST 
Ohio ~ Leaning to Reagan, although only by a couple ol 
points. Carter has pulled close but not yet passed. Everything 



depends on who gets out their \(>fe TucNd.tv ^ 
number still iiniisualK high j ■ : 
said J. Pal nek Lcah>, Ohio DcmiKLi... 
director. 

Illinois — Leaning Reagan. 

MichifUMi — Leaning Reagan. The two imw a; 
show R^gan with nine and seven perceniaw 

Indiana — Frohahle Reaean. All m 
polls show hini a suhsianliai ieaJcr t>\cr (. a 
South Dakota — Prohahk- Reagan. 



■# 



I- I t f 

V.I not i 
. K n« I 

.• f ■ 



The Electoral College: gambling with the presidency 

BY M ICHAICL STROUSBERG ballots for Reaean/ u/ki^h ko<^ u» .. .n <>i^^t^.- rr<Am ^jnuna fnr f'^nrr • 




BY MICHAEL STROUSBERG 

KI.AMRK \l s I All HKITKR 

One of the true illusions of any presidential 
campaign is ihc belief that we actually vote 
tor the eandidaies ihem.selves. 

We don't . 

A \ i>te tor Ronald Reagan is not a vote for 
the man. It is a vole for a slate Republican 
eleeiors pledged to vole for Reagan. 
Snmlariv. a \oie t\>r limmy Carter is a vote 
tor slate of Demoeraiie electors pledged to 
vole tor him. The same goes for Anderson, 
Clark and Commoner. This is the 
conNiiiufional arrangement tor the election 
of ihe president of the. U.S.: the electoral 
ci'tllege. 

laeh poluieal party in e\ery state 
iu>nnnaies a group of electors numerically 
ec|nal \o the state's congressional delegation 
(teprescniaines and senators). The electors 
are pledged to \ote tor the iheir parly's 
president lal nominee but they are not 
CitnstiiutionalK required (o do so. in Tlorida 
iheie are T clecioral votes — the 8ih largest 
m the naiuMi. 

Takmg Florida as a national example, the 
presidential election is decided in the 
follow mg wa\: First, the popular election is 
held on November 4. If as polls mdicaie. the 
maioriix of Moridians \ote tor Reagan, then 
the Republican slate of eleciorN pledged to 
vote the Republican nominee are elected and 
will meet in Tallahassee m earl\ December. 
There, if the electors remain loyal, ihey will 
rubbersiamp the popular \oie and casi -ihcif- 



ballots for Reagan.^ 

Their votes are then sent to the president of 
the Senate via the General Services 
Administration. On January 6, the president 
of the senate along with the joint session of 
Congress, supervises the voting tabulaticHi. 
The election will be decided by a majority of 
the national electoral college vote (270 out of 
538). If nobody gains a majority, the election 
is thrown into the House of Representatives. 
Officially, the election of the President of the 
U.S. is held on January 6, not November 4. 

The weaknesses of the electoral college 
system are glaring. Dr. Paul Piccard, of 
FSU's Government Department, wants the 
electoral college abolished. Like many critics 
of the system, he feels there are too many 
things that have, can, and do go w rong. 

*'The biggest indictment of the electoral 
college." said Piccard, "is that it distorts the 
campaign. Everything is oriented to the key" 
Slates, the ones with the most electoral votes. 
Someone can win or lose an election 
depending on what happens with just a few 
thousand votes in stales like Ohio and New 
York. The voters in those states become very 
important to the outcome of the election 
while the voters in the other states — ahhh, 
just write 'em oft. It you can win the 13 big 
Slates then you're home free, it doesn't really 
matter what happens in the rest of the 
country.'* 

The reason for the political diMortion is 
political expediency. A candidate is obviously 
not going to campaign as hard in Wyoming, 



which has three electoral votes as he w ill in 
New York, which has 41 electoral votes. 

Perhaps the most unfair aspect of this 
system, critics charge, is that you don't have 
to win by a very big margin to collect the 
electoral votes. If Reagan wins the popular 
vote in Florida by just a few thousand votes, 
he gets all of Florida's 17 electoral votes. 
Critics contend this all-or-nothing process is 
not very representative. 

As Piccard notes: -**A squeaker in a 
poiHilar vote gets a big bonus in the electoral 
votes. What's reported as a close election in 
the popular votes is reported as a sweeping 
victory in electoral votes. 

Another problem is the very real possibility 
that the loser of the popular vote can ¥rin the 
electoral vote and thus .ascend to the 
presidency. In other words, it is possible for 
Carter to be re-elected even though 
nationwide more people voted for Reagan. 
This happened to two presidents — Hayes in 
1876 and Harrison in 1888. That's hardly 
what most Americans consider democracy, 
but as Alexander Hamilton once wrote about 
the electoral college: **A small number of 
persons, selected by their fellow citizens from 
the general mass, will be most likely to 
possess the information and discernment 
requisite to such complicated investigations 
(presidential elections)." 

Another aspect of the electoral vote prone 
to attack is the **doublecrossing*' by some 
members of the colleges. All things 
considered, there is nothing to stop an 



elector from voting for tarter 
•*supposed to" vote t>f 
Conceivably, the elector^ . 
threatened, bribed, or oiheruwf 
voting against the person ihcv •f'f 
vote for. 

Piccard does not see ' 
problem, however. * In 
elections," he said, "ihr 
elector who crossed iht 
been a real problem If 
impossible tor a presidcniiai . 

or threaten an elector K < 
pervasive at election nmt if'** 
be kept secret. 

The overv* helming ma 
do not cross lines bt\ a 
sense. They've got \o 
associate with. The\ 
their loyaliv !„ ihc 
human beings ihe^ 
were elected to vote a .er j ' *' 
what they do." 

The feature o\ ihe elev:o'i- 
vehemently criiici/ed h the 
the election be turned ovef^ 
Representatives tor ip^ ^ ^ 
Senate for the ' ^ 
college cannot rev 
be a paralyzing . . . ..^^ 
winners. Nor onl> ihaun ,^ 
toendupvMihaproidf"'*^ 

from different parties 

Imagine thai - i>nirn^ 
Bush on the same uckft 



f.it^lv 
it«»rn 

; II I.' It 

t \ X\h 

'cf ri>' 

... 



1^ Will 



her I 



I 



CINEMA 



wvakening' rises above cheap scum 



^,H! MOVH \KI) 

,,ttf 'fft' 
'!'(■ nostrils 
rakirtfi 
, in this 
• h\ the 
.rui's Then 
f,nr I he: CUt 
■rn M(U'. and 
, bowels: and 
, jnsi'd ihe 
rinsed it with 
fhcv next 
.siih powdered 
J hen. having 
„ ,/i with pure 
. sia. and other 
!h('\ sew It up 

ffmHlofns. Histories 
K! i\ that insisictl 
11' ilic brains ol 
mil ihroiiuh ihcir 
. !i.h ii> be a gold 
t ihc prcnJiiccrv of 
films. 
:..i!d'.. directors 
N.ifl I rciid lo Terence 
drawn less on 
. isiiH»nali**in ol' I he 
kK'iM i gypi than a 
ijiiiu/cd oiicnialism 
I urban Bey 
' ii- taiina leaves ralhcr 
jammmij viscera into 

•< \iuiki''iini: comes 
>:cf.ihl\ closer to 
I' KMirrcciirig Ihe 
"! > ol (he mummy 
iiloriunalcly. we are 
>cn dimpsc^, nc\cr a 
J visuMi. ol ancient 
"on/mg stodgy 



"\'c\. slic*^' Jcfrih|\ 
%t"\iu»l. and incrilv\vvu;!!. 
Her scMialtiy t\ dchuett h\ 
(lungs like curiv krgs and 
Ia4!c hrcasts. Bui thai i\ 
siill pan of the culiiirul 
smagc. Until thai cliaiijsCN, 
Barbiv isn't giving in 
change.** says I li/ahcih Torrcy, auihur o\ 
a cultural .study on America's ta\tMitc 
doll. 

'Mn the 6<K, Barhk* came it- rcprcsvnt 
Amcricim culture av the hvrt>ii»c. Rarely 
hetore in Amcricai! Imu>ry has the culture 
accepted aMiiman its us ideal. 

She received a great deal of alicmioti 
lit I he UK as the Annrrican dream. I hcji m 
the 7<K wtwien came ini*> their iiv%n and 
sort t»l rcali/cd their t»vkii poieiuiulv 

**r d4»ti*i think liarbie hcr^clt uilected 
ihe wiMiian'v movement. But I think the 
abflfty io sec Ihc wonmif as the rdeal in the 
60s and 70s was an example ol the 
•ji ov^iiig awareness of uofiicn ihettvscl\eN/' 
.he said. 

Today, she says, the doll's wvnld is 
dcHncd increasingly by her I t I est vie 
accessories. She has a lO-spccd bicyck\ a 
dune buggy, several sports cars, a camper, 
a beach bus, a motor hivnte, a catamaran, 
a yacht, a private plane, a real gardeiu a 
swimtning pw>t and If houses. AUo 46 
(fiettds. 

rtierc's even an encyclopedia ol liiirbie 



America's 
affair with 
Barbie 



nvavhnic Uk MaiU'l. 
r!-v*i"d (woi'iic oui *M'h i»uc 
OiUfil on Uic*. isMu and 
?tiC nc\? ihmg'yoit kiunx. 
iherc'd be aiioihcr." 

Torrey says, "You cart 
tell by the years, really, 
vs here the ptipuiar inuid is 
in America by lusi 
examining fh»* various, 
anilacts and acces!»tTnes that are mektdei 
in Barbie's dream world." 

in the 1960s \he was a big girl m a small 
town. She went i(» prmns, barbecues an 
dated. .A college education was \i\id m 
Itie American dream. Sears was so«>n 
marticifng ihe Barbie Dull campt»''» which 
was free or the usual encumbrrK\ees. 
b*xiks. It was diseomiftued. '^Vou don't 
see lliai kind of acccsst>ry or afiHaci in 
Barbie's world agaifi U\ son ol an 
imeresiing statement m what our Ci>uiiiry 
values," loirey said. 

By I974» the doll was on her v\ay to 
becoming a supersiar, a eclcbniv She 
drives what's called "Star\etie." She's 
invoked in a stage show that looks like a 
nimi version of the Academy Av^ai d- 
*'She\ becoming nmch more glamon/ed 
and much kss a specitic idol: She's ^'aincd 
a lot of real estate, which is something she 
dfdn'i have ortgir.aik "m! he's g^eitiiig 
more accessor i/txl," loncy said. 

Jn l%7 she was given the lace ol a I 
year-ivld. it replaced a far more 
sophisticated lace. Her clothes changed. 




dolK, with price guide, published by^^.^'^.^^oo 



Cia/eite BiH>ks of Kermiu Texas, for 
collectors, 

I he doll has hatl lour dil lerem faces and 
UMwe ihan 4(> subtle facial variations. The 
pt>pular notit^n bk>iide is better was 
tliscovered by Mattel in the early 7()s. 

Barbie wav among the fkst toys 
advertised on teknisii>n, v\hieh has bcxm a 
big factor inns succcs5. 

N<»t all tnoi hers recall her advent 
kiit#*?* **l sikJn*t thiiik Barbie \^as a doH 



one said. *'k 




, ( oitwk (( harlion 
' ^ m I gypi 
lo' ihc lost 
I'lmcess Kara. 
\m!o is iealous not only of his tanned assist am 
^^Mki. bill also of his obsession with the dead 
M>mc Mihble conveniently falls awa> from the 
V UMiib and Hesion and \ ork start their \ery 
^^^Hviii mio Kara's tun. I lesion's wife has 
' pains and goes into labi>r The child is born 
•^Hcsion piies open the sarcophagus miles away. 
^ spuiiots \o lile. T he spirit of Kara is ob\ lously 
■> 'Mkcovct Hcsioirsjau'jhici rather than waste time 
'^''^""•ronUxe.ii old dust andgau/e. 

^ iikvnin\: luis iwo essential \iriiies. l irsi. there is a 
•''"*Min! ol uvaiion shots — minarcis.aKhcoUiiJica! 
"'■'\l v:\piian eeoloiiical foniuuioiis. The film. 
" M> lame in leiins ol \ioieni scenes (hat one 
' piotoiind res(x\i lor those kind of folks at the 
Hitin iiuelii ha\e served to create a travelogue 
. '«Jnahorroi film 
^ ^VoiHl viriue iv ihc occasional conicniporarx formal 
^ ''*Hh tviypiuiii nu>iih Atier ihc niiiial violation of 
*^'*nth and womb, ihc bab\ is placed in a plastic oxygen 
' ^' ^ggesis a >ai\ophagus. W hen the child later 
^'"^^K'aneighiccn \cai old v^scl for kaia's soul, she 
'•''•Axl. and her bod\. luidc except for a sheet and a 
'^''^niHc. recilK (he wrapped bod> of Kara. 

lor reasons known only to the direciafs. 
»^«»U|slit up in helping Kara's transformaiicMi. 

He has a hidden safe buili in his house to 
^ '^'t^-n c anopic jars that contain Kara's vttri 
^ Egypiian taste for false passageways and leilwrf 
menikm murder of ilic workinf dw$ bcfoes 
^ h'r all tlie iafaMMWis crafii^iiuinshir could liat'f 
r-aiK expanded, as could have the tmfilkd 
'<^Kin$hip hetwttn teker and dai^t«r. 



a nitinev 



The trarisformaiton coincided with the 
yi)utb, generation ctmiing of age, the 
peritHi when kids said no one over 30 
mattered. 

"In the early ?|^ln'y iuvr eased 
prodiiclion of her "iecessorics. her 
vehicles, stores atul houses. Increasingly 
Harhie became the center of her wi>rld. 
Now ^he's the icon of the ^Me' J^^^p'*^*" 
and has become increasingly sPlr the 
culture has become increasingly self- 
absorbed," ri»neysaid. 




" Mil 



Kara's father had killa r lover and forced her to 
marrv him. She seems to h e been put off by what was 
then quite normal behavior and managed to have him 
crushed beneath a stone (not to mention killing everyone 
who had ever talked to him). Heston displays not only his 
professional, workaholic obsession with dead Kara, but 
also a less than normal interest in his daughter who has 
unmentionable compulsions to go to movies with young 
bovs. 

Not onl\ timidity but also totally misplaced elements 
marred The Awakening. The stereophonic effects of the 
Dolbv svsiem were used to good effect at limes when the 
claustrophobia of the crypt was aurally suggested or 
ectoplasmic tiroans shifted across the theatre, but a few 
good calls to praser would have been much better that the 
commercialized music to which wewcreattime submitted. 
Heston's attempt at a universtity leaure was barely less 
ridiculous than Oini Eastwood's art history- class m The 
Eiiier SanctioH, and Kara's golden mask was a little too 
naturalistic (unless, of course, she was also crushmg 
Hellenistic artists). . 

There were also certain disjcMnted »ipects to f^ ' cdttin. 
that made it as difTiculi to belie\e in the story a^ a unified 
entity as to resive a corpse who has been stored in se\wl 
dtfTcrent parts of a tomb. 

AH thinfs con^dered, the film is worth seeing Just as 
there are onh flashes of ihe incursion of an ancient, 
psvchotk femme famie into our time, there are only 
fKmpses of the ideal roummy's^urse flick struggling to 
break Ihroi^ the pedestrian pace of The A^^^akemn^l. Still, 
if offers a new wTinkle in the wrappings, and its efforts to 
get its energy from the mvMeries of an. death, and time arc 
much more imr^ng than shctug up coccb. 



Mondav . Nox ember 3 . I *W0 9 




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TUf S - HII J »11 
SAT 4SUN NOON CLOSING 



352» SOUTH MONIKX ST. 




WE'RE PAYING 

; CASH 

INSTANTLY FOR 
CLASS RINGS 
AND OTHER JEWELRY 



Sat. 10-3:00 



>1 



FOLMAR 




UM A 



1 



IN THE VARSITY SHOPPING CENTER 
WFST TENNESSEE ST • (904) 224 




Prat OHt Tin Bank with $2 ar mara purdiasa. 

Joiii u at ottr bi| Anniversn" otidbratioii. And 
our ^rcttt selection ards. ^ft«. and 

stadoiicry. For any purchase t S2 or more today. 
»*U ^ive yos a liBfict> 0i 




Colle9e Square Shopping Center, 
Corner of West Tennessee and Ocaia Rd 
Monday-Friday Itom-tpm; Saturday lOam ipm; 





Itt 



I;. 

If * 





If 



• '-mi 

itii«;iiiilfMt||, 

p 

%ir^ HI 

Mini?! I { 

i » 
'l ' • 

S I s ^ ■ 

■ ■ m 



J. 




10 / Monday. November 3, 1980 FtorMi FtanUieay 

Bad timing blamed for disappointing concert turnout 



BY MKHAEL McCLELLAND 

Lasi Saturday's Harry C haf>in conceri was 
noi qiJiic fhc success thai f SL's I 'nk)n Program 
Oliice had hoped lor — C hapin drew only 1200 
fans, and lost more than $2,000, according to 
csi imatcs made by U PO. 

*'C hapin was one ol the best concent you 
could hope to see, hut not enough people know 
about him," said Ciary Nesbitt, entertainment 
director of the LPO student council. "That, 
along vMih the timmg, kept attendance down — 
the timing was poor.** 

I he Chapin concert came only a week after 
I PO's highly successful Homecoming Pow 
\H()v\, tcaturing the I itiic River Band and the 
Dirt Hand. Having the two shows so close 
toL'cthc; mav have torccd nianv student^ 
make an either (^r (,lccisK)n. Apparently, mans 



fans chose I it tic Ki^er Band over Chapm. 

"We were hoping to drav% two different 
audience^, the r(>^k fans at Homecoming and 
the more laid ba^k people at C hapin," Nesbiti 
cxplamed. "VV c thought that way we could have 
someihing for everyone. " 

In spite of Chapin's poor showing, Neshiti 
expect ^ UPO's concert series lo show a profit 
for the quarter. 

"I-ittle River's prc^fit will make up tor the 
Atlanta Rhythm Section and C hapin, and a little 
bit more," Nesbiti said. "Financially, we should 
be ahead." 

Nesbitt added that LPO i^ expecting to make 
at least a small protit from the upcoming Arlo 
Ciuihrie cc>ncert. Ciuthrie will be playing two 
shmss in Rub> Diamond auditorium Nov. 21. 
Early response to Guthrie hai> been good, and 



I P( ) IS hoping to sell-out both shows. 

\eshin is hoping thai ilie new Iv -implemented 
Union Program Council will help bring nu>re oi 
the enteriainmeni students want to fSl . An 
important pan ol that, Nesbitt said.' is geffniL' 
feedback from the students on just vxfiat i\pe of 
sh(n\s ihe\ wmild like \o see. Nesbiii in 
encouraging studeniN ti>drop b\ the L PO i>ltice 
in the student unk>n, and will be setting up a 
concert information table in the Union 
courfvard everv Wednesday. 

"The philosophv is different, it's going ii^ he 
democratic," Nesbitt said. "Rather than lusi 
one administrator deciding what slu>v\s ue're 
going to have, we'll have a uhi^le C ouncil 
deciding. Concerts will be iu>; just vshai I want, 
but what 1 think the greatest number of people 
want.'* 






Harry Chapin 




Classified Ads 



Roam 306 Union, Open 9 AM 4 
Deadline: 12 noon the day befcn 





2 END TABLE LAMPS. FLORAL 
DESIGN IN EXCELLENT 
CONDITION. CALL 575 0291 5 9 PM. 



Sublet, 1 bdr furn. apt. %\9S per mo. 
Pool, Ctrl, heat 1 bl from FSU must 
least by Nov. 5. 386-2579. 



BLACK & WHITE TV 19 IN SEARS 
SSe. 222 M94 torn. 417 EAST VIRGINIA 

#6. 



Room for rent. 647 W. Pensacota St. 
bath and kitchen privileges. $105 mo. & 
utilities. 222 2873 



NICE QUEEN SIZE WATER BED 
Frame liner mattress & bottom setup 
for only . $75. Will deliver 576 8521. 



OORMSIZE RUGS 
DON T LET YOUR FEET FREEZE 
CARPET $15 20 PH 224 6133 



FSU'UF COUPON 
$50. CALL 644 6995 AFTER 4 PM. 



10- speed 25' 2 Inch red Pucti Cavalier 
with red fenders, all alloy parts, quick 
release hubs, toe clips, new chain and 
rear tire, fur seat. Only $195. Call eves. 
576 4261 or come by Munchie Wagon in 
Union daytime. 



CASING 

FOR TV AND FILMS. 
PROFESSIONAL AND 
NONPROFESSIONAL; ALL AGES. 
$5-25 AN HOUR. CALL CANDACE AT 
224-2004, 9-4, M-F. 

TWO PEOPLE NEED RIDE TO FT. 
LAUDERDALE AREA 
THANKSGIVING WEEKEND-WILL 
SPLIT (pAS-CALL 644-«142 OR 644 

4339. 



Kenwood TX-620 tape cassette deck 
$200. Call 878-2219. Ask for David. 

FoR^Lfc^ 

WEIGHT LIFTING BENCH W/ LEG 
LIFT, 165 LB WT SET EXCELLENT 

CONDITION 576 7240. 



Used couch for sale. Fair condition, 
large, price negotiable. Call Joe or 
Emily at 575 5737. Most sellnow, so 
don't wait. 

TTirtsa; 2 Vfff. Tech., 2 u. of F. 
football tickets for sale. Must sell 644- 
2388,644 1105 

Be prepared for the cold weather! 
Hardly worn, heavy ^4 length gray- 
suede coat, quilted lining, women's 
s ze 13 New was $120, asking $60. 644- 
4075 before 5 p.m., ask for Laurie. 



FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED. 2 
BEDROOM, 1'2 BATH AT LAS 
PALMAS FROM DECEMBER 
THROUGH SPRING QUARTER. FOR 
INFORMATION CONTACT 
MELANIE •70-2396. 

WANTED: TICKETS FOR FSU VA. 
TECH GAME. PLEASE CALL 870- 
2067 ASK FOR JOE. 

Sublease 1 or 2rms at Cash Hall; wtr & 
sp qtr, meals, maid 'serv., bar 
w/HBO, FREE to come look; 
poolskte. Call 222-1767. 



In Leon County Special Land Sale 4 
miles south of truck route on Oak 
Rirtqe Road 3 acre tracts 1850 acre'lOA 
tratts 1650 acre. 20 to 40 acre tracts 
1500 per cst re, terms; 13°o down Syr at 
1?<»c interest 

JimmyBoyntonRealty phone 222 7581 
After hours 576 3874 for Ben Boynton 



2 BEDROOM, 2 BATH APT SUBLET 
$265 MONTH PRINCE MANOR. CALL 
575-6251 OR 575-6340 OR 222-2517 
JULIE OR ANN. 

2 bedroom unfurn. apt for sublease 
$250/month includes water and cable. 
Refundable deposit. Call 575 4090 or 
222 8300 after 2 pm. Close to FSU. 

SUBLET ROOM AT CASH HALL FOR 
W/S QUARTERS FREE $50 
SECURITY DEPOSIT LEFT-POOL 
BAR, MEALS, A/C. CALL 244-5742. 



Sublet: 3 br house unfurn. $300/mo. 
fenced yd., quiet st., scrn. porcti, 
washer, avail. Nov. 15, 385-1343. 





ROOMMATE FOR WINTER 
QUARTER ONLY. WALK FROM APT 
TO CAMPUS LOW PRICE 222 0690. 



Classic car- '65 Plymouth Valiant 
convertible, slant 6 engine, runs good. 
Needs body work. $400 or best offer. 
Call Jeff 644 6577 




MOPED, 1970 HONDA EXPRESS. 
$275 CALL 224 6503 ASK FOR JIM 
OSCEOLA HALL RM. 378 



Starting winter quarter non smoking 
male rommate to share two-bedroom 
furn. apt. '/i mile from FSu $66.23/mo. 
IN. us. < 4 etec. Ph. 576 5344. 

i need either one or two guys to share a 
two bedroom fully furnished house. 
Rent wil be $140 or $100 per month, 

respectively No pets, please Central 
air and heat and carpeting throughout. 
Call 222 9800. 

Need cash? Got any baseball cards or 
Larry, 893-3873 

FEM ROOMMATE WANTED, 1 BD 
APT. CLOSE TO CAMPUS $105 81 >/a 
UTIL. CALL MOLLY 232-4010. 



1980 Honda CM400T 5,000 miles 
shield luggage rack highway 
helmets and more. Call 222 2971 week 
days. $1700. 



Wind 
bars. 



Studiows liberal fm wants same to 
apt. win. & spring qu». 
$115 & urn. Call nionH Kaffiy 575- 



RMT. NEEDED AT MONTEREY 
APTS. $12S/MO. '/a UTL. CALL M5- 
7306 BEFORE 5 8. 224-1174 AFTER 5. 




ROOAAMATE WANTED TO SHARE 3 
BDRM HOUSE UTILS 
f75/MONTH. CALL ROBIN 224 5774 
AFTER 8 PM. 



TICKET COUPONS NEEDED FOR 
VI RG. TECH. GAME NOV. 8. $10 PER 

COUPON. CALL 599-9538. ASK FOR 
BRIAN OR LEAVE NAME & 
NUAABER. 

.'sparately need 4 tickets or coupons 
to FSU-UF game. Will accept 1 to 4, 
coupons. Will p«y good price. 224- 
2869. 




IMMEDIATE EMPLOYMENT 
DRESSMAKING, PATTERNWORK, 
CUTTING. 
FULL AND/OR PART-TIME 
CALL MRS. WILLIAMS, DRESS 
ART. 
306^64. 

NEED TUTOR QUALIFIED TO 

HELP IN OCEANOGRAPHY 1001 
AND ECONOMIC 2011. PLEASE 
CALL JILL 644-1193. 



FREE RENT & FOOD FOR MALE 
OR FEMALE IN EXCHANGE FOR 
COOKING, GR0CEF;y SHOPPING, 
ETC. FOR MYSELF & 2 SONS. 
LARGE HOUSE, OWN ROOM. CALL 
385-8494 AFTER 3 T»M. 




WILL DO TYPING IN MY HOME. 
TELEPHONE 385-9609. KEEP 

TRYING. 



WANTED PERSON WITH CAR WHO 
WISHES TO EARN MONEY FOR 
TRANSPORTATION CALL 644 2170. 

YOU WRITeT T EDI f; " f Y^PeT 
Themes, term papers, at reasonable 
rates. Call eves, wkends- 385-5574. 



TYPING FAST EFFICIENT LTRS,' 
RESUMES, PAPERS, ETC. 85c PG. 
386-4843. 



MINI WAREHOUSE UNITS 

6x6 available larger sizes $14 50 up. 
Call us at Lakewood Mini Warehouses 
3864191. 



TYPING IBM DISSERTATIONS 
THESES TERM PAPERS. CALL 
PAT DIXON 386 1255. 



I string tennis racquets One day 
service. Lowest prices in town. Call 
Bill at 576-0206. 

TYPING: BIG OR SMALL PAPERS, 
DISS., RESUMES! NEAR CAMPUS 
75c/p SUE 222-9637, AFTER 6. 

LEASE ~~ 
YOUR FURNITURKI 
wide variety 
immediate delivery 
Optior to Buy 

FURNITURE MART RENTALS 
1206 S. Adams 



Edited Typing IBM Selectric 11 
Reports/ Res u m es / Letters/Dissert. 
575-7171 Mission Rd Area 



Excellent, quality typing using an IBM 
Selectric II. Experienced in typing 
termpapers, theses, diss«rtati«w. 
576*9154. 

Quality Typing of Dissert., Themes, 
etc. Call 644 6031 or 224-3546/Sva. 
Reasonable. 



TYPING 
REASONABLE RATES 
305^7103 




LUNA 

Did you hear that Sol #1 is into kinky 
sex! Ask him and watch hltn crack a 
smile! 

Rastaman 



IT'S COMING TOMORROW! 

THERE'S NO PLACE TO HIDE! YOU 
MUST SEE IT! TOMORROW NITE 
AT THE DOWNUNOER 9:30 AND 
10:30 IT'S HOLLYWOOD: THE 
RANCID YEARS! THE WORST 
FILMSOF ALLTIME! 



METHODS OF CONTRACEPTION 
Mon 8. Thu 2:30pm, Tue 9am 
UNIVERSITY HEALTH CTR Rm 423. 
AAen and women welcome. 



RHONDA WELCOME HOME 
I LOVE YOU THOM 



TB- 

K E E P I N TOUCH AS ALWAYS 



LL 



SHABBOTT DINNER 
HILLEL WILL HAVE 
THE DINNER NOV. 14 
INSTEAD OF NOV. 7 
MORE INFO. 222 5454. 



DEBBIE SALYER, 
GREAT WEEKEND, LOV YOU TOO! 
YOU DID IT IN LESS THAN 4 SO CAN 
1,(1 WON'T RUSH IT) 



United Seminoles 
You ALL made it possible for me. 
Thank You xoxoxoxoxoxoxox Beth 



To all of you basic studies students 
who I bugged and bothered for the past 
2 weeks thank you so much for your 
patience, support and votes. With love 
and appreciation. 

Beth Nugent 

-— — _ 

You're da cudest. 1 miss you real bad 
I love you Bef . Beeep. CUDER. 



PROTEST THE RESURGENCE OF 
ANTI SEMITISM IN FRANCE 
BY RALLYING WITH FSU 
STUDENTS AND FACULTY ' 
WED 12 PM IN UNION 
COURTYARD 



I need a ride to the Oaytona 
Beach/Delond area on 11/7/00. Will 
tfiare«(penses. Call Teresa 644-3316. 

icUNGFU 
Ot wilop power and control 

214 W. College 224-7718 
Next to Great Bicycle Shop 



SHABBOT DINNER 

NOV 7 
GUEST SPEAKER 
MORE INFO. 222 54S4 



COMING! 
HILLEL SCRUB SUITS 
GET YOURS 



$200 REWARD 

FOR INFORMATION LEADING TO 
THE IDENTIFICATION OF THE 

PERSON WHO TOOK OUR SIGN AT 
THE PHYRST homecoming weekend. 

MOSNCM OYAN IS COMIIM 
NOV. 12, 1900 

IN TAMPA 
IF YOU WANT TO SEE 

HIM, CALL HILLEL 
OFFICE BEFORE NOV. • 
232-5454. 



Everyone's been goosed Have yoo 
ever been ducked? Pick up your duck 
card in Mm Union ticket office. 



Amy A. Thanks for the work on the 
Pumpkin Special! It looked great! 
Only 3V2 months till Valentines! 
Laurie 

LAURIE^ 

You're welcome about the Pumpkin 
Special. 

Jill, the Tired Classy Classified 
Typeseffar. 



BAGELS' 
BAGELS! 
BAGELS! 
IF YOU LOVE BAGELS 

COME TO HILELL S 
BAGEL SALE! NOV 12 
IN THE STUDENT UNION 
MORE INFO. 222-5454. 

Ever seen a duck run? On Nov. 9, you 
can run with our duck. Sign up in Rm 
318 Union. 




MONDAY NITE 
MOST OF OUR CLASSICAL 
COLLECTION WILL BE PLAYED 
ON MONDAYS AT THE LUCKY 
HORSESHOE BAR. 

WEIGHT CONTROL 

Nutrition counseling, 644-3280 center 
for family services 9 3, M F 

MARC MALCOM RMT 
Massage therapy & relaxation/stress 
management counseling 27? O'iSO 

TNT hTdEAWAY canoe RENTAL 
Wakulla River at Hwy. 98. November 
Special: mention this ad & rent 2 
canoes for the price of 1. Call 1 925 6412 
or 878-5607. 



THIS MONDAY & EVERY MONDAY 
IS BULLWINKLES LOG CABIN 
WORLD FAMOUS GONG SHOW 
WITH KIRK DONOVAN. tSO 1st 
FRIZE. 

A POOR GIRL IS RICH AT POOR 
PAUL'S. .25 DRAFT ' 2 PRICE WINE 
EVERY MONDAY POOR PAUL S 
POURHOUSE,618W. TENN. 



Soft Contact Lenses. 

Hard Contact Lenses. 

24 hour Contact Lenses 

B & L Contact Lenses. $50. ea, S85 pr 

Dr. Allen Dean, 222-9991. 

Backpacking in the snow! ^or 
beginners Dec. 15 20 in Western Non'- 
Carolina. ' All equipment & 
transportation provided. OUTDOOR 
ADVENTURES 305-588 0352 P O. Box 
801 Lake Worth. Fl. 33460. Have a 
great break! 

Country Western Dancing Class 
Rocky's Wed 7 9 pm by BALLROOM 
DANCE CLUB Guaranteed fun i 
Cheap thrills! Not too late to join! 
Info 575 6846. 



Blue Kaycvd is honored by the 
following merchants: Nic's Toggery 
Athletic Attic, Hobbit Hoag«e 
Factory, Brewmaster's Restaurant 
(opening soon), Mac's m The Back 
Lounge, Pizza Pro, Tatianassee 
Flowers, The Pub. The Phyrst Ada^- 
8i Eve Campus Hairplace, Zonxers 
Brown's Pharmacy, The AAeiting Pot 
Annette's Women's Fashio.it, Great 
Bicycle Shop. Barnacle BiH's- 
McGregor's Steak House, Roger 
Nelson Mus»c Store, The Outpost, S*a 
Fox Restaurant & Lounge P ^ 
Lo«Mtge, Quality inn Southerna re. 
Captain's Lounge. 

Marilyn & Joyce are waiting for ^0- 
with information fighter 55 00 sfy e 
cuts. JJ's HAIRPLACE 4225 A 
Pensacola St. S75-7750. Walk ms 
welcome 



JJ's HairPlace Inflation f ighting *5 J) 
Style cuts. All the time 4225 W. 
Pensacola St. 575 7750 waix 



.ns 



■AT LUNCH AT THE PHYRST 
WITH A fRIEND! 



:■ • • 'FP CO rv: 

' " Z "i t * 

POURMOUSE*'! A 

CAN YOU USE 
IF YOU CAN IS 
JUGGLE MAKE »lO».t i 
PLAY mSTIu^f, 
IMPRESSIONS Ce ■ i . 
YOUR BELLV B,-'> -.i-T^ 
TO BULLMSH . f ..-» 
ANOEvE»t vC^ii' * 

bullai»<klES aofic 'I* 

GONGSHOWr' 

HOLIDAY *0tTt4 

Dhotograpp i eof"*"t ■ 
Packafle p»a»n f <.&^ • . 
Call Oeif^ar S>ud^ r< t, 



r 




m 



ple.- 

NECK^/. 
GOLD C - 

57S r}^2 Wit- »t*A«- 
6ACK 

Lost brow" woe* »^«»* 
and L 

12 45 p' - A •' ■ 

FOUND CONTAC 
BUSINESS PABK .0* 

UNlONLOSU^" 

POUND GOLD s"- 
224 4708 EVENINGS ^ 

Taiu.^ ■ • ■ 

Re^a'-c 




' t 






i 

ryChapin 



Open 9 AM-4 PM 
the day befort 



HIRSTY WOMFN NEVEH had 
, ' rER F« flND Than poc( 
I -0^ EREE MICMElOB f ,i: 
y 2 4 PtA 8 9 PM POOtt f« 
URHOUSE 618 W TEHHtiSfel 

AN YOU USE tMCASH* 
IF YOU CAN SIMG OMC^i 
JGGLE MAKE PEOPLE lAUO* 
LAY AN INSTRUMENT 

Impressions or hh\su f 

'OUR BE LLY BUT TON Of • oc< 
^O BULLWINKLES Th v .sOAt 
NO EVERY MONDAY NIGHT r 
JLLWINKLES WOttLO I^AMC 
>ONG SHOW 

HOLIDAY PORTRAITS 

\ake Special Gift\ Bu» • 
■ otographir portraits »atte » - 
icKage plans .n color iroTi V' 
all Oelmar Slud-os at 17* mt 




EASE t LOST Oil 
iECKLACE W/ PENDANT T, 
;OLD CIRCLES. DOLPHIN lEI 
S m7. WILL rtEWAHD TO GET 
\CK 

♦ brown wool jacket btwn . 

uand.s Hall. 10 ?6 t)t*'> 
om Reward Ka.ia 644 n * 

JUNO: CONTACT ^ENSL 
JSINESSPARK LOT 10 73 » St I 
MION LOST 4 FOUND 

,UND GOLD BRACE^a;,C* 
4 4708 £VENlNGSTOirf N 

>St 9/2V/80 Op^' f.u' '>« ' ' 7 
ilue Lost .n the w.c-r ■ 

Ker room f-.f^-'^S wWg-'^ 
^ S565 or 3»5 iW Ask W 

ward! ! 

.OST GREEN WORLt^ .^^.^ 
F LIGHT JACKET, SEN ■ 
ALUE PLEASE CALL ^- 





n 




5eniinoles turn 
urricane into 
ulsa depression 

nMlint >|t»«IMI»ll«HI 

I , . H c!i A flumcaiH! wlurn 
I Mtla\ alicrmHin bui 
jii it had been 
, liilviitlcprcssuMi. 
i.c (.ttldcn Hurricane 
cl! in!t> I he end/one 
i,cs .iu.t> and tuur linies 
! Scinim»le >%eaihermcn 
, c I heir predieiion of 
i '111 . 

n.iiicr how long or hard 
I Ml. the I SU defense 
,i,c iinal score of Saturday 
s ,.»nir<>m:iin>n N^iih TuKa in 
. ( ptKll Siadium was 45-0, nol 





. ; .IS il»c scoreboard read after \h» 

jiiM- oursclvL"^ credit for the 
• huchackcr Reggie Herring 
.! I he ol lcnsc gave up the 



\\\ li«n\ high up in the polls will 
k iiiiliMiikal Seminolcs rise when 
!%triia>'s wm is coupled with No. I 
V *^ima\ 6-3 loss to SEC foe 



Juhiiathm after successful ^iml 

MississipfH State and No. 2 UCLA*s 
23-17 defeat at the hands of the 
Arizona Wildcats? 

**Thrcc. three, three,'* an 
exhuberant Herring, who led the team 
in tackles with six unassisted stops and 
five assists, cried. **When I heard 
UCLA lost (it was announced while the 
pjayers were warming up before the 
game), 1 got goose bumps. We played 
inspired football." 

"That fired me up," added tailback 
Sam Piatt, who tied a team record with 
his fifth 100 yard game of the season, 
rushing 23 times for 113 yards and one 
touchdown. "I know it fired the whole 
team up. We knew we had to go out 
and win impres.sively.'* 



Photo t)y Bob OUry 

"1 never saw a team and a crowd get 
excited like that when they announced 
the UCLA score.** added FSU coach 
Bobby Bowden, who has kd the Tribe 

to an 8-i mark this year and- to 
victories in 23 of FSU's last 25 games. 
*M told the players the ducks are on the 
pond, now it's up to us to do our job." 

And the Seminoles responded 
magnificently, racking up 444 total 
yards on the evening, I7i in the air. 
Quarterback Rick Stocksiill cuniplcicd 
77 percent of his passes (14-18) and 
connected on scaring strikes ol 17 and 
10 yards to Hardis Johnson and Kurt 
Unglaub, respectively. On the ground, 
Mike Whiting scored twice as he 

Turn to FSU, paf^e 12 



f\oMM Fbmbratt Mo ndax. November 3. l^SO 

Early scoring binge lifts 
FAMU past Tuskegee 49-22 

B\ vv \^ M l>^ 

II \\\m \l "IMIM I * W Ml I » M 

li sianed ChriNinui^ n \ -hct lor ilw HiwhUi 
WM RaliicTH tn their criixhaii; 4^ :: HonKVommi: \icioiv 
o\er rival Tiiskeyee Instiiuic. 

•*\\e were Im^kinc for rc%cni:c.** ^aid Ratilcr 
quarterback Nailiamci kiH>iKe. 

**They beat us last year in our HiHiKVomine gaim* ( I^-I4l 
and we never forgot it." 

The quest for s^eci re\engc mu%t ha%e Kvn in the 
Rattlers* minds from the onset. Befiwc five niinuiCN had 
ticked off the clock in the first quarter, the Rattlers had 
recovered two fumbles and scored three touchdiwn^. 

"The wall was in the middle. I faked lefi and weiii up i In- 
middle,** said junior tailback Greg Fa'^haw. who aiuriu-d 
the opening kickoff 75 yards to Tuskcgcc ^ 7 \ard 
linc.**After I got all my blocks,' I brcikc to the outside aiul 
thought i*d bring it tn but that gtiy came from imhtfre and 
got roe.** 

Even though Fashaw couldn't bring it in for six on that 
play, the confident Rattler offense did on the ncxi. 

Mike Solomon, a 6-foot 200 pound, junior tailback, 
bulled his way into the Tuskegee endzone for the sciirc. He 
finished the day with 87.yards on 1 3 carries 

"It was all because of Gus. Big O, Big B. C'K, ( uddv. 
JC, and Block." said Solomon when asked his thoughts ol 
his running performance. "Thai s nn wholcdav ." 
Solomon was casually relerrmt' to his oticnsivc line which 
pushed the Tuskegee defense back for a loial of 34<) \auls 

While Hubbard uas pleased vviih his revamped ollcnsc. 
he should have been overjoyed by his defense. 

Forcing five Tuskegee tumbles on the afternoon, the 
biting FAMU defense put the ball back into Ihe olteiisc's 
hand on Tuskegee's first two possessions. 

Michael Whatley, Tuskegee's starting fallback, lei ilic 
ball slip from his grasp two of his first three carries and ihe 

I urn lit tAML , pu}»i' 12 



A "Man of Action'' for the Leon County Sclio^ Board! ! 
Elect.. JIM LOUWERS, who is 



CU5TOm hl-fi 



1. Qualified, 

I Bs University of Detroit 
• ^ Ed Wayne State University 
' S Wayne State University 
\ D University of Tennessee 
I atherofsix U) children 
' ^Perintendent Certification in 
^*»ree (3) states 



Experienced, 



• Matliematics/Science Teacher- 

10 years 

• Attiletic Director- 

• Hi9»i Sclieoi Ceacn- 

• Secondary School 

Administrator- 

• IBM Computer Systems 

Engineer- 2 years 

• School Board Member in three 

states 

• Citadel Professor- 2 years 

• SclMOl Planner- 6 years 



7 years 
IS years 

3 years 




8 

C 
3 



^K^— Cusfom Hi-Fi. the Price Cutters. 



456 W. Tenn. 



222-5020 m 



Political Advertisment 




I 

t 



% 

i 

i 

I 



CUSTOm hl-f I PISCOUnT ccnlcfi 





,iii«;trrtiffli|)> 

filltlll^tlBl'' 



If 



■J 



ill 





12 / Mondav, November 19«n Florida Mambt an 




1 1 



15 carries and 
yards on 6 



FSU from page // 

compiled 74 yards on 
Ricky Williams added 34 
aiicmpts, scoring once. 

"I was pleased with the offense," Bowdcn 
noted, "Especially ihe way ihey controlled 
the game. The offensive line sure played 
good tool ball-** 

**l tigure Notre Dame (undefeated, 33-0 
vMnners over Navy) will be Number One. 
Cicorgia (undefeated. 13-10 winners over 
South Carolina) will be Number Two and 
we'll be Three." Stockstill added. **Wc*ve 
gotten a lot of breaks. We've got a lot going 
for us right now, wc just can*t get upsei.** 

**l guevs we'll move up to three,** iKMed 
noseguard Ron Simmons, who had six 
tackie»i, two for losses. *But we'll take 



anything they give us. 

**We deserve to move up.*' Bowden said. 
**We paid our dues early in the seMn and 
other teams are paying their dues now. 

**My onl\ thinking (on a bowl bid) is that 
in the last couple of weeks we have heiped 
ourselves and our friends have helped us. But 
there is always a chance you can get locked 
out of a bowl, being an inctependent. We 
can't worry about that. We mmt do our 
part." 

**That*s all we talk about at Rbrida State 
— a National Championship.** added 
Herring. **l feel we deserve the chance (to 
play for the title), and we will if we get in the 
right bowl. Just put us in the place, just ^ve 
us the chance. That's all we ask.** 




Reggie Herring 



FAMU 

Gcrfden Tigers payed dearU i. 

Getting the baU on Tuskcccc : 
found receiver Emory Collier - 
an eight yard touchdou n w ^ 
early 14-0 lead. Whaile\ \ sc. 
made matters worse. Kooiu. 
before sweeping to his right on a kee;\ a; 
yards in for the sccwe. " "^'^ 

Facing a three touchdow n deficii Tuskc 
great effort. Just before the half T 
Kenneth Crum lobbed a screen pas^ 
Jordan who ran 32 yards for tht . f ^ 
touchdown run by FAMU fullback } . > \' 
Tiger came back to add a 77 yard 
fumMick.EdO*Neal. 

But it all proved to be too little, too late a. 
upped their record to 3-4 and the Tigm fd} : < 




g COIN LAUNDRY ^ 

Largest in town-60 machines 

Closest to ctimpus 
Air Conditioned-Cofor T.V. 
69S w. Virginia St. 



F.S.U. PANHELLENIC 

Presents the 

Panhellenic 
Formal 

UmOm BALL ROOM 

HtlDAYt NOI^MI^ER 7tii» 1900 
8.*0Q-i:00 

$5.50 per couple 



I TM 

aders 








ACE 
OERS 



. I III. 



FFICIAL T-SHIRT 

M of TAITO AMER CORP 



WHITE ON BLACK ONLY 
S'M-L-Xl Quality 50/50 Silk Screenedby hand 

Send Check. Ca^. Money Order 
$5.95 -f .75 ShHHHflg and HancHti^ 

TO THE 

WIZ KIDS 
37U HiUview SL, McKeesport, PA 15132 
A GREAT XMAS PRESENT 

PROWPT DELIVERY 
"DISTmBUTOR INQUIRIES WELCOME ' 







(Save up to $20 on Siladiunf College Rings.) 



►Mr. 



Siladium rings are made from a fine jeweler s 
stainless alloy that produces a brilliant white 
lustre. It is unusually strong and is resistant 

to deterioration from coiTosion or skin 
reactions. 

In short, it's quality and durability at ^n 
affwdable pnce. 







Both men's and women's Siladium ring 
styles are on sale this week only through 
your ArtCarved representative. Irade in 
your lOK gold high school ring and save 

even more. 

It's a great way of saying you Ve earned it. 



/IRT(7IRVED 

^COLLEGE RINGS 
Bymbdizing your ability to achieve. 



Nov, 3-7 



University Union 



Union Store 



Deposit required. Master Charge t>r \'isa accepted. 



\4 - 




pec 



\ cant] 



an J: 
I, for thi 
This I 
iwis and 
con 
incufTi 

crcd to 

>2 deidii 
I van Ittd b 

^ Mason s 

from : 
shortly b 

ccont. 

»oughi 
>le to 111 



0 



\ abrd 



1 1 



7 

varU line. Kotmct 



1 



r- 'o l.lllbilckRoov.,H. 

f rank Middleion fhc 
a louchdoHn scamper ^ 

1'^ " ! tc asiheRaiib. 
I igers fell 2 < 




lugs.) 




Idiuni ring 
through 

1 rade in 
and save 

ien more. 

arned it. 



nion 



1 Gollt gt' 




ii' 
If 




lorida Flambeau 



fAUTi NCLoi iy\ 

chanvt'of shower ^ v a . 
bui tair V\cilncsda>. Highs m 
ihc 70i. iovk sionighi m ihc40s 



I the' 



suVtMBLR 4, 1980 



SERVING TALLAHASSEE FORM YEARS 



FOL6i,/>/a32 




emocratic drama played out today 



jgh turn out 
\pected locally 

iY DANM v(k;t 

M ^MB^ M SlAf¥ WRITfcR 

ca.it'MHcr. 

I • lon^'. hard and sometimes 
..i[!;paiei!';iie end today as an 
- .j pcr.cui ot I con County voters 
polls lu elect national, state and 

if^ind Ihc curtain voters will face a 
\ long and ccinplcx ballot thai also 
a sUdv, vole on city-county 
ioiiJanon. five slate constitutional 
^ixJmenis. city annexation questions 
rnon-presidcniial write-in candidates. 

of the wriie-in candidates are 
sng in a single race, challenging John 
•^an If , the only official name on the 
' >r (he county supervisor of elections 
niN contest, which featured two 
WIS and a lot of bad blood, is perhaps 
Bosi controversial. Sullivan, the son of 
nr incumbent supervisor Wilma Sullivan 
>ently deputy supervisor of eiections, 
^trtd to run only minutes before the 
Jeadline. Up until then, Wtlma 
"ifl had been running unopposed for the 
A lawsuit filed by write-in candidate 
f Mason sought to have SulHvan's name 
o«ed from the ballot. Mason dropped the 
shortly before withdrawing from the 

> second lawsuit, filed by write-ki 
^te Richard Black (who*s still in the 
>• wught to make polling places mof€ 
to the handicapped. 




Paula Hawkins, husband Gene and family ^roU from ampaipi plane at 

Tallahassee airport yesterday: style over substance everytime. 
Othet write-in candidates challenging 



SuUivan are: Tom Bates Jr., Retha Forman, 
Erwhr jKkson, Dot Joyce, Arthur Mobley 
Jr., Camp Peavy, Jan Pietryzyk, Karen 
Roberts, Bob Ryon and Jack Todd. 
Wfite-in votes may be cast by penciling in 



the candidate's name behind a metal slat near 
the top of the ballot. With seven write-in 
slots on ihe ballot, be sure the slot matches 
the office for which the candidate is running. 



Turn to LOCAL, page 9 



She talks loudly 
but says little 

BYSAM€X>LEY 

FLAIUEAU STAfF WafTER 

If anything has characterized Paula 
Hawkins's bid for the U.S. Senate, it's one 
overriding concern: preserve the image 

Hawkins has allowed nothing, not 
discrepancies in her campaign speeches, nor 
questions raised over her campaign fundmg, 
nor an overall haziness on specific issues, to 
dispell her carefully cuhivated pose as 
crusader for Florida in Washington, friend of 
the middle-class, proteaor of the American 
family. 

Not that her opponent. Bill Gunier, has 
run the most admirable, or cleanest, of 
campaigns. At first, Ciunier, rejected the 
negative approach, trying to emphasized his 
differences with Hawkins on specific issues, 
like his reluctance to drastically reduce social 
services inihe name of a balance budget. 

That all changed, though, when the two 
squared off in a televised ciebate Oct. 26 in 
Winter Park. 

Little time in that debate was devoted to 
issues, as the candidates turned to bitter 
attacks on each other's ethics. Gunter 
accused Hawkins of breaking an eariy pk<%e 
not to accept contributions from groups 
representing special interests, especiaOy oU 
and utiUty companies and out-of-state 
corporations. 

Hawkins countered by pointing to 
Gunter's acceptance of money from big 

TumtoHAWKiNS,pa^i 



committee wants Wainwright removed 



Third in a series 



BY MICHAEL MOLINE 

FLAMa&MISTAFFWtrTER 

Wainwright shoidd be fired as head of the iMda 
rnem of Corrections because of his gross 
agemeni of the state's prison system, according to a 
t^y a subcommittee of the House Committee on 

ons. 

Trt . obtained last week by theftom^eauandofficially 
^wday .accused Wainwright of violating state laws 
- ^ ng nepotism and use of inmate labor for non-public 
;^ns ii said family favoritisn in the department's hiring 
mot: practices has caused widespread discontent 
■ on employees and is a chief cause of widespread 
" ^ 0 1 guard brutaUty against prisoners . 
-"f^erniorc, the report implies, Wainwright lied to Gov. 
^•faham \^hen he told Graham DCXT policy prohibits the 
^of mem bersofthesame family within thesamc institution 
^nofihcsiate. In fact, it says. "Information furnished by 
/^nment clearly shows that the state's nepotism lav. 
"*oil) abndgcd in the areas of hiring, super> ision. and 




advancement . The Department's policy is sidestepped so often 
that it can hardly be considered a policy.'* 

The report also outlines Uie link between favoritism andthe 
high turnover raieof guards intheprison system. TWsyear 50% 

ofiheguardsemploycdbytheDOCquit. 

• • The Department is currenUy loiing many of it's employees 
due to the existeoce of favoritism, nepotism and selective 
advancement, whkh employees perceive to be pervasive 



throughout the correctional system," the report says. "The 
Department has repeatedly blamed low compensation for 
employee discontent, but ... thai perception of favoritiim and 
unfairpromotionalopportanitiesaremiMorfactors. ' ' 

Indeed, compbanu of favoritism were conunon mong 
onployees and former employees interviewed by committee 
staffearlierUiisyear.TheysaidTclativesof Wainwright. Union 
County Sheriff WmWhitriieadandotherDOCadministrators 
ate regulariy proinoted, regaidicss of their ki^ of service or 

talent. 

Said oae guard: "If yon're not in the family, or the clique 
dowadiere. yon justdon 't get anywhere . " * 

There also exists a link between the Department's rampant 
nepotism and brutality by guards against prisoners, the report 
says, family members tend to protect one another . according to 
theteport, andagiiard is imlikely to report brutality committed 

by a relative. FintfaemKire. prison employees not part of "the 
family'* are scmiclinMS themselves brutalized into silence 
regarding instancesofbrutality.Oncformcr guard toldof being 

drwed and beaten alter oomplaimng ^bout beatmgs of 
^gutRli. Turn to FRiSO\ page f 



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2 ATuesday, November 4, I9«0 Flonda Flambeau 



Women's Week organizer's satisfied 



BYMICHAELMCCLH LAND 

Tallahassee has the third highest rape rate for a city of it*s 
size in the United States according to FBI statistics. That 
prompted the creation of the Stop Violence Aganist Women 
Task Force, a local organization of concerned women 
determined to make Tallahassee a safer place for aH women. 
The Task Force has worked toward that end through co- 
operation, mutual support, and most recently, education. 

The Task Force was respomible for last week's **Scop 
Violence AgainM Women 
Awareness Week.* a series 
of programs designed to 
make the local eoatmunity 
more aware of problems 
facing women in today's 
world. Their series featured 
programs on violence agakist 
women, health concerns, 
and economic issues. The 
turn-out for the programs, 
according to it's organizers, 
wasgood. 

'They were out because 
they were upset about rising 
violence against women,'* 
said Gail Rowiand, one of the 
chief organizers of the 
Awareness Week. "They 
expressed that over and over, 
what can we do about i t ? — that they were tired ofbeing told to 
just lock themseivesaway." 

**The real success was in the amount of awareness that was 
gained from it,** said Elaine Sisko, director of Florida 
State 's Women *s Center and another organizer of the project . 
"Alotof people heard about it , even if they didn *t come to it . I 
think it was a success in the amount of people we talked to 
about it one-to-one." . . ^ 

There were problems with the Awareness Week, Sisko 
conceded. Many of the programs were held at Florida A&M 
specifically to reach Tallahassee's black female oommuoity, 
but responsefrom black women was poor. 

"It was our first real step at reachingtheblackconmiunity, ' * 
Siskosaid. " It *llget better." 

The week ' s activities centered around wotnen, birt they were 
not designed to reach only women. Men were encouraged to 
attend the programs, and according to both Sisko and 
Rowland, manydid . 

* * I encounteredalot of hostility from many men on campus, 
but a lot of them came to the program too," Rowland said.^I 
hope the men that did come got a lot out of it. I think that the 
best way to increase awarenessismen talkingtootho-men . * * 

"It made a di f ference because it made people aware, ' * Sisko 




Elaine Sisko of the 

FSU Women's Center 



said of the week's activities. Awareness of the problem has 
gone up, but you're not going to change the problem just by 
education. You have to solve the problem through research, 
find out why men commit rape, and why it's so bad in 
Tallahassee. 

'*ldon'ttMntt1wtjiistafiteraiipeekofpn%RHiiiswecans»>p 
worrying about violence against women. Violence against 
women is an on-gotng thing, ' * Sisko said . 



UF presidential 
poll halted 

BY MICHAEL McCLELLAND 

FLAMKAU STATF Wnm 

They're voting today, voting from one end of the 
' country to the other. Voting from California to the New 
York Island, voting from sea to shining sea, voting out 
thereon those amber waves of grain. 
But they're not voting at the University of Florida. 
They had planned to vote. A campus-wide straw 
poll was scheduled to be held at UF on October 28, an event 
that, according to student body president Eric MeOear, 
would have familiarized students with the electoral 
process, and would have given than an idea of how UF 
students stood politically. 

Then, at the last moment, the straw vote was cancelled. 
Why it was called off (tepends largely on who you talk to. 
The Republicans blame it on the Democrats. The 
Democrats, in turn, blame it on UF's computer. 

"The computer program that was necessary to run a 
ballot was not ready," Mellear, saikd. "We did not have 
the logistics ready to run an election." 

Alachua County Republicans tell a dif^Feroit story. 
Accorcfing to a press release from the Youth for Reagan 
campaign, Mellear cancdtod tbe vote whoi the Alachua 
County I>eniocratk Executive Conunittee expressed their 
fears that Carter would lose the UF election. Mellear, 
Youth for Reagan is quick to point out, is a member of the 
Alachua County Democratic Executive Committee. 

"I don't like the fact that the I>emocratic Executive 
committee can determine what events can and can not take 
place on canqyus, " said Mike Bedke, UF Florida Youth for 
Reagan chairperson. "Rather than listen to what students 
have to say about the candidates this year, the Democrats 
apparently feel it's better to prevent the students from 
voicing^ opinion." 

If the election had gone on, Mellear predicted, the final 
tally would have been very dose. 
But now we'll never know, will we? 



John Carey cited for 'distinguished service' 




BY DEBORAH BAmONGTm 

FLAMBEAU STAFF WRITER 

When Dr. John J. Carey, professor of ReUgioa, was 
persuaded by his mother-in-law and 
brother-in-law to attend Florida State's 
Homecoming Banquet, he never questioned 
their ob\iousIy suspicious motive — the 
claim that they'd never been to one before. 

The Garnet and Gold Key Ross Oglesby 
Award was an honor that caught him 
completely unawares. 

The annual award is bestowed upon a 
faculty member or administrator who has 
given "distinguished ser\ ice to students and 
the University." Awards, however, are not 
new to John Carey. 

In the past Dr. Carey has been singled 
out for the Robert E. Lee Award of Duke 
University, the Algernon Sydney Sullivan Award, the 
Thomas Arkle Clark Award, and the Standard Oil 
Foundation Award for Excellence in Undergraduate 
Teaching. The Ross Oglesby Award is his latest honor. 

Carey says he did not begin school with religion as his 
main interest. When he entered Duke he was thinkii^ 
about law school 

''Transitions in my life caused me ;o change my studies 




to the ministry," he says. He entered Yale Ministry School. 
Carey earned a B.D. degree at Yale. His first job was at 
I Catawbe College in Salisbury, N.C. This 
move was to Carey's advantage because as 
he said, **It let me work on the borda line 
between concerns of the chiifch and higher 
education. It was a good niche." 
When he came to FSU 20 years ago he 
£ maintained that borderline position until he 
I was persuaded to join hi^er education. 
S Being on both teams is what Carey 
8 obviously enjoys. At FSU he served first as 
^ the University Chaplain and Assistant 
I professor of religion. Later he became 
£ associate dean of students and went on to 
become vice president of student affairs, 
meantime helping to establish the Florence 
program. He attained a full professorship in ReUgion and 
served six years as Chairperson of the department. 

His activities do not end there. He has written numerous 
articles, with four or five more in the planning. He 
authored five books, the last of which, Carfyie Aiamey: A 
Pilgrim 's Progress, came out this year. 

Though offered chances to leave FSU. Carey feds that 
**A department with the stature of our religion ctepartment 
is a good place to work. 1 can't think of a brtter place to 
work than FSU." 



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uae Cowles Nicholes, who 

'iKapnporing herself for a seat 
• '^hMc Service Commission for 
.tors by birddogging utility 
wd attending more than 100 
?j and hearings on her own, 
appointed to the powerful 
m body Monday. 
, . boh Graham said he picked 
"Is, 40, over nine others 



recommended by the PSC 

Nominating Council, because she was 
qualified, was a woman and ''will 
bring a new viewpoint** to the 
commission. 

She will take her seat January 6, 
when the term of retiring 
Commissioner fV. T. (Billy), Mayo 
expires. 



PfHwr m Hmmm Ca mwnmnm Atfcilw, toe. 

• service provMtr to dteatoMVcfwraiis 

• Exptricfictd in comptfttr data analysis 

• Doctorafa in Coufistling f rom F S.u 

• SvccMtlifl ill tfavaiopiiif aducatiafial prosrams 



SC adopts energy goals 



I MUD mss IM fcRNATIONAL 

f Public Service Commission 
unanimous!) approved a package 
ierg> conservation goals intended to 
i oii consumption by Florida utilities 

percent this decade. 

t Matcwidc energy policy, which was 
KlKcd by the legislature, shifts much of 
wdcn of encouraging conservation to 
He's 57 electrical utilities. 
' >mpb formula nnandates the utilities 
»etp their growth in the electrical 
^iid and consumption below the rate of 
ae in the slate's population. 

companies ihai meet their goals 
■ ^■^a;Jed wwh a higher authorized 
return lor their investors. Those 
will see their authorized profits 

^fliw requires the utilities to conduct 
^ home energy audits bv Jan. 1 
Mdanother 250,000 by Jan. 1 , 1 984 . 
"i«rgy audit, a specially trained 



technician advises home owners on how 
they can save gas and electricity. 

In finally adopting the rules, the PSC 
made a few minor changes to a tentative 
package it approved last August, inserting 
key clauses saying that the conservation 
effort is not intended to hurt economic 
development or dictate whether new power 
plants should be built. 

PSC Chairman Robert Mann said he 
thought the goals do not go far enough. ^ 

**I continue to believe a reduction of 25 
percent (in oil consumption) by 1990 is very 
unambitious," he said. 

Commissioner Joe Creese said he was 
disappointed itiai the conservation formula 
could not be expressed more simply but 
recognized that valid data on which to base 
the formula has not yet been developed. 

Successfully proposing that the 
commission reconsider the goals in 12 
months. Creese said, "We're going to 
articulate these goals so the man cm the 
street can understand them." 



overnor's intern program opens 



•VCURTFItLDS 

FtAMKAl' WKrmi 

students interested in a unique 
nal opportunity, the Governor's 
^San conducting interviews 
ff^r positions in the Governor's 
^ ^'rogram. The program allows 
to receive college credit 
rk experience. 
'-'^ ^^a-v created a year-and-a- 
C.cn Bob Graham. Graham 
^«?^lative intern 20 years ago and 
with them a great deal during 
^ career Graham's experiences 
^"'ff^Nhip programs led him to 
^ ^'"^ of his own after becoming 

^'ateuidc program is open to 
fniorv. and graduate students. 

' 'ire maiormg in fields other 
nnicni arc encouraged to apply. 
...^^^ no! lusi for government 
Lindd Buckles, one of the 
'coordinators. "Even if they arc 



not interested in working in government, 
they can get a better knowledge of how 
state government works, and take that 
knowledge with them to the private sector. 

••Interns don't just file, type and answer 
phones. When the students get an 
internship, they are part of the staff. They 
work. We have several areas in which tiKy 
can work such as legislative affairs, citizen 
assistance, and minority affairs. We shape 
the internship to fit the intern, not the other 
way around," Buckles added. 

Buckles said there are few programs like 
this in the country. The program offers 
training seminars which, according to 
Buckles, are unique to this problem': The 
seminars consist of a professor giving the 
theoretical side of a topic followed by 
someone who works in fovemment telling 
how things are done on a practical level. 

Students who are interested should 
contact Buckles or her office at 488-2817 as 
soon as possibk. 



E. Jackson 



E. Jackson Believes They Do! 



^E. Jackson 

St PERV ISOR OF ELECTIONS 

'Pd Pol. Advs MarkCarr. Treu.. 0«m.) 



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Florida Flambeau 



The Florida Flambeau is published by the Florida Flambeau Foundation, Inc. an indcpeiKknu non- 
profit corporation which is solely responsible for the contents of the paper. 

Florida Flambeau Foundation. Inc. Newsroom, 204 N. Woodward Avenue, phone 544-5505; Ma^lg 
address, P () Box U 7001. Florida Siaie University. Tallahassee. Florida 32306. 

Sidney Bcdmgfield Editor Mary Tebo Associate Editor 

Bob O'l.ary Phoio tdiior Steve Dollar Associate Editor 

Brad Lision News Editor Chris Farrell Associate Editor 

Chris Brockman Sporis Editor Melissa Beckham An Director 

, , I II I • 

Mobley for Supervisor 



Somcquestionable politics have the voter ^— —————— 

of Leon County in a bind. Choosing a new ENDORSEMENT 
Supervisor of Elections will be a difficult 

task, primarily because John SuiUvan, with the aki of his mother, retiriiig 
Supervisor Wilma Sullivan, fcMSted himself on the public as the only candidkOe on 
the ballot. 

Wilma Sullivan decided on the last day of qualifying that she would retire; John 
Sullivan qualified moments before the deadline. And the rest of Leon County raised 
holy hell. 

In rapid-fire succession, 1 1 candidates initiated write-in campaigns, leaving the 
voters with a multitude of choices and little time to make a responsible decision. All 
write-in candidates were invited to be interviewed by the Flambeau; two didn't 
show. 

And of those interviewed Art Mobley, a state employee, seems the best qualified 
man for the job. 

A 2^year-€M Mack man, MoMey holds a BA frcnn FAMU, and currently works 
as a complaint anal3fst for the State. He is articulate, well-known locally and wdl- 
respected in both the black and white community in Tallahassee. 

Other candidates are capable; Erwin Jackson, who holds a PhD and has 
mounted a well-organized campaign is a more-than-adequate choice for the job. But 
Mobley may have the edge in registering new voters, especially black voters, and for 
'that reason we give him the nod. 

Flambeau endorsements 

As the current political season slouches to a close, we look back with dianay and 
concom. It hasn't been the most ui^fting of campaigns; most races offer a choke 
between mediocrity and malidousness. 

We did agree on five endorsements out of six races, however. Some are put forth 
more strongly than others, but we feel a vote for each of these candidates will best 
serve the citizens of Tallahassee and the surrounding community: 

U.S. President — Jimmy Carter can beat Ronald Reagan, and it is important that 
he does. There are differences between the two salesmen, and Carter offers the 
better goods. Turnout will make the difference, and we urge disenchanted 
Democrats to make the pragmatic, shortterm choice: vote Carter and stop Reagan. 

State Senate, District Three: We opted for challenger ElUot Messer, a Republican 
from Tallahassee, over Democrat Dempsey Barron. Messer isn't a real alternative, 
but the kingly Barron has amassed too mudi power during his 24 years in the 
legislature, and has come to ainise his power more often than not. It won't matter 
much, since the district will sorely back its prime l^islative benefactor, but we urge 
voters to pull the lever f(Mr Messer. 

is more dear cut: 

^ick with the establishment-oriented Democrat or go with the Hesty representative 
of the new right. Don Fuqua has been in Congress 18 years; John LaCapra is 
salivating over the prospect of ousting him. LaCapra is a two-fisted conservative 
talking voodoo economics and ball-busting foreign affairs. We say stay with Fuqua. 

Leon County Commission, District One: Our only wholehearted endorsement of 
the campaign. Independent Steve Cottrell is bright, articulate, sensitive to the needs 
of the County and willing to make tough decisions with an eye on the greater good. 
Dough Nichols has been a competent Commissioner, bu*^ his views on growth are at 
times irresponsible. As an independent challenger, Cottrell is at a disadvantage, so 
even if he's the only candidate on the ballot you fed like votii^ for, go to the polls 
and do it. 

Lcoa Cmmty Svpcrvisor of EleciioM: Art Mobley is a 29-year-old Black man 
running as a write-in candidate against John SuUivaa. MoMey k weU-educated — 
B. A. m FAMCI ^ and has had experience as a con^laint analyst for the State. Of all 
the cmdidates interviewed, Mobley makes the best case for the job, and we urge 
voters to write-in his name today for Supervisor of Elections. 

U.S. Senate: State Insurance Commisssioner Bill Gunter, a Democrat faces 
Republican Paula Hawkins, former Public Service Commissioner. Gunter is sleazy 
and Hawkins is dumb. No decision from here. 

Consolidation of Leon County and Tallahassee government: There's a lot to be 
said for consolidation, hut fir-^f we want to see a charter, and urge voters to request a 
charter in the Nk>vember 4 election. 



Reagan's weakness of mindl 



BYBRADLISTON 

FLAMBEl ANtW.StDITOR 

As a reporter I cut my teeth on this 
presidential campaign. I've learned to teU time 
in the half-lives of political ideas. PeAiq», in 
the end, I've learned more about being a voter 
than a reporter. 

During this campaign I've had remarkable 
access to the components of our political 
system. In the last year I've listened to half a 
dozen men tell me why they shouldbe president . 

I've heard their families, friends and dosest 
advisors ten me why as weU. 

One very interesting think I've learned about 
presidential candidate: they talk about the 
issues more than people generally assume. That 
is surprising, considering how often they 
change their minds about them . 

Anyone who heard Ronald Reagan speak in 
Tallahassee almost a year ago could not have 
mistaken the bellicosity, now absent, that 
rangin his words. 

It is also hard to forget George Bush calling 
the Reagan/Kemp/ Roth tax bill 'Woodoo 
economics." It's a Grase that sticks with you. 
Bush wanted to make one thing very very clear 
to this town: their were some fundamental, 
irrecoadiable differences between himself and 
Reagan. And no, he wan't interested ki being 



Perhaps we reporters have failed to give the 
public enotigli pd'spccUve in tins campaipi. 
When Bush was ralHing against Reagan's 
economics most reporters were more 
concerned with whether Gerakl Ford would 
pushBoihoutoftiierace. 

As a result I don't believe many voters have 
fdt the true impact of this campaign. Issues 
haveoomeandgonewith bardyapassing notice 
by the public. Whk^ says as mu^ about issues 
asitdoesthepaUic* 

Throughout most of ihiscampagin I've been 
a Jimmy Carter supp>orter, although t here have 
becnbrief flirtations with Kennedy, Anderson, 
and Commoner. 

This is not because I agree with Carter's stand 
on all issues — he is as guihy as the others when it 
comes topoliticalconvenience — but because I 
am one of the few voters in this election who 
believes ourcountry is better of f than it was four 
years ago. 

Under Caner we have developed foreign and 
domestic polices that give us a stronger base to 
face the future. In regard to Third World 
nations, whosupply us with most of the natural 
resources that fuel our economy, we have 
establish! . a credibility that will serve us in 



MO VABLE A 



dealing with the emcrginfr.v.*. . . . 
possess. 

As I write this, lu'ucvcr, 1 fcai im: 
will be our next president. 

M'. • ; ar nt Rc.!im:i J^'Cs no! 'C" •• 
i.»iut>- a: li 'liLcr i>r"rav'.^i. i." 
there I- ^-i ratil> inua'thaiiaj.:dinuf:r.' 
those epit hats. 

Reagan has ptt K.ted himsdfisiiK 
strength. He wants us to believe tte 
presence in the White House wUl praem 
mythical power so many pcopk thtal 
countyoncchcld. 

There is nothing in wbil Re^ aji 
scares me as much as the siab te* 
Reagan is the uhimate roedii cmidac 
empty vehicle designed to do oiil) 
win the presidency. 

A Reagan presi<kncy will not be flMrit 
strength but by weakneM. Therf m 
powerfiilmenbedhindthe Reaiao mc 

The same men who give as C»t^- 
Watergate,aiidthedeathoftbeGrtt(Scvr 

It is the nanire of Washii^ton for pc^ 
people to vie among themsclvw.ai !!T»r J* 

bnnally/orthepowertobchadinihajw*- 

Reagan does not figure lo be i 
influence in this battle for power. t$iP«*" 
must be. He isquite willing for hi^ a 

the real reins of power But * her 
of State and the National Stvai' 
square off against one anotbc 
needs a president, not his chici . 

mcdiatethedispute 

Washington, if Reagan is 
chaosforfouryears Reagan has Ov^*^ 
to be uninterested in usmg ihc po*^ 
presidency.merelyinwinningit 

Nothing haunts me about n >^i^ 
much as the image of Reagan^ 
the conventions, when he had iii^ * . 
several verbal blunders aW^j 
evolution.etc.agreemgto^^^^ 
unless it was voiang the wore* j 

advisors. .a 

Jimmy Carter has not becJii ^ 
strong president. This .5 noc^J^ 

presidencies, we has e bccon^^^ 

forthat.ButReaganotterstlm^ 
weakness ofmind thai come* tw. 

single-minded pursuit of w» 
without evca really decidmgl^'^ 

use it. 
Mo»abteN«»»»lir»«t 



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a phiJos 

be o 

' Barry 

get 

J. I J an 

•tOfJiania, 

ban 

*fierCa 




of mind 

\ablen 



emerging power these m 

, however, 1 f ear tbtf Re.^ 
tresideiit. 

eagan does not stem from 
monger* * or * *raci St . " ah 

! y more than a grain of tru 

>rojected himself as a m* 
vants us to believe (ha 
r White House will prescrv 
k so many people ihmk 
d. 

hinp in what Reagan ^a\^ if 
.uch as the man hms 
uitimatc media candidate 
designed lo do only one M 

esidcncvwill noibemarkeat 
y weakness. There are soii 
Jhindihc Reagan cai.Js- 
who gave us Cambo 
ihedeathofthcGreatS<vK 

- of Washington for po*^*' 
,,.,ng themselves, at timesu 

wcrtobehadinthatiown 

. not figure to be « Jl^' 
sbattletorrx^wer.asapf^l^ 
uitewilhngforhisst^^^ 
^poxser. But when Ibe^ 
IL Natumal Sec«if«y A^;^ 
Lnst one an^.^^; 
|cnt. not his chitl w ^ ' 

ears.Reag»llh^«^^f, 
sied in using the i 

iclyinwtaniatit- 
,.nts me about h.5 c^f 

dicing the wordsput"*^ 
^er has nwt 

find that coin« *" ^^id. 



Tttodwr. M <w wbcr 4. im I 5 



rom piss-ant to dreck: the campaign winds down 



$) SIDNEY 

camptign 

quotes and 
coiled from 
able and nol-io- 

. , jca: 
iM'tr Press Secretary 
on bearing that 
York Tmns would 
e word **pi$s^/* 
Tmes reporter Steven 
afl that the Tunes was 
. place for the word 
"If you can't use the 
piss-ant in the New 
jimes. what are you 
'0 say when one of 
: jicsand you have 
an obituary?** 

se*^ York Times 
endorsed Jimmy 
['resident, 
fr! Murcock's New 
didn't. The blood- 
: labloid (the Post 
rx.imcd Ted Bundy's 
tion with the dubious 
imc poetry: Love-Bite 
may Take Grisly Secret 
"''.fi has come out 
. vdlly for Reagan 
i ihat has the Carter 
upset, according to 
Uunder Cockburn of the 
\ilat( Voice. The Post 
^ on endorsements is 
good, however. **lt is 
"inung to comtemplate 
York Post, whose 
on to reality is so 
Rpirtf that it is now 
ible, after scrutiny of 
iiy's headlines and 
I counsel, to conclude 
tfce exact opposite of 
the Pan is reporting 
^rgiag will actually 
Cbckbora surmised* 
m tssholism runs 
^nt at that hideous 
tee dass rag The 
Check out this 
*!«ition of the Carter 
"Jimmy Carter 
lerved the cause of 
laocrttic Party either 
«ory or in practice. 
• Keynesian, 
a moneurist, 
a decontroUer, 
^ * bureaucratiaer, 
^« a disarmer, 
^ mes a saber-rattler, 
barter is a man 
" ■ a philosophy." This 
- ^1 be OK is said by. 
^^rry Commoner. 

get it straight- 
^ «i ardem Joha 
' supporter, 
only phikjaopliy 
a. his only virtue 
m Of course The 
'^^i'c bit the Cvter 
four years i^, 
»QUBd has yet to 

N do ihcy do in *80? 



Anderson and Kennedy 
instead of opening their baby 
blue eyes and realizing the 
futility of foisting an 
unwanted liberalism on a 
constricting two-party system, 
in my mind, New Republic- 
type liberals have done more 
damage this campaign than 
any number of Carter 
dcmociats. The Carter people 
are at least smart, if 
unprincipled. 
•Typical Reagan dreck on 



SMALL CHANGE 



the campaign trail, this time 
somewhere in the wheat fields 
of the midwest: "Do you 
know that a report based on 
the ability of you to farm and 
what could be done with the 
tillable land that is being 
farmed in the world today 
(says) you could feed a 
population on this earth not 



just double what we have but 
a population of 28 billion 
people. . .One of the best 
things government can do is 
to get its hand out of your 
business. . but then I'd like 
to recognize that there is a 
legitimate area for 
government to participate. ' ' 
First the ludicrous claim 



that seven times the world 
population could be fed 
without plowing up every 
green piece of earth between 
.Moscow and Maclay 
Gardens. Then the inevitable 
contradiction, in which he 
tells the beneficiaries of 
corporate-run. state-backed 
agriculture that he would 
simultaneously reduce and 
increase the government's 
role. Hey. but he's a mce guy 
and all. 



•Since vomit is in this 
election year, here's a sufclirc 
way to lose lunch: read a 
thank -you note from a 
recently endorsed can dida te . 
Bill Gunter's rump-pat to the 
Tallahassee Democrat, which 
1 spied sureptitiously, reeked 
of "try my utmost to 
uphold** and **appreclalc the 
conndenoe ihowa.*' It mm 
signed, umikf '*BiU.*' Dtdnn 
get to see the letter firaai 
Paula Hawkins, damn H. 



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6 / Tuesday, November 4^ 



Planet 



World 




Waves 



BFIRtl.l.ebanon - Oil industry reports from the 
Persian Ciull indicated yesterday that increased OPEC 
production to offset Iran-Iraq losses because of the war 
falls tar short ot earlier predictions. 

Only Saudi Arabia, the world's largest oil exporter, will 
be undertaking a major production hike and the Middle 
East Economic Survey reported t rom Nicosia, Cyprus, that 
the Saudis would charge $32 instead of its current $30 per 
barrel tor the stepped up output. 

CUERNAV AtA, Mexico — Striking workers at a plant 
that manufactures female hormones are demanding a 35 
percent wage hike and smaller breasts before they return to 

work. 

Salvador Buenrostro, leader of the union at 
the Syntex chemical plant in the resort city of Cuernavaca, 
50 miles south of Mexico City, said Sunday the 30-day 
strike will not end until the company meets thcir demands,. 

The demands u . jde a 35 percent pay hike plus special 
protection for male workers in an area of the plant that 
manufactures female hormones used in birth coptrol [Mils. 

About three dozen male workers in the section have 
suffered from unnatural development of thdr breasts, 
Buenrostro said, and "have faced social proWems to a 
considerable degree." 



Nation 



DALLAS— The American oil equipment firm with the 
largest single monetary claim against Iran is not likely to 
"roll over and play dead" tor the release of the American 
hostages, a spokesperson said yesterday, nor are others with 
outstandinglawsuits. 

SLDCO, a Dallas based firm founded by Texas Gov. 
Bill Clements, is seeking $175 million from the 
National Iranian Oil Co., a corporation owned by the 
Iranian government, for what SEDCO executive vice 
president Spencer Taylor said was in effect the 
nationalization of SEDCO property. 

WASHINGTON — The Supreme Court today rejected 
a challenge by ousted Rep. Michael Myers to his 



bribery indktniem in the FBI's Abscaai invcsti^iwis of 
official corruption. 

The justices, without comment, tet stand a New York 
federal appeals court ruUng last August denying an effort 
by the Pennsylvania Democnt to iMsmiss Ws indictment on 
grounds the executive branch had exceeded its autherity in 
setting up the undercover Abscam operation. 

ATLANTA — Public Safety Commissioner Lee 
BrowB asked the FBI ye«erday to provide official aid in 
a 15-month string of induction-slayings in which 15 Wack 

children have disappeared or died. 

Brown warned that "parents have to know where their 
children are." and promised that police will do everything 
possible to clear the streets of those under 15 after dark. 

SELMA, Ala. — A longtiAK friend of anti-gay rights 
crusader AbIU Bryaat said yesterday the former 
orange juice queen and Alabama industrialist Larry 
Stiplin Jr. have discussed marriage, **but nothing is 
set in cement." 

State 

MIAMI — The Supreme court today cleared the way for 
the immediate transfer of up to 2,000 Cuban and Haitian 
refugees to Puerto Rico. 

Refugees housed in niakeshift camps in the Miami area 
and hundreds more still arriving in southern Florida are 
expected to be transferred Within a few days to Fort Allen, 
on Ihierto Rico*s southern coast. 

The justices refused a request by Puerto Rico to extend a 
ban on the transfer ordered last week by Justice wnfam 
BraMum. Thdr action lifts Brennan's ban. 

TALtAHASSEE — Gov. Bo» GnOum said the 
selecticm ot a clianceBor wiH have more impact on the 
quality of higher education in the next decade than any 
single fmdof and the Board of R^nts should take time to 
pick the right person. 

"The board is taking a proper, jmident course," 
Graham said when asked if he was unhappy at the long 
delay. The board has been seeking a successor since before 
ChanceUcM- E.T. York retired July 1 . 



|Algeria to media; 
hostage release 

UWno m SSI N 1 m N ^ n. . s , 

MiUtant Moslem gunmen agreed u . 
control of the American h u ,, 
government, and Iran named A 
in reioising the 52 captives to t hci 

The U.S. ^vemment wekonu J :\ 
the released process would take nmc 
Edmund R. Muskie said 1' 
however, much remains to be dor c 

Muskie said the reports from I an have \ 
but warned "they should be vk acJ ^ 
process which will require time, pdiicnv.v j ^ 
^^rkin ambassador Redha Maiek mc 
with Deputy Secretary of State N\arrr 
discuss Algeria's role in the lu siaec - 
refused to discuss details of the . 
diplomatic delations, Algeria repie^^:. , _ ., 
the United States. 

The White House said President (a 
analyzed** the crisis with his advi^rv K 
Akron, Ohio, to resume car . .m . . 
election. 

*'The president and his advisers felt that if the 
were trmisferred to government control. th» aok^. 
significant step,** a White House statement m 
also viewed favorably the prospect of a roie < 
Algerians in the situation.** 
The rapid chain of events was set in motKc 
; whdming vote of the Islamic Majlis partiairxnt ' 
t avoring release of the hostages once the United Sut 
fulfilled four conditions set by Khomeini Sept 12 
These were: a U.S. pledge not to interfere m 
affairs, the imblocking of Iranian assets froffa 
banks, the dropping of fmancial claims agamy Inr mi 
move to return the weahh of the late shah. 

The parliamentary resolution ordered the go^err 
release the hostages in stages, as the conditions ir? h^* 
an approach Washington has rejected. 

White House Press Secretary Jody Po*dl *i 
hopes of inunediate release, saying "1 have - 
expect the hostages will come out before c\(x'm:^ 




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ampaign trail will end today 



r 

I MHDftlAS»l^«Tt«>AT10^AL 

uisriTON- President Carter and RonaidHeagan 
' ! v^ithSperccntofthcprobableclcctoraicstill 

jing 10 the fii«l New York Fimes-CBS poll 

akcn bcforcihc Iranian parliament announced its 
case of the American hostages in lnui» showed 
44 pcrccni. Carter with 43 percent, independent 
onlith8pcrccnt.and5pcrcentiindecidcd. 
Srime^ aid that of those undecided 5 pcrcait.Tnost 
A ere DcmoCTatsand independents — indicating 
i have a better chance of getting their votes than 

an rival. . ,„ 

ot 2,264 registered voters was condnclad by 
Kct\*ecn Thursday and Satuntey, so it gave no 
• cation of the effect on voter sentiment of the 
s development. 

The I percent spread between Carter and Reagan fdl within 
^noHsmarginof errorof 2pcrcent. 

ncr final national poHs, Reagan led Carter by five 
vcflHtge points in the Harris polb, and was three points 
read of Carter in the Gallup Poll, both coiapleted Sativday 

•publishcdduringtheweekend. 



A White House statement said Carter was ready to return to 
WasHii^on * * atany pmnt ** if ho^agecteveiopnients wimnt . 

En route to Detroit, press secretary iody Powett said 
campaign pollster Pat Caddelltook a **smaH sample'* Sunday 
showing Reagan ahead of Outer by 1 or 2 percentage points. 
Powell said the dau indicated Reagan has a '*big lead** in the 
West and Rocky Mountain stMs but thm Carter wnsateKl in 
every other region. 

FoUowiniganearlierrally in Akron, Carter was asked if he is 
going to win Tuesday. **l think we will,** he rephed. fed 
goodabotttit.** 



Reagan 



Carter 



, .Jent Carter, predicting victory and warning of the 
Ronald Reagan presidency, made a 
aialappcal" ' I o ptx ent iai John Anderson voters yesterday 
; , . ' MM pk'i cd h 1 s t i nal campaign swing . 
T ; J CI 1 1 set out on an ambitious six-state blitz on the 
i he election, making stops in Akron, Ohio; St. Lx>uis, 
hern Illinois and Detroit, and planning a wind-up m 
-eon and Washington state. 

! k president had planned a visit to California, but ch<^ 
oit instead in alast-minutechange. 
irtcT was greeted by a crowd of 1 ,000 to 2,000 at a hastily 
ngcd rally at Detroit Metropolitan Airport. "Ihwarthe 

ItpuWican claim they are going to carry Michigan and Icaune 

berctoshow they are wrong. ** Carter said . 
He also said. Fd like to make a spedal appeal to the 
pie this year who have been supporting John Anderson . . . 

nercisalot incommon between usand I amaskingyou in these 

ewhoursnot to wasteyourvote.** 
carter madeHttlecommentonthehosta^crisisthroughout 

c day, saying only, **l just read the news reports this 
ning. i think they stand for themselves, and what I said 

'-^t^^rdaylthinkisbest.** 

^ui an interviews with Detroit tdcvison station WXYZ, 
urier wasd asked if the hostages would be home by 
5'«»ugurationDay. 
f here's no way I can guarantee, but obviously the 
lopmcnts in the past coo^ of days have been 
^■"vourafing/'hcsaid. 



Ronald Regan*s 12-year quest for the presidency 
concluded yesterday with a nationally televised appeal for 
support and a growing belkf among his Courage that 
victory is at hand. 

As Reagan wound up his campaign with stops in 
Portland, Ore., San Diego and Los Angeles, a tdevision 
audience watched his call for "an era of natimial renewal** 
broadcast in a paid address iH'oadcast all three conanerdal 
networks. 

As he completed his fmal campaign blitz, the Republican 
presidental nominei^ who first tried for the White House in 
1968, was surrounded by advisors who spoke and acted like 
winners. 

The candidate himsdf also appeared confident of victory 
replying "No" when asked if the latest develc^ments in the 
Iran hostage crisis would hurt his chances. 

Reagan referred to the delicate situation briefly in 
remarks prepared for delivery in hfe televsion appeal, 
saying he hoped for the "safe return" of the hostages but 
i^ering no (H>uuons on what action President Carter 

should now take. 

Instead, Reagan stuck with the longtime centerpiece of 
Itts campaign — an attack on Carter's economic record. 

And in a speech to 5,000 people at the site of one 
Lincioln-Doiiglas debate, Reagan said Americans can 
expect "HMwe rhetoric, more misery," from a second 
Carter term. 

Campaign pollster Richard Wirthlin, who has been 
tracking voter sentiment repeatedly over the past week, told 
reporters as Reagan headed West from Peoria, III., i 
wouldn't be surprised if we get 320" electoral votes 
Tuesday. A candidate needs 270 electoral votes to win. 

Wirthlin said 300 votes would be a "conservative" 
estimate and the 320 total is not unHkely. In his televised 
commercial, Reagan urged voters to ask themselved a 
number of questions about how they view themselves and 
the country. 

"Most importantly,** he said, ''the basic question of our 
lives: Are you happier today than when Mr. Carter became 
president of the United States?** 



Hawkins hits harder in final days 



I SI U DPRJ SSINTERNATION AL 

^ " ( 'iinicr and Paula Hawkins swapped more verbal blows 
ot todav's balloting in which one ol them will be 
10 the U.S. Senate seat now held by Richard Stone. D- 

Hivskms Hcu around the Florida Panhandle to sharpen her 
as a consumer advocate while leatlets portrayuig 

* '-'frasanadv ocateofabortionondemand weredistributed 

•ndshoppincinaUs. 

^^^f' I audcrdale. Gunter delivered his strongest blast at 

^arpioneucd Republican opponent, charging her and her 

^Hhconductingalast-minutesmear campaign. 

'"nier said leaflets being dropped in shopping centers 

^^'nMruehissiandonabortion. 

PaulaHavskinsandhervsorkersareshametulh engagedin 
'*'«»nke^i kind ot smear by handingoul leatleismiplyinglam 
ibonion.-'hesaid. 

^truih IV t hat 1 am opposed to abort ion on demand and 

* "uidopposcit, except in ca>es of rape, incest andtosavethe 
^^''^f the mother." he said. '"That is the same position that 

Hawkins has taken and she shouldcaUoff thisevU smear, 
andr^iaciics ti the last minute webencatlicooteiBpt,** 



Saturday, showing that Ha\skinshasa 10 point advantage in 
their race, and is runningneck and neck in Dade County which 
Gunterneedstowin. 

Stone, whom Gunter defeated in a bitter primary, has 
declined to campaign for Gunter in the voter-rich South 
Florida condominiums where Stone is a big favorite with the 
Jewishcommunity. 

Stone announced his support of all the Democratic 
nominees, including Gunter, the day after his defeat, but has 
remained in Washington far fromtheFloridapoliticalscene. 

At a ncvs > conference Monday. Gov. Bob Graham said the 
• key" to the Hawkins-Gunter race lies with how Stone's 
voters respond in votingforGunter. 

He said he has not personally asked Stone to campaign for 
Gunter but he hopes the Stone people wiU forget the 
bitteriwssofthe primary and vmefor Gunter. 

At one stop, Hawkins nid she had taHwd to Stone and he 

hadcaOedher "Senator" andinvitedtoshowhertheropesin 

Washington. 

Asked if she interpieted Stone's remarks as an 
endorsement. Hawkins saki: "hto, l*m not calling it an 



Kiorseniciii. 

Stone issued astatement in Washington saying only that he 
hadtiAtcdtoHawkins, "but lannot endorsingher. 



Dr. Allan O. Dean 

OPTOMETRIST 

810 Thomasviile Road 

Intersection of Monroe and Thomasviile RdJ 

(kunp ntm m hm Eym HmMi Cmm 
Appointments - 222 9991 





to 



_ . ra' 



College 
Graduates 

BECX)ME A LAWYER S ASSISTANT. 

• Progwn wrovad by American Bar Assoctalion. 

• Oay or Evening ctataea avalable. 

• Employment asaislance. 

A RepresentativB from The Mttiormi CmH9r for Ptnhgal 

Training s Lawyer s Assistant Program will be on campus 
on Tuesday, Nov. 18, from 9:00 a m - 5 00 p m at the 
Placement OfflC9 to meet iMefMted students For more 
information contact ttte Placement Office or The National 
Center for Paraiegal Trammq^e Peacfmie Roed. NE. 
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8 / TuoKtey. November 4, I960 FteMintfrh 



m 



Election Night 

A T.V. guide to who wins the White House 



BY ARNOI D SAWISLAK 

i; M r hD P Rf>S I N T fcU N A T IO!S A L 

WASHINGTON — A tekvison watcher's guide to the 
1980 election: 

•You will begin hearing some returns around midday. The 
chances are they won't mean much. They are likely to be 
results from tiny rural precincts that finish voting early or 
partial returns that reflect only morning balloting. 

•Early in the evening, the networks will begin projecting 
winners These are predictions based on returns from 
sample precincts, just as the pre-election polls were based 
on opinions from samplings of voters. The projections have 
a fairly good record, but keep in mind they are not the 
actual results. 

• Remember, this is a winner-take-all contest for Sectoral 
votes, so winning in either New Jersey or Florida, which 
have 17 votes each, is better than carrying both Connecticut 
and South Carolma, with eight each. The magic number is 
270 electoral votes. No one wins without it. 

•If you live in the Eastern time zone, significant real 
returns should be available shortly around 8 p.m. frmn 
states such as Kentucky, which have an early pdl donng 
time and machine voting, and Connecticut, which is 
famous for its fast counting. 

•Florida, which begins closing its potts at 7 p^m. EST, 
nHQf be one of the first crucial states to fall. Pennsylvania 
with 27 votes closes at 8 p.m. ami it figures to be a invotal 
state in this election. 

If President Ciffter wins both of thm, rated as tossups in 
the final UPI survey of election proH^ects, his chances for a 
second term should be good. If Carter and Ronald Reagan 
spKl^W, wc'ne got a real race. If Reagan carries both 
states, he may well be the ilbct tenant at 1500 Pennsylvama 
Ave. 

•Two eastern states to use as an early check point are 



Virginia 12 voles and Maryland 10. The first is siq^posed to 
be leaning toward Reagan; the second toward Carter. If 
that isn't what the returns say, we may be in for some Ing 
surprises. . 

•Illinois 25 and Ohio 25 should start reporting by 9 p.m. 
and both are rated as "leaning" toward Reagan. He surely 
will need at least one of them to win. But both have been 
slow countuig states in the past and it may be a while before 
they fall into a candidate's electoral column. 

•Another check point: Mississippi and Alabama ought to 
be reporting significant returns by now and if the president 
is carrying both, he may have secured his southern power 
base. Carter lost only Virginia in the South in 1975. 

•By 10 p.m. EST, the big battleground states of the 
heartland — Ohio, Illinois, Michigan 21, Wisconsin 11 and 
Miimesota 10 should be reporting and several may be 
decided. 

And by now, late-closing 9 p.m. EST New York, with 41 
votes, ought to be coming in also. Reniaid>er: the Carter 
campaign has said all along the president nnish have New 
York to win. 

•The counting after 10 p.m. EST sho^ have moved 
across the Mississippi River into the plains states, generally 
regarded as Reagan country. But there is a crucial decision 
in this area: Toas, whose 25 votes equals any othe three 
states between it and CalifoMa. It is rated a tossup. 

•Most of the western states also are supposed to be for 
Reagan with the exoepHoa of Hawaii, leaning Carter, and 
Oregon a tossup. But the big prize is Reagan's California 45 
votes, which only the most enthusiastic Carter canqiaigners 
believe the presi^nt can carry. 

These states come in late, and if the Ing states have been 
sf^ttmg, it very wdl could be one of the smaller cmes in the 
Far West that determines who wins. So keep a running' tally 
sheet and if it comes to that, put on an extra pot of coffee. 



Hawkins /. 



ram page! 



business in Florida, particularly contributions from 
employees of the companies he regulates as state insurance 

commissioner. 

Hawkins has denied accepting funds from sources that 
would present a conflict ot mterest. In a press conference in 
Tallahassee yesterday, she said, "We are returning money 
to groups we pledged not to accept contributions from. I 
did not ask any regulated company for anything." 

Hawkins was pressed to explain a request for money she 
signed sent to the Good Government Committee, a pohtical 
action committee representing Florida Power Company. 
Hawkins regulated Florida Power during her term on the 
Public Service Commission, a tenure she often points to as 
demonstrating her strong consumer advocacy. 

"I didn't know who Good Government was," was her 
reply. "Did you know they were Florida Power's PAC?*' 

Stories in the Miami Herald have also suggested that 
Hawkin's acceptance of $400,000 from the Republican 
National Committee could be considered by some as 
violatmg her promise to "fight for the people of Florida.'* 

Hawkins defended the contribution, which constitues a 
hefty chunk of the more thar $750,000 she has spent. 
According to her, Floridians delivered over $700,000 to the 
National Republican Senatorial coffers. 
•*1 would say Florida got shortchanged," she said. 
Much of Hawkins's campaign finances come from 
8in^e4ssue groups that support her stands on such issues as 
abortion and gun control. For all her haziness on details, 
Hawkins has made her major beliefs clear: She favors 
increased defense spendmg and constitutional amendments 
to outlaw abortion and return prayer to public schoob. She 
opposes tiw ERA increased aodal senrioBs, aid promises 
bydget cuts to deficit spending. 

A nasty turn the abeady dirty canqiaigB has taken in the 
final days before the election pcrints out the inqKNtance <d 
personality ever issues in the race. Hawkins has 
GuBter for siqiporting liberafized abortion 



laws, while Gunter has maintained that his anti-abortion 
stand is the same as Hawkins and that the Republican camp 
is engaging in smear politics "beneath contempt. Such 
name calling has been the rule the last few weeks. 

An exchange at yesterday's Tallahassee press conference 
wasindicativeof the Hawkins strategy. 

She was asked about a $4,000 contribution to her 
campaign from the Western Company of North America, 
a oil-drilling supply company owned by conservative Teams 
millionaire H.E. Chiles. 

**That money's been returned,'* Hawkins assured 
reporters. But when pressed to explain how the nK>ney was 
even accepted in the first place, she could only promise. Til 
investigate.'" 

That simple statement characterize the Hawkins style. 
With a patent stock reply, questions about campaign 
finance are nonchalantly brushed away; with a quick catch- 
phrase, the specifics of an issue are left hopelessly vagiie. 

But that powerful image. 

By all indications, the Hawkins strategy has worked. 
Yesterday she said she felt "comfortable** she will win,** 
and last-minute polls bear her out. 

The Gunter-Hawkins race is not unique. Like it or not. it 
reflects a trend in American politics away from races 
offering clear choices between candidates with directly 
opposing views on crucial issues. If Gunter embodies old- 
style politics, backed by in-state business interest, Hawkins 
embodies the new. Hawkins's slick, image-oriented 
campaign was financed by interstate, single-issue groups, 
backing her for ideological reasons rather than in hope of 
receiving special-interest legislative benefits. 

And as emphasis shifts from particular issues to broader, 
ideological matters, winning an election will depend less on 
a candidate's expected performance in campaigning. 

Candidates won't discuss their own virtues as much as 
decry thenr opponem's character. 

And only the voters will suffer. 



Over 500 
Hsodtlras 
in stock 

$5.00 



SPECIIl! 



385-81861 ^ 



line W. ThariM St. (com«r Vharp* ft BiinbiMp 

JIM & MILT'S BAR B Q 

1923 W. Pensacola (west of Stadium 
CARRY-OUT 576-3998 



\\\ 



MichekH) 
Bud 

between 

5-10 PM 



TODAY! Don't forget to write n 

JAN piETRZYK 

Your First Candidate For 

Supervisor Of Elections 

• Vice-President FSU Student Body 0^^- 

• Gold Key-FSU Leadership Honorary. 

• FSU Graduate-Business Admm. 

• Public-Interest Lobbyist For Veteri««» 
Student Legislation. 

• Has Conducted On-Campos Vflsf 
Registration Drives. 

• Has Across-The Board Expsnt"c» 
Areas of the Elections Officf. 

- - - - CLI P THIS PORTION' 
1. Bring Pen or pitncH 4. Lift <^ ^ 



0* 



Efections Lever 
(DO NOT PULL). «-T»n«— 
3. Look up 10 inches "^^^^m 
above lever and find JJJ^^j^Jt 



above lever-and 
ttie" Write- In" box 



Pol Adv "'offS^jTr 

C«mp»9n ^r^^Mrtr■ Btpi***^ 



ONCf 
D BU<|* 




cJistrict2 
republican 

. Pa«d pot.t.f 41 A13,' ■• 
Pf»nh D Hh- t- 




harp« Cr Bainbridg 



BAR-B-Q 

l^st of Stadium) 
[76-3998 



C5 



( 



MdMieb 
Bud 

caiM<40< 

bctwawi 

5-10 PJL 

t to write-in 



IP 



RZYK 

dateW , 

Elections 

••••itrary. 



in AM 



>Hlct. ^ 

I Lift COVfT 

I ''•P? o^s opened 
p keep yourWfii^ 

kte secret. 




prison /^^^ 



^ niaccs much of the blame for thekvdof aepoCttOi 

,^apof inc 5^ in the construction of penal iiutitl^om. It 
2^ nonda prisons are located in isolated rural areeas 
' L rvK)! of labor "However, the report contuiiies, 
^'^ZU that nepotism... is a result of geography and 
f onDortunifv rather than conscious design, this 
^'''Lse the blatant and v-idespread nepotism found by 
'"fllnittfe especially as it relates toupwardmoWlky.'* 
T^aKo alleged state prisoners are illegally housed in 
Count) jail at an estimated cost to taxpayers this year 
S The practice began due to overcrowding in state 
^| monCounisyearsago,butpersiststodaybecauseof 

'f«r.!ial rclanonship between Sheriff Whitehead and the 
IL'iLbcauscof Whitehead's enormous local poKtcal pull. 

«Ho.s m charge ot the Department, the Secretary or the 
^,fofLn.onCoun!y'>"thereportasks. 
^ . -w pris()ners housed m the county jail have been 
-fiorover a vcar , I he report alleges . W h i i c t h us incarcerated, 
wirtooievcnoffically in jail. Some c)t ihcn> ..a c not even 



been classified or given medical and psychiatric tests to 
determine whether ihcy belong in nunimum or maximum 
security prisons. 

At the same time, prisoners held in the county jail, as well as 
those held in state prisons in the area, are used to provide labor 
for private interests, includmgyard work for local re»denu and 
officials. 

"Theallegeduseof inmate labor by the Sheriff, indicated thai 
th«e arc persons in positions of trust in the Department of 
Corrections and in Union County who do not adhere to the 
Florida Statutes and who may be guilty of very venous 
violations, some bordering on malfeasance in office." the 
report says^ 

The report also criticized Wainwright's length of tenure as 
secretary of the DOC. Wainwrighi has held that post since 1%2 
and thercsuh has been stagnation and refusal to keep abreast of 
penological trends, therepori charges. 

Other sources echo I hat claim . 

"TheoverallattiiudeintheDOCistobeiough,"accordingto 
Itevid Mack, of the Florida Clearinghouse on Criminal 
Justice, a prison reform group." Louie's got all the generals in 
place with 18 years' in the system, that he's got trained, and 
that's how theythinktheplacesoutght to be run 



Five amendments on ballot today 



FROM STAfr> RKPOR TS 

^- i.'hefive constitutional amendments on the October, 
a); al! passed with flying colors, this time around it 

nininoi besoeasy. 

r.nda voters have a chance to approve or reject the 
, .>\»ing amendments on today's ballot: 
.\-.>ndment 1: abolishes the Constitution Revision 
, ,.ion. which had only one meeting in W8, and is 
. xheduled to meet again until 1998. ^ ' 

•Amendment 2: grants every Floridian the right to avoid 
government intrusion into their private lives, and 
^'vec!^ the public's access to financial disclosure 



information. 

•Amendment 3: allows the Legislature to forego reading 
aloud a bill. Instead, it would substitute the publications of 
a bill's title in the legislative journal to fulfill the first of 
three reading requirements. 

•Amendment 4: allows the issuance of slate bonds 
without referendum to finance construction of water 
facilities operated by state and local governments. 

•Amendment 5: extends idefinitely the two cent gasoline 
tax allocated to tiie state's counties. Otherwise, it would 
ex|ikein2006. 



Local 



from page 1 



'aaisvi be provided.PoUwork«s can answer any furtho- 

mm. 

^ local races on die baUotinclude: 
11 Hi«e af RqmtcitMllfCi, Digtiki 2 
TitUttssec attorney John LaCapra, a new riglit 
iepubbcan, b challenging conservative Democrat Don 
m who has held the seat for 18 years. LiCapra favors 
^<hft. a balanced federal budget, uid feels America can 
e on domestic oil. Fuqua is afainst the (h»ft, favors a 
^ budget if practical, and would tohre the eneiiy 
"^^^ through conservation. 
^Siiiiltr,INgtoict3 

^ publican lawyer and lobbyist Elliot Messer, a 
^ attorney, is challenging "dean <rf the Senate" 
*^ Barron, a Democrat who has represented the 
for more than 20 yem. Both candidates are 
xrvative; Messer stresses education, the wirom n c n t 
f ^xation; Barron defends naiaorities and poor peofile. 
^«)SWff 

Boone, who beat out mcmbent Ken Kaisaris m 
Democnitic runoff, faces writo4n omdi^ P»il 

J^^mbent Democrat John Brown is up against write-in 
I * • Junes Bowles. 
^"'^ Tncoicctor 

-^rat John Chafm is challenged by two write-in 
r^l'^- Jim Fair and Henry EUassen. 

;^n^ocrai Doug Nichols, a former builder aiui 
^J^*ho has held the seat for four years, meets 
challenger Steve Cottrell, a former Florida 
pad student. Cottrell, a political newcomer, favors 
I r;^* ^ comprehensive coumy planning map that would 
f pans ftf tK. — partes, uidustry 



WL^? of the county for mm^ i»c p». 
L «|hborhoods. l^chob would use the map as a guide. 

i*m^ "^"^'"^ " *etally binctog. 

x^;^ Democratic ConHsittioaer Lee Vause is 
' vC:d ■ candidate William Milton Adkins UI. 

^ (George Andenon meets RqpubicaB Jta 



School Board, District 2 

Democrat Bill Wilson faces Republican Kathleen Hill. 
School Bosrd, District 4 

Democrat Emily Millet, an incumbent is challenged by 
Itqwblican Frank Barbo^. 

CoMoHMoa SIraw Balot 

Voters have tluee chokes as to whether the Tallahassee 
city govemm«it should be consolidated with the Leon 
County govemmwit: for. against, or wiU decide when a 
charter is presented. The vote is noa^mdmg, and wiU be 
used by local crffidals to decide whether or not to take the 
tinietodcvd<H>an«^c*»'^- Coosohd^oii was defeated 
three times m the past decade. 

City Annexation, Northwfgt 

You can vote for or against aUowii^ part of the county 
stretching from Frenchtown west to the Truck Rou^ south 
of MO to be included in the dty Himts. Once m the aty, 
property taxes would to up. but utffity iat« would go 
down. Only city residents and those living m the proiKiied 
annexation area can vote on this. 
City Annexation, Northeast 

A smaller area of the county near Miccosukee Road 
surrounding the Capital Medical Centa^<«in^h«|^ 
chance to join the city, and you can vote fo^ « ^SSi 
The same voting restrictions as m the 
Annexation appy. If approved, the new areas of the city 
wUl be subject to more restrictive aty laws. 
MttititeitBtkHi, Florida Supreme Court 

Voten can vote to retain or kick out six Supreme Court 
iustices: James Adkins, James Alderman, Joe Byrd, Arthur 
Englan Jr., Parker Lee McDonald and Be" O^^non. 
Mnrtt Iteteatloa, First District Court Appeals 

Voters can keep or remove seven judges: Anne Ca.^ 
Booth, Guyte McCord Jr.. Dick Mills Jr.. Leander Shaw 
S!%aXs Shivers. Larry Smith and Wmifred 

Weirtworth. . , :« 

rhi Mit fwilfft Second Judicial Circuit 

^«LfS Lewis Hall Jr. and Mailory Home face off for 

die Cha^ to replace judge James Joanos to P«^»^«^ 

J^^^dsen. Jefferson. Wakulla. Frankhn ar^berty 

cmmties. Hall is a Tallahassee attorney and HoraCT » a 

former Senate president and a lobbyist. 




.November 4 w^n ' P 

I 



:| COtffMMI 



Mon FH 11 00-2:00 
All the Sicilian 0«€p-Disn Pltia 

A Salad ftar Yav Can Sat 



$2.79j 

sNov.lt. 




Westwood Shoppmf Center S7$-t*44 



LARGE 




Ail 



tNirMseof 



Piaase bring coupon 

f yesday Night nam 
Buffet I 

6 00 p m 8 30 p .m I 
thff S ciiian D««p-Diah Pixia I 

Zmry Eat I 



fcr bai«d Bar You C 

$3.25 

Bipires Nov. iz. |»8a 



pinap 




Westwood 





mmamRmrmiooKsnuimrmuHms. 

College Square 1964 W. Tennessee St. 

Mon-Sat 10-7 57S-35B9 expires I0/31/M 

fe tmQfiiMiii 



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INBRIEF 



ELI AND ClOSSCUT SAW HAVE CANCELLED 
their campus appearance due to sickness of a band member. 
Comments are welcomed at 644-6710. 

PHI BETA LAMDA MEETS TONIGHT AT 6:50 IN 
113 Business. 

STUDIO THEATER PERFORMS "WAITING FOR 

Lefty'* today from noon to 1 p.m. on the Union Stage. 

THE PREVrr CLUB IS TOURING THE 
Cimrt)eriand Large Animal Clinic today. Please meet in the 
Union parking lot no later than 5:30. 

BLACK STUDENT UNION MELTS TONIGHT AT 



S:30in221 BeOamy. 
FSU WOMEN'S CENTER BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

meets tonight at 6:50 at the Women's Coiter. 
CHESS CXUB MEETS TONIGHT AT 7 IN 34i UNION 

for the election of officers. 
"FEDERAL CAREERS: WHAT AND HOW CXINIC 

wiU be held tonight at CCIS room 1 10 Bryan from 6:30-7:30. 

SIRS FMtMS SHOULD K ADMINNTOiH TO 
classes between Nov. 3 and Nov. 19. Completed forms are 
due in Evaluation Services on Nov. 24. 

"CAREER DAY IN THE SOCIAL SCIENCES" 
starts at 3:30-5 p.m. this afternoon in the Leon-Lafayette 
Room, Union. Topics will be grad school placement and 
career opportunities within the social science's fields. 



lassified Ads 




Aoom 306 Union, Open 9 AM^ p« 
DMdNne: 12 noon the day be'-. 








4- ♦ * 




p4 I 





Two FSU Va. Tech. Coupons $10 Mch' 
or best offer. Call 224 8859. 

2 Football coupons eacti for ttie Va. 

Tech & U of F Games. Best Offer. 
Call 878 7318 aft 6 mrw or anytime. 



FINE HOUND PUPPIES 
HAVE YOUR PICK OF LITTER. 
PH 224 3854. 



Be prepared for the cold weather! 
Hardly worn, heavy % length gray 
suecte .coat, quilted lining, wonnen's 
size 13. New was $120, asking $60. 644- 
4075 before 5 p.m., ask for Laurie. 



Kenwood TX 620 tape cassette deck 
$200. Call 878 2219. Ask for David. 



DORM SIZE RUGS 
DON'T LET YOUR FEET FREEZE! 
CARPET $15 20 PH. 224 6133. 



FSU/UF COUPON 
$50. CALL 644-6995 AFTER 4 PM. 

10 speed 25' 2 inch red Poch Cavalier 
With red fenders, all alloy parts, quick 
release hubs, toe clips, new chain and 
rear tire, fur seat. Only $195. Call eves. 
576-4261 or come by Munchle Wagon In 
Union daytime. 

2 END TABLE LAMPS, FLORAL 
DESIGN IN EXCELLENT 
CONDITION. CALL 575 0291 5 9 PM. 



BLACK & WHITE TV 19 IN SEARS 
$50. 222 5694 torn. 417 EAST VIRGINIA 

♦IICE QUEEN SIZE WATERBE^ 
Frame liner mattress 8c bottom setup 
for onlinTS. Wf H deliver 576-IS21 . 

In Leon County Special Land 5;ale 4 
miles south of truck route on Oak 
Ridge Road 3 acre tracts 1850 acre lOA 
tracts 1650 acre, 20 to 40 acre tracts 
1500 per acre, terms: IS^'o down 5 yr. at 
12°o interest 

JimmyBoyntonRealty phone 222 7561. 
After hours 576-M74 for Ben Boynton 




Classic car '65 Plymouth Valiant 
•convertible, slant 6 engine, runs good 
Needs body work. $400- or best oHer. 
Call Jeff 444^577. 




'75 YAMAHA DT250B $300. LESS 
THAN 3,000 Ml. BART 644 1548 OFF 
ROAD LITTLE WK FOR STREET. 



A^PED, 1978 HONDA EXPRESS. 
S275 CALL 224 6503 ASK FOR JIAA 
OSCEOUk HALL RM. 378. 



Honda CM400T 5,000 miles. Wind 
Shield, luggage rack, highway bars, 
helmets and nwrt. Call 222-2971 weelt' 
days. $1700. 




Iftflation c oiw p ti t us fo rent our guest 
room f9 an intelligent and 
sophisticated grad (preferably Law 
student) who enjoys/tolerates: 
smoking, reasonable cleanliness; 
occasional erudite banter involvino 
words like erudite; warm and 
ufnaifiaii housemates. 92 Bucks ptua V» 
MR. Marc tr Holy 222-47M. 





2 bedroom, 2 bath apt. ideal for 2 or 3 
people. $255 mo. partially turn. Tai. 
/Mali area. 386 4422. 

Sublet immed: effic. apt. 2 bl from 
FSU $190/inc. util. Lease by Nov. 5 

acroMfrom Law BUtg. Call 222-OMO. 

Housemate needed till Nov. 30: $70 81 
V4 utilities, own room, non-smoker. 721 
E. Sixth Av. 224-1123. 

Sublet, 1 bdr fum. apt. $19S per mo. 

Pool, Ctrl heat 1 bl from FSU must 

least by Nov 5 386 2579. 



Room for rent. 647 W. Pensacola St. 
bath and kitchen privileges. $105 nto. & 

utilities. 222 2873. 

Sublease 1 or 2 rms at Cash Hall; wtr & 
sp qtr; meals, maid serv., bar 
w/HBO; FREE to Come look; 
poolside. Call 222-1767. 

2 bedroom unfmi. apt. for sublease 
$250/month includes water and cable. 
Refundable deposit. Call 575 4090 or 
222-8300 after 2 pm. Ck>se to FSU. 

SUBLET ROOM AT CASH HALL FOR 
W/S QUARTERS FREE $50 
SECURITY DEPOSIT LEFT-POOL 

RAP • « tr ,- : r ■ '- - ■ o<, c-7<i 




NONSMOKING RMT FOR OWN RM 
FURN. DUPLEX $87.50 8. V2 UT. 
NEAR FSU. LARRY 575-t746 

BEFORE 5. 

I NEED A vTrgInTa TECH. 
TICKET. CALL 2249454. ASK FOR 

JOE. 



NEAT FEM RMMT FOR ASAP OR 
WINTER QTR. 1 BDRM APT $1(K«i Vi 
UTL. CALL 224 4791 SOON. 

ATTENTION 
TRYOUTS FOR NEW DANCE 
GROUP 
GOLDEN GIRLS 
To perform at FSU basketball games- 
need to have dance background and be 
a registered FSU female student. 
WHEN: TUES. NOV. nth-4:00PM 
and SUN. NOV. 16th 2:00 PM 
WHERE: TULLYGYM 
both try-out dates are compulsory 
wear clothes to dance in (shorts, etc.) 
INFORMATION: 644-3080, 644 3484. 

Wanted: One student coupon tor FSU- 
Va. Tech game. Please call 222-9434 
after 1 : 30 pm. Ask for Jay. 

CASING 

FOR TV AND FILMS. 
PROFESSIONAL AND 
NONPROFESSIONAL, ALL AGES. 
$5-25 AN HOUR. CALL CANDACE AT 

ROOMMATE ' FOr" WINTER 
QUARTER ONLY. WALK FROM APT 
TO CAMPUS. LOW PRICE. 222-0690. 

Starting winter quarter non-smoking 
male rommate to share two bedroom 
furn. apt. V2 mile from FSu $66.23/mo. 
pi. us. V4 elec. Ph. 576-5344. 

I need either one or two guys to share a 
two bedroom fully furnished house. 
Rent wil be $140 or $100 per month, 
respectively. No pets, please. Central 
air and tteat and carpeting throughout. 
Call 222 9800. 

Studious liberal fm wants same to 
«*»ai^ 2 br apt. win. 81 spring guar. 
$115 8. V» util. Call ni«Ms Kafhy 57S- 
1119. 



TWO PEOPLE NEED RIDE TO FT. 
LAUDERDALE AREA 
THANKSGIVING WEEKEND WILL 
SPLIT GAS-CALL 644-6142 OR 644 

4339 



FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTEOn 
BEDROOM, 1'2 BATH AT LAS 
PALMAS FROM DECEMBER 
THROUGN SPRING QUARTER. FOR 
INFORMATION CONTACT 
MELANIE 178 2396. 



WANTED: TICKETS FOR FSU VA. 
TfCH GAME. PLEASE CALL ITt- 

2067 ASK FOR JOE. 

TICKET COUPONS NEEDED FOR 
VI RG. TECH. GAME NOV. •. SW PER 
COUPON. CALL 599-9S38. ASK FOR 
BRIAN OR LEAVE NAME 81 
NUMBER. 



Desperately need 4 tickets or coupons 
to FSU-UF game. Will accept 1 to 4 
coupons. Will pay good prlo. 214- 

2869 




PART TIME 
ADVERTISING ASSISTANT 
FLORIDA FLAMBEAU 
Working Hours: 10am-2pm or llam 
3pm, AAonday-Friday (20-25 hour per 

Requirements: ^Typing 40 wpm, 
bookkeeping, daily correspondence, 
telephone, 10-key adding machine. 
This iob involves cmtact with the 
Advertising manager, sales staff 8> 
occassionally clients. Very busy 
office! Must be able to work under the 
pressures of daily deadlines. Group 
medical insurance available. 
Telephone interviews only! Call 
Tracey Rowe, 644-4075. 

Models needed for fashion/figure 
modeling. No experience necessary. 
Write Three G. Photography P.O. Box 
12602 Tallahaaaee, Fl . 32308. 

BARTENDER WANTED 
COME BY 302 RAVEN STREET 
OR CALL 224-3773. 

IMMEDIATE EMPLOYMENlT 
DRESSMAKING, PATTERNWORK, 

CUTTING. 

FULL AND/OR PART-TIME 
CALL MRS. WILLIAMS, DRESS 
ART. 
386-876'f 

NEED TUTOR QUALIFIED TO 
HELP IN OCEANOGRAPHY 1001 
AND ECONOMIC 2011. PLEASE 
CALL JILL 644-1193. 

FREE RENT & FOOITFOR MALE 
OR FEMALE IN EXCHANGE FOR 
COOKING, GROCERY SHOPPING, 
ETC. FOR MYSELF B 2 SONS. 
LARGE HOUSE, OWN ROOM. CALL 
385-8494 AFTER 3 PM. 




TYPING 

EXPERIENCED SECRETARY 
USING IBM SELECTRIC II. 
REASONABLE RATES. EDITING 
AVAILABLE. CALL 877-3694 
EVENINGS/WEEK ENDS. 

J€FF RYDER 

Trained in Rolfing 8< Aston bodywork 
8t movement education 222 6527. 



WILL DO TYPING IN MY HOME. 
TELEPHONE 385-9689. KEEP 

TRYING. 

TYPING FAST & EFFICIENT 
IBM ELECTRIC 
878 1587 or 386-4567. 

YOU WRITE: 1 EDIT, TYPE. 
Themes, term papers, at reasonable 
rates. Call eves, wkands- 38S-5S74. 



TYPING FAST EFFICIENT LTRS. 
RESUMES, PAPERS, ETC. 85c PG. 



MINI WAREHOUSE UNITS 

6x6 available-larger sizes $14.50 up 
Call us at Lakewood Mini Warehouses 
386-4191. 



Experienced in typing theses and 
dissertations, prompt service, 
reasonable rates Phone; Mrs 
Marks 576-6913 between 8 and 5 
weekdays. 

TYPING: BIG OR SAAALL PATCRS, 
DISS., RESUAAES! NEAR CAMPUS 
7Sc/p SUE 222-9637, AFTE R 6. 

LEASE 
YOUK FURNITUNEI 
wirte variety 

immediate delivery 
Option to Buy 
FURNITURE MART RENTALS 
1206 S. Atfams 



Edited Typiaf IBM Salectric ll 
Reporta/Reswmas/Lattars/Olasert. 

575- 7171 Mission Rd. Area. 

Excellent, quality typing using an I BM 
Seiectric II. Experienced in typing 
term 

576- 9354. 



Quality Typing of Oisaart., Thames, 
etc. Can Mim \ ar 224-3S46/Sue. 
Reasonable. 

~^ — typTng 

reasonable rates 

385-7883 




SHABBOTT DINNER 
HILLEL WILL HAVE 
THE DINNER NOV. 14 
INSTEAD OF NOV. 7 
MOREINFO. 222-5454. 



YOU MUST SEE HOLLYWOOD: THE 
RANCID YEARS TONITE OR WE'LL 
JUST HAVE TO KILL YOU. 
HOLLYWOOD: THE RANCID 

YEARS 

HOLLYWOOD: THE RANCID 

YEARS! 

CPE-SG free midnight film series this 
week-order of Omega presents 3 
Stooges film festival. Sat., Nov. 9 at 
midniteMooreAud. Free. . 

KcT 

ONE YEAR TODAY! THANX FOR 

EVERYTHING! LOVE, 

AJ 

Hey You » ! ! 

Yeah you-You make me feel soao 
good! Thanx for being you Bill-bob- 
w/out you (as Elvis puts it) I get sa 
lonety I cmiM ^1 if Lave ya', Al- 



MOKSHA LUNA 

ARE YOU READY FOR ZOOKO? 
MEET ME BEHIND THE GREEN 
BUSHES IN THE DOWNUNDER, 
AND I'LL SHOW YOU WHY ZOOKO 
BECAME FAMOUS! 

MAVA RASTAMAN 



CATFISH ALLIANCE MEETING 
THURS AT 7:30 IN 346 STUDENT 
UNION FREE MOVIES "ABOUT 
FALLOUT" 8. "OPERATION Q". 
OPEN TO ALL. 

TB— 

I DIDN'T FORGET YOU ON FRI. 
NIGHT. YOU KNOW THAT 
YESTERDAY'S CLASSIFtCD WAS 
FOR 181/11. TUES. NITE AT ELI. SEE 

YOU. 

LL 

ANYONE INTERESTED IN 
FORMING A JEWISH STUDENT 

UNION. PLEASE ATTEND AN 
ORGAN IZI NG MEETI NG NOV. 5 
«:3e PM RM. 352 UNION OR 
CALL 222-5454 

CPl labor series workin^with SCU 
Florida AFL 8. (^10 & Tallahassee 
Peace Coalition present: William 
Wimpesinger Presdien? lam to discuss 
"Conversion to Peace" Thur., Nov. 13 
at 8 pm , Diffenbaugh Rm 201. 



DEBBIE SALYER, 
GREAT WEEKEND, LOVE YOU 
TOO! YOU DID IT IN LESS THAN 4 
SO CAN I (i WON'T RUSH I T) JIM. 

Catwoman: 
Well, today is the day! Is America as 

stupid as the polls indicate? 

Has Ronny McReagjn finally done 
an academy award acting job? Do I 
need a shovel after all his doggy-poo 
promises? And can Zonker Harris win 
as a write-in? In any event, hold your 
breath! JoeAAama. 



Congratulations to Linda and Margie 
Alpha Gam's tiwo new pledges. Thank 
God you're an A lpha Gam! ! • 

. N in ia and Lucas ~ 
Should we be called TRINITY or the 3 
Stooges? We had one hellacious 
workout Sun. just what is needed after 
a weekend in the Downunder. Th^" 
oysters were a big protein lift-* bet 
Conehead's Sat. nfBM was alaa (wHo is 
Carol?). / 



HOLLYWOOD: THE/ RANCID 
YEARS TONIGHT! ^ 
ZOOKO LIVES ' AT TNE 
DOWNUNDER! 

HOLLYWOOD PREMIERES 

TONITE! 

DEADBOYS LIVE IN HOLLYWOOD 
AT THE DOWNUNDER TONITE! 



Uncle Jan wants you (to vote far IMm 
for Leon CeiMty Superviser of 
Elections today). Pd. Pol. Ad. Pd. for 
By BaBby Bacon, Camp. Trees. Rep. 
WRITE-IN JAN PIETRZYK 

DON'T PUT YOUR HALLOWEEN 
COSTUME AWAY WEAR IT THIS 
SUN. NIGHT FOR THE PEOPLE 
BENEFIT. COME DANCE WITH US 
SUN. 9 NOV. AT 9 PM. LUCKY 
HORSESHOE. 



RHETT 81 PETER— GLAD YOU 
STAYED IN TOWN THIS 
WEEKEND. TB 81 LL. 

PROTEST THIS OUTRAGE iTl ^ 
JOIN FSU STUDENTS & FACULTY 
EXPRESS YOUR SOLIDARITY 
WITH THE JEWS OF FRANCE 
IN LIGHTOFTHE RECENT 
OUTBREAKS OF ANTISEMITISM 

ANONEOFACI^It 
RALLY TOMORROW AT 12 NOON 
IN THE UNION COURTYARD 

ALPHA GAM SAYS TH ANK YO U ! ! ! 

To all who supported our Pancake 
Breakfast November 1 . We love you ! ! ! 

MELANIE 

HI HOW WAS YOUR WEEKEND? 
DID YOU GET BEWITCHED ON 
HALLOWEEN NIGHT. SEE YOU AT 
H8. L. FROM LL. 



Did Ethyl do you in last night? If so 
please meet Iter down in tt>e Union 
todayfrom 10:00 2:00. 



$200 REWARD 

FOR INFORMATION LEADING TO 
THE IDENTIFICATION OF THE 
PERSON WHO TOOK OUR SIGN AT 
THE PHYRST homecoming weekend 

I need a ride to the Daytona 
Beach/Oeland area on 11/7/80. Will 
share eaqw nses. Call Teresa 644-3318. 

KUNG FU 
Develop power and control 

214 W. College 224-7788 
Next to Great Bicycle Shop 

SHABBOT dTnNER ~ 

NOV. 7 
GUEST SPEAKER 
MORE INFO. 222-5454 

COMING! 
HILLEL SCRUB SUITS 
GET YOURS 



METHODS OF CONTRACEPTION 
Mon & Thu 2:30pm, Tue 9am 
UNIVERSITY HEALTH CTR Rm 423 
iwen •no women welcome. 

iiOSHEH DYAN IS COMING 
NOV. 12, 1980 
IN TAMPA 
IF YOU WANT TO SEE 
HIM, CALL HILLEL 
OFFICE BEFORE NOV. 8 
222 5454. 

Everyone s been goosed Have you 
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card in the Union ticket office. 

~ BAGELS! 

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IF YOU LOVE BAGELS 

COME TO HILELL'S 
BAGEL SALE' NOV 12 
IN THE STUDENT UNION 
AAORE INFO. 222-5454. 

Ever seen a duck run? On Nov 9, you 
can run with our duck. Sign up in Rm 
31t Union. 



LUCKY HORESHOE 
POETRY TONIGHT WITH LINDAY 
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CINEMA 




! ZookO and the Dead Side Boys in Creeps Go Beserk 

id Years' hardly sour 



lY STEVE DOLLAB 

ASSOCIATE EDITOR 

Inough the New York Post's Archer 
en might be tempted to call it a *'laff- 
Hollywood: The Rancid Years is a bit 
phisticated than quickie blurbs 
I tml indicate. 

Thf 28-minute take-off on B-movie 
'.iwfHiN from the 30s and 40s, premiering 
|iii|lu in the Downunder, mocks its 
hikjcct at every turn, never missing a 
|iincc at shameless punning. Clever or 
'•s^'ul. the constant razzle of dialogue 
*a,^ages to seem both genuine and satire in 
!^ send-up of everything from gangster 
ao^ies to Beia Lugosi and the Bowery 

Scripted by Mike Ogden, director of 
tilm scries, and directed and 
yx'j^id b> FSU fihii students Lee Berger, 
^ - t)arl!ngton, Peggy Davis, and Barry 
' Ihe Rancid Years cashes in on the 
ff^fnt "bad cinema" craze ignited on 
campuses and sustained by late- 
i"ij\ision. 

- ^iiin usually composed partly in 
*iilw.and partly on leftover stock donated 
Jyihe College of C ommunication) opens in 
^ fonn of a talkshow and finds Zoltan 
^0 Jr., (Tim Mills-Cironinger) son of 
^•cfendary Laipathian actor, defending 
* fUhcr's artistic integrity against 
«w conclusive evidence to the contrary, 
^ed 00 four fitei clips. 

^ ^ clips are the heart of The Rancid 
«ch featuring Zoltran Sr. 
'^aycd with masterful comic aplomb by 
is the hapless peraonlflcaiioii of 
• Pff«»nially trashed by his improbable 
^^ics The Dead Side Boys. 
^'ffps Go Beserk, Zomlm Hay ride. 
Rhythm Barade. and My Gun b 
a f^forts by "poverty row** 
^ »ni Studios in horror, WWII 
-Uganda and nira aoir-detecttve 
-taking. 

exercises, as Zobran Jr. 



I JT^^s- arc regftttabiya ghastly smirdi 
father s ^ name. They are also 
^^tcntly funny, especially to anyone 
; 10 the trashier elements of 

"'''^'an culture. 

N /ancy, subtle as a slegehammcr, 

osii! ^'"'^^ '^^ ^^mplcment in the crew's 
;^ ^^^"^'<^^'^iul attempts at achieving an 
^'^^ look in their genre parodies. 
^ Co Beserk, where Zooko prepares 



Dead Side by "Slats" to be "a brkle of 
science" only to get the heave-ho to Ponca 
Oty'* is practically a dead ringer of any 
number, of Channel 17's sleazy midnight 
features. One only wishes that the 
sequences were longer. At 28 minutes, the 
production staff hardly has enough time to 
really show its stuff. But then, at the length 
of the standard TV sitcom, 77w Rancid 
Years benefits from a quick pace, never 
slipping into the stifling boredcND common 
to network TV. 

• e e 

"Zoltan Zooko," explains Ogden, whose 
performance as the pasty-faced menace is 
the highlight of The Rancid Years, "is a 
composite of several actors of the time (30s 
and 40s), and not necessarily horror actors, 
but those who saw their careers fall apart. 
People like John Barrymore, who ended up 
in degrading roles." 

Bela Lugosi, however, whose stardom 
peaked in the role of Count Dracula and 
bottomed out in Plan 9 from Outer Space, 
is the primary reference for Zooko, Ogden 
admits. 

"I've always been fascinated by those 
type of low-budget, shoe-string 
productions," he confesses. "In some of 
those "best-worst" pictures, the 
production goes beyond just being 
laughable. There's a real set of aesthetics, a 
kind of demented poetry thirt springs from 
the clash of the director's imagination wkh 
his paucity of means. 

Ogden Berger, Darlington, Davis and 
Wax aB studfed some examples of thitt kind 
of IHm, typified by titles Uke Gien or 
Gkmdgr f I Changed My Se}^ aad She Gods 

of Shark Re^. 

Birt they found their specific inspiration 
in a recoit "bad movie" spoof called The 
Cinema of Raymond Park, featuring dips 
of such ficticious Park fihns as Return of 
the Swan^ Vir^ and Mau Mau Striks at 
Dawn. 

"Tliey took tlie auteur theory to absurd 
extremes, but the clips didn*t have an 
authentic kwk. That's what we wanted to 
improve upon in The Rancid Years,** 
Ogden says. 

• • • 

Hollywood: The Rancid Years has Its 
world premiere tonight at 9:30 and 10:30 in 
the KSU Downunder. Admission is free, and 
beer and food will he sold. See if vou can spot 
the Stars. (Hint: They aU wear dark glasses.) 




Tuesday, Novcmbcf 4. 19C0 / 11 




• •• 



Laur|rr«t m tr»wn-W> 

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12 / Tuesday, November 4, 1980 Florida FlambeM 



Injured James 
Gilbert may 
missVPI game 

BY WAYNE DEAS 
F^MKAu SPORTS witrrai 

Midway into the thkd quarter of Florida 
State's 45-2 tlmishiiig of the Tulsa 
Hurricane Saturday, there was a loud and 
beck€ming scream of pain that was different 
from the familiar one uttered hy most 
Seminole oppcments this season. 

It was FSU*s own James Gilbert who lay 
witherii^ on the turf . 

**i mrned to look at the ball in the air and 
somebody went under me," explained the 
noseguard, who suffered a severely bruisol 
shin and was forced to leave the game. 

Gilbert, a 6-foot, 240 pound junior from 
Miami, has been a mainstay in the nation's 
fifth best defense. Stepping in for Ail- 
American Ron Simmons, who was sidelined 
due to an ankle injury earlier in the year, 
Gilbert's entrance crorted no slack in the 
Tribe's defense as he miuie 20 solo tackles 
md 12 assists. 

- **1 just got an opportunity to show what I 
can do," Gilbert said. "You can't show 
nothing from the bench." 

Processing a fair amount of talent for 
someone sitting on the bench, Gilbert 
wasn't able to demonstrate his full 
capabilities because of the awesome 
presense of Simmons in the middle of the 
line. Thus Gilbert, a noseguard at heart, 
was forced to put forth an extra effort and 
undergo the complex role of also playing a 
defensive tackle position. 

"It was not so difficult for me because I 
have been at both positions all year and you 
just have to remember their different 
assignments," he explained. 

Although the speed of Gilbert's recovery 
is not certain (he's listed as only a probate 
starter for this week's game with Virginia 
Tech) the sight of him being helped off the 
field caused some concern around the FSU 
fjeldhouse. 

"When I knew he wasn't coming back I 
said I hope it ain't a knee," said FSU coach 
Bobby Bowden. 

"That'll mean I'll have to play the whole 
game," said Simmons, who played his best 




James Gilbert 

game, since his ankle injury, which still 
hasn't ccmipletely healed. 

But Bowden has a possiUe remedy up his 
his sleeve. 

"It is going to create problems but if 
Simmons can't go longer we'll stick (Sam) 
Restivo or (Ali^onso) Carreker in there," 
he noted. 

Asked what went through his mind while 
lying on the field seemingly helpless, Gilbert 
answered: "I said 'Oh no, not again' 
(refering to a shoulder injury he suffered 
last week against Memphis State). Even 
though I couldn't get right up, I soon knew 
that it wasn't broke because when I got to 
the locker room 1 was able to put a little 
pressure on it." 

By the time Gilbert is able to put full 
pressure on his leg he will be looking to 
transmit some of that tension onto 
opposing offensive linemen. Going into the 
Tulsa game he headed the team's "Big 
Play" category with seven tackles for 
losses and four quarterback sacks. 

Last year Gilbert, winner of two out of 
three weight-lifting events in the team's 
Superstar competition, showed his strength 
by coming off the bench and recording 
three quarterback sacks, three tackles for 
losses, one interception and a safety. 

And even though his massive presense 
might not be felt in Doak Campbell 
Stadium Saturday against Virginia Tech it 
certainly will be missed if he hasn't 
recovered enough to play. 



SPORTS IN BRIEF 



Baseball balgirl tryouts are Wednesday at 
3:30 in room 1 17 Tully Gym. Please bring a 
photograph. For more information contact 
Debbie at the baseball office, 644-4812. 

The All-campus V olleyball finals will be 

Wednesday and the final three teams are 
Lambda Chi Alpha, Kellum Three and the 
Mexican Killer Bees. 

Over tkr vtckead ia Tamfia, the FSU 

women's ski team finished fir^ and the 
men*s squad finished fourth in a 
tournament. Overall, the team plac^ 
fourdi. 

The Men's Rugby Club picked up its first 

wm of the season, 24-12 over the weekend 
as they downed a squad from Albany. The 

club's record now <;tand<; at l-'^-l 



Tribe now 3rd 

FROM STAFF RFPORTS 

The Florida State Seminoles climbed to 
third in this week's Associated Press college 
football poll as Notre Dame took over the 
top position, followed b\ Georgia. 

Alabama, which had topped the poll 
since the beginning of the season fell to 
sixth after its loss and second-ranked 
UCLA fell to eighth. Rounding out the top 
five wQ-e Southern Cal. and Nebraska, Ohio 
State was seventh in the voting, while 
Pitt^rgh was ninth and Penn State tenth. 
The Florida Gators climbed into the Top 
20, placing 20th. 

FSU received one first place vote in the 
writ's poO OB the verge of its second 
regionally televised game of the season. 
Saturday's contest with Viipiiia Tech 4ias 
been moved up to a 3:50 Idck-off.'Hie 
game can be seen on ABC affiliate WECA- 
T\', channel 2" (cable 4) locally. 




For further iiiformation contact 

GARYNESBITTinthe 
Union Program Office at 644-6710 





FREE 



in the 



Union Ballrooin 

Tuesday, November 4 



8:00 p.in. 



Arlo 



sutnrie coming Nov. 21, watch the 
Flambeau for ticket details. 




Florida Flambeau 



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SLRVLSG lALLAHASSEEtOR bH YL.\RS 



Rage from the new right 



Keagan routs President Carter 



BULAU. RICHARDS 

IPIfOLITKALWtrrai 

uraid Reagan rode a bipartisan tide to a 
'\ ,c!orv in the nation's 49th 
1 . uMi yesterday with President 
. u! before the poUs had closed in 

V !fV44 p m EST Missouri's 12 electoral 
Kcagan over the top with -a total of 
il votes — three more than the 270 

Hsf u rmcr actor turned politician and 
raocrat turned Republican headed for a 

j^hde in the electoral college, leading in the 
> nine largest states and a score of 
^itkr ones that probably would give him 
dover350electoral votes. 




*0W/(/ Reagan after voting 

^^erdav: neo-cnnscrvative blitz swept 
' '^'^du: Curler pollster Pat Caddelt told 
'^f^^idem Monday, 'Wsailover" 



Just before 10 p.m. EST, Carter went to his 
campaign headquarters at a Washington hotel 
to admit he had lost the longest and Boost 
costly presidential election in the nation^s 
history. 

*'I can*t stand here tonight and say that it 
doesn't hurt," Carter said, smiling broadly in 
defeat told cheering and crying supporters. 
Ironicatty as he left the hall, the imnd played 
"Happy Days are Here Again." 

* 'The people of the United States have made 
their choice and of course I accept their 
decision," he said. **I have not achieved afl I 
set out to do, perhaps no oae ever does. * ' 

Reagan's big victory apparently carried 
limited coattails — although two liberal 
Democrats, Sens. George McGovefn of South 
DakoU, the 1972 presidential candidate, and 
Birch Bayh of Indiana, were (tefeated by 
conservative chattengers. 

Repubticans were threatening to take over 
coiitrcd of the Senate, haying won three of the 
nine seats they needed for a majority In eight 
other races there was the possibility of GOP 
gains. It appeared unlikely the GOP would 
take control of the House, however. 

Though he swept many Democratic 
strongholds, Reagan's popular vote was still 
running at about 50 percent, indicating many 
voters wanted someone else for president . 

Carter's hopes for re-election were buried 
under a combination of problems that have 
plagued his administration — the 52 American 
hostages in Iran, an economy marked with 
high inflation and high unemployment and the 
apparent acceptance of Reagan's argument 
he has allowed the nation to fail behind Russia 
in military strength. 

Carter's pollster Pat Caddell, who told the 
president Monday he would lose the election, 
said the race was about even over the weekend . 
Caddell said the outcome was sealed by the 
developments in the hostage situation Sunday 
and his survey showed that between 59 and 70 

Turn to REAGAN, page 8 




Carter and Rosalynn in Plains de/eat came early 

Hawkins, Barron victorious 



LMTKDPRI^XSlNrKRNATIONAL 

MIAMI — Republican Paula Hawkins 
defeated state Insurance Commisaoner Bill 
Gunter last night to become Florida's first 
woman U.S. Senator. 

The 53-year-old Hawkins will be only the 
second Republican that Florida has sent to the 
Senate in modem times. 

With 52 percent of Florida's 3,603 precincts 
counted, Hawkins had a slim 51-49 percent 
lead of 24,000 votes, but the margin has 
increased as the big-county votes began 
rolling in. 

The populous Miami and Fort Lauderdale 
areas were giving the feisty former state PubUc 
Service Commissicmer big victory margins as 



were the Republican strongholds of St. 
Petersburg and the southwest coast . 

And surprisingly, Hawkins showed strongly 
in the Tampa area where Gunter had hoped to 
capture a wide victory margin. Gunter won 
Oriando-Orange County, the home area of 
both candidates, and the nearby Daytona 
Beach area. But elsewhere in the so-called 
*'Interstate-4 corridor" across the peninsula's 
midsection, Hawkins led \bt vote count. 



• •• 



Perennial Senate power Dempscy Barron of 
.Panama City extended a 24-year legislative 
career* winning re-election over.lawyer- 

TurmtoSENAIE^pageS 




Sullivan wins Supervisor 



^^P^^yBan'OngnetssmformskBtnighi 



^BYDANNIVOGT 

FLAMBEAl STAFF WRITFR 

More than three quarters of Leon County's registered 
voters turned out yesterday to re-elect three mcumbents 
andgiw cautiousapproval to a ciiy-couniy consolidation 

plan- r I . 

In the hotlv contested supervisor of elections 
campaign. John Sullivan Jr., son of the incumbent 
handily beat out 1 1 write-in candidates to keep that post 
in the family for another four years. 

Voters also welcomed about 8,000 new residems to the 
city by approving the annexation of two parceboftandoo 
the urban fringe of the city. - ^ «u 

Even though more people voted agamst Suikvan than 
.cast ballots for him, the large number of write-in 
candidates diluted the effect of theoppositioo. 

* *My experience wiU help me be a good supemsor, to 



manage the office and all," Sullivan said early this 
morning at the Leon County Courthouse, wheie the 
ballots were tabulated 

•*I hope 1 can live up to the levd of confidence showed 
by the voters who put me in office." 

Arthut Mobley Jr.. wlio finiilied a ^fotant second to 
SuHivan. found it hani to beieve that even the (^y's Mack 

precincts gaveSaffivannrottg support. 
''I guess It was old people not edacsMd on the wriie-in 

process," Mobky said at the cowthowe. "The amount 
of people ttiat diiiat m iU»4m m u a catattiophe. But they 



Mobley added, 'Tl roB ow in nqr grave before I run 

again in Leon Omty. " 
Uncrffleiii renkt showed Soliivan with 12,402 vottt. 



Florida Flambeau 



r/ut 

Mild davi: coo\ ntghjs *ifh 
highs in Uic 7Ui, iowi lO tlic 



Novembers, im 



SERVING TALLAHASSEE FOR 68 YEARS 



VOL6i.Na33 



Rage from the new right 



• 

eagan routs President Carter 



BVCIAV F.RICHARDS 

UPlfOLITKALWBITa 

J Reagan rode a btputisan tide to a 
. victory in the nanon*s 49th 
sdfljtialdection yesterday with President 
conceding before the polls had closed in 



M 10:44 p.m. EST Missouri*s 12 electoral 
r put Reagan over the top with a total of 
•'dectoralvotcs — three more than the 270 

■aiediowin. 

ihf former actor turned politician and 
<iriocni turned Republican headed for a 
/iibde in the electoral college, leading in the 
afwn's nine largest states and a score of 
-jjlcr ones that probably would give him 
tdova 350electoral votes. 




*«WW Reagan after voting 

'^frdav: neo-conservadve blitz swept 
'-'■uj. Curler pollster Pat Caddell toid 
'^f^^idem Monday, 'It^sallover" 



Just before 10 p.m. EST, Carter went to his 
campaign headquarters at a Washingt<m hotel 
to admit he had lost the longest and most 
costly presidential electiOB in the nation's 

history. 

**I can't stand here tonight and say that it 
doesn't him/* Carter said, smiling broadly in 
defeat iM cheering and crying supporters. 
Iroiucaily as he left the hall, the band played 
"Happy Days are Here Again." 

* 'The people of the United States have made 
their choice and of course I accept their 
decision/' he said. "1 have not achieved all 1 
set out to do , perhaps no one ever does. ' ' 

Reagan's big victory apparently carried 
limited coattails — although two liberal 
Democrats, Sens. George McGovern of South 
Dakota, the 1972 presidential candidate, and 
Birch Bayh of Indiana, were defeated by 
conservative challengers. 

Republicans were threatening to take over 
control of the Senate, having won three of the 
nine seats they needed for a majority. In eight 
other races there was the possibility of GOP 
gains. It appeared unlikely the GOP would 
take control of the House, however. 

Though he swept many Democratic 
strongholds, Reagan's popular vote was still 
running at about 50 percent, indicating many 
voters wanted someone else for president. 

Carter's hopes for re-election were buried 
under a combination of problems that have 
plagued his administration — the 52 American 
hostages in Iran, an economy marked with 
high inflation and high unemployment and the 
apparent acceptance of Reagan's argument 
he has allowed the nation to fall behind Russia 
in military strength. 

Carter's pollster Pat Caddell, who told the 
president Monday he would lose the election, 
said the race was about even over the weekend . 
Caddell said the outcome was sealed by the 
developments in the hostage situation Sunday 
and his survey showed that between 59 and 70 

Jjim to REA GA N, page 8 




Carter and Rosalynn in Plains defeat came early 

Hawkins, Barron victorious 



UNITED PRLSS INTERNATIONAL 

MIAMI — Republican Paula Hawkins 
defeated state Insurance Conunissioner Bill 
Gunier last night to become Florida's first 
woman U.S. Senator. 

The 53-year-old Hawkins will be only the 
second Republican that Florida has sent to the 
Senate in modern times. 

With 52 percent of Florida's 3,603 precincts 
counted, Hawkins had a slim 51-49 percent 
lead of 24,000 votes, but the margin has 
increased as the big-county votes began 
rolling in. 

The populous Miami and Fort Lauderdale 
areas were giving the feisty former state Public 
Service Conunissioner big victory margins as 



were the Republican strongholds of St. 
Petersburg and the southwest coast . 

And surprisingly, Hawkins showed strongly 
in the Tampa area where Gunter had hoped to 
capture a wide victory margin. Gunter won 
Orlando-Orange County, the hme area of 
both candidates, and the nearby Daytona 
Beach area. But elsewhere in the so-called 
*'Interstate-4 corridor" across the peninsula's 
midsection, Hawkins led the vote count . 

• •• 

Perennial Senate power Dempsey Barron of 
.Panama City extended a 24-year legislative 
career, winning re-election over .lawyer- 

TimtoSENATE^tmgeS 




Sullivan wins Super 



Bammgreetssupportmkist night 



^ BYDANNIVOGt 

FLAMBEAVSTAFFWRrrER 

More than three quarters of Leon County's registered 
voters turned out yesterday to re-elect three incumbents 
and give cautious approval to a city-county consoUdation 
plan. 

In the hotly contested supervisor of elections 
campaign, John Sullivan Jr., son of the incumbent 
handily beat out 1 1 write-in candidates to keep that post 
in the family for another four years. 

Voters also welcomed about 8,000 new residents to the 
city by approving the annexation of two parcels of land on 
% the urban fringe of the city. 

Even though more people voted against Sullivan than 
-caM ballots for him. the large number of write-in 
candidatesdiluted the effect of the opposition. 

**My experience wUl help me be a good supervisor, to 



manage the office and all," Sullivan said eariy this 
morning at the Leon County Courthouse, where the 
ballots were tabulated. 

**I hope I can live up to the levdof confidence showed 
by the voters who put me m office." 

Arthut Mobley Jr., who finished a distttit xcood to 
Sullivan, found it hard to believe th« even the dty'sWadt 
precincts gave Suliiv an strong support. 

*• I guess it was old people not ecfaicaied on tlie wi» >in 
process,'* Mobley said at tlie courthoyfc. •'Th e aoMNtftt 
of people that didn't wr^»4a was a caiaitiOl* a> ^ ^ 
voted their consdeoce, and they teervc Joka SoMvan," 
Mobley added, "ITi roB over in a^r grave beloie I run 

again in Leon County.*' 
UnofTicial fcsnto siKywed Soffivan with 12,402 votes. 



* » 





011^ 



fif «f!^f 



f '4 




2 / Wednesday, November 5, 19g0 Florida FhuOm 




Stolen auto causes three car pile-up 



mOM SlAWr REPORTS 

A chase of a stolen car that began at the Burger King near 
the Nortliwood Mall yesterday ended twenty minutes later 
in a' four-car crash at the intersection of Tennessee and 
Woodwtfd itnm. 

The incident began at t^jproximittely 11 a.ai. yesterday 
morning when a 16-year-oid juvenile from Fort Lau^rdale 
stole Russell Hansen's orange Datsun from the parkhig lot 
of Albertson's. 

"We're vacaiioimig, staying at some campgrounds. We 
went into Albertson's for about five minutes to get some 
bread, came back out and it (tl^ car) was gone," snd 
Hansen. 

At approximately 2:30 p.m., Leon County SherifPs 
investigator Randy Spem:er recognized the car at Burger 
King near the Northwood Mall. Spencer followed when the 
juvenile, whose name cannot be released, drove away. 

Spencer tried to stop him but the juvenile sped up with 
Spoicer in pursuit. Ehiring the chase, the juvoule hit a 
Tallahassee Police car on Branch Street. D^age to the 
police car was slight. The juvenile continued with Spenoo* 
still in pursuit. 

They then turned onto Tennessee Street off of Raven 
Street, next to the Subway restaurant. When the juvenile 
reached the Woodward intersection, traffic was ba(fted up 






Russell Hansen (L) surveys his wrecked 

Datsun, 



A kigh speed chase invoking a stolen w emkd in 

a heap on Tennessee Street yesterday. 

so he tried to make a U-turn through the median, ^moer 
also drove his car through the median. 

**We'd been in pursuit for so long that when he tried to 
make his U-turn, I just tried to stop him. I cHpped him in 
the rear and you can see what happened," said Spencer. 

What happened was a collision between Spencer's car 
and the Datsun that the juvenile was driving. As they 
collided, a black Laguna apparently sideswiped the cars. 
Then a grey Datsun pick-up truck, heading east through the 
intersection, rammed into the side of Spencer's car. 

No one was seriously injured. The juvenile was taken to 
the hospital in handcuffs to be checked. He apparently had 
only cuts and bruises. The driver of the truck also was 
taken to the hospital to be checked for a possible injury to 
his leg. 

The cars did not get off as lightly. The stolen car driven 
by the juvenile suffered heavy damage as did the front end 
of the truck. One side of Spencer's car was dented rather 
severely. The black Laguna was damaged least with a dent 
in the left rear end. 

According to Dick Simpson, Leon County Sheriff 
spokesperson, there is the possibility that the juvenile might 
bearunaway. 



FSU freshmen are getting better 




BY BART CHURCH 

FLAMBEAU STAFF WRrrER 

Florida State's freshman class this year is academically 
better than it has been in at least six or seven years, 
according to Dr. Paul Ellimt, associate vice president for 
academic affturs. 

This improvement has occurred, according to Elliott^ 
despite falling enroUments nationwide which have, an^ed 
keen recruitment competition between universities, and 
desinte FSU*s hick of applied programs (like eivnieeca^ 
and architecture) which tend to attract "better" students in 
the70's. 

The average SAT score of this year's Hrst-time in allege 
freshmen was up 12 points over test year's average (which 
had a big increase as well), according to a study just 
released by FSU's admissions office. National average SAT 
scores are down three or four points, said Pete Metarko, 
director of admissions. Scores of bteck first time freshmoi 
were up 14 points. 

"The caliber of our students is steadily rising,*' said 
Metarko. "We're getting nM>re students and they're 
better." 

Nearly 10 percent more black first time freshmen are 
Intending FSU this year as did last year according to the 
adnnssions study. The total number of first time freshmen 
catering FSU must stay at about 2S00 under a Board of 
Regents quota qfstem. Many more studmts appUed for 
those 2S00 spots this year than have in recent years, 
according to Metarko. 

"The applicant pool was way up." said Metarko. "We 

were able to be much more selective. Not every student who 
wants to corae to F^ can get in." 

Elliott attributes the larger aiHUlicant pool to the 
followmg hnprovements at FSU: 

* Better recruitment throughout the state of Florida 
and even nationally. 

• Better admissions processing because of a new 

computer system which allows much more efficient 
handling of applications, acceptance letters, recruiting 



letters, etc. 

• More scholarships of all types available to incoming 
freshmen. (Twice as many were awarded this year as in any 
other year.) 

• . More visibility provided by the successful football 
team. 

*'Our freshmen class will continue to improve 
(academically) next year even if we go four and seven, but I 
doubt if we will (go four and seven) under Bowden," said 
Elliott. "Students are realising that a degree from FSU is- 
worth a lot academically. " 

Metarko agreed saying that "visibility gets good students 
interested, but the thing that people are looking at is 
academic quality," 

"Will I be able to get a job with my degree?" added 
Metarko when asked what criteria '*good" students use 
whoi picking a school . 

Good students of all kinds are choosing FSU, according to 
Elliot. Three times as many black National Merit and 
National Achievement Scholars chose FSU this year as have 
in any other year. First time freshmen women's average 
SAT scores increased 16 points over last year. The average 
ACT score of out-of-state students increased from 21 to 23, 
a significant increase given that the ACT scale only goes up 
to 36. ^ 

Grade point averages for first time freshman remained 
about the same as they were last year according to Metarko. 
As usual, women had significantly higher CPA's than men. 
Men had significantly higher SAT and ACT scores, 
however (this is also usual, according to Metarko). 

Average SAT verbal score this year was 454. Average 
SAT math score was 491. Average ACT score was 21. 
Average CPA was 2.88 

"We have reached the peak in the popularity of applied 
programs, which FSU is weak in," said Elliott. "Not only 
are we sucoeding in improving the quality of our students 
now, but, as we cycle out of this era and into a new era 
stressing the humanities, we will be able to go forward 
amazingiy.'* 




Educational Cnttr 



TiST PREPARATiOM 
SfCCIALISTS SINCE 1938 



Ftr infpfinatiofl About Other Cen-fs 'r Mr * %- ^ 
Outside NY State CAU Toti r»Ef m 



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After oaMiit all he could 
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Fatmoiis All-You-Can- 
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Opening 



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rson suspected in local house fire 



B\ ( I KI ULLDS 

II AMMAt. ST ATT WtKWfM 

^ iiicT eight p.m. on November 2, Carl Austin. 
109 West Seventh Avenue was aUegedly stabbed to 
llyy Sue Windom. aft 19. of tlie same address. 

It^-forted stabbing occurred at the apartment of 
iisier. According to Tallahassee Police, 
a domestic argument developed between Austin 
jofli. who tether. Windom left their home 
J licr*ii$ter*s apartment. Austin then followed and 
l^npposedty stabbed there by WindoiiL A fiict knife 
tiTfarenl weapon used in the stabbing, 
o yesterday morning, the house where Austm and 
^bvcd. located at the corner of Seventh Avenue and 
51 Drwe. was burned. I he Tallahassee fire Departmeni 

olice search for way 
10 keep man off street 

CURT nELDS 

fLAMIKAt STAFF WITTEa 

\ nan arrested on the Florida State University campus 

irc^passing October 22 is due to be released on 
{fljbcr6. Local police, however, hope to find a reason 

cleave the man, Joseph E. Baltzell. 
liUdl <*as arrested after reportedly harassing several 
!hc ISL campus. The women alleged that 
:ii niadc Ma'omcnfs about women deserving to be 
:andthat he would rape anyone he tell like raping. 
■ A,i iTi-^fcd and charged with "trespassing after 

.ihJ i;a^^portcd to the I eon C ounty Jail. 
y general consensus is that he shouldn't be on the 
aid I SI I'l^iice Officer Linda Presnell. **If there is 
- icgal \*ay to keep him off the street, we would like 



According to Lieutenant Giles of the Leon County 
fTs OfHce, inquiries to ether states about possible 
>nts for Baltzell have turned up nothing, 
nothing pans out, it looks as if he'll be released, -* 

•ilcs. 

zdi has been evaluated by the Crism Management 
The Unit evaluates individuals for psychiatric need to 
c if the individual is dangercHis to others or to self. 
m results of that evaluation are not suffic^nt cause for 
»ning Bait /ell without some othet devetopment between 
ind ihc sixth. 

• • • 

TuKa LiniverMtv football team lost more than the 
' Saturclav niuhi. During the second quarter, some 
ptrsDiis broke mio the Tulsa dressing room and 

;5^^9incash. 

'*Hi>e\cr broke inio the dressing room did so by using a 
giiH)lot some son to cut through a corrugated metal 
^ftcr gelling past tfic wail and into the dressing room, 
^T)etralor(s) weni through the belongings of the Tulsa 
and coaches. The $579 was all that was taken. 




RONALD 
RAY-GUM 

SAYS, ''My Me^type 
resume let the world 

see the real me. " 



I Rm. 314 
^ |univ«rsity 
Union 



644^44 

9afn-3pm 



^« ALLAN O. DEAN 
Ol*TOM€TfWST 

'^THOMASVIUE RD 



fion of 



mediatype 



Manny's 

SPEC/AL OF THE WEEK 

Fried Flounder 

Good Mon Sun 
5 9p.m 




'It is not known at this time if the 
si^pected arson is related in any way to 
the stabbing inciitent or not' 

— Tdbhassee Pofice 



suspects arson was the reason for the fire. 

It is not known at this time if the suspected arson is related 
in any wav to the stabbing incident or not. An mvestigaiion is 
underway according to Barry Bumgarner, information 



officer vkith the faiUhassee Pulut IKpariment. 

• • • 

At 12:22 a.m. yesterday momii^ a car that was iravcttng 
West on Tennessee Street fired a slKNiitn the Slfma 
Alpha Epsilon fraternity house. 

The Mast hit a car parked outside by the house. It also 
struck some windows on the south side oC the home. 

One person at the house was sUghtly injured by flptm 
glass. No one was injured by the blast itsdf. 

Florida Stale University Police offKriab request that if 
anyone has any information i^xxit the incidcAi that they 
contact them at 644-1254. 

According to Lieuicnant Jack Handley of the FSII pt lice 
department, no suspects are knoi*n but an investigation ts 
being conducted. 




A 





(Presenting our Designer Diamond Collection. )* 





A This week only, ArtCarved presents its 

dramatic new college ring concept for women 
in lOK and 14K gold. On display only while 
the ArtCarved repr^entative is on campus. 



The new Designer Diamond Collection, 
reflecting the importance, value, and rare 
beauty of genuine diamonds, is an 
ArK^arvedf innovatkm. 

This collection is also available with a new 
diamorul substitute, Cubic Ziromia, which 
creates the same dazzling elegance for less 




It 
1 

!l 

II 

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/IRT(7IRVED 

^COLLEGE RINGS 
Symboluing your ability to achieve. 



DESIGNER 
DIAMOND 
COLLECTION 



Nov. 3-7 university Union 



Union Store 



*ateo available with Cubic Zirooraa, a cbamond substititte. 
Depiisit i«|uirwl. Master Qmge iw Visa aocefHtd. 



0 1960 ArtCwiid Oift^e Rbiks 






4 / Wednesday. November 5. 1980 Florida FlambcM 




■0' 

itMW***'".,, 

I'm M 




I 



■ J 



Florida Flambeau 



The Honda Flambeau is published by the Florida Flambeau Foundation, Inc. an independent, non- 
I>rorit corporation which is solely responsible for the contents of the paper. 

Florida Flambeau Foundation. Inc Newsroom. 204 N Woodward Avenue, phone 644-5505; Mailing 
address. P.O. Box U-7(X)i, Florida Sute University, Tallahassee. Florida 32306. 

Sidney Bcdingfidd Ediior Mary Tebo Associate Editor 

Bob O'Lary Photo Editor Steve Dollar Associate Editor 

Brad Liston News Editor Chris Farrell Associate Editor 

Chris Brockman Sports Editor Melissa Beckham Art Director 



Prison reform 



Loiie Wanwiiglit tt inder file yet agi 
Tim times during the last year-aiid-«4^ 

ability to manage, even his inteUigence. And three times Gov. Bob Graham has stef)ped in 

to save Wainwright. 

This time it looks serious, though. An ad hoc House committee, which investigated the 
prison system for 18 months, released a report yesterday denouncing the prison system in 
Florida and placing much of the immediate blame on Wainwright. 

The committee believes Wainwright should be fired, and we agree. 

For 18 years Wainwright has headed the Department of Corrections in Florida. 
He took over a relatively small, manageable system, and has seen it grow aknost 
geometricatty as the incarceration ri^ in Florida began to soar. Now thai sy^on is 
bloated aad uiiwieldiy, in need of wfaolesate refmn. 

Wamwii^ simply isn't capaUe oi such rrform. 

Some of the complaints raised by the committee are astounding, others merely 

depressing. They include: 

• Gross mismanagement of the entire system; 

• favoritism and nepostism in hiring practices; 

• refusal to update and upgrade penological proceedures to meet increasing demands; 

• disregarding brutality by guards, and sexual assault by guards and prisoners. 

The list goes on and on, but the bottom line is evident: the prison system in Florida is in 
serious disrepair, md the fiist step toward positive reform is the dismissal oi Louie 
Wainwright. 

Obviously Wainwrigbt isn't the entire problem, aiid his dtoiissd wiU 11^ 
system. That will involve a deeper study, one that delves into die societal proUcms that 
have piodiioed sudi wextraorcfinary mctaceralion rate. And one that addrcssrs the 
l . fg i s fai hir e's uiiwaaagness to confront the probiem. 

fts not a popular subject; prison reform won't win many votes. Most Legislators 
understand their constituents, and unfortunately, most constituents — you and 
me — are content to forget about both the prison system and the prisoners inside. 

Until our prisons explode, that is, and we are faced with an Attica style uprising. 

The truth is the prisons are our problem, and the people we send there to rot away 
imnoticed are our responsiblity. Unless we are willing to accept that responsibility, we will 
never honestly address the problems of our time, much less overcome them. 

Sure Louis Wainwright should be fired; that's obvious. 

What isn't so obvious is our own tawdry role in allowing the penal system in Florida 

to reach such an indefenstbk? and inhnmaiM* state of deterioration. 






Getting more miles-per-gall 




BYMANNEGIEGOIY 

FLAMBEAU COLl MNIST 

No one can tell you how much gas your car 
will use, although ever\' car has the potential for 
^ting a certiiin number of miles per gallon. 
MPG estimates are calculated as part of the 
Environmental Protection Agency's auto- 
tTnission certification program. Most often these 
estimates are calculated using a hand built 
prototyp)e car, so that the engine of such a car 
will perform optimally for that year. Not every 
model is tested however. They are tested 
according to "engine families" so that not every 
aigine combination Ls evaluated. They are also 
tested in the laboratory and not under normal 
driving conditions, which means that wind and 
weather conditions are missing although 
correction factors for those conditions are 
estimated, which mathematically adjusts the 
figure to approximate what couki be expected on 
the road. 

The **city** mileage number actually 
resembles suburban driving oonditioiis rather 
than actual stop and go city traffic, ahhough 
by law the city mileage must be fmphasifinri in 
any advertiscfliaits. The MPG csrtmatrt are 
uidlBl with comparing cars of shii^ar aae nd 
transmisskm type, but kss reliable when 
oooqiaring small cars with different types of 
transmissions. How much money you wifl 
save if you buy a smidl car depends on the 
MPG you were fettuig on your old car. For 
example, if you switch from a car getting 15 
MPG to one that gets 20 MPG you wiU save 
the ooit of 250 gallons of gas per year. But if 
you change from a car that gett 15 MPG to 
one getting 40 MPG you will save only the 
cost of 55 gallons per 15,000 miles. 

All of these estimates depend on how you 

drive. The following are some tips for gettii^ the 

roost out of a gallon of gas: 

• First of all, plan ahead. If you combine 
several short trips into one long one you will be 
driving as litde as possible with a cold engine. 
This is important because when an engine is cold 
it can be getting as littk as two or three miles 
gallon. 

• Also, don't sit and let the car warm up. It 
does the engine no good at all while at the same 
time getting 0 MPG. If you drive off at a 
moderate speed as soon as the engine is 
running smoothly all parts (inciudiog the 
heater) warm up faster. 

• Try to anticipate traffic conditions ahead 
of you so that you can try to keep as constant 
a speed as possible. 

• Watch ahead for traffic signals and tr>' to 
avoid getting caught bdiind cars exiting from 




CONSUMER WAK H 

and expressway or car^ making a !cf' ^ar * 
A delicate foot also makes for ga » 4 
Imagine that there is an egg <4rarT«^ | 
bottom of your foot and in 10 ^le^ r | 
accelerator and brake pedab wshoui 
the egg. 

• If you have manual tmi^'<y 
downshift before braking I - 
slop the car wastes gas. IX'.-. 
nec^sar\' to accelerate adcqu.r 
and as you build up speed shut ut ■ 
be afraid to lug the engine; stxi or 
downshift if the car is not running snxxr 
high gear. This is espeaally useful in car^ i^- 
diesel fuel because the engines m thc< 
more efficient at slow specdsihan h . 
have overdrive on your car use it evtr 
not on an expressway. This device b 
most conditions whae the car is gouii 
miles per hour. 

• If you drive a car v\iih au;. 
trmsmission you will have les^ amiiol tr..- 
RPM (Rotations Per Minute j d er, 
However, if you can sense wtoi At - 
upshifting you can encourage it to Aift v 
by letting up a little on the aoodenior. 

• Obemthe 55 aOtittr-bmwt^^ 
dK> help to impfowe gv nleifE. 
atowcr thn 55 in laih fw sm e«n 

• Abo, it hdpt to tare oir da atme 
are idling more than 30 leooodk 
•Bondi the pi jwu ine in resttftim 4e « » 

it takes for it to continue kffing 

• KeepB^ the engine tuned v^-iil save 
keeping the tiro infUtted a the 

Iiewe. lUriial tires arc espedaflyh^ • 
becaoK they on take up to 35 
presRtte per square inch, which •■ 
becMse of kTwer roling resistance 

• Don't use your car as a 
to thccar whKh red la- . t 

Triwannicessary objects out X • 
take h^gage or bike racks oft un.c^ • 
using them. Higher octane gas won r 
better mileage unless your car has b« 
to take advanti^ of t 
least, most gas saving gadgct> no» 1^ 
are of little use to anyone but tf» P<*^ ^ 
manufacture them. Most of them to^t 
tcited by the people at Con^Tif^ 
m» ^mm^ and have been founu 

value k-B^i 
Cotrojiner Waldi rmft t>er> 



Florida Flambeau Foundation, Inc. Business and Advcrtismg Office, ^ uOlf^ 



phone 644-4075; Mediatype lab. 314 Uotvenity Unioo, phone 
University Union, phone 644-5785. 



Rick JohnMM. 
Traccy Roare. 
Laurie Jones. 



Amy Arbofasi. 
Inc Duncan.. 



Produ--'-'"- 



leaainial FS 



)0m 



Vi Mark Tv* 
iot be bi 
melw ihr . 

mm wi 

■I the end 
nihil cool- h 
|iBd coaceplual 
1100 has tak 

«^oh«l. The .1 
^iWKiualit) I 

^ reaJly $ur 
• which 
) the 
[ioft.; DcU-mat 
*Ha! now 

Xding !i> 



^txtf, the 
"^10 am 

^ for con 



I 



Mil I ,„ 




ler-gaUoi 

m wAm 



CMS imddng a left hsnA turn 
makes for gas r k:4^« 
c is an cn strapped to v 
oot and try to step on 
rake pedris widioiit break . 



don' 

Ibraking. IMng the cngne 
is gas. Downshift only 
prate adequately (as on a 
ip speed shift up evfy. Dor' 
the engine; you on ilmv 
|ar is not rumang snoodilr 
specially useftd in CMS dnt I 
the Cities in these can 
sIcMvspeBdsthBnNgli. Ify^ 
I your car use it even if yon 
way. HiiB device is useful 
here the car is loiai over 

ve a car with automa' 

have less control over 

Pier Minuie) of the 
can snie when the car 
it to shift 
.ontheaocdeiator. 
5 nrilHW^our speed hin 
rove fas miieagc and go«r 
Ijiigh gear saves even mrc ca^ 
• ^ turn off the engine n 
[iuiii 30 seconds. After 
u use in restarting the car is I 
to continue jdiing. 
engine tuned ^iW save fts, 
tires inflated at the .orrt 
es are especially helpiui 
take up to 35 pounds o' ' 
,re inch, which will save 
>lline resistance. 
nr car as a mobik 0om- 
car which reduces g»< 
•V objects out ot your car i 

bike racks on unless yotJ 

ber octane gas wont 
less your car has bew 
of it. And last bi^ 

tving gadgets no^jT 
o anyone but diep«*'^ 
•m. Most of them have 

eoplc at Consum^^^ 
%e been found to be of 



w N Woodward 



445 Claisifi*! 



Prodnrtioa 



letters 



ardworking Tarpon Club all right 



Arected to all of you who have heard <rf, enjoyed 
at interested in the FSU Tarpon Chib. One of the 
•jd-»orl(iRg dubs on campus. Tarpon is involved in 
flsiied swimniing/creative aquatics. Members put in 
luny hours in and out of the water preparing for 
1011^ Home Show in February and NIC A (National 
• ' r reative Aquatics) meets throughout the year, 
r S itionals are being held at William and Mary 
in Virginia in the spring and we are hoping to fly as 
•^bers there possible. Because Tarpon operates 
i.iub rather th ^ m intercollegiate athletic team, the 
Mjonty of OUT expenses must be raised by team 

:)eccmber 6, Tarpon swimmers will be participating 
-aflflyalFSU Jog-A-Thon, through which we hope to 



raise the bulk of our money for Natiomds. The amount of 
money Tarpon raises depends upon the amount of pledges 

' made f or the laps team members complete. 

If you know anyone in Tarpon, or if you've ever enjoyed 
a Home Show or just want to help us get to Virginia, this 

letter is an invitation to you to make a pledi^e for us; either 
a per lap amount for a team runner or a set dollar amount 
for the club. Anyone wanting to support Tarpon, please 
contact a Tarpon swimmer, our Faculty Advisor, Alicia 
Crew, at the Union Pool or the W omens' Athletic 
Department. 

Come watch us run on Saturday, December 6 at the FSU 
Track and don't forget the Home Show in February at 
Montgomery Pool! 

Smile, Daimiit! 

Dave Langlais 



Some things can't be burlesqued 



taor 

Ic \^ horn Dismay Concerns: 

Twain once said, "There are some things which 
.iMoi be burlesqued, for the simple reason that in 
- \cv !hev are so extravagant and grotesque that 
. c!i tor burlesque to take hold of." We have such 
vMih the now infamous "Bill Wade" scandal. It 
end. managed only to burlesque itself. 
. ..^aK)l- headed academy (see note) where logic, fact, 
■~t :^n.eptual progression are held in highest (?) esteem, 
-vuoii has taken a death-grip upon the jugulars of most 
M^Hed The arguments stem from an elected candidate's 
' -cvualitv rather than his position on an issue. But this 
callv surprising as this campus is a small replica of 
• \^hich has been known to elect a president 
10 the deftness of a candidate's hair-dresser and 
x'd-mates by similar process. 
*'a! now e\i>ts is a form of logomachy which, 
ng 10 Ambrose Bierce, is "a war in which the 
JNare words and the wounds punctures in the swim- 
of self-esteem — a kind of contest in which, the 
-Tpshed being unconscious of defeat, the victor is 
*>>»dihere>*aiu !xuccess." 
^n, Bill Wade N platform for election was and is: 
1) There is an intense superficiality inherent in the 
"•wining election process. 
^ Sexism is also inherent in the process. 
-) Graebdominate the process. 
%i«(l, and stiU agree, whole-heartedly , with the fbst two 

"»se$. The third I agreed with because the word 
ncTcm" was omitted, as in, "Greek domination is 
^ in the process." Greek domination, as far as I 
was not inherent; but, rather, implied dye to lack 
''"taionty participation. Of course, since the deetion, I 
^ iuiow it roust, by d^u^ion, be inherenl to the 

for Bill Wade. I voted for his pramacs. I (fid not, 
*^««csted by an over-nealoiis scrttiUer, vote as a joke, 
^f^fr. the joke came anyway. Hunan heiats have since 
10 amaze roe. For the most part they merely disgust 



^for const met ive debate, Steve Black, I postulate: 

"J^' the Homecoming Chief and Prince«;s, Greek or 
JKircck, do noi represent all of Florida State University. 
r*^8unicnt is found in the third point of Steve Black's 
L •• '0 lake this small plurality as majority approval 
I position is irresponMble. if not dishonest." Yet, in 
this has been the case. I hold that either a 
"^'^r-'' number of students vote (to be determined in the 
f^^^tlebaic) or the whole process be eliminated. 



Second, 1 hold that the "Flambeau" had the right to 
support Wade (implicitly or explicitly) just as YOU or 
anyone else, as thiiiking individuals, had the right to 
disagree. 

Third, it is obvious that Wade refused to resign because 
his loyalty lies in protest of idiocy. I hold that Wade 
appears very idiotic and yet you fail to see the connection. 
Also, with all this talk of "Death to the Faggot" I have 
heard (implicit or explicit) the people around the country 
will have a wrong impression of FSU. 

Fourth, I agree with your statement, "when anti-Greeks 
attack fraternities and sororities, they are attacking a 
segment of American society." (I saw that movie, too.) 
You talk of organized power as being "the way h is." I 
hold, however, when a "silent majority" becomes 
organized, via the Flambeau, it encroaches on Ckeek power 
and this you do not hke. And, gee whiz, we didn't even 
know SOaOO of our "not so silent majority" on a day-to- 
day basis, golly gosh! I also agree with your justifkittion of 
Greek domination of Homecoming. You do act more 
chUdishly than others (i.e. provide flo^ and bamers, cheer 
Uke hell, etc.). I hold that Greeks have a dtvme right to be 
"Kings of the Idiotic." 

Last, it is all too easy for Greeks to sk and poimd their 
paddles, read the Flambemi and ciiticize, knowing att the 
while that they wffl never have to spmO: or think much less 
put their words into actimi because they know tte Greek 
system (in the form of a brother) win (k> all this for them. I 
hold ibm, a depea of non-conformity and non-compromise 
is necessary m any organization just as it is in society as a 
whole. Without it, we would be one world (or government) 
right and 4.5 billion people wrong and anestheticized. 

You may attack what Bill Wade represents by 
the methods you, Steve Black, suggested. You may use 
Khomeini styte enMitional illogic as in "Death to the 
Fi^got." You may use Martin Luther King, Jr. style 
rational defense of your rights as in the contents of Steve 
Black's letter. As for control of the press I must deficate 
loudly. This is an inane suggestion. I have no more, and 
probably less, control of the press than you, Steve Black. 

Personally, I couldn't give a flying Greek what the 
Flambeau prints. 1 feel secure in the knowledge that 1 can 
disaiiree when need be. 

WBbMD.Thnish 

Note: 

Academe, n. An ancient school where morality and 
philosophy were taught. 

Academy, n. (from, academe). A modem school^ where 
football is taught. 

Ambrose Bierce 



1 rttm Foley: Letters to the editor of the Honda Flambeau should be signed, and must irKlude an address 
and phone number if possible. They should be lypc-wnlien. double spa.ed. aivJ no longer than 1 50 words. 
Correct name^ will be run with each letter unless the author has a valid reason ior rciiuiiimg anonymous. 
The editors reserve the righiio edit the letters for length and to meet standards of good taste. 




FOLMAR 



CUM AMD 
PAWM SHOP 



IN THE VARSITY SHOPPING CENTER 
WIST TENNESSEE ST • t904| 224 6636 




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Iran 



Momentum fading 
for quick release 

L M I KD PRKSS INTKRNATIONAI. 

ALGIERS, Algeria — Western diplomats monitoring 
develop.nents in Algeria's role as middleman between Iran 
and the United States said yesterday momentum appears to 
be fading for quick release of the 52 American hostages. 

"It looked yesterday as if something was in the offing/* 
said one diplomatic source about Iranian statements 
suggesting an immenent release of the hostages, now into the 
second year of captivity. 

**But now it seems weVe in for a much wait." 

Ttie government continued a domestic news blackout 
about Algena's designation by Iranian Prime Minister 
Mohammad Ali Rajai to '*take care of the hostages. 

In its only reference to an intermediary role, the official 
television station said Algerian ambassador to Washington 
Redha Maiek has relayed to the United States an Iranian 
request for a reply to its release conditions. 
• **When both governments agree, we will act/* said an 
Algerian official who gave no indication whether the 
hostages might pass through Algiers in any eventual release. 

Some .Western diplomats suggested the government of 
President Bendjedid Chadii might favor the hostages arriving 
in Algiers — however briefly — on their way to freedom as a 
means of enhancing the country's position in the non-aligned 
movement. 

These diplomats noted the presidency of the non-aligned 
V movement is scheduled to pass to the Arab world in 1982 and 
that Iraq had been tapped for the post. 

They said Algieca might hope to replace Iraq if its 
leadership is thrown into question as a result of its war with 
Iran, another member of the non-aligned movement. 

A visit to Algeria by Habib Chatti, secretary general of the 
Islamic States Organization, did not appear to be directly 
connected to developments in Iran, according to political 
observers in Algiers. 

Chatti, a Tunisian, arrived in Algiers Monday on his first 
visit since his election as secretary general. He went to Al- 
Asnam Tuesday, the city devastated by an earthquake Oa. 
10. 

State Department spokesperson John Trattner was 
responding to a broadcast by Radio Tehran in which the 
Iranian foreign ministry said the U.S. response to the 
conditions set by the Iraman partiament shoukl be given 
quickly and through the mass media. 

Trattner said, "We cannot and will not negotiate throi^ 
the press and the mass media.'* 

He suggested that if there were any difference in 
interpretation to iron out "direct contact woukl be the b^ 
way to resolve them. ' * 




Jimmy Carter was hung in effigy in Tehnm on ^^mer 
the anniversary of the U.S. embassy takeover. polls. 



Justice warns against overuse of death penali 



UNITED PRESS INTERNATIONAL 

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. — A Floiliir^ 
Supreme Court jtmice warned yesterday that 
too broad an aiH><ication of the staae*s death 
penalty law could lead to its invalidation by 
the federal courts. 

Justice Arthur England made his remarks 
as the high court considered cnral arguments 
on whether the ax-murder of a man who was 
sleeping could be viewed as more "heinous, 
ferocious and cruel*' than the average 
Iwoiocide. 

General justices, including England, 
QMestioncd .wiiether there were sufficient 
aggravating circumstances in the murder to 
justify the death penalty that wi» imposed. 

England lold Assistant Attorney General 
Michael Palecki of Tampa that he 
appreciated the obligation of the state to 
defend death sentences under appeal, but 
added: *M have to wonder. . .if the attorney 
general worries. . that continued insistence 
to this coun that the death penalty has to be 



tiQiheid,** will lead to an invalidation of the 
lam. 

Ei^land and other justices indicated they 
believed the case before them had, as England 
put it, "the characteristkrs — and I hate this 
word — of a routine homocide.'* 

He iKHed that the U.S. Supreme Court has 
traditionally struck down death penalty 
statutes that do not precisely tinnt execution 
to crimes that are espedany heinous. 

Palecki argued that the Pasco County case 
before the court, although appearing to 
involve a love triangle, represented a "cold 
calculated design to kill.** 

In the case, William Simmons was 
convicted of first degree murder for killing 
James Hardy with two blows to the head 
from an ax-like hammer while Hardy was 
asleep in his home on Feb; 4, 1979. 

According to testimony, Simmons was a 
lover of Hardy's wife and planned to share 
insurance proceeds with her. 



Prosecutors produced witnesses who said 
Simmons had talked for months of his plans 
to kHl ffordy and had offered money for their 
help. 

The case differs from the average crime of 
passion, Palecki argued, because "the viaim 
was sleeping in his own home, totally 
defenseless, and his face was chopped with a 
hatchet-like weapon. * * 

Smunons' lawyer, Charles D. Waller of 
Dacte City, contended that "the viaioi was 
rendered unconscious (with the first blow^ 
and therefore was spared any pain or 
suffering." 

He argued that the trial judge, in imposing 
the death penalty, erred in considering 
Simmons' prior conviction for armed 
robbery, his attempt to bum the body and his 
seeking of the insurance money as 
aggravating circumstances. 

Likewise, Waller said, the judge should 
have considered as mkigatiag circumstances 



the murderer's age (24). hi 
rehabilitation," his 
marijuana and the passion 
the love triangle. , 
Florida's capital pun^- 
requires that aggravai.ng 
outweigh miiigacing '^^"'"^^^^ 
premeditated murder beiofcm^ 

can be imposed. ,^wdi 
In another case, the couf « , 

from kiwyers for the Dcpan . ^ 

and a group of P^^P^^^".^-- 
dispute on whether hou^ ^ 
by non-residents can ^ § 

The department contend^^^ ^^ 

owned by out-of-state rt>'^ 




computed into ad ''^'l'^ 
Coumy Property ^^'"""^J^aP^ 
md others argue thai tnc ^ 
erroneous because state ♦ 
means for a.sev^ors w 
household effects a pcf^*^ 



tteuhcf : 
Jne candi 



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•oit impt) 
'fobley wa 
>rding U) 
«hy GU 
liOQ sup 
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afchcd i( 

'US pf 

•rythi! 



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H> iNs, 
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Planet 



World 



UNITED 




thhAMhlamkem Wednesday. November 5, I9i0 / 7 



Waves 



til HDAI) " President 

, prepared for a long war. offered yesterday to 
h.s troops trom Iran **tomorrow" if Tehran fnUy 

Baghdad's territorial claims. 
"STstatc run new agency said Hussdn toW the 

\L assembly that if Iran rejected the proposrf. "Iraq 
for a long war ... until our enemy says 'yes' 
„rids to our rights." . 
has stated it is not prepared to accept mediation ui 
..^y.oid v^ar until Iraqi forces withdraw entirely. 
i.iq's defense minister said in a newspaper interview 
lilraqi fora'> "annihilated" an Iranian "brigade" that 
^ 10 break out of encircled Abadan, site of 
ielirgcst oil refiner) in the Middle East. 
jUlfinian brigade used to contain about 4.500 men. 
Inn s official Pans news agency countered with a claim 
« !hc bodies of M) Iraqi soldiers were decomposing in 
leifscrt around Di/ful, a pipeline center,^ after Iranian 
af.-cs wiped (HJt an entire motorized "division/' killing 
•■Vfr.em\ 'roops last Friday. 

\N C ITY — Pope John Paul I! praised priestly 
r -d. esierday and said a priest should love the church 
Biman lines his witc. 

John Paul, celebrating mass in St. Peter's Basilica with 
W) Roman Catholic cardinals, 10 bishops and 400 priests, 
» priestly vows mean total dedication to the church and 
Bfninisiry. 

j "With such concrete spirituality, the priest becomes able 



to love the universal church and that part of it that has been 
given to him with all the ardor of a husband t o w wd a 

wife," the pope said. 

SEOUUSouth Korea — South Korea's martial law 

commander yesterday upheld a military appeals court 
verdict against leading dissident Kim Dae-Jang, sentenced 
to death for allegedly trying to overthrow the regime. 

The commander. Gen. Lee Hui*Sung freed four of Kim's 
co-defendents accused of lesser offenses but upheld loi^ 
prison sentences against 16 others. 



Nation 



VACAVILLF, Cahf. — For the third time since the 
shocking Tate-LaBianca killings in 1969, a parole hearing 
was scheduled yesterday for Charles Maason, imprisoned 

as the mastermind of the mass murders. 

Despite a steady job, good disciplinary record over the 
past year and a better attitude, the prison's most notorious 
inmate stood little chance of being granted a release date by 
a three-member panel of the Board of Prison Terms 
hearing his case at the California Medical Facility. 

ATLANTA — The trial of a former Dade County 
policeman accused of a civil rights violation linked to the 
slaying of black insurance agent Arthur McDuffie has been 
moved from Atlanta to New Orleans. It was the second 
move for the trial. It was transferred to Atlanta ftust month 
when U.S. District Judge Wiffiam Hoevdcr granted a 
change of venue from Miami. 



Write-in candidates complain about the polls 



BY SAM COLEY 

H AMBKAl STAFF WRITF.R 

Confusion reigned in the race for Leon county supervior 
rfdcciions, as an uprecedented number of write-in 
talditesvied for the post. 

Almost as the polls opened, complaints rolled into 
arTcni Election Supervisor Wilma SulHvan's office. 
Most of the complaints dealt with voting-machine 
ifcaciionsihat hampered voters attempting to cast write- 
3»«o. In most cases, the paper tape that records write^n 
■iteoAer tore or would not advance. 

cuKGdate complained that a string used to secure a 
"vil to the voting booth was so short thiU writing in a 
^^Kiate was difficult or impossible. 

wouldn't even reach the write-in space for the county 
sioner. " said Arthur MoMey, write-in candidate for 
or of elections. 'Tt made casting a write-in vote 
impossible 1 did call in and complain about that.'* 
Mobic) wasn't the only write-in candidate to complain, 
*»>fding to the director of the state division of elections, 
^hy Glisson. Erwin Jackson, another candidate for 
•action super\!sor called her office and requested an 
■<'^er to oversee the election. One observer was 
^chcd to Sullivan's office in the courthouse, two went 
**"ous pra^ncts. 

^^hing seemed to be working when we got there,'* 

j^kJOB could not be reached for comment. 

Sullivan s»d most of the problems were quickly 
once election workers arrived at the precincts. 
Vme of the complainu were unfounded, acconfiag to 

-"i»y. it's a scheme to stop the election/' SuBivwi 
Jlus is potitics. They'B do anything to discredit tins 




IN BRIEF 

^HE noPLE FOR RATIONAL MAHiVANA 

•^^^ts tonight at 7:30at the Lndqr ifofieslioe. 
^OWC DANCE MKETS TONKaiT AT Sc3i W 



r ■ 



/"onBallrowB. 
I INSURANCE SOOKIY MEKES TONKRT AT 

' "^tarrv- Conferenoe rooeft. 
^^^TIGATOR TO WCMK ON STUDENT BODY 



General's staff. S3.tO m bowr. Apply in 2S6 
'^'«lUb Of FSU IXWTINIHES WITH A 



Wilma Sullivan, 

the current supervisor of 
elections. 

Sullivan noted that, aside from write-in complaints, her 
office saw no more than the usual election-day difficulties. 

♦It's onlv meant longer lines,'* she said. She explained 
returns would be very late coming in. pnrtiy because of tfie 
write in votes. parOy because there were so many races on 

the ballot. . 

The write-m snafus prompted speculation that the 
supervisor of elections race would be voided Dorothy 
G^son said all complaints would be entered into the 
election report she files, by law. with the clerk of the circuit 
court From there, it's up to the candidate to file a protest. 

Arto Mobley wasn't sure what he would do next. 

"She (Sullivan) has made it very difficult," he said. But 
he was reluctant to accuse Sullivan's office of any 
wrongdoing, agreeing tiiat Uic unusual number of wnte-ins 
could pose problems. , * i . 

"I don't think the mistakes were intentional. A lot of 
things can go wrong. Maybe somebody just made some 
mistakes." 

breathalizer demonstration today in die Umon Coyrtya rd 
from 10-2 p.m. and a toctweo* Alcohol and the Pw^yin 

117 Bellamy at 3:30. 

FSU FRISRCE WffiC CMAM MKTS AT THE 
Florida Wgh Basebal field on Mondays. Wednesdays and 

"^S^HMRAL CAREER: WHAT AND HOW" CXINIC 

meets today at 4 in 1 10 Bryan Hall. _ , ^ 

BASEBALL BATGIRL TRYOUTS TODAY AT 3:30 

in 1 17 Tully Gvm. Applicants must submit a photograph. 
FACULTY SENATE MEETS IN MOORE 

Auditorium today at 3:30. 





LETS SEE... 
IFIDIVKTHE 
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8 / Wednesday, November 5. 1960 klonitkFkmkam 




Reagaj 



percent of the people disapproved of his handling of the 

situation. 

Carter too was plagued by the km of toiBe votes to 
independeiil candidate John Andencm — hut in most <^ Hie 
induitriilittKi southern stittcs where the electkMi wm 
deckled that did not make the differenoe. 

Anderson too called ReagM and congnttiifatted Inin on Ins 

victory. 

There was no victory s ta tcB W i it anmediatdy from the 
Reagan headqtnrters In Lot Ai%etes,eventhcm^Car^ had 
teleplKHied his congratulations to the former Califmua 
governor almost an hour and a half before concedii^ 
pobfidy. 

**We're snrprised we went mta the Somh and blew him 
away," said Reaftti senior advisor James Baker in Los 
Angeles. 

Rieafan won Fkirida's 17 electoral votes dcdstvely ami 
President Carter'sstatecoordkiatiMrbteracdCiffta''sdrfeat OB 
the Cuban refugee problem. 

."We were never able to owcome the refugee thing,'* Jay 
Hakes sakl as Reagan built a lead of 5S pierceia to 40 percem 
for Carter on the basis of 4CI percent of the vote. John 
Andersonhad 4percentandEdO«rk I percent. 

Birt Reagivi coordinator Herb Itemon said Carter lost the 
election by spendimt his Ume d^BncSi^ the mi^akes of the last 
fouryevsaiiaofferingaohopeofchaoge. 

He ateo said there was no reason that Florida would suffer 
under a Repulican adminsrtratkm just became Democratk 
ofiloeliolders,ledl^ Gov. Bob Ckaluun, campaigned hard for 
the president. 

"Theie's going to be another etoction in four years," he 
smd. Hakes saki he talked to Carter akies after the p rea k le nt 
knew he had tost and "Fkxkia is still one of the pieadesnt's 
favorite stiUcs. After all, we lost a lot of places and we can't get 
nttdntafll oftiwra." 

Reagan himself stayed out of public view during the early 
evening hours, having said earlier he was "cautiously 
optimistie" about his diances. 

Reagan pollster Riduud WirthUn said he was not surprised 
at Reagan's evly lead, ife sakI the ddiate with Prnldent 
Carter made adtftcTCToe. 

"Seeing Ronald Reagan next to Jimmy Carter, listening to 
Jimmy Carter labeling him as a radical and dangerous and 
bittgerem, those words really didn't warii off on the governor 
Ml may in fact have backlashed on the president over the last 
four days," Wirthlin sakl. GOP national chairmiki Bifl Brock 
was exuberant. 

"I fed fantastk," he said. "We're gmngto have, I tMnk, an 
incredible win for Governor Reagan. People when they get 
mad and tfiey get hart — as they have by inflation and 
unempkiyment— they're gomg to voteforachan^." 

Reagan cast his ballot in Los Ai^Mes early in the day, but 




Nancy Reagan peeks while Ronnie votes 

Local from page 1 

Mobley with 5,708, Jan Pietrzyk with 4,905, Camp Peavy with 
4,574, and Dot Joyce wkh 4^1. hkme of the other camfidales 
topped 1,500. 

Incumbent County Commissioner Doug Nichols crunched 
challenger Steve Cottrell, taking a majority in each of the 
county's 47 precincts. However. Cottrell said he was 
encouraged by his vote total, and called numii^ for ctffice a 
ery positive experience. 



RoiuUd. Reagan and George Bush appeared 
confl^ early during yesienkiy's yoiing. 

Union workers almost everywhere said the turnout was 

unexpectedly heavy. Both the Carter and Reagan camps have 

said that a heavy turnout by Democrats who outnumber 

Republicans in registration in the key states would help the 

president, hurt the early votes comradicted that conclusion. 

• •• 

Democrats fought to retain control of Congress as a 
conservative Republican wave cut into their ranks, dooming 
Sena's George McGovem and Birch Bayh. New York elected 
conservative Alfonse D' Amato, a virtual unknown when the 
campaign started. 

Republicans — needing a net gain of nine seats to capture 
the Senate for the first time since 1953-54 — had picked up 
three and had good shots at eight more. 

Rep. John Brademas of Indiana, the third-ranked House 
Democratic leader and a veteran of 22 years, also fdl befcNre 
the GOP onslaught. 

The Democrats gave ground grudgingly, however, as their 
array of entrenched and moderate veterans swept to victory, 
upsetting GOP hopes of moving beyond the liberal ranks for 
their election victims. 

Results from the eastern seaboard and the South and 
scattered counts from the nudwest indicated strong that the 
Democrats would keep control of the House and the 
Repitbficans wm still far l 



Going into the elections, the Democrats held a 273- 1 59 edge 
with three seats, now held by the Democrats, vacant. In the 
Senate, the Democrats' margin was 59-41, including Sen. 
Harry Byrd of Virginia, who runs as an indepedent but 
organizes with the Democrats. 

To gain control of the Senate the Republicans would have to 
reach a net gain of nine seats — eight if they can persuade Byrd 
to switch allegiance — a possibility since his endorsemem of 

Ronald Reagan. 

A traditional pattern was forming in the House. For the 
most part incumbents were winning by big marg iiiy and 
vacated or open seats were being closely contested. 

There were also some indications that Reagan's long 
coattails, especially in states where he was running far ahead of 
President Carter, were helping some congressional 
candidates. 

McGovem, one of the nation's leading liberals, and Bayh, a 
liberal challenger for the presidential nomination in 1976, both 
were targeted for defeat — not only by Repiilrikans, but also 
by the ultra-conservatives. 

McGovern was upended by Rep. James Abdnor, a generally 
well-liked conservative House member, and Bayh was beaica 
by Rep. Dan Quale, a conservative newspaper publisher. 



Democrats swept all three school boaid races, with George 
Anderaoai, am ll^son and mcmBbeatEttily Mtet al wBwiBg 
by healthy margins. 

Talh i ha s see kiwyer J. Lewb HaR Ir. ootpnoad fonner 

•Senate president and lobbyist Mallory Home to become 
second judicial cncuit judge, replacing laaMS Joanos. HaO 
wonwithSSpereentofthevoteinthesacoantycircmt. 
Winners ranning onopposed or facing only write-In 



lobbyist Elliott Messer. 

MeiierledinT*diassfeandL«oeCoi«f, i^,. 
«o^ected. with abont 25 percent of rt^^ 
Barron ledevcrywhcre else ui the giant. ^Uom^l^^ 

Barron, a Democrat. Seiu e president i« 
currently rules chairman, had said "ih« WKkv 
would make the difference in his bid for a rj4 • 
Messer, a newly-turned Republican makiMliafc, 2 ' 
Legislature. ""Wa 

• • • 

Democratic Representative Don Fuquaof Akltt 
Republican challenger John I aC apra. a JiM^ 
lobbyist in the race for the 2nd District Houses 

• •• 

Florida voters approved constitutioiiai nmiBm 
cities and counties the financial means to solve tfe? - 
water supply probiemsand limiting the right ^ftnci m, 
pry into the private lives of citizens ^ 

They also approved a legislative housekeqw^^ 
dealing with the introduction of bills in the U^u^ 
defeated an amendment to aboUsh the Constitvtioti I 
Conunission. 



The amendment to allow cities and countia u ^ 
backed bonds to finance drinking uaicr s>^tet7^< *> 
by a 2-to-l margin with more than a third 
counted, and an amendment to permit the use '^Uk 
money for road maintenance well a^ coa> 
leading 52-43 percent. 






PmkHawkins 

The controveraal privacy amendment - which »* ^ 
by Fkmda's homosexual community - had 
some opponents as being a millstone that rnighi dru 
restoftheamcadniems. 

But with more than a third of the precincts ia, tie pp^ 
amendment was passing 59-41 percent. 

The legislative housekeeping amendment w» , 
1 for appnnfal with only the anemtoeDi to atK)»<> 

going down, 57-43 percent. 

The gasoUne tax amendment will alio* ^'"^'fj^ 

use money from the fifth and sixth cents of ^^^^^gc 

gasoline tax for road maintenance as well as 
coittinues the so-called "second gas tax past aw 



candi&ues iMteled incumbent Lee ^•f^V' 

i fiMWMSii I John Chafbi as tax coUector.J^ ^ 

property appraiser, and Eddie Boon* » 



to tht dtf. moH people f'^'^ 'Z'fSc!^''' 

l> tkM Oppose" «• t"" 



Bow 



»e mat 



*H in a t 
' <^oct 

'''' or « 



*»tneof I 



.1., 



Abo> 
tn ^ 



CINEMA 



David Bowie finds life after Eno 



..CHIISFARRHL 

Bovk»<; has pned 
^ Pandora's box m 
hctd and found 
. ^mier^ Whatever 
r icirned playing all 
^ rotes m the bi/arre 
I ...nodrama that's been 

I -^fiiWIig doN^n endless 
moaning in the 

p^gh pop s Baudelaire 
glial *hal It IS that's got 
e -jnnme scared, he 
.T^s ne>.- o'Mies out and 
;! It's tear ol the dark 
tfnaunisus, and the hall- 
tficd terror on Bowie's 
album spooks you like 
lun the attic. 

It spooks sou with the 
jtive, sinuous music 
learned at Brian 
no V knee And where 
best work is far 
...c, Scarv Monsters is 
ore immediaie. It also has 
tobcrt Fripp on guitar, 
•*>ding bome wonderful 

Ihe guitar insinuates 
<{( into song after song, 
A Fnpp spreads it over 
Fisliioii" like an 
vaMatioii. The sound 
^ and throbs, weaving 
-wMm of his own from 
Ytlmair. 

That's the bit the 
lin that's {Hire Eno, 
waiving emotion with 
mA. Bowie works more 
•tk liis voice, serving up 

aad despair and ennu, and wbh a mastery of pop 

wic made part of that history himself, and there is 
Joubt the ghouls of Ziggy Stardust and Alladin Sane 
iiong the monsters that have him so terrified. The 
^lecc of this album and Bowie's best radio song in 
Ashes to Ashes," an exhausted and chilling 
a J It returns to the story of Miyor Tom, the hero of 
s first hit. 

^ Major Tom's a junky," Bowie tells us now, and we 
' ' all along. For years he's led us to the edge 
i: anwshere out of this world; Scary Monsters 
BoNNie at the brink, terrified and uncertain. 
l>avid, v^hat shall I do." his fans scream on "Teenage 
*ikll.ic '; i ll say don't ask me, I don't know." he 




FlorkU FUmbeau Wedne^dav. NoNembcr 5. IfiP ' ^ 



answers. Rarely has emptiness sounded so compelling. 

Bowie's toyed with the icy heart of decadence before, 
dabbled in soulless blue-eyed techno-soul, but the frozen 
wastes of this LP have little to do with that. "It's No 
Game," done in two styles on the album, sounds both times 
like the strangled cry of a desperate man who*s met too 
many who took his poses seriously. 

**It's belittling to have to bow before fadsts," a 
confession from a man who called Hitler the first rock star, 
or just another pose. Bowie's desperation is the most 
controlled you're likely to find, and perhaps the moMtcrs in 
that Pandora's box were just monster mask after all. Even 
Joseph Conrad, though, never pricked his own heart of 
darkness, and Bowie's record takes you ckMeeaoii^ to fed 
his beating. 



Ijust want to have something to do 



BY STEV t DOLLAR 

ASNOCIATi: EINTOa 

^^«^pness reigns. After sitting up all night swilling Jack 
a downtown hotd room, watching this shamWes 
a democracy impkxie and ^ttcr like a smashed TV 
incr or Reagan, doesn't matter, it's a Hobson's choice 
cashed my last check. Emoticmal bankruptcy, 
' - o e \v ho hang onto vain hopes too long, rears 
^ nead and spits up an evening's worth of bile. Take 
' ' " a ^iirror. Do you recognize the face staring back? 
"^^^t now, maybe tonight. 1 feel like Martin Sheen 
^ frames of Apocaiypse Now. You know. Bloody 
^ - mg head, coiseless nagging from the Puritan work 
^ Onh 1 don't want a mission, and all I need is a shave 
*jJ^ON^cr. Some clean clothes. A fresh outlook. Got a 
fi^c dollar bUl in my pocket. Think I can find some 
l^^w>likeme? 

' Saigon, but there's a couple of worthwhile 



escapist gigs in Tallahassee tonight. Start at Moore 
Auditorium (either 7:30 or 6:30) and Lina Wertmuller's 
Swept Away: Yeah, so she's a (sometimes blatant) cross 
between Bergman and Fellini. has more eye-glasses than 
Fred Sanford and flirts with "dangeroiks" themes some 
critics find offensive and heavy-handed. S^^•ept Aviuy is 
funny as hell, tosses an appropriate socio-economic political 
twist into the sleaziest of genres (the Italian Sex Farce), and 
boasts impeccable casting. It's worth the SI 50 for 
admission just for the expression in Giancarlo Ciiannmi's 
eyebrows and the quickie lesson in Italian vernacular. 

Colorful language also figures tonight at the Lucky 
Horsehoe, where Tallahassee's often dynamic Implications 
and Slutbo\^ promise to exterminate the bugs m their 
sound systems and drive the audience into a non-stop dance 
frenzy with their energetic nu-iunes. Or something close. 
Admission price is nebulous at press lime, but should be 
under $2. Starts at 9:30. 





wiMi $2 or mar* pvrdiMa. 



Join us at our bi^ Anniversary celebration. And see our 
feremt selection of cards, ^ts. -aiKi stationery. For any 
purchase of $2 or more today, we'll ^ve you a handy 
write-on-w^M-off nemo board. Remember. The holidays 
are just arcKind the corner. And so are we. (All j^is one 
per custonrar. while they last.) 

Lee!i-lH£Mu^Slxip 

* College Square Shopping Center/ 
Corner of West Tennessee and Ocala Rcl. 
Monday-Friday 10am-8pm; Saturday MM 
Sunday 12piii-S^ Flioiia: S7S-3Ma 




I 
I 

i 

I 



i 



10 / Wednesday, ^fove^lber S. 1980 FlorMa 







, I 



1i 




-I 




i 




Ciass^Tied Ads 




Aoom 306 Union, Omh q ■ u^** 
. TZ noon the dav b,fo,, 





FOR SALE Nee<J cash immcdiatei/ 
Canon AT 1 Camera. 50mm Ims plus 
c«ae porfect condition S200 or bnt 



JVC tttroo, AM/FM radio, twrntaMo ft 
receiver plus 2 speakers 

Big 5 drawer walnut dni 
Call 222 2971 after 4pm 

U.F. coupon 
on Tuesday !!! Best offer 
385 1471 after 6pm 



FSU UF COUPON S70. CALL 224 1M3 
EVEN. 



sale 2 Va Tech tickets S10 ea. and 
3 Gator tickets $30 ea Call 576 8517. 



FOR SALE— TWO COUPONS WHICH 
CAN BE TURNED IN ON TUES. FOR 
THE UNIV OF FLA. GAME tMOFOfi 
PAIR. CALL 222 4528. 

4 TICKETS VA. TECH VS FSU CALL 
444-1257AFTER 6PM. CALL :^85 5090 



FOR SALE 5 TICKETS TO UNIV OF 
FLA. GAME WED. COUPONS $200. 
CALL 575-2732. 



Nov Cat Moden $130 
Leedex Monitor $115 
Zenith 12", RF mod. $50. Carroli «44 

6065 



2 Fla. Fia. State coupons for sale. 
Redeemable on Tues. CaM 224-7720 and 
make me an offer. 

2 3 FSU/UF coupons Tuesday pickup 
SSe e«ctt or best offer. 575-8844 or 224 
4299. 

Two FSU Va. Tech Coupons $10 eacti 
or best offer. Call 224 8859 



2 Football coupons each for the Va. 
Tech & u. of F. Games. Best Offer. 
Call 878 7318 aft 6mrwor anytime. 



FINE HOUNDPUPPIES 
HAVE YOUR PICK OF LITTER. 

PH 224 3854 



Be prepared for the cold weattier! 
Hardly worn, heavy iengtti gray 
suede coat, quilted lining, women's 
size 13. New was $120, asking $60. 644- 
4075 before 5 p.m., ask for Laurie. 

Kenwood TX 620 tape cassette deck 
$200. Call 878 2219. Ask for David. 

DORM SIZE RUGS ^ 
DON'T LET YOUR FEET FREEZEI 
CARPET $15 20 PH. 224 6133 



FSU/UF COUPON 
$50. CAL4. 644 6995 AFTER 4 PM. 

10 speed 25' 2 inch red Puch Cavalier 
with red fenders, all alloy parts, quick 
release hubs, toe clips, new chain and 
rear tire, fur seat. Only $195. Call eves. 
576 4261 or come by Munctile Wagon in 
Union daytime. 

2 END TABLE LAMPS, FLORAL 
DESIGN IN EXCELLENT 
CONDITION. CALL 575-0291 5 9 PM. 

BLACK & WHITE TV 19 IN SEARS 
$50. 222 5694 torn. 417 EAST VIRGINIA 
#6.* 



NICE QUEEN SIZE A ATERBED 
Frame liner mattress & bottom setup 
for only $75. Will deliver 576-8521. 

In Leon County Special Land Sale 4 
nf>iles south of truck route on Oak 
Ridge Road 3 acre tracts 1850 acre 10A 
tracts 1650 acre. 20 to 40 acre tracts 
1500 per acre, terms : 13% down 5 yr . at 
12% interest 

JimmyBoyntonRealty phone 222 7581. 
After hours 576-3874 for Ben Boyntan 




1973 Vega auto, trans. A/C. Excellent 
condition. $700. Mike 224 3409. 

Classic car '65 Plymouth Valiant 
convertible, slant 6 engine, runs good. 
Needs body work. or best offer ' 
Call Jeff 644 6577. 





Female roommate to share 2 bdr 
unfurnished duplex. No pets near 
campus $117,50 & util. after 6. 386-4309 



Fm rm needed share 1 br apt. Plaza 
Apts. $105 montniy plus V2 utilities. 

Call 222 2986. 

NETd to buy 2 COUPONS FOR 
FLA. VS. FSU GAME. CONTACT 
ANG IE 224-7077. 

NEED TWO COUPONS FQR THE 
VIRGINIA TECH. GAME. PLEASE 
CALL 576-1976. 

WANTED, COUPONS FOR THE FLA 
STATE U OF F FOOTBALL GAME! 
WILLING TO PAY. CALL 576-7435 
MORN.ORNITE. 

DESPERATELY 
NEED RIDE FROM SC NOV. 10 OR 
11. CALL GAIL AT 644-5974. 

NE¥b 6 TICKETS FOR FSU FLA. 
CALL 222 5954 8:30-5:30 TAKE ANY 
REASONABLE OFFER. 



Male roommate Winter & Spring 
qrtrs. $97.50/month 8< W utilities. 1 bik. 
from campus. Phone Al at 224 5603. 

Female roommate needed. Two 
bedroom apt. 1 mile from campus. 
Rent $150 a montfi. Soon as poss. Carol 
576-5721. 

Wanted: 2 FSU-UF tickets. Will pay 
any reasonable price. 576-7205 day or 
night. 



NONSMOKING RMT FOR OWN RM 
FURN. DUPLEX $87.50 & Vj UT. 
NEAR FSU. LARRY 575-8746 
BEFORE S. 



ATTENTION 
TRYOUTS FOR NEW DANCE 
GROUP 
GOLDEN GIRLS 
To perform at FSU basketball games- 
need to have dance background wid be 
a registered FSU female student. 

WHEN: TUES. NOV. 11th 4:00PM • 
and SUN. NOV. 16th 2:00 PM 
WHERE: TULLY GYM 
both try out dates are compulsory 
wear clothes to dance in (shorts, etc.) 
INFORMATION: 644 3080, 644-34M. 



CASTINO 

-SL^ ^""^ FILMS. 

PROFESSIONAL AND 

NONPROFESSIONAL, ALL AGES. 
$5 25 AN HOUR. CALL CAWMCC AT 

224-2004, 9-6, M-F. 

Starting winter quarter non smoking 
male rommate to share two bedroom 
turn. apt. W mile from FSu $66.23/mo. 
pi. us. <^ elec. Pit. S76-S344. 



TICKET COUPONS MEEDEO FOU 

VI RG TECH GAME NOV 8 $10 PER 
COUPON CALL 599-9538. ASK FOR 
BRIAN OR LEAVE NAME ft 
NUMBER 



1 BEDROOM FURNISHED 
COTTAGE N DUVAL ST $100 MO. 
S50 DEPOSIT. CALL 305-9643 AFTER 
APM. 



2 BEDROOM APT. FOR SUMLCTl I 
BLOCK FROM CiMMPUS AT COLONY 
CLy. CALL 2S2«aOR MIANAOSII. 

1 room fum., common bath area, Vs 
blocfc from campus. $110. mo. includes 
all utilities. Call 1 6pm Mon , Wed., 
Fri., 222-7276. 

Inflation compels us to rent our guest 
room to an inteiliBent and 
sophisticafed grad (preferably Law 
student) who enjoys/tolerates: 
smoking; reasonable cleanliness; 
occasional erudite banter involving 
words like erudite; warm and 
unselfish housemates 97 BuclksplllS V!» 
util Marc or Roly 222 6786 

2 bedroom, 2 bath apt. ideal for 2 or 3 
people $255 mo. partially fum. Tal. 

Mall area. 386 4422. 

Sublet immed: effic. apt. 2 bl from 
FSU $1M/inc. util. Lease by Nov. 5 
across from Law BIdg. Call 222-0060. 

Housemate needed till Nov. 30: $70 ft 
V* utilities, own room, non-snwiwr. 721 
E.SixttlAv. 224-1123. 

Room for rent 647 w Pensacola St. 
bath and kitchen privileges. $105 mo. & 
utilities. 222-2073. 



Studious liberal liTwants same to 
share 2 br apt. win. ft soring quar. 
$115 Si Vk uflt. Call nfgMt Kathy 575- 
1119. 



'75 YAMAHA DT250B $300. LESS 
THAN 3,000 Ml. BART 644 1548 OFF 
ROAD LITTLE WK FOR STREET. 



1900 Honda CM400T 5^ miles. ^Tiiia 4»9 
sMeld. luggage racK. IHi Bw iii 
tielmets and more. CaH 222-1971 
doys. $1700. 




TWO PEOPLE NEED RIDE TO FT. 
LAUDERDALE AREA 
THANKSGIVING WEEKEND WILL 
SPLIT GAS-CALL 644-6142 OR 



raHiALE ROOMMATE WANTED. 2 
•EDROOM, 1W BATH AT LAS 
PALMAS FROM DECEMBER 
THROUONSPRtMD QUARTER. FOR 
INPORMATIOW CONTACT 
MBLANWr 





BAGELS- 
BAGELS' 
BAGELS' 
IF YOU LOVE BAGELS 

COME TO HILELL S 
BAGEL SALEf NOV. 12 
INtHE STUDENT UNION 
MORE INFO 222 5454 



Ever seen a duck run? On 
can run witti m 

31§ Union 



9. you 
in Rm 



PART TIME 
ADVERTISING ASSISTANT 
FLORIDA FLAMBEAU 

Working Hours: 10am 2pm or iiam- 
3pm, Monday-Friday (20^25 hour per 
week) 

Requirements: Typing 40 wpm, 
bookkeeping, daily correspondene*, 
teleptKme, 10 key adding machine. 
This job involves contact with the 
Advertising manager, sales staff & 
occassionally clients. Very busy 
office! Must be able to work under the 
pressures of daily deadlines. Group 
medical insurance available. 
Telephone interviews onlyl Calf 
Tracey Rowe, 644-4075. 

Models needed for fashion/figure 
modeling. No experience necessary. 
Write Three G. Photography P.O. Box 
12102 Tallahasaee, Fl. 32308. 

BARTENDER WANTED 
COME BY 302 RAVEN STREET 
OR CALL234-3773. 

IMMEDIATE EMPLOrMENT 
DRESSMIAKING, PATTERNWORK^ 

CUTTING. 
FULL AND/OR PARTTIME 
CALL MRS. WILLIAMS, DRESS 
ART. 
386-8764. 

FREE RENT & FOOD FOR AAALE 
OR FEMALE IN EXCHANGE FOR 
COOKING, GROCERY SHOPPING, 
ETC. FOR MYSELF & 2 SONS. 
LARGE HOUSE, OWN ROOM. CALL 
30S-f«94 AFTER 9 PM. 



Butchy Bat>y We aren't scared just 
prepared you can add a shake to our 
life any nite Ms Piggy Barbra Jacki. 

Need help with relationships? Group 
now formins. Call PaydlOiOBy CIMc 
644 3006. 



WFT 

WE MADE IT, 
YEAR TODAY. 



STINKER! ONE 
I LOVE YOU, JET 



THIS FRIDAY NIGHT 

SHABBOT SERVICES 
MEET IN PARKING LOT OF UNION 
POST OFFICE— AT 7:00 PM, 
SERVICES WILL BE AT FSU 
RESERVATION. THERE WILL BE A 
BAHN FIRE. PARENTS ARE 
WELCOME! MORE INFO. CALL 
DUCE 30S-7S39. ^ 

I'M DESPERATE! 
I NEED A RIDE TO THE ATLANTA 

ATHENS, GEORGIA AREA THE 
THANKSGIVING WEEKEND WILL 
. SPLIT COST! CALL ADAM 644-3109. 

U.J.A. CAMPUS ORGANIZER 
WILL BE ON CAMPUS 
FRIDAY, NOV 7 

IF INTERESTED CALL THE 
HILLEL FOUNDATION AT 
222 5454 

DEAR BRUCE, 

THANKS FOR BEING SO 
SPECIAL. JUST WANTED TO SAY 
HAPPY BIRTHDAY LOVE JANE 




BODY SHOP WILL BE GIVING A 
FASHION SHOW AT BULLWINKLBS 

ON WED 

Hey Ho Letz Go • Hey Ho Lett Goi 1 1 
Down to tfie Horseshoe Bar Nr aMMlMr 
Now Wava Nita witli tBe... 

Im pll caH a M ft Slwt Boys 
November SNi ftiia 



SLAPSTICK AT BULLWINKLES 
TONIGHT THRU SATURDAY. 
TONIGHT IS LADIES NIGHT, ALL 
LADIES ADMITTED FREE. 



"UPPER DECK " 
Quality Inn Southernaire Special 28% 
student discoant w/ ID Beer-WiiM 
•aaBias. Blue Key Card 



CATCH 'EM 

IT. 



THEY "POP" 




Want to be happier? Group forming. 
Call Psychology Clinic, 644-3006. 

«uitar lessons: Folk, Blues, C ft W flat 
s Vng^ picking, bottleneck. Dave 
Greenwald 222-7749, 7-11 pm. 

TYPING 

EXPERIENCED SECRETARY 
USING IBM SELECTRIC II. 
REASONABLE RATES. EDITING 
AVAILABLE. CALL 077-3694 
EVENINGS/WEEK-ENDS. 

I String tennis racquets. One day 
service. Lowest prices in town. Call 
Bill at 576-0206. 

YOUR FURNITURE! 
wide variety 
immediate delivery 
Option to Buy 
FURNITURE MART RENTALS 
1206 S. Adams 



THE CHRISTIAN COFFEEHOUSE 
FRIDAY, NOV. 7. 8-12 PM 
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CENTER 
925 W. JEFFERSON 

THIS IS YOUR CHANCE!! ~ 
JOIN THE FSU CAMPUS TODAY! 

PROTEST THE RISE OF 
ANTISEMITISM AND NEOFACISM 
IN FRANCE! 
RALLY TODAY AT 12 NOON 
INTHE UNION COURTYARD. 
LET YOUR VOICES BE HEARD! 

Wanted: Responsible spirits. Meet 
down in the Union Wadmn^, Nov. 5 

from 10:00 2:00 

NAT ART EDMEETING 

THUR, NOV. 6, 7:30 PM EDUC. 126 

COME ONE, COME ALL 



Slut Boys/Implications 
November stti Lucky Horseshoe Bar 

Marilyn ft Joyce are waiting for you 
with information fighter $5.00 style 
cuts. JJ'S HAIRPLACE 4225 W 
Pensacola St. 575-7750. Walk ins 
welcome. 

Old "Books for co ii e c tors and readers. 
Thomasville has 2 dealers— Virginia 
Breedlove on Thomasville Road about 
2 miles before town. Signs on left. 912- 
228 0073. And Dick Rieber, 429 S. 
Hansen St. rear. 912 226 7415 by 
appointment only or by chance. 

THIRSTY WOMEN NEVER HAd"a 
BETTER FRIEND THAN POOR 
PAUL. FREE MICHELOB EVERY 
DAY 3 4 PM, 8 9 PM. POOR PAUL S 
POURHOUSE 618 W. TENNESSEE 



TYPING FAST EFFICIENT LTRS, 
RESUMES, PAPERS,' ETC. 85c PG. 
386-4843. 

TYPING: BIG ORTSMALL PAPERS, 
EL^/ V.^J^V'^ES! NEAR CAMPUS 
7Sc/p SUE 222-9637, AFTER 6. 

MINI WAREHOUSE UNITS" 

6x6 available-larger sizes $14.50 up. 
Call us at L^ewood Mini Warehouses 
386-4191. 



DEAR ~ CATHEAb-OOES 
GETTING A LICENSE MEAN I'LL 
HAVE TO BE KNOWN AS JUANITA 
CATHEAD? WILL WE HAVE TO BE 
SPAYED OR NEUTERED TO 
PREVENT MORE CATHEADS? 
WILL I LOSE MY IDENTITY? ARE 
YOU GOING TO EXPECT ME TO 
WASH YOUR UNDERWEAR NOW? 
LET'S REDEFINE THINGS! LOVE, 
JUANITA. 

Lesbian and' Gay Rap Group-For 
anyone interested-provides a relaxed 
environment to meet and talk wftti 
others. Thurs. 0-10 pm DIf. 112. 

""shabbotTdinner 
hillel will have 
the dinner nov. 14 
instead of nov. 7 
more info. 222-5454. 

CPE-SG free midnight film series this 
week-order of Omega presents 3 
Stooges film festival. Sat., l«ov. 9 at 
midnite Moore Aud. Free. 



JJ'S HairPlace Inflation fighting $5.00 
Style cuts. All the time 4225 w. 
Pensacola St. 575-7750. Walk-ins 
welcome. 



MARC MALCOM RMT 
Massage therapy & relaxation/stress 
management counseling 222 0550. 

I HAVE STRUNG OVER 5,000 
RACQUETS! if you want it done right 
call Winewood Tennis Shop 877-8135. 
Free pickup and delivery I 

THE PUB SPECIAL 

All the spaghetti you can eat ft bread 

and salad $2.50. 



Retired secretary. Accurate typist- 
good speller for papers, dissert., 
theses. Reasonable. Linda Ourbin 576- 
1988. No calls after 10 p.m. 



CATFISH ALLIANCE MEETING 
THURS AT 7:30 IN 346 STUDENT 
UNION. FREE MOVIES "ABOUT 
FALLOUT" ft "OPERATION Q". 
OPEN TO ALL. 

CPE labor aeries working ^ith SCU 
Florida AFL ft CIO & Tallahassee 
Peace Coalition present: William 
Wimpesinger Presdienr lam to discuss 
"Conversion to Peace" Thur., Nov. 13 
at 8pm , Diffenbaugh Rm 201. 



ATTENTION FORMER 
HOMECOMING CANDIDATES: The 
Flambeau business office has your ad 
pictures Tia Hood, Beth McAniy, 
Sharon Frye, Laren Ryan, Pat Rylee, 
John Knapp, and Kent Barton. Please 
pick them t4> as soon as postiMe. 

EVERY WEDNESDAY IS LADIES 
NITE AT BULLWINKLES. ALL 
LADIES AD^'1ITTED FREE' 



EVERY WED. IS LADIES NIGHT 
AT BULLWINKLES LOG CABIN 



YOU WRITE: I EDIT, TYPE. 
Themes, term papers, at reasonaMa 

rates. Call eves, wkends 385 5574. 



TYPING IBM DISSERTATIONS- 
THESES TERM PAPERS. CALL 
PAT DIXON 386 1255. 

WILL DO TYPING IN MY HOME. 
TELEPHONE 305-9689. KEEP 
TRYING. 

Edited Typing IBM Seiectric II 
Reports/ Resu mes/ Letters/ D i ssert . 
575-7171 Mission Rd. Area. 



ANYONE INTERESTED IN 
FORMING A JEWISH STUDENT 
UNION. PLEASE ATTEND AN 
ORGANIZING MEETING NOV 5 
6:30 PM RM. 352 UNION OR 
CALL 222 5454 



EAT LUNCH AT THE PHYRST 
WITH A FRIEND! 

Wed. is Michelob day. .39 glass. $i 99 
pitclter till midnight. Poor Paul's 
Pourtiouse, 610 W. Tennessee. 

If you want to try a really good wine 
THE PHYRST Is going to have a 
super Llebfraumiich wine special this 
Ttmrsday. Try it! 



DON'T PUT YOUR HALLOWEEN 
COSTUME AWAY WEAR IT THIS 
SUN. NIGHT FOR THE PEOPLE 
BENEFIT. COME DANCE WITH US 
SUN. 9 NOV. AT 9 PM. LUCJCY 
HORSESHOE. 




$200 REWARD 
FOR INFORAAATION LEADING TO 
THE IDENTIFICATION OF THE 
PERSON WHO TOOK OUR SIGN AT 
THE PHYRST homecoming weekand. 

KUNGFU ' ■ 

Develop power and control 

214 W. College 224-7780 
Next to Great Bicfdar 



Soft Contact 
Hard Contact Lenses. 

24 hour Contact Lenses 

B & L Contact Lenses. $50. ea, $85 pr 

Or. Allan Daan, 222-9991. 

Backpacking in the snow i ' For 
beginners Dec. 15 20 in Western North 
Carolina. All equipment i 
transportation provided. OUTDOOR 
ADVENTURES 305-588^)352 P.O. Box 
001 Lake Worm. Fl. JOm. Have a 
great break! 



■H DYAN 
NOV. 12, 11 
IN TAMPA 
IF YOU WANT TO SEE 
HIM, CALL HILLEL 
OFFICE BEFORE NOV. 0 



- goosed Have you 

card in the Unkm ticket office. 



Blue Keycard is honored by the 
following mercttants: NIc's Toggery 
Atbletic Attic, Hobbit Hoagie 
Facfary, Br aw m BOt a r't Restaurant 
(opening soon), Mac's m The Back 
Lounge, Pizra Pro. Tallahassee 
Flowers. The Fub. The Phyrst, Adam 
8t Eve Campus Hairplace, Zookers, 
Brown's Pharmacy, The Melting Pot, 
Annatte's WHoman's Fashions, Great 
Bicycia Sliop, Barnacle Bill's, 
McGregor's Steak House, Roger 
Nelson Music Store, The Outpost, Sea 
Fox Restaurant 8. Lounge, Ricco's 
Lounge, Quality Inn Southernaire, 
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oaches say FSU's fourth 



li-Yafkfl'Pn - The United Press 
DPfial Board of Coaches Top 20 
foocljall ratings after nme weeks, 
nt ptoce votes and records in 



s •.r)amc(291)(7-0) 

jHriiemCal(l)t6^i) 

RondaSi (8-1) 
seiska(l)(7-i) 

-.fgh(7-l) 

jic{7-l) 
. i..oma(5-2) 



613 
576 
514 
463 
459 
412 
350 
343 
329 
259 
175 



12. Michigan (6-2) 

13. South Carolina (6-2) 

14. North Carolina (7-1) 

15. Baylor (7-1) 

16. Brigham Young (7- 1 ) 

17. Mississippi St. (7-2) 

18. Texas (5-2) 

19. Purdue (6-2) 

20. Florida (6-1) 



84 
82 
78 
77 
75 
37 
26 
23 
21 



Note: By agreement with the American 
Football Coaches Association, teams on 
probation by the NCAA arc ineligible for 
the top 20 and national championship 
consideration by the UPI Board of 
Coaches. The only team currently on 
probation is Auburn. 



AMU's Wright honored by MEAG 



Florida A&M end Erwin Wright 
amcd defensive player of the 
in the Mid-Eastern Athletic 



'*ier selections announced Monday, 
ill! Carolina Slate quarterback Prince 
hips was named offensive player of the 



mrS IN BRIEF 

IM Department will sponsor a 
^Golf Touraamcnt Saturday at 9:30 
" fliAelM field. Please bring your own 
^ Nit extras will be available. No 
is necessary and the niks will be 
''"■cd before the competMon begins. 
»ncr. you mtist have a VALIDATED 
:fnt ID. 

^ «i be a water rid Mb nthg 

>it ai 6 in room 1 18 Bellamy. Team and 
3 ittts will be ordered at that time. 



Wright had five solo tackles, three 
assists, two quarterback sacks and two 
fumble recoveries in a 49-22 win over 
Tuskegee Institue. 

In South CaroHna State's 59-7 win over 
Morris Brown, Phillips hit nine of 14 passes 
for 318 yards and three touchdowns. All 
three scoring passes went to wide receiver 
Charlie Brown. 



The FSU snow skteg dab will meet 

tonight at 7:30 in room 201 of the 
Education Building. 

The finals of the intraiNiral teanis 
tournament are in. Frank Morrone 
(advance<Q,Iran AriU (intermediate), and 
Scott Scliirrroan (beginning) were the mat's 
singles winners whHe Cathy Falvey 
(advarced). Gigi Meehan (mtermediale), 
and Lou Ellen Combs (beginnini^ were the 
wmnen's winners. In men's doubles, Sid 
dements tAd Lec Fry won the advanced 
and Ivan Arifl teamed with Loms Andris to 
win the mtermediate event. 




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VOL 68,Na34 



A Republican Senate 

GOP sweep ensures party majority 



kfeated Senate candidate Bill Gunter receives a consoling hug from 

4 ioika^ on the Cabinet, Secretary of State George Firestone 



I MTLDPIt:SSiMFKN\ri()N\i 

Washington — Republicans captured 
undisputed control of the Senate yesterday 
for the first time in a quarter century — 
staging a spectacular coasi-io-coasi blitz 
against liberal Democrats and even ousting 
southern conservatives. 

Tne GOP assault — which far exceeded the 
most optimistic predictions — gave 
Republicans a firm 52-seai majority with a 
good chance to add another if veteran Sen. 
Barry Goldwater outlasts a strong 
Democratic challenge in Arizona. 

Should Goldwater win his still too-close- 
to-call election against Bill Schulz, a business 
tycoon, the 97th Congress will open next 
January with the Republicans in charge 53- 
47. 

That would give the Republicans a net gain 
of 12 seats, completely wiping out the 
Democrats* dominating 59-41 edge. 

The House — in contrast to all other 
elections Tuesday — remained Jiimly in the 
hands of the Democrats who were expected 
to retain 245 to 2» seats, wctt above the 21 8 
needed for a majority. 

The Republican control of the Senate will 
be the first since the 1952-1953 session — the 
first two years of Dwight Eisenhower's 
presidency — and no Repubiiaui ia ^^flce 

Turn to CONGRESS, pt^e 6 



Stone to join 
Reagan outfit 

BY DANNl VCXiT 
wiMMmmmMmwwnm 

OmMd famflibeBt U.$. S«Mlor IMafi 
Stone wW ht lttl|M«t PrtMmt'^i 
RomM Seagaa get mrm^ to the.«MliMf*t 
€t^m and smy evtMaty tak« a |ok wMi 

I, sottfctt ctoae !• 



StMt, a FloffMa DeMCtai d ii i atii hy 
M Qiflter to mi Oeto^ 7 Dfcra tk 
nmottt will h$ w«rkiiit llt«faii*s 
traasltlMi ttmm^ Uut tmircct said. 
Somewhere 4mm the road tke lane d«cfc 
temrtor mitiit do soaietMag more 
Inibslialiiri fcnr Reagaa* biit Stone in ptayiiifj 
it fti4 dtnt to Ms vfftt, oac of tiK somes 



Gunter lost tlw Semite seat to Republican 
Paula Hawliius la Tuesday *s election, 
aiaridug tiie fhst time Florida voters ever 
elected a woman to the Senate. Hawkins, 
53, is only the second Republican since 
Reeonstructloa to represent Florida in 
the Senate. 




After three tries, FSU settles on a controller 



BY BART CHURCH 

Fl ^MBF Al STAFF WRITER 

e ne (hrough three controllers in three 
i . Bill Hodge, Florida State's vice president 
f adminisiranvc affairs, finally has a chief 
T*ncia! officer he is satisfied with. 

Bodme officially became university 
^'folkr last Monday, according to State, FSU's 
"^^Ictter. The controller oversees the 
*iirsement of FSU's budget of approximately 
■Omillion. 

^ loi ot hiuh ic\el adminisirators and former 
^''^ if^e! administrators were not at all surprised 
•ippoimment. They feel that it represents 



the culmination of three years of turmoil in which 
three high level and high paid administrators were 
thrown out of the controllers office and replaced 
with a "yes" man. 

Hodge maintains that the two controllers and 
one associate controller that have left the office 
since he came to FSU in 1977 were for one reason 
or another, not suitable for the controllers office. 

Scott Kent, former assistant vice president for 
administrative affairs and controller under 
Hodge's predecessor, now runs a tiny office called 
operations analysis. He still earns his assistant vice 
president's salary of $34,940. 

Kent was demoted from assistant vice president 



to acting controller in the faU of 1978 when Hodie 
became vice president for administrative affaars. 
Bob Henderson, who is now a ccNinty 
commissiooer and associate director of FSU's 
union, was associate controller under Kent. 
Bodine was research assistant, a staff posittoo in 
the office. 

"I looked at Mr. Kent's performance in that s 
job and I decided I wanted some other 
performer.*' said Hodge. "I wanted all 
departtieat beads to report directly to me." 

Kent, who still has a job in adauaistrative 

Turn ta CONTROLLER^ peiie ii 



c 

(53 

5 
m 



> 

o 




Bob Bodine, 

FSU controller 



new 



officials 



maligns system 



Fourth in a 



MK HAELMOLINE 

H NMBtAl ST AFI WRITER 

Department of Corrections is 
recognized as a model of 
^'•'•ive prison management. 



^ Flond. 



lis 



^'^i^aiorsinMsi. despite allegaiions from 
sources that the department is a 



^ managed haven for incompetence, 

tad corruption, 
^critics include prison reform groups, 
' corrections officers and state 
^ Most of their complaints were 
"nicd by the House Committee on 

in a report released this week, 
•ccording to Vernon Bradford, 




spokespers<Hi for the DOC, the depnrto^s 
critics know nodiii^ <rf prison manafenem 
and wottkf allow crMnals tti coatioi 

state's pritoiii. 

Chief among the complaints of the 
department's critics is that die DOC has 
stagnated under the 18-year tenure of 



secretary Louie Wainwright. Rather than 
providing an atmospliefe conducive to the 
rehabilitation of eriminab, crito diarfe that 
under Wainwright the DOC actually 
reinforces criminal conduct through its 
systematic brtttalizati<m of inmates. They 
ckum bentuigs and sexual assault against 
inmates, both by guards and by other 
iiunates, is a daily occurrence and that, the 
DOC actually coildones \ iolcnce as a means 
of controlling inmates. The committee report 
calls for Wainwright's dismissal 

Bradford denies those allegations and 
attacks the committee report as a 
compilation of half-truths and lies by 
disgruntled former prison employees. 
Because the names of those employees v^erc 
withheld by the committee, he said, it is 



impossible to verify the accuracy of their 
complaints. 

**Howcan we answer something when they 
don't give you any details?" he asked. "This 
is a very generalized report by anonymous 
people about anonymous incidents in 
anonymous times and places. Some of the 
alleged incidents happened years ago — v^hv 
didn't they complain then, if not to the 
department, then to the courts or the 
Legislature?" 

Bradford said the committee's reason for 
withholding the names of the former 
corrections officers who made the allegations 
— that they feared retribution — was 
* 'poppycock •* 
He said c ^ , 1 cru s policy is to 



I 

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t!!/:-ur.ft;:|ii!. 



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2 / Thursday, November 6, 1980 FlorMa 



FSU's 33rd Student Senate sworn in 



BY MICHAEL McCXELLAND 

HAMKAV STAFF WBTmi 

Keith Ckmens, an Actjbn Party senator serving hb 
second term in |he Florida Stale $tiKknt Senate, has been 
elected Senate president. The victory gave Cfemens a 
position of authority and responsibility in student 
government second only to student body presidoit Rob 
Auslander. 

Pam Huelster, senior United Seminoles party senator, 
was elected to the office of senate president pro-tern.* 
Huel^'s eiec^icMi sharply reflected the changing make-up 
of the Senate. This year marks the first time in five years 
that Action has not had a clear majority and the first tmie 
that a non-Action senator has held one of the top two 
posts. 

Clemens and Huelster were elected during the first 
meeting of the newly elected 33rd Senate. The new senators 
were sworn in by student Supreme Court Chief Justice 
David Markus, elected thdr new officers, and then were 
addressed by Auslander and outgoing senate presictent 
Mike Lindno*. 

Lindner, who is leaving student government and FSU to 
attend law school at the Univmity of Florida, urged 
senators to try and get other students invc^ed in student 
government, and expressed his concern that student apathy 
toward their representatives would weaken the system. 

'*WiU student apathy continue to allow student 
government to be run by only a few?'* Lindner asked. 
"This problem, m(Mre than any other, deserves your 
attention.** 

Auslander, addressing the Senate at what marks the mid- 
way point in his term, had a grim message for the new 
senators. 

"Things aren't going to be the same this year,** 
Auslander said. '*So much money is going to utilities, and 
to athletics. We're really goinig to have to tighten our 
belts." 

Auslander also bad some kind words for the outgoing 
senate president. 

''Student govemmoit has changed enormously. No one 
has done more towards opening up stiKlent government 
than M fke Lindner, * ' Auslander said. 

Lindner was presented plaques of appreciation from 
both the Senate and the executive branch, and was 
repeatedly interrupted by standing ovations from the 
enthusiastic group crowding the Senate chamber. 



Following Lindner's speech, Clemens took the presidential 
rostrum to describe his goals for the coming year. Clemens 
hopes to improve the parking situation on campus, and to 
increase student lobbying efforts at the Florida legislation. 

One of the most important issues on campus, Oemem 
said, is improving conditions for FSU's disabled stuctent 
population. Clemens added that he would like to see DIS 
students from the government department get involved 
with student government, and, in a move rarely seen among 
politicians of any nature, recommended that the salary of 
the Senate president be redUL^cd irom $5,000 to $3,000. The 
remainder of the president's salary would go to the Senate 
president pro-tem, or to the chairperson of the 
Organizations and Finance committee. 

Speaking after the meeting, Clemens mentioned some of 
his hopes about the Senate itself. 

**The Senate this year has a totally different comix)sition 
from previous senates," Clemens said. "Senators must not 
split up and serve only their party. They must realize that 
they are here to serve the needs of the FSU student body 
and not their own needs." 



FSU gets Navy grant 

BY KENNETH WEST 

FLAMBEAU WtUTER 

New funding has made it possible for Florida State's 
Geophysical Fhiid £>ynanucs Research Institute to continue 
laboratory studies of climatic processes. 

The $750,000 grant was awarded by the Office of Naval 
Research, which i^eviously awarded the institute $1.87 
million for the research. The grants l^ve enabled Dr. 
Richard Pheffer, professor of meteorolo^ and director of 
the mstitute, to develc^ a major laboratory experinMntal 
program which has attracted mi^ international mterest. 

"We'll be focusing attention on internal mechanisms 
responsible for important aspects of climatic variability," 
said Dr. Pheffer, **It is a laboratc^ set up to simulate 
climatic patterns without outside variables, such as 
mountains or land and ocean tempe^tures, to »x:ount for 
cUmatic anamolies." 



KUIIIIIl 



^Prison 




investigate all allegations of improper behavior by guards. 
In fact, he said, the department recently added 15 new 
investigators to its staff because of its determination to 
clean up the prison system. 

**The Florida Department of Corrections has one of the 
best m-ofessional administrations in the nation," he said. 
**It is not a system that is iimnune from probleibs, but 
we' re trying to solve them through progressive techniques. 

**We were attacked by a small, vocal outside group with 
no particular expertise in criminology. They want the 
criminals to have more contrcd than the administration." 

Indeed, Bradford said, it would be impossible to 
eliminate nepotism entirely because so many of the state's 
prisons are located in rural areas with limited pools of 
labor. In these areas, he said, extended famibes with 
traditions of working in the prison system are common. 

He also rejected the committee report's suggestion that 
nepotism within the DOC contributes to coverups of 
instances of wrongdoing by corrections staff. 

"Whether or not they're related or not is immaterial," he 
said. "It's a matter of human nature that it's difficuh for 
someone to turn in a friend or close associate. That's not - 
special to the prison system — it's a fact of life." 

Bradford said he was speaking of the Florida 
Clearinghouse on Criminal Justice and the People's Prison 
Projeoi, two prison reform ^oups, based in Tallahassee^ ^ 
and r^-r - v 'ie respectively, which have supported the ' 



littee report, and Dr. Amette Gurardeau, who heads 
the House corrections committee. 

Bradford was especially vocal in denouncing the 
conmnttee report's (^arge of ran^Mm nepo^m within the 
DOC. The TtpQsi said dtpartraent administrators may be 
guilty of violi^ing the state anti-nepotism laws; Bndfoixl 
said that charge was ludicrous. 

That law prohibits the hiring of immediate family 
members to work under the supervision of members of 
their own families. 

Although it is common fc»- members of the same family 
to work within tiie DOC, ft^foid said, they are not 
. allowed to work uncter the supervision of their relatives, in 
accordance with the nepotism law. 

Bradford also denied charges that the DOC fosters 
racism and condones sexual assault among tiie prison 
population as a techniQue of controlling inmates. He said 
the department works hard to prevent assaults within the 
prisons, bu| <tften fails because of the (famgerous nature of 
the prisoners. 

''We're not ruiming a Kiwanb retreat here," Bractford 
said. We're running a prison with one or two thoittiiid 
very dangerous pe<»ple. 

"We're a reflection, nothtng more and nocMog less, of 
the outside world. It's society's responabiBty to determine 
who should come to prison and for horn loi^ We hive no 
control over that." 

Bradford also discounted the commitlce's call for 
Wainwright's ouster: '*Why tamper with success? Yott 
*tbink we've got problcois here? Look at other states." 

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;ite-in candidates cheated 
emselves and the public 



1^ 



mandate 

^ of the Leon 

Supc^i^^'' of 
office on 
But strangely 
y also got four 
jfSullivans. 
k< /arre turnabout 
He blamed on 
on tte write- 
themsclves. 
political 
ind selfish pride 
■ •e m candidates 
. he job to 

. I before the 




ivUma and John Sullivan reading one of 

the law suits filed against them b^ore last Tuesday *s 
election 

What they did was try to get publicity for 
thcmsdves al Sulfivan's expeosc. Richard 
Black filed a lawsuit sedcing to make the 
polls more accessible to the handicapped, 
claiming the SuUivans were neglectiiig the 
rights of a significant part of the dectorate. 

Later, Mason Hied a suit to have 
SuUivan's name removed from the baiot 
because he refused to take a leave of 
absence for his election <^iice job during 
the campaign and wcmld actually be 
counting his own votes last Tuesday. 

On dection day. Mason went before the 
county coimnission claiming that Soffivan 
violi^ the state anti-nQX)tisin laws. 

Sure, ai the bad piMdty hut SoUivan's 
election chances, but not as much as 
banding together behind one candidate 
would have. 
The local press tried to help. The 
■ Flambemm^ Tallahassee Democrat and 

Niturally, she was running unopposed. Capital Outlook all endorsed Arthur 
^ one write-in candidate observed, only i^i^i^ jr. as the best candidate for the 
ktby Bowden would have a chance of -.^ n ^nsn't enough, however. Mobley 



!wo-ihirds of the votes in that 
against Sullivan, but since the 
m was spread among 11 
iwatcs. It vvent for naught. No single 
.'■• n candidate polled even half as many 
is Sullivan, the only one on the 

The anti-Sullivan movement began with 
rrie intentions. Almost no one, except the 
vans themselves, could consider the 
m Sullivan got his name on the ballot 
m^m but shady. His mother Wilma, 
■il held the office for 16 years, was 
candidate in the race until the 
i'minutesof the filing period. 



ANALYSIS 



. "v/u.u iioT^ • JOO. U waSD i cnousu, ww«iTv.. 1..—-^ 

^ting her. She did an adequate job topped other write-ins, but finished a 

^ office, didn't make waves and ^^stant second to Sullivan, 
^yfdt it necessary to speak out againsti • 



But 



*hcn she withdrew at the last 

snijte, giving her son, who already worked 
a DC elections office, a golden opportunity, 

^ :ook the oait and put his name on the 

«ot 

"^i ploy alone got the people riled. The 
*an family reputation was tarnished. 
KfoTf long 12 write-ins threw themselves 
*^^''^crace. all feeling they would have no 
'^We beating someone with such a bad 
^"Wition. 

vote totals showed the write-ins were 
bot their lack of humility and 
wical savvy screwed up everything. 
^|*®nly sensible way to get the 
out would have been for the 
J^lo pick among themselves one 
^ fell would make a decent 
_^iw^Tliis one opposing candidate 
had no trouble stomping John 
into his political grave, 
didn't do the sensible thing. The 
^^l^tofc to suggest such a move was 
dropped out of the race 



But 



Through a lack of 
political awareness 
and selfish pride the 
11 write-in candidates 
virtually gave the job 
to John Sullivan. 

Sullivan might not nwke a tad 
supervisor. He's got amcricwe. ■«« what 
he lacks in smarts he mikm up fotmth 
enthusiasm. H? nem got Wo mwUiagint 
battles with tl» other c»wIi<Ut«» wbo 
constantly betttW Mm. But becauseof the 
way he got on the btfot. he'll |«*rt»y 
have a rough fow y««i». 

But not as rough a ftiw J«ws 
DeoDle who thro««h their votes dearly said 
d^wanted anybody but Sullivan. All the 
wtMe-iBs crying "the people deserve a 
choice" wocB't hui^ enough to give it to 
A..— k the people lOt screwed^ 





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4 / Thursday, November 6, 1980 Florida Flambeau 



Florida Flambeau 



fit Florida Flambeau is publisM hy the Florida Flambeau Foctidation^ lac. an 

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Liberal sitting ducks 

Like dominoes they began to fall early, and didn't stop until each had hit the 
ground. 

First went Birch Bayh of Indiana; the three-term liberal conceded defeat before 
the polls evai closed. Then followed John Culver, the gregarious Iowa liberal who 
lost in a vicious battle agaimt Rq)ublican Charles Crassly. 





m 







McGovern in South Dakota. 

All are vetcnoi liberal Democrats, with years productive service in the Cmigtess 
under their belts. They're all used to tough re-election campaigns, but in the past, 
they had always been able to survive. 

But 1980 was different; none could overcome well-organized, heavily-financed 
opposition mounted by archconservative national organizations. 

In one fell swoop the neo-conservatives excised the liberal guts of the U.S. 
Congress, gaining control of the Senate for the first time in 25 years and claiming the 
all-important chairmanship of numerous influential Congressional Conunittees. 

Liberalism took a beating in 1980, and these Democrats felt the whip. 

But liberalism isn't the only loso- here. Intdligent politicians like those nieiiticHied 
are hard to come by, and their dqNuture from public service will oidy detract from 
^>od government. 

Responsible government 

FSU'-s student government, long the deserving recipient of constant criticism from 
the public and press, has in the past year taken great strides toward responsible 
representation. Student body president Rob Auslander has worked hard to erase the 
taint of administration shill left by his predesessor, and the student senate, under the 
able guidance of Senate President Mike Lindner, has managed to avoid much of the 
political in- fighting and fiscal mismanagement that has plagued earher Senates. 
Neither branch of the government has reached its full potential, but no oiie can dray 
the marked improvement over past years. 

Last night, the newly elected Bird studoit Senate toc^ a major stqp toward 
continuing that trend towards respectability. In what was possibly the only rational 
election of this past week, the Senate dected Kdth Qenms to succeed out-going 
I»eskient Mike Linder. 

Cfemens is, not surprisingly, a member of Action Party, which has dominated 
student politics since their inception five years ago. What is surprising is that Action 
chose to back Clemens' bid for the presidency. Action has, in the past, been an 
almost exclusively Greek, conservative party. Clemens is not a member of the Greek 
system, and while he would quickly reject the label of ^Uiberal," Clemens is far more 
moderate in his views than most Action members. Action's support for Clemens 
lends great credence to their campaign promise of (HDenuEig their party to a more 
. diversified constituency. 

Party politics aside, the senate is to be commended for their choice of leaderslup. 
Clemens, a junior majoring in business, will be serving his second term as a Senator. 
Last year he headed the senate OrganuoOkMis and Finaiice Conmiitlee, a positkm of 
reqxMisibility and authority seccmd only lo the Senate President. Cleniais handtod 
that position exceptimially wdl, and there is no reason to bdieve he won't do just as 
wefl as president. 

The new Soiate has accepted the mantle of p<^ticalteadership on a campus that is 
faced with the constant threat of vkdoice against women, the problem of facing 
rising inllaticM on a set budget, and the continual challenge of improving 
educational and social conditions for a student body of more than 23,000. We can 
only hope that the senate and their new president will be capable of hving up to the 
great challenge they have accepted. 



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V*; t t » « I ♦ * 'ill i . 



Ronnie and Nancy: Bonzo goes to Washington 



Smarmy liberal smartasses 



BY CHRIS FARRELL 

ASSOCIATE EDITOR 

It's time to put a quick end to a dangerous 
mood that began with Jimmy Carter's 
gracious concession speech Tuesday night. 
An orderly transition to a Reagan 
administration? 1 ain't joining that parade. 

Judging from the mud Carter threw 
Reagan*s way during the campaign, he 
should have told the racist warmonger to 
drag him kicking and screaming out of the 
Oval office. Wouldn't have changed things, 
but it would set a hell of an example. 

Instead, the horrified incumbent choked 
out something about the American people 
having made a choice. What an ugly joke 
that is. Befoie Ronnie gets too fond of the 
word "numctete.*' let's remember what he 
got: just over half of a bit more than half of 
the potential voters who'd bothered to 
register. So the President-elect isn't exactly 
the persoailiattion of the national will. 

Even most of the people who voted for 
Reagan — or Carter for that matter — 
seemed to be acting out of resi^iation rather 
dum convictioii. 'Course it's difficult to get 
worked up aboirt a <^ce between two 
waOcmg body bags. 

To those worthy stahvarts who vote from a 
sense of civic duty, a piece of advice. Over at 

Democratic headqoarters last night, 

dispoiled workers were ahenly mnBbii^ 

abom MoBdde in '84. and FHtzamt the oriy 
professional pol aeanag 19 for the oat big 
one. It demonstrates more stupidity 
concern to queue 19 cutty four ymn and 
choose Tweedttkhim over Tweedledee. If you 
put your mooey on electoral pofitio, you'd 
better start working now to buiki a gr a tifoo ts 
alternative to those Democratic and 
Republican blowbards next time aroraid. 
And if that's too much work, just stay in bed 



BOYS KEEP S WIMjIS^ 



In the meantime, though, jofflttoK 
who decided months ago w< ««« tfWI * 
one out. We don't owe one sbxM 
loyalty to the Reagan adamsijwer 
neither do you. Forget the cm 
operation a punch-drunk Carter 8 
and resolve to drag your ^^^f^ 
square wheel, a stumbling Week a * 
of the Reagan juggernaut. 
all, we'll just keep America slntfW ^ 
fascism at its own incrtial 
the forced march the New ^f^, 

There might even be some hdp/^^ 
newly-elected horror bouse <» * ^ 
U.S. Congress. Alrcad) cnsni - 
governmental torpor, a legi^^ - 
Repubtican Senate an^^;;^ \^ 
might well grind to *caa9lf^^ 
worth atry. 

Only this is hardly a time fc^ . 
opUmism. More likely , 

Bwdcrates in Conff"^;^^,.^' 
from the funeral pyre of hl>«»^^ 

fi«er than a born-agaifl 

tibeials aooss the '.Ta 
those snu«nyhal^asses ^o^^ ^ ^ 

Bight moan | 
programs start to go. 

the ghetto and women m tl^ , 

them a job and a paycheck. - j 

BOW and fed guilty later. 

Nope, no one can '^i^i^- 
Hgnl times ahead, troop*: 

rto raise boJ. 

• •• 




Boys keep Swi««*«« 




^ Ftafnbeaii I liyi^>, November o, t^ao / f 




irtasses 




though, join those of 0^ 
|tht aao we were $i«in| thi^ j 
kSn't owe one smidgin o 
L«a(an administmion. an 
i Forget the cravtn cc 
!h.dnink Carter is pu^h^f , 
rag your feet, become a 
,«.btag blocic in the >»cj 

, America shui mng io.ard 

f„ inertial rate ra.her 
he New Right is P 
,n be some help fro« 'J^ 
ror hou>c on the luU. 

I Already '••"^""'J'.v^ 
rpor. a legi^'-cure w^^ 

!,e and a D''"'f*''^id, i 
,o a complete halt. 

likely ar,.k. 

p^^eofltbenj^r, 

he nation: I ^ 
if.asses f^o- J*[,r«"f»^ 

Women in <|,ui 
L paycheck. «W » 

itv ^ but yo««fj 

u, iroopf. 1^*^ 
raise 

• •• . _A ii 

ingiBf 



letters 



[ntoierant sword 
^ts both ways 

'^(^.ihc <i : ^'^^^Je. pro-Greek and the 
*.. f (, reck lorces have gotten a lot 

I fgas '^M^ 'i^*'^' ^^^^ ^"^^^^ amorphous mass 
iMent b<Hl> who arc anti-Wade and anti- 
^ or. more preferably, firmly and deeply 
I Iff To mv mind, the Greeks' intolerance 
.-«ott$. and the faults and shortcomings of 
ipm have filled volumes. But put in 
JVC. isn't the fear and loathing of the 
fOtrfc sy^icm by non-Greeks just as 
gfgttttibk and intolerable? 
ff must separate the desire to raise a 
l^,;,fnatc issue of rights, or effectuate a 
affmcnt. from a simple desire to "crap in the 
Lidibowl,' and so msure that personal, 
L^j^tivc views of institutions arc 
jcophonously and overpowcringly expressed, 
this type of if 1 don't like it. nobody can" 
.df thai s(>niehow gives a wormy taste to the 
L arian apple And the behavior of Wade A 
Co after the parade, as they prominently posed 
Loi middle fingers upraised, emitting the very 
Lphomoric jeers they condemn, did little to 
•oatorcc my impression of their gallant Struggle 
Of nghts and tolerance. 

As for the "democracy** of the selection by 
I "constituents,** it is obvious that if ntkwu i i 
I jtlaa were run with twemy candidates and no 
Loff. the Grand Dragon of the Ku Klux Klan 
[•oald occupy the White House, tnunpeting 
ibout to "mandate** to tmd peoples' outmoded 
uKl irrtiional ideas of liberty and equality. 
In sum, my own attitude is that the essence of 
jieraiKe and freedom is in allowing peo|»le to 
silly, misguided, shallow contests if they so 
Jmit, free from interference borne of either 
caiousy or missionary zeal. Before we 
•boleheartedly cheer on the *'chanH>ions" of 
|his or the "defenders of tradition," we 
^Id notice that both their halos are a little 
'ooked. Bigotry is never palatable, but neither 
desiruaion of an institution on the basis 



of a subjective, personal standard of hovs others 
should think. Be careful when brandishing the 
sword of tolerance and rights, lest you cut 
yourself. 

Steven J. Stolting 



Customers report 
bad night at Billy's 



Recently we went to BiOy's on Apninchee 
Parkway for a couple of drinks and to have a 
moe qiiiet evening. The evcnng tinned mto a 
fiasco because of harassment and unwarranted 
bchsvior by the management. 

After sitting at the taUe for forty minutes we 
were approadied by a manager who asked us to 
move so he could utilize the table for another 
cimoner. Apparently he thought nt caay prey 
having no justification for asking us to move, 
nnce we were well behaved and paying 
customers. We informed him we were not 
moving. He qukkly left vfter loosing his 
composure, on^ to return about twenty minutes 
la^ demanding we move or leave. 

Upon his departure , we again resumed to 
our **nice quiet evening** at Billy's. 
Approximately thirty minutes later a woman 
approi^hed us and indicated we had ten more 
mmutes. She repeated "Ten more minutes or 
I'm calling the cops." Needless to say the night 
was filled with abuse and unpleasantries. If 
Billy's is trying to have a little bit of class, we 
would like to know where it is. 

Doris M. Wilson 
Martha H. ZapaU 



Opportunity missed 



Hovicver, that interest docsa't always seem lo be 

beneficial. 

First. It would seem reasonable that any 
harassment, name-calling and condemnation of 
Wade should cease. It serves no good purpose. 
Wade ran according to rules and campaigned 
within them. It may have yielded an embarassing 
result. However, many of the critics probably 
did" not vote. Only 24^o of the eligible 
electorate did. It may be true that some voted 
as a joke. If they took the election that way they 
should quietly take their medicine. If one didn't 
vote, don't wail. Maybe next lime you'll learn. 
Less than 1% additional tumoiit voting for the 
second place candidate could have halted 
Wade's win. 

Ftmher, the k>sers and those ^ptthetic with 
them should accept the resulu. Under no 
conditions shoidd conduct and behavior that 
was displayed be encouraged. It is very 
amazing that ail the hoitifity was directed u 
Wade. He did not use sttblerfaae. U was dear 
what he was doii« and he said why. In fact, 
there is much truth m the reaaoBs he gave. 

It wcHild be best for all if stu^nts, 
administrators and alumni address other 
ooBoems on campus. Perhaps aooM of the funds 
airami are thmidng aboitt cutting off could be 
better contributed towards repairing buildings 
aadfacffities here thitt are in dlsrepau-. I believe 
that ioaK things here are neglected as over 
emphans to football and celebrations 
surroioKfing It. A national ranked team is fme. 
But, there are other mittteit that need auention 
» weU which are just ai Important, if not SMire 



The steady stream of letters and articles on the 
election of Bill Wade as FSU's 1980 
Homecoming Princess shows a considerable 
measure of interest on the part of many. 



I suspect that a few of Wade's votes were 
protest votes m that sense. Rather than spending 
energy in condenmation and ridicule, it would 
be better if we inquired into these other 
concerns. I believe we will all be better off. It 
isn't such a grievous thing that Wade won. What 
is grievous is the possibility that what has 
transpired will be overlooked as an opportunity 
for self-examination and as an excuse for the 
venting of prejudices by those lacking of 
understanding and tolerance. 

Ollie Lee 1 aylor 



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6 / Thursday, Novaiilier6. 1900 flerkte 




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Friendly Senate may help 
but Tip Reagan's big problem 



I MTK) PRLSSirVTEKNATIONAL 

WASHINGTON — President-elect 
Ronald Reagan will face a Congress divided 
when he assumes office in January — the 
Senate controlled by Republicans and the 
House held by the Democrats. 

The division may pose more of a problem 
for Congress — as leaders of the two 
opposing parties set out an agienda — than 
for Reagan . 

Initially, Reagan will be granted the 
traditional "honeymoon" which will allow 
him to settle into the White House and among 
other priorities, seek a working agreement 
with Congress. 

The situation is rare, although not unique, 
and last happened to President Herbert 
Hoover in 1930. 

In the preceding election. Republicans 
gained clear though small majorities in the 
Senate and House. But prior to the opening 
of the new Congress, several Republicans 
died and the Democrats ruled in the House. 

The last time, the voters elected different 
parties to govern the two chambers was in 
1916. 

Republican presidents have learned to 
suffer Democratic control of Congress. 

Dwight D. Eisenhower had a Republican 
Congress only during the first two of his eight 
years in office. Richard Nixon and Gerald 
Ford never even had that luxury. 



Having at least half the Congress 
Republican for the next two years gives 
Reagan an edge his recent predecessors 
never enjoyed. With the Senate in the grip of 
the Republicans — almost surely under the 
agile leadership of Senate GOP leader 
Howard Baker — Reagan will have to exert 
his greatest effort in creating a partnership 
with Speaker Thomas O'Neill. 

O'Neill is an Irish pol from Boston — in 
the finest tradition of that breed — and may 
appear somewhat alien to a midwest-born 
Californian who is not versed in 
Congressional in-fighting. 

Although O'Neill is certain to become a 
key factor as Reagan pushes his set of 
priorities, the speaker is not without his own 
problems. He lost many of his liberal shock 
troops in the election and the large 
Democratic margin is flawed. 

Some of Reagan's programs, if refined, 
may turn out attractive to Democrats who 
may have been terrified by the election results 
and may now be eager to move to the center 
and the right. 

In that case, Reagan may have a better 
chance of holding them than O'Neill and the 
problem of a rebellion would be substantially 
reduced. A greater hazard for Reagan would 
come if O'Neill and Baker start bickering and 
the administration's program bogs down in a 
partisan battle on Capitol Hill. 




Jimmy Carter waving goodbye in Plains last Tuesday 



PuuUi HowkinSf surrounded here by family, will be a part of the 
Republican nunjority in the Senate 



Carter, staff looking ahead 



BY HELEN THOMAS 

UNITED PRESS INTERNATIONAL 

WASHINGTON — President Carter said 
he has told Ronald Reagan he wants to have 
a positive and constructive relationship with 
him, but the responsibilities of the Oval 
Office are his own until Jan. 20. 

Gathering with reporters in the Oval Office 
before he departed for Camp David, Carter 
reviewed his presidency, the campaign and 
his plans for the future, candidly and without 
any apparent bitterness. 

**I will do everything I can to work with 
Governor Reagan," Carter said. "But I will 
be the president for the next months until he 
takes office." 

**I feel very much at ease and 1 look 
forward to working with him," he added. "I 
hope I can keep my commitment to be very 
constructive with Governor Reagan," he 
said. "I would like to have a good positive 
relationship with him." 

Although he portrayed Reagan as trigger- 
happy in war and peace policies during the 
campaign. Carter said, "I have a firm belief 
that Governor Reagan will do his utmost to 
keen the peace.** 

He said that he had designated chief of staff 
Jack Watson to work with the Reagan 
transition team. 

"I want the next IVi months to be the best 
months of this administration." 

As for his future. Carter said "1 don't 



Congress /romp^i 

then ^1 be there in January. 

Tuesday's electkm also marked the first 
time since 1916 voters have elected a Senate 
and House controfled by different parties. In 
1930. RepoMicais orfanized the Senate and 
Democrats the House because several GOP 
deaths switched the balance after the 



The shift of power wiU signal inassive 
chautes in the Seaate liierafdiy with Sen. 
Sum Thunnond slated to beoome pcesidem 
pro tem and f ourth liae f or the pnMeaey 
and ScaateGCH> leader Howard Baker odds- 
on-favorite 10 beeoBC BMiiorky lender. 

R/^pirt^ttcnns nbo will take over all 



committee chairmanships and set the agenda 
for the 97th Congress. 

But the shock of losing power was never 
greater than early Wednesday — when the 
crushing defeat the Democrats feared but 
did not really expect came true. 

The Ronald Reagan landslide was 
"obviously a big help'* to GOP Senate 
candidates, John Heinz, chairman of the 
Republican Senatorial Campaign 
CcMnmittee, tokl reporters Wednesday. But 
he said most €K>P winners wm ahead before 
Election Day. 

On the brink of taking control, 
Repubficans won elections in Georgia, Alaska, 
and North Carolina to go over the top. 

Frank htoiowski, a 46-yett old bank 



president, beat Democrat Clark Guening by a 
10-point margin in Alaska, pretty much as 
anticipated. 

The Republicans shocked Sen. Herman 
Talmadge of Georgia, a 24-year vet, in 
Georgia and Sen. Robert Morgan, a 
bibletoting conservative, in North Carolina. 

The winners were Mack Maitingly, a little 
known Georgia businessman, and John 
East, a political science professor and ally of 
Senate conservative Jesse Helms. 

Some of the Senate's most prominent 
liberals went down in all parts of the country. 

Among them: George McGovern of South 
Dakota, a three-termer who was the party's 
1972 presidential candidate; Warren 
Magnuson of Washington, 75-year old dean 



know," adding he and his t 
would discuss it during their " 
the presidential reireat. He v.; 
question on whether he would cc 
public office again. 

Carter is expected to urite h 
and as the first Southern pres.: 
1844, he will also establish a picv. 
library in Georgia. 

A deeply religious horn-again !• 
has expressed in the past a desire u - 
missionary work. 

But he has al\sa\N -a:J • - 
return home to Plains. His wife. R>.^ 
has often expressed the same Je 
home "to my things" and her pcop - 

As for so-called "deorgia Ma' - 
secretary Jody Powell, vvho ha^ 
to the president, is c\pe<.ted 
Washington if he gets a good 
also has expressed a desire lo 
Powell has also indicated thai he * ^ 
book. 

It is understood thai lormcr Kvc - 
General Griffin Bell has iincd ^ -*-*^ 
job in Georgia for Jordan, who his 
he belonged in Washiruiion. 

Domestic polk> adviser Sluan 
is expected to return to his 
Atlanta. And Philip '^'''J:'^,, 
appointments sccrcatarv. whose l»r^^ ^ 
also Plains, is expected to remait! • 
boss.** 



of the Senate and Appropriation*^ 

chairman; Frank ^ f^^^^-'h 
veteran and Foreign ^f^' 
chairman; and BirchBayh of ind^^ 

year member o\ ti e 3en«« 
1976 presidential ' '^^^^^.^^ 
Democratic tirsi-temKn ^ 

New Hampshire and J^'*'" V*Z^* 
also were targeted by ^\if<^ 

lost. . rvmOfl 

Republicans Jercfnuh ^^^,r. 
Nickleswon in AlabaiiU»c ^ 

GOP also scored a ^"^^^Z^ 
Alfonsc D'Amato. i coiw^;;^, 



Alfonse D'Amato. ifTT^^^ ^ 
Democratic Rcp. nj^fi* ^ 

ielibefiH*»***^ 



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10 / Thursday, No«aBbar6.iW0 .Florida Pa 



Planet 




World 

TtHRAN, — A spokesperson for 
Iranian Premier Mohammad Ali IU|m said 
yesterday the election of Rowrid ReagM as 
president of the United States will not 
affect the issue of the American hostages 

Tehran radio said: "Aincrican 
presidential elections concern America 
alone and do not mterest Iran.'* 

But Hojatollesbin Masafi KMai* 
deputy speaker of Iran's parliament, 
predicted solution of the 368-day-otd 
hostage issue would take longer as a r^uk 
of Reagan's victory, and again warned the 
Americans would be placed on trial if 
Washington dbes not meet the conditions 
set for their release. 

**We would have finalized the matter 
earlier if Carter had been rc-etectcd," 
Khoini was quoted as saying. 

BAGHDAD Iranian and Iraqi troops 
battled in a forest of palm trees yesterday 
for control of the oil-refinery city of 
Abadan, an Iranian communique said on 
the 45th day of the Perisan Gulf war. 

''Fighting has moved imo the pahn tree 
forest of Bahmanshir,*' the communique 
said. 

LONDON — Bianca Jagger received her 
divorce settlement from Rolling Stones star 
Mick Jagger yesterday and she appeared 
quite satisfied with the undisclosed amount. 

The only indication that the amount was 
highly satisfactory for the 33-year-old 
Bianca was her broad smile. She and Jagger 
were married in 197 1 and parted in 1977. 

TOKYO • — A Japanese baseball hero 
outslugged Jimmy Carter and Ronald 
Reagan yesterday in the battle for headlines 
in Japan's morning newspapers. 

Home run King Sadahani Oh.announced 
his retirement Tuesday after a 21-year 
career playing for the'Yomiuri Giants, 
saying he would become a coach with the 
dub. 

Nation 

VACAVILLE, Calif. — Shaggy-haired 
mass murderer Charfie Manson stomped, 
whistled and said he'd "lurk with the 
environment" if released from prison, but a 
parole board ctenied the former cult leader's 
request for freedom for the third time. 

The 45-year-old Manson, vrho in recent 
months became a janitor in the prison's 
Protestant chapel, appeared before the 
three-member Bowd of Prison Terms panel 
with his right hand bandaged. 

Throughout the two-hour hearing; he 
smoked, twisted his beard, and stomped, 
dapped, whistled and shouted. 

Asked what he would do if released, 
Manson said, -^^Td lurk with the 
environment, some kind of nature trip, 
weeds and woods. I'm also good with the 
mind trip, environment and the like." 

BARRE, Vt. ~ Voters have honored the 
memory of a dead man by re-electiBi kim 
to the Vermont Legislature. 

Rep. Sergio Pasetto, 70, D-Barre. who 
died 10 days ago, defeated his living 
challenger. Republican Laaren Leafitt» 609 
336. 

Pasetto's name remained on the ballot 
because new forms could not be primed in 
time for Tuesday's election. 



Waves 



SAN DItGO — Tom Metzer, the Ku 
Klux Klan chief whose congressional bid 
was buried under an avalanche of votes for 
his opponent, denied yesterday thai the 
defeat was a repudiation of the Klan. 

He announced plans to form the "White 
American Political Association." 

The 42-year-old Democrat, a television 
repairman, was defeated by four-term GOP 
incumbent Clair Burgener, 58. He got 
35,107 votes to Burgener's 253,949. 

WASHINGTON — The spirit of 
California's Proposition 13 property tax cut 
flowered Tuesday in Massachusetts, where 
voters endorsed a proposal that could cut 
property taxes 40 percent. 

In the state where colonists staged the 
Boston tea party to protest British taxes, 
unofficial voting showed the measure 
winning 62 percent to 38 percent. It would 
reduce property taxes gradually to 2.5 
percent of full property value. 

Opponents said the plan would force cuts 
in funding for police, fire protection and 
social services. 

WICHITA FALLS, Texas — Jurt)rs 
deliberating the fate of an unwed mother 
who carved out the heart of her 4- year-old 
daughter shouted so loud courtroom 
spectators could hear them, but they could 
not agree on the woman^s mental state, 
resulting in a mistrial. 

"The foreman sent out a message saying 
the jury was unequivocably hung and no 
amount of deliberation could change it," 
Judge Keith Nelson said Tuesday. 

The final vote, after almost 15 hours of 
deliberation, was 10-2 in favor of 
convicting Patricia Ann Frazier, 25, who 
claimed demons drove her to kill her young 
-daughter. 

NEW ORLEANS — An angry postal 
worker shot to death his female supervisor 
with an automatic rifle, then wounded a 
security guard in a brief gunbattle while 
fleeing, police said. The gunman was 
arrested minutes later in a hospital 
emergency room. 

A postal worker in a federal building near 
the Louisiana Superdome said the suspect, 
Curtis Collins, 34, entered the second-floor 
office Tuesday and shot Adrienne Whartoi^ 
34, six times. 



State 



TAMPA, ^ Joseph Pavl ftwAM, a 

suspect in racial sniper shootings 
nationwicte, was ordered to appear today 
before a U.S. magistrate ^o must decide 
whether to send him to Utah to face charges 
in the sniper slayings of two black joggers. 

An identity hearing for the self-avowed 
white racist, wanted for questioning in the 
assassination attempt on civil rights teader 
Vernon Jordan, was set for this afternoon 
before U.S. Magistrate Paul Gaie Jr. 

MIAMI — Dade County government 
has to give up its official second language 
— Spanish — but the county's relieved 
nicotine addicts, breathing a smoky s^, 
can keep puffing away in public. 

With a resounding margin of nearly 10 
percent, Dade voters approved the 
controversial "anti-bilingualism** 
referendum that will prohibit the county 
government from spending local tax dollars 
to print anything in any language but 
English or to promote any culture but thM 
of the United States. 




. .1 THE PUBi.s^ DANISH BAkEf^v FPESH FPOMmconS 



THIS AD EFFECTIVE: THURS., NOVrTliiiil 
WED., NOV. 12, 1980...CL0SE0 SUNOAV 




^ct-Accurici 
Program 



REGULARLY 35^f 
FLAKY PUFF PASTRY FIXED 
VMTH APRKX>T OR PRUNE 




CLAWS 

each for 




(THtS ITEM AV/ULABLE IN 
DANISH BAKERIES ONLY) 



ESPECIALLY FOR CHOCOLA 
LOVERS' THE ORIGINAL 
TOLL HOUSE RECIPE 

TOLLHOUSE 
COOKIES 




per 
dozen 



$419 





Pubfht 



TOPPED WITH BUTTER STREUSEL 
AND ASSORTED FRUITS AND 
LACED WITH CREAMY SWEET 
ROLL ICING. 20-OZ 

MELTAWAY 
COFFEE CAKE 



REGULARLY $179 
FRESH BAKED 

WATER 
ROUS 




nt 



lOdfT if 

i^nj Jo 



ml ri>k.| 
niri>llrt-i 

-! a: i.i: 



into 
"iaKlH< 

would 

mscn \ 
^ iHjdgct 

b\c 
' rmnvx 
• ,t 
If :ncnfs 

\\k Johani 
rekaseti 
before. 1 
in Edii 
Joh.l 

^ npui, I, 
WIS n- 

Jmg t 
ng ncv 



■ ) 



.''Han 



0 



ntroller 



Qoc commoit on why he thought Hodfe 



' wiiits yes pcofrfe." said Henderson. "Hodge 
who will prostitute their principles to satisfy 

v.-jciilM course." 

(i!^ apponited a large search commiiiee. chaired hv 
ll^TiW. FSU*s budget office, to find a replacement 
"\m "nic comifiittcc considered many candidates. 
M Bodifie, who they rejected. Lansing Johansen, 
na Blasters degree in accounting from University of 
(t top accounting school) and experience as an 
^of and controUer for the state of Illinois and the 
of Arkansas, was selected by the committee and 
. nted by Hodge. 

H(xlgeand Bodine pretty well worked together without 
said Johansen. "1 think the whole thing was set up 
n) Hodge wanted it. They did not want the controUer 

I controller." 

Iben Johansen became controller in May 1979, Kent 
8«npped of his acting controller title and transferred 
I acaied position, director of operations analysis, 
level sources report that the only reason Kent wasn't 
-(d oui right was that he is good friends with Bernie 
,FSL president. Henderson, who was number two in 
Y controllers office, was transferred to the union. He 
ediy is a friend of Bob Leach, vice president of 
iflM affairs, who runs the Union. 
Hfnderson still earns his associate controller's salary 
> •22 now, alter two raises), which is $3,000 more than 
-Hjss earns (Nancy Turner, director of the union), 
ener says Henderson is very qualified and does a good 
disassociate director of the union.) 
^^dlne was moved up to associate conuoUer three weeks 
ore Johansen came to FSU. 

Hodge offered no explanation for Bodine's promotion or 

ndcTson's transfer. 

ThcfHH^r nuin ( Johansen), through no fault of his own, 
iifd into (hi> ihmg and was led down the primrose 
. n. said Henderson, "Hodge orchestrated things SO that 
dinc^^ould gci the controllers position.*' 
johansen maintains that Hodge and Ilona Turrissi, 
budget otficer. want and wanted a weak controller 
•"0 would not get involved with reviewing the budget or 
' h other matters for which the controller is legally 
ponsible (The controller is legally responsible for 
^ 'vemeni ot I SU's budget of at least $95 million 
!\ and tor "resource allocation and future 
^"'iimenib involved in long-range planning," accoi duig 

job description of the controller.) 
*1jile Johansen was controller the state auditor general's 
'K released its reports on FSU's financial situatioo the 
before. Tlie report showed that FSU had a $750,000 
«Wi in Education and Genml Funds, according to 
^tuea. Johansen's staff did a study of why this deficit 
^cvtd and determined that there was a problem in 
%tiiig transfers (Turrissi's responsibiiity). He proposed 
^ ihe controUer sit on the university's budflet committee 
>nput, so as to prevent audit probkros m tiie future, 
fherc was no official response to this suggestion. Hodge 
i tdl Johansen to butt out, accordi^ to Johansen. 
^ rding to Henderson and Johwiacfi, audit criticisms 
l^iBgnewatFSU. 



IN BRIEF 



ymjm stodenis meets 



'^BeHamvat 7. 
^^^IMI KOR HISPANICS, OFFERED UNDER 
>^ imenis in Modern Languafes," is open to studenu 
»ft native speakers, but have not received a formal 
J^i'on For information call Dr. Fernandez. 644-3727. 

SI RF AND SKATE CLUB MEETS TODAY AT 
' ^ He ph\ r t The second surf team runoff, scheduled 
^ "weekend will be discussed. For informatioa call 
^4i::4.9r5orEricat 644-6166. 

TABLt TENNIS CLUB MfctTS TODAY AT 4 
^ ^lonigomery Gym. Club elections will be held and 
l^are asked to bring $1 for dues. 
^VERNMENT STUDENTS ASSOCIATION 
Tj^i in 66 Bellamy at 7. 

T^lnSH ALLIANCE MEETS TONIGHT AT 7:30 
OiH!^ Two free movies, **Ail About FaWoul" and 
****Q"wiU be shown. 




B.J. Hodge, vpoj Scott Kent, fomm 

Adminisirmtive Affairs FSU cotUroUer 

at FSU 



In 1975 the legislative auditors found such a mess that 
they, at one point, walked off campus," said Henderson. 

Steve McArthur. the Board of Regent's vice chancellor 
for administration said that the 1975 audit criticisms 
"weren't as good on the average as the other nine 
universities. " McArthur did say that FSU's audits have 
improved since. 

When Johansen was hired he was told that FSU is 
different and that the controller has no budgetary powers, 
according to Hodge. Johansen said he understood this, 
according to Hodge. 

Johansen sent Hodge a letter in March 1980 stating that 
he could not continue as controller. 

**We were spending money before we got it,*' said 
Johansen. "Eventually some legislative auditor will have 
the courage to say 'you can't do this anymore.' Then the 
Legislature will get involved and there goes your funding.** 
Hodge told Johansen he had until August 31, the dale his 
contract expired, to find another job. 

•*I don't negotiate," said Hodge. '1 do not change jobs 
for people." 

Johansen consulted a lawyer who agreed that he had 
been fired without sufficient cause. A settlement was then 
worked out in which Johansen signed a release form 
(stating he would not sue FSU) and Hodge agreed to make 
Johansen a "financial adviser" at his controller's salary 
($29,900) until December 1980. Johansen was exiled to a 
tiny office in the nursing building to do his " fin a nc ia l 
advising." 

Johansen said he agreed to this "because I have a family 
to support and I could not afford a two year tegal fight. 

•*I have been treated very unfairly by Florida State both 
as a person and as a professiooal," added Johansen. 
"Every other job I have ever taken has been a promotion. I 
have never had any interpersonal conflicts m my other 
roles." 

Johansen has accepted an acfanimstrative position at the 
University of Fk^ida. 

;fIodie appofaited a second search committee to replace 
Johmisen. This time, though, he appointed only three 
people. All three served under him in administrative affairs. 
The committee did hmiled advertising for the position and 
recommended three names to Hodge. One of those names 
was Bob Bodine. 

"I hope that this is the beginning of a period of stability 
in the controllers office,'* said Hodge. "Bodine knows the 
^em at FSU and is technically quaUfied for the job." 

CPE NEEDS INSTRUCTORS FOR WINTER 
Quarter. Interested persons call 644-6577 or come by 247 
Union. 

COLLEGE BOWL INTRAMUKALS END TONIGHT 
with six remaining teams. Games start at 6 p.m. in 240 
Union and Leon Room. 

TRANSCENDENTAL MEDITATION IS THE 
topic of a free introductory lecture at 8 p.m. at Florida 
Federal Savings. 601 North Monroe. 

FSU WILDERNF^ CLUB MEETS TONIGHT AT 7 
in 226 Bellamy. Plans for the trip this weekend will be 
discussed. If vou want to go. be there. 

RHO EPSILON MEETS TONIGHT AT 7 IN 
Weichelt Lounge. Agenda includes real estate faculty 
presentation on curriculum. 

"FEDERAL PLACEMENT AND CO^P 
Conference" will be held today from ^30 to 4 in the Umoo 
Ballroom. For information call 644-6431. 

NATIONAL LIBRARY SER VldS fOt THE HJND 
and Physically Handicapped wH be ^mmuA by Jolm 
Kozar today at 3:30 in 29 SdKwt of Ubiafy ScicMoe (I 
Strooer Library). 




$2 

Br^rMMav^tS.ltSt 

WtSlWiHMi $*iop'|»tiif Ctiit#r SIS-fi«* 





THME TO PREMUUL 




M 222-0009 



TfST 

smiAiisn sMCf iim 



523LTeillL 



fm 



CAiL TOIL r«f wm-mMt7 





Frat Mtmo Board with S2 or mart purcliase. 

Join us at our bi^ Anniversary celebration. And m« our 
^rtat selection of cards, ^ifts. and stationery. For eny 
purchase of $2 or more today, we ll ^ive you a handy 
write-on-wipe-off memo board Remember. 1 he holidays 
are just around the corner And so are w«. (All ^ts one 
per customer, while they last.) 









s 

1 



frfi 

liSlii.iliilfil*! 
If, V - •'SHI' 



1 



H 



12 / Thursday, November 6, 1980 Floriifai f Uualmui 




MUSiC 




Streisand suffers 
from Gibb-erish 

BY DEBORAH BARtiNGTON 

FLAMBEAU staffwhhe 

Guilty, Barbra StreisaiMi, riiliwlii 

His hair is too tall. His pants too tight. "His face too 
dominant on the alhum cover, the back, the inside, and the 

sleeve. His voice is too high. His music too commercial. His 
melodies too sin\ple. So why did Barbra Streisand kt hhn 
make Gibb erish out of her new album? 

Shall we blame it on duomania? Teaming up, howevor, 
isn't for everyone. And in this last venture it isn't bend^dal 
for Barbra, Barry or many lovers of fine music. It would be 
apt to have titled the album Woman Insane. 

Instead they opted for Guilty. Without standing trial 
"Guilty** is a Saturday Nig/u Fever reject. On this song we 
find Streisand doing iTef impression of Barry Gibb. 
Unfortunately she has too much talent to pull it off. Gibb 
can't sing lead and proves on this cut that he can't even cto 
back up chores. 

"Woman in Love" is a single that is climbing the charts, 
li was written by Barry and Robin Gibb. The vocals here 
aren't bad. Streisand's voice quality rings through, 
especially on the word "fair". They way she sings it is 
slightly reminiscent of Stevie Wonder's "All In Love Is 
Fair", which Barbra also recorded. But then that was a 
song written by a real artist. 

Barry Gibb is a commodity. Neither he nor his brothers 
can even read music. They plug in a formula and, strangely 
enough, it works. But their magic bag was empty when they 
went to work on "Guilty". 

The third song on side one is "Run Wild". This is just 
not the Barbra that her fans know and love. Again put the 
blame on that Bee Gee element. Though they began with a 
good concept for this cut, it seems to be more from the 
Olivia-Newton-John school of blandness. "Promises", the 
next cut, is also too fast and funky for Streisand. Somehow 
she makes it acceptable. What kills any hope is Barry's 
atrocious back up singing. He single handedly destroys the 
chorus. 

"The Love Inside" is definitely more her speed. It is slow 
and mellow. This one could have possibly pleased old 
Streisand friends, but the lyrics aren't the calibre of Alan 
and Marilyn Bergman or Rupert Holmes. These writers 
know what she can sing that will seem believable. She tries 
to overcome this lyric hurdle, but at last notice she was stiU 
trying to clear it. 

Barry picks up writer Albhy Galuten for the first song on 
side two. They come up with "What Kind of Fool". Not 
even the magnificent brothers Gibb could have salvaged 
this. They ask "Who's sorry now?" The answer is whoever 



Clampdown inflates * speed' cosl^: 



(ZNS) Cramming for college exams o^y not be as easy as it pmaU bc d in the form of diet piiu 

used to be. thanks to a crackiiowii af»iiist the use <^ says thit mott doctors now sa> that speed ^ 

"speed" by the medical professioii. ft"" M overwright person after JOdm 

Dr. Ronald Dougherty of the Drug rehabilitation dime fv>..«K-rt^ 

at Crouse-Irving Memoriid HotpHal in Syracuse. New ..^V^^ W » - , 

York, reports that more and more sUtes are outUiwing ^'^'',[™^: * psychological 

amphetiSaine prescriptioos beamie of the hmiful side dangerous and canleadtol^^ 

effects of the pills. Dougherty says that as a result of he ^ 

Speed — also known as Methedrine, Dexedrtae, acro« the U.S.. some users pay as much a< ^ ^ 

Crossroads and Crystal Meth — used to be routinely singfc hit of speed that retails i or jusi U c^ 




BeadfadieiiiQf^^ 

#Aiiieuser-i;^ lac. Sf: loA&,m 




1 1 




costs 



|t<.ai speed has 00 audi 
after 30day». 




speed is not 
cal sense Ws 
^etd to brain damage. 

ifilt of the ban on sp,. 
[( ""chas$5or$6for^ 
14 ccntsaurtt. 



7 






CINEMA 




bmen get a raw deal 
theatre these days 

iY SAM CO LBY 
rLAMKA V iTArr wam 

. . , nc new age slowly, siibdy icttlei in, the flustet 

distraction, and whit coidd be i tnier i«B itf the 

r recent spate of cheapk opofiHUioo movics, 

aturing women in varfoiis stylet of ahuse and 

If vou really need proof <^ the sad state of 

e ill at the Parkway Five will do. Thou^ tfte 

^ txpio^ offerings there go about it diffierait ww, 

iu'c the same unabished BMSOfyny. 

I ar de Raima's high-budiet sleaae Dnssed ^ KiU is 

an a case of "aU style, no substaDoe." The 

.e IS there, but it's not pieasant Dd^ahna plays on 

intisies that aU women crave itese and death, 

i packaging only a cover for his own venal mc^ives. 

miff Htry, Bloody Mary, is a low-budget gut-splikr 

a evy woman who inherits her father's disease of 

ovemffloing his body,'* kilhng off her lovers with a 

Ji hiifim and sucldng their arteries diy. £>f»^^ 

M the World is soft-core porn abont women 

ipped and herded into pnson-hke chambers, where 

ire tnded. soki, and raped. That doubtful plot only 

as fiDer between shots of luscious, squirming females. 

he initial shock of Reagan's Section slowly subsided, 

m flood of exploitation movies makes the first 

principle of cinema painfully clear: Movws 

> I the ciilture that produces them only all too w^. 



CHEAP THRILLS 

Grease' opens tonight 



nMMM sr AfF nrom 



Second Stage theatre prodactkm of Grease opens 

it« 7 at Tommy's Deep South Music Hall. The local 
n of the 50s musical is directed by Lc Wilhelm and 
Hoblii (the team that brought you Studio Theatre's 
rendition of Everyman). Admission is $3.50. 



• • • 



^HitiBg artist Rafael Ferrer speaks about his work 
at 7:30 in room 128 Diffenbaugh. The lecture is 



'■^ open to the public. 



• • • 



^"•ttbi $ I po feature film is that delightful IteHan 

on spectacular Allegro Non Troppo. Bruno 
rampant humor and wild imagination can be 
^J«si$1.50. Showtime is 7:30. 



• • • 



^ Wi|s rock and roll to Downunder tonight at 9. 

^_^»onisSlfor students. $2 for the general pubUc. 



Dance workshops on at FAMU 

^R()Ms^A^^ REPORTS 
^eGaiiher Athletic Center hosts an artistic program 
very physical one. Reginald Yates presents 
. of Movement" at 10 tonight in room 222 
on the FAMU campus. Billed as a multi- 
' iZ^'^ featurmg both visual and performing arts, 
classes in African, ballet and classical 
" * The fee for the workshop is $7; call the Gaither 
,£2!«r at 599-3635 for information. 



Barbra 



i2 



laid out bucks for this album. 

Robin collaborates with Barry on "Life Story." The 
phrasing on Streisand's part is food. A teen gtrliif tiK 
50s would have sat in her room and gained strength from 
this pseudo-ballad. Gaiutcn redeems hanseif on *'h4ever 
Giving Up." Starts with a nice up beat, so noch to thM it is 
puzzling to think how Babs will handle it. She does tet. 
spiels in her movies and now she sings in rapid fire time. 
This could have been a g^at «lded boms, aaochcr 
dimension on a fine album. 



for wImi seems tht 0^ foi effort on the wholi LP. TlK 
vocals are dev. crisp, nadersiaadaMe. wMi aMmal 
Gibbish influence. RidMid Taedoes rwrfiit work oo the 
keyboards, which ccftimily hd|» m^te this soag. It n a bit 
BHTfu i if SiartiM slowly it mtn a tinr hit Mmsv* ftswti to 
a slow pace and then takes oa trai^ngs of an ovcitwe — 
and ends hkc a beginning. They should have thrown out 
everything else and buOi the fonadMaoo INm "Midbc ll 
LikaAi 



••1 



'Make It Like A Memory" is the top contender for a 
real album. Other songs like it are painfully absent. 



Streisand should not be fooled by the commercial 
of Guilty. If she plans to finish out the decade in this 
fashion she will not only lose the respect of her peers, but 
the adoration of millions of fans who still want to knew 
why she doesn't sing songs like **Peopk** anymore. 



?1 



UP & ENGINE 
^IR SPECIALIST 



DIVERSITY ENXOI 

*^^-UP SERVICE MOTOR REPAIR 
679 W. TENNESSEE ST. 
TALLAHASSEE, FL 

lusiiEss trtTm 




(Or How To Get Your College Ring For 



Trade up. Trade in. And save. Because 
ArtCarved offers you the unique opportun- 
ity to trade in your lOKgold high school ring. 

You can save up to $90 on the college ring of 
your choice. And ArtCarved offers twenty 
different styles fixMn whidi to choose. 

Get ready for The Great Ring Exchange. 
You can't aff cud to pass it iqx 



I 



Sytnbolizittgyour ability to achieve. 

» 

Nov. 3-7 university Union 



1 



union Store 



CharKeor Vtsaaocepced 



01960 AnCarved Cottcve Rii«i 







I 




mi:- mm 

'iff 






14 / Thursday, November 6, 1980 Florida Flambeau 



ClassiHed Ads 



Room 306 Unirni nr^ n 



the da> 




Sublet furnished 2 Odrm noose wtr qtr 
frplace, washer/dryer $250/nfio. & 
S100 refundable deposit 877 7386. 



coupons 2 v. tech 7 vp 724 3126. 

Tfsu/u of f. coupon. 



1 BEDROOM FURNISHED 
COTTAGE N DUVAL ST $100 MO. 
SSO DEPOSIT. CALL 315-9643 AFTER 

2 BEDROOM APT. FOR SUBLET! I 
BLOCK FROM CAMPUS AT COLONY 
CLUB. CALL 222-1232 OR MANAGER. 



Jll stereo witn t-track, record 

ptef r and AiM/FM radto $5$ ar Btst 
CsN after Imr , S7S-ffls. 



1 room furn., common bath area, V4 

block from campus. $110. mo. includes 
all utilities. Call I 6pm AAon., Wed., 
Fri.. 222 7276. 



ExcaHafit 

comlitioii Sisa, One FSU-UF ticfcat. 
Bast affar. Call 644-l3f 7, Malania. 

JBL U SPEAKERS EXC. COND. $300 
PR. 222-t375. 

TWO FLORIDA FSU TICKETS FOR 
SALE. LAST CHANCE. CALL 644 
6930. ASK FOR EDDIE. 

FSU— UF COUPON $40., VA. TECH. 
COUPON $10. 224 4727. 



Inflation compats us to rent our guest 
room to an intelligent and 
sophisticated grad (preferably Law 

student) who en joys^tolerates : 
smoking, reasonable cleanliness; 
occasional erudite banter involving 
words like erudite, warm and 
unselfish housemates. 92 Buciaplus 
util Marc or Roly 222 6786. 



2 FSU— UF 

REDEEMABLE TUES. 
9961 AFTER 5 PM. 



COUPONS 
$50 EA. 576- 



2 bedroom, 2 bath apt. ideal ter 2 or 3 
people. $255 mo. partially fum. Tal. 

Mall area. 386-4422. 

Housemate needed till Nov. 30: $70 & 
V4 utilities, own room, nort-smoker. 721 
E. Sixth Av. 224-1123. 



ONE FLA — UF COUPON. MUST 
SELL BEFORE WEEKEND 
REASONABLE PRICE. CALL NOW 
224-3712. 

FOR SALE Need caih imme^ately 
C«ion AT-1 Camera, 90mm lens plus 
case-perfect condition $200 or best 

offer. 

JVC stereo, AM/FM radio, turntable 4 
receiver plus 2 speakers 
Big 5 drawer walnut desk with file. 
CaN 222 2971 after 4pm. 

U.F. coupon, ~ 
redeemable on Tuesday! !!Besf offer 
3BS- 1471 after 4pm. 

FSU UF COUPON m. CALL 224>1it3 

EVEN. 




Roommafe wanfad- male or female. 
One bedroom house 3 blocks behind 
Sweet Shop 708 St. Augustine Apt. 1. 
$75 a mth. Vj utilities. See or leave 
message for Allan at the Omni Rest. 
1. 



For sale 2 Va. Tech tickets $10 ea. and 
3Galorticfcefs$30e a. Ca|l 576-tS17. 

iiov.C«tModen$136 " 

Leedex Monitor $115 

Zenith 12", RF mod. $S0. Carroll 644 



2 Fla. Fla State coupons for sale. 
Redeemable on Tues. Call 224- 77% and 
make me an offer. 

2-3 FSU/UF coupons Tuesday pickup 
$50 each or best offer. 575-8844 or 224- 



FOR SALE— TWO COUPONS WHICH 
CAN BE TURNED IN ON TUES. FOR 
THE UfilV. OF FLA. GAME $100 FOR 
PAIR. CALL 22^4S^0. 

1 FOBltoN coupons each for the Va. 
Tech Si U. of F. Games. Best Offer. 
Call 878-7318 aft. 6 mrw or anytime. 

FINE HOUND PUPPIES 
HAVE YOUR PICK OF LITTER. 



Be prepared for the cold weather! 
Hardly worn, heavy ^ length gray 
suede coat, quitted lining, women's 
Size 13. New was $m asking $60. 
4B75 bafora 5 p.m.^ ask for Laurie. 



TX-4M tape 
L Call 878-2219. Ask for Davkl 



DORM SIZE RUGS 
DON'T LET YOUR FEET FREEZE! 
CAR PET SI5-2B PH. 224-6133. 



10 speed 25V^ inch red Puch Cavalier 
with red fenders, all alloy parts, quick 
release hubs, foe clips, new chain and 
rear tire, fur seat. Only $195. Call eves. 
576 4261 or come by MM W c iila Wagon in- 
Union daytime. 



Fm roommate wanted own room in 3 
bedroom apt. one btock ftwn campus 
$91 plus one-third util. Call 222-1531. 

FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED 
FOR W/S QUARTERS 2 BEDROOM 
FURN. APT. $172.S0/MONTH PLUS 
ELEC. CALL 576-3S30 ASK FOR 

CAROLYN. 

Desperately need ride to Jacksonville 
Friday afternoon or awaning. Call J24r 

4727 after 3:00. 

Female roommate wanted to sublet a 
1 bedroom at Cokmy Club. Rent will 
be $110 per month apt. furnished. 
Good location on the sundack 
overlooking a poof. Call 22 4-7311. 

Female^rbismmate to share 2 bcfer 
unfurnished duplex. No pets near 
campus $117J0 81 util. after 6. 386-4309. 

Fm rm needed share 1 br apt. Plaza 
Apts. $105 monthly plus 16 utilities. 
Call22^29•A. 

WANTED, COUPONS FOR THE FLA 
STATE U OF F FOOTBALL GAME! 
WILLING TO PAY. CALL 576-7435 
MORN. OR NITE. 

NEED 6 TICKETS FOR FSU FLA: 
CALL 222-59S4 8:30-5:30 TAKE ANY 
REASONABLE OFFER . 

Male roommate-Winter & Spring 
qrtrs. $97.50/month 8. '/» utilities. 1 bik. 
from campus. Phone Al at 224-5609. 

Female roommate needed. Two 
bedroom apt. 1 mile from campus. 
Rent $150 • iiianlli.Saeii as poasL Carol 

576-5721. 

SSS!f*^!**« FOR OWN RM 

FURN. DUPLEX fB740 4 Vi UT. 
NEAR FSU. LARRY 171^46 



2 END TABLE LAMPS, FLORAL 
DESIGN IN EXCELLENT 
CON D I T ION . CALL 575-029 1 5-9 PM. 

In Leon County Special Land Sale 4 
miles south of truck route on Oak 

Ridge Road 3 acre tracts 1850 acre lOA 
tracts 1650 acre, 20 to 40 acre tracts 
1500 per acre, terms: t3%daMi«i5yr. at 
12*b interest. 

JimmyBoyntonRealty phone 222-7581. 
After hours 576-3874 for Ben Boynton 



A Ti BkTt6W 

TRYOUTS FOR NEW DANCE 

GROUP 
GOLDEN GIRLS 
To perform at FSU basketball games- 
need to have dance background and be 
a registered FSU female student. 
WHEN : TUES. NOV. llth-4:0DPM . 
and SUN. NOV. 16lh-2:00 PM 
WHERE: TULLY GYM 
both try-ouf dates are compulsory 
wear ctotties to dance in (shorts, etc.) 
INFORMATION: 644 3080, 644-34BI. 




1973 Vega auto, trans. A/C. ExcOHant 

condition. $700. Mike 224-3409. 

Classic~car- '65 Plymouth Valiant 
gwytlMa* slant 6 engine, runs good, i 
Needs body work. 

Call JHf 644-6577. 



CASTING 
FOR TV AND FILMS. 
PROFESSIONAL AND 
NONPROFESSIONAL, ALL AOSS. 
$5-25 AN HOUR. CALL CANDACR AT 
224-2804, 9-6, M-F. 

vllil^^J^S®^***^* NBCDEb POR 
VI RG. TECH. GAME NOV. 8. $10 PER 

BRIAN OR LEAVE NAME i, 
NUMBER. * 





Models ne e de d for faaMofi/ffgwre: 
No mparience necessary.' 

aphy P.O. BoK 



Fl. 



IRORM APT. TO SUBLET. UNFUR. 
POpLJENNIS. CLOSE TO FSU.. 
tItSL $M^3a9 AFTER S. . 




PART TIME 
ADVERTISING ASSISTANT 
FLORIDA FLAMBEAU 
Working Hours: 10am-^>m or Ham 
3pm, Monday-Friday (20-25 hour per 
<s^ek ) 

Requirements: Typmg 40 wpm, 
bookkeeping, daily correspondence, 
t e l e p h o ne, W-tey adding macMiw. 
This job involves contact with ttie 
Advertising manager, sales staff & 
occassiona 1 1 y clients. Very busy 
office! Must be able to work under the 
pressures of daily deadlines. Group 
medical insurance available. 
Telephone interviews only! Call 
Tracey ROwe, 644-4075. 



GAY PEER VOLUNTEERS 

If you are a female or nnale with a 

gay related concern and would like lo 
talk with a trained gay peer 

volunteer, call Dr Lucy Kizirian. at 

644 2003, M F, 8 5. Confidentiality 

ikept. 



Ever seen a duck run? On Nov » you 
can run wifH aur dUCk. Sign up m Rr- 

318 Union 



1 ■ s ■ • -- - « 




GOING HOME FOR 

THANKSGIVING? WE NEED A 
RIDE TO NAPLES OR MYERS. 
TWO PEOPLE, WILL SPLIT GAS. 
CALL 644-1672. 

VAL: ~" 
HAPPY 19th-LEGALAGAINI 
VOLONS!!! MOI 

WANTED: GIRL(S) TO 

ENTERTAIN AT BACH. PARTY 
FOR SMALL GROUP OF 
GENTLEMEN FRIDAY NOV. 7. 

CALL 222 0814 




IBM Electronic Typewriter. Ternr^ 
papers, etc. Call 575 3914 anytime. 

GET A JUMP ON YOUR GIFTS 
CUSTOM PAINTED CARAFES 
half carafes appx. $8, full-carafes 
appx. $12. (Prices vary w/ dasign) 
Call 224 4979 for information. 



Juggling lessons seven days a week 
every morning. 10 to 12. Five dollar 
donation, everything supplied-507 
College. 

Quality Typing of Dissert., Themes, 
etc. Call 644-6031 or 224-3546/Sua. 
Reasonable. 

Exceflofit, qoality typing using an 

IBM Selectric 11. Experienced in 
typing term papers, theses, 
dissertations. 576-9354. 

Want to be happier? Group forniiniB, 
Call Psychology Clinic, 644-3006. 

Guitar lessons: Folk, Blues, C St W flat 
8i finger picking, bottleneck. Ogya 
Greenwa Id 222-7749, 7-11 pm. 

TYPING 

EXPERIENCED SECRETARY 

USING IBM SELECTRIC II. 
REASONABLE RATES. EDITING 
AVAILABLE. CALL 877-3694 

EVENINGS/WEEK-ENDS. 



DELT VOLLEYBALL FANS: 
WE MAY BE #2 BUT YOU ALL ARE 
#1. OET PSYCHED FOR 
POOTRALL. THE TEAM 

Lustful Luna, 

The Downunder was packed Tuesday 
night-too bad no one saw us behind 
the green bushes. We have to do it 

again. ..and again. ..and again 

Innocent Rhett 
P.S. Can't wait for The Return af 
Zaakoi 

Casey, strike it rich in "oil", I moan, 
"Grease". Good luck. I know youtl do 
great. Marilyn 

Seminole spirits are maturally high. 
Keep the cork on. 
^^^^ Ethyl C2H50H 

METHODS OF CONTRACEPTION 
Mon 8. Thu 2:30pm, Tue 9am 
UNIVERSITY HEALTH CTR Rm 423. 
Men and women welcome. 



SLAPSTICK AT BULLWINKLE S 
TONIGHT THRU SATURDAY 
TONIGHT IS T-SHIRT NIGHT 
OVER SS88. IN CASH PRIZES' 
BRING YOUR ENTIRE T-SHIRT 
COLLECTION. 



THURSDAY NITE LONG NECK 
BUD NITE 
sec 8PM TIL CLOSING 
NOAH'S ARK 1S11 JACKSON BLUFF 
RO. 

Let Lonnie Linton, formerly with 
Command Performance, cut and 
style your hair for less at Se^rs 
Shears, Wed-Sat, lOam &pm Caii 877 



hi: j 
likes] 
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If you want to try a really good wme 
THE PHYRST is going to have a 
super Liebfraumilch wine special 

tonight. Try it! 




Every Thurs. is T-shirt night at 
Bullwinkles Log Cabin. Wear your T 
shirts A win cash for your T shirt 
Slogans. Over S500- worth of prizes 
avary Thurs. 



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Need help with relationships? Group 
now forming. Call Psychotogy Clintc 



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IF YOU LOVE BAGELS 

COME TO HILELL'S 
BAGEL SALE! NOV. 12 
IN THE STUDENT UNION 
MORE INFO. 222-S4S*. 

"' ' THIS FRIDAY NIGHT 
SHABBOT SERVICES 
MEET IN PARKING LOT OF UNION 
POST OFFICE— AT 7:00 PM. 
SERVICES WILL BE AT FSU 
RESERVATION. THERE WILL BE A 
BAHN FIRE. PARENTS ARE 
WELCOME! MORE INFO. CALL 
OU€EaBS-7S3». 



"UPPER DECK ' 
Quality Inn Southemaire Special 18% 
student discount w/ ID Beer-Wtae- 

•iua Kay Card 

II 

FACIAL & BODY HAIR REMOVAL 
Permanently by electrolysis. Deep 
cleaning facial treatment. Regina 
Ancar, Ektctrotogist. By appointment 
223-3170, 747 E. Tennessee Street 



TNT HIDEAWAY CANOE RENTAL 
Wakulla River at Hwy 98 November 
Special: mention this ad & rent 2 
canoes for theprtcaof 1. Call 1-925-6412 

or 878 5607. 



I'M DESPERATE! 
I NEED A RIDE TO THE ATLANTA 

ATHENS, GEORGIA AREA THE 
THANKSGIVING WEEKEND WILL 
SPLIT COST! CALL ADAM444-3I08. 



PREGNANT? — 

FREE PREGNANCY TEST 
VOLUNTEER COUNCILINO 
TAPPS INC. 222 7177 

I HAVE STRUNG OVER 5,000 
RACQUETS! if you want it done right 
call Winewood Tennis Shop 877-8135. 




SS^^J?^ and 
dissertations, prompt service, 
reasonable rates. Phone: Mrs 
Marks 576-6913 between 8 and 5 
weekdays. 

MINI WAREHOUSE UNltS 
6x6 available-larger sizes $14JiO up. 

Call us at • -"^ -■ 

386-4191. 



U.J.A. CAMPUS ORGANIZm 
WILL BE ON CAMPUS 
FRIDAY, NOV. 7 
IF INTERESTED CALL THE 
HILLEL FOUNDATION AT 
222-5454 



ATTENTION FORMER 

HOMECOMING CANDIDATES The 
Flambeau business office has your ad 
pictures-Tia Hood, Beth McAnly 
Sharon Frye, Laren Ryan, Pat Ryiee, 
John Knapp. and Kant Bwton. Plaasa 
pick them up as soon as possible. 



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THE CHRISTIAN COFFEEHOiM 
FRIDAY, NOV. 7. 8 12 PM 
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CENTER 
925 W.JEFFERSON 

NAT ART ED MEETING " 
THUR,NOV.6,7:30PMEDUC. 126 
COME ONE, COME ALL 



SAT LUNCH AT THE PHYRST 
WITH A FmCHOl 



Sort 

Hard Contact Lenses 
24 hour Contact Lenses. 
B A L Contact Lenses. $50. ear 
Dr. Allen Dean, 222-9991. 



IBSpr. 



YOU WRITE: I EDIT, TYPE. 
Themes, term papert^ at reasonable 
rates. Call eves, wicands- aas-S574. 

WILL DO TYPING IN MY HOME. 
JfLEPHONE 3t5-9Mf. KEEP 
TRYING. 



Lesbian and Gay Rap group- For 
anyone interested-provides a relaxed 
environment to meet and talk 
ottiers. Thurs. 8-10 pm Dif. 112. 



Edited Typing IBM Selectric II 
Raports/ Resumes/Letters " 

575-7171 Mission PH • 




DEL SUGGS IS BACK! 
This weekend only Del Suggs is 
at The Alley. Thurs-Fri-Sat from . 
ytil I . Downtown across fram Lewis 

Catwoman, 

You can quit holding your breath, 
America Mew It. And the saddest part 
of all is that Liberal Democrats fell 
everywhere. Bipartisan politics in 
America? Surely you jest. 'Tis a sad 
day for all, for ,we are different 
country. At least ttie Aliki red ligM 
still exists. Much love, Joe Mans a. 

eT ~~ 

Can't wait 'til Saturday mgRtt 
Maybe I'll make it through me game 
thta woek. You give me incantfvol 
(Thanks for the Ben-Gay rub)— L.6. 

Kadette, Duck A Snort, 
Saturday wUI be groati wru drink 

the 'Holes to a vicotryl 

•arevarf Love yal Larl. 
P.S. Duck, what IM| 
hunks on your ooorTI? 



SHABBOTT DINNER 
HILLEL WILL HAVE 
THE DINNER NOV. 14 
INSTEADOFNOV.7 
MORE INFO. 222 5454. 

CPE-SG free midnight film series this 
week order of Omega presents 3 
Stooges film festival. Sat., Nov. 9 at 
midmte Moore Aud. Free. 

CATFliH ALLIANCE M#EtlNG 
THURS AT 7:30 IN 346 STUDENT 
UNION. FREE MOVIES "ABOUT 
FALLOUT" & "OPERATION Q". 

OPEN TO ALL. 

CPT labor series working with SCU 
Florida AFL 8. CIO & Tallahassee 
Peace Coalition present: William 
Wrmpesinger Presdieni lam to discuss 
"Conversion to Peace " Thur., Nov. 13 
at tpm , OfNanbmgh Rm Ml. 

DON'T PUT YOUR HALLOWEEN 
COSTUME AWAY WEAR IT THIS 
SUN. NIOHT FOR THE PEOPLE 
BENEFIT. COME DANCE WITH US 
SUN. 9 NOV. AT 9 PM. LUCKY 
HORSESHOE. 



Blue Keycard is honored by the 
following merchants: NIc's Toggery, 
Athletic Attic, Hobbit Hoagi* 
Factory, Brawmpfter's Restaurant 
(opening soon)/ MaCs In The Back 
Lounge, Pizxa Pro, Tallahassee 
Flowers, The Pub, The Phyrst, Adam 
81 Eve Campus Hairplace, Zonkers, 
arown's Pharmacy, The AAelting Pot, 
Annette's Women's Fashions, Great 
Bicycle Shop, Barnacle Bill's, 
McGregor's Steak House, Roger 
Nelson Music Store, The Outpost, Sea 
Fox Restaurant & Lounge, Ricco's 
Lounge, Quality inn Southernaire, 
Captain's Lounge. 

HOLIDAY PORTRAITS 

Make Special Gifts. ..But fine 
photographic portraits take time. 
Package plans in color from $19.50. 
Call DHmar Stixttos at 224-3824 



WhaidoBB i» 
L.L. Bcanimlf e 
all have in cotsaoa* 
they've iU had pod0ii« I 

8tAMHt^.ite'>* 



taJM 



4 >i 



BODY SHOP WILL BE GIVING A 
FASHION SHOW AT BULLWINKLES 

ON WED 



8208 REWARD ~ 

FOR INFORMATION LEADING TO 
THE IDENTIFICATION OF THE 
PERSON WHO TOOK OUR SIGN AT 
TNEPNVKSTr 




KUNG FU 
Oevelep power and control 

214 W. College 224-7786 
Next to Great Bicycle Shop 



Lost: straw cowtx»y hat in room 117 
Bellamy. Great sentimental vatje 
and reward, tf found call Chns at *44 



K^SHBHDYAN IS COAAIMO 

NOV. 12, itao 

IN TAMPA 
IF YOU WANT TO SEE 
HUM. CALL HILLEL 

NOV.O 



LOST KEYS '7 

DIFFENBAU6HII1SET OF 4 KEYS 
ON SMALL SN.VER RING. CALL 176^ 
6482 _ 

G E RMAN SHEPHERD 
CALL m-9m TO 



FOUND 
PUPPY. 
IDENTIFY. 



731 NG*^ 

Sun.lC*'iii«J^ 

Gene Vefli»«*^ 
Largest ifl ••••^ 



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wcet I 

(iced II 
h earn 
trnfnuniiN 
' iiiverN 

< 0:. < 

fed to \ 

a Ir 

P^k ahec 
'<tff ofj\ 



222-S4S4 



Everyone's been goosed- Havo 
ever been ducked? Pick up your 
card in the Union ticket office. 



PLE^E I LOST A GOLD 
NECI^CE W/ PENDANT-TWO 

GOLD CIRCLES, DOLPHIN BEN 
575-3052. WILL REWARD TO GET IT 



farm 



We arr 

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^•^G LOT CALLOAv'o*:^;^ 

|i L<»f 9^?«.8(> Op#l t*fr - 
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A#«fia/jr/>rwinev«» 
pui wheels on your rcunar 
if you'd like 
— AmyShocfiiai 



444-5744 



What do B.fl. Jam. 
L.L. Bean and e.e.( 
ail iMive in coMMB? Wky. 
ttey've aU had posicn doM I 



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■ • ^ mmmmmm 



ROGER SMITH 




Harrier mentor 
likes bouquets, 
Dsycho- cybernetics 

B\ DXKIKN ANDREI) 

sPM IM lO WW H.AMBKAL 

O A , you are loemg the tine, looking 
^ beyond the starter and up the 
jtrnHiY. The f>un goes off and you sprint to 
' f?/ of I he pack, trying to avoid too 
• m^m about. At about a half of a 
. , u)u make a sweeping turn to your left 
- ^'jn to ^tfle into a good stride. At this 
should be thinning out. If 
, nQii problems before with being boxed • 
r iui oif, this is now the time to 
/''j'l \/i > our early race position. ** 
. ; Mhat 1^ going on you*re probably 

sycho-cybernetics is the answer. It 
ads like mental acrobatics and that 
is is not too fan astray. According to 
eer Smith, FSU*s new women's cross- 
jotry and track coach, psycho- 
genetics will "give the athlete a mental 
picture of the race. The coach talks 
tiirough the race step-by-stq>, half-n^l>y 
half-mile, while the athlete mentally 
JiBzes everything, from removing his 
^ats. to pre-determined mile and 
nishing splits. And once the athlete can 
uaiize, then the athlete can do." 
Psycho-cybernetics is only a nnali part of 
exciting program Smith is estaMlshing 
t^^l, and if past history continues to 
^ai iisclf. Florida State womoi's track 
field is destined to continue in lus 
•nning precedent. After building a 
^ ning program at El Monte High Sdlool 
- *hcrc he took a team thitt had not won a 
meet m 63 attempts and in two ye«s 
produced the Pacific League Champions — 
.arncd his talents first to Clackamus 
UmmunuN C ollege (Oregon), and then to 
*f Uivcrsiiy of Wyoming before heading 

■■02, 5:03, 5:04. . . After hearing your 
split vou 11 Av7(>H at I his point whether 
'feed 10 either pick up the pace, or back 
a little. But regardless of the 
^mon, remain m contact with the runner 
^ ahead of you. If you are leading at 
/^'.'j: perhaps you may want to yield 
'"'^^/i off someone else. Let them do the 
' Leading at this point is not 
"^'^^y psychologically advantageous. " 
^ left Clackamus after three years, 
^^^calihv stats of 51-1 in cross-countrv 
^Wition and IIW in track and neid 
while taking the 1977 national 
^^5hips in both. Five ol 
-J«jrv athletes and 19 track and fleid 

garnered AU-Amcrican honors. 
«ore arriving m FSU, Smith, along 
" wife and son, spem a cold year at 
^ ^nucrsiiy of Wyoming. In spite of not 
^ 10 train oittdoofs more than two 
^ his count before the AIAW 
' ^1 championships, Smitli qualified a 
.^\Nuad that finished 38tli in the nation, 
^able in the light of the Hct tint 
' ^'<^r 500 womb's conpetitive 
US. He ipidKfied Ml indpor 
^^^^^ fmishcd 24th, and a cross- 
^ <eam earlier m tlie M of '79 tlwi 




Lady Seminole coach 

brought him to the national championships 
hosted by Florida State and his first 
aquaintance with Tallahassee. 

**I have always maintained that there are 
three areas in the country — Florida, 
Texas, and California — where a coach can 
build teams of national championship 
caliber," he noted. **The climate is 
conducive to year-round training and that 
gives us a jump on some other sdiools.*^ 

"You are now at the one and a half tnUe 
point and approaching the first rtal hill in 
the course. Shorten your stride, lift and 
move strongly up and over the top of the 
hill. Once you begin the downhUl use it to 
your advantage. Mamtaming control, go 
ahead and fly, pass a few people. Let the 
momentum of the downhUl he^ cany you 
up the next hUi." 

So Roger Smith returned once agun to 
TiOlahassee, this tone to work his magic at 
FSU. 

*^I'm a doer. With the backing of our 
administration — and Barbara Palmer 
(women's athletic director) is committed 
and a winner — I truly believe Florida Stote 
can become a national caliber program,*' 
he noted. 

Athletes recruited from as far away as 
Wyoming, Oregon, Canada, even England 
and Brazil, as well as a host of Floridians 
are ^ building blocks. Gary Winckler, 
prior assistant at track and field 
powerhouse Oregon State, will be assisting 
Smith as co-architect. Together they intend 
to lay enthusiasm as foundation material. 

*'At the two-mile you still have a few 
more hilb in front of you, but determine at 
this point where you want to surge and 
move» maybe to try and catch someone or 
perhaps lengthen your lead. Pick an uphill 
to move on, or Just after turning a blind 
corner sprint to earn a few yards on a 
pursuer, but nevertheless move sometime 
before you begm your final kick. " 

According to Smith, "the most 
important thing is to emulate excitement 
about track and field. By exciting the 
athletes about their abilities eventually they 
will believe in them. And when the athletes 
believe, they can do. You can tell them to 
run up tree-trunks, and as long as they 
believe it will work, they'll be ready to run 
when necessary." 

Turn to SMITH, P^e 16 



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At the Institute f(X Paraleaal Training ii« ha^ 
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a Legal Assistant you will do work traditionally performed by 
attorneys and other professionals in law firms, corporations, 
banks, government agencies and insurance companies 
Furthermore, you will earn graduate credit towards a Master 
of Arts in Legal Studies through Antioch School of Law for all 
course work completed at The Institute. 

We are regarded as the nation's finest and most prestig- 
ious program for training legal specialists for law firms, 
business and finance But, as important as our academic 
quality is our placement result. The Institute's placement 
service will find you a job in the city of your choice. If not, you will 
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If you are a senior in high academic standing and looking 
for the most practical way to begin your career, contact your 
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W« wiSI visit yoyr campus on: 

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16 / Thursday, November 6, 1980 Florida F!«mbeau 



Men, women swimmers ready 
for season-opening dual meet 



BY WAYNE DEAS 



While Florida State's football team is 
looking towards an expected major bowl 
bid to climax another successful year, the 
Seminole swimming teams wiO open their 
seasons this Saturday with equally high 
hopes of iiitercoilegiate success. 

"We've got more talent in our swimming 
and diving events combined than ever 
before mid wSk be much more improved/' 
stated women's head coach Terry Maul 
about the 10 a.m. meets with Incfiaa River 
Community Cottege. 

Maul, muned Region III Coach of th^ 
year in 1979, led his squiid to a ^3 record 
and a 2Sth pfaK» nado^ finish. This year 
staked with seven returmng AO-Americans 
and several eitiemely talented newcomers 
Maui's team mppears destined for unlimited 
nadbniri aodmm. 

"I don't w»tt to start predicting so early 
but I'm pretty sure we'll be 9-3 or better," 
said Maul. **But we don't want to be ^per 
psyched out until our big mee|s against 
Georgia, Miami, LSU, South Carolina, and 
Alabama in January. Until then we'll focus 
on winning one or two big meets on 
technique and talent." 

Winning on technique aikl talent should 
not be a hard task for the women swimmm 
because they are loaded with just that. 

Terry Miller, owner of four AH- 



American honors and holder of three 
fieestyie and two hidividual medley records 
at FSU will be returning* to lead the 
wmnen's team in her final year at FSU. 

Just as talented this year but not coming 
off the same successful aeaam that the 
women's team had, the men swinuners win 
be kx>king to improve on thdr 5-5 reccHd. 

"We should have much more success 
than last year. (Last year's 5-5 record) was 
diM to injury, illness and youth," said 
moi's coach John Stafford whose squad 
win compete alongside die Lady Semkidies. 
*'Hoc tme time last year did we have an 
entire team healthy to practice or conu>ete, 
and our young team made many mktakes m 
and away fnxn die pool." 

Stafford, who said youth will not play a 
big role this year, will be looking for the 
leadership qualities of. seniors Jim 
Hamilton, and Barry Griffm to filter 
among his team. The two national AAU 
qualifiers are also the team's co-eaptatm. 

*'Five days befcM'e school started we 
(Hamilton, Griffin and Stafford) planned 
out the team's attitude and tone for the 
year," estplained Stafford. "Since then, 
through their leadership and desire, 
practices have been a fun tfa^ to do every 
day." 

And that fun will either pay off big 
Saturday or prove to be detrimental to the 
team. But only time will truly iell. 



Smith 



frmn page IS 

And just when is it necessary? Last 
weekend at the r^onal duunpion^ps was 
the harriers first true test, and the Lady 
*Noles came thnn^ admirably, taking the 
team title with a low score of 47.* They 
defeated the previous two-year winner, 
Ahibama, by 8 (55), and third place flmsher 
Florida by 13 (6(^. 

"The b%gest thing is to wm our region. 
Thai we can g^ to nationals, and we think 
we can finish among the top IS teams in the 
country," &Bith explained. 

Last year FSU finished twemy-second. 
But this is 1980, year of the Seminoles, year 
of the song "AaotlKr One ^tes the Dust", 
and the year of the unveiling of Smith- 
Winckler, Inc.. "We're not building for the 
future, the future is now." An old coaching 
adi^e reckes, "Hiere are two ways to get to 
the top of aa oak tree — either cfimb it, or 
sk <m an acorn and wait." Rc^er Smith 
intends to climb his tree. 

l^t to get to that fine perch requires 
talent, whieh the athletes supply, and 
careful coaching, which Smith and 
Winclder will provide. 

**Each athlete is an individual," he 



pointed out. "The athlete is not to be put 
on a pedestal, neither is the coach, 
therefore it is a two-way street. There 
should be a marrying of ideas between 
athlete and coadi. 

"I've coached men all my life in both 
football and track and And I've come 
to beUeve women are voy dedicated and 
appreciative. Besides I've never had a 
football team send rile flowers." 

"Moving strongly now you have but less 
than a Haifa mile to go. JTus is the point where 
you really need to reach down and dig. Find 
a mw reserve of strength, end reason to 
maitUam ymw pace for a little Mt hm§er. 
Think of the hours and hours you've sp&nt 
putting miles upon miks belwidyou. Fifty 
yards from the finish. Lift mul drive. Focus 
on the finishing chute and kick with 
everything you've got, Visutdtce breaking, 
through thefin^dng tape, or hearing yow 
finishing split as a personal best. Ladies, 
runfromyom hearts!" 

Roger Snrith has seen a few bouquets in 
his day mid undoubtedly will be sharing the 
sweet scent of many more accomplishments 
at FSU if psycho-cybernetics continues to 
work as well as it has in the past for the 
Lady Seminoles. 



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PEN 24 HOURS 



/Igent Orange:\FSU prof studying the defoliants 's effects (page 6) 



Florida Flambeau 



MILD 

Clear and cold v*ith a m 
the mid 3<K. Sunn\ and mild 
this afternoon with tughs in 
the 70s. 



SERVING TALLAHASSEE FOR 6H YE iRS 



VOL 68, Ml ?5 



FSU lacks money to plug leaks \AT WEEK'S END - 



BY MICHAEL McCLiXLAND 

llJ^MKAi; STAFF WMTEK 

Faced with leaky roofs and an empty pocket book, Florida 
30e hts opted for stop-gap measures to temporarily keep 
It din OHt of the the deteriorating stiidail Union complex. 

FSU plans to spot-patch- the roofs of the Crenshaw 
^ Moore Auditorium to keep the buildings dry 
dtil noney can be found to replace their roofs entirely. The 
Oi^B Blinding, where damage from leaking roofs has been 
Jk most severe, will remain i n its current condition until 
leney can be found to 



'^tia the entire roof. The 

wf of the Davis Building 

itech houses the President's 

iiing room, is in such 

XK<r condition that 

lininisirators feel it should ^^^.^^^^^^i^m^^m^^m 

k replaced rather than patched, according to Robot 

Henderson, associate director of the Union. 
"A possible scenario would be patching Moore and 

Cftnshaw. and replacing Davis, then in a year or so replace 
•fishaw and patch Moore, and the next year replace 
' e By that time we'll probably need to replace the roof 
i ine Activities building," Henderson said. 
Moncv \o patch the roofs of Crenshaw and Moore could 
• * H t> iiid by a careful check of this years budget, 

neauciNor, said. Replacing the root of the Davis Building 

wuld be a ercai deal more expensive, and presents the 

idminiiiraiion with a difficult problem. The Union complex 



has a sepcrate legal status than most university strucmrcs, 
and is ineligible for funding from the Legislature-supplied 
Edttcaticm and General funds. The Union's own funds, 
supplied entireiy by stodent government and a few profit- 
tenerating vcMures located in the Union, are barely Iwie 
enough to cover Union operating expenses. There is quite 
simply no money for expensive repairs. 

Bob Leach, vice-president for student affairs and 
administrative head of the Union, is currently attempting to 
locate an alternate source of f unding for the repairs. If no 

funds can be found. Leach 
said in an earlier interview, 

the university may be forced 
to close parts of the Union. 
Leach is presently out of 
town and could be reached 
for comment on the status 
of his search for funding. 

Replacing the roof of the Davis Building would cost an 
estimated $95,000. Replacing the roofs of Moore and 
Crenshaw would cost an additional $110,000. Estimates on 
the cost of just patching Moore and Crenshaw have not yet 
been comjjleted. 

The Davis Building roof has been identified as top priority 
for replacement, Henderson said, because of its poor 
condition, and because of a potential health hazard presently 
by asbestos ceilings within the building. Asbestos ceilings are 

Turn to UNION, page 9 



'(When leaks occur) asbestos may be released 

in the air, and could present a health hazard/ 

—John Martin, FSU Safety and 
Risk MaBagemeDt director 



•••••• 



• • • • 



■ > ■ ■ Hi... 

••••••••• . 

• ••••••• . . 

• .....«.., 



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• • • • • 




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Forming a government 

Stone, 'Scoop' Jackson to serve in Reagan administration 



I MIHIPRKSMNURNAIIONAl 

lOS A\c.l 1 FS — President-elect Ronald Reagan told 
nauon \csicrday he will not interfere with President 
•'■'er'^ellons to tree the U.S. hostages and will work with 
^^Republicans and Democrats to form foreign policy. 

'he same time Reagan reaffirmed support for the 
J<PuNuan Party platform and its opposition to the Equal 
Mis Amendment. He said in regard to the Moral Majority 
^'her conservative groups that supported him: "I am not 

^er<»raic myself from the people that elected us." 
his tirsi lull lledeed news conference since his dramatic 
*n victory Tuesday. Reagan named his top campaign 



staff and advisers — the crew that engineered his etectkm 
Tuesday as the nation's 40th president — to hc«l his 
transition forces. 

While he said he was anxious to get to work on the 
transition, Reagan said he wanted it made dear he would do 
nothing to interfere with President Carter's final weeks in 
office. 

Reagan said he wanted to "rcbuiW a Inpartisan base to 
American foreign policy" and he named among hi? advisers 
in that area three Democrats — Sen. Henry Jackson of 
Washington, defeated Sen. Richard Stone of Florida and 



Washington defense lawyer Edwi^ Bennett Wimwis — to 
help his Republican team. 

Reagan said Senate Republican leader Howard Baker 
"will be majority leader'* even though he is believed too 
libend by a number of coi»ervative Republicans. Reagan 
said that despite critical remarks from the right he plans on 
making full use of his vice president, George Bush . 

Reagan refused to commoit on whether he would run for 
re-election in 1984, saying: **I haven't thought beyond the 
term to which I have been elected. But if there is any 

Tmm m MEAGAI% §mge 9 




Election night a *decldedly decadent' affair 



paint stUi wet on 
^ Bush button 



FIAMBFM STAFF WRITFR 

The tone of the Reagan Celebration at the 
downtown Hilton was unmistakable 
Tuesday night, as victorious campaigners 
sloughed fine, expensive scotch and danced 
before a large color TV as returns rolled in, 
confirming Reagan's mounting landslide. A 
tall, lean woman m extravagant striped fur 
borrowed from the Weimar Republic 
leaned against the podium, cocktail m one 
hand, cigarette in the other, and giggled 
drunkenly at the decidedly decadent 
proceedings. 

Faces familiar to anyone watching local- 
level politics for the last few years were there, 
FSU student body president Rob A udandif 



among them. 

One woman, though, maintained her 
distance throughout the aiiair. Originally 
from Venezuela and now pursuing her 
doctorate at Penn State, she claimed to be a 
Carter supporter, despite the deep blue 
Reagan/Bush pin on her chest. 

"The people in Latin America, sure they 
don't like this," she said. "They see it as a 
ictum to the old days, when the MarfaMS 
could be expected to land at the least sign of 
trouble." 

A rumor that state Repub darling Paula 
Hawkins would be arriving any minute 
brought a rush of excitement to the 
gathering, but her failure to show did 



The atmosphere at * Democratic 
iicddquarters on Monroe Street, thoi^, was 
a bit more doom-laden. 

**rm not proud of the Aasorican people." 
observ^l Carter caaipirign worker Gcorie 
PInlfipy. 

Oaia Jane Smith, also a Carter supporter, 
lamented, **l*m heartbroken. This new 
acfaninittraticm wil amsMit. k is tmm %o 
the core. 

**l have great fears the people's voice will 
be lost/* she continued. "The voice will be 
that of great money, great industry. 



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Court aids citizens against pollution 



IMTKDPHKSSINRRNATIONAl 

The right of a citi/en to sue for clean air and water was 
affirmed by the Slate Supreme Court yesterday in a 
landmark decision thai said the complaining citi/cn need 
not shovv any special injury from the alleged pollunon. 

The effect of the ruhng is to make each citizen a 
•'private attorney general'* in the fight against 
environmental pollution. 

•*The citizens of Florida have been given the capacity to 
protect their rights to a clean environment — a right not 
previously afforded them directly," the court said in a 7-0 
opinion authored by Justice Parker Lee McDonald. 

The court reinstated an 18-monlh-old suit against the 
South Florida Water Management District and Department 
of Environmental Regulation, alleging that a spillway 
operated by the district near Jupiter was a source of 
pollution of the Loxahatchee River. 

The suits, filed by the Florida Wildlife Federation whose 
members use the river for recreational purposes, seeks an 
injunction to halt the pollution and also asks that the 
district be required to pay money damages and court costs. 

The siut was dismissed by Palm Beach Circuit Judge 



Timothy Poulton, who invalidated a section of 
environmental law provkling thai the attoiwy general, a 
municipality or a citizen may seek injunctive relief to 
compel enforcement of laws and rules protecting the 
quality of the air and water. 

Pouhon called the law an impermissible invasion by the 
Legislature into the prerogative of the judiciary. He aho 
questioned whether the wildlife federation, a non-profit 
corporation, qualifed as a "citizen'* authorized to bring 
such actions. 

"The Legislature has declared the protection of the 

environment to be a collective responsibility and to treat 
corporations as citizens is consistent with that 
declaration," the high court said, sending the suit back to 
Palm Beach for trial. 

DER, a co-dependent in the lower court, joined the 
federation in arguing for constitutionality of the statute on 
appeal. 

The justices noted that Floridians, in a constitutional 
amendment adopted a decade ago, made it the policy of the 
state to ''conserve and protect its natural resources and 
scenic beauty." 



Self -described rapist is released 



BY CURT FIELDS 

FLAMBEAU STAFF WRITER 

A man who describes himself as a rapist was released 
from the Leon County Jail yesterday, despite efforts by 
local police to hold the man longer. 

Joseph E. Baltzell was arrested for 
"trespassing after warning" after allegedly 
harassing several women on the Florida 
State campus. 

The women claim Baltzell made several 
statements about raping women and that 
women deserved to be raped. 

Local police were hoping a way to keep 
Baltzell off of the street could be found but 
no justification for further detainment 
could be produced. 

According to one observer at the hearing which gave 
Baltzell his release, the presiding judge gave Baltzell until 5 
p.m. Friday to either leave Leon County or find a job or 
permanent residence. The judge had to explain his ruling to 
Baltzell several times. 

Baltzell tried repeatedly to hide from photographers 
and frequently laughed and giggled during the hearing. 




Tallahassee police yesterday obtained an arrest warrant 
for Mark Harris Baxley in connection with the murder 
of Robert Blanton, who was found dead in his motd room 
last Saturday morning. 

Baxley is 23 years old and from Milton, 
Florida. 

According to Barry Bumgarner, 
Tallahassee Police Department information 
officer, investigators hope to taJ^e Baxley 
into custody soon. 

"He went back (after Blanton's death) 
to Milton from here and then left. We 
don't know where he is right now," said 
Bumgarner. 

Bumgamer added that investigators are in Milton now 
trying to pick up a lead as to where Baxley might be. 

Baxley is also charged with robbery. 

Blanton, of Plantation, Florida, was found dead from 
repeated blows to the back of the head in his Quality Inn 
room on Brevard Street November 1. A new Volkswagen 
I>asher belonging to Blanton was taken at the time also. 



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Florida Flambeau 



ThcHandaRMibesuttiwbliiliedbytlieiMdBna^^ iDdependeiit. 
pram corporatkMi wiiicii it Mldy rcipoB^ 

Floridi Flambeau Fomdatioa. lac. Newsroom, 204 N. Woodward Avenue, phone 644-5505; MaUiag 
addfcn. P.O. BorU-DOOI. FloridtSlMe Umwsity. Tallahisiw, Florida 32306. 

Sidney BecKagfMi Editor Mary Tebo Associate Editor 

Bob O'Lary Photo Editor Steve Dollar Associate Editor 

Brad liston News Editor Chris Farrell Associate Editor 

Chris ^odunan Sports^ Editor Melissa Beckham An Director 



Administering death 

Irony knows no bounds. At least not in this state, which seems dead set on frying 
as many prisoners as possible as quickly as possible. 

Even the Supreme Court's getting a little irritated at the Attorney General's 
obsession with the electric chair. 

But not because executions repel the justices; they're. more afraid of having the 
state's capital punishment law invalidated. 

Speakii^ to assistant attorney general Michael Paleck earlier in the week, 
Sttpreme Court Justice Arthur England warned against interpreting the death 
penalty too broadly, and said overuse of the dectric chair may force federal courts 
tQ invalidate the statute. 

That's ironic. A Supreme Court justice pulls aside the eager young bloodhound 
and whispers gently in his ear, 'Listen son, death is cool, just go easy, huh.' 

Of course we don't believe death is cool, especially when administered 
capriciously by an ailing judicial system that doles out justice sparingly at best. 

Jim Smith and the gang up in the Attorney General's office disagree though; the 
pop phrase **Go for it" best describes their attitude toward capital punishment. 

England made his remarks after considering the oral argimtients cm whether the 
ax-murder a man who was steeping could be viewed as more^hdnous, atrodous 
and cruel" than the average homocide. Engiand said he appredated the obligation 
of the state to defend sentences under appeal, but added, **I have to womler. . .if Uie 
attorney general worries. . .that continued insistence to this court that the death 
penalty has to be upheld" will lead to an invalidation of the law. 

Traditionally, the U.S. Supreme Court struck down death penalty statutes that do 
not precisely limit execution to crimes that are especially heinous. 

As you may have guessed, we disagree in principle with the death penalty under 
any circumstance, and are always galled when judicial bodies discuss the 
technicalities of its administration. 

Surdy Justice England had good intentions; if the dectric chair is to be used at all, 
let's be sure it's at least cfone accordmg to the law. 

Then again, if we thought federal courts wouki really invalidate the law, we'd be 
cheering the Attorney Genial on. 

That would be ironic: Jim Smith's overzealousaess accidently invalidating the 
state's death penalty statute. 

It also would be just. 




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Letters Policy: Letters to the editor of the Florida Flambeau should be signed, and must include an address 
and phone number if possible. They should be lypc-wrilten, double spaced, and no longer than 150 words. 
Correct names will be run with each letter unless the author has a valid reason for remaining anonymous. 
ThecfStors rcKrvc the ri^loedk the letters for kngth and to meet sianaards of good taste. 




Man in disorder 

Reagan ' s hurricane party 



BYSAMCOLEY 

FLAMBEAU STAFF Wnm 

Lena (Swept Away) WertmuUer's Seven 
Beauties is often considered her best work, a 
film brimming over with little delights. 
Maybe the best one is where an aging 
anarchist in a Nazi POW camp breaks ranks 
one morning and runs toward the latrine 
screaming, **rm going to jump into the Sh— 
!** Just before leaping into the gurgling open 
cesspool, he has one final yell. "Man m 
disorder!" he cries, and drops into the 
swirling pestilence. 

Just to show that nobody does that kind of 
thing and gets away with it, Nazi guards 
open fire into the pool, and the anarchist's 
blood bubbles to the surface, mixing with the 
urine and feces. 

• • • 

If .you're from anywhere near the gulf 
coast, you know what they're like. Hurricane 
parties, where otherw^ sensible human 
bdngs pick the most exposed real estate they 
can find, and fueled with drink and drugs, 
deny the doom they know is inevitable. 

The last few weeks have been like that. 
Even though everyone knew it would 
happen, the reality of it sttll came as 
sometl^Bg of a shock. Just thkik — no more 
welfare, only tanks. No more abortion — 
only prayer in schools. NO more dvfl rights 
only an amencteieat banning busing. 

But is it really ail that bad? Who feds the 
ERA had a chance even if Reagan had lost? 
Who has foTfOtten Carter^s annual calls for 
rechieed social iervices; more defense dollars? 
SALT II was dead a year ago. Carter's 
campaign ilietoric notwith^andhigi if 



AGE OF GOLD 



Reagan's promise of a new SALT 111 ii if 
lowest kiml of bad faith. 

There's no need for worry. 

If die mood ofTrentoo. Fta* 
indication, we're doiiig n».dcm^ 
happy male kxals content themdw 
the same two blocks for taw 
sipping Btltentine. con wyd t^^J ^ 
Sue Ann, captain of theCfcceiki**^ 
waits just around the comer. 

Or maybe try Gdnesviie oi i 
evening. Dancers dreiied m 
sunglasses and day-gk) Nouses lw« - * i 
ho totlnmderiiigiicw-*tvcd»w « 
only to sip milkshakes cut with slot r 

Fred's Dry Dock, oo Thwpc Sfr?f 
Provide a due. "On the "J^^^^ 
where I want to be. fir fr*'^ 
monetary system and cnimMJI J^. 
wrecked with desptk. Gtiesi m 
win have to do. f^ji 

No. that's no need lo wo^J^ J 
New Orieans, Venice Beach, 
can always get out of town 

That, I suppose will be the 
the dampdown, when uiefci 
run, nowhere to hide. 

If you think the party$«*'' 

you're wrong. 
It's just began. 



phone 644-407S: 
UwvenityUBioii, 

Rick Johnson... 
Tracey Rowe... 
Laurie Jones 



nd Advertising Office JW/V^^ ^ 
Me Ji rtnn M». SM Uaimii^ Umom. ' 644-5744, c 




(0f 



General Manager Amy Arbogast. 

Advertising Manager Jane Duncan. . • • 

Business Manager 




1 I 




arty 



'FGOLD 



[se of a new SALT III » Hi 
id faith. 

for worry, 
of Trenton. Floridi » t^f 
* doing fine. Down there. 
p\s content thcmsdm dfivini 
Locks for hours every "i^ 
"inc. convinced ever-evwi^t 
iincrftheCheeftetdersqii^l 

'thccorwer. _ 
[y Gainesville on a FrMhT 
,cers dressed in M P^^^ 
ky-glo Mouses heave to«^ 
ingnew-wave disco, stoppinf 

shakes cut with sloe gm 
fock. Oil ThOTC Street; n^^- 
1 ••On the ro«l aiwn, 
iio fee. far from • i^ouWeB 
m and crumbling 
Z^, Guess this boartK 

enice Beach. Mianu ' 

ut of town. 

>se wiU be the sur^^ 
\ wbea th«re'» 

hide. . . hfoilc'' 

the party's ^ 



II. 



fiackiri" 



e. 206 N ^^'^'fTollW^ 

.Sityi^ ^ 



ernie says 



let ters 

there ! ' 



touke this opportunity to urge Seminole fans to 
'!^e^l Stadium Saturday afternoon for the game 
iia Polytechnic institute. The regular 7 p.m. 
ibecn moved to 3:45 p.m. for the regional ABC 



jn support has been tremendous this season 
^jjine will be carried live on the ABC television 
there might b' a tendency among some fans to 
imeiiid watch. It is important to our players to have 



the vocal support of afll our fans during any athletic contest 
and especially one with this traditional opponent. 

Campbell Stadium crowds so far this season have set new 
attendance records and we don't want to let down now near 
the end of the season uhen we will be watched by millions 
of fans thoughout the south and east. We also will be 
watched by several major bowl scouts who are considering 

Florida Stale tor a po$t-season bowl game. 

Bernard F. Sliger 
President 



iirol Marbin lauded, lambasted 



,wr to thank Carol Marbin for her excellent column 
y wbjcct of wuch cratt. The torture and murder of 
of women bv the Church was nothing less than 
ic Jirared at half the human race, a fact that we all 
ii. be more aware of. 

' n^n up in a virulently Catholic household.! can 
4)Uiai ihc C hurch does, indeed, teach thatwomenare 
sior beings possessed of an inherent evil merely by 
t having been born female. Even after splitting 
T, nc Roman C hurch, all Christian Churches retained 
doctnne of misogyny, and continue to teach it today, 
.haionly to listen to the diatribes of the moral majority 
Ike a look at the Republican Party platform to see the 
Tin this. 

;na uragc all women to study our own history to leam 
ihc use of violence has proven cutturally beneficial in 
fnting us from revolting against our status as caressed 

pic. and to recognize the pivotal role that Chfistiamty 

played. 

Gailltowlaiid 



Editor: 

Halloween is truly a holiday that has lost its original 
significance. But to say that we should think of violence 
against women when we celebrate Halloween is absurd. 
Marbin's article is the height of extended paranoia; her 
logic is impossible to follow. 

There is only one day (or night) a year when kids can get 
dressed up in outlandish costumes, roam the streets and 
demand from total strangers something sweet to eat: 
Halloween is sanctioned coercion at its best. 

I would hope that Ms. Marbin would somettoy do a bit of 
research and discover the real roots of Halloween. 
Witches were often accused of spreading false and 
misleading information. I wouldn't accuse Marbin of 
being a 20th century witch because she tries to make 
Halloween a sexist celebration. Perhaps she wouW like to 
join tiie cetebrators, and come in tiie costume of a rational 
humaabeii^. 

Dan Lopez 




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Chemical warfare 



FSU researcher 
looks at effects 
of Agent Orange 

BY MICHAEL STROt SBERG 

Fl AMBFAl STAFF WRITER 

A disastrous chemical mistake. 

That is how FSU chemistry professor Ralph C. Dougherty 
views the Agent Orange controversy raging across the 
Veteran's Administration office. In Dougherty's mind, "It 
was a very large scale experiment done with Jiuman 
populations without their consent.'* 

Indeed, the Agent Orange controversy is beginning to take 
on the dimensions of a colossal nightmare. It all began in 
l%5 during the Viet Nam War, when chemicals were sprayed 
to clear the jungles of dense foliage thought to be hiding Viet 
Cong. One such routine spraying mission was Operation 
Ranch Hand. An army handout for the mission assured the 
American troops that "the chemical is non-toxic to human or 
animal life." 

The chemical referred to was the herbicide called Agent 

Orange. 

What the hand-out did not mention was that Agent 
Orange contained the dioxins2,4, 5-T; 2,4,-D and TCDD — 
three of the most toxic compounds known to man. 
According to the General Accounting Office, the Defense 
Department "took few precautions to prevent troops' 
exposure" to Agent Orange, although over 10 million gallons 
were sprayed in a period of 5 years. 

Since the end of the war, thousands of Viet Nam veterans 
have suffered cancer, sterilization, chloracne (a painful, 
hideous acne that can cover the entire body), and 
neurological and psychotic disorders. Many have given birth 
to children with missing bones and other malformations. An 
FDA researcher once estimated that the dioxins which were 
present in the Agent Orange are "100,000 to a million times 
more potent" than Thalidomide in causing birth defects 
among the children of people exposed to it. Agent Orange 
Victims International claims that 50,000 men served in areas 
sprayed with Agent Orange. 

The veterans cannot get disability payments or free 
treatment from the Veterans Administration. The VA's 
position is that the veterans cannot prove that Agent Orange 
is the cause of their maladies. The U.S. government refuses 
any responsibility whatsoever for the plight of the veterans, 
even though many of the veterans' symptoms are identical to 
those known to be caused by dioxins. 

The veterans cannot sue the Federal Government; a 19S0 
Supreme Court ruling prohibits servicemen from suing the 
mitttary — no matter how grossly n^ligible the military 
might lave been. In^ead, 3,€00^^ Nam veterans saifetmg 
from what they charge is the effect erf Agent Orange have 
banded together in a suit against five chenucal companies 
which manufactured the herbicide: Dow Chemical Co., 
Monsanto Co., Thompson-Hay ward Chemical Co., 
Hercules inc. and Diamoad Shamrock Corp. 

The veterans contend that the companies knew the 
inherent danger in Agent Orange but failed ta inform the 
Pentagon or the service men. The con^ianies, in turn, intend 
to sue the Govenunent. They claim the mihtary mandated 
the manufacturing specifications of Ageiit Orange. 

The suit against the five companies hasn't started yet, but 
H could drag on fcnr years. At the moment, there is no way to 
prove beyond a shadow of a doubt that Agent Oran^ is the 
cause of the veterans* afflictions. The stakes could easily run 
into the hundreds of millions of dollars or even billions. The 
treatment for cancer m oat petscni can readi 2SO,000 Mbn. 




Dougherty believes there is a striking parallel between the 
problem of smoking and the problem of Agent Orange: 
"The relationship between tobacco consumption and cancer 
was first drawn about 30 years ago, although it was not 
definitive because the evidence was statistical and 
epidemiological. As late as 1970, the president of R.J. 
Reynolds [largest tobacco company in the U.S.) said, 'There 
is no proof that smoking causes health damage.' 

"Unfortunately, the same thing is being said by the 
IcheMcal companies about Agent Orange. Because of the 
Mi'Aa evidence — statistical and epklemiolo^i^ — 
^-^TooBipaiaes may win in court."* » . 




Dougherty has examined samples of seminal fluid from 30 
out of a sample of 70 Vict Nam veterans who claim they were 
exposed to Agent Orange. Out of the 70, three have died of 
cancer (the three did not participate in the seminal fluid 
tests).Compared to FSU students, Dougherty found that the 
veterans had lower sperm counts. "But," said Dougherty, 
"The sample is very small, so the level of statistical certainty 
is very low." 

Dougherty has been involved in bitter confrontations 
between the Environmental Protection Agency and Dow 
Chemical Co., one of the defendants of the veteran's suit. 
The EPA wants the dioxin 2,4,5-T (which was present in 
Agent Orange) banned from the market because they 
consider it far too dangerous to human populations. Dow 
Chemical maintains that the compound is safe with restricted 
use and should continue to be used as a herbicide. The 
outcome of the hearings, which started in February, could 
very well influence the results of the Agent Orange suit. 

Dow Chemical has vented its wrath on Dougherty for his 
findings of 2,4,5-T in the urine of college males. Through 
slick maneuverings and not-so-slick pressure tactics, the EPA 
has yielded to Dow in not considering Dougherty's findings 
in the hearings. "What Dow is most upset about," said 
Dougherty "is that we've contradicted their claim that the 
public is not exposed to the compound. Our set of data 
appear to be pretty much in agreement with the Health and 
Nutrition Examination Survey's which found 2,4,5-T in 
about 1 percent of the population — a finding which upsets 
Dow considerably." Dougherty suspects the exposure comes 
from eating beef that has been raised in rangeland treated 
with 2,4,5-T. "But," he is emphatic, "That's just a 
suspicion. I can'i prove it." 

The EPA withdrew Dougherty's research from the hearmg 
as a result of Dow's maneuverings at the University of 
Wisconsin. There, a professor compiled what Dougherty 
considers "damaging" evidence against dioxins, including 
2,4,5-T. Dow zeroed in on the professor because his animal 
toxicology data was one of the most extensive, far-reaching 
— and valid — experiments in dioxins. Dow somehow 
uncovered the professor's travel expenditure and managed to 
get him fired, even though he had tenure. Dow's tactic, 
according to Dougherty, was to discredit the professor 
personally to circumvent his professional findings. 

Dow fought for weeks against the Wisconsin professor and 
the struggle look a huge toll on EPA lawyers. They came to 
Dougherty's research and Dow, in effect, said they would do 
the same thing. The EPA figured they would be better off 
dropping Dougherty's find because as valid as it was, it was 
not as extensive as the Wisconsin research. According to 
Dougherty, the EPA lawyers are at a distiAot diaadv] 



because they haven't been out of law school m^^ 
years. "Here they are," he said, "against thcbesi 
Dow could come up with — the sharpest, 
attorneys that there are.Theycan make monkeys fliK< 
anybody." 

There is no doubt in Dougherty's mm -^i 1* 
should be banned. He points to a report fro 
a disproportionate amount of women who li .- 
sprayed with 2,4, 5, -T gave birth to deformed bursr 
250 live births in the area, there were eight asa « 'i 
born without a brain. "It is my opinion as a a 
Dougherty stated, "with no connections wiih En^ • ^ 
organizations other than casual ones, that the : 
too dangerous. If you have a compound thai is 
hazardous in lab experiments, if you find if m P 
public — and we have — that's sufficieni rcasor. ' 
to remove it from the market." Dos* and other, 
disagree. They claim that statements such as f>'-^ 
have no basis in fact because there is no absotuir ^ 
proof. . 

Dougherty agrees there is no absoluie proof 
of the issue, but he feels that Dov* and other corajiir 
rigorously fighting the FPA because ^J^^ 
great deal of money. The dioxm 2,4.5.1 f^i^ 
approximately 100 million dollars a y^^J^,^ 
There is no love lost between Dougherty and 
Dougherty believes Dow has relegated social i ^ 
the back seat. He describes the foMo«^*J^ 
example: "An official of Dow ^}^^ ^ 
Neanderthal man was expon-d ^''^''"^[j n i 
show that nature emits similar fg\ 
biggest stack of crap that 
concerned — and I've got chemical evKW» 
not true. That they would say ^^^^^^^^o^-* 
the public on such an issue, I think repress" 
calculated irresponsibility." ^ hivin * 

Basically, the problem the EPA 
similar to the problem the veteram » ^ 
Orange is their malefactor. According 



problem is that proof is a matter °f 
an epidemiological one in layman sten»' 



problem." Dougherty believes ^^^^S^^^ 
scientific proof by locating '^^^^yZ^^ ^ 
contact with Agent Orange 
experiences, the same exposures. i» ^ 
drugs, explosions, toxic ^^^^'^f^^^ f 
that's just the catch; it's nearly ^^^^^oi^ ^ 
group for the Viet Nam vetcraiis. "^^^^ tfSf^ 
is such that some people contri** 



n't 




ot law school more iiia:. 
" (i-ainst the bc\\ hv> firr 
iIr- sharpest, highest pak 
an make monkeys out ot mml 

jgherty's mind that 2,4.5. 
o a report from Oregon where 
women who lived near toicstj 

to deformed babies. Out 
jre were eight cases of hah* 
my opinion as a scicniiM.' 
,nncctions with Hnvironmcnr 
il ones, that the compound 
impound that is known lof 
I if you find it in the 
, sufficient reason, inmy^ 
Dow and other comp 
tements such as I>«»^J 
there IS no absolute 

) absolute proof for 
Dow and other con^^ 
because they stand to , 

lars a year in P^^^'' 
.oughertyWidDowChcH 
.legated social rtsponsih^^^^ 
e foltowing as the dt -n 

,w Chemical has 
,odia«nslinanat-P. 

ioxins as 2 A5.-T^ 

vcr did exist «5 I 
.id evidence toshow^J 

that in an attempt to 
link representsaii example 1 

t^ PA is having with 
Iterwis have in V^o^^^^^ 

recording to 0^ 
of statistics The q^^^ 

nan's terms. ^„ only • 
the veteran. 

le but did have 
ures.thefo<>d.J"^ 

„icals in the J^'^^.cc 
ly impossible to g ^^a, 

US. The nature 
"tract diseases or 0-^ 



) 



.-WW" 



Robert Jackson 



FAMU 



.^SN^ sHlH)KD 

jN usual 

^ f iorida A&M 
crsitv -idem 
-mcni President 

mio office on a 
n offering 
,:. abihiv. communi- 
and fiscal 
isibilitv to FAMU 
the senior ^^usiness 
J from Maryland is 
\\ putting what he's 
c<j in the classroom 

I intend to manage 
*fni government by 
Jackson said. 
-I s the best way to 
done.** 

-f of the first objectives his 
ration hopes to accomplish is 
;.g life into the 19^1 winter quarter 
\MU. ''Fall quarter is packed fitf 
caent with football and 
ccoming. " Jackson said. "Winter 
irter is traditionally dull it needs a big 
of energy and we pkm on givi^ it 
ttan." 

IB the talking sta^, plans for the 

irter iodude at least one major concert 
t host of otl^ activities. 
Attoopts are being made to bring author 
Haley to the university in February to 
Ip celebrate Black History Month. 
Another important objective being 
sued by the administration is an 
{^)roved health care program for FAMU 
Jcnts Jackson noted that 85 percent of 
fAViL students receive financial aid. *'If 
skk and forced to use money fbr 
iURCNN that's needed elsewhere, you lose,'* 
aid Negotiations are continuing with 
V h C arolina Mutual in an effort to 
aprovc student policy coverage. 
' ^ n and his staff have also initiated a 
make check cashing easier on 
i \ML .ampus. In response to a 
M b> them, the Lewis State Bank is 
^'^cntlv conducting a study to determine 
*c economic feasibility of locating an 
womaiic "Max" teller on the campus at 
[«hfr the Student Union or the Credit 

fAMl joined the Center for Participant 

^nion m presenting speakers to both 
anpuses. 

^ of our main desires is to provide 
*' ampus with speakers from diversified 

* grounds who can challenge us ail to 
^ er prepare ourselves for the futuie." 
jwied it is the beginning of doaer 




Robert Jackson, FAMU studen tbody preside n t 



relations with Florida State. Meeting 
recaitly with FSU President Rob Auslander, 
the two agreed on the need to establish a 
better working reiatimis^ between the two 
universities. 

Jackson is pleased with his relationship 
with FAMU President Walter Smith and 
the administration. 

"From the beginning," Jackson said, 
"we have approached the administration in 
a professional, cooperative manner and this 
has opened a lot of doors for us. The 
achninistration knows we are sincere and 
very capable of handling our jobs." 

**You have to realize you are still a 
student and involved in a learning process. 
The administration has been around a long 
time and knows the ins and outs of the 
university. Our main goal is progress for 
FAMU. We respect the chain of command 
and use it whenever possible to get things 
done." 

Fiscal responsibility is also a major goal 
of the Jackson administration. He feels his 
background in business will help. 

"We intend to run a responsible ship — 
to insure that the next administration has 
the financial resources it needs to be 
productive." 

Operating on a $150,000 budget, Jackson 
noted his group has had to scrap some 
major projects due to lack of available 
funds. One was the renovation of the 
projection room in Lee HaD deagned to 
improve the audio quality of movies shown 
there. 

One possibility for this- near future 
inchtdesa IS minute raci^ show on W AMF 
hosted by Nfiss FAMU, broadcatt major 
Robm McKmzie. Jackson noted the show 
will offer students a direct Une of 
communication to student govenmMOt. 



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UNITED MtESK INTCKNATIONAL 



World 



KHURRAMSHAHR. Iraqi-occupied Iran — Iraqi 

forces poised in this shattered city yesterday to take the 
refinery town of Abadan, nine miles to the south, while 
artillery and mortar fire continued to soften up the 
tenacious Iranian defenses. Iranian religious leader 
Ayaiollah Ruhollah Khomeini urged the defenders of 
Abadan, site of the Middle East's largest oil refinery, to 
hold firm. *'Do not allow them, the Iraqis, to come in," 
Khomeini was quoted as saying. 

PEKING — A special court said yesterday it will hand 
down indictments against the Gang of Four this week after 
long delays reportedly caused by the refusal of Mao Tse- 
tung's widow to confess any crimes. 

WILLEMSTAD, Curacao — Three hijackers 
commandeered a Venezuelan DC-9 with 59 persons aboard 
yesterday and ordered it to fly to Cuba, where it landed 
safely after a refueling stop in the Dutch island of 
Curacao, airline officials said. The plane carrying 54 
passengers and five crew in addition to the unidentified 
hijackers, was on a domestic flight from Caracas to Puerto 
Ordaz in southeastern Venezuela when it was hijacked 
shortly after 6:30 a.m. EST. 

MOSCOW — The Soviet Union's top two leaders 
yesterday called for improved relations with the United 
States under a Reagan administration and vowed to avoid 
speeding up the arms race. But premier Nikolai TIkhnov 
warned the president-elect against using force to solve 
international problems, saying, "We cannot but draw the 
proper conclusions for ourselves.'* 



into their homes. Felt and Miller ^ ho were first 
investigated in 1976 and indicted IVi years ago, became the 
first high FBI officials ever to be convicted of a crime 
stemming from their official duties. 

LAROUND — Some black leaders predict Ronald 
Reagan's election will set the civU rights cause back 20 years. 
Minorities across the nation surprised pollsters and the 
candidates oa Election Day by breaking from traditional 
voting patterns. 

NEW YORK — Most of the nation's biggest banks 
yesterday raised their prime rate to 15 V4 percent from 14 '/2 
and analysts say higher interest rates are ''bad news" for 
the economy, especially the housing industry. 

A government report released in Washington yesterday 
showed America's balance of payments picture — by one 
measure — was better this summer than it has been since 
1 976, due largely to a big drop in oil imports. 



State 



Nation 



WASHINGTON — Former top FBI officials W. Mark 
Felt^ «id Edward S. Miller weie conWcted yesterday of 
cons|»ring to approve illegal break-ins in a search for 
fugitive radicals in the early 1970s. A federal jury, following 
8>/i hours of deliberations that started We&Msday, found 
both men guilty of violating the civil rights of friends and 
relatives of Weather Underground members by breaking 



TALLAHA^^^ — The leader of the Rqxiblican HcNise 
bloc, whose numbers were strengthened in Tuesday's 
election, said yesterday it would be foolish of Gov. Bob 
Graham to call a spcdal session next month to ccmsider a 
state gasoline tax increase. Minority Leader Curt Kiser, 
Clearwater, ssad House Republicans want the matter put 
off until the regular session in April when it can be looked 
at along witb other tax issues. 

MIAMB Bob Green, former husband of anti-gay 
crusader Anita Bryant, said yesterday he still loves his ex- 
wife "vrith all my heart*' and has *'no other goal in 
Mfc^than to win her back." But Green, who has generally 
shumied reporters since Bryant filed for divorce last June, 
refused to conunent on recenUy published reports that the 
former beauty queen and sing^ is considering marrying an 
Alabama industrialist. 

WEST PALM KACH — Three youths Fidel Castro 
shipped out of Cuban prisons on the Mariel sealift to 
Florida are being charged with the kidnap, rape and murder 
of a young mother abducted from a Hialeah phone booth 
Monday night, the Palm Beach County sherifTs office said 
yesterday. 




BUY AND SELL 

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Sheets & Pillows 
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The look for Fall is very etc. . 
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now fUagan is savonng his victory, an aide 
^kkot-clccl ii looking forward to a week of 
lus rinch nott week, but "now Uiat the mantle 
jeiicy has desceoded, he's chon^iiiif at the bit 

Ixt be at his ranch near Santa Barbara frooi 
; fijjgy. He will return to Los Angeles for two 
fore heading to Washington to oversee the 
J, Reagan has 



Va., abM 50 wtSkm fraoa the capital and mqt 
Hooie. wmm tht mm from the White 
House, darmg the traosttios. He wiU probaMy make 
several trips bKk to the fioch befdie mkttit office. 

Reagan said he was pn^iared to tid» over the helm of 
fOvciiiiiKiii, hut woidd take no actioB that appeared he 
to do to before tlie Inauguration on Jan . 20. 

K is stiB the prpsidem/* Reagan said. '*We 
are not gomg to httrode. . .this adomiatratlMi is stffl in 
office." 



Night 



from page 1 



• • • 



hard line Democrats and liberals mourned across 
•he mood at Dcmpscy Barron Campaign 
•?rs on Downtown Monroe St. was nothing less 
as supporters sampled boo2e, beer and cold 

^rtrsy of their candidate. 

-used look working across his creased face, the 
*as seemingly wanted cvcrywl^ at once — his 
^ fan^ stepping up to a second floor loft to congratidate 
^ aides hurridly fielding phone calb to the Panhandle 

rcral juggernaut Jack Gordon (D-Miami), 
3j.'-:n frequent opponent on the Senate floor (and 
onaily odd political bedfellow joined the happy 
his ever-dapper appearance lending a touch of 
cptusijaiion to a strictly down-home affair. 



* • 1 



'Hell yes! We drove an the way from Bristol. Wouldn't 
miss this for the world," beamed a North Florida farmer, 
who drove to town with his wife and a friend. "We love 
Dcmpscy. Too bad about Carter though, but. you know, 1 
think the country's about ready for a change.'* 

Meanwhile, across the street at the F&T restaurant, a 
gang of drunken youths could be seen trying to np dowaan 
EliiotMesser campaign sign. They said they were bored. 

But out on the street, the mood was more one of a 
tendency to view Reagan as just another in a lifelong 
succession of miseries. 

**Hdl. I don*t care,** one youth ai Beertown said as he 
dambered into his four-wheel drive pickup. "I've cast my 
vote — for the Bull," he added, gesturing with the brown, 
quart-size bottle. 



Union 



fromfitgel 



gpiice throughout much of the Uinon* but in most places 
Rprooit DO health hazvd. In the food preparation and 
ffviiig area of the Davis' Gold Key ch^ dining room, 
«;ver. water leaking through the roofs has caused 
.Tkking and peeling in the asbestos ceiling. When that 
cncking occurs, according to Safety and Risk Management 
ior John Martin, asbestos may be released mto the air, 
could present a health hazard. In March of this year, 
tia ordered the ceiling of the food preparaticm area in 
Gokl Key Club sealed in thick plastic, and 
RUDaided that the ceiling be replaced as soon as 



possible. Seven moirths litter, the damaged oeQing remains 
in place, seided in protective plastic. 

"We ckm't have the $4,000 to reph^e the ceOing," 
Henderson sdd. "Equally important is that the money for 
the roof has not been foiuKL It would not make any sense 
to fix a ceiling that you knew was goiog to fall apart as a 
result of a leaking roof. " 

Henderscm said that the roofs of Moore and Crenshaw 
will be patched as soon as the university Maintenance Shop 
schedule and the Tallahassee weather allows, probably 
within the next three to four weeks. 




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10 / Friday, November 7, 1980 Florida FlambeiM 




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IN BRIEF 



CARIBBEAN CLUB 

meets tonight at 7 at the 
International Students 
House. 
••POPULATION 

Change and Socio-economic 
development in East 
Africa*' is discussed by Or. 

Simon H. Ominde Monday 
afternoon at 12:15 in 346 
Union. Sponsored by the 
Africa Council. Bring your 
lunch. 

CPE'S "BRFAD 
Baking Class** meets 
Sunday at 3 p.m., at 1012 
Paul Russell Road. Call 877- 
9580 for information. 

"HOW TO BE A 
World Christian without a 
passport" Intervarsity 
Christian Fellowship meets 
tonight at 7 in the Weichelt 
lounge on the second floor 
of the Business Building. 

THE PRE VET CLUB 
holds a dip clinic Sunday 
from 12-3 p.m. at the 
Stadium. 50 cents for 
students, $1 for general 
public. May be cancelled if 
cold weather arises. 

NIGERIAN 
Students. Union meets this 
Sunday at 2 at 185-3 
Crenshaw Drive, Alumni 
Village. 

A FOLLOW-UP 
lecture on Transcendental 
Meditation meets at 8 p.m. 
tonight in 143 Bellamy. 

DR. HEAD SPEAKS TO 
Phi Sigma (Honorary 
Biology) about 
Concupiscence in Clams, 
Saturday at 6 p.m. in 222 
Conradi. 

A FAITH AT WORK 
Day of Discovery meets 
Saturday from 9^ at the 
Holy Comforter Episc(H>al 
Church. To make 
reservations, c^ 385-1005. 

SINGLES FORUM 
this Saturday from 7-10 
p.m.- at the Unitarian 
Church on North Meridian. 
Beer, wine, and cheese social 
hour and discussions on 
token gestures and technical 
vocation. 

CPE AND S.G. FREE 
Midnight Movie Series on 
Saturday in Moore 
Auditorium. Feature fOm is 
"The Three Stooges." 

PEOPLE FOR 
Rational Marijuana Laws 
Benefit at the Lucky 
Horseshoe this Sunday. 
Featuring Red Dog, Sunny 
.Bhie, Ohze, and Torreya. 
Bring your Halloween 
costume or be square. 





^H:r;:zs:u village market rattan 

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m 




E M ^B E R 7 ^ ,1 9 8 0 




4 



i 






Name designers, both big name and foreign, however, have learned one lesson in 
common with Ford and GM; men won't invest in a new style yearly Just to stay au 
courant. According to Jesse Kornbluth in the New York Times, as "designer labels 
become the brand names of this decade, " shoppers will look for high style in thm 
form of durable garments, refined taste, and accomplished tailoring. 

The basic look this season will be based on a looser, smoother cut than in recent 
years. Taking off on the boxy shapes and bold patterns of 30 years ago, European 
designers will offer suits with softened comers and bright colors. 

Words like sophisticated, practical artd classic pop up in description of the new 
trend, but striking mbowm 0f pattern, color and texture add e nnodemist twist to 
timeless fashion. ^ t^.^ .^Meh could easily run 

The center af^ TjL^kia the influence of ^''''''ZS^^^ mwmi fabrics and 
from 

foremost f'^"'"*i2muks of contempoier, dwg/lTW^^^ rBCognizattB 

The price tag ^^''TZMtwIU be end eondortttm. 
colors ^"'^IT^M sport jecket inwoU 'J^^^J^gereted petten, *. 

black and wkita miipIIF"" 

This is definitely the season for sweaters, and a vast array of sty/es and fashions 
will be marketed in the coming months. That leaves plently of room for personal 
teste, and the sweeter and sport Jacket k}ok should prompt some interesting 

combinations. 

Teal, jade and purple colors, as well as patterned sweaters should mark the 80 line. 
Calvin Klein s pullover sweater shirt in wool, angora and nylon {$47. 50) is purple at 
Its most attractive; Alexander Julian 's crew neck in Shetland wool shows what can 
be doite with simple patterns. It's $86. 

of boia col^2Sl^^""""'"*y of - 

•oft *• ttwUmn jZIT""*' '^"""^ —tl - 

Outeryr^Mr mm, uZZ <** K—r. 

exciting took ofJU J^.' <=<"'cer„ in 

They ere cut m '^^7'?"""^'^ <=oets coMJiZ7«Irif! «W 
c/essic trencf, coet^tZm^ZJ" •MmZLi^"^ ^^^^ bnm 



^ithboth 

*^osa look with m 
"^tvidualism in the 



^ huLi^^f^ll^^^^^^^ guidefines 



easyte 



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12 / 



» November 7, 1900 At Wcck*s fM 




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/ 



Women can avoid drab look 



tY DEBORAH HARRINGTON 

Read this or go naked. VVomen will be flaunting a look 
this fall and not themselves. Fashion dictates that women 
turn their backs on the traditional. Those who follow the 
codes of dress to the letter might be surprised. Drab is out. 

The usual dark colors that have been associated with the 
chill in the air at this time of year will be replaced. "The 
colors of this fall look like Easter," according to Susan 
Respess of Kiralfy*s Vogue. They do not look like the past 
winters. 

"The colors for fall and winter are pastels, light purples, 
light greens, yellows, blue, and peach. The sweater styles 
u ill have a softer look, they will have a more feminine look. 
Many seem to be going for the soft angora lambswool a 
lot this year,** stressed Ann Kilenyi of Casual Corner. 

"A lot of sweaters have embroidery on the front in 
pastels. Muted colors, pink, blue, yellow, peach combined 
in skirts with winter white looks good. Gorgeous blouses in 
soft georgette material with peter pan colors are going to be 
big. Cardigans came back in this year,'* explained Respess. 

If skirts aren't bigger than pants then they will be as big. 
There will be a few changes in this category. "People 
will continue to wear pleated pants. They 
are trying to bring in a new style with buttons that open the 
pants down the side," Respess added. 

Remarked Kilenyi, "Baggies are still in, but they are 
modified. The leg is not as full and the pant part itself is not 



as full; it is sort of a tapered baggie.' 

It would take a re-birth of Twiggys and Lulus to promote 
the mini skirt. The death of high heeled shoes has probably 
ended any hopes of thigh length skirts. 

"Mid and low heels are best, especially for casual wear. 
Burgundy is the biggest color. A true brown is not really in, 
more of a wine, or rust will be popular. Preppy shoes. 
Western boots and moccassins are real hot," said Bruce 
FrankUn of Ford Shoe Store. 

"Dresses will be real soft and tlowing. The blazers and 
suit line is popular. Jackets with dresses are in and the 
colors will be red and jade." noted Dons Leeih of Nic's 
Toggery. 

If a new trend starts it will most likely be ones suggested 
by Respess. "Walking shorts in plaids, gray and navy when 
worn with knee socks, Oxford cloth shirt and a sweater tied 
around the neck might be big. Bermuda bags with 
changeable covers arc popular. Monogramming is very big. 
You monogram everything: shirts, sweaters, purses, robes, 
everything. Genuine stone jeweky mixed with the add-a- 

bead is promising.'* 

None of the styles of last fall are completely dead. 
Prepsters will be prevalent, dark colored blazers still give a 
classy look, and though designer jeans are getting cheaper 
and don't carry the same status, they will continue to be 

worn. 

"It is a refreshing look for fall and winter to see such 
bright colors," Kilyeni said. 



FALL 



fniriiti" jj us 

r STUDIO B -/ 

1317 Jackson Bluff Rd. 



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-long quest leads to FSU 

OTHER VOICES 



WiQLVl 

So koyt long have 

s«n here about 
I came here when I 
jgjg f was born in 
nenk.and I lived 
for five years. 
..moved to Austria. I 
[: t Austria in a refugee 
t: for about two years 
jKD came to America 
jKdm New York. 
How did you end up 

It s such a long story 
want to hear the 

f thing? 

'A ell. ve^ 

' )K I 'Acnl to 
J" ! ■,..cr>itv in New 

• ' • A ' uars. and at 

I the second year 
J usuallv have to 

• -hai major they 

ouldn't do that, 
In'i know what 
.'I m\ life was. 
ill>. I needed to lind 
1) identity, what are 
nvidions, what do I 




e That's when I 
d to leave school for a while, and 
' '0 ido out on a search for truth. 

h look mc through a period of, 

a\bese\cn years or so. 
• I 'ned dittercnt life styles, finding 
; in completely different jobs, 
"^n^ involved wiih different people, 
'hai were considered "cool" by 
. : 'i^ple I ike for a girl, you shouid be 
■ ' 1 didn't really like it. 
)i>u mode k'd for a w hile? 
Yeah. Or, for example, it was 
>^ered really cool to be involved in 
nys with the superstars. So I got 
all spiffed up and knocked on a 
door, an address I got out of the 
pages. . . 

TtmmsmNew York? 
Yeah, Vantage Recording Studios. 1 
das a secretary lor the vice president, 
' il»t for six months, found out what 
'•asaUabout. 



SVETLANA SHAGa tkMgk '^Hvml w ke M Ihusim'' is 
gm^/U to Mve m mkmisofiA^ affmitmky. Svctimm, or 
Lam to ker Amgjb-S&xm firkmis, was korm m Siberia to am 
exiled Latriam tmAe r ami a filler wko served m^WUke 
Rassiammmy. Ske'sBvedim the US 20 of her 28 years, ami is 
now stadymg Ej^gUsh at FSU im hopes afteadmm i^eretare 
amdmmmkywMmgalfooliabomlterexperiemees. 

SC: Did you meet any superstars? 
SS: I had an apartment in Greenwich 
Village, with a roommate, and Rod Stewart 
came over to my house. Most arrogant guy 
1 ever met. I didn't like him at all. He came 
with a flittery suit, a glittery hat and jacket, 
but 1 didn't care what he wore, it was the 
attitude I didn't like it very much. 

The first place I got seriously involved 
with was a yoga monastery. Matter of fact, 
there was a sign on the street, right in the 
middle of New York, which was real 
unusual, that said *'Come to know God, 
come to know purity,** and so forth. And 
that was very attractive to me, because I 
saw, looking at most people's relationships, 
most people really mess them up. I had it 
made, 1 had a good job and I got a lot of 
money for it, prestige, lots of boyfriends. 
SC: Living in New York Oty. 



Turn to VOICES, page 14 





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Voices 



from page 13 



SS: Yeah, What more could a person ask for? Yet. deep 
inade, there was an cmptniess. I needed to have the answm 
to these questions. I was going into this yoga monastery 
and damg a lot of selfless service. You know what that is? 
You go into the moiiasury and help them out, just doing a 
lot of jobs, bm you dcm't get paid for it. So finally, they 
said, since you spend so much time here, why don*t you 
just come and move in, be with us. I said, OK, why not? I 
Uved a leal monastic, real ascetic kind of life for two years. 
Basi<adiy, 1 didn't talk to anybody Ibr two years. I was the 

only girl there, the rest were ai guys with shaven heads. I was 
going to cut my hair all off, but they just said no, just cut it 
really short, as a kind of purification thing. I just worked 
on a Hmdu scripture book for two whole years. 

SC: After that it vm the Moonks, right? 

SS: Weil, I felt 1 had learned all I could in the 
monastery. My goal is always to search for the truth, and I 
prayed to Ood, send me something or somebody. Tint's 
when I met someone from the Unitarian Church. I heard 
their divine principle, and 1 was convinced it had a logical 
lustoricBl perspective, culminating with Rev. Moon. . . 

The last session I had was as a dancer in the International 
Folk Ballet Company, which was also sponsored by Rev. 
Moon. In the very end, I twisted my ankle, so I couldn't 
perform, so for the first time I had the opportunity to think 
about things. Help, that's what Ithought,he^, seriously. I 
had a sbter in Fort Lauderc^le, and a year pricH' to that sl^ 
had become a Christian, and she Was writing me, asking me 
to come visit, but vacations aren't heard of in the 
Unification Church. But my mom said if you &> visit her, 
ril pay your way down there. Coming down to FlcMida, I 
was introdiK:ed to Christianity. At first, I thought it was 
totally illogical. But the evidence shows it to be true as 



opposed to the other faiths, and particularly to the 
Unification Church that 1 was in. I called the Unification 
Church in New York, and naturally their response was., 
why don't you come up here, we'll investigate it together, 
and I said, no way. 1 finally decided to accept Chnstianiiy 
as the truth. 

SC: Did you finally find that truth you were looking for? 

SS: Exactly. And I'm at a point right now where I'm 
open. If somebody comes up and disproves Christianity to 
be the one that has the most evidence as the truth, I'm 
open, because I think the truth always could be challenged. 

. .Rod Stewart came over to my house 
(in Greenwich ViliageK Most arrogant 
guy I ever met. I didn't like him at all. . • 
it was the attitude' i 



SC: Do you remember being'in Russia? 

SS: I rcmcmbor, I was v»y young, we had a log cabin, 
with a b^ metid stove. My mom would be the first one to 
wake up, and she would have to bcHi water so it would be 
warm enough for the rest of us to get up. I remember richng 
in the snow, being pulled along by dogs, Huskies, I guess, 
^bman Huskies. 

SC: Is your herUa^stHl important to yemf 

SS: Oh, vcty. I was raised up is a very Rusaan 
conmiunity in New Ycnrk, and even now my family still 
speaks Kussian. I'm very proud of being Russian, not 
commuittst, but of the Rusna before the takeover, before it 
l>ecame the USSR. 



Renowned harpsichordist to perform 



FROM STAFF REPORTS 

In the world of harpsichordists, the name of Kenneth 
Gilbert is spoken with hushed reverence. The master of 
this unique instrument, veteran of engagements with fine 
symphonies throughout the western world, brings his very 
special talent to the Music School North Recital Hall 
tonight at 8:15. 

A distinguished teacher and scholar, Gilbert is both 
academician and musician. Besides his many symphonic 



appearances he has performed chamber music with the 
likes of Alfred Deller and Jean-Pierre Rampal. He has. 
taught at conservatories in Montreal and Antwerp and is 
conducting two workshops at FSU this month. Tonight's 
recital is a rare chance for the general public to see and 
hear this renowned artist. 

Tickets for the show are available at the Fine Arts 0ox 
Office. ' 



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THEA TRE 



Friday, November 7. 1990 / 13 



aergetic song and dance 
Uk production of ^Grease' 



Bv ^T^:v^: dollar 

.<ncf$ hyped on Robert Stigwood's 
ffston of Orease may be a bit 
rtJ wficn they sec Second Stage 
s rendition of Broadway's longest 

rylocil theatre group has taken the 50s 
i ind adapted it for the limited space 
lamiBy's Deep South Music Hall, where 
Lp«*»ction runs for the next three 

)(fMor I c Wilhelm and musical 
Isjax Diane Hoblit promise to remain 
.ftc!hc Broadway original, smoothly 
I jtsfTping the creative promises necessary 
j^t Urease, the film, a star vehicle for 
« Travolta and Olivia New ton- John. 
'V actual structure of the play is not 
: *crcnt from the film,", explains 
lislfci. "but the music will be. The movie 
. -ivc diHO sound and we're going for 
rcai Misled." 
* '^'-^ ind Hoblit have already enjoyed 
jva-ss using 50s musical forms in 
a//cd up version of Everyman, 
hidua-d hy Studio 1 heat re last year, 
"l ie on a shoestring budget, they put 
i;' orieina! musical extravaganza 
. ..J !hc spirit ot Cicne Vincent with 
h. medieval allegory. 

"I'sc, the material they, and 
:.cr Jim Sturgell, work with in 
^ .iiivihiiiL' but crusty. The script 
■ a well nni ruled mix of song, dance 
^eiie, and this production, explains 
"c.:;, Miould burst with energy. It will 
f a special emphasis on movement — 
I '^iJ onstage and off — as well. 
'If you're puritanical, you ain't gonna 
-It." he laughs. "It's a very physical 
r sometimes fairly suggestive. But I 
^!'t want to say it*s too suggestive. People 
^4^1 come for that and be disappointed.*' 
*ilWin, Hoblit and Sturgell, who were 
N from outside the Second Stage milieu, 
piifumg to capture the verve and vigor of 
^ 505 music and their youth-oriented 
'*^t. and then turn it loose on the 




DeLane Matthews as cheerleader 
Patty 

"One thing I like about the play is the 
music — it's so exciting. A lot of what we'll 
be trying to do is get across that energy on 
stage. We've been real lucky in that 
everyone in the cast (which includes nearly 
30 members) has good voices. It should be a 
lot of fun," Hoblit says. 



The Second Sti^ prodmrtiOB Gnme 
coatinacs toaight throagh Saaday at 
Toauay's Deep Soath Mask IfoH. The 
sliow starts af 7 p.ai. Adateioa is $3.50. 
Grease will also eoatlaac for the two 
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16 / Friday, November 7, 1980 FhondM 



MTWEBtSEMU 

CALENDAR ~^ 



BY VICKI ARIAS 

FLAMBK At STAFF WRITES 

HAPPENINGS 
UPO's Duck Run, 5,000 meters around 

FSU campus, happens this Sunday morning 
at 10. Register in 318 Union, entry fee is $4 
and includes a T-shirt, free beer and a duck 
card if you cross the finish line. 

School of Music presents Kenneth Gilbert, 
harpsichord, and keyboards, tonight at 8:15 
in Music School North. Sunday features 
Roger Drinkall, cello, in a faculty recital 
with Alan Thomas on piano. Performance 
starts at 8:15 p.m. inOpperman Music Hall. 

Grease, a Second Stage Production, plays 
tonight, Saturday, and Sunday at Tommy's. 
Doors open at 6:30 and admission is $3.50. 

Grease, a Second Stage Production, plays 
tonight, Saturday, and Sunday at Tommy's. 
Doors open at 6:30 and admission is $3.50. 

LeMoyne Art Gallery presents Richard 
Smidt, local painter, today, Saturday and 
Sunday. Gallery hours are Tuesday through 
Saturday 10-5 p.m. and Sunday 2-5 p.m. 

FOUR ARTS GALLERY CONTINUES 
their faculty art show through November 14. 
Gallery hours are Tuesday-Friday 10-4 p.m. 
and Saturday and Sunday 1 -4 p.m. 

MUSIC 

Ricco's: Barbara Winfield and Spare 
Time, tonight and Saturday, top 40 rock and 
country, and comedy, no cover. 

Tommy's: B B Jam, rock and roll, tonight 
and Saturday. 

Lucky Horseshoe: Midnight, variety rock, 
tonight and Saturday; Sunday, Benefit for 
The People for Rational Marijuana Laws, 
Sunny Blues, and more. 

Bullwinkles: Slapstick, rock and roll, 
tonight and Saturday; in the Beer Garden, 



Julie Howard, acoustk guitir; Smday, The 

Rolling Mother's Review, rock and roU folk. 
Alley: Del Suggs, salt water music, tonight 

and Saturday, no cover. 

Maxim's: The Blackmen Brothers, jazz, 
tonight and Saturday, no cover. 

Do>^nunder: Azwon, jazz rock, tonight 
and Saturday, $1 students, $2 non-students. 

FLICKS 

Moore Auditorium: Kramer vs. Kramer, 
7:30, 9:30; Jimi plays Berkley, 11:30; 
Saturday, Allegro Non Troppo, 7:30, 9:30, 
The Three Stooges, free, midnight. 

Capital Cinemas: It's My Turn (R) 3:15, 
5:15 (Sat . , Sun .) 7: 1 5 . 9: 1 5 ; T/ie >1 wakening 
(R) 3, 5:10, (Sat., Sun.) 7:20, 9:30; Xanadu 
(PG) 1:10, 3:10, 5: 10 (Sat.. Sun.) 7:10, 9:10; 
Private Eye (PG) 1,3,5, (Sat . , Sun . ) 7 , 9. 

Miracle: The Special Edition of 
Encounters of the Third Kind (PG) 2:30, 5, 
(Sat., Sun.) 7:30, 10; Ordinary People {K) 2, 
4:30, (Sat., Sun.) 7, 9:30; Elephant Man 
(PG) 2: 15, 4:45, (Sat . , Sun.) 7:15, 9:45. 

Northwood Mall: Sound of Music (G) 2, 5 
(Sat., Sun.) 8 

Tallahassee Mall: Border Line (PG) 1:45, 
3:45, 5:45, (Sat., Sun.) 7:45, 9:45; Squeeze 
Play, 1 :30, 3:30, 5:30(Sat., Sun.) 7:30, 9:30. 

Parkway Five: Battle Beyond the Stars 
(PG) 1:30, 3:30, 5:30, (Sat., Sun.) 7:30, 9:30; 
Big Brawl (R) 1:30, 3:30, 5:30 (Sat., Sun.) 
7:30, 9-M\ He Knows You're Aone {K) 1:45, 
3:45, 5:45 (Sat., Sun.) 7:45, 9:45; Long 
Riders{R) 1:45, 3:45, 5:45 (Sat., Sun.) 7:45, 
9:45; Emanuelle Around the WorIdiX)l:45, 
3:45, 5:45 (Sat., Sun.) 7:45, 9:45, 

Varsity: Private Benjamin (R) 2:30, 4:45, 
(Sat., Sun.) 7, 9:15; Motel Hell (R) 3:15, 
5: 15, (Sat., Sun.) 7: 15, 9: 15; D/vi/ie AfacfAiess 
(R) 3:30. 5:30(Sat.. Sun.) 7:30, 9:30. 




GRADUATE NURSES 
JANUARY 19, 1981 



A very important Dote 
TO Rememberi 

MEMORIAL HOSPITAL Is a wefl-respecttd, ftM 

service acute care f acilitv with future plans of ex- 
pansion. To further ensure the success of our 
career nursing staff, we have implemented a 
highly comprehensive and personalized INTERN- 
SHIP PROGRAM. Ttiis 3 month program Is designed 
to provide the Cfadiiate Murse witri maxlimim at- 
posure to the medical field while allowing for ac- 
celerated career and personal growth. Our next 
program starts on January I9th and then again in 
May of 1 981 . Also, Full Time positions avaiiaDle for 
RNS and LPNS. 

For further information on enrollment and other 
positioris available, and on our liberal salaries. 
Denefits and stUf t availability, can coiiea or write 

TO: 

Laurie Blough. R.N.. Nurse Recr uite r 

(815) 955-1401 



MEMORIAL HOSPITAL 

1901 Amnion St • Sarasota, Florida 33579 

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Dining in style 

BY KENNKTH WEST 

Gourmet dining and cooking is not gorging on food tad 
rattling pots and pans; it is an art, a science, a cultural 
experience, and a damn good business. 

China was the theme Oct. 30, at the Little Dinner Series, 
presented twice weekly by the School of Hotel and 
Restaurant Management. Candles fit the way into the lobby 
of the Seminole Dining Room, where "ortental" dad waiters 
enticed guests with sumptuous trays of Chinese hors 
d'oeuvres and J you — a plum wine punch. ^ - 

"Each dinner, the menu and the production arc orgamaed 
by a team interested in that particular theme, and the rest of 
the class is the production crew,'* said Don Lydon. 
president of the Society of Hosts, "It is just like running a 
restaurant with gourmet cooking. The students do 
everything." 

"The class also emphasizes wines wad ^iquette for 
serving and dinmg," Lydon explained. "Each production 
team organizes the menu, arranges the finances, and 
reports to the class about the customs of the country they 
do." 

The FSU program luis 38S students involved and is 
ranked third nationally, behind Cornell and Michigan 
State, according to director Ashley Stiff, who teaches the 
class responsible f€>r preparing the Little Diiuier Series. 

After an opening course of eggdr<H> soup came the sweet 
and sour shrimpy served with hot tea. And then the 
entree... marinated beef slices with Chinese vegetables, 
c<riorfully served over a steaming bed of rice, 

"We're placing virtually 100 percent of aU our students 
in good paying jobs, with three or four offers per student," 
Stiff saki. 





Table setting for the Unle Dinner Series 

*'The hotel industry is hurting for people," added 
Lydon. The field is wide open; the question is who do i 
want to work for instead of who can I work for." 

The Little Dinner Series is presented twice weekly each 
quarter by the students of the School of Hotel and 
Restaurant Management. Partisans pay $35 at the 
beginning of the quarter and feastone night a week, either 
Tuesday or Thursday. 




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• Steaks 

Mag your omn 
Booze & Ice Clieet 

576-2325 



An FSU Tradition for 20 years 




SaLrina puts 

7 jfs of 
experience in 
staling for joiUo 



Sakrii 
tk Model 
Vicki 



Adam&B/e „ 

CampusHauplace 




FSU Union 844-1848 



8-6 M -F 

9 «»4 Sal. 



look Great... 
Slay Warm..^ 

F00I lib a O 

mlU'm bucks! ^ a 



•sklwear 

HIUMMT 




92i w. Tkarit SL 

386-6214 





FORD SHOES 




177^7 




firiiif , Noireiiibcr 7. 19i0 / if 





CD 



■YCHHISMIOCKMAN 

n AMIFAI SPORTS EDITOB 

»JU TV . Chaimel 27. Cable 4 

"'^ final score in Saturday's Florida 
* Virginia Tech footbaU game is 3-0, it 

surprise many people. 
^ into the 3:45 p.m., regionally 
*wj^baitle between the third-ranked 
^*«>fcand the unranked, but bowl bid 
•'Py, Fighting Gobblers in Doak 
*l*«ll Stadium, it looks like the 
^' 'oe of FSU's Bill Capece, the 
liurd highest scorer, or the right 



foot of Tech*s Dennis Laury could decide 
the crucial contest. 

So far this season, in sevm victories taid 
two defeats, the Mokies have never given 
up more tlma 18 points to a dngle 
opponent and are now tied wMi Pittsburgh 
as the naticm's top team io total defease. 
But the Seminoles, who have given up just 
12 points in the past three games and have 
two shutouts to thdr credit, wSI prove to 
be no pushovers on defense, ddier, where 

Tm to DEFENSE, page 23 





GET T2£ gfiUM £VER Y DAY 

MAM'S 10 KARAT m-$m 
LAON» 10 KARAT 

AND IN A00nX)N TO THE HKiNiOT mHU IN TOWN 




r 



$2 $2 

GOOD FOR ONE 
TWO-DOLLAR BILL 

WITH SALE OF CLASS RING 

^2 COiXfCTOirS QUAMTBIS 



CUP 
THIS AD 
& EXCHANGE 
FOR A REAL 

$2 BILL 
WHEN YOU 
SELL YOUR 
CLASS RING 



COLLECTOR'S QUARTERS, iNC. 



PARKWAY SHOPPING CENTER 



87S-4115 



M-ta 0:304^30 




will be the key Saturday 





18f»li 



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popeye's scores 



Again 



4 piece chicken dinner and beverage; get FREE 

your choice of Popeye's Famous cool Bt creamy 
cole slaw or Popeye's Famous 
homemade haice beans. 




error good thru 

nDv.is.i9ao 
491 W. Teilfl, 

(comer of Mlacomb) 



FAMOUS 

FIMEO 
CmCKEN 



FREE 




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ill u mm 




20 / Frkfaiy^rNovembcr 7, 1980 Flonit 

Gold Bowl bid up f oj: grabs tonight 

B\HAVNfcDEAS 
rLAMKAi NPorrswMm 

Tonight at 8 p.m. in Dcnk Campbei 
Sudium, the 3-4 Florida AAM Rattkrs will 
be playing for none than just the sake of 
respectability against the powerful 6-2 
North Carolina AAT Aggies. 

"We will be playing for a bid in the Gold 
Bowl which is held annually in Rtchroond, 
Virginia on the sixth of December." said 
Rattler head coach Rudy Hubbard. '^Our 
guys have improved every game and a Gold 
Bowl bid would be a great uplift and would 
keep enthusiasm high for next year." 

But North Carolina may prove to be too 
big of a hump for the Rattlers to surmount 
ot reach that post-season glory. Also in the 
thick of things in the Gold Bowl 
competition, the Aggies are tied for second 
in the MEAC conference with a 2-2 record 
and need a win to keep any post-seascm 
hopes ahve. 

••They are going to be tough," said ^ r> a m mwt j 

Hubbard. "Esiiecially their mtmim SwOFMng FAMU uefeilSeswroundsru^ 
game." 

Running is just what the Aggies do best as thdr back 
fidd has chewed up an average of 540 yards per back . That 
includes the quarterback position also, as senior 
quarterback William Watson has rushed for 549 yards cm 
the year as well as thrown for over 30D yards and 5 
touchdowns. 




Photo by Jm Burtwnk 



"Watson is definitely the person we have to stop,'* said 

Hubbard. 

However Watson, who also has a 60 yard touchdown run 
on the year, is joined by bulling fullback Charlie Sutton 
and quick tailback Wayman Pitts. Their rushing totals are 
490 and 529. respectively. 

Seeking to counter the Aggies awesome running game, the 
Rattlers will field a much improved offense lead by 

sophomore quarterback Nathaniel Koonce. Koonce has 



thrown for over 300 yards on the season and instiBs 
tremendous confidence in the team, Hubbard revealed. 

••We're very pleased with how fast he has developed," 
said Hubbard. ••He is now given more freedom to call his 
own offensive plays and run our type of offense." 
' Another player Hubbard said to keep a close watch on is 
senior flanker Bobby Hawkins. Hawkins has caught ony 12 
passes this year but has a 25.8 yards per catch average. 
Earlier in the season against Albany State Hawkins grabbed 
a 74 yarder, which demonstrates his ability to make the iMg 
play. 

With the vast amount of offensive weapons on the field, 
FMU's Gold Bowl hopes might be a matter of who gets th 
ball last. Nonetheless if the Rattlers are defeated, which will 
put an end to any bowl hopes, there still remains an 
optimistic attitude among the team. 



BY WAYNE DEAS 

FLAMBEAU SPORTS WRITER 

Upsets! Bowl picture 
changes. UpsetsI Bowl 
picture changes! 

Yep folks, that's been the 
rule in this year's quest for 
the number one ranking in 
college football. Three 
weeks ago it was then third- 



FLAMBEA U PICKS 



ranked Texas getting Pearl 
Harbored by SMU 20-6. 
Then it was second-ranked 
use caught in a 7-7 web at 
Oregon. 
And last week it was a 



ridiculous case of America's 
childhood pastime game of 
Follow the leader. Number 
one ranked Alabama led the 
charge in falling flat on its 
face in a touchdownless 6-3 



loss to Mississippi State. 
Keeping up with the rules of 
the old but enjoyable game, 
Number Two, UCLA and 
North Carolina and Baylor, 
six and ten, respectively, all 
bit the dust rn the scorching 
turf of the NCAA's Sahara, 
the losing column. 
Turn to PICKS, page 24 





' "I'tiiiniifiiiiii : 



'If You want Genuine, Home-made 
Italian Food . . .You can fly to Italy 
or Drive to Mom & Dad's. 



It 



-Nino Violanle 




Ttolto n RettauraHt 



417S Apakxrhee Parkw«iy/U.& 27 Soulh/Sh milas EcM ol Ccviiol 
HoucK Spim -Hp m /QaMdllonckxys. 

•7>4Ssa 



New & Used Bicycles 

Parts ^Accessck\es^Serv\ce 

FUJI-NISHIKI- WINDSOR-LOTUS 

Rainbow Specials 

12 spd Lotm Excdlte $233.- 
10 8ped Windsor Carrera $247.— 
M spd Windsor International $216— 
ML Alloy Equipped wMi Quidi 
Release Wheels 

631 W. Tenn. St. (across from Bullwinldes) 

1021 Hr« ''^ ^ 30 Mop^^* 



. t I. \ 




FRIDAVS SPECIAL 

Buy a soft ice cteaa cone 

GET ONE FR££ 

1528 W. Tennessee 2224714 
Ask about Satunlay's SpacU 



REWARD 



Be on the lookout for 
sensuous new fashions for me 
hard to fit young woman. Last 
seen at the Lots to Love Shopr 
Northwood Mall, Tallahasset. 

Fashions will be arfned with 
dangerous appeal for young 
men, and loaded with good 
looks up to size 52. 

Reward is based upon your 
decision to capture these good 
looks yourself at the Lots to 
Love Shop. 



0^ 

V»;;\s /• • 



are 



ONE OF THE NEWEST TRENDS IN Of 
IS THE NATURALS" AND WE H A\ F THi. 

• SILK FlOWBS 



PANS 



• BURSTS 

• WKATMSan^'^ 

Stop in soon and we ll ^^ow you -'^^ ^. 
easy it is to make your own d«o» ^ 
rangements using The Naturals - . 
tions you will be proud to display 
home or to give as gifts! 

HaralsonATtJ 
^ crafts 

Governor^Square 
877-2097 



Cfl€ftTIVt IDtflS 



"1 r 



Fr.* 



Sr. 




FECIAL 

|creain cooe 
FREE 

222^14 

ly's Special 



lookout for 
hions for the 
woman. Last 

to Love Shop, 

f Tallahassee, 
le armed with 

I for young 
id with good 
• 

led upon your 
Ire these good 
the Lots to 



\ 




i 



r 



NDSINPrrORATiNC 
b WE HAVE THEN< ALL 



wort 

you ^"l" 

own decorative af 
I i .o display io y*'"' 

jsonATt^ 
iiit crafts 

rernor's square 

^-2097 



.^..ry,^;-^ (v)i<fT' -'21 



iator sports center opening postponed U^^iln) 



.pa rs at the new StqAeo O'ComieU 
' be finiflwd by Dec. 6. the 
of Florida Thursday said it has 
home bwketball opener against 
on that date ta StaikviUe, Miss, 

,ani to showcase our new era in 
« ynd^r coa. h Norm Sloan in a new and 
fjahiv." Honda Athletic Director Bill 
i In order to avoid any complications 
,^:ficr or not O C onncll Center wiB be ready 
3k 6. *e ha^f adjusted the schedule." 
ordi traded sites with Mississippi State, 
Lito scheduled to play the Gators at 
t/twBeFcb 28 That game now will be played 
^ville instead. Carrsaid. 



Last week a report hy state-hired 
consolmt. Lev Zetliii, of New York, revealed the 
cj uncme of additkmot stmctml defecu in the 
Sttpporto of four huge air ducts that bold up the 
teflon-coated roof and in a beam underneath a 
walkway in the pod area. 

Bary Koepke, UF associate director of planning 
and analysis, said there was no way that the 
repair plans could be drawn, a contractor hired 
and the work completed before Dec. 6. 

The Dec. 6 opening date was the latest in a 
series of missed completion dates, which began 
with Scpicmber 1979. Since then, the $12.8 
million coliseum has had to undergo more than 
$1 million in repairs. No estimate of the cost of 
repairiuL' the latest deficiencies has been given yet. 

Workmen are rebuilding 24 under-designed 



beans, wlBcb support 
12,00CKseai iMfity. 



upper level seats ai the 



At one point, university officials had 
considered going ahead with the Mississippi State 
game at the coliseum, and roping off the affected 
seating areas. But Canr said that idea was re/ected. 

••We do not want to start a new era of Florida 
basketball under adverse conditions," he said. 

State officials have said they intend to go to 
court to try to recover the cost of building repairs. 
The bubble-shaped, multi-purpose structure, 
which was named after a former UF president, 
was designed by the New York architectural firm 
of Cicigcr Berger and built by Dyson and Co., of 
Pensacoia. 



OR. AUAM O. DEAM 



AMKHMTNMEMfTO 





Today^i Kbur Last Chance 



your favorite ArtCarved class ring. Cut it out. 
^ It with you tor a while. Get an idea what it*s 
' ro own the ring that says, "1 did it!" 
Then. have the j^enuine article hrted by the Art- 
vevi representative visiting campus r^xlav. You'll 
vHir newest selection ot rinj^ srvles to chixise 
om — arij ^ specialist who will make sure the 
f perfect. Plus, there are some incredible Art- 
^-*rvevl otters to cut the cost of your class ring . . . 



CUT your ties with the past during our "Great 
Ring Exchange!" Trading your old lOK gold high 
school ring for a new ArtCarved college ring could 
save v(^u as much as $90. 

CUT the cost of a traditional or contemporary 
Siladium ring to just $79.95 — a special ArtCarved 
"Rii« Week" discount up to $20. 

CUT a smashing figure with a women's class rmg 
from our exciting new "Designer Diamond CoUec- 

lion.** 



Any u/a> yuu cut it, xoda-^ is tfce hot day to select ^oiir AnCarwed doss 

/IKRTIRVED 

^COLLEGE RINGS 

. . . SYhfflOUZING yOUR ABflJTY TO ACIffiVE. 




or VBA 



Nov. 3-7 U al wrt t y Ihdoa 

© AitCwved 





XMNEROF 
TENNESSEE 

222*1227 

STUDENT DISCOUNT CARD 

^ICK ONE UP TODAY 

10% Off 

ON )VLL PARTS 
* LABOR WITH 

THIS AD. 
Foreign cars tool 

PLEASE BR ma AO 



m ■ 




a ^iP^' 



jf 4 • 



» • 



22 / Friday, November 7, 1980 floriia 



lassified Ads 



Aoofii Sn Union, OpenTAjT*, 
MM^iS^f noon the dav bffo^^ 



■0 



I 






I ^1 





TWO VA TECH FSU TICKETS $15 
EACH OR BEST OFFER. ON THE 
45YD LINE! 222 5461 



TWO VA. TECH FSU TICKETS $15 
EACH OR BEST OFFER OM THE 
45YD LINE! 222 54«1!!! 

GARAGE SALE SMALL WASHER~& 
DRYER SINGLE MATTRESS MISC. 
ITEMS SAT. 9 5 816 PIEDMONT. 

tOSE 901 SERIES IV SPEAKERS W/ 
CHROME STANDS, SASO/PAIR 316- 
7757. 

Own your own honne 5 mi W. of FSU. 
Furnished mobile home on 1.6A in 
quiet neighborhood; 1 Br, 1 bath, 
large LR, lots of storage space. 10 x 
20 covered wood deck. 2 utility 
buildings; one has a washer. On Sand 
Rd. 150 yd N. of Sullivan Rd. $15,000. 
Open house Sun 1-5 pm. Call 57^-5758 
for more information. 

TWO TICKETS TO THE VA. TECH 
VS. FSU GAME. CALL, 644 4324. 



Le» Paul custom Mack 1 yr old with 
hard shell case $550. Call Mark in 
Havanna 1-539-5782. 



Firewood-Split your own and save! 
125. per Vt ton truckload. Cut into 
length, many wmi^ mwd spUttiNf. 
Call 877-5504.'** 

Naughahide couch corner with coffee 
table. 11 ft. long good condition. 877- 

7596 $100 



2 VIRGINIA TECH FSU TICKETS. 
CALL LEE 222-7192. 

Make your reservations now. Tharpe 
St. Market 8i Flea Market booths by 
the Day. Week or Month. Buy-Sell 
Trade. Reservations 224-5590 or 385- 
4661. 900-924 W. tharpe St. 



COUPONS 2 V. TECH 2 UF. 224-3126. ' 

1 FSU/ U OF F. COUPON. 
$40. CALL 644-6130. 

Small stereo with 8-track, record 
player and AM/FM radio $50 or best 
•ffar. Call after 2pm , 575^1935. 

For Sale Conn trombone. Excellent 
condition $150, One FSU-UF ticket, 
•ast aftor. Call M4-TS87, MManMf. 

jei736"sPEAKERS EXC. COND. $300 

PR. 222 1375. 

TWO Florida FSU l"iCKETS for 

SALE. LAST CHANCE. CALL 644- 
6930 ASK for EDDIE. 

2 FSU— UF COUPONS 

REDEEMABLE TUES. $50 EA. 576 
W61 AFTER 5 PM. 

ONE FLAt-UF coupon. MUST 
SELL BEFORE WEEKEND 
REASONABLE PRICE. CALL NOW 

224 3712. 



for sale Need cash irrimediately 
Canon AT 1 Camera, 50rnm lens plus 
case perfect condition $200 or best 
offer. 

JVC stereo, AAA/FM radio, turntable & 
receiver iMus 2 speakers. 
Bi9 5 drawer walnut desk with file. 
Call 222-2971 after 4pm. 



U.F coupon 
r td e em able on Tuesday !! !Bast Offer 

385 1471 after 6pm. 



FSU UF COUPON $70. CALL 224-1863 
EVEN. 



Nov. Cat Moden $130 
Leeclex Monitor $115 
Zenith tr*, RF mad. 
6085. 



Carroll 644- 



2 Fia. Fla. State coupons for sale. 
Redeemable on Tuea. CaH 2S6-77Mand 

make me an offer. 

2I1 FSU/UF coupons Tuesday pickup' 
$50 each or baa* offer. S75-M44 or B4-, 
4299. 

FOR SALE— TWO COUPONS WHICH 
CAN BE TURNED IN ON TUES. FOR 
THE UNIV. OF FLA GAMCtlMFOR 
PAIR. CALL 222 4528. 

FINEiK>Um^PPIES ^ 

HAVE YOUR PICK OF LITTER. 

PH. 224-3854. t 



for the cold weather! 
Hardly ¥iiom, heavy ^ length gray 
suede coat, quilted lining, women's 
size 13 New was S120, asking $60. 644- 
4075 before 5pm ask for Laurie. 



Bar tloolt for $ale In grMl cowditiOP. 
Make offer 575^3726. 

coupons for U of F Bama Twat. 
pickup $100 for pair finiif Call irfter 

4pm 877 0817. 



10 spaad I'^h inch red Pudi CavaWar 
witfi rad fenders, all alioy parts, quick 
release hubs, toe clips, new chain and 
rear tire, fur seat. Only tIfS. Call eves. 
576 4261 or cenie by MuncMa Wataiiifi 
Union daytime. 

In Leon County Special Land Sale 4 
miles south of truck route on Oak 
Ridge Road 3 acre tracts 1850 acre 10A 
tracts 1650 acre, 20 to 40 acre tracts 
1S00 per acre, terms: 13% down Syr. at 
12% interest 

JimmyBoyntonRealt/ phone 222 7581 
After hours 576 3874 for Ben Boynton 



ATTENTION 
TRYOUTS FOR NEW DANCE 

' OOUP 
,_-v^..^EN GIRLS 
To perform at FSU basketball games 
need to have dance background and be 
a registered FSU female student 
WHEN. TUES. NOV. 1lttl-4:00PM 
and SUN. NOV. 1Mtl-2:0e PM 
WHERE: TULLY GYM 
both try out dates are compulsory 
wear clothes to dance in (stwrts, etc.) 
INFORMATION : 644-3080,644 3484. , 



Need cash? Got any baseball cards or 
other trading cardt to tall? Call 

Larry 991 3873 



Raleigh Grand Sport 10 speed men's 
bike $100 Panasonic sa 40 fm stereo 
receiver $30, Call Jace 877 4395 




\vn Vaga auto, trans. A/C. Excallant 

condition. $700. Mike 224 3409 



Classic car '45 Plymouth Valiant 
convertible, slant 6 engine, runs good. 
Needs body work. $400- or best oHar. 
C«N Jeff 644 «S77. 




PARTY SPOT FREE FOR 1 MONTH 
SUBLET PRINCE MANOR LARGE 
BEDROOM OPTIONAL 
FURNITURE. CALL SOON 576-6428. 

Sublet 1 bdr furn. apt. $210 month & 
elec. pool, laundry, cable tv. 2 blocks 
from FSU . Need to lease for Dec. or 
Jan. to June. Parfcwood Apt. 224-2180. 

1 BDRM APT. TO SUBLET. UNFUR. 
POOL TENNIS. CLOSE TO FSU. 
$195. 576 9389 AFTER 5. 



1 BEDROOM FURNISHED 
COTTAGE N. DUVAL ST. $100 MO. 
$50 DEPC^T. CALL 3B5-9«43 AFTER 
6 PM. 



Sublet furnished 2 bdrm house wtr qtr 
frplace, washer/dryer $250/mo. & 
$100 refundable deposit. 877 7386. 



2 bedroom, 2 bath apt. ideal for 2 or 3 
people. tt55 mo. partially furn. Tal. 
Mall area. 386-4422. 




Wanted: 2 FSU UF tickets. Will pay 
any reasonable price. 576-7205 day or 
night. 



WANTED LIVE IN HELPER FOR 
DISABLED GRAD STUDENT. YOUR 
OWN ROOM. CALL DM^iNG DAY 
488 7962 EVENINGS 224-1516. NEED 
MATURE PERSON. 

Roommate wanted male or female. 

One bedroom house 3 blocks behind 
Sweet Shop 708 St. Augustine Apt. 1. 
$75 a mth. '/2 utilities. See or leave 
message for Allan at the Omni Rest.. 

after 1. 



Fm roommate wanted own room in 3 
bedroom apt. one block from campus 
$91 plus one third util. Call 222 1521. 

FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED 
FOR W/S QUARTERS 2 BEDROOM 
FURN. APT. $172JQ/MONTH PLUS 
ELEC. CALL 576-3530 ASK FOR 
CAROLYN. 



Female roommate wanted to sublet a 
1 bedroom at Colony Club. Rent will 
be $110 per month apt. furnished. 
Good location on the sundeck 
overlooking a pool. Call 224-7311. 

Female roommate to share 2 bdr 
unfurnished duplex. No pets near 
tampM$117J0ii util. after 6. 386-4309. 

Fm rm needed share 1 br apt. Plaia 
Apts. $105 monthly plus Vi utilities. 
Caft2S2-19M. 



WANTED, COUPONS FOR THE FLA 
STATE U OF F FOOTBALL GAME! 
WtLLItIG TO PAY. CALL 9A-743S 
MORN.ORNITE. 

N^b 6 TICKETS FOR FSU FLA 
CALL 222 5954 8:30-5:30 TAKE ANY 
RE ASON ABLE O F F E R . 



Kenwood TX 620 tape castatia deck 



Male roommate Winter & Spring 
qrtrs. $97. 50/ month 8. 'y^ utilities. I blk. 
from campus. PhonaAl at224-S80i. 

Ticket coupons needed "for 
virg. tech. game nov. 8. $10 per 

COUPON. CALL 599 9538. ASK FOR 
BRIAN OR LEAVE NAME ti 



OORMSIZE RUGS 
DOITTLET YOUR FEET FREEZE! 



2 END TABLE LAMPS. FLORaO 

DESIGN IN EXCELLENT 
COtlDITION. CAU.575-0291 5^9 PAA. i 

— ' »— — . ■ . i. 



CASTIN« . 
TV AMD FILMS. 
PROFESSIONAL AND 
•i088m>PeSSIONAU AU. A»ES. 
tS-lS AN HOUR. CALL CA8IOACK AT 
f-6, M-F 



y > » 



' 4 li 4 



-L-L4-. 



4 



i 



Overseas Jobs- Summer/Year round. 
Europe, S. Ama.« Australia, Asia. All 
Fields. S500- $1200 monthly. 

Sightseeing. Free Info. Write: IJC 
Box 52 FL5, Corona Dei Mar, Ca. 
92625. 



Models needed for fashion/figure 
modeling. No experience necessary. 
Write Three G. Photography P.O. Boac 
12602 Tallahassee, Fl. mn. 




FLIGHT INSTRUCTION 

Jeff Ryder FAA Certifted 

222-6527 



IBM Electronic Typewriter. Term 
papers, etc. Call 575-3914 anytime. 

GET A JUMP ON YOUR GIFTS 

CUSTOM PAINTED CARAFES 
half carafes appx. $8, full carafes 
appx. $12. (Prices vary w/ design) 
Call 224 4979 for information. 



Juggling lessons seven days a week 
every morning. 10 to 12. Five dollar 
donation, everything supplied-507 
College. 



Q«Mllty Typing of 
etc. Call 644-6031 
Reasonable. 



Dissert., Themes, 
or 224-3546/Sue. 



Excellent, quality typing using an 

IBM Selectric II. Experienced in 
typing term papers, theses, 
dissertations 5-6 9 5 54 



Want to be happier? Group forming, 
Call Psychology Clinic, 644 3006. 



Guitar lessons: Folk, Blues, C & W flat 
8t finger picking, bottleneck. Dave 
Greenwald 222-7749, 7-11 pm. 



TYPING 

EXPERIENCED SECRETARY 
USING IBM SELECTRIC II. 
REASONABLE RATES. EDITING 
AVAILABLE. CALL 877-3694 
EVENINGS/WEEK ENDS. 



WILOWOMCN 
Party liard 

carcful-you're being 
BD to our Junior WW, Lisa. 



wds an actor nad» a d 



TYPING IBM DISSERTATIONS 
THESES TERM PAPERS. CALL 
PAT DIXON 386 1255. 

_ __ 

YOUR FURNITUREl 
Wide variety 
immediate delivary 
Cotton to Bay 
FUfMHTURE MART RENTALS 
1M6 S. Adams 

224-4388 



Retired secretary. Accurate typist- 
good speller for papers, dissert., 
theses. Reasonable. Linda Durbin 576- 
1988. No cans after W p.m. 

"mini WAREHOUSE UNffl"^^ 
6x6 available-larger sizes $14.50 up 
Call us at Lakewood Mini Warehouses 
386-4191. 



I String tennis 
service. Lowest 
Bill at 576-0286. 



racquets. One 
prices in town. 



day 
Call 



Joe Mama. 

There once 
Ray gun, 
wtK) acted too long witfi play-guns, 
Sowtienttw* 



U.J.A. CAMPUS ORGANIZER 
WILL BE ON CAMPUS 
FRIDAY. NOV 7 
IF INTERESTED CALL THE 
HILLEL FOUNDATION AT 
722 5454 



YOU WRITE 
Then>es, term pa 
rates. Call eves. 



I EDIT, TYPE, 
reasonable 



aapers, at 
wiiands- 31 



WILL DO TYPING IN MY HOME. 
TELEPHONE 3tS-9689. KEEP 
TRYING. 

Bditad Typliig IBM Selectric II 
Raports/Resumes/Letters/DtaMrt. 
5^7171 Mission Rd. Area. 



The world consisted of NO ON E • ! 
*T8« H«e* (at tnt Aliki?) Catwoman 

MELANIE " 
HAPPY BIRTHDAY A DAY LATE. 
BETTER THAN NEVER. ANYWAY 
TONIGHT SHOULD tE 
INTERESTING. 

LL 

S4M RKWARO 

for information leading to the 
identification of tt»e person wtK> took 
our sign AT THE PNVilST 

homecoming weekend. 



SHABBOTT DINNER 
HILLEL WILL HAVE 
THE DINNER NOV U 
INSTEADOF NOV. 7 
MORE INFO. 222 54S4 



CPE SG frit midnight film series th.s 
week -order of Omega presents 3 

Stooges fUrr festival Sat.. Nov. 9 at 

midntte Moore Aud Free 



Be a responsible spirit don't see the 
Va. Tecti gamattirouffi eiHyl^ayat! 



HaH 
life 

I 



wal^amas parants fa NOR SSS8IOC . 
•t FSUi Party ftard 



DON'T FUT YOUR HALLOWEIn 

COSTUME AWAY WEAR IT THIS 
SUN. NIGHT FOR THE PEOPLE 
BENEFIT. COME DANCE WITH US 
SUN. 9 NOV. AT 9 PM. LUCKY 




Twinks, Super 8. Tom , thanks for all 
yoor support' i made it through 
LowfFllMar, 8» Company 8k AAary. 



ATTENTION ONE AND ALL THiS 
YEAR'S FUN^-r • KING AND SEXY 
QUEEN ARE CHRIS SHOEMAKER 
AND CANDI LAUER! THESE TWO 
STUDENTS SHALL REIGN OVER 
THE MYSTICAL BUBBLE OF FSU. 
THE MUNCHIE WAGON HAS BEEN 
AWARDED THE FUNKIEST 
STUDENT OF^ATION ON ANY 
COLLEGE CAMPUS- 
CONGRATULATIONS! I i ! 

RICKY, HAPPY ANNIVERSARY. 
HOPE WE HAVE /MANY AAOREi i 
LOVE YOU A4.0T, TAMMY. 



everyone's been gaooid- Have you 
ever bean ducked? Pick up your duck 
card in ttft Union ticket office. 

MOSNCH DYAN IS COMING 
NOV. 12, 1980 
IN TAMPA 
IF YOU WANT TO SEE 
HIM, CALL HILLEL 
OFFICE BEFORE NOV. 8 
222-5454. 

Ever aaan a dude run? On Nov. 9, you 
can run with our duck. Sign up in Rm 

318 Union. 



WFT, 

WE MADE IT, STINKER! 
ONE YEAR TODAY. 

I LOVE YOU, JET 



One of Hitler's first acts after getting 
elected was to oatlaw all abortions. 
Will Reagan do the same far 

Amerikkka? 



CONGRATULATIONS 
AMERIKKKA, YOU VE REALLY 
DONE IT NOW. ANTI WOMEN, 
ANTI BLACK, ANTI POOR, ANTI- 
HUMANISTS, ARE YOU READY TO 
START GOOSE STEPPING IN TNE 
STREETS? 

MANAGER- 

THERE OI8CE WAS A VERY 
YOUNG MAN 

WHO HAD AN OLDER, FEMALE 
FAN. 

TODAY HE'S 25 

AND THIS AIN'T NO JIVE. 

KEEP UP WITH THE FAN IF YOU 

CAN! 

HAPPY BIRTHDAY, CATCHER 

FREEZIN-HOT 
6 PIECE JAZZ/ROCK BAND 
FOR BOOKINGS 576-3424 

WFT, 

WE MADE IT, STINKER! 
ONE YEAR TODAY. 

I LOVE YOU, JET 



KUNGFU 
A new cantar for the Martial 
Now formiiHl classes 214 w 
2i«-77W next to Great Bike Shop 



Arts. 



DEL SUGGS IS BACK! 
This weekend only Del Suggs is back 
at The Alley. Thurs Fri-Sat from 9 
until 1. Downtown across from 
State Bank. Don't miss him! 



GAY PEER VOLUNTEERS 

If you are a female or mate with a 

gay related concern and would like to 
talk with a trained gay peer 
vwunteer, call Dr. Lucy Kizinan, at 
644-2003, M F, 8 5. Confidentiality 
assured and no records ke|3t. 



GOING HOME FOR 

THANKSGIVING? WE NEED A 
RIDE TO NAPLES OR FT. MYERS. 
TWO PEOPLE, WILL SPLIT GAS. 
CALL 644-M72. 



WANTED: GIRL(S) TO 

ENTERTAIN AT BACH. PARTY 
FOR SMALL GROUP OF 
GENTLEMEN FRIDAY MOV. 7. 

CALL 222 0814. 



Need help with relationships? Group 
now forming, CaN Faydmlanr Clinic 

644-3006. 

BAQELS! 
BAGELS! 
BAGELS! 
IF YOU LOVE BAGELS 

COME TO HILELL'S 
BAGEL SALE! NOV. 12 
IN THE STUDENT UNION 
MORE INFO 222 5454 



THIS FRIDAY NIGHT 
SHABBOT SERVICES 
MEET IN PARKING LOT OF UNION 
POST OFFICE— AT 7:0t PM. 
SERVICES WILL JIE AT FSU 
RESERVATION. THERE WILL BE A 
BAHN FIRE. PARENTS ARE 



jJl 



I'M DESPERATE! 
I NEED A RIDE TO THE ATLANTA 

ATHENS, GEORGIA AREA THE 
jHAIJIICSGiyiBIG WEEKEND WILL 
•PLITCOyrtCALL A OAM i4«gli8. 

Ike CHRISTIAN COFFEEHOUSE 

FRIDAY, NOV. 7 8 12 PM 
UNIVERSITY LUISHERAN CENTER 
nSW. JEFFERSON. , . ^ 

1 i 1 I f 





THE PUB 
Before game special-Satwday. Free 
sun visor with pitcher of beer. 1312 W 
Tmnessee. Go Holes! 



HEY, GOOD LOOKING! 
Check it out Sunday night, Nov. 9th 
ROLLING MOTHERS IN CONCERT 
AT BULLWINKLES, NINE TO ONE 



THE ATHLETES' FOOT 
HAS SOLID WHITE DOLFIN 
SHORTS IN STOCK! 



PRE-XMAS SALE with coupon $1 off 
Magic Set Expires Nov 22 Magic Fun 
Shop Univ. Plaza 1916 W Tphn. 



SUNDAY NIGHT 
BULLWtNKLE'S DON'T MISS 
ROLLING MOTHERS REVUE! 



AT 
THE 



SLAPSTICK AT BULLWINKLES'5 
TONIGHT ft SATURDAY. 



ROLLING MOTHERS FOR YOU 
RUNNING SAVAGE, VITO, TOO 
Rolling Mothers, Rolling Mothers, 
MIMI PLAYS TNE KAZOO 

At ^^Nrinkles, Sanday night Nov. 9 



FREEZIN HOT IS 
SWEETBAY STUDIO 



PLAflNG AT 
B, FRI 8. SAT 



Students and faculty please show 
yoor support for employees of Air 
Florida airlines, by flying on other 
airtmes tlifs tioliday season. 

Old bo(N(s for collectors and readers 
Thomasville has 2 dealers— Virginia 
Breedlove on Thomasville Road about 

2 miles before town. Signs on left. 912- 
228 0073. And Dick Rieber, 429 S. 
Hansen St. rear. 912 226 7415 by 
appointment only or by chance. 



AAarilyn 8i Joyce are waiting for you 
With information fighter $5.00 style 
cuts. JJ'S HAIRPLACE 4225 W. 
Pensacola St. 575-7750. Walk ins 
welcome. 

Jj^s l4airPlace inflation fighting tSJDO 
Style cuts. All the time 4225 W. 
Pensacola St. 575-7750. Walk ins 
welcome. 



Brown- 

a 

V . ■ . 
Net SOT. Vk'. 
fiat 0»if * 
Lourc 
Capt* 



CPE labor series working with SCU 
Florida AFL L CIO 8i Tallahassee 
Peace Coalition present; William 
Wimpestnger Presdient lamtodiscMS 
"Conversion to Peace Thur., Nov 13 
atOpm . Diffenbaugh Rm 201. 



0«t 



I MA , f 

RACQUE' 
call ^ fv.» . , - . " ' ■** 
P'-e^p.o.: ■ ; ■ ' 

A T T E H ^ «. 
HOiWF 

Sharor f'ff i^^^ 
John «tn^»op. tfifi 1^., 

EAT LUMCM '.f 
WITH A n 

HOLIDAY P09^ti 
Make Sd^c - 
photogr.jD'' 
Package ch*-, 
Call De<"-.a' s-, • . . 

Qvali'v Inn UtviMr^f 
StMttfIt di»CM«1 • 0 Inti 

Santfwicim NM«m $im 

Accpptffl' 



FO'J 

Df 

4719 



AND 

AFTE« 



Lost Tues 3 
Sound key ctva.n k 
Wendy at M4 S»I7 rh^m^ 

FOUN C 

CALL TO lUfcN' ^' 
644 549S 

GLASSESFOUNO 
WMS 8LDG ^0 C.A V 
UNIV UNION "iSCs 

DESK ?ic "yy 



Found 
Green 
•dentity 



near 



FOUND A TAN '. 
WALLET IN Dif ■ • ■• 
M429Mt lOENT ( ' 

lO " ■ • 

RiNu .Nv 0^:. 
PLEASE CALL m 'i: - 

Losf s*'^* 
Bellamy Gftj" >* 
and reward »♦ ftwwt c»« C' 

Miss.^-v ^ *' ■ 

Husky 9 mo ^c r-*- •" 
1353 Offer pjcuo'w 

P.. EASE • -2^' 

NECKLACE A "E^^'iV 

GOLD CIRCLES 

575 «52. ^WILL «6**»- 

BACK 

FOUND GER**" j'-^ 
RUPPy CALL 
lOENTIfV 



LO»t9 2*»0Ooa 

vaiwe. LOS' 
locker room 4- ' ' 

576 55*5 (X 3»5t»» A»« " 
Reward' 

fS25 REWAiF^'^^f'S 
BROWS ATTACHE •«» 
LOST ABOUND Ai.y»" 

EVENINGS S'*4i''J 



Let Lonnie Linton, formerly with 
Command Performance, cut and 
style yavr iMir for lass at Seers 
ttiw Ipw. Can Vf' 



•434. 



THIRSTY WOAAEN NEVER HAD A 
BETTER FRIEND THAN POOR 
PAUL. FREE MICHELOS EVERY 
DAY 3 4 PM. 09 PM. POOR PAUL'S 
POURHOUSE ait W. TENNESSEE 

PLEA MARKET EVERY W^KENO 
Sat ♦ til * Sun 1 5:30 Tharpe St. 
Market & Flea AAarket 9 0 1 f K HMH 
Tharpe 224-5590 3i5-4«*l _______ 

Soft Contact Lenses. 
Hard Contact Lenses. 
24 hour Cont act Lenses. 

Or. AMan Dean, 222 mi. 

TNT I4IDEAWAY CANOE RENTAL 

Wakulla River at Hwy 90 Nu w ww b s r 

Special mention this ad & rent 7 
canoes for the price of 1 CaU\ 975 64X7 
ortTS 5607 




Sis boony^- 




MARC MALCOM RMT 
ttierapy & relaxation/slre» 

counseling 7?: 0'5S 



1 , 



Seethef^o^ 

L/ve at S*^^"""^ 
Sunday ntgK 




Open 9 AlEi pi 
day btfort 



^>W^'nQ soon). Jir, . 
f^'cycle Shop B.et'f'^ 

McGregor . ?t.^r ^ 

Nelson V sfon. 15,'; • 

WALLOONS UNLlMiT.f*' 

-'.very av...ab.< r Hr 

Prw pickup ano 

A !■ TeVtToN ~ Fob. 

f lambeau tHisinei.s o^f .^ r - 4. 
picture* Tia Moofl " ( 

• h^ron rr:.» Lar-W ft,,,, t,,. j,J 

• '•■'n Knapp. «no Kent Sarton pJ 
p f them up Mr 



EAT LUNCM AT TMf PHVtj 
WITH A FRIEND' 



HOLIDAY PORTRAITS 
Make Speoai Giftt |v- 
photographic portraits take 
Package plans in color irtw m 

Call Mmar Stu<;ioo of 234 3134 

, , I 

"UPPER DECK 
Quality Inn South»rna,r,. Sp#f,*i 
'ucl<-nt discount « id B<><-r 

s.indwicties Hea«»«s. KIim Kt« 
Acceptad! 





FOUND: FSU UF COOr'uN 
DESCRIBE AND GIVE 0ET4 
WILL SELL AfTEK SUNDAY 
4719 



Lost Twos. 3 keys on a yellew 
Sour>d koy chain if found ptei 
Wendy at 644 S912. Thanks 



FOUND GOLD BRACELET 
CALL TO IDENTIFY 
644 M95 

GLASSES FOUND OCT - 
WMS BLDG TO CLA V 
UNIV. UNION INFC"V 
DESK. (2nd floor} 

Found Set of keys n S on 
Green near library Can *4-» 
Identify. 

FOUNC»: A TAN K BROWN 
WALLET IN OIFFENSAUOH 
kU Km & IDENTIFV 

LOST SET OF KEYS ON SM 
RING INC. OLDS .CAR ICIi 
PLEASE CALL MI 1521 TMAWk! 

Lost: Straw c«»&y 
Bctiam,' Great sentiment** 
and rev/ard It fc-ond c*H CnrHi 
5505. 

Missimj sinceT<.»lioween: 
Husky 9 mo Leather strn»flce»i»^ 
3353 Offer pick c» ^^^^'^^ 

NECKLACE W/ P^o, pH^N ^\ 
GOLD CIRCLES. DOlP^''» ;J 
575 wif. WILL REWARD TO C 

BACK. ^ . 

F O U nF~GE R MAN ^,7' 
PUP«=Y CALL taaJ"^ 
IDEN : 'FY 

LOTt 9/29/ao Opal 

value. Lost ;n r^^^'J,,. 

Reward'! — 
tS25 REWARD'FOR RETURN f J 
BROW^^ ATTA(_Hf W^^CONTf^ 
uOST AROUND A.MN 
F VENINQS S7» 




Sis-boom bah, 
Si^ the Rolling^ 

N'cv. 9 



^ . her twonatioiially, Mcording to 



ft.* 



^tgafc »5 total yards per game, the Moki? 

' Vujnior cnliege transfer Robert Brown, a 
^ 4< tack le^ on the season (13 for a toss of 
,:;,an linebacker Ashley Lee who has 41 

ii/jU3i Dcen tremendous," Vh^nia Tech 
'Iraiition Director Jack Williams said Thursday 
I Jj^-And 1 ec has been one hell of a player." 

basic 52 dctcnsc (same as the Seminoles) and 
twflfwchangc. basically, for Florida Stale," he 
l(%tgoi to put pressure on (FSU quarterback 
Wc sacked the Wake Forest quarterback 
«ifl the season opener. And we sacked the West 
.janffback Hve times last week." - 
tisiillhas stood up under the pressure of the best 
aoidy Pitt's Hugh Green who sacked the FSU 
^fiBtwoin the first play of that game. The junior 
,lKk to complete 10 of 20 passes for three 
iia that 36-22 victory. Since then he's gone on 
„ 61 percent of his passes and is 11th in the 
^thtt department. But he isn't lookii^ past the 

ji'i take them lighdy," said Stockstill, who has 
M% ptsses in eight victories and one defeat this 
it's gong to be a tough ball game. " 
I fdumi year, wc had to come from behind to beat 
[ad tet year we Kad to do it again to win 17-10. 
.1 T\ tmc and no one wants to look bad 



on TV." 

Last year's contest was also regionally televised and as 
FSU coach Bobby Bowden put it then: "The defense won it 
for us again." And noseguard Ron Simmons, who has been 
plagued by an ankle injury this seascm, led the camera- 
ii^red Tribe defense as he collected eight tackles, three 
lot losses, and was given the ABC-TV/Cl^det Awarcb 
as FSU*s'mQst valuable player. 

Saturday's confrontation should produce nnich of the 
same as roommates Simmons and tailback Sam Plan vie for 
ABC honors. Together the seniors have collected seven of 

the coveted plaques over the past four seasons at FSU. 

"Virginia Tech is always tough," Simmons noted, then 
added about his ankle. "Just to move it hurts like hell, it's 
just a matter of me wanting to do it." 

"We'll have to play one of our best games ever," 
Bowden said. "They've got the ingredients of a great 
team.'* 

"If we hope to have a chance to win, we have to play a 
nearly flawless game," Virginia Tech coach Bill Dooley 
noted. "We can't keep turning the ball over and expect to 
win." 

The Mokies have coughed up the ball 25 times so far this 
season, losing 11 of their 24 fumbles and throwing 14 
interceptions. This is a disquieting statistic for Tech fans 
when FSU's mistake-causing defense is figured into the 
picture. The Crunch Bunch, the Tribe's defensive line, has 
caused 25 fumbles and recovered 18 of those in nine games 
while The Intimidators^ the Seminole defensive secondary, 
have picked off 12 errant passes this season. 




LP. #3 Florida state j^mlnoles 




iohhlBrs 




wwT ^ 



w mm ' 4^0' 

^ tickets 10 OR fak loaay oi lie Eastslde of me stadium. 
^ are aiioiM to Dw 1 stnlal an 1 aaoil acfeil Mr SUa 

oci. Ill ounr uckote an sia^ea^ 

%Xll^^^m^l^ 'HOLES 




I j. 




a 

K * 




y.iU .11.. ...tkLib . ^.yiUf),, iL,4.JDi.-..jlllll.i.lil 



...ilMJil,.. i;.jli,hL.lijllllJii^..,iJlli|lULUiiklt jllLlLi....,i,AdUlLi,Jh<iU>lllli.i.U,.ihi ,LLii.»Ajl9.ki.r....iiLL.«iiLiiU. 



V 




24 / Friday, November 7, 1980 Florida Flamlieaii 



tf|ltMi^% 

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t 



1 ♦ 




ili<pii^fii 

i!.':Kr.^flflfl 



f 




t I 



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1 

4 



And what makes mailers worse, ihey rudely ihrev\ my 
ingenious and carefully thought out bowl predictions of last 
week totally out of whack. 

I had Florida State vs. Alabama in the Sugar, the Ohio 
State-Michigan wmner vs. the Pac-10 champion in the 
Rose. Nebraska vs. Texas in the Orange. Baylor vs. Notre 
Dame in the Cotton and Georgia vs. the Ohio Siaie- 
Michigan loser in the Gator. 

Then, those picks seemed logical and very probable but 
'Bama's blunder in Mississippi throws their Sugar Bowl 
chances down the nearest gutter, and a Georgia win in 
Jacksonville tomorrow will cancel their round trip plane 
(bus?) tickets to that city for the Gator Bowl. 

I'm not trying to change my bov\l picks, (I'm a Seminole 
but not an Indian giver), but the bowl picture now looks so: 

Sugar: GeorKia vs. FSl for the national title 

Rose: Ohio State vs. W ashington 

Orange: Nebraska vs. Alabama 

Cotton: Notre Dame vs. Baylor 

Now to showcase my 3-1 record of last week and to 
improve on my 15-9 overall record. 

Florida State (8-1) vs. Virginia Tech (7-2): 

Two weeks ago I would have said this one would be 
razor-edge close. That's because the bowl picture was 





tumamnmimiooKsiHamnmimKi. 

College Square 19«4 w. Tennessee St. 

Mmi-Sat 9-7 575-3St9 

' • •Man Rat iBiail Miinnni 5iniw^ fVif pfTfrtT^ 



unclear and ihe 'Noles had nothing tangible to shoot for. 

But now the reception is steadily clearing up and coming in 
with the sweet taste of Sugar. Besides, m what should he an 
added slogan on FSU's new scoreboard. At Doak You 
Choke. FSU by the lime Chief Osceola impales the 50 yard 
Une. 

Florida (7-1) >s. Georgia (8-0) in Jackson>ille: 

Last year about this same lime the Gators were 0-6-1 and 
had graciously accepted their April 1st Toilet Bowl bid. 
This year, they are 7-1 and are playing for the SEC title and 
a Sugar Bowl bid. I cast my vote for Charlie Pell, 1980 
coach of the year. But asking him to beat'Georgia is like 
asking for a recount of this year's presidential elections. 
Georgia bv the time Mr. Walker gets bored. 

FAM L (34) fs. Norrii Carolina A&T (6-2): 

Trying to stop the Aggies version of the Three 
Musketeers (quarterback William Watson, and running 
backs Charlie Sutton and Wayman Pitts, 549, 490, and 529 
yards rushing respectively) will be too much for the young 
Rattlers. The Aggies by 10. 

Getting back at the world game of the week. (Obvious 
game of the week.) 

Alabama (7-1) vs. LSU (6-2 in Tuscalousa: 

After 'Bama gets through skinning the Tigers they will be 
clawless, fangless. stripeless, and even roarless. 'Bama by 
the time Bear L j..^ j-ci^ his knife out. 

Wayne Deas is definitely going to replace Jimmy who? 



^TMERPSSTH 
TIME TO PR 




liwatmul Cntir 



SffCIAllSTS SINCf 1S34 



For lafonMttM Atowt OtHtr C«Mta 
li Hut nw « |» CNUi • /UnM 





U5TOm hl-fl 



SUPER SAVINGS M CALCUUITORS Are Now at CUSTOM HI-FII mm 
MODELS PRICED to Sell CHEAP & FASTI Hu rry, THEY WOMT WST LONG! 

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456W.Tenn.. 

Phone 222-5020 



missis 

ifiii tue>t«cf WP' 
LAMM aM% • 



U5TOm hi-fi DUCoUriT center} 



9 * 



Florida Flambeau 



r\RTl Y C I Ol D\ 

Slight chance of shovkcrs >»iih 
htghs in (he low aiui lows 
m Uie higli 501. 



^uAV_M)VtMBER 10. im 



SERVING TALLAHASSEE FOR 68 YEARS 




(Mrf Osceok ckmga ^mn^iM atop mte^ on the Sminok wm over 

yn, see page II 

Bowl bound 

FSU angling for a date in New Orleans 



4 n )/;7er o/ie ^iVes the dust, 
^niHher one bites IkedltSt, 

(her one's gone, 
Another one's gone, 
^i^heronebiiestheekiMi." - 

Queen, The Game 
What started as a Top Ten hit and became a way of life 
for I he upset minded Seminole football team etaUet in the 
«ason has now taken on sugary connotations. 
"Anoiher One Bites The Dust" now Sixms to describe 
^eiklv fate of teams rated above Florida State in the 
naiional polls. First Nebraska and Pittsburgh toppled, then 
and USC fell to lesser foes, then Saturday the 



Fighting Irish of Notre Dame bit thedost. And the Florida 
State Seminoles, who once fell as far 18th in the ppUs, arc 
on the verge of being the nation's second best fdotl»U 

• 

team. 

Bobby Bowden, who picked up his 116th career victory 
on his birthday when the Seminoles roUed owff the Vliglma 
Tech Fighting Gobblers 31-7 Satvrday, ranked the 
undefeated, untied Georgia BuUdogs as the top tarn m the 

nation. 

••Then it would be tight as a tick b^ween OB mad USC for 
second,** the 51-ycar-oW AlabaflM native said. "Maybe if 
we had gone for a Ue (against Miami) it wouW be difTerent, 
but I don' t play that kind of foo^afi.'* 

Tm» to BOWL, n 



Consolidation: 
spedfics usually 
are its downfall 

BYDANNI VOGT 

FLAMBF Al SI \¥t RITt R 

Last Tuesday, for one ot the few times in the last decade, 
more Leon County voters fasored the concept of city-couniy 
consolidation than opposed it. 

And when the ten biggest cit> and county pohiicians gather 
this evening they'll be faced with a Herculean task — irymg 
to figure out what that vague approval means. 

With a yes, no and maybe vote on Tuesday" s ballot the 
voters got behind the concept. But when const^lidaiion gels 
down to specifics, as it has three times >n the last nine years, 
it doesn't seem to have a prayer In 1971. 1973 and 1976, 
three different specific consolidation charters were 
resoundingly defeated. 

With those facts in mind, the Metropolitan F'laniui^ 
Organization, made up of all city and county 
commissioners, will cautiously begin to hammer out a 
consolidation plan that satisfies everbody when it holds ilS 
November meeting at 5 3u loday. 

The specifics that brought consolidation down in the past 
include how city and county utility companies would divide 
up the spoils, whether the Tallahassee Police Dcpartflient 
would cease to exist, how many officers would sit on the new 
commission, how they would be elected and hom many 
government workers wouki be out of a job under the new 
plan. 

Fight for UUMn 

City residents and a few in the urban fringe now buy 
power from the city utility department, whtte the test of the 
county uses the less-expensive Tak|ttin Electric Cooperaihrc. 
If consolidation occored, it would be difficult to decide 
which company would serve the customers. 
This caused both groups to actively opfxiee consolidatioa 

Turn to COISSOUDA HON. Pt^e 6 

I Wo paper tomorrow 

Tomorrow is Vetcran*s Day aiwl the Fhmbem will itoi be 
lIsNlshing an issue. AU state offices and the two 
ii^^ei^ities and one junior college in town witt be closed. 

iaitially the University had planned to celebrate 
Veteran's Day on the lOth, but tl^ Legi^tufe <^«rf 
iiiiiad to honor the veterasis of foreign wan each year on 
the same day — Novmber 1 1. 

■ '-T^-'i^^i^tmm will' resume pu^bticattoti^ on' ^ Wednesday, 
November the 12. and will coarinue put^htng Hve <^ys a 
week, Monday through Frklay. until D ec e m ber 8» when the 
paper wBl take a thm week breidc before returning the 

l^lcw Year. , , . 



i 



Problems in Florida prisons won*t go away 



Last in a series 



There may be isolated instances of 

brutality against inmates by guards, 

Bradford said, but for the most part such 

violence is in self defense. After aU. he 

added, "if society decides it doesn't want to 

jail people for rape or murder or cirild 

molestation or some other crime, wc can cut 

down on our MMttiom.** 
But the quettioo remains: Have we a&»wed 

the prison system to d e v elo p an aimo a phere 

which teeeds crhaiiials, rather than 



bV MICHAEL MOLINE 

^ I ^MBI Al STAf F WRITER 

■defending the Florida Department of 
^^^ions against allegations of corruption 
"^•Jniiality against inmates, deparimeit 
^^^y^non Vernon Bradford said recently: 
tltll * "^^^^^'on* nothing more and 
fes, of the outside workl. We're not 
"'"li Kiwanis retreat here, we're running 
with one or two thousand va-y 
'serous persons. It's society's To AmetteGirardemi. bend of the House 
^ nsibi^ to decide wIk> siKMid com \o OiMBlMat em GwikUoib and a laaf-CHBa. 
^forhowkmg WehaveaocoMnsI critic of the department and its secretary. 

Louie Wmnwright. the answer is cte: '*We 




don't have an environment where 
rehiMitation is possible. We have an 
environment where we make better 



In fact, Girardeau claims, the 
adnuniatration of the Department of 



Corrections relies almost exclusively on 
vioteooe and the Ihicm of violence to control 
inmates, creating an atmosphart of 
repression which dehumanizes prisoocfs aid 
nakes them more likely to resort to 
brutality. 

Furthermore, Girardeau claims, 
prisoners retain thai i 1r — of despair, 
hopelessness, and violence, a hen ihev leave 
pr Many commit other crimes upon 

rt . crimes more violent than those they 
were imprisoned for in the first place. And 
they return to prison, and the cycle 
continues. 

Ttum to PRiSOi\ pege 7 







2 / Mmday, November 10, / Horida FlamtKMl 



.^jp^ MONDAY. II OW H IW to VOUMMEI NIM 



MONDAY 



XXXVI 



<#xount 




After neariy a month of arduous, 
tiresome, and sometimes bitter 
campaigning, the survivors gathered 
toged^ ku^ Wednesday night to be 
sworn in as the new members of the 33rd 
Slud^ SMaale. Ths year's Senate, which 
has no clear majority party for the first 
time in six years, is expected to be 
greatly dtfferent from its predecessors. 
And, as if to validate those expectations, 
they have elected the first bi-partisan 



Senate leadership in eight years. Keith 
Clemens, of Action, won the Senate 
Presidency and Pam Huelster, of United 
Seminoles, won the Pro-Tempore 
position. Tim Meenan, of Students, was 
run for both positions but f^led to gamer 
enough support to defeat either Clemens 
or Huelster. 

Clemens and Huelster have pledged 
themselves to promote a greater unity of 
function and purpose for this Senate. 
President Clemens announced a q|>eciai 
opening of the Senate Offices on 
Monday, November 10 to enable students 
and other membei^ of the Uniy^ty 
community to meet with the new 
lead^^ip. Hie Seiiale edicts /in ki 
fiQpnns 250 and 254 UnicMn. ^ 
Wednesday's session was also marked 
several speeches and presentations to 
the out-going Senate President, Mike 
Lindner. Lindner, who was lauded by 
Student Body President Atislander, 
Attorney General Ciklin, out-going Pro- 
Tempore Abbate, and the newly elected 
Qemens, has been remarked to be the 
most outstanding Senate leader at FSU in 
many years. 



Student Govemment 
Leadership Workshop 

ilOV. 15-16 

The Office of Student Devebpmcnt 
sponsoring a Student Governmc 
Leadership Wwkshop on Nov 15 and 
at the St?mi!iole Reservation Tht 
purpose is to acquaint Stude- 
Government and other camp- 
organization leaders with univers* 
policies, practices and personntl. Then 
M^lB be mpllasts on understaniu^ th« 
operation of our own Studen* 
Gpvemment wt^ improving kadoshp 
Acadmic Deans, rcpres^ntat ? 
from the various Vice President s d^Mt^ 
wd StudenI Mairs personnel will be 
avaiiabie to dtecuss the different ^pects of 
the university with the student leader 
For mope iirf<Mrmatk>n call the Office c 
Student Development, 323 Union, 644 
3840. 



SPECIAL EVENTS 



HC FALL FROUCS 



Nov 14-Salley Hall-B.B. Jam 
Nov. 15-Dorm Olympics 

Nov. 16-Jennie/Reynolds/Cawthon 

Almost Anything Goes 
^k>v. 17-Dorman Hail-Coffeehouse 
Nov. 18-DeGraff-Open House 



Nov. 17-Dorman -Coffeehouse 
Nov. 19-Broward /Gilchrist 

Dating Game 
Nov. 21-Deviney-"Shampoo" 
Nov. 22-Kellum/Landis 

Pre -Game Pep Raiiy 




Humanities Union Of Graduate Students will sponsor a discussion of 

"Faust" by Dr. Audrey Wilson of the FSU Humanities Dept., Thursday, Nov. 
13, at 3:30pm in Rm 128 Diffenbaugh. 

Women's Center presents Linda Powell, black feminist writer, activist and 
musician, on Thursday, Nov. 13, at 7:30pm in the Palm Room of FAMU 
Student Union, and Friday, Nov. 14, at 7:30pm in 126 Bellamy on the FSiJ 
campus. Ms. Powell will address in her lecture the topic of "Black Feminism.*' 
For more information call 644-4007. 

SCU, Horida AFL-CIO and Tallahassee Peace Coalition presents 

William Wimpesinger, president of the International Association of Machinists, 
who will be discussing "conversion to peace isconomy/* Thursday, Nov. 13, at 

8pm in 201 Diffenbaugh. 

SG Free Midnight Rim Series continues with "Animal Fann," Saturday, 

Nov. 15. at midnight In Moore Auditorium. 

FSU Veteran's Club is sponsoring a party on Veteran's Day, Nov. 11, at 
9pm at Prince Manor Apts. 132. Bands include RAdical Rocket Rdl and 
Sonny Blue— FREE Come enjoy the musk: ffifui meet the Vet's Club. 
FSU Martrtiag CMi presents "The Interview aid You," a firsthand kx>k ^ 
interview techniques, staralegy d interviewers and tips on successful 
inlerviewlni^ Abo tips on resume writing. Dr. Juanita Wl^ms wiB be the 
featured fpuriur, Nov. |L1. at 7pm in Rm 220 Biobiess BIdg.-Stany 
ConfMnee Room. Al are wekome. 

laiMMiioMt Nbkm IVoprBmiiiiia By UK>— presienting Senior Foreign 
S«vice oncer from the U.S. Stale Dqjt., speaidng on re^nsibilities of a 

t, Nov. 18, at 7pm in Rm 201 Longmire. 



CORRECTION 

CiMrrectkm To Schedhile Of C1«mm-REL 3145, Women r 

Religion," will be offered MWF 2:30-3:20, NOT on Tuesday anc 
Thursday as printed in the sch^uie of classes. 



MBTINCS, MEETINGS 

Prc-Vct Club will hold a meeting Wednesday. Nov. 12, at 6pm ir 
PIMS office. All new members are welcome. 
Onkami Ddte Kap|M-New member tailing will be Tbur^dy. 
Nov. 13, at 5pm In front of the Westcott BIdg. Initiation Banquet i«« » 

Sunday, Nov. 16, at 6 at Capitol City Country Club. Please register W 
the banquet in Rm 323 Union. 

Mwtar Board wiU meet Tuesday, Nov. 18, at 6;3Upm in Rm 
-Unk>n. This meeting is mandatory for all members. ^ 
FSU Advertising Club will hold another of its J]]!^!, 
Thursday, Nov. 13, at 7pm in Rm 201 Diffenbaugh New memb€» 
anyone With an interest in advertising are welcome to attend 



Nov. lO-Ouurlie Chaplin 
Nov. 11-They Died With 

Their Boots On' 
Nov. 12-A Woman's Decision 
Nov. 13-Tht Seduction of Ktoni 
Nov. 14-La Cage Aux Folles 
Nov. 15-The Song Remains 

TheSame 





A i 



fill i 



\m INT 



t44 



I M(|ii Itii I |i 1 1 



M(>nda>. November 10, 1980 / S 



oman sues after incomplete abortion 



rWOM STAFf ttPOBlt 

t was filed toft Tuesday in Leon County Cireuit 
'^^ rnan whoclatmsshe was bospitalized after m 
artkw perf onned at the Fenyato 
tiiTaliahMsee. 

! ynn Hayes, a Tallahassee resident, has 
nicr with negBienceatooi with Amhassadore 
^ Co. of Vermont and Dr. Samy Farouk Rafai, 
tfocd in the suit as the doctor who performed the 



Hayes said she cn tph wicd to the HaM CeMr of 
alNkMiuBal pain after ha ahortioii \m wmmm, qsh« a 
vacmm aspirator, **hirt w«s told thai these wcif expected 
and tisttai post-abortioo symptoms and required no further 



The conq^bint said it kter turaod out her ahortioii had 
not been coosplete. She was subaeiiiiently hoqpita^ at 
Tallahassee MesBoriid Rcgioiiai Medicai Ceater. No one itf 
the.Health Center could be reached for comment. 



SBRIEF 

Thev Died ^'^^^ 
ioois On vMth Errol 
i:.* Fort Apache yf»\\\\ 
\^avne. will be 

[.,inJ..\ :n Moore 
surnng at 7 p.m. 

U A HtBhl, A 

JO notorious f)t>roihy 
founder ol the 
Workers 
will be shown 
.^sed at United 
.i> Center, Tues. at 
m (583 W. Park 
Thb b pan of the 
I PeaccMakers 



I en!iir\ 



^cries. 



IMIKMKW & 
A iirsi hand 

ln!e^\lev^ techniques, 
«.c^>, and lips on 
<tul inier\ie\sing will 
prescnied by Dr. Juanita 
IS Tuesday at 7 p.m. 
room 22 Business, 
vored by the 
%i?':r'i,' ("!uh. 

iHKIsIINA BOLiVAR 

Maa^ Brothers will be the 
speaker at a Fashion 
"eeting Wednesday at 
cuind lloor Sandels 




^^'ith names Umi 
Jj*adeh. Bani-Sadr. 
*1 Khomeini, we Iranians 
•omed constantly dbout 
' ^^icdl errors ih our 

- ctters Now that 
y^hpe handles all our 
-^^^ can turn our 
•^ore important 
problems 
'f*n s Foreign Minister 
S**«gh Qotbzadeh 





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Address — 



PlEASt PWNT) 



LAST 



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4 / Monday, November 10, 1980 Ftoriit W—teM 

Fiorida Flambeau 

The ftafMi FTl-rrn - it by the Florids Flambeau Foundation, lac. as 

^jgftt fwyimiHm which IS (oldy rr^ponstbk for the contenis of the paper 

Florida FUmtbeau Foundation, Inc. Ncwifoom. 204 N Woodward Avenue, phone <»44 55U?. Mailing 
addre&i. P C Box U-TOOI. Florida Stale Uaivcrsiiy. TaOahnsce. Florida }2)W. 

SMtfiry Bt^^^tM Editor Mar> Tebo Associwe Editor 

Boh OTwy... Phoio Editor Sioe Dollar AsMKiaie. Editor 

Brad Liston News Editor C hns Farrell AsstKiate Editor 

Chris BrockfiiM Sports Editor Nfclissa Beckham Art Director 



Politics as usual 

*Tolitics is a dirty business." 

That plurase is probacy as old as dvilizatioii itself. Since humans 
fir^ began coop era ti ng to better protect dieir intwest. there has been 
political wheeling and dealing, and there's Iktle reasm to b^eve omr 
iuicestors handled the sordid but necessary business with any more 
decency than we do now. 

Which is why John Sullivan's blatant manipulation of the political 
process for his own personal gain doesn't necessarily surprise us; 
offend and gall, yes. But no surprise. 

Sullivan was elected Supervisoi #f Elections in Leon County last 
Tuesday. His was the only name on the ballot. His last-minute, just- 
under-the-wire Hling manuever, which has been documented 
extemively, was a brU^urt example of ui^thical but effective pohtics. 

SulUvan's mother, incumbent Supervisor W&na Sullivan, wi» 
considered unbeatable; itt ^ hist moomt she badLed out of the race 
and John stepped in. 

A slew of outraged citizens raised cain over the sudden tum-of- 
events, and immediately began write-in campaigns. 

They failed, of course. A confused electorate only knew one thing: 
thicy didn't want Sullivan. But the large number of write-ins split the 
anti-Sullivan vote, leaving Sullivan with a majority. 

On election day voters reported numerous inoperative voting 
machines; it seems many had no paper on which to write in a 
candidate's name, while others had the paper, buttheglasscoveringthe 
paper would not lift up^ 

Of ccmrse, we aren't saying ^ Sullivan's tan^wred with the bootl^ to 
keep votors from writing in names for the post; S^e Supervisor of 
Elections Dorothy CHisson investigated and cleared tl^ current 
Supervisor and her son of any criminal charges. 

But given his short track record, it wouldn't have surprised us if John 
Sullivan had gone that far. He seems oblivious to it all, content to take 
office against the wishes of the majority of Leon County voters, and he 
has that right ; he did win the election . 

But everyone knows he had to dip down low to do it. But like they say. 
That 's politics for you . 

Reagan and the ERA 

We know how Ronald Roigan feels about the Equal Rights 
Amendment; he's against it. But his stand on equality for women is 
considerably more shady . 

Reagan claims his objections to the ERA are technical, not 
philisophical. Legislation already exists in this country, he says, 
guaranteeing women equal rights, and he supports those laws. If they 
haven't worked, more vigorous enforcement of them, rather than 
adding to the overweaning power of government with a constitutional 
amendment, is the way to repair the situation. 

Some particularly troublmg rhetoric goes with that argument; the 
IMresident-elea is specifically worried about government interference 
in family life. That sounds suspiciously like saying that women should 
be allowed to earn as much as men, so long as their h\isbands have the 
last word on how that money is spyent. 

And that scenario captures the problem in a nutshell. Women's 
secondary status in this country is at least as much a social issue as a legal 
one. Laws to correct that can be effective only insofar as they encourage 
a change in our attitudes toward women as they mandate a shift in their 
treatment under law. And a constitutional amendment, hopefully, 
would accomplish that where existing te^slation has failed . 

But Reagan's anti-ERA stance, even when softpedakd with this 
technkal-iihihiophical red herring^ sends signab to the country that we 
don't need to dutfige our attitudes tmards women. Nkxeover, it was 
used to gain the mppori of a cultural right that k singularly 
unendmiastic about dianging our legal treatuMm of them. The faflme 
to enforce current equal rights legislalion is no coincidence, and the 
reiffity of Reagan ' s position on the ERA is tacit support for maintaining 
the status quo. 



Reagan to mold Supreme co uJpaa 

NATIONALm;\St 



BYCUZABETHOLSm 

LNfTFD FliSS INTEINATIONAL 

WASHINGTON — President Ronald Reagaa 
may have the opportunity t* tiominate the 
Suprraie Cdort and move it fimher to the right by 
appointing several members ~ possibly indyding 
the first woman justice. 

The president-elect could have four or more 
chances to appoint justices amenabie to his 
conservttive phitosophy. 

Five of the aine justices are in their 70s — 
Chief Justice Warren Burger, Justices William 
Brennan, Thurgood Marshall, Harry Blackmun 
and Lewis PowelL All of those but Burger have 
suffered health problems recently. 

The two most liberal members — Brennan, 74, 
and Marshall, 72 — were ill last year, sparking 
retirement speculation. But most court observers 
feel they will try to hang on, hopiag to slow the 
court's drift away from activism. 



judicuU 



Reagan has pledged to name a woman to ''one 
of the first Supreme Court vacaades in my 
adnuaistration," and also has made dear he 
wants his appointees of the hfetime posts to 
conform to liis views. 

In part* that philosophy is embodied in the 
OOP platform which calls for appointment of 
judges who "respect traditional family values 
and the sanctity of hfe." That stand was criticized 

on ahoftion, but Ream said he 




RonaldReagan 



Wffllaai French Smith, a ck»c Rc^ 
and personal attome> sa\d. in j 
political philosophy is the la^ of ;he 
should be made by the legislature j-^ 
by the judiciary, and. to the mm 
made by the judiciary " 

Smith, mentioned both is ^ 
general or Supreme Court n.-m^m, 
expects the former California go^fm^ r = % 
federal judges mudi as he made appouumm 
the state bench. 

Paul Haerle, who screened ^ • 
nominees, said Reagan 'Mmuiianc 
quality and an esseniidlK conser.ai .e 
philosophy." Haerle saiJ he expecii Ra, 
look for nominees like Justice V^ilha- 5 * 
whose "knowledge, miellectua - 
conservative philosophv make him 4. . 
appointment." Given 'he philovphui 
for Reagan justices, ihere is much ifxcuo. 
who fills the conser\ ative bill. 

Among uomen, C aria Hills. 46. a w 
of the list. Setretarv ol Housing aad 
Development under derald Ford, and f( 
deputy assistant atiornc\ gencraJ, tk 
practices law in Washington. D C 

Also v^ell regarded is Judge MiL: 
now on a state appeals ^ouri m 
Reagan had her in mind lor a C ai :.*"^: a Sc— 
Court vacancy, but the opening j 
materialize. 

Although Reagan has not commiiid h«r 
filling a possible vacancy of MarshiB's sa 
another black, there will be pressures to s- 
One prime candidate for the "Wack jt 
William Coleman Jr.. 60, transport«ion Kctfi 
under Ford. Coleman, who was the 
Court's first Mack law derk. is mm hi prm' 
IHactioe. 

Other Macks mentioned indude U S So(>>> 
General Wade McCree Jr.. and Wail - 
lawyer Amalya Kearsc, appointed to the 
York federal appeals court by Carter Judir 
Higginbotham Jr. of the 3rd U.S. C»fcu« i ^ 
of Appeals, also may have an outside diaflcc 



Another Bill Gunter horror sto 



BY SIDNEY BEDINGFIELO 

FLAMBEAU EDITOR 

Bill Gunter stories are fast becoming cliche; 
every day it seems a new and more sordid tale 
centering around his political avarice surfaces. 

This one mvolves Richard Stone, the incumbent 
Senator he defeated in the Democratic primary, 
and comes via Gainesville Sun political reporter 
Ron Cunningham. 

During the vicious campaign, Cunningham 
writes that an incensed Stone confided in a group of 
reporters that Gunter owed his Cabinet seat to 
Stone's aid during the 1978 elections. It seems 
Stone loaned Gunter his South Florida 
organization, thus allowing Gunter to win the 
Insurance Commissioner's race handily. Once in 
office, though. Stone says Gunter immediately 
began positioning himself for the Senate race, and 
utilized his new contacts in the Stone organization 
to help toward that end . 

"He stole my people, and then he used them 
against me,*' Cunningham quoted Stone as saying 
at the time. 

It's that sort of anhnosity between the two men 
that some say prompted Stone to let Gunter lose to 
RepubUcan Paula Hawkins without Ufting a finger 
to help the fellow Democrat. 

Of course, Gunter aides belirve Stone cut a quick 
deiri with the Repubticani after his priouvy lots, 
and his appointment to the Reagan transition team 
only oonfinned diat fact in their eyes. 
And that may wcO be tme; it certainly seems thit 



SMALL CHANa 

way. Not only did Stone rtSm to pcn^ 
endorse Gunter. but he even ptow* ' 
Hawkins days before the cicctiofl offenB^ 
her around Washington after her vldor^ 
Stone's desperately-needed help ^ 
Gunter drowned under the RepiwK*" 
swept the state and thenation. 

But m the end. it's hard to 
animosity between Stone and GiMttcf. «^ 
half of the Gunter horror stories aretf* 

Also, placing all the Wame for Ob*^'*^^ 
Richard Stone is unfair. It doesn i f 
credit to the Paula Hawkins ctfip ^J^;, 
as she may be philosopbiolly 
housewife fashioned a big-nion^> ^ 
reeked of super slick political sa*^^ 
outclassed Gunter*$ tired effort 

Hawkins avoided every Pjifa^' ^ J^, 
cultivaied her pre-pUwied toug 

Deftly pUying on the media 
describe her as feisty and outs 

as fresh, inv«ofaiin|. "^^.^ 
point-of^. No 
nieiy was dkcmmd. Hawkms , 
1900 Florida voters. Uke those aK_ ^ 
wanted someone to beheveiorailicr 



'V*'' 




to FSi 
lalane^ 

, '.j' (>nal 



e*ef> 



'••are l<| 
Mi 2, an J 





e cou it 

~NAL 



;.al 



nominee, on t u, 



a close Reagan advj 
In a nuiihell. 
lav^s of the coui 
IcKislaiurc and convi 
^hc extent poiiibic. 

!'j>th as a possible , 
jj <Hjn nominee, .^lu 
f^:li)rfjia governor v^ni 
jhc made appomimcn 

i 

screened siaie i i ' 
simultaneously 
jally conservative 
[nd he expetis Reagan 
'uslice William Rehnq 
intellectual abilities 
make him an ideal ^ 
he philosophical 
icK is much specula., 
/e bill. 
|ia Hills, 46, is near the 
Hof Housing and lir 
Herald Ford, and for 
prney general, the 
jgton, D.C. 
iud§c Mildred Lillic 65 
court in Los Ant e$ 
for a Caltfor^ Sup m 
the opening did mt 




not cofiunitted hims 
icy of MaidiaH*s icat 
iViO be pre»iires to d 
for the "Wack sea 
), transpoftatioa tecr 

. who was the Sup 
lerk, is now in privat 

!ned indiade U.S. Sol 

ee Jr., and Wall ^ p 
, appointed to the 'W 
urt by Carter. Judge L 

Ihe 3rd U.S. Circuit C 

avean< 



itii 

M). 

m 

■IIP 

tor 



ror sto 



PHANGB 

tone refuse to per^o 
he even placed a c a 
iic election of tcnn^: to 
II after her victors vv.t 
L-ded help in Soul h Ho 

r the 

iation. 
hard to overcMim^*' 
,c and Gunier. even i ^ 

lor stories arc true, 
hlame for Ounter s u 

It doesn't 

'^kinscamp. Kcpr^ ^^^^ 
)sophically, tne ^ 
big-money campa^= 
political sa>>y. *" 

Ptiall as shecara- 

anncd t<'"»^''**'- J,,^ » 
» media's perverse " ^ 

acnvclv ngh»n< 
Iter tnai her^ . 
i iwkins undew'*'^ 
e those around Aec^ 

leve mralh*'**'** 



FhrUali 




Monday, ^k>v< 



10. im/ 5 



iculty pay hikes received 
ist in time for Christmas 



B^BARlCHtRtH 

I ^fjvc months and a court hiltleliy 
llZof but finally Florida State's 
[Jp04 »o «^ suppkmeatal salary 

f^d of Regents (BOR) releaicd $1.8 
' , .0 FSL last Friday so that efiglMe 
^ can be raised by an avcrafe 6.4 

. e the Legislature passed the 
^tncntal Appropriations Bill whkh 
|T(o improve Honda's univenities bf 

10 bring facuhy salaries op t0 par 
. .,-.onai averages (as worked out in a 
p ;v Oklahoma State UnivCTsity of 
I fvery major state university in the 

■•jPi salary inaeases could only gO into 
i- : !ne governor signed a controvcrsild 
lisp education bill passed by the Legitlaturf 
.amc day. The governor vetoed the 
education bill and went to court 
..j that it was unconstitutional for the 
Ijf'jfjre to tie salary increases to an 
,.: bill. The governor won his suit 
lew 2 and released the salary increase 



The BOl rdcaied ilK foBds tt» dw ome stM 
n^watiesRrkliQf. 

FSU shoi^ have the fuads to facuby 
MnlMers Mdre Chiistous, si^ Ilona 
Turriasi, the umveraty's director of bucket 
Mdaaalysis. Faculty mentes will receive their 
salary increase retroactively for Fall quarter. 

Approjofluul^ $300^ of FSU*s $1.8 
nUion wSI be aittoiiiatically distributed to all 
assistant professors, associate professors, and 
professors who were on salary last year, 
accordiaa to Turrisn. This nondiscretionary 
c omp e ti t ive adjiKtment wia bring all digible 
faculty up to at least 85 percent of the national 
awate salary for their rank and ^scipline. 

Another ^00,000 wOl be set aside to pa:y 
salary expenses (retirement plans, social 
security, taxes, etc.). 

The bidance. $1.2 n^ffion, will be paid to 
various eligible faculty m discretionary 
increases. 

**Any rmwwning critical dass/market plaoe 
faculty salary adjustment funds shall be 
eiqfKiided on the basis of imiversity master 
plans and ukKvidtml merit mod, experience," 
according to the ' Suppleraciatal 




Bob Graham fought in court for 
release for pay hikes 

Appropriations Bffl. 

FSU has not worked out a sfiedfic sysMi 
for distrttmting these discretionary increases, 
according to Timris^. The money will 
probably be givep to the various schools or 



colleges to be distributed by the deans based 
on the intent of the bill (v^hich was to bring 
faculty salaries up to national average 
salaries), said one of Turnssrs assistants. 

A system for distributing the automatic 
salary increases has been worked out. 
according to Turrissi. These ' competitive 
adjustments" vmII be distributed b> 
wiMTipanng a fadjltv member's base 
salary plus no n -discretionary increases (the 
general one percent increase and the "one 
step" increase, if applicable) in thai salarv 
since last year with the national average salar> , 
given the faculty member's rank and 
discipline category. (Discipline categories arc 
broad headings like social science, fine arts, 
natural science, etc.) If the national avcrafe 
salary of a faculty member is higher in the 
discipline, rather than discipline category, the 
discipline Figure will be used. (I>isciplines are 
more specific headings like criminology, 
theater, chemistry, etc.) 

If a facuhy member's salary is less than 8S 
percent of the national average, he/she wii be 
given an increase to Ining the salary up to at 

FMomri avcraie sahvies are Kstcd in the 
Oklahoma StM Universky 1979-80 Salary 
Survey, available in Strozier Library. 
Accordiaa to the Supplemental 
Appropriatioiis BiH, the OSU study must be 
thestandard for comparing salaries. 





TMIMBltB 




mwm f Mr ifiitr 



ALL SEATS 99C 



9 pm Mm. Footliaii 




Successful Careers 
Don't Just Happen 

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TUeSO^Y. NOVEMBER 18 



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Two year quest for child care center bears fruii 



BY l At RA CASSFI S 

The firsi da> time child care facility at F lorida Slate will 
open its doors m January, 1981. The Educational Research 
Center for Child Devejopmeni, located at 370 Hall Drive, 
will accept 40 to 50 children, three to t our years old. 

The Center wiii provide child care whiie functioning as a 
research center for several departments on campus, said 
Sherrtil Ragans, director of resident student development. 

Students and faculty from Early Childhood Education, 
Child Development in Home and Family Life, the School 
of Nursing, the School of Socii#Work, and other 
departments can conduct research projects throyfli 
Center. 

Applications will not be taken strictly on a tirst-come- 
tirst-serve basis, said Ragans, but based on a careful 
selection to provide racial, gender, and age balance. Aside 
from these considerations, priority will be given first to 
children of full-time students, then to children of part-time 
students and finally to children of faculty members. 

**FSU students are given highest pricHity because it is 
their money being used," said Ragans. 
Applicants nmst declare their income to drtmune the 



Consolidation 



from page 1 



in 1971, and has been a sore point ever since. The 1976 
charter ^id away with the surcharge the city now charges 
county residents, but would have extended countywide the 
10 percent city utility tax and also covered county telephone 
service. 

Law eat orcenent 

Ail three past charters proposed the abolition of the 
Tallahassee Police Department, placing law enforcement 
under an elected sheriff, which nxans a hefty increase in 
that office*s power. 
Who would fOKliie govtffiwnwit 

The make-up of the new government has long been a 
sticky point. There are currently five city and five county 
commissioners, and both p'oups are independent of each 
other. 

The 1973 charter proposed an eight member board: five 
commissioners elected by districts, with two more and a 
''strong mayor'* (elected not appointed) chotea 

countywide. 

in 1976, the proposal divided the county into six districts 
with one commissioner from each, with only tl^ mayor 

elected at large. 
How to elect them 

Some say the lack of single member districts in the 1971 
charter brought it to defeat as blacks and students formed a 
coalition against it, claiming it would dilute their power at 
the polls. The following two charters sought a delicate 
balance between single member districts (like the present 
county goverment) and at-large elections (as the city now 
operates). 

The 1976 charter would have made the races non- 
partisan, meaning the labels £>emocrat and Republican 
would receive less emphasis. 
Who would get fired 

When the city and county bureaucracies merge, 
supporters claim, it will eliminate duplication of services. It 
will also mean lots of people might lase their jobs as a result 
of the increased efficiency. A separate city and county 
attorney would no longer be needed, nor would a pdlice 
chief or.a host of other workers. 

The 1973 charter contained a proviso staling no one 
would lose their job as a result of consolidation, which 
watered down the increased efficiency claim. As with any 
employee-related issue, the merger calls for skillful 
negotiations. 

Today the ten politicians probably won't get past 
discussing who will draw up the charter and when. But 
somewhere down the road, before the voters get a chance to 
turn their recent approval into the reality of consolidation, 
all the specifics must be addressed. 



rate charged on a sliding scale. Ragans said no one will be 
turned away lor inability to pay. 

The new facilities on Hall Drive are kxated behind 
McCollum Hall in the old Mabry Heiehtv area Two 
buildings were renovated at a cost of S70,0UU; providing a 
covered drive-through carport, a fenced yard, new carpet, a 
new roof, and special equipment. 

November 17-26, is the week set for accepting 
applications. Interested persons should pick up 
applications at 370 Hall Drive from Carol Sanborn. 

The Center is the result of efforts begun in 1978 by F.SU's 
Women's Center to provide low-cost child care for faculty 
and students. The Child Care Co-op operated by the 
Women's Center since 1972 provided only night-care and 
depended largely on volunteer help and donations, though 
it did receive some Student Government funds. 

As a result of a law suit brought by women faculty at 
FSU concerning discrimination in pay and lack of child 
care facilities, the Women*s Cemer and the Florida Student 
Association pushed for revision of an FSU statute stating 
Educational and General funds could not be used for child 
care facilities. 

Between 1975 and 1980, three separate committees 
reported to President Bernard Sliger substantiating a need 



for ch,ld care a, FSf Inlv-.,„,^^^ 
allocation ot funds lor ihe pto\c^: --^^^mei 

The nev^ director of the Center k Joan Semfc i 
Assistant Professor of F arK ( ^rlJh.^M F^iih^^'^' 
College ot William and Marv i: ^^ rnshuft \ 
has done research in early chiljh , • . * , . * 
at the **I earning To l earn" fa. - Ui,^ 
earned her Ph.D. at the tnivcrsnv ut hondi 

"We can offer a unique senice to a unique .^^ 
said Sprigle, emphasizing the educational coreponef 
Center. **As a child care facility and research ctr 
expect more from us and we can give it 
resources and the professional trainrng mi, 
most commercial facilities. * * 

An important feature is parent parik r, 
Sprigle said. The Board of Directors v^ii _ ^ 
parent re pr esen tative. 

**We are more apt to make an impact > 
or her family because wc can dra\A on 
findings and use professionals trained specitMii> £ 
childhood, " she said. 

For more information, call Shernll Ragamaifcn <^ 
brat 104 Cawthon Hall. 




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flDHda FlamkcM Monday. November 10. 1910 / 7 



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World 

nHiAN - Divisions within Iran grew 
. yesterday with a Tehran newspaper 
'^ Ta former prime minister defending 
^ Gkotbzaieli, ,lhe imprisoned 
^ forcign minister who advocates 
ase of the 52 American hostages, 
fiiefe were no new developments to 
j that release of the captives, held 
.^dtys. was any closer. 
GiKHbMdeh. who warned before his 
eii that radical policies in Iran were 
liking the release more difficult, was 
sprisoned Friday in Tehran after allegedly 
. jcizing both officials of the stotc radio 
ntf Kiaision and the mihtants hoidtng the 

Nation 

KHANCISCO — The U.S. oil 

r;. dnilcd 5.168 more wells in the first 
"c months ot this year than in the same 
iriod ot 1979, the American Petroleum 



Institute reported yesterday. 

IK3BBS FERRY. N.Y. — Conrail said 
yesterday an employee responsible for 
routing trains has been removed from duty 
pending the results of an investigation of a 
train collision that injured 120 people. 

The employee was not identified. Conrail 
previously had attributed the crash to 
*' human failure." 



State 



MIAMI — • The state Departmeat of 
Health and Reluibiiitatt¥e Scnrices said 
Saturday Haitian and Cuban refugees will 
cost taxpayers in Florida another $90 
million by next fall. 

A state committee studying the econcmiic 
inipact of the refugee infhix rq^orts that 
Florida's problems have been compounded 
by the federal government's faihire to take 
responsibility for the thousands of 
criminals that left Cuban prisons during the 
Mariel boatlift. 




\i USOli from page 1 

Tk worst ot it all." Girardeau said, "is 
m the people do not seem to understand. 

people come back to us more 
angerous than they went away. The public 
r:eption of the prisoners at Starke and 
r prisons is of a bunch of animals. But 
'? not a bunch of animals. They reflect 
Jieamiude of their keepers." 
Other sources claim DOC officials create 
! olcnt image of prisoners to justify the 
lera -' lent's "get tough" attitude toward. 

Said David Mack, a staff worker with the 
Ftonda Clearinghouse on Criminal Justice: 
"Tky don't want the public to be appalled 

thev do to the inmates. That's the 
iii administration attitude — to be 
louic has got all the generals in 
"i.evMth 18 vcars in the ^vstem, that he's 
cd. that have been in the Goon Squad, 
thai s how they think the places ought 
IB be run." 

Mack agrees the prison system is often 
'^Ihon guards as well as inmates. He said 
^«in> prison guards are pressured into 
'kJicncc or aeecpiance of violence by other 
•»tk because of the parochialism within 
*tdcpanment. 

^hai assertion was echoed by the 
Coimiinee on Corrections. In its report, 
'^commitlcc complained that the location 
®f >iatc prisons in isolated rural areas with 
'^Hed labor pools means guards have close 
* of family or friendship with other 
^rds and arc therefore less likely to 
^l*iB of brutality agaanst inmates, 
j^i^nheraiore, the report says, corrections 
too low to attract -outsiders, and 
^'fied tppticants for correctiOBal duty 
**^tocomeby. 

DOC has hccn trying to win higher 
'^'^^ for its guards, for years, but the 
has been sbw. The department 
^ ncreases last year, but salaries for 
fcciions officers sttU average below 
^ (^f other law enfomnieDt offiocfs. 
Jjnhcrmorc. recent atteoqiU to build 
^5 close to the state's wban centers «e 
'ntly fought by diiMM who warn 

prisons, but not in their 
;"^rhoods. Radford said 
at ions for a new naxanuni tecwrity 
' n l>ade Cotttty have already 
approved, but construction has been 
^^^sfuiiv blocked by local residents. 
•■■^ underlying problem is that the 
Dublic just doesn't care about 



prisons, according to Vance Arnette, 
general director of The Governor's Task 
Force on Criminal Justice. 

*'l don't really think the public cares one 
way or the other," Arnette says. "For years 
and years the Department of Corrections 
has been-saying its had a problem. They've 
been asking for more money for years, but 
it never gets fimded. it's not a popular 
issue." 

House Speaker-designate Ralph Haben 
agrees: 

"You've got inflation, you've got cost 
increases in everything, you've got a higher 
crime rate. The concensus is that if I'm a 
law-abiding citizen why should I be 
concerned over someone who tried to do it 
the easy way? You're not going to change 
that. Some people may recognize the 
problem, but you're not going to get a large 
group of people to empathize with the 
problem. It's a social problem, but it's not 
a popular social problem." 

Haben thinks the answer lies in paying 
guards more and pushing construction of 
the new prison in Dade County, but other 
sources claim the state would do better to 
look seriously at alternate correctional 
methods, including allowing mwe convicts 
to serve time on weekends and remain in the 
community at their jobs during the week 
and giving shorter seirtences. 

** After two years in prison things start 
taking place that have long-tarm iamifW 
resuhs." said Clearinghouse mSf worker 
Jimmy Lohman. "InstitutiooaMzation 
starts taking place. Pwple get mora and 
more removed from the comnwidty and 
their faaulies and they have a harder tisK 

coming back. 

**We overuse uicarceration as a response 
to crime," Lohman continued. "A lot of 
people that m m prison don't need to be 
there. Fifty percent of the people in prison 
in Florida are convicted of non-violent 
property crhnes. Most of them arc young. 
Citiiens should start asking themselves 
whether spending aU that money to keep 
someone kicked up is an appropriate 
response when it's a known fact that 
prisons generaUy don't have a rrfiabihtauve 
effect ' 

As Haben said, "People complain about 
putting prisons and half-way houses in their 
neighborhoods, but while these prisoners 
are there they're under supervision. If one 
tries to leave it's immediately known. 
Which is better? In a while they'll be out 
and living next door to you without 
supervison." 



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i / Monday. November 10. 1980 Fio'^'^ ' n i. 





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Eraserhead'goes uptown 



BY IIOBEIIT HOW AKD 

FL AMKAl STAFF WHfTFJI 

TkeEkpkmMM , Mirocif, 7:15, 9:45 

" 'Tis true my form is something odd. But blaming me is 

kkmimg God; Could I cret^ myaeH miew I wouU not/mi 




— Johnhterrkk, IS86 
They have been waiting. Sallow-complexioncd, their 
pupils are permanently dilated, and their spines gradually 
defonning as they slouch in darkened theatres. They sit, 
ahusing iU-maniicred children in Rog^ Corman movies, 
mittng. 

The cineastes who have flocked to the midnight cult 
showings of David Lynch*s underground masterpiece, 
Fr overhead, have been waiting for his Elephant Man to see 
what a schizoid could do with 5 million dollars. 

Now we know — quite a lot. 

Neurofibromatosis had deformed John Merrick from 
birth to the extent that only his left arm and genitals were 
normal. David Bowie, starring in Bernard Pommerance's 
Broadway play, would contort hiimself as slides of Merrick 
were projected behind him and a graphic description of his 
illness read by Treves, Merrick's physician. Lynch's use of 
John Hurt for the lead in his film was another cause of high 
expectations. Hurt had had the bullet-head creature (not 
unlike the sperm-animals in Eraserkead) burst from his 
chest in Alien, and had played the quintessential drug 
addict in Midnight Express. He is also known to PBS 
audiences as Caligula in Claudius and Raskolnikov in 
Crime and Punishment. For his latest role, he allowed 
Christopher Tucker to bury him in the most elaborate 
make-up job since Jean Marais wiggled his ears in 
Cocteau*s La Belle et La Bete. 

A physician. Dr. Frederick Treves (Anthony Hopkins), 
rescues Merrick from the clutches of Bytes (Freddie Jones), 
a freak show entrepreneur. Treves takes Merrick to his 
hospital, staffed by such patrician types as John Guilgud 
and Wendy Hiller, and, through what J. Hoberman of the 
Village Voice calls "a perverse example of upward 
mobility," Merrick finds himself the darling of Victorian 
society. He receives visits from royalty and the famous 
actress. Dame Madge Kendal (Anne Bancroft), fortunately 
the only trace of intervention by producer Mel Brooks. 

Freddie Francis' photography is absolutely magnificient. 
The tonal values of the black-and-white photography are 
rich enough to tempt one to agree with Rudolph Arnheim 
that the introduction of color in cinema was a sign of 
degeneration. Like daguerretypes brought to life, the scenes 
of freak shows, squalid London streets, and expensive 
parlours have the ring of absolute authenticity. 

Echoes of Eraserhead are felt everywhere. Lynch's 
obsession with industrial landscapes and machinery is 
manifest in brilliant imagery, and the exceptional use of 
smoke recalls Lynch's remark that he saw Merrick's head in 
the clouds above St. Helen's eruption. Visceral memories 
of the wheezing of Eraserhead's child (who looked like 
nothing so much as a large submarine sandwich with a 
skinned calf's head protruding from it) are recalled by 
Merrick's respiratory problems. We can easily understand 
how Lynch once dissected a dead cat to study the textures. 

A Brief Word from the Critics: Hoberman was 
disappointed by Lynch's film version. He accuses it of 
being maudlin and a '*Manichean class bias. The lower 
orders are put on earth to exhibit, beat, exploit, and 
torment Merrick; their betters exist to invite him to tea and 
rhapsodize over his soul." Lynch creates "a world without 
Marx and before Freud," md, indeed, when Kendal meets 
Merrick and they start reciting lines from Romeo and 
Juliet, the bathos is such that it seems like a Mike Ogden 
parody of the Zefferetli original. 

The play, which Lynch was not legally allowed to see, 
does have its advantages. Kendal asks Treves about 
Merrick's **unafflicted parts," his genitals, and concludes 
that **he Bmsi be lonely indeed." Later she undresses 
kwlefly'SO that he might have a ghmpse of **paradise." If 
Ettiot Gould were playing such a repressed soul, he might 
once again demud, 'Bring me that soltry bitch with the fire 
in her eyes!" 

'^IH^^I^B^I^ir^^^^fc^ ^^^^^^^BHBfc^^ l^tBHSttlBM' ^^^5 til I^^IO^J <^^^kiH ^BWl^^^^tSS UK 

to be nofflML He tpeodi horns grooming hinaelf . He is fike 
B«tohiod*s Conioniiist: soawaie <rf hit own abnoraudity, 
he cuuMM pefccive tlie groleMiiieneii of lui society. As wMi 

HiifiMllyhis 



CINEMA 



us the ambivalence of life. Pommerance's Treves states that 
as Merrick "achieved greater and greater normality, his 
condition's edged him closer to the grave. So — a parable 
of growing up? To become more normal is to die?" 

If integrity of an intelligent mind locked in a twisted 
body is a cliche, it is one that is largely ignored in our 
society, whose physical ideals are indistinguishable from 
Leni Riefenstahl's Nazi youth camp fantasies in Olympia. 
-Lynch's darkly beautiful photography saves it, I believe, 
from being a pat on the back for the upper classes. Merrick 
is,iike his predecessors the Phantom of the Opera and Notre 
Dame's Hunchback, an alienated being lumbering through 
twisted landscapes as the mob hounds him into train station 
urinals. Just as Merrick's staff refused to give him a mirror, 
David Lynch has effectively thrust one into our own hands. 





Directw David Lynch puzzkd by yei 

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Florida FUunbeiu Monday. November 10. 1980 / 9 



THE A TRE 

Maiastage readies 
agrand spectacle 

iYROBFRT HOWARD 

fl AMBI Al ST AH \*RITFR 

Holmes Stands alone. Playing an emotional tune 
^J^n he stands in a space that is made palpable by 
svMrls through the shafts of dim lighting. In 
*rfMlBii»a«c Theatre's most hypnotic moments, the 
^Sb«I set silently moves in behind him. The audience, 
accustomed to being dazzled by the Islamic 
\^^uA the monumental Red Fort of Agra set of the 
gmoiisioene. has no need to fear that Cruafer of Blood's 
\7fl»ft ^"^'^ London will bring about 
[•ctic environments. Baker Street evokes Victorian 
^iKity with ao imensity of detail that holds up under the 
fsi jcnitiny. 

efforts of scene designer Bob Barnes and others have 
r ojccd through two and a half months of construction the 
visually impressive production ever mounted on 
Tsll|C. Technical director Russ Backes is guilty of no 
, mmm when he calls Crucifer Mainstage's "spectacle 
if tUc decade." Like Islamic arabesques, Crucifer's sets have 
w created using considerable logic that end by evoking an 
fomeoce that bloids all the technical daatau into a stale 
-vMifKatioii. 

Hollies' perceptkxis of time and space give his life an 
aacdible intensity, and Baker Sleet is his mind writ large. 
Comforted by its enclosing cornice and walls the color of 
*wl blood, he has the pleasures of syringe and violin to 
mkie him. yet he can't endure his bourgeois stability for 
ioiong. He finally needs Baker Street's door most of all. 
Hvooih it, disorder is injected in the form of clients, and 
Holmes can read their hidden guilts as csB»ly as a latloo on a 
j^\y''^ arm. 

*hcn Watson tells Holmes that, "1 have heard you say 
*r ! IV difficult for a man to have any object with him in 
aiij use, without leaving the impress of his individuality 
m It. " he is aUo expressing Barnes' fundamental concept: 




Stem Welsh md Bab Bmms m 0m m qf 

"The set should reinforce or somehow speak for the inner 
meanings, which is the same as intensifying character." 
Every set of Crucifer replicates the personalities who move 
through them, from the cold colors of Ponticherry Lodge to 
Stacey Alver's costume designs. "Lestrade doesn't fit 
anywhere," she says, referring to the poHce inspector. "He's 
the foolish comic tyi^ character, and he's in a green plaid so 
that he looks out of place no matter where he is.'* 

The basic narrative dynamic of Crucifer is the incursion of 
disorder (drugs, foreigners, love) into a stable system. Just as 
the different theatrical arts blend into a coherent experience, 
the oriental and occidental motifs converge in the sets. There 



is OK set tiiii is Eartam (llcd QMe at Afn^ «k tei || 

Wcittrn (Baker Strcct>« ami two tlutf are kamwmMom 
(Ponticherry Lo^ and tlie 
down the Thames throvrn in for good 

Any play that has five sets runs the risks of faOing apart 
with stylistic conllicis. ''Usually when yon do a show." says 
toene painter San 0aga>dl a. **most designers will try to putt 
it together under one heading of style, and Bob has chosen 
his deawnts frmn the different locations which work 
tonenier even thoMfh they aic not in the same place. There 
are repeats of patterns and color that carry through the 
whole show. What you try to do as a painter is make sure you 
keep a continuous style throughout There's wallpaper, 
woodwork, bricks and all the standard things in the show, 
but they are slightly taken over the edge. They are 
nonrealistic." 

"If I had been authentic," observer Barnes. "I would have 
been dull. So I theatricized and romaniici/cJ what voii \^ould 
think the Red Gate looked like if you didn't really knov^ If 
you were doing an Islamic play in an Islamic country, you 

wouldn't have tooverdoit." 

Lengthy set changes can also take the hue out of a thriller 
Lighting designer Steve Welsh uses a scrim, a curtain that 
becomes semi-transparent when lit from behmd. "Once we 
set up a momentum, we can't stop or we'll \o*>c the audience. 
That's why a lot of the scene shifts are done behind the scrim. 
The actors say a page of dialogue while the set's being moved 
off behind the scrim. We light through, it opens, and ihey 
walk into the new set. It never slows down." 

The sparse furniture and Indian mementos of Ponticherry 
Lodge make it obvious that its owner is a man with a dark 
past. "There's really no dialogue to that effect," says 
Barnes, "there is just perhaps an excuse to design a very 
exotic interior, seeing that he came back from India and 
decorated his house in the style of Indian architecture as 
John Nash did with the Royal Pavilion at Brighton." 

The design strategy of painting the sets as brightly as 
possible and then reveahng them in murky, smoke-infused 
lighting allows for considerable control. Barnes remarks that 
"I would hope that the scenery will speak for itself and 
somehow not too loudly. In a play like this, half of the fun is 
in the decor, so you pull out all the stops. This time you're 
allowed to go ii-^e.' 



♦» 



Crucifer of Biood opeM Thursday at 8:15 p.m on tfK fSU 
Mainstage. 



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ir»Mwig s Lawyer's Assistant Program wiH t)e on campus 
» Tuesday, Nov 78. from 9.00 a.m. - 5.00 p.m. at the 
^•cemenf Offica to maat Mtnatad studartts. For more 
'HomatKin contact me Placemant Office or The National 

AMauta, Qsofpto 90990, f^M^ 



'' ease wnd m 



as a 



I 

I 
I 

V 



SPRiiBoaY c 

CSPRWI6EVE 

SiH. It 



□ MUOAY 
S«L17-0k.1S 



11 -SHI, • 

□ FALL EVE 
0BL»-llar8 

THE NATIONAL CENTER FOR 
PARALEGAL TRAINING 

3376 Peachtree Rd.. NE 
Attanta, Qa. 30326 
404/266-1060 




■ 
0 




Dr. Allan O. Dean 

OPTOMETRIST 

810 Thomasvite Roaid 

(Intersection of Monroe and ThomsavMa Rd.) 
Comprehensive Eye Health Cars 

Appointmants - 222-9991 





Jm m All tilt SieiHaii 
1^ I ft SaM tar 



bring coupon 

on Buffet 

O a ap Ditt Piiia 






mtrctiaseof ^ Mm9m.n,m» 

Westwoad $tiopi>in9 Center 



Ploasa Mng coti|>on 

Tuesday Night 
Buffet 

6 00 p m -8:30 p.m. 
AN tlM Sicilian 0««|>'Disli PlMxm 
y Salad Bar You Can Eat 

$3.25 



1 UlRGf 





10 / Monday. Novonber 10. 1980 FiorMa Flambeaa 



WMMii't HmMi Can CRalc 

Ml ■. Wllory SI.. PensacM. Ha. 



4m77l 



Prseouci luliii. 



iMi 



Wednesday is SOc night 

ijtiTj^ ^ks^n Bluff Rd 




1317 JacitiawSfoH M, 



ScOINLAiiNBR 



4,, : 




lassifiedAds 




Aoom 308 Union, Open 9 AmTp^ 
Deadline: 12 noon the dav befo i 




2 FSU/UF COUPONS FOR SALE. 
BEST OFFER ACCEfTEO, CALL 
LORRAINE AT 444-5339. 

2 F S Cr U F COUPONS (FIRST DAY 
PICKUP) $50 EA. OR BEST OFFER. 
488 S578 OR 575-0443 AFTER $, 



1 FSU UF COUPON 

BEST OFFER CALL 644 4950. 



TWO U OF F COUPONS 
$35 OR BEST OFFER 
CALL 576 1979 

FSU/UF F OCT B AlUcOU'pON 
HIGHEST OFFER TAKES IT 
CALL «44 1150 ASK FOR TODD. 



Bar stools for sale in gr«rt condition. 
AAake offer 575 3726. 

Two coupons for U of F fame Tues. 
pickup S100 for pair firm! CMI after 

4pm 877 0817. 

Raleigh~Grand Sport 10 speed man's 
bike $100 Panasonic sa 40 fm stwao 
receiver $50, Call Jace 877 4395. 



BOSE 901 SERIES IV SPEAKERS W/ 
CHROME STANDS, M5Q/PAIR SH- 

7757. 

. ' ■ ' ■ ' - ' ■ " 3in. - = l» 

Firewood-S^it ymm awn and savei 
S2S. per ^ tan t r a chlaad . Cut into 
length, many wml mm^ ipNtNnfl. 

Call 877 5504. 

Naughahide couch-corner with coffee 
table 11 ft. long good condifton. tT?- 

7596 $100. 



For Sale Conn trombone. Excellent 
condition $150, One FSU-UF ticket. 
Best offer. Call 644-1397, Melanie. 



JBL 36 SPEAKERS EXC. COND. 
PR. 223-1375. 



$300 



Be prepared for ttw cold weather! 
Hardly worn.' heavy ^ length gray 
suede coat, quilted lining, women's 
size 13 New wai $120, asking $60. 644 
4075 before 5 p.m., ask for Laurie. 



Nov Cat Moden $130 
Leedex Monitor $115 
Zenith 12", RF mod. $50. Carroll 644- 



FOR SALE — TWO COUPONS WHICH 
CAN BE TURNED IN ON TUES. FOR 
THE UNIV. OF FLA. GAME $160 FOR 
PAIR. CALL 222 4528. 

10 speed 2S^/2 inch red Puch Cavalier 
wittt red fenders, all alloy parts, quick 

release hubs, toe clips, new chain and 
rear tire, fur seat. Only $195. Call eves. 
576 4261 or come by MwKMa Wa«an In 

Union daytime. 



In Leon County Special Land Sale 4 
miles south of truck route on Oak 
Ridge Road 3 acre tracts 1850 acre lOA 
tracts 1650 acre, 20 to 40 acre tracts 
1580 per acre, terms : 13% down 5 yr at 
12^ interest. 

J immySoyntanReatty phone 222 7581. 
After hours 576- »74 for Ben Boynton 




%972 FORD, RANCHERO, LOW 
MILAGE, AIR, PS. AIR SHOCKS, 
AUTO, PB, EXCELLENT 

CONDITION. 576 4018. 

Classic car ^65 Plymouth Valiant 
convertible. Slant 6 engine, runs good. 
Needs body work. $400- or best offer. 
Can JeH 644-6577. 




won RENT one bdrm. apt. at Univ. 
tir. »tmtl»Ut9 for rent, tts/ma. 4 




2 aedroom. 2 
people. SHS 



PARTY SPOT FREE FOR 1 MONTH 
SUBLET PRIMCE MANOR LARGE 
BEDROOM OPTIONAL 

FyRNiTy«c..aM.L boon sya-642t. 

SuWct 1 bdr furn. apt $210 month & 
alac. pool, laundry, cable tv. 2 blocks 
from FSU . Naad tolaaaa for Dec. or 
Jan. to June. Partcmwod Ap t 224 2180. 

^ BEDROOM FURNISHED 
COTTAGE N. DUVAL ST. S100 MO. 
$50 DEPOSIT. CALL M&-H4i AFTER 

6 PM 



1 BDRM APT TO SUBLET. UNFUR. 
POOL TENNIS CLOSE TO FSU. 
$195. 576 9389 AFTER 5. 



Sublet furnished 2 bdrm nouse wtr qtr 
frplace, waslter/dryer $250/nrM). It 
$100 refundable deposit. 077 7306. 



SMCC AVAILABLE WINTER 4 
SPRING QTRS OSCEOLA HALL 
MEALS A/C POOL MAID SERVICE 
10MIN WALK. CALL 21MS13w 

2 BR 1 B PART FURN. NEXT TO 
FSU, SUBLET DEC. I $105. CALL 
CINDY 4i 



Maai tartars 

turn. tal. 




FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED 
FOR W/S QUARTERS 2 BEDROOM 
FURN. APT. $142.5Q/MONTH PLUS 
Wi ELEC. CALL 576-3S30 ASK FOR 

CAROLYN. 



1 or 2 MALES NEEDED TO TAKE 
CONTRACT AT OSCEOLA HALL 
FOR WNTR 8. SPRG QTRS. TOP 
FLOOR APTMT END RM, QUIET 
A/C ALL UTILITIES INCLUDING 
FOOD PROVIDED. CALL 
MALC OLM AT 224 7509. 

F rmmt needed w/s cfir. Own room. 
Close to campus, '/a of rent Oi util. Call 
576-4392. 



Need a ride to New Smyrna Beach for 
Thanksgiving. Please contact Dee at 
644-5315 to make arrangements. 

WANTED LIVE IN HELPER FOR 
DISABLED GRAD STUDENT. YOUR 
OWN ROOM. CALL DURING DAY 
480-7962 EVENINGS 224:1514. NEED 
MATURE PERSON. 



Roommate wanted- male or female. 

One bedroom house 3 blocks betiind 
Sweet Shop 708 St. Augustine Apt. 1. 
$75 a mth. '2 utilities. See or leave 
message for Allan at the Omni Rest. 
1. 



Fm roommate wanted own room, in 3 
bedroom apt. one Mock from campus 
$91 plus one-third util. Call 222-1521. 

FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED 
FOR W/S QUARTERS 2 BEDROOM 
FURN. APT. $172.50/MONTH PLUS 
V7 ELEC. CALL S76-3S30 ASK FOR 

CAROLYN. 

Female roommate wanted to sublet a 

1 bedroom at Colony Club. Rent will 
be $110 per month apt. furnished. 
Good location on the sundeck 
overlooking a pool. Call 224 7311. 

Female roommate to share 2 bdr 
unfurnished duplex. No pets near 
campus $117.50 8. util. after*. 386 4309. 



WANTED, COUPONS FOR THE FLA 
STATE U OF F FOOTBALL GAME! 
WILLING TO PAY. CALL 576-7435 
MORN.ORNITE. 

ATTENTION 
TRYOUTS FOR NEW DANCE 
GROUP 
GOLDEN GIRLS 
To perform at FSU basketball games- 
need to have dance background and be 
a registered FSU female student. 
WHEN: TUES. NOV. 11th-4:00^ 
and SUN NOV 16th 2:00PM 
WHERE; TULLY GYM 
both try-out dates are compulsory 
wear ckithes to dance in (shorts, etc.) 
INFORMATION: 644 3000,644-3404. 



Ne ed cash? Got any baseball cards or 
oMier trading cards to saU? Call 
Larry, 093-3073. 



FAST. ACCURTATE TYPIST (65 wpm) 
TO WORK LATE NIGHT HOURS FOR 
FLORIDA FLAMBEAU. PART-TIME. 

CALL Amy sun. -thurs ■v ow w qs 

BETWEEN 7 PM AND 11 PM AT O**- 
SMI EXPERIENCE IN TYPESETTING 
HELPFUL. DO NOT CALL DURUM 
Wi. THANK YOU. 

Wmted desperately: Reliabto pa r t e n 

to babysit Syr old boy at least or>ca a 
week. Must have car to pick him op 
at scfKMi, bring him home tii 1 get 
(about 10). Salary negotiable. Please 
call Ann 3OS-0MO CBoMMl 



Overseas Jobs- Summer/year round. 

Europe, S Ame., Australia, Asia. All 
Fields. $500 $1200 monthly. 
Sightseeing. Free Info Wnte IJC 
Box 52-FL5, Corona Del AAar, Ca. 




TYPING FAST EFFICIENT 
LETTERS RESUMES PAPERS ETC. 
OSc P6. 306^043 

TYPING LET ME MAKE YOUR 
PAPERS LOOK GOOD! NEAR 
CAMPUS 75C/PG SUE. 222 9637 
5S 



TYPING-IBM DISSERTATIONS 
THESES TERM PAPERS. CALL 
PAT DIXON 386 1255. 

IBM Electronic Typewriter. Term 
papers, etc. Call 575 3914 anytlnw. 

GET A jTJmp on YOUR GIFTS 
CUSTOM PAINTED CARAFES 
half-carafes appx. $8, full carafes 
appx. $12. (Prices vary w/ design) 
Call 224-4979 for informatfon. 

'Juggling lessons seven days a week 
every morning. 10 to 12. Five dollar 
donation, everything supplied-S07 
College. 

Quality Typing of Dissert,, Themes, 
etc. Call 644 6031 or 224 3546/Sue. 
Reasonable. 



Excellent, quality typing using an 
IBM Selectric II. Experienced in 
typing term papers* tkasat* 
dissertations. 576-9354. 



Guitar lessons: Folk, Blues, C & Wflat 
8. finger picking, bottleneck. Dave 
Greenwald 222-7749, 7 1 1 pm . 

TYPING 

EXPERIENCED SECRETARY 
USING IBM SELECTRIC II. 
REASONABLE RATES. EDITING 
AVAILABLE CALL 877-36?4 
EVENINGS/WEEK-ENDS. 



TYPING FAST Oi EFFICIENT 
IBM ELECTRIC 
878-1587 or 386 4567. 



Experienced in typing theses and 
dissertations, prompt service, 
reasonable rates. Phone: Mrs. 
Marks 576-6913 between 0 and 5 
w ee kdays. 

LEASE 
YOUR FURNITURE! 

wide variety 
immediate delivery 
Option to Buy 
FURNITURE MART RENTALS 
1206 S. Adams 
224-4300 



MINI WAREHOUSE UNITS 

6x6 available-larger sizes $14J0 up. 
Call us at La fce woo d Mini Warehouses 

386 4191 



YOU WRITE: I EDIT, TYPE. 
Themes, term papers, at reasonable 
rates. Call eves, wkends 385 5574. 

WILL^ TYPING IN MY HOME. 
TELEPHONE 305-0600. KEEP 

TRYING. 



Edited Typing IBM Selectric II 
Reports/Reaumes/L^ters/Dissert. 
575-7171 Mission Rd. Area. 




TO THE PHYRST: I stole yoor 
blaosad sign, but 0400 isn't nearly 
enovgn to gat n>e to talk, but if you 

leave $1,000 in small, unmarked bills 
in the old bus shelter at Park 8i 
Monroe Sunday at 11pm, in a brown 
Skaggs Oi Albertsons bag, i ll think 
It. 



Dear Lefty who says that writing a 
Thesis and Rontanca don't mix. The 
14IB Is comMiB fast; 



FREE 15 WK. OLD MALE KITTEN. 
NEEDS A GOOD NOME. PLEASE 
CALL 90-6MO KOm TRYtNGI 



Pam E. K JaiiJj 

Ata w coming to T 
aalch your Gators git fiBBM<? R m 

rd beltor give me a caNMt^ tfiMr yau 
km la il a M i w 4 \ tor Gator meat!) 



The sisters of Phi Mu would like to 
welcome all of our new Big Brothers: 
Ja#f, Bart, Steve. Jeff, Mitch, Gil, 
Frank ie, Mark, Brian, Jordan, Mike, 
and Kelle tt. Low.T.W.F. 

3 Is a vary mystical and magical 
number which symbolizes perfection- 
3 perfect majors at FSU are ASIAN 

STUDIES, LEISURE SERVICES and 
MULTINATIONAL BUSINESS. 
Thank you Or. Lo, Dr. Singh, Or, 
Swain, Victor, Sue, Dr Ozanne 

KG YOU to "DRliNiClN" RAN T I NGS 
CONVINCED ME THAT YOU ARE 

NOT YOURSELF, BUT AN 
ANDROID GET RID OF YOUR 
FASCIST MASTER. 



$; I DON'T BELIEVE IT— NOT A 
WORD OF IT. 



Warning: Pete Dearaujo is back! 
After working with Charlie Daniels 
and Barbara Mandrell (he sold pot) 
he hopes to evoke laughs at tttat 

place of distinction, Bullwinkles. If 
you love to boo, hiss and spit at 
comics see this sorry excuse for an 
entertainer. Tomatoes provided. 

Fhave this theory about a variable in 
human behavinr called the bleephole 
ffactar. It seems ta be running 
particiriarly high since tlia e l a c ti aa. A 
cause 81 effect relationship? They're 
in the White House, in the senate A 
running rampant at FSU. Maybe R's 
time for a national colostomy. 

■ BAGELS! 

BAGELS! 
BAGELS! 
IF YOU LOVE BAGELS 

COME TO HILELL'S 
BAGEL SALE! NOV. 12 
IN THE STUDENT UNION 
MORE INFO. 222 5454. 



METHODSOF CONTRACEPTION / 
Mon 81 Thu 2:30pm, Tue 9am 
UNIVERSITY HEALTH CTR Rm 423. 
Men and vitoman vtolcome. 

^WrIwaro " 

for information leading to the 
identification of tt>€ person who took 
our sign AT THE PHYRST 

homecoming weekend. 

KUNG FU 
A new center for the Martial Arto. 
Itow formins classes 214 W. ColtoBa, 
224-7780 next to Grea t Bike Sbop. 

GAY.PEER VOLUNTEERS 

tf you are a femate or male with a 

gay related concern and would like to 

talk with a trained gay peer 
volunteer, call Dr. Lucy Kiziriar. at 
644 2003, M F, 8 5 Confidentiality 
assured and no records kept. 



CPE labor series working with §CU 
Florida AFL 8i CIO 81 Tallahassee 
Peace Coalition present: William 
Wimpesinger Presdient lam to discuss 
"Conversion to Peace" Ttwr., Nov. 13 
at 8 pm , Diffenbaugh Rm 201. 

SHABBOTT DINNER 
HILLEL WILL HAVE 
THE DINNER NOV. 14 
INSTEADOF NOV. 7 
MORE INFO. 222 5454 




TOM B THE CATS ARE 

PERFORMING AT BULLWINKLEt 
TUES., WED.. 8. THURS. ONLY. ^ 

HOLIDAY PORTRAITS 
Make Special Gifts. ..But fine 
photographic portraits take time. 
Package plana in color from 010.JO. 
Call Dalmar Studiaa at 234-3024. 

DANflL'S POR HAIR SPECIALli 
Precision cut reg. $0 NOW $7 inclades 

shampoo, conditioner, O cut. Call 
222-1112. Good thro Dec. 31, 11 



A POOR GIRL IS RICH AT POOR 
PAUL'S. .25 DRAFT ' 2 PRICE WINE 
EVERY MONDAY POOR PAUL'S 
POURMOUSC, 010 W. TCMM. 

n^MIANT? '^'^ 
FREE PREGNANCY TEST- 
VOLUNTEER COUNCILING 
TA»»StN C.ia-yi77. 

m% MONDAY B EviiV MONOAY 
IS BULLWINKLES LOG CABIN 
WORLD FAMOUS GONG SHOW 
WtTN KIRK DONOVAN. $S0 Itt 



Let Lonnie Linton, formerly with 
Command Performance, cut and 
style year hair tor less at 




THE ATHLETES' FOOT 
HAS SOLID WHITE DOLFIN 
SHORTS IN STOCK! 

Soft Contact Lenses • 

Hard Contact Lenses 

24 hour Contact Lenses 

B A L Contact Lenses. $50. ea. $05 pr. 

Dr. Allan Daan, m-oooi. 

Blue kaycar^ it honorod By the 
followinB marc hawto : NIc's Toggery, 
Athletic Attic, Hobbit Moagie 

Factory Brewmaster's Restauran* 
(opening soon), Mac $ In The Bac« 
Lounge, Pizza Pro, TaiiafiassT 
Ftowers, The Pub, The Phyrst. Adam 
A Eve Campus Hairpiace, Zonkers, 
BroiMn's Pharmacy, The AMelting Pot, 
Annatto's women's Fashions. Great 
Bicycle Shop Barnacle Bill s 
McGregor's Steak House, Roger 
Nelson Music Store, Tho Outpost, Sea 
Fox Restaurant A Launge, Ricco's 
Lounge, Quality Inn Souttiemaire, 
Captain's Lounge. 



■AT LUNCH AT THE PHYRST 

WITH A FRIEND! 




FOUND GERMAN SHEPHERD 
PUPPY. CALL 222-3103 TO 
IDENTIFY. 

Loat: Straw cowboy hat in room ii/ 
Bellamy. Great sentimental value 
and reward. If found call Chris at 644 
5505. 

Lost in Diffenbaugh Rm 232 on Mon 
Nov. 3 a leather pouch with initiaisj 
WBS. Has sentimental value. If foundl 
please call Wade 575 6078. 



LOST BROWN WALLET W/ ALL MY 
ID'S. IF FOUND CALL SCOTT AT 

576 9002. 



I LOST A LADIES GOLD SEIKO 
WATCH. AT THE FOOTBALL GAME 
224-7393 (REWARD) 

Lost 9/29/80 Opal earring sentimental 
value. Lost in the vicinity of pool 
locker room 81 Flambeau office Cai^ 
576^5565 or 305 8109. Ask for NK^rqAre\ 
Rawardlf 



Lost Tues. 3 keys on a yellow Auto 
Sound key chain. If found please call 
Wendy at 644-9?12. Thanks. 

FOUND GOLD BRACELET 
CALL TO IDENTIFY 
644 5695 

GLASSES FOUND OCT. 31st IN 
WMS BLDG TO CLAIM, GO TO 
UNIV. UNION INFORMATION 
DESK. (2nd fl^or) 

Found Set of keys lT/5 on Landis 
Green near library. Call 644 5958 to 
identify. 

FOUND A TAN & BROWN MAN S 
WALLET IN DIFFENBAUGH. CALL 
644^2964 A IDENT4FY. 

LOST SET OF KEYS ON SILVER 
RING INC. OLDS CAR KEYS. 
PLE ASE CALL 222-1521 THANK S. 

$25 REWARD FOR RETURN OF 
BROWN ATTACHE W/CONTENTS 
LOST AROUND ALUMNI VILL 
EVENINGS S74-4512. 



I L Bean and ec 

all HivtiBcotomor.' 

they've ill had pown 4,. 
at A#«/iof.,pf,a«»,|, 



Universrty 
644.5744 



Wanted 




Part or full time 
Flexible hours and ^ 
Must be at least 18 
Must have own cof 

and insu'T" 

Must t>e aDie to *Ofli 

weekends 

$3.10 an hovr to start 
plus mileage and 
tips 

ApD^v person 

( • .., , .; A) prr. 

ar *d 6 OC f-r" 
at any location 



M980Dom»«>»^'^ 



-ALL YOU CAN ^AT^ 

• BISQUITS •RIC£ANDCRAVYO« 

• COLiSLAW WAS ^ 
SERVED FAMILY STYLE WITH TR'*^'*^ 

FOR ONLY S3.25P6»»^«*^ 
DRINKS EXTRA 



MON 3 JO TILL 10 00 

TUfS -PBI »lBt1 
SATBSUMNOONaOlWC 



177 Itt* 



I 1 



piN lAtNDRY 

0 



• AM-4 PM 

h« day before 



^haidoB.B. Jam. 

Bean and c e umm r r 
|:havc in common • v^h . 
' vcall had px^^ crs doi,c 
|;M^ditf/>pe. ihai stfchai 



Rm. 314 
fuvtrsify Uam 

644 5744 



anted 



elivery 
ersons 



full time 
^ ours and days 
Lc at least 18. 
t have own car 
insurance. 
>t be able to worit 

H'O an hour to start 
mileage and 



)ly In person 
^veen 4:00 pm 

6 00 pwn 
my location 



J80 



o 

oa 



EAT— 

□ GRAVY OR 
H TRIMMINC 

OllTMMONROliT 



Seminole offense' riddles 
ation's top defense 31-7 



tWi^ FlM^eM Monday. Novnwbcr 10. tWAl 1 



nCHRIJ^BROCKMAN 

fl3 the detensive maich-up of the 
iitufday's confrontation between the 
Tah Fighting Ciobblers and the 
f Florida State soon turned into 
Rick. Sam and Bill Show, which 
.c rcviev^A from the bowl scouts. 
; Honda State play Pittsburgh and 
a believer out of me," praised 
jWy, a representative of the Gator 
which has indicated strong interest in 
iSaninoles. "But 1 didn't realize they 

fiOgOOd." 

fc>ing against the nation's top defense 
tied with Pitt for the honor.), the 
|:-aj;tfn^c racked up as much yardage in 
\^\ half (205) as the H Okies had given 
]x game 10 their first nine contests of 
rwon. 

^\ a slow first qu««r ( * ' We hdi&Itt 
ffdout their defense yet,'* quarterback 

Siockstill explained.) which saw 
Tech go ahead 7-0 on a 25 yard, 
dwn pass, the Seminoles erupted 
?omts in the second period and never 
lAi., ^ack after that. 

iiunk they fooled us on that play/' 



FSU coach Bobby Bowdeii,who celebrated 
his 51st birthday with the win, noted about 
the lone score. **It looked tike they wttt 
going to throw it in the flat. 

"The defense played super again, i don't 
know if Virginia Tech could have ever 
stuffed one down our throats." 

Indeed, the FSU defense, ranked second 
in the nation, was its usual awesome self 
while holding the Hokies to only 140 total 
yards, 57 in the air, forcing three fumbles 
and intercepting Tech quarterback S^gm 
Casey three time 

Linebacker Reggie Herring, who has 
done everything but wash uniforms for the 
Tribe this season, once again led the 
defensive stand as he recorded two 
quarterback sacks and 15 tackles, eight 
unassisted. Roll Simmons also looked good 
for the regional TV audiehce as he 
recovered a Tech fumble on the U and 
participated in five tackles. 

Offensively, the Seminoles were led by 
ABC player of the game Stockstill, who 
completed eight of 16 passes for 121 yards 
aad two touchdowns, both to Hardis 




^nmgfimn ^ffSU's tackstrokm 



Nnole svydmmers triumph easUy 



»R(>M M M l Rl PORTS 

l^fc«!<*^ State swim teams started the 
l^h "^^^ Saturday morning as 
'"^"'s and women's squads 
their first victories of the season. ' 
meet with Indian River 
L College, one of the nation's 
L^'****^ f^er schools for four-year 
^ue. the Lady Seminoles emerged 
'•34 victory while the men's team 
"';ttpi744»win. 

. ^Off 1 aational ranking of 28th in 
Udy *Nolc swimmers were led by 
McCoy as she tied one FSU 
1^1^ 2? broke another record to 
|^5«anoles. McCoy tied the six-dive 
* ^ «ie-rocter board and broke 



the mark for the three-meter board. Both 
records were held by Tina Patala, who set 
them during the past season. 

M(.<'oy compiled 237.35 points on six 
dives for the lower board to tie the year-old 
record and shattered Patala's three-meter 
mark with a 242.2 point total. 

Led by Region 111 1979 Coach of the 
Year Terry Maul, the Lady Seminole 
swimmers have seven returning AM- 
Americans this year as they hope to better 
their 9-3 mark of last season. 

The Tribe swimmers, both naie aad 
fcmaJe, will face their biggest rivals, and 
one of their toughfest foes, next n e hmd 
when they square off afunst ttm QsM 
swiniteam. 



E 

« 



X3 
O 

I 




1 



This one's for the record book 



FSU plaoekicker Bill Capece connects on the field goal that set an NCAA record 
for the OMMt points seored in a si^le seaseii (9Sr> Saairday aigtat a|iaast Virginia 

Tech. _ 




BASKCTBAU 
AT FLORIDA 
STATE 1$ 

BIG 
STUFF 



STHBEIT TICKETS M 
SALE NOW «T THE 
HNION TKKEI OFFICE 
I AT THE ATHLETIC 
TICKET OFFICE IM 

TlUf avM. 



11 HOME GAMES 



lov. 28 Central Florida 

IK. S JiCkSSBVlllt 

lec. 30 sootii CimiM 

JM. 3 Memphis state 

jM 10 laillit fiRllMi 

JM. 24 Tilane 



m. 7 UflisfMi 

Fes. 9 St. Levis 

FH. 11 ftnfftrt" 

Ml« 21 HtHift A A 



CIS-STUDENT SEASON PASS 

m TUKH UFOMUTM CAU 144-1111 






00 




♦ 



». .1 



1 ' 4 




12 ' Monday. November 10. 1980 Florida Flambeao 



early 



means 



FROM STAI 

Too little, loo late in the scoring column and too much, 
too early in the mistakes category proved to be an 
insurmountable barrier in the way to victory Friday night in 
Doak Campbell Stadium. 

Playing before it's smallest crowd of the season. The 
Florida A&M Rattlers fell 24-22 to Mid-Eastern Athletic 
Conference foe North Carolina A&T. The FAMU squad is 
now 3-5 on the year and 1-2 in the conference. The Aggies 
climbed to 7-2 overall and 3-2 in the conference . 

The Rattlers smelled victory late in the fourth quarter 
when they cut the Aggie lead to a mere two points on a 
Bobby Hawkins punt return of 69 yards for the score. But a 
sniff was all they got. the successful PAT was the final 
score of the game as FAMU unsuccessfully tried an onside 
kick and A&T's Joe Clyburn fell on the ball giving the 
Aggies a chance to run out the clock. 

The North Carolina school virtually dominated the 
contest, racking up 329 yards on the ground to FAMU*s 
175, a statistic that irked Rattler mentor Rudy Hubbard. 
But the former Ohio State player and assistant coach was 



even more frustrated by the peiMities his yomg sqyad 

c<rilected. • 

"Whirt botheri iBc in«« thwi the w they controlled the 
ball is the (ductal penalties w^had," Hubbard said. 
"Discipline is so mpmtmA. I guess ive*re going to have to 
work on tiiat some more ^ week/' 

The Rattlers managed oidy six first downs hi an AifT 
dominated first half with their only score coning on a 
blocked punt which Wiilfred Ardfcy covered the end 
zone after Cahin Forte had stopped the attenqyt. But it 
was all downlnH from there and the halftime score was 14- 
7. / 

FAMU rallied briefly in the third quarter, going on top 
15-14 on a scoring strike from quarterback Nathaniel 
Koonce to Clarence Chester, who then hobbled the snap 
from center on the PAT and knifed across to put the 
Rattlers up in the game. 

But the Aggies battled back, adding a field goal and 
another TD to hand the Rattkrs their fifth defeat of the 
season. 



Bowls 



from page 1 



Instead, the Tribe went for a two-point conversion and 
ended up with the 10^9 loss and an 18th spot in the polls. 
Since then they've battled back to national rankings of two 
(AP) and three (UPI), trading spots with USC in the two 
wire service polls. 

But Saturday's win, in front of representatives from the 
Orange, Cotton, Sugar and Gator Bowls, coupled with No. 
1 Notre Dame's 3-3 tie with three-touchdown underdog 
Georgia Tech wffl ahnost assuredly move the Tribe one slq> 
closer to the pinnacle d c^^ege football, the fthdional 
Chawpioaship. 

"I just hope Southern Cai won't bounce past us ISk they 
<id last week," Bowden noted. 

And if the Scminoles are raidced second in the nation 
when the bowl bids eoine out next Saturday, what will the 
bowlsdo? 

'^Numbers One and Two sounds fike a dream OMtch-iq), 
doesn^t kt" countered Sugar Bowl Commits Vice 
Prsiidcnl J.B.CoinconSatnrday during theTrtties mnth win 
of the season. "The rankings are what really count. If FSU 
is ranked No.. 2 it would be hard for us to overlook them. 

"1 don't agree with theory that independent teams 
have no chance for ra^ior liowl Mds. It's good lor us to gel 
highest raakndtettBsposs^le." 

And a Georgia-FSU matchup for the National 
Championsliq) would be a gme made in heaven for the 
Sugar Bowl. But the Cotton Bowl, which has the ridiest 
prize in the post-season game pot, is also keeping a dose 
eye on the Semincte and the developing bowl picture. 

"The Notie Dame game definitely hcHped Florida State," 
feoMrked Cotton Bowl representative John ScovalL '*We 
will wait tffl Tuesday (when the rankings come out) to try 
mod sort out this Chinese puzzle. But the Alabama-Notre 
Dame game will have a big effect on the situation." 



Scheduled for Saturday at 4 p.m. on national tefevidon^ 
the match-up between tl^ Crimson Tide and the Fighting 
Irish could definitely swing the bowl pkrture, at least for the 
Cotton Bowl. And the loser may drop out of the nujor 
bowl picture altogether. But, according to linebacker Pmd 
Piurowski, another game had equal effect on the Seminole 
New Year's day plans. 

"I'm glad Georgia beat Florida (26-21)," he noted. 
"That should help our chances of getting into a major 
bowl. (The win virtually assured the Bulldogs' presence in 
New Orleans on January 1 .) 

But, everyone continues to ask, do the Seminoles have 
the national backing and interest needed to convince bowl 
and TV people they're worth a trip to a major bowl? 

"The days of Florida State not being recognized are 
over," assured Coincon. "Florida State now has national 
prominence." 

"For TV ratify a mtfiond folowing can be good. The 
ratings are important to us. because that's what we use for 
negotiating with the network. But if we're talking about 
No. 1 versus No. 2, everything else is irrelevant. ' ' 

So it a& hinges on the rankings jmd whether the Tribe, 
without the ttiKfition of Notre Dame, USC and Atebama, 
can prove to the pollsters wi^ its record that it deserves to 
be No. 2 in the nation. And now o^ tone, and the 
issuance of the polls on Tuesday, wis tcD. 



FSU 



from page 11 

Johnson in the second quarter. Stockstill also scored once 

from the one. 

Sam Piatt provided the knock-out punch in the Tribe 
attack as he set an FSU record with his sixth 100-yard 
game of the season. The senior tailback romped for 108 
yards on 24 carries, scoring once on a nine yard burst up the 
middle. 

Bill Capece capped all of the Seminole touchdowns with 
PATs as he kept his record perfect for the year and added 
their final score, a field goal from 45 yards out to give 
himself the national record for the most points scored in a 
season (99). He is also within one field goal of tying the 
collegiate record of 22 field goals in a single season. 

SPORTS IN BRIEF 

Football playoffs begin Wednesday and ail teams should 
call the IM office at 644-2430 to find out who and when 
they play. 

The FSU junior varsity will phiy the IV sqpad from 

Florida at i:30 today in Campbell Stadium. Admission is 
free. 



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w m^ESDA Y, NOVEMBER 11 1980 

Leon County judge 
orders release of 
'dangerous' escapee 

BY LADRA CASSELS 

RAMBEAl STAFF WRfTf I 

K mn arrested after allegedly harassing and threatening 
women on the Florida State campus was released from the 
Leon County jail Thursday despite information idoitifying 
him as an escaped mental patient from Oregon. 

Leon County Judge Hal McClamma, who presided over 
the man's hearing last week, said Joseph Edward BlauweU 
could not be held on that basis and '*the best decision was to 
order him out of town to be somebody else's problem . ' ' 

Blatzwell, 27, who has an extensive multi-state criminal 
record, escaped from Oregon State Mental Hospital where he 
was involuntarily committed after thrrfttening to kill another 
person. 

Blatzwell was arrested by FSU pc»lice under the name 
Joseph Blatzwell, one of 19 aliases used by Blatzwell, 
according to the national computer crime file report received 
l>y the Leon County Slwrifrs Department. He was charged ^ 
with trespassing after warning and held in the Leon County g 
Jail until November 6. £ 

Authorities in Oregon refused to extradite Baltzwell 
beause he was scheduled for release from the hospital in a 
matter of weeks at the time he escaped, according to sources 
at the Florida State Police Department and the Sheriffs 
Department. The Sheriffs Department decided the expense 
of extnKiition was not justified since Blatzwell would be 
released very soon after his return to Oregon. 

"They will take him back if we hand-deliver him," said 
keith Dawes of the Sheriffs Department. **They don't want 
him despite the fact he has an extent ve history of criminal 
violations." 

Blatzwell's criminal file records 35 arrests for 13 violations 
including assault ^ tiery, obstructing police, and sex 
ottenses. He has ten arrests for invasion of privacy, the most 
cccni being the trespass charge filed in Tallahassee last 

ANAL YSIS 

The Anderson 
indifference 

Why Anderson's campaign 
must be seen as a failure 

BY MARY WmmAH 
PAoncNcwssdvurF 

In his post-election comnienU, Rep. John B. Anderson has 
tried to cast hb independent presidential campaign in a 
positive, optimistic light. But by any objective standard, that 
^^ampaign must be judfed a fatture. Although he received far 
t^ore media covaift than any other candiate runnmg 
outside the major parties, and although he spent roughly $12 
^'•lion, Anderson received only seven pmeat of the vou. 
and failed to carry a single state. 

It will be unfortunate if Anderson's poor showing snuffs 
'ut the hope of an independent force in a future election, 
^cadents of U.S. history and of interest group politics have 
to major party coalitions which make little sense. The 
voters find themselves thrown together with people whose 
Views on maay imiea flwy Mm. The indcfieDdent option 



SERVISG T M l AH \SSHK)R6H YFARS 



VOL ^ Aa 37 




Joseph Blatzwell (LK who escaped from 
Oregon mental hospital prior to amvina m 

month. 

Less than half of those arrests resulted in convicti<ms. 

Despite efforts by local enforcement agencies to hold him 
longer, BlatzWeU vm released from the Leon County Jail On 
November 6. He allegedly harassed several women on the 
FSU campus. 

One woman present at the time claimed Blatzwell said he 
"would rape anyone he feb like raping/* and that he had 
raped women before. 

"He exhibited some strange behavior but not the kind to 
warrant invoking the Baker Act." said Jack Handley of the 



TeUahasaee, at hearing be^on Leon Cmmiy Judge fM 

McClanum (far right) last we^ 

FSU police. 

Under the Baker Act, persons can be detained for 
extended psychological evaluation. 

"The Baker Act states his behavior must be dangerous to 
himself or to odiers and exhibit that bdiavior before police 

officer," Handley said. 

Handley said Blatzwell repeated to police that "women 
who wear shorts deserve to be raped." The statement vvas 
made in a police interview with Blatz\Kell but officials 
decided the comment did not constitute behavior 

Tmm ESCAPEE, pm 7 





John Anderson and runmngmate Pat Lucey on 

yfoters prefer candidates w/ri. - numUity: Andermt 
Z^%Mtne MS early impression as an avm^ng angel 



Sugar to snub 
Seminoles: paper 

MIAIVII — The Sugar Bowl wM dkome 
the winner of tlie Notre Daine-Alahaiiia 
game SMrday to he the Georgia BvlMogs' 
twoaent in the New Yw's Day gant* the 
Mimm News reported MmiMy. 

Ocorgb has oaiy to defeat Aahare to 
become the Soatheasttni Coafertncc 
^mpiofi aad^ aa aa to wM rtk hid to 
tiK game hi the Looisiaaa Saperdoaw. 

The News saM the Sagv Bowl was the 
miy New Year's Day game that was 
decided^ hat that Florida State woaM 
prohabiy phiy in the CoOoa Bowl at 
md tit Qmm a| MM woM 
what's left 

Fornui howl 'Invitatioas m 'not' a! 
go oirt aaii Satarday. 

"WeVe going to have the No. 1 teaai 
IGton^ aai tlM's gohtg to as the No. 
1 howl," aa aaideatified Stegar Bo«l 
eonualtteeauui was ^aoted as sayiag. 
** We*re' ^ » ^ wiawr of the 
Notre Daaie- Aiahaaui game to pi^r lot the 
aMhNMrt 'Chaa^ioasMip*** 

K'Ifee a(^wimwr said fh^ ipnn*"'***''*' 




I 



t 



*1 

# 

2 / Wednesday, November 12, 1980 Florida Flambeau 



FPIRG: giving students a greater voice in public policy 

t^rm th.ti cioiatures were collected to establish the chance. **lt*s different people, doint it a Mt. 




BY SAM CO LLY 

FLAMKAli STAfr WVIEB 

Some ideas never die. The Florida Public Interest 
Research Group (FPIRG) is one of them. 

FPIRG is a student-oriented group dedicated to giving 
students a greater voice in public affairs. The group is 
holding it first organization meeting tonight at 7:30 in Room 
201 Longmire. **FPIRG, if established, would be a vehicle 
for student involvement in areas of public policy," student 
government president Rob AusUnder said. 

Neal Friedman, one of the organizers of FPIRG, anq>Iified 
Auslander's remark. "Students rigirt mem haw »o power. 
It*s (FPIRG) for students who mt frustrMd because they 
have no impact.*' 

The first attempt to establish a PIRG at Florida State was 
in 1972. At that time, according to the ^oup*s organizers. 



more than enough signatures were collected to establish the 
group on campus, but the Board oi Regents thwarted 
FPi RG before it got c^f the ground. The BOT adop^ a rule 
that re<pitred, in addition to its estab&toent bdng approved 
by five percent of the student body on a peUtkm, all funding 
for public interest research groups be voluatary. FPIRG, as 
then chartered, could not meet that stqMlation. 

Funding has always been a nemisis for FPIRG. If 
wp^oved by students, FPIRr. would collect $2.50 from 
every student's tuition and Activity and Service fees. 
Students not wishing to support FPIRG could then, in the 
second and third week of classes, receive a refund. 

The idea of an additional charge,even if refundable, levied 
against students is always controversial, and an attempt to 
hnjrfement PIRG in 1978 failed for just that reason. 

But organizers feel this year's effort stands 4i better 



chance. "It's different people, doing it a (fcffr - 
Kelly Flood, one of the FPRIG's b«to$, «,d 

the students we beiM orgwuied. It's a mcft ~ 
"it's also more granroots/* according t© k 
organizing committee was quick to emphasut H ^ 
organization run by the students, for the students \ . 
much of the work ro^t be done by profesion^ 
like faiwyers, lobbyists, and teachers, tlj monc. , 
controlled by an elected board of directors. wNcfc * 
ahvays connst of students. 

Some of the areas in whkh FPIRG woukl work i.. ^ 
to its organizers, iachide the media, "various couikJ 
state aad local gOYenment," and the courts. 

But r^t now, they say, the immediate usk is top 
thing off* the ground. So far, FPIRG has coUecied Uk « 
of 300 to 400 students who have expressed in in^ « 
group. Tonight's neeting shoidd bring more. 



die 



Board of Regents narrows chancellor search to two 




UNITED PRESS INTERNATIONAL 

Tampa — a citizen's committee screening candidates for 
chancellor of Florida's university system narrowed the field 
from 27 to two Tuesday — U.S. Energy Secretary John 

Sawhill and form^ Wclkslcy CoUcge President Barbara 

<fc ■ ■■ • ■ 

Newell. 

Dr. Newell — U.S. representative to the United Nations 
Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization in Paris — 
was one of five finalists picked in May and then interviewed 
by the Uaivo^sity Board of Regents search committee. 



Sawhill is scheduled to be interviewed in Tampa 

tomorrow. 

After the first list of five fmalists was agreed upon, one 
candidate withdrew and the search committee el fa mnated 
three, all but Dr. Newell, in August after personal imerviews. 

The committee convinced Sawhill to put his name in 
contention and planned to forward the names of Dr. Newell 
and Sawhill to the full Board of Regents for a final decision 
on who to name to the $65,00(>-a-year job to succeed E.T. 



York, who resigned. 

Two days before the oonunittee was to meet to fonkird iir 
reoommcndafion, SawhUl was appointed to his federal pm 
by Presideat Gaiter and dropped off the candi(tee fist 

The search committee was concerned that forwardif^ the 
name of only one candidate would leave the fuH Botrd of 
Regents with little choice, so it asked the citizens group tc 
reevaluate those they dismissed earlier, plus six addmoui 
nimes, including Sawhill. 



ml 



University of W. Florida may pull out of student lobby 




BY MICHAEL McCLELLAND 

FLAMBEAU STAFF WRITER 

Student government officials at the University of West 
Florida, citing financial problems and philosophical 
differences, are considering withdrawing from membership 
in the Florida Students Association. 

**I think being a member right now is taking a lot of time 
and money and not doing us a lot of good," said Ron Van 
Horn, UWF student body presidem and the university's 
representative to the FSA. 

The difficulty, according to Van Horn, is the state-wide 



lobbying organization tends to concentrate on major issues 
that will affect students at all Florida universities, and neglect 
issues that are of importance to individual universities. 

The FSA is made up of the student body presidents from 
each of the nine student universities. The FSA lobbies for the 
more than 120,000 students enrolled in the state university 
system. Losing UWF would cost the FSA $3,400 in annual 
dues from the two-year university. 

**It would mean that the organization would not be 
representing the nine state institutions," said Rob 
Auslander, students body president at Florida State and 



chairperson of the FSA. "We would lose the inpui of a 
smaller school, which is important, f think H\*ould be 
detrimental to all the students in the state " 

Withdrawing from the FSA is : being discimcd. 
according to Van Horn. Such a mo\^ would require ik 
approval of the UWF student senate and president. Wi 
Wallace, administrative head of the FSA, will be m 
Pensacola to address the UWF Senate today, and Van Hom 
said he plans to discuss his concerns with other members 
the organization at the FS.A's November meeting before be 
asks the senate to vote for withdrawal. 




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Florid j f iiiiil>e«i Wednesday, NoYcmber 12, 19§0 / 3 



Merger vote set for October; 
officials want opinion poll first 



B\ DANMVOGT 

. , and Leon County may 
j in less thin a year if 
^.^^^ J timetable grudgingty 
^osd Monday nighl. 

fflidjng out what county residents 
,iBt in a consolidation charter 
a public opinion poll was also 
^led by the ten city county 
„0BlBiofiers. who elected themselves 
jc charter drafting coounittee. 

TV timetable, composed by first- 
^ itv cooiinissioner Carol BeUamy, 
,y,o! the charter to be drawn Op by 
amy 10, submitted to next spring's' 
:^,latyre, then appear on a special 
fferesdnBi ballot next October. 
^me, however thought that was 

fvhiflgthif^. 

•Ihe more haste that is used, the 
^ the ippearmee we're puslung 
M thiflg again," maintained County 



Commissioner Lee Vause. Vause 
worked on three charters during the 
70s, an of wNch were rejected by the 
voters. 

City Commissioner James Ford, abo 
in on all three charters, was disturbed 
at the lack of conunon people pn the 
charter commission. 

•The first (bad course) we're on is 
right now — when do we plan to 
involve John Q. Public Citizen? The 
ten of us (connnlssionerB) have no 
credibility when we put the charter out 
on the Mock. We need to get the public 
invohwd or tiwre's no poim in wastfaiga 
lot of time/* Ford said. 

Bdiamy, seemingly the most 
optimistic n^mbo' of the charter 
committee, feds people living in the 
urban mm d tiie county mcreaangly 
need services only the city can provick, 
and consc^dation is the way to soivc 
the i^oldem. 




^iHuncheon 



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4 SalaU Bar You Can Cat i | 

$2.79 




City Commissioner Carol 

Bellamy, a newcomer to the local 
political scene, is pushing 
consolkkukm 

BeUamy also ^ said it is more 
inmiortant to follow the timetable than 
conduct the pubhc survey. 




ITTOOKA 
HUNDRED YEARS 
lOMAKE^THISfiOOi: 




Heve't iMK «f laiett ttykt 

from Fryr It comes from matt 
than iOO vean of benchcs^kiag 
cxpcncncc. Knowtag die old i^lct 
is pMi of how Fiye keeps < 
up with fresh new styles. Yet 
even though our <irviesnuiycl 
over the years, aur q^tty and 

The best. 



Students may get 50% Taltran discount 



BY PANNI VOGT 

II AMBtAt ST AH WRITEK 

V jdcnts may soon be able to ride TalTran buses for half- 
pfiiCif the city commission gives the go-ahead tonight. 

While still in the conceptual stages, the discount is part of 
i package of fare reductions that may be offered students 
aod aiy employees and eventually the general public. City 



Manager Dan Kleman recommended the reductions be 
approved by the commission when it meets today at 5 p.m. 
in City Hall. 

The commission might also approve a special bts 
accessible to the handicapped to use on the Florida State 
campus. If the commission approves, the new bus would 
replace one of the Seminole Express shuttle buses. 




IP 



Thomasvilki Rd. ^^^^^ Carriage Gate 
224-9527 893-5038 




2 
J 

ft 



1980 illa^^rigal ©mneri <©rlrcr jForm ^ 

Tickets to the 16th Annual Madrigal Dinner pageantry at Florida State University will be sold by mail order only. The 
complete prke for each tkket is $10.00. Your tickets will be mailed to you beginning November 20. Please be sure to 
read all ticket instructions carefully to avoid a dday in fiUing your order. PLEASE REMEMBER THAT ALTHOUGH 
EACH ORDER HAS PERSONAL HANDLING, NO CHANCES OR ADJUSTMENTS CAN BE MADE ONCE YOUR 

ORDER HAS BEEN RECEIVED. 



CUT ALONG THIS tlNE 



I 



FSU 1980 MADRIGAL DINNERS ORDER FORM 
(Please Print) 



Please note: THOSE WISHING TO SIT 
TOGETHER MUST SUBMIT THEIR 
ORDERS TOGETHER. 



Name 

Mailing Address 
City & State 



PLEASE TAKE THESE STEPS: 

1. Make checks payable to: 
FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY 



ZipCode_ 



j Telephone No. 



Are you: Student 
Endosed find 



Faculty. 



Staff. 



First time attended: Yes_ 
_ Other 



No. 



for 



tickets ® $10.00 each. 



(amount) 



dumber) 



NOTE: Umit of 12 tickets (1 table) per individual request 



I. No specific night preferred. 

I^you want a specific night, indicate numerically your preference of 



2. Prepare a kgal-nae, stamped, 
self -addressed, envelope and 

enclose it with your order. 

3. Mail your check, order and 
stamped envdope to: 

Central Tkket Office 
University Union 
Horida State University 
Tallahassee, Florida 
32306 

SORRY, NO EXCHANGES 
ORReWDS 





1; 



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QifiJiiisri 



rifll ; 




ft Mflffl 




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If j; 



Eorida Flambeau 



/ 



Tile florirti n— tiriii is puMished b> the Florida Flamfbmm Foundaiioii. tnc. m 
pralk corporation which is solely respomiblc for the contents of the paper 

Florida Flambeau Foundation. Inc. Newsroom. 204 N. Woodward Avenue, phone 644-5305; Mailing 
address. P.O. Bo« U-7001. Florida Slate Uirivcnity. 

Sidney BcdMf fidd. . . . . : Editor 

Bob O'Lary Photo Ediiof 

Brad I ision News Editor 

Chris Brockman Sporis Editor 



Mary Tebo Associate Editor 

Sieve Dollar Associate Editor 

Chris Parrel! Associate Editor 

Melissa Beckham An Director 



Democracy is a blues band 



Notes of the election: 

An interesting scenario from the West has unseated Democratic 
Senator James Corman of California and Democratic Representative 
Al Uliman of Oregon winning if not for an overzealous broadcast 
press on election night. 

Both men felt quick network projections of Reagan as the 
wimm* of the Pre»eQtial ^ctlcm may have kept Democrats sway 
from polls out west, and thus serioi^ly hurt their causes. 

Indeed, Wal^ Cronklte came on the the ak at 5 p.m. EST and 
claimed CBS exit polls showed Reagan with a substantial lead. This 
some two hours before the polls closed in the East, and a full five 
hours before polls closed in Claifornia. 

Of course, Walter's reprt was on the money; Reagan had already 
clinched the victory by then. But the, West Coast Democrats do have a 
point. 

Democrats no doubt discouraged by Birch Bayh's early concession in 
Indjiana, must have figured it to be comp^tely hopeless in Republican- 
dorainated California, Oregon and Utah. 

But competiticm is the name of the game for the networks on 
election night, so when the lijghts rofied the anchors ii^reif t i^mM to 
withhold aocuiate information, even if it meant skewing the results 
out West. 



Carter strategists decided early on that a debate with Ronald 
Reagan could only hurt the President, according to the New York 
times, and tried every way possible to wiggle out of such a 
confrontation. 

It seems that the Carter people were about to offer Reagan an 
ultimatuni on October 14 calling for a one-to-one debate by the end of 
that week or not at all. To tl^ President's (Qsmay, tlw League of 
WoiTOti Voters re¥ised its euiier ^anoe aad proposed a ^iro-man 
debate. 

Many feel the debate gave Reagan the credibility necessary to swing 
the undecided votes his way; Carter pollster Pat Caddell claims an 
unprecendented lO^o shift occurred during the 1st week of the 
campaign. 

Also according to the Times, Carter went against the advice of chief 
advisors when he referred to daughter Amy's belief that nuclear 
proliferation usurped ail other issues of importance. According to one 
yde at the debate, the Carter s up p of t c rs groamd when the 
mentioned 



The gaffe was typicid of Carter's perfcnmance throughout the 
campaign, accorchng to another top aide. 

In years past,the former Georgia governor had proven himself a deft 
campaigner, but this time around he played like an amateur. 

"I don't know what happened to his instincts," the aide told the 
r/m^s. 'Thy were 50 bad." 

Of course, it's much easier to have good instincts when mounting an 
attack, as Carter did against Ford in 1976, and like Reagan did this 
year. When defending an abysmal economic record, no amount of 
political ii^tinct is enough; when attacking such a record, no amount 
of ^Boranoe b too devastatii^. 

Ronald Reagan proved that. 



Florida Flambeau Foundation. Inc. Buuness and Advertising OfHce, 206 N. Woodward Avmue, 
phone 644-4075; Mcdiatype lab. 314 University Union, phone 644-5744; Classiricd Ad Office. 306 



Amy Arbogast. 
Jane Duncan. . . 




Production Manager 
. Mediatyjpe Manager 




Sleep-walking with the new right 



BY CAROL MARBIN 

FXAMBEAU COLUMNIST 

"... whether one wanted to or not, if one had 
the serious will, one would have to decide to wage 
war in order to arrive at pacifism. Indeed, the 
pacifist humane idea is perhaps quite good 
whenever the man of the highest standard has 
previously conquered and subjected the world. . . *' 
"Peace is made by the fact of strength — 
economic, military, and strategic. Peace is lost 
when such strength disappears, or — just as bad — 
is seen by an adversary as disappearing. '* 

The previous quotations could almost have been 
uttered by the same person, although the former 
had been written over a half century before the 
latter. The first quote, arrogantly proclaimed by 
Adolph Hitler, declares that peace can only be 
preceded by war, while, the second, just as 
arrogantly proclaimed by Ronald Reagan, argues 
that peace must be achieved through strength. 
Here, euphemism obscures clarity. 

The subtle, or not so subtle reemergence of the 
New Right can be documented in numerous ways, 
manifesting itself in multifarious forms: starting 
with the landslide victory of Ronald Reagan for 
President, and culminating in a Replublican 
dominated Senate for the first time in a quarter 
century. The resolution of several state county 
referendums indicates a similar swing to the right, 
with voters at every turn loudly echoing the words: 
"Keep government off our backs." 

Massachusetts approved a Proposition 13 style 
tax rebellion. California and Dade County both 
refused to ban smoking in public places. Rert 
control was voted down in San Diego and Seattle. 
Missouri and South Dakota rejected restrictions on 
nuclear power plants. Michigan voted not to lower 
its drinking age from 21 to 19, and South Dakota 
decided to lift an 8-year-old ban on the hunting of 
Mourning doves. Even Florida's constitutional 
right to privacy provision can be seen more clearly 

as an anti-government backlash than a gay rights 

statement. 

According to John Dolan, head of the National 
Conservative Political Action Committee, however, 
the conservatives are not satisfied with their 
victories, and they have targeted as many as nine 
liberal Senators for defeat in 1982. Dolan believes 
that the use of independent expenditures, an 
obvious exercise in obfuscation, was instrumental 
in the sweeping Republican victory, and adds "If I 
were a liberal politician running for re-election in 
1982, I'd be quaking in my boots." 

The success of New Right politics can be traced 
not so much to a clear, well-defined ideology, as to 
large and generous campaign contributions, and a 
tightly knit and well organized core group. 

In fact, today's conservative ideology bears little 
resemblcnce to the Biu-kean philosphy of old. It is 
unsystematic, eclectic, and at times contradictory, 
yet iR>ti^heless dangerous andJnsidious. |t appeals 
to a broad base, but reflects a narrow, parochial 



CASTLES BURNING 



interest. It dc^ric wcuum and fut hti 
Democratic toreign policy, and with 'i^'-v 
indignation, indicu the cdectitjsfli 
exacerbatory ramifications of domwtiv nij 
economic policy — vet offers nothing m i» pb.- 
but austerity and an increased miliiarN hu<%et 

Republican foreign policy, at least aao'd-i ■ 
Reagan, would consist mainly of 'Mandin^.r 
the Russians." Lending new meaning to the ttr- 
_ "scapegoat politics," Reagan has rcccniiy c»ry 
"The Soviet Union underlies ail the unrest . 
going on. If they weren't engaged in thi^ u 
dominoes there wouldn't be an\ hot spo(> 
world." Reagan seems to forget ihatiiuko - 
play the game of dominoev 

Contrary to orthodox Machiavellian - 
foreign relations arc not a game A Rc^^ 
administration portends the death of the Strj?:f 
Arms Limitatations Treaty, the demivc o; Ki^^ 
American detente, as well as the uncqu;HXi 
support of anti-communist regimes mcTm- 
irrespective of their domestic policitt.Speafia** 
Reagan endorses increased economk de^HopacP , 
(read exploitation) in the Caribbean, which r« » 
less-than-affectionately termed a "red ^^^^^'j 
must wonder whether there were my kem^ 
learned from Vietnam, Nicaragua. Uir 
Grenada. 

Consistent with his foreign policy. • 
economic policy is equally anachronisuc ^ 
simply, he advocates significant decreases 
spending in order to make wa) 
military budget which already approw 
like proportions; u nan tici paling a popw*' 
which may make Miami look htlk tBfft 
preview of coming attractions. , ^^^a^ 

Arguably, the New Right pol.ticaJ 
basically populist in its orieniatioir" ^ 
reductionistic, simplistic and "^'"^ 
looking in time ( see Reagan's aiutwW-^ 
and ERA to demonstrate how ^ 
be). It advocates economic ausi^»^. ^ , 
same time envisions "a ^'"'^^^^ "Vf^j^ 
edifying of all, it receives us ^ it' 
justification from us religious row 



Majority). 
Without 



a prion 



dooffliflf 

administration to failure, onej^ . 
the New Right's blend of r^^^^^-V^- ^ 



perhaps even McCariheyesque po^_^ 

little to add to the ^""^^^^^l^J^c. ^ 
except perhaps paranoia ^'^^^m^*' 
go backwards in ^ 
like to. except maybe wiWO »^ ^ 
of our sleep. And as """"^J^^ugcirtii* 
only thing that comes tot 



Li' 



y* fl 



;itmcnt 



ob^y 

IK 

coiine, v»i 
penonal 
[prohibita 
promote 
Elucidaiii 
•oukl be 
km% m ot 
liddy'v 

wuaicad li 

Fla 



In my fij 
iteioconi 

Fini of 
iff misum 

«1 mm, 
^cfultr hu\ 
let 

To cowipj 
'llfowraf 




'AM 




V 



w right 



BURNING 



vacmun and futility 
>licy, and wHh rtghteou 
the eclecticitm and! 
Nations of domestic and] 
offers nothing in its 
f eased military budget . 
>licy, at least according to] 
I mainly of ''standing up ' 
new meaning to the tci 
Leagan has recently carpeuJ 
lerlies all the unrest (hat is] 
I't engaged in this game of 
I 'I be any hot spots in thej 
[o fo^ that it taka two to] 

>x Machiavellian doctrine 
not a game. A Reaga 
the death of the StrategiC| 
faty, the demise of Rusw-I 
well as the unequivocal 
Irnunist regimes increased 
jmestic policies. Specificam.| 
ised economic development 
le Caribbean, v^hich he hasj 
termed a "red lake * On< 
Ir there were any lessons! 
im, Nicaragua. Iran, orl 

foreign policy. Rcaca; 
l^ually anachronistic. Q^'-' 
Lnificam decreases in social 

Tiake way for an '"'■'f^^JI 
Ulrcady approaches Molocn 
licipating a popular respon^e 

fnii look Uttic more than H 

, Right political 'deolo0 

Its orientation. »t is 

k, and manifestly '^^T; 

Lgan's attitudes on iW^^ 
ate how reactiona^"^ 
omic austerity ^W^* 

eves Its most f*^^, 
religious rooti 

,re, one BW* ,„J 

heyesque l>«»^..jj ^t«ei 
Uempor»y P<*'^ 
ia and Aeionc. wc^ J 

, no iMttW coof" = " 
ndane » «« '»•'' 



letters 



Liddy's logic grotesque 




^tclv. I attended the "lectyie" 
ampus by G. Gordon Liddy. ft 
' Asioundmg and rcpreheaiiWe that 
' *»cho ravings of a convicted Watergate 
- »ould be SO warmly aad 
uasiically received by • college 

^ t that I am one <rf the few persons 
^ancc who bothered to reflect vpoii 
«of the slick justifications givHi by Mr. 
4(jv for his beliefs and actions. In 
10 a question, Liddy explained Ms 
0 kill columnist Jack Anderson by 
> ng 10 the ancient distinction <hvwn 
.»c(n laws which are **naUi mse" 
xcnbing actions on the basis of some 
, law and/or morality) anil'*niala 
-^hbita" (proscribing actions through 
e law.) As examples of these 
es, Liddy noted tluit molestii^ a 
u; Aouid be malum in se while refusing 
} obey traffic laws wonkl be malum 
prohibition. The unstated premise, of 
mm, was that under liddy's twisted 
' ftnonl code, laws winch aie merely mala 
prahMu may be ignored in order to 
naote some overriding principle or goal, 
jodrtiig fiuther, Liddy ported that it 
•odd be accepUUe to break all German 
tm is order to kiM Adolph Hkkr. 
Liddy's own actions, however, pfemrt a 
oie middled and kas justifiable situation, 
ranted, it is difficult for anyone to 
^mi thit she/he would refirain from 



"Eighty.axiQg" (one of Liddy's favorite 
cophemians) a wammngering psychotic 
who ii ifoectly ieipoiisa>le for miHions of 
deaths. 

However, I would be more interested in 
hearing the least extreme situation in which 
Liddy would ignore laws labeled mala 
prohibita. Like any slick lawyer, Liddy 
deftly steered clear from examining the 
specific mala prohibita laws which he 
ignored while planning and executing the 
break-ins at the Watergate Hotel and at the 
office of Daniel Ellsberg's psychiatrist. 
Specifically, the positive law's proscriptions 
against breaking and entering and 
conspiracy. What was the overriding 
principle which justified his planning the 
break-ins? Was it to ensure a margin of 
victory for a president who was, according 
to Liddy, the most competent president in 
the United States history? In order to retard 
the growth of liberalism? To promote some 
myopic and cockeyed vision of national 
security"? 

Those who ascrte to Liddy's credo that 
power is a commodity Aich must be 
obtained at all costs would be wise to take 
some time otherwise spent cheering football 
games or decorating IbOow fraternities with 
toilet paper and reflect upon the 
insignificance of the ** overriding 
principles" which allegedly justified their 
hero's floutiQg^<tf"mabi prohibita" laws. 



Flambeau timing poor 



dilor: 

In my first letter to a newspaper, i would 

»f to comment on two things. 

First of all, to Sarah Valentine: excuse me 

i misunderstood your letter, but it was a 
gem. anyway. "Greeks" seem to be 

•^-^iar human beings just like you, but 

^'t let a few (crazies) distort your 
%mcni ot the whole for any minority. 

' compare name calling and bottle- 
'rowing to kidnapping and murder is an 
"■Kcssary overdramatization. 



Now, to the Flambeau: your political 
.endorsements were clear and reasonable 
and Brad Liston's article on Reagan was 
excellent. It occurs to me, however, that 
you underestimate your ability to influence 
students' opinions. Considering that i^Klut 
three-fourths of FSU*s population votes by 
absentee ballot (if at all), I only wish that 
you had taken this explicit ^and some time 
before today, the voting deadline, 
November^. 



FSU's disabled students need help 



Uiior: 

This past Wednesday night ended the 
S.G. Senate elections for lWO-81. I 
^o"?ratulate all those newly elected 
be they Action, United 



^«naiors 



^oles. Student's Party or Independent. 
^ this will be a year of progress. For 
" in many ways already has, but there 
»tmany problems on the UnivmUy which 
lobe addressed. 

ihMilaL* ^''^^^ quarter freshman, in a 
J**wr a therefore called disabled, 
■•ny limes only in the eyes of others. 
T*.lkive been at FSU people have been 
"■^helping me negotiate those natural 
J^'J^ which sometimes hinder me. For 
' "^Tf gentle sloping walkways become 
^^^i"* between me and my classes. I 
those natural barriers can*t be 
but physical and mental barriers 



can. One person trying to help break these 
barriers is Keith Clemens, a Senator last 
year, re-elected this past Wednesday. When 
I first arrived at FSU I was invited to a get 
together with other "disabled" students. 
Keith Clemens spoke about SG's interest in 
scMne of our problems. Specifically, "Why 
can*t SG vans be used on rainy days to help 
disabled students to class?** 

I hope the new Senate can work together 
with him so that we all can benefit, not 
only "disabled" but the student population 
in general. 

Further, I am pleased to see SG 
recognizes this problem, but they need 
input from all the students of FSU because 
they can only know our needs if you and I 
tell them. 



^«'m Policy: Letten to the editor of the Ftorida Flambeau should be signed, and must indude an address 
fit number if possible. They should be type-written, double spaced, and no longer than 150 words. 

^«*t( 



^; lAnin will be run with each letter unless the author has a valid reason for remaini 



^ reserve the right to edit the letters for length and to meet standards of good taste. 




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6 / Wednesday, Navemtar 12» IfW Flondbifiaaikcaii 



Planet 



World 



UNtTCD 




Waves 



ALGIERS, Algeria — Deputy Secretary of State Warmi 
ClMristo^lMr held * 'useful'* talks yesterday with Algerian 
mediators on the release of the 52 American hostages but left 
for Washington before the secret letter be brought with him 

was relayed to Iran. 

Christopher and a high-level negotiating team met twice in 
tke day with Alierian Foreign Minister Mohamed Benyahia, 
acting as a go-between in the negotiations to free the hostages 
held for 373 days. 

In Washington, a U.S. official who declined to be 
identified said Christopher left Algiers for Washington 
because he expected it would be "several days** before Iran 
may respond and he saw no need to wait. 

WARSAW — Thousands of Poles, jubilant over the 
courtroom victory of the independent labor unions, braved the 
wintry Warsaw night yesterday to rally at the torchlit tomb of 
the unknown soldier and mark Poland's 62nd anniversary as 
an independent state. 

But the occassion was marred by the arrest of dissident 
Wojciech Ziembinski, one of the organizers of the 
demonstration, on charges of '^disturbing the traffic," 
dissident sources said. 

Ziembinski, who was jailed for 45 days after a similar rally 
last year, was the first dissident to be detained in more than 
two months, sources said. 

PEKING — China yesterday caUed Ronald Reagan's 



sweeping victory an "explosion" by American voters 
frustrated with a troubled economy and a weak foreign 
policy. 

"As a big power, the United States has lost its sense of 
security,'* China's official Xinhua news agency said in a 
lengthy analysis of the presidential election by its two 
Washington correspondents. They characterized the election 
as a "tremendous explosion of the American people's sense 
of frustration," drawing many of the same conclusions 
voiced by American pundits. 



Nation 



WASHINGTON — Sen. John Tower, incoming Armed 
Services Committee chairman, said yesterday the Republican 
administration will move quickly to improve U.S. military 
power through major weapons programs — including the 
neutron bomb. 

Another target is a new version of the B-1 bomber, he said. 

"National security, not budget balancing, is our No. 1 
priority," said Tower, who — since the GOP will control the 
Senate — is in line to succeed Sen. John Stennis, D-Miss., as 
chairperson of the military panel. 

WASHINGTON — House budget writers yesterday 
approved a 2% across-the-board cut in fiscal 1981 spending 



that would force one of Ronald Kt:4gaa*s 
upon him. 

After heated exchanges hetucen Dcmocim 
Republicans, the House Budkic C mmutcc Ksmt^ 
voice vole a proposal by Rep Kobtrt Gtaino, 
give President-elect Reagan the spending cu! he ii^i^f 
wants. I he proposal would let thc.|leagan adn^tato^ 
figure out what to cut and would force ji to cum 
Congress, m a politically embarrassing step • k for>8^ 
money if it couldn't fulfill Reagan's pledge lu .u. *iee 

PASADENA, Calif. — Voyager ! bega.i 
important part of us mission to ring-cirdcd Saium .cv r u 
swinging past the giant moon Titan that is shrou^kc - 1 
smog-Hke haze which may grow \^orsc m the v > - 

Scientists also picked up the first hint of wha; >vu,^ ti- 
enormous mountain — "a heck of a hill" asonepwg 
the moon Tethys. 

The spacecraft, launched more than three vears i| 
now more than 947.3 million miles from tanh. is cr. : 
*'its greatest period of discover)," said officuOi ai jjic jc 
Propulsion Laboratory control ccnier. 

WASHINGTON — Jesse Jackstwi yestcrda> .a .c. 
"agenda of resistance" to thwart attempts m Conf-f 
weaken civil rights legislation durinc the lame dudi lesA** 
and when the 97th Congress begins in January. 

*' We're on the defensive, but we arc not m cwk ■ . 
told a news conference. "We must stand up and !o.>. 



Reagan can expect better relationship with Congress 



BY JERELYN EDDINGS 

UNITED PRESS INTERNATIONAL 

Ronald Reagan, who stood in front of the nation's 
Capitol a few months ago in a grand show of GOP unity, can 
expect a better working relationship with leaders of the new 
Republican Senate than Jimmy Carter ever had with the 
Democrats. 

Reagan, who worked closely with congressional 
Republicans in the months before last week's victories and 
whose campaign was headed by Sen. Paul Laxalt, can't 
possibly expect much worse. 

Senate Democratic Leader Robert Byrd, D-W.Va., spoke 
out f requently against Carter's foreign policy decisions and 
was often known to be miffed at Carter's lack of 
consultation with him on important national affairs. 

The Democratic-controlled Congress also rejected several 
of Carter's initiatives and overturned by embarrassing 
margins two of his 24 vetoes, including the lO-cent-a-gallon 
oil import fee he announced with much fanfare last March. 

Reagan, on the other hand, goes to the White House on a 
friendly basis with Republicans in Congress. 

He came to Washington during the campaign for a special 
GOP "unity day" and stood outside the Capitol, flanked by 



Republican congressional candidates and others who were 
not running. Many worked as advisers to his campaign, 
unlike with Carter, who came to Washington as an outsider. 

Leading Republicans, such as Sens. Robert Dole of Kansas 
and Rep. Barber Conable of New York, also held news 
conferences in Washington simultaneously with Reagan's 
Los Angeles news conferences to announce Republican 
programs such as the Reagim-Kemp-Roth tax cut proposal 
named for the GOP n<»mneeand the bill's House and S^iate 
sponsors. 

Some of the new Senate Repubhcans, who ousted such 
prominent liberals as Birch Bayh of Indiana, George 
McGovern of South Dakota and Warren Magnuson of 
Washington, rode Reagan's coattails to Washington. 

**All of us owe Ronald Reagan and George Bush a great 
debt of gratitude," Senate GOP leader Howard Baker said 
after the election. 

Baker, who ran against Reagan for the Republican^ 
nomination for president, says a much closer working 
relationship will exist between the White House and 
Congress in the new administration. 

'1 used to get along better with the Democratic majority 



than President Carter did," he told reporters revciiu* 

Some leading Democrats will even find it ca<.icr t 
with Reagan than they did with Carter, Veteran 
Jackspn, D-Wash., has agreed already !o \^i^rk unaRc<|* 
transition team and is rumored to be consKkred fer ^ 
Cabinet post. 

Baker should be the new majontv party lc«lcf. d^c 
rumblings of a challenge to his leadership from thcfif ffte 
Laxalt plans to nominate him when Republicans duc^' 
January, and Reagan gave Baker his full support m 
after the elections. 

Reagan could have a tougher time ucd- . 
House Speaker Thomas O'Neill, D-Mass.. b : ' 
actually have his own troubles with only a 50 
and many conservative Democrats who alrcaU) - 
Republicans on key issues 

Next year will be the first time since 1930 ihtf a pfc«*« 
has worked with split leadership in ( ongress. TheCiOP * ' 
control of both houses in 1929, ^vhen Hcrhcrt Hwnr • 
elected, but the death of a few Republicans gave Defni>. 
control of the House the next year. 

The last time voters put different parties in charge y 
two chamber^ was in 1916. 



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pronmes 



n Democrats «nd 
^ITiiuce acc^ 
OiaiM. IXCoim., to 

Ming M he laid he 
<^>S«n adBunmraiion 

|forcc it to cone to 

^tcp, to aik for more 
[citetocutwttte. 
I li^giii tlie moM 

iclcdSttm yesterday, 
is stooudcd in a 
in the raauBer. 
ft of whatcoukibeaii 
ir'Mooeputit — on 

three yean ago and 
•na Earth, is entering 
id offkiab m the let 

^estenhtycaHedfc^an 
:mpts in Congress to 
|he tame duck sessioQ 
innary. 

lot in enOe," lacl»cm 
Li ttpandrenst.'* 



S 



>rters recently, 
find It easier to work 
^r. Veteran Sen. Henry 
to work on a Roigan 
be considered for a 

party leader, despite 
[hip from the far right. 
(Repuhlicans caucus in 
full support two days 

|c dealing with liberal 
[lass., but O'Neill will 
|nly a 50-votc BM^rity 
ho alrewly side with 

1930 that a president 
Ingress. The GOP won 
Herbert Hoover was 
llicans gave Democrats 

larties in charge of the 





oridians curt.... energy consumptioa 



re beghming to quench their hist for energy 

to take world energy 
e serioosiy, if flgaretKdeasad 
Gov. Boh Graham's Energy 

indication. 

j.tually cut their eonsumiition 
4.5 percent hi the firrt iev«n 
of this year compared to the sane 
j^t year, and managed to hold their 
jcase in electricity purchases 
^ 13 percent Citiiens abo h^an 
, 55 m.p.h. speed imlt to heart: 
Donda Highway Patrol issued one 
fewer speeding dta^ during the Q^^^^ 
■ludicd. 

! of tboie cut-backs were onde by North Ftoridians. 
vorth FkiridB bought about 7.5 percent less gasohne 

, y 5 percent less electricity in the flift seven 
"^tsttH of the year than last year. Central Florida cut its gas 
ises only 5 percent and South Florida by a mere 2.4 



1*4 




Central and South Floridians actually increased their 
electricity usage by 1 .4 percent and 3.9 percent respectively. 
South Florida showed no decrease in speeding tickets 
although Central Flondiam cut their violations in half. 



The North Florida cut -backs came despite 
a record-breaking heat wave in July. 
Although energy consumption in the 
Panhandle lurched upward from the 
previous July by 6.5 percent, this increase 
was more than offset by reduced usage in 
the rest of the seven month period. 



The increase in gas sales in South Florida 
reflects gas shortages brought on by a 
truckers' strike which hit the area hard in 
1979. Compared to July 1978, gas sales in 



South Florida were down omsideraUy. 

'^Despite some increases in energy use in July, due to 
extremely hot weather and other mitigating factors, the 
overall trend in energy consumption in Florida is 
downward,'* Oraham said in a press rdease. "This is an 
encouragu^ trend for Florida's eaagy future. " 



aben promises committee 'surprises 



IMTH) PRKSS INTKRN ATIONAI. 

.oming House Speaker Ralph Haben says the 
—" !!ee chairpersons he will appoint next week will 

:c will be a couple of surprises. Everybody thinks 
r c got it tigured out, but I've made a couple of 
f'pccied decisions, which had a rippling effect on other 

menis, " the Palmetto lawyer said in a recent 

M the surprises, he says, will be the chair of the 
.ommittee that will draw up new House District 
- -aries over the next 18 months. Haben believes this 

be the toughest he has to offer. 
Haben. 39, officially becomes House speaker during 
>vijv's organi/aiional session. He succeeds Hyatt 
*nol Daytona Beach, who retired from the Legislature 
fftwo years of running the House. 
*.D. Childers of Pensacola becomes Senate president 
•oday, succeeding Phil Lewis of West Palm Beach, who 
"^fidn't seek re-election this fall. • 



Both Haben and Childers will announce their committee 
chairpersons Tuesday and both are trying to keep their 
appointments secret now. 

Haben did announce one selection this summer, saying 
Herb Morgan of Tallahassee would retain the 
appropriations committee chairmanship he held under 
Brow n. The appropriations chief had to be picked quickly, 
Haben said, so he could begin work on the $16 billion-plus 
1981-83 budget. 

While Haben hasn't said so publicly, Sam Bell of 
Daytona Beach will be rules chairperson, a powerful leader 
whose responsibilities include decisions which bills are 
considered by the full House. Bell*s staff already has 
moved into rules committee offices. 

Childers h^snU said so, but formw Senate President 
Dempsey Barron of Panama City will be hb rules chairman. 
Baron held the powerful post under Lewis. He didn't 
occupy the rules chairperson's office in the pre^knt's suite 
before, but will now. His staff ahwftr has taken it ow. 



Escapee 



from page 1 



-wgcrous 10 himself or to others.*' Officials decided 
[s^hological observation was not warranted in the case 

terribly concerned about the man,*' said Judge 
pkCUmma. "I sentenced him the best way 1 knew how but 
litre was no reason given to hold him longer and his 
l^s^tifutional rights must be protected also.*' 
^'^Clamma ruled that Blatzwell must leave Leon County 
nset on Friday, November 7, or find employment and 
■-i'>h permanent residence. 

^ Saturday. November 8, authorities at Governor's 
•-3rc Mall received reports that a man matching 



Blatzwell's description was seen in the mall. Joe Osborne of 
Mall Security said the persons recognized the man from a 
photograph of Blatzwell that appeared in the Flambeau. 

"If someone will file an affadavit to that effect, 1 will 
revoke his probation and place him under arrest," 
McClamma said on hearing of the reports filed in 
Governor's Square. He said if positive identification can be 
made proving Blatzwell is in Leon County, he will be 
arrested for violation of probation and any overt act he 
commits. McClamma said he considers an overt act '*what 
he was doing on the FSU campus — harassing people." 

The Sheriffs Department is investigating the reports. 



148 

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BUYING 
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Class Rings ^ Women's 
Wedding Bands — Small 
Wedding Bands — Mscliym 
WMidiiiQ Bmtfs - LMfS 




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15.00 UP 
25.00 UP 
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most iiMfi's dSM Hfisa ktiss iMliMMHi i9S ^ slio 

buy gold chains, charms, pendants, bracalsts, 
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ALSO BUYING 

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0<< <<& w 







8 / Wednesday, November 12, 1980 



^1 



1 1 



I 






111^ 



i f 

\ ■ 



■"ft f 




Anderson 




offers volcn tfie chance to oone tofetlwr ia a temporary 
coftlitioii, leaviBg them free to re-form in different 
coiiihiiiatkms later on, when issues and candidates chanfe. 

Iheie it HHich to be said for this freedom, whether one 
sees it as a temporary aid to sorting out party alignments, or 
whether — following the views of several fouoding Itthers 
— one views independent poKtks as the ideal. 

Andmon*s failure did not cancel out the pontive 
attributes of independent politics. But an examtnalion of 
the reasons for his drubbing suggests that iodependeDts and 
third party canctidates will probably continue to fail until 
m^or changes are nade in federal election law and until 
independent leaders can transcend elitisai. 

John Armor, a Baltimore lawyer who specializes in the 
problems of miniority party and independent candidates, 
says that all of their problems boM dom^ tinee: aeoiss to 
ballots, money and media. 

With the substantial boost from his earlier run in the 
Republican primaries, Anderson did better on ballot access 
than any alternative candidate except Libertarian Ed Clark. 
But Anderson fared far better on access to money and 
media than all of the others combined. This was still not 
enough to overcome the enormous advantages of the 
Democratic and Republican candidates . 

Starting as a Republican candidate had given Anderson 
access to more than $2 million in federal matching funds 
during the primary season, a great aid to his effort to 
become nationally known. But when he switched to 
independent status at the end of April, he was like 
Cinderella at midnight when her carriage turned into a 
pumpkin. No more matching funds, no more public money 
for a convention, and most devastating of all, no $29 
million from Unde Sam for the general election. 

There was some poetic justice in all of this because 
Anderson had been a majo|; backer of the Federal Electior 
Campiign Act, which discriminates so severdy against- 
independent candidates. 

Helped by genmns media coverage early in his 
campajgn^ Anderson was ^cd by the media later on when 
it really mattered. Strapped for money, he could not 
compete with the federally-funded Carter and Reagan 
campaign. The vicious circle was coaq>leted ivhen his poll 
ratings fell rapidly, and he was squeezed out of the tol«id 
cmdal presidential debate. 

The 1980 experience, added to that of Senator Eugene 
McCarthy in 1976, indicates that we cannot have tiruly 
competitive pol^ics as kmg as tiie Federal Election Act 
remains in force. 

But Anderson*s problems were not exiemal. They #so 
involved ^the limits of his political base: a campus-based 
constituency that wi» narrow to start with viA showed 
minimal ability to reach out to other groups. 

The elitist image of Anderson's off-campus sui^XMters 
reinforced Im baac in-oblem. Anderson included among his 
financial supporters some of the most pronunent of n^iat 
writer Carl Oglesby called "the Yankee group" — 
moneyed people, especially in the Northeast, who have ties 
to multinationid corporations and lead to be Europe- 
\firsters and reformers. 

Members of the Rockefeller family appeared on his 
financial reports, as did New York Times matriarch 
Iphigene Ochs Sulzburger, Trilateral Commission 
coordinator George Franklin, and men like William Bundy 
and Nicholas J. Katzenbach. Anderson received enough 
support from the Yankee group to be taken seriously by the 
media, but not nearly enough to compete with Reagan and 
Carter. Again, this was partly due to the restrictions of the 
Federal Election Act. 

Another group which stood out among Anderson 
supporters was the "new class** or knowledge elite: 
academics, people from the film industry, newspaper and 
TV executives, writers, publishers, consultanu and 
government workers. 

Many of these people have vested interests in the liberal 
programs of the last 20 years. It was probably no mistake 
that John Anderson, widely advertised as a fiscal 
conservative, did not caU for large spending cuts and 
commensurate tax cuts. The movers and shakers of the 
"information society'* had no interest in reducing a large 
part of the economy it controlled through its universities, 
think tanks, publications, consulting companies and 
aowmment agencies. 

They understood that when Anderson spoke<»r the need 
for sncriiioe and fiscal disci p li n e, he wasn't talking so much 



about them as about the huge ninnbers of Americans who 
work outside the knowledfc industries. Whether one 
reviews Anderson's issues or simply his corresponding 
style, it is easy to see why he showed so Itak appeal to blue 
cottar workers, blacks, poor people, and farmers. They 
were not fa i priB i i e d by his oratory and his siKer dollar 
wcMrds. 

OccassicMially, Anderson's aides indicated a superior 
attitude toward the country at large. When Anderson's poll 
ratings failed to improve afler his debate with Reagan, hb 
press secretary Tom Mathews, remarked, "I can't explain 
why he hasD't moved. Maybe the American people can't 
take the truth. Maybe it really hasn't sunk in yet that the 
country is in real trouble. * * 

A reporter who followed the Anderson campaign closely 
wrote in the Washington Star that some of the candidate's 
top aides talked disparagingly about the "lumpen out 
there," a distinctly ccmdesoemfing chaia^erization of 
voters. 

The "lumpen** did not understand Anderson's 
righteousness. The good humor and soft mockery he 
displayed toward the end of Ins canqMipi never overcame 
the earUer impression of Anderson the avenging angel. He 
was like the reformers described m Edwm CyConner's 
political novel The Last Hurrah: 

**They're so honest 1 I mean, they're so aertma idxmt 
bei^ honest. And they're always right itart everything, 
not just politic!. Thew'a this one little professor w^ a 
funny head: He's right att the time idxiat po&ks nd 
television comedians, and movies* and tlieiighc way to fM 
babies. . .he's just so senous and to right and so mgry 
about being ri^." 

Huge mm^ers <tf American people do not tUnk the . 
new knowMge class is r^ abont evcrytfaina. They prefer 
camfidates aad ooi^tiam nii a little hmiiiy. 



DR. ALUM 01 1 
•1«TN0IIAlnuid 



tli 

APPOIMTMBUI 
222-m 




MediatypemAtm 
pitt wImcIi OS ywi 

— Am V Stow 



644-S744 



THIS WEEK IN THE 



DQWN UNDER 



UPO Presents 




mom 




Tiwra. tliraii0ii Sit* 



ft luck a home, m «/ D.U.CX fii^ 





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ijour\« 
incd ih. 
ipersoni 

If he* 
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APPOINTMENTS 



Media type will even 
put wheels on youf resume, 
if you'd like. 
<— > Any Skoca^tR 
KoUk^MoclMn 



M4-5744 



jHcxcm* 




,1 HICHAH MROUSMG 

aipfOttsienenrouslywtMaupto 
^ ,nd begins phW. By mk|. 
to mentor slowly shut! his eyes, 
lafld h» forelwKl and looks 
He ctnuot understand how his 

. poorly (terin« • l^^'^®*^- 
'\,.d!0lo|y of performance - music 
f wfie. is probably the least 
^ aspect of human adkm. Many 
is, Borgs and Makarovas are out 
«atifif hi the wings — peofile whose 
dvercomes everything except an 



the Bost part, assurances from 
, lerve only as good-natured 
HSMiit. The words "just rdax" are 
> , [he two most inconsequential 
j pcrfonner hears. He or she knows 
lottordax. What they don't know 

ordw. 

tm end, Wesley Collins, professor of 
It PSU. has developed a new course 
department. "Psychology of Music 
■^ormince" is designed to attack 
trxmince anxieties. Collins feels it could 
# be termed '* Psychology of 
mance" because he has athletes, 
ncss and theatre nu^iors as wett as nnisic 
^ in his class. 

don't talk about music,** said 
jfH, "wc approach the performance 
«i personal point of view. The person 
y instrument. The piano, the tennis racket 

.ehicies." 

Collins approaches the problem from all directions, 
ung useful infnrmarion from psychology, sociology, 
and Eastern thought. 

The biggest probtem we come up against,** he 
ned, "is plain nervousness — stage fright. The 
has to be dealt with physically, emotionally and 

lily." 

The course begins with lectures on nutrition. Collins 
aincd that **there is a eausal relatlonsliqi> between the 
[>Qd a person eats and their emotions. A performer has to 
itp If he's ignorant of the effects of certain foods it's 
'^' ble he's going to be down, depressed, etc. For 
sugar. There are books about sugar and its 
ting effects on emotioas — depresffloo, uniety, and 
«^)it)k moods." 

OBitt iatroduces his stuctents to macrobiotics — a 
fife** diet. He emphasizgs tlie extreoMS of food 
ording to their chemicals and preservatives. The serious 
diet will consist mostly of grains, vegetable and 
""cneits, while duninating att foods wkh chemicals and 
1^. 

^ a foraier musician for the Jackie Oleasoa band, 
feds concemration n a oMral issue U> a performer, 
^ny cases he has found the problem to be the person's 
One of the chos texts is Psydm^beme^ 
'^'^ ddves heavily into setf-image enhanoeamt. Tlw use 
iuto sugiestion and biofeecHiack Is also ^andard for the 



fright 




Dr. WeS Collins assists George Barker in physical techniques 
aimed at improving his performance skills. Carolyn Curtis looks 
on 



they're aH 



Relaxation, of course, is at the core. CoUins teaches this 
through breathing exercises based on Hatha yoga. "We 
teach students to bring down the cycles of their brain waves 
to the Alpha (or calmest) state. Yoga is an efficient, 
scientific method for developing a psycho-physical control 
— it is not a religion," he said. 

There is a direct relationship between the lungs and 
emotions,** Collins claimed. Most peopk only breathe 
from the top third of their lungs, he noted, which creates an 
anxiety state. 

Using this kind of knowledge. Coffins said, allows a 
performer to be both rdaiml and "up" for a perfomaaoe. 

"We know you get the best performance," he said, 
"when you're complefety reiaxad and not tense. A lot of 
people have the idea you have to gird yourself for a 
performance but that's not tme. Our definition of 
rebucation is energy eqiended in an intelligent way. If a 
person is operatii« at "optunum paf mi aanc c " , they are 
aHowing, through mental concentration, energy to be 
expfciied through them in a disciplined manner. It would 
flow m a ^xmtaneoos, free, uninhibited fasluon." 

Although he has not established a way of measuring the 
vahie of benefits gained by his students, Collins bases his 
evaluations on reactioiis of students themselves and 
conunents from other faculty members. 

Students have reported overcoming stage fright, 
increased self-assurance, general vitality, and even loss of 
weight. Various faculty members have complimented 
Collins for his work. They don't exactly know what it is 
he's doing, but they do know their students are suddenly 
performing better. 



1528 W. Tenne aag g 
222-8714 



^AMERICA'S 
FRESHEST ICE CREAM 



Wednesday Specials 

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• Shell Mirrors 

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Flaished Clocks & Tables 

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UCCY WORKS 



REP 

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SPtX lA 






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224-8583 
Saturday 




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iiiiii till 




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10 / Wednesday, November 12, 1980 FbrMa ¥kmkm 



IN BRIEF 



•*EDLCAnON IN CLBA" — A SLIDE 
presentation by Dr. Sydney Grant of I.I.D.E., 

College of Fducation, at 12:15 p.m. in 346 Union. 

CPfc'S COOKINC, FOR HEALTH CLASS EXPLORES 
the versatility of the lowly soybean. Us 
emergence as drink, dinner, and dessert at 7:15 tonight at 
821 West Pcnsacola, near Woodward. Call Chris at 386- 
8718 or Randy at 224-2333 for information. 



THE FSU YOUNG DfMOCRATS MEET TONIGilT 

at 6 in 346 Union. 

**HOW TO CHOO« A MAJOR/CAREER" OJNIC 

meets today at 4 in 1 10 Bryan Hall. 
POLANDS LEADING FILM STAR, MAJA 

Komorowska, stars tonight in "A Woman's Dedskm" at 
7:30 and 9:30 in Moore Auditorium. Admissimi is $1.50. 
AN INTERNATIONAL STUDENT BAI^UET WILL 

be held on Friday, November 14, at the Parkway Baptist 

Church at 7 p.m. Please call 222-2605 by tonight to make 



reservations for 
transportation. 



the free dinner ^or if you need 



WKHSHJINCKXYOwj, 

Rechjoe 
If Overweight 

AiTfBiicon Heart Assodolon I 



Classified Ads 



noomjw union, OptiiMUM^ 
P— oHiHi; 12 noon the day btfon 





OYNACO SPEAKERS S75 FOR PAIR 
GOOD CONOIT»OM-€ALL 222-9374. 

4 SALE 2 UF-FL^ COUPOMS 
TUESDAY TURN-IN. BEST OFFER 
CALL5M-0423. 

FOR SALE! 2 FLA. GAME TICKETS. 
BEST OFFER. CALL ««i-3M0 AFTER 

12 NOON. 

TWO U OF F COUPONS FOR SALE. 
CALL 222 4392 AFTER 5 PM. 



BE THERE TO SEE FSU BEAT U OF 
F. 2 COU PONS FOR SALE, $45 EACH 
FIRM CALL 576 7870. 



Bar and stools for sale in grMt 
condition. Make offer 575 3726. 



Pwtr super wide GT Grand Prix Mag 
wheels incl. rims & hub caps Greatfor 
small cars $50.00 each. 575-5679. 



2 FSU UF COUPONS 
$80THE PAIR. 
CALL 576-8489. 



NEW SEARS DELUXE 

TYPEWRITER. BROUGHT FOR 
tlM. BEST OFFER. CALL 222^]M 
ATTEK S. 



♦SOLD TO THE DEVIL* 

Our Collective National Soul if Please 
Please Our Standard of living is 
maintained (4 more ye^rs) 
Regardless of consequences. 

2 FSU UF COUPONS (FIRST DAY 
PICKUP) $50 EA. OR BEST OFFER. 
488-5578 OR 575 0443 AFTER 5. 



TWO U OF F COUPONS 
S3SOR BEST OFFER 

CALL 576-1979 



FSU/UF FOOTBALL COUPON 
HIGHEST OFFER TAKES IT 
CALL 644-1160 ASK FOR TOOO. 

Firewood-Split your own and save! 
$25. per 1/2 ton truckload. Cut into 
length, many mm^ mm0 I p UttiWi . 

Call 877-5504. 

Naughahide couch corner with coffee 
table. 1 1 ft. long good condition. 9fJ- 

7596 $100 



BOSE 901 SERIES IV SPEAKERS W/ 
CHROME STAMI>S, USS/PAtR 386^ 

7757. 

Raleigh Grand Sport 10 sp ee d men's 
Mke $100- Panasonic sa 40 fm stereo 
rtceiver $50, Call Jace 877-4395. 

For Sale Conn, trombone. Excellent 
condition $150, One FSU-UF ticket. 
Mst offer. Call M4-1397, Melanie. 

iBL 36 SPEAKERS EXC. CONO. S3Q6 

PR. 222 1375. ' 



Be prepared for the cold weather! 
Hardly worn, heavy ^4 length gray 
suede coat, quilted lining, women's 
size 13. New was $120, asking $60. 644- 
4075 before 5pm, ask for Laurie. 



Nov.Cat AAoden$130 
LeedexAAonitorSIIS 
Zenith \r'. RF OMd. 



$90. Carroll 644- 



10 speed 75>/» Inch red Puch Cavalier 

with red fenders, all alloy parts, quick 
release hubs, toe clips, new chain and 
rear tire, fur seat. Only $195. Call eves. 
576-4261 or come by Munchie Wagon in 

WOtt SALE— TWO COUPONS WHir 
CAN tE TURNED IN ON TUES. FOK 
THE UNIV. OF FLA. GAME Sift POK 

PAIR. CALL 222 4528. 

2 TUES. COUPONS FOR FSU/UF. $40 
OR BEST OPPER S76-Sf74. 




n Speed, 25V^" red Puch Cavalier. All 
•Hoy parts-prime i S185 for info, call 
S76-4MI eve. or cwne by fhe MuncMe 
Wagon in Union-dpytfme. 

In Leon County Special Land Sale 4 
miles south of truck route on Oak 
Ridge Road 3 acre tracts 1850 acre lOA 
tracts 1650 acre, 20 to 40 acre tract* 
1500 per acre, farim: tmdoiwi Syr. at' 
12% interest. 

JimmytoymonRealty phone 222-7581. 




Triumph Spitfire 73 FM 8 track 
overdrive $1900. 386 5856. 



1972 FORD, RANCHERO, LOW 
MILAGE, AIR, PS, AIR SHOCKS, 
AUTO, PB, EXCELLENT 
CONDITION. S76-4818. 




Take over lease Dec. 1, one bedroom 
turns, great location, low util. Bills. 
Can 893-0IO4 or 57ll'7042. 

2 bdr. duplex $168 mo. Now 575-:^9^ 

224 3152 very large 



FM ROOMMATE NEEDED 2 
BDROOM $120. 8i W UTILITIES. 
CALL DEKff E AT 576-9785. 

SUBLEASE ROOM AT 
CASH HALL FOR W/S QUARTERS 
$50 DEPOSIT LEFT, A/C BAR 
POOL, MEALS. CALL 224-5742. 

FOR RENT-one bdrm. apt. at Univ. 
Sqr. available for rent. $9S/mo. 8i 
uti. 644-4102 after lOpm or B-4397. 

2 BR/1 B PART FURN. NEXT TO 
FSU, SUBLET DEC. 1 $185, CALL 
CINDY 488 t450. 



Sublet furnished 2 bdrm house wtr qtr 
frplace, washer/dryer $250/mo. & 
$100 refundable deposit. 877 7386. 



1 BEDROOM FURNISHED 
COTTAGE N. DUVAL ST. $100 MO. 
$50 DEPOSIT. CALL 385-9843 AFTER 

6 PM. 




FEMALE ROOMMATE TO SHARE 2 
BEDROOM IV2 BATH APARTMENT 
AT LAS PALMAS. DEC. THROUGH 
SPRING QUARTER FOR INFO. 
CONTACT MELANIE AT 878-2396. 

FM RMMTE NEW HOUSE^ BR, 2 
BATH $100 ii SHARE OF UT. 
PURNISHED NO PETS 10 MIN. 
DRIVE FR/FSU. CALL 575-1376. 

I need a ride to and from Miami over 
Thanksgiving. Time flexible and 
willing to ^It cost. Noifify Mary at 
644 1362. 

RIDE WANTED MELBOURNE 
AREA. THANKSGI Vlt^G 

WEEKEND. SHARE EXPENSES. 
BOB^2^S473. 

NEED 3 ROOMATES FOR 2 BDRM. 
APT. $77.50 EA. AND V4 ELECT. EA. 
GOOD LOCATION AND CLOSE TO 
CAMPUS. CALL SEAN 576 0861 
AFTER 5 PM. 

Male/Fern, roommate wanted for w/s 
qtr to share nice apt. at Case Cordoba 
with 2 females. $108 mo. 81 */i elec. 
Partly fwm. 5 mM. ftom PSU-CatI Mo- 

576 7265. 

FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED 
FOR W/S QUARTERS 2 BEDROOM 

FURN. APT. $142.50/MONTH PLUS 
'/i ELEC. CALL 576 3530 ASK FOR 
CAROLYN. 

1 or 2 MALES NEEDED TO TAKE 
CONTRACT AT OSCEOLA HALL 
FOR WNTR Si SPRG QTRS. TOP 
FLOOR APTMT END RM, QUIET 
A/C ALL UTILITIES INCLUDING 
FOOD PROVIDED. CALL 
MALCOLM AT 224-7909. 



W/S qtr. Own room. 
Vbaf r«nt4wty.Cail 



F-mmit 
Close to 
576-4192. 

Fawia la roommate to share 2 Iwir 
unfurnished duplax. No pels near 



WANTED LIVE-IN HELPER FOR 
DISABLED GRAD STUDENT. YOUR 
OWN ROOM. CALL DURING DAY 
488 7962 EVENINGS 224-1516. NEED 

MATURE PERSON. 



Fm rm needed share 1 br apt. Plaza 
Apts $105 monthly plus utilities. 

Call 222 2986. 




FAST, ACCURTATE TYPIST (65 wpm) 
TO WORK LATE NIGHT HOURS FOR 
FLORIDA FLAMBEAU. PART-TIME. 
CALL AMY SUN. -THURS EVENINGS 
BETWEEN 7 PM AND 11 PM AT 644- 
5744. EXPERIENCE IN TYPESETTING 
HELPFUL. 00 NOT CALL DURING 
DAY. THANK YOU. 

NEEDED: VOLUNTEERS FOR A 
TOUGH JOB-LOWERING 

FLORIDA'S DRINKING AGE FROM 
19 TO 18!! MUST SHARE A 
COMMITMENT TO DUMPING THIS 
LAW! GROUPS AND 

ORGANIZATIONS WELCOME. 
WRITE JUNIOR, 1410 W. SLiGH 
AVE. TAMPA, 33604. 

Woman fo help new mottter 4 hours a 

day flexible. Call 576 7844. 

LUNCH TIME SANDWICH AAAKER. 
APPLY HOBBITT HOAGIES, TOWN 
SOUTH SMOPPING CEHTER 878- 
6661. 

Overseas Jobs- Summer/year round. 
Europe, S. Ame., Australia, Asia. All 
Fields. $500- $1200 monthly. 
Sightseeing. Free Info. Write: IJC 
Box 52-FL5, Corona Del Mar, Ca. 
92625. 

Make pizzas, etc. Fri. night. Sat. 81 
Sun. daytime, Tues. 8i Wed. 11-5. Must 
be 18 or over. Come by Barnaby's at 
2331 Apalachee Pkwy. 8:38^11:88 am or 

2 5 pm weekdays. 



Everyone is talking about student 
apathy, let's talk about student 
PIRGs! Attend the organizing mtg. of 
the Florida Public Interest R e se arch 
Group. 7:30 201 Longmlra Bldg. 
tonight! 




IBM Electronic Typewriter. Term 
papers, etc. Call 575-3914 anytime. 

TYPING FAST EFFICIENT 
LETTERS RESUMES PAPERS ETC 
85c PG. 386-4843 

TYPING -LET ME AAAKE YOUR 
PAPERS LOOK GOOD! NEAR 
CAMPUS 75C/PG SUE. 222-9637 

EVES. 

Guitar lessons: Folk, Blues, C 81 W flaf 
Si finger picking, bottleneck. Oavo 
Greenwald 222 7749, 7 11 pm. 

Juggling lessons seven days a week 
every morning. 10 to 12. Five dollar 
donation, everything supplied-507 
Coliaga. 

Quality Typing of Dissert., Themes, 
etc. Call 644-6031 or 224-3546/Sue. 



Excellent, quality typing using an 
IBM Selectric II. ~ 
typing term papers, 
disserfatiaiis. S764SS4. 

Edited Typing IBM Selectric II 
Reports/Resumes/Letter s/Disaert. 
W5-7171 Mission Rd. Area. 



MINI WAREHOUSE UNITS 
6x6 available larger sizes $14.50 up 
Call us at Lakewood Mini Warehouses 



Call 



Roommate wanted male or female. 
One bedroom houe 3 blocks behind 
Sweet Shop 708 St. Augustine Apt. 1. 
$75 a mth. utilities. See or leave 
message for Allan at the Onwil R«gf. 
after l. 



I 

service. Lowest 
BIN at S76-0286. 



Retired sacratary. Accurate typist- 
good ^uUttliW&r papers, dissert 
theses. WMmiille. Linda Durbin 576 
1988. No calls after 10 p.m. 

WILL DO TYPING IN MY HOME. 
TELEPHONE 385-9689. KEEP 
TRYING. 

TYPING IBM DISSERTATIONS 
THESES TERM PAPERS. CALL 
PAT OiXON 386 1255. 

LEASE 
YOUR FURNITUREl 

wide variety 
immediate delivery 
Opiienle Boy 
FURNITURE MART RENTALS 
1288 S. Adams 
21«-43Si 



S600REWARD 

for information leading to 
identification of the person «vho 
our sign at THE PHY 

homecoming weekend 



trie 
took 
RST 




ATTEND FLORIDA PUBLIC 
INTEREST RESEARCH GROUP 
ORGANIZING MTG. TONIGHT! 7 30 
201 LONGMIRE BLDG. EVERYONE 
IS TALKING ABOUT STUDENT 
APATHY LET'S TALK ABOUT 
STUDENT PIRGsf 

Everybody remembers wtw played 
THAT GIRL-AAarlo Thomas. But who 
played THAT GUY? Who else but 
GUY KATHE Of the Video Center 

LAMBDA " 

SIGMA 

DELTA 



.IS coming 



FREE 15 WK. OLD MALE KITTEN. 
NEEDS A GOOD HOME. PLEASE 
CALL 576-6648 KEEP TRYINGI 



METHODS OF CONTRACEPTION 
Mon & Thu 2:30pm, Tue 9am 
UNIVERSITY HEALTH CTR Rm 423. 
Men and women welcome. 



BAGELSI 
BAGELS! 
BAGELSI 
IF YOU LO¥B BAGELS 

COME TO HILELL'S 
BAGEL SALE! NOV. 12 
IN THE STUDENT UNION 
MORE INFO. 222 5454. 



SHABBOTT DINNER 
HILLELWILL HAVE 
THE DINNER NOV. 14 
INSTEADOFNOV. 7 
MORE INFO 222 5454 



CPE iabor series working with SCU 
Florida AFL & CIO & Tallahassee 
Peace Coalition present: William 
Wimpesinger Presdient lam to discuss 
"Conversion to Peace" Thur., Nov. 13 
at 8 pm , Oiff enbaugh Rm 201. 



A new csnSsr far 



KUNG FU 

iBa Martial 
214 w. College, 
RaKflaOroatBifceSliep . 

LUNA " 

Are you ready for the BIG EVENT? 
This Friday in the union will be 
JUGGLERS TOSSING TO REGGAE. 
Student should not miss this-bring 
your own balls and you can loam r 
toiuggletooH! 

RaggaoRhaft 




TOM A THE CATS PERFORMING 
AT BULLWINKLES TONIGHT 4 
TNURS. NIONT ONLY. TONIGHT IS 
LADIES NIGHT, ALL LADIES 
ADMITTED FREE. 



For Raw Power . We want the 



Slut Boysw/ tggy Pop! 



1 1 



November 23. 



at Tommy's 
(theFollowert) 



Lesbian and Gay Rap Group-For 
anyone interested-provides a relaxed 
anvironmant to moot and talk with 
others. Thurs. 8-10 pm DIf. 112. 

*FREE TO GOOD HOME* 
YELLOW COUNTRY DOG, 10 
MONTH OLD FEMALE LAB, 
LOVES KIDS, NEEDS SPACE TO 
RUN. MOVING. MUST FIND HER A 
NEW HOME. CALL 644-578S 1-4 pm. , 

Dear Sigma Chi brothers. 

We still love you even though we 

smoarad you in football Sunday! 

XXOO, Little Sigs 

Letz hear 'em play-yeah let us hoar 
Nioniplaytil 

Skn Boys w/ Iggy Pop 
November 23 



HUTCH & HOSS 
WEDNESDAY NIGHT 5 PM TIL 9 
PM 

"UPPER DECK " 
QUALITY INN SOUTHERNAIRE 
BEER, WINE. BOOZE, 

SANDWICHES AND HOAGIES! 



We wanna hear the. 



Slutboysw/lggyPepiii 

Nov . 23 (the Follow ers 1) at Tommy's 

Let Lonaie Linton, formerlr-sMHttii 
Command Performance, cot and 

style your hair for less at Sears 
Shears, Wed-Sat, lOam 6pm. Call 877 
0434. 



HOLIDAY PORTRAITS 
Make Special Gifts But fine 
photographic portraits taKe T rne 
Package plans in color from $19.50. 
til Dolmar Studios at 224-3824.' 



Wanted: 2 FSU-UF tickets Will pay 
any reasonable price. 576-7205 day or 
night. 

Blue ICeycard Is honored by the 
following merchwtts: NIc's Toggery, 
Athletic Attic, Hobbit Hoagie 
Factory, Brewmaster's Restaurant 
(opening soon), Mac's In The Back 
Lounge, Pizza Pro, Tallahassee 
Flowers, The Pub, The Pbyrit, Adam 
B Eve Campus Hafrplace, Zonkers, 
Bf«wn's Pharmacy, The AAelting Pot, 
Annette's Women's Fashions, Great 
Bicycle Shop, Barnacle Bill's, 
McGregor's Steak House, Roger 
Nelson Music Store, The Outpost, Sea 
Fox Restaurant 4 luwnge, Ricco s 
Lounge, Quality Inn SouNiomalre, 
Captain's Lounge. 



Soft Contact Lenses. 
Hard Contact 
24 hour Contact 
B & L Contact Lenses. 
Dr. Allen Dean, 222-9991. 



S88.ea,S8Spr. 



■AT LUNCH AT THE PHYRST 

WITH A FRIEND! 

Old"56oks for collectors and readers 
Thomasville has 2 dealers— Virginia 
Breedlove on Thomasville Road about 
2 miles before town. Signs on left. 912- 
228K1073. And Dick Rieber, 429 S. 
HansafI St. rear. 912 226 7415 by 
appointment only or by ctiance. 

EVERY^ WEDNESDAY IS LADIES 
NITE AT BULLWINKLES. ALL 
LADIES APMI TTEP PREEI 

Stereo World: Save 28% on any La/ A 
Way for Christmas delivery Jusf 
S18.88 starts your Lay a way on jvr 
Sansui, Technics, Akai, Pioneer, 
Infinity, Onkyo. Ar, and ott»ers. A* 
atx)ut our easy terms Hours 12-6 pm. 
Closed Sunday and Monday 



If you want to try a really good wfne 
THE PHYRST is going to have a 
super Liabfraumilch wine special thfs 
~ Try Itl 



39 glass 
Poor Paul's 



Wed. is Michelob day 
gitdyr til l midnight 
^OMfBama* 818 Bf . T< 

m^mmM sale «rlth cou^ tt oft 
A^ic Sat-Expires Nov. 2^Ma9lc f*m 
Shop Univ. Ptaza 1916 W. Tenn. 

MAieMALedMfiBtT. 

A r« 




FOUND ootoMjlaa 
c All TO totmm 



GLASSES FOUHO C 
WMS 8L0C TC C.i « 
UNIV. UNfOe mtoim. 
DESK, itmnmi 



Found Stt o> itn 1, 
Grew mm mm (m mt 
identify. 



LO»t9/2f/|OOw(Mr^, 
vekw UH 41 m* . 
locktr room & f ■ 

Rtward!! 



Lost in Oi»' 
Nov. a a ^ 
WBS. Mas ief^ 
pNeiecaitWMiPHgi 



LOST BROWN «Ai.4,E - • 
ID'S IF FOUND CA*.. ^' 
57«N0? 



in «E^A80F0••f^■J•^ 
BROWN ATTAC«f * a 
LOST AROUNO 
EVENINGS mwi 



Rm 

644-5744 

1 



/ 



%\ C MK 



si 



A >' 



(I 



NiBoilicr 

Kkaaig 



luce 



»rt AssociolionCj) 



on the day before 



CALL TO IO«IITIl5¥^ 
644 5A»5 

GLASS E S F 0 U N 0 OC T Jlu 
WMS BLOC. TO CLAIM. GO 

DESK. (Ind floor). 

Found: Sot of hoys IvTST^.^ 
Groofl noor IMirory. OH mm \ 

identify. 

Loot f/Jf/|0O»»l tor ' , . 

value Lost in tt»t vic>nttv 
locK*r room 4 FtomOoou oHki. . , 
576 SMS Of 3IS^. AlkfV MWfir 

Reward! ! 



Lost in Olfftfibou^i Rm 231 « 
Nov 3 o toother poMCt) wMM 
was. Hoo oontinrtentoi value. If i 
plOMO coll Wode 57S M7I 



LOST BROWN WALLET W ALL 
ID'S. IF FOUND CALL SCOTT 
576 9002. 



ilS REWARD FOR RETURN Of , 
BROWN ATTACHE W/CCNTE«ll 
LOST AROUND ALUMNI Vii 
f VENINGSS7« *S12. 




Rm. 314 

University Unto*^ 
644-5744 





fBglUM wiU have to waii iiU December 



iU-Florida game date changed 



BV CHRIS RR(K KMAN 

Surprise! Surprise! Just when 
Holiday plans all worked 
^rxont coniLs along and throws ft 
I wrench u\ liic works. But look at 
sidt. maybe mom and dad wlB 
vou on national televison when 
I i n the Florida State-Florida game 
0 Dotk Campbell Stadium on 
riflMOKl of November 22. 
til way you don't have to be 
itat being too hung over to drive 
HorTlnksgivittg. Now aD you have 
nat is being too hung over to 
|kr fmk the week after the game. 

>cKs about school anyway, right? 
[is PSU coach Bobby Bowden pat ft, 
■Ms to move it, h*s fine wHh 
riapiinight need that rest.** 
I»e will abo be moved up, with 
tiaie slated for 12:25 p.m. on 
'V Uter in the day, ABC wiQ also 
^ Dame-Sottthcm Cal eonlest 

give us time to get healthy," 
Eric Ryan. "ItMI give (Mike) 
• anltk a chance to heal." 
junior fullback sprained his ankle 
Virginia Tech Saturday m the 



Seminoles romped over the Hokies 31-7. 
Coupled with Number One Notre Dame's 
3-3 tie with Georgia Tech, many players, 
coaches and, of course, fans, thought it 
would mean a rise hi the polls for the third 
(AP) and fourth (UPI) ranked Tribe. 

Not so. Nebtnka, whom the Semiaoles 
beat lg-14 m UKOto, jumped past FSU 
and die top five in each is now Georgia, 
Nebnsfca, FSU and use trading places for 
tldnt and fourth, and Atabaraa fifth. 

"It doesn't surprise me,^ Ryan noted. 
'*W^ve been riiafled befove." 

Indeed, it seefl» kind of insfthing. 
Nebraska's loss to ^ Sen^noks seems to 
mean liess than FSU's one-poiift (could- 
have-been-a-tie) kxs to Miunt But the real 
hnportance of the rankmgs — how it will 
affect the bowl bid pictaie — hasn't been 
revealedyet. 

All three major bowls, the Orange, 
Cotton and Sugar, are waiting for the 
resttlu of Saturday's 4 p.m. contest 
between Alabama and Notre Dame before 
handmg out these precious slips of paper 
As one bowl official put it, "It's a Chinese 
puzzle." 

Seminole fans just hope one of the 
to that puzzle is in Tallahassee. 



cliar latans and the rank ings 
JOCKBEAT 



iV WAYNE DEAS 



Nca leO the pvcssTm smoked. That 
^« ne up,'* storawd the usuaffy 
"^teiligent and easy-gooig man oim 
"I didn't expect to stay the 
natural order of peogiiaiion 
> hat we would move up one spot 
^icbraska at Nebraska. That teUs 
1 1 hope things change next week, 
just told me is ridiculous! ' ' 
FSU coach Bobby Bowden 
' bother word of displeasure 
^"^iy know he had just heard 

aot the ones that called the 
^ race between a peanut fanner, 
'^icar physicist and an out-of- 
!^ * *0"-up. Or the one that 
^ * C^emocraiic, male senator froas 
^'^Horida. 

was infuriated about was 



that Florida State had ncrt moved a 
centimeter in either the AF or UPI polls 
after tieing third and fourth respectively hi 
both, and after wimung against Virginia 
Tech while No. 1 Nottc Dame tied the 
feeble Geof^ Tech and fieB tnm top 
INC. instaad of aittaaolng, N^irasfca 
Md/or use jun«ied past the Semiaoles. 

The validity of the polls, or more 
aocmleiy, the popidarity contests, was 
best depided by a feOow journalist and 
associate, David Lanun, Times Umiom 
Bnecutiveand Sports E^lor. 

*^Hie poOs were created to give college 
fans something to talk about during 
midweek/* he wrote. *'Thc bowls were not 
creatfxi to determine national championsips 
or rrwaid teams for outstanding seasons; 
they 'were created in various warm weather 
H^TItij^i— tt^HiMMt tnnrkm aiMl/ Off PfOvidc a 

Tm to FOILS, page 12 



Flmridi Hjmbcjiii .\ ,:dncsday, Novcm^bcr 12, tWf^ ^11 




7m iM 






capeziQ 

at fL 
fountain 

LAMASSKC rviAi. 



Step Out 
In Style 

with "Ms. Lili" 

by 

dngo 



Buff irt russet foot wifti Stitched 
vamp design and matching 

puff stitched urethane shaft. 
TALLAHASSEE MALL g-^ 

10:00-9:30 Mon.-Sat. 





When you're m the mood for a drink after bombing a quiz 
or a late-night cram course, come by Church's Fried 
Chicken and with the purchase of a two or three piece 
chicken order, we'll give you a 16-ounce Pepsi ' — 
absolutely FREE! 

You see, at Church's we appreciate the student business, 
and we know that sometimes a tall, cold drink is just what 
the doctor ordered. So ha\ e a drink on us while enjoying 
Church 's famous tend n- fried chicken 




FREE 16-OUNCE PEPSI 



Have a driak M at! Widi Che iNutiMe «r a^r two Of 

and this coupon, you'll receive one 16-ounce Pepsi atwriMlljr bm. Kc d rrm abte at particii 
Church's Fned Chicken locations One coupon per customer. pJcasr CustooKr pay* appiicahleii 
and local taxes. Not vaitd when used m coniunctioo with any other ^Kctai oiler. Not redecroabk 
for cash. 



Now 21. 1980 



aaaia 




CHimoi's^ 




CHICKEN 







0 

f *• m\ 

lli. ^^^^ 
mm 



I. 



: * 

* t 




12 / Wecfaiesday, hk>vemb€r 12, 1900 FlorMi 



SPORTS IN BRUSP 



TODAY IS THE 
deadline for mixed doubles 
temm and racquetball sign 



Polls 



little eniertainmeni for the 
home folks. Their creation 
was as economically 
motivated as the gas station 
on the corner. Like an 
unescorted woman in a bar 
their beauty lies in the eyes 
of the beholder." 

And while getting upset is 
a natural reaction for any 
team that has whipped 
UPI's third-ranked team 
(Nebraska) and was ranked 
above the AP's second- 
ranked team (USC) only a 
week ago, it won't change 
anything. Ii should just 
increase the realization of 
how political ihe polls really 
are. 

Keeping calm and 
performing on the field will 
prove to be the overriding 
factor in the end, because 
those so-called national 
powers (Georgia, USC,. 
Nebraska, Alabama and 
Notre Dame) will get a taste 
of reality in die next few 
weeks. 

If Georgia doesn't get its 
doce at AnlNim or Georgia 
Tech, it sorely won't escape 
the sour-tasting medicine it 
will receive in the Sugar 
Bowl. Hopefully it will be 
administered by Bowden^s, 
boys, if they get to go to 
New Means. 

USC, who can't go to a 
major bowl this season 
because of NCAA rule 
violations, will get their 
dosage when they go up 
against Washington or 
UCLA. 

Nebraska, which might 
be the biggest fake of the 
five, may get by OklahcMna 
and their Orange Bowl 
opponent, but the 
Comhuskers won't be able 
to make a dear-conscienced 
claim to the mtional title if 
FSU goes undefeated 
against both Florida and 
their bowl opponent. 

And Alabama and Notre 
Dame should not be 
allowed to even vie for the 
honor of being the nation's 
top team, considering their 
records and the caliber of 
the teams they have been 
disgraced by. 

Thus Bowden, FSU and 
all the teams cheated by the 
polls need not worry. Those 
charlatans in front of them 
will get what's coming to 
*em. Besides, what a team 
does on the field will count 
in the end, and it seems 
almost impossible to keep 
Bowden's boys off the 
Sugar, Cotton or Orange 
turf. No matter what those 
myopic judges of the 
popularity contests say. 



ups. Play will begin 
Sattifday and comnne on 

Sunday. 

TOMORROW IS THE 
deadline for badminton 
entries. Play will begin 
Monday and continue on 



Tu 

THE liTH ANNUAL 
Miller Lite Nile Flag 
Football Tourney will be 
held on Nov. 17-19. Sign up 
begins today and will be 
Umited to the first eight 



teams that bring $10 by the 
IM office. Prizes will be 
awarded. 

THERE WILL BE A 
National Collegiate Flag 
Football Tourney in 
conjunction with the Sugar 



Bowl. Any teams mtcrested 
in playing, call Bemic 
Waxman at the IM of fice ai 
644-2430. 

THERE WILL IF A 
supervisors meeting today 
at 3 p.m. 




Our Visa* blazer hdks like a classic 

but doesrft cost like one. 

We make it for guys and girk. And call itthe\l^ltonC1asnc*. Becauie that's exactly what it is, in cvefV ^ 
of the word. Pick yours in navy, pacific blue, l»own, gold, burgundy, red, orange, camel or green coinfoft»H«. 
easyore, wrinkle' resistant VISA* polyester. And, since youVe buying directly from the namifecturcr, 
there's no retailor's mark-up added to the price. 

Why pay more, even for a classic, when there's Vt^lton Clothes? 




The Walton Classic* is a great group blazer. Kfcn's sizes range from 36 to 54; 
short, regular, long and extra-long. Women's sizes range from 6 to 20. And 
we offer constant IZ-month delivery. For all the decaik, CMOCt £W Skoke 
at (404) 466-4851. 

*Vnaiia 




r * 

ni 

lefei 



VS.>I 





L-,ll..,ii>4llLi. 11 



I • 




Florida Flambeau 





SERVING TALLAHASStt tOK 6S YEARS 



hi ^^UV EMBER 13, ISn 

nion leader fears Reagan's* 
lefense policies disastrous 



BVSWKOI.FV 

am Winpisinger is right, 
»(fagan's economic and defense 
<jeanonly lead lo disaster, 
igpiflsinger is president of the 
ir^n. member International 
.,j!ton of Machinists and 
lc Workers, one of the larger 
LtK) unions. He's convinced 
rrmiliiary spending not only drains 
needed funds from social 
jf^s. but results in increased 
ment and higher prices as well, 
idcnt of a union with many 
^:^ employed in the defense 
jr).ihat'sa ri^ky stand to take, 
la's gei it straight. We're 100 
If for committing the resources 
-jrv i(» protect our territorial 
lyand lo defend the vital interests 
cnalion), ' W inpinsinger has said, 
^contends, instead of impr^)ving 
S's p(>siii(>n in world affairs, 
Jcfensf dollars only damage the 
a! home. 

>c reason, Winpinsinger says, is 
H' industries are notoriously 
[ar i iniensive — that is, for every 
par invested in defense, only a small 
iTKifl goes back out in the economy in 
•»« Money diverted to the Pentagon 



is missed in the civilian sector, where it 
could have provided jobs in industries 
like construction, food and clothing, 
consumer goods and services, and 
durable goods like automobiles. And 
since defense goods will never enter the 
marketplace, they represent an 
economic dead end: money spent on 
weapons is gone from the marl^etplace 
forever. 

That's how Winpinsinger reconciles 
his stance on lower military spending 
with his presidency of the machinists 
and aerospace union. Lowered defense 
spending would open more jobs up to 
union members in the civilian sector 
than they would stand to lose in defense. 

Winpinsinger has a plan for going 
about this, he calls "economic 
conversion." This conversion is needed 
so that *'one day, those of us who 
depend upon military production for 
our livelihoods can think about and act 
on war and peace issues, free from the 
fear of job loss and economic security," 
according to Winpinsinger. 

Of course, to call for a reduced 
defense budget these days is surely to go 
against the tide. Ronald Reagan's 
election indicates many Americans, 
much of labor included, want defense 
spending raised. 




dent of the International 

Machinists and Aerospace 
WcNrken U nion, wiU speak at 8 
tonight in room 201 
Diffenbaugh. 

*'l don't pretend to be an expert on 
defense or weapons procurement," said 
Dr. James Gwartney of the FSU 
economics department, '*but it would 
appear that to say the U.S. defenses are 
impregnable right now is a pretty shaky 



Committee created 
to study prisons 



I MItn PR>ss|%T»1IN*TM>NAI 

Tallahassee - Gov. Bob Ciraham created a 
permanent committee to advise him on 
correcnons problems, including violence and 
overcrowding at Florida State l*rison, and put 
Attorney General Jmi Smith in charge. 

The Governor's Advisory Committee on 
Corrections is not a direct result of recent 
problems at the Starke institution, including the 
stabbing death ot u guaid. However, the group 
almost certainly will devote most of its time to 
those difficulties. 

Corrections Secretary Lovk Wainwright 
promised a circuit judge Mondasf tiMl tlie 
population at FSP. the state's main maxiamm 
security facility, would be kept bdow 1 .000. 

Bradford County Circuit Judfe R. A. CSteen 
had ordered the population capped at 750. Tlie 
department appoded the order, which kept tt 
from taking effect. The one is now peiidif^ 
before the 1st District Cowf of Appeal. 

Wain Wright's promise required the transfer of 
more than 100 inmates from FSP, which might 
cause o vercro w din g elsewhere. 

The Smith p^oup wfli foOow op the work of 
Graham's Execntive Review Committee for the 
Department of Correctkms, winch made a six- 
month study and snlmiitted a report a month ago. 
Oat of the report's recoomiendations was that a 
permanent prison system advisory coram^lee be 
estab!i^hcd. 




Will he or won't he? 

DickHowser walking on thin ice as NY manager! 



BY CHARLIE W ABE 

SKOAL TDTHE FLAMKAI) 

As a first year managCT^ he won 103 games, led his team 
to the Eastern Division pennant of the American League 
and did it with a patchwork pitcUng staff and an inMd 
more famtfiffi' with the emergency room than the locker 
room. 

But he still may be out of a job. 

Only with the New Yofh Yankees. And only if employed 
by George Steinbrauier. 

Dick Howsor, who coached at Florida StMe in 1979, 
replaced Billy Martin as the Yankee skipp^ last year. 

Under Howser the Yanks burst out of the gate, building a 
comfortable lead by OEud-Aprfl, only to watch it disappew 
chiring the dog days of August. The surging Baltimore 
Orioles took five of six from the New Yorkers then, and 
owner George Steinbrenner began to publicaHy criticize his 
players — and the manager. 

The Yanks held on, but lost in three straight to Kansas 
City in the American League playoffs. 

Since thenj Howser and Steinbrenner have had many 
conversations about next season. But as this interview 
points out, no decision has been reached. 

Not to Howscr's knowledge, anyway. 

rn V Do you wan! to manage the Yankees next season? 

DH: Well, Td like to manage, but there are a lot of 
things other than just managing. We (Steinbrenner and 
Howser) talked about that. Tdraiher not comment on that, 
rd like to manage or I wouldn't have taken the job but you 
have to manage under your conditions. I'm that strong 
headed. I think I knou what it takes to win and what it 
takes to be a good manager and if I can't do it, basically. 



the way 1 fed I have to do it to wm, then no 1 don't think 

I'd care to be back. 

CW: What rok do you think the press has played in this 
whote thing? It seem like that 's been pml of the problem as 

far as the negotit^kms have gone. 

DH: Well, not icaUy. I went into tl^ Yankee job 

knowing you're always going to be on the hot spot with the 
press. But i felt hke the media people have their job to do 
and I have my job to do. As long as 1 can explain things to 
them, the reasons I did things during the season, 1 got along 
very well with the media. 1 understand they're in a lough 
situation right now. They're trying to explain this thing all 
over the country, what's happening. I don't know and I 
don't think George really knows, right now. So it's not an 
easy situation for the press, either. They've got their jobs to 
do and right now hey're in limbo just like George and I are. 

CW: It sounds tentative, kind of a day by day thing. 

DH: It really is and that's what it is exactly. It's hard to 
explain it and that's why it's hard for me to talk to them 
(the press) all the tmie and jusi say, 'well, we haven't really 
made a decision yet.' It is tentative, there are a lot of ihmgs 
we are discussing. And I'd rather not comment on anything 
until we get the entire thing finalized. 

CW: You had a great season with the Yankees, you 
broke the attendance record, had 103 wins, why do you 
think all this is going on? 

DH: Probably because we didn't win everything. 
Basically, George is right. TlM Yankees tfe expected lo win. 
I liK ught we won but we-didn't win everything. He'sgothis 



lis;. 



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Hawkins no women's senator; 
Stone will resign eari^ 



I MIHlPRKSSlNTKRNAflONAI 

WASHINGTON — Sen.- 
elcct Paula Hawkins, 
fielding a question on her 
opposition to the Equal 
Rights Amendment, said 
yesterday she did not run 
for C ongress to represent 
women's interests. 

••Women's interests are 
men's interests. I'm for 
equality for all," the tart- 
tongued Republican said in 
an interview on the ABC 



Good Morning America 
show. 

She said she would 
campaign nationwide for 
adoption of state statutes 
dealing with equal rights. 

Hawkins' election as the 
first woman Florida has 
ever sent to the U.S. Senate 
v^as protested by ERA 
forces as a "total disaster** 
and hailed by anti-ERA 
groups as a decisive defeat 
for women's rights. 




Ribbons' home 



Ribbans benefit Friday 

BYCLRT HFLDS 

Kl AMBKAl SIKH WRITKR 

When Jane Ribbans, the 
24 year-old counsellor at the 
Leon Association for 
Retarded Citizens, died one 
week after being raped and 
slabbed in her home by one 
of her patients, she left 
SI 8, (XX) in medical bills. 

On November 14, 
Lambda Alpha Chi 
fraternity is sponsoring a 
benefit to help pay that 
debt. 

On September 3, Ribbans 
was assaulted in her home at 13201/2 Linda Ann Drive and 
stabbed repeatedly. An escaped patient that RRlfoans had 
been counselling at the Association was charged with sexual 
battery and first degree murder in connection with the 
incident. During the following week, Ribbans went through 
a series of operations as doctors unsuccessfully fought to 
save her life. 

••AH of the money goes to the Ribbans family. Lamda 
Chi is not making a cent off of this,** said Tom Amontree, 
who is in charge of the benefit. ••Some of our ahimiii came 
to us w ith the idea of doing a benefit for the Ribbans. We 
do a lot of community service projects. In fact, we won the 
community service award last year, and this seemed like a 
good worthwhile project.'* 

The benefit will be held at the Tallahassee Sports 
Stadium on Capital Circle at 8:30 p.m. November 14. 
There will be a $2 donation required at the door. Inside, 
ther will be 25« beer, a free mechanical bull ride, and 
several contest s . Local merchants have chipped in with $7 ,000 
in prizes to be gi\en away, indudtng visors to the first 500 
people to attend. 



* ••The ERA has nothing 
to do with the U.S. Senate 
and the people of Florida 
were smSut enough to know 
that," said Hawkins. 

She said she was upset 
that these groups stereotype 
women as one-issue 
representatives saying, in 
effect, that she will be a 
senator who is also a 
woman, not a wonira's 
senator. 

Meanwhile outgoing Sen. 
Richard Stone, a Democrat 
defeated in the Democratic 
primary, said he will resign 
Dec. 31 to enable Ifowkins, 
53, to take her seat three 
dayseaiiy. 

The idea has to give her a 
slight jump on other 
freshmen senators. 




Hawkins 



although most feel thece 
wiH be UtUe adv»itaie since 
Republkans agreed before 
the election to dole out 
committee assignments to 
new mem ber s in alphabetical 
orcfer rather tbm seniority. 
Stone said it ndght give her 
a betto- choice of offices. 
Gov. Bob Graham, will 
appoint her prior to the 
Jan. 3 start of newly-dbcted 
senators. 



Feminist lecture today 

FROM STAFF RETOBTS 

Linda C. PoweU, a black fenfflif^ 4K;tivist, writer, aad 
musieian, will be in Tallahassee today through Saturday for 
a series of lectures and w(»-kshop$ at Florida A & M and 
Florida State. Powell's visit is sponsored by FAMU's 
student government and the FSU Women's Center. 

Powell is known for her critiques of Michelle Wallace's 
controversial book ** Black Macho and the Myth of the 
Superwoman," an examination of sexism within the black 
ccHnmunity. 

Both Wallace and Pow^ feel that black women should 
work to free themselves from sexual oi^res^on, as weD as 
from racial oi^xession. That position has met with sharp 
criticism from many prominent black sociologists who fed 
that black women should concentrate their efforts on 
eliminating racial prejudice before turning to the problem 
of sexual discrimination. 

Powell wUl speak m Wallace's work tonight at 7:30 in 
the Palm Romn of FAMU's student union. She will be at 
FSU Friday night to present ''A Black Feminist Analysis of 
the Women's Liberation Movement." The lecture wiU be 
held at 7:30 in Room 126 of the Bellamy Building, fcHlowed 
by a reception at the Women's Center. Saturday morning, 
Powell will attend a Black Student Union sponsored 
workshop on ''Resolution of Problems in Black 
Education," 10:30 p.m. in Room 128 Diffenbmigh. 

For more information, contact the Women's Center at 
644-4007. 



Wmpinsinger frompage 1 

argument." 

Gwartney believes that, although there will always be an 
economic cost associated with increased military spending, 
that cost has to be weighed against the needs of U.S. 
security. 

*'Sure, if you increase defense spending, you're going to 
have less non-defense commodities. But you have to 
consider the dear old world we live in." 

Organized labor seems to agree, with the union vote 
going for Reagan almost as much as for Carter, despite the 
AFL-ClO's endorsement of the Democratic candidate. 



But Winpinsinger apparently has no intentions of 
edging toward the right, even just a littie bit. He is a vice- 
president of the Democratic Socialist Organizing 
Committee, and is used to finding himself to the left of 
other labor leaders. He even led a walkout of some 75 
ctetegates when it became clear the Democratic convention 
would nominate Carter. 

A proposed merger of Winpinsinger's machinist and 
aerospace union with the United Auto Workers, however, 
may help Winpinsinger's cause. The UAW in recent yew» 
has positioned itself to the left of most of organized labor, 
and if merged with the machinists, the result would be the 
largest international union in the country, with over 2.5 
million members. 



Im Brief policy: The Flambeau in Brief secticm, because of limited space, does not print notices or regular 

meetings of membership groups. Unless pre-registration is required, morning events will be announced the 

previous day and afternoon and evening events the same day as they occur. Only one notice will be run of 
each event, and all events must be open to the public. Notices will not be taken by telephone, but must be 
mailed to The Flambeau at FSU Box U-7001 or delivered to the Flambeau office at 204 N. Woodward Ave., 
by 1 p.m. the day before they are due to run. All notices should include day, time, place, costs, if any, and a 
contact number for The Flambeau. All times are subject to standard editing. 




CEJ^TUR Y 2 

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$5.00 



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'He O K 




' ' ' I bmhtau T>i!ir*.iiiv Novfmher I 1 




acuity Senate ends debate 
flliberal studies, for now 



^.^ in hour long dcbatc in which one 
•» ^fnaior referred to another as 
■Jfts. ' Honda State's Faculty Senate 

• i provision allowing academic 
• ' request inclusion of as many 

, .uMild like in next year's 
.;uuicwcqiiircnienls. 
>.oie*asciosc, but the forces favoring 
of four liberal studies courses from 
jcpartmeni went down to defeat. 
Bienis v^ill now submit their requests 
'Ka^iI studies courses to an area 
which will then pass its request on 

• "dergraduate Policy Committee, 
1 turn pass its request on to the 
Senate. ' 

action the Senate voted to stop 
students to take 
orv /unsatisfactory (S/U ungraded) 
for liberal studies credit. Honors 
ars will not be affected by this rule, 
jing to Stephen Winters, tmk studies 
^ fhis policy will go into effect next fwB, 
itudents have the option of adofHintthe 
•Kile new Kbcnrf studies policy or of livhig 
fitrihe policy in force whai they entered 
Kwiversity,** said Winters. **Th^ cannot 
xiiaddioose between the two. " 




Winters 

Under the new liberal studies 
requirements students need not take 
^emtstry or physics. They do have to take 
the equi^ident of six addHioaal quarter hours 
ia iHHMatties and two more quarter horn HI 
phyiic^ iGienoe» acoopdiot to WiMfs. They 
alio flMitt ccMupiele a history series, not 
mandated un^ old liberal studies 
requirements. 



City delays bus pass plan 



BYDANNI VOGT 

ll 4MRf At STAIFWRITKR 

monthly discount bus pass giving 
J^wi riders as many trips as they want 
veil cautious approval by city 
"■ioioiiers last night. 

hi disagreement on who should get 
diicount led the commission to 
^^^poneiny action on a plan for at least a 

'■tk. 

I ihink the commission is supportive 
■ Jomc type of monthly pass at a 
<*nt," City Manager Dan Kleman said 
^ the commissioners discussed various 
^Wth without agreeing on one. "We'll 
*p new plans within 30 days, and 
« » bick before the commission. * * 
Jntrovcrsy centered around a pUn 
H in additional 50 cent discount to 
^ ho could get ten or more of 
^Ptoyees to purchase the passes. 
Commissioner Carol Bellamy 
the extra dbcount, others feh it 



was discriminatory. 

*'We need one pass at one discount price 
avaHnMe to everyone, otherwise it's an 
unfav rihiation,*' proccfted CoaMdnioiier 
Hurley Rudd. 

Mayor Dick Wilson also opposed 
Carter's plan, daimlng it worked against 
mployees of smaO businesses. 

Comnussicmer Sheldon Hilaman said 
there shoukl be three categories: the general 
public, students, and the elderly. 

In addition to the monthly pass, 
commissioners discussed $10 a month 
commuter passes effective only during 
Monday thru Friday rush hours and a 50% 
tieket for students under age 17. 

In an unrelated issue, the 
agreed to lease Florida Stale a wheetdnir- 
acoesiible bus for uat ^ the Semiaoie 
Eiqivess shuttle. The bus, Gostuig FSU more 
^tti $700 a nnmh, wiO be leased from 
Decenriier 1 toAngnitSl, 1901. 



CORRECTIONS 
& 

CLARIFICATIONS 



•page one story in yesterday's 
alias used by Joseph Blai/weil 
^^_^P^llcd. The story should have read: 
arrested by FSU police 
'"'^aame Joseph Balizcll, oneof 19 
"^jacd by BtotiweU, according to the 
!^coaq|iuterc^ 

^LtQeCottntySherifTsD^Murtment. 



^P^c one story on GOttsoiidatton in the 
"^^r 10 tssne. the nambemm 
> reported the compnritive rates 
users in the 



Actually rales are less expensive in the city 
than they are for people belonging to the 
Talquin Electric Co-operative. We regret 
any inconvenience caused by our mistaice. 

••• 

An hNerview with Svetlana Shago in the 
November 7 issue of the Flmmbemu 
contained a statcoMm by Shago implying 
that the Unitarian Church was affiliated with 

Rev. Sun Yung Moon. Shago n a e a n osny 
the Umfkataon ChMch is 




$55---COUPON--$55 



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TOP DOLLAR 
GOLD 

Travel Lodge 

Rm 117 
w. Tennessee 



\Mb ^ty MY gold ff 9U¥m mmi coins. \ 

$55 ....... $55 



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umilOli OF COUK TV SBS 

oneDayonly-niiiay.llov.i4 

12 Noon til sold out 



25" CONSOLES 



From PORTABLE UP TO 

These seta are reposs es s i ons, bankruptcy, reclaimed, etc. 

$150 $250 

AU Mtf tiMMTOughly c:liecked out and each comes 
wMh 9(May pictme tube wananty 

THESE ARE NOT MOTEL SETS 

HOLIDAY lim>ARKWAY 

Friday, Nov. 14 12 Noon tH told out 



I # • 



4 / Thursday, November 11, 19a0 kktnAm flun^ewi 




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wmum 





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Florida Flambeau 



The Florida Flambeau is published by the Florida Flambeau Foundation, Inc. an indepcndcni, non- 
profit corporation which is solely responsible for the contents of the paper. 

Florida Flambeau Foundation, Inc. Newsroom, 204 N Woodward Avenue, phone 644-5505; Mailing 
address, P O. Box U-7001» Florida Stale University. Tallahassee. Florida 32306. 

Sidney Bedmgfield Editor Mary Tebo Associate Editw 

Bob O'Lary Photo Editor Steve Dollar Associate Editor 

Brad Liston News Editor Chris Farrdl Associate Editor 



MK1)(l(UnM M leiNB IfiUS OF W 

1)11 lim^ 0^ mia^ 5 tcim 

vow III mSF/ (I UB SBI^ 




Chris Brockman Sports Editor 



Melissa Beckham.^ Art Director 



Florida Flambeau Foundation. Inc. Business and Advertising Office, 2{>6 N. Woodward Avenue, 
phone 644-4075; Mcdiatype lab. 314 University Union, phone 644-5744; Classified Ad Office. 306 
University Union, phone 644-5785. 



Rick Johnson General Manager 

Tracey Rowe Advertising Manager 

Laurie Jones Business Manager 



Amy Arbopist.. Productioft Mmiger 

Jane Duncan Nfecfiatype Manager 



1 



letters 

Winpinsinger seen 
as labor's 'Moses' 

Editor: 

Workers in factories producing instruments of war face a 
contradiction about having to make a living and a sense of 
guilt about producing instruments of mass destruction. But 
the workers in these, and other, industries are actively 
pursuing a p' .a to resolve their dilemma. Unions, mass 
organizations and individuals are joining together as a 
powerful force in the struggle for conversion from the 
production of instruments of war to peacetime production 
— the transfer of wasted billions from the war budget to 
human welfare budgets. 

The adverse economic impact of military spending goes 
beyond the fact thai as military spending increases, all 
other government services are left to compete for the 
remaining scarce federal dollars. Military spending 
contributes to unemployment because, dollar for dollar, it 
creates far fewer jobs than almost any other kind of 
spending (according to a Bureau of Labor and Statistics 
study, the same $1 billion in federal funds which would 
create only 74,000 military jobs could create 101 ,000 jobs in 
the civilian sector). Military spending fuels inflation in two 
ways : 1 .) It pumps money into the economy through large 
corporate profits and wages, but does not provide products 
or services that can be purchased by the average citizen. 2.) 
It contributes to the inflationary national debt. 
Approximately two-thirds of the public debt accumulated 
through war and military spending. 

U.S. military forces should be designed to deter attack 
and protect the territorial integrity of our country. Detente, 
not superiority, should be our objective vis-a-vis the 
U.S.S.R. Unless we change our nation's spending priorities 
we will continue to pay for miUtary prc^ams we do not 
need at the cost of services we cannot afford to do without. 

The people of Tallahassee have the opportunity to hear 
one of the foremost proponents of reduced military 
spending, William Winpinsinger. As president of the 
International Association of Machinists and Aerospace 
Workers, Winpinsinger is an advocate of real security for 
Americans, a security based on imernationid peace and 
justice, not a false security based on *'tlte balance of 
terror** and a iMavily armed world. 

Many thmk Winpinsinger is a Moses** ready to lead 
U.S. labor out of the wfldemess, to revitalize the labor 
movement. Winpinsinger bdkves the U.S. labor movement 
should contfaiue its miieion, to itn/e the makm's oppressed 
and underprivileged, and to further its accomplishments of 
keeping the maldistribution of America's wealth Urom 
being worse than it is. 

No matter what your philosophy, you should not miss 
this oppoftunity to hear one of America's fkiest leaders 
m an issue <rf inipoitWKe to everyone. 



Human rights activists fear Reagan 



BY ROBERT MILLIKEN 

PACIFIC NEWS SERVICE 

WASHINGTON, D.C. — During a visit to Washington 
recently, the leader of the Guatemalan Christian Democratic 
Party, Vinicio Cerezo, was asked how he saw the future for 
human rights if Ronald Reagan became president. He 
replied, diplomatically, but grimly: '*It would be in the 
strongest national interest of the U.S. for Reagan to continue 
this country's support for human rights in Latin America.'* 

Cerezo's appeal was spoken with conviction, for 27 
members of his opposition party have been assassinated by 
death squads over the past year, and Cerezo himself is on a 
death list which he claims the Guatemalan regime has 
prepared. 

His sentiments reflect the growing anxiety among the 
human rights groups in Washington whose numbers and 
influence have grown since the Carter Administration made 
human rights a key plank of its foreign policy. After four 
years, during which most activists agree the human rights 
situation in Latin America has benefited from American 
support, they are now asking if the momentum can be 
maintained in a Reagan Administration. 

Unlike Carter, Reagan has specifically excluded human 
rights as a foreign policy concern. Reagan has consistently 
stressed a building up of America's defenses, an expanded 
military role for the United States abroad and a 
strengthening of U.S. ties with Third World allies such as 
South Korea, Taiwan, and Argentina, which have blatantly 
violated human rights. 

This, together with Reagan's call for a strengthening of the 
CIA, has left human rights groups worried that U.S. foreign 
policy may be heading for a return to foreign interventionism 
and the realpolitik of the Nixon and Kissinger era. 

But rather than meaning an end to the human rights 
movement, most groups anticipate their - will increase 
under a Reagan Presidency, and some are aiieady planning 
such a scenario. Laurence Birns, director of the Council on 
Hemispheric Affairs (COHA), a research group on Latin 
America, says: "If Reagan wins, it will be bad for human 
rights in Latin America, but good for human rights groups 
like COHA. There will be more work for us, and more need 
for resources." 

Jo-Marie Griesgraber, deputy director of the Washington 
Office on Latin America, agrees that by proclaiming a vocal, 
explicit human rights policy, the Carter Administration has 
helped temper more violations than would have been the case 
otherwise. The Office was formed after the 1973 coup in 
Chile and Uruguay. 

"The Carter policy has encouraged vast impro\emenis in 
Bolivia, Ecuador, Peru, Honduras, and the Dominican 
Republic," she says. "The elections in those countries were 
tied somehow to the fact that the U.S. would smile on their 
initiatives." 



NATIONAL 

Griesgraber says the nun fear not* is the u-- 
human rights legislation ni ik ig U.S. militjr\ 
aid dependent on a countr> s human rights pc 
The legislation was originally opposed by the \fcr 
on grounds that it would tie the president's ba^ ' 
policy. But, says Griesgraber. the legi'.iaiiun 
bans on U.S. aid to Argentina and Chile - 
being reversed regardless of het her there is iKcp-r. 
Democratic Congress after No^eiiiber 

Griesgraber foresees some likeK change 
Presidency: **I expect that a Reagan aJn 
warm up relations with Argentina and Bra. 
with Chile and then concentrate its s;;a ifr 
Caribbean," she says. 

Cindy Buhl, of the Coalition for a Sc* Fwr 
Military Policy, whose 43 member organi/a 
several human rights groups, agrees that Rcagar 
an accomodation with Atgentina. Chile .! ' 
suggests that human rights enMips v^ou,. 
Reagan. "There is nothing like a ciear enemy ta«l/a* 
together.'* 

But if there is agreement on thi 
uncertainty over the strateg\. Human nehs k=' 
anticipate that, as under Nixon, there ^ouid be i.r* 
access to State Department officiah. and .c'^j f" • 
like the open contacts and mf.^rmation iraumz 'Hi' 
on between the State Department and human i" ' 

in recent years. .^-..^ 
Some human rights activists are equaily cofl^- 
the prospect if Carter is re-elected. 
moves towards a more right-vMng ^^'^"^L^.- 
something which could stay in place lung ^"^^ j 
is over at the expense of his much-trumpeted vm^ 

stand four years ago. ^t^'€4 
And there is uniform condemnauor. J 
human rights lobby of the Carter p^^iicy \ 
Where U.S. policy in Latin Amcrua has 
sanctions, there has been only token P^^^ 
government at the thousand, of P^''"'^ 
in South Korea, the Philippines and '"^^f^lj^^ 
Phillip Harvey, executive ^'^^^-'^^^ ^ , ?^ 
Coalition for Human Rights, ^J^, ■ 
would "harden up some of the worst eWBPi^^^^ 
policy establishment which already s««» 
Korea policy anyway.** . ihc^^ 

In spite of the disquiet over ^"^"^llJJ^^^f^ 
groups are optimistic on one P^^^^'^^ 
last few) years have firmly ^^^^^'^^-^ 
public issue both in the U ni led Slate 
this is here to stay. 




Letters Policy: Letters to the editor of the Florida Flambeau should be signed. 
address and phoi^ number if possible. They should be type-written, ^^^^^^'^P^^^^ .f "^^j^^ fof 
words. Correct names will be nm with each letter unless the author has a ''^ ' .^^^ 
watmymimm. The editofi leterve tiie ri^ to edit tlie letters for koglh and to meet staodar > 




Flofiii FlamKt'jy Thur^Jjv. No\ ember 13. 19i0 / 5 





eagan 
^NAL 



ter now » the fate e \ 
ig II .S. B^iiry and ecori i 
IS kMan rigiiu pcrfonr 
.>|ipoM(l liy III* While h 
.e Pfcild c at 't liHMb in k> 



! he kgislaiioii — especi^Uv 
li mmd Oiie — is in 
nether tliere is a 
lv ember. 

likdy dMBfcs under a Rc 
Rei^aa administraiion « 

ifia and [Brazil, renew rela 
ntratc strategies on 

tjon for a Ne>* Foreign 
lember organizations mv 
Lrcesihaiitcagan^ould 
itina. CWk and Brazil 
|groiipa i^mld ftoun^h uf 
aclBircoeinyiodra»pcv 

II on the outlook, inc 
igv. Human rights acm 
In. there woukJ be link, it 
Itfidak, and ccrtamlv not! 

trading that ha> ' 
rights 



|s are equalK concerned at 
cted. They see Carter^ r 

Iht-wing defense po^tu 
place long after ekcfioiK 

ted human 

Lna..on among 

; ter policy ^ 
Mic-nca has been 
u> token Pf'^'^r^ 
political prisoners"" 
, and Indonesia. 
ctor of the NOT* 

I ^^orstelenieiiW""*^] 

LurepoUcy^""^: 
'.,im.Theybel*»***'', 

Siaics and 




led, and 
and no 1 



tba" 



Parking woes plague disabled students 



^ ^' f 101 a handicapped student anempctog to attend 

n he pa^ Tive week^ of this quarter* I have been 
*^ -ark in my numbered, allocated space at least 10 
^ ,^ ^ Because someone else parked in it. 
/numbered spaces are assigned to a handicapped 
h a mobility problem that prevents them from 
^1 distances across campus. A student who lives off 
!ift^ one assigned space, those that live on campus and 
gel two — one at their dorm and one at another 
Ttee spaces are not a priv ilege — they are a necessity 
1 The federal laws calls it reasonable 
,on. Icall it a right. We cannot park at the stadium 



letters 

buildir.gN dunng rain storms, \ve ma>L go aic»iig 'nc preN^ribed 
sidewalk, and often out of the way to findaranip loget mioa 
building. 

The culprits are everyone — from professors, stucknts, and 
even the maintenance workers. 1 have had cars parked across 
my back bumper so I couid not back out of my space; I have 
had cars parked on the grass next to my car so close that I could 
not get my wheelchair up to the door, much less into the car; 
and 1 have had cars just park in my spot, even though there is a 
sign there advising that it is a wheelchair parking space and also 
a tow away zone. 



t have not Ind cars towvd yet because it is exticwly line 
consuminfif for me— I mu'.t physacatty cai the poficc aad then 
wait iin !hc . jr ;o pcrs4>najly request towing. Ihavehad'Can 
ticketed bv mst calhng and reportii^ their presence, but this 
action sccuii to make no impression — the sMe car was 
parked there again m three days. 

Starting November 10, 1 wiU miss class, be late for tesisor do 
whatever is necessary and I w^ start having vehicles towed out 
of my spot. I wiU abo urge other stiideois having siflMlar 
problem to do the same. The tow fee should run 
approxMtteiy S50 phn tlie ticket from ¥Sk) ^boM m ym 
bmck another SIO. thm seems like a large price to pay for an 
easy parking ptoce! 



«ul I KR SKATING 

' I eon County 
op tonight at 7-9 
■ 1 1 p m. at the 
\ ::;urv on North 
" \dmission is S2 
i&andSI '"'^r kids 

Ifti AlDRfcY 
talk on Faust ^ 



llid reason 



for 



scheduled 
•is been moved to 

>>. November 20 at 

pwi. 

™ JEWISH 

Lmon holds its fust 
'i tonight in 214 
at 6:30. We will 
pmt cultural and 
aspects of the 

'>A POWELL, 
eTiinisi activist, 
- musician, speaks 
f^- ^ 30 in the Palm 
of the FAMU 
Union. Powell's 
covers hiack 
^. Sponsored by the 
Student 

CHKss CLUB 
'^^^ 3 'Simultaneous 
^'^on t,xia\ at noon in 
. ^^rCour^%ard. 
^ ^OSPll CHOIR 

^> ai i: noon 
^^oaCoortvard. 
^^NISH FOR 
Offered under 
xpenmcnis 
Languages), 
who are 
^i^mhMhaveM 




of 



6 / TtersdiQf, Novcnbor 13« 1910 PhfUli 






pi ( i nil 



Planet 




Waves 



World 

TEffHAN — Iran received the U.S. reply 
to its four hostage demands yesterday and 
an Iranian parhamenl member charged the 
United States was stalling on meeting the 
terms for the release of the 52 Americans. 

BAGHDAD, Iraq — Iran resorted to 
guerrilla tactics yesterday in its 52-day war 
against Iraq and touched off a confused 
battle in which Iraqi troops shot each other, 
Tehran Radio reported. 

There was some glimmer of hope for an 
end to the Persian Gulf war with the 
decision by both nations to receive fomicr 
Swedish Prime Minister dof PataK, at 
the head ui a U.N. peace delegation that 
will travel to Baghdad and Tehran next 
week. 



i;Nrrco racss intckmational 



CAIRO, t g,>pi — Sonie 700 troops from 
the U.S. Rapid Deploygient Force arrived 
today for a joint exercise with Egyptian 
forces and to get regional experioice for 
possible action if a military crisis threatens 
the oil-rich Persian Gulf. 

Nation 



generally agreed the only necessary piece of 
legislation they must deal with inuiiediately 
is the 1961 federal bttdfct. 

The House Budget OMBaiktee» further 
behind in its work than its Senate 
oonnterput, zipped tliroii^ a budget- 
drafting session in three hours, i^iproving a 
2 percent acroas-the-bowd cut in fiscal 1981 



TALLAHASSFF 



State 



WASfllNGIWI — 

met yesterday for^he fHrst time with 
IVciidcBt CMr^ tep men, and asked them 
to defer as many decisions as possible 
during the final days of the Deraocnttic 
administration. 

WASHINGIWi — The lame duck 96th 
Congress yesterday abandoned efforts to 
pass a tax cut this year, md leaders 



NEW YORK — A videotape played 
yestefday at the latest Abscam trial showed 
Rep. Wwmk llMiipaaB of New Jersey 
pkidag up a briefcase containing $50,000 itt 
a flwetittg with an oadeicover FBI i^ent 
and handing^ to an allied co-conspntor. 

At no time during the meeting did the 
congressnnn ackaowMte that he knew the 
briefcase contained the aicMiey, afthoagh 
the prosecution maintains he did. 



House Speaker Don rackfr 
^WOO bribe from a jai aa; ^'-^ 
presented to the l eun Grand Jur) j 

Warren Goodwta. chief ^wtm 
Aiiornev Harry MorrlMa, »U « ^ 

three to three and onc hitf dhji^^ 
jurors to question wiin«sej i^, 
report on an extensive invest^wiot gfi, 
allegations made h\ Jin 11^^ j^n^ 
for World Jai Alaj of Mwni. ^ 

KEY WEST — Luesrommi f 
Jeamie brought ahnost 2 feet of i 
Florida Keys and stirred sets 
before slowing and weakening 
of Mexico yesterday. 



in 



Natural gas prices will rise 



BY DANNI VOGT 

FLAMBKAU STAFF WRITFR 

If you plan on using natural gas to stay 
warm this winter, it will probably cost more 
than it did last winter. 

The city commission last night hiked the 
cost of natural gas as much as 19 percent 
for some customers. Officials claimed the 
Tales residential customers pay will not be 
affected, and predicted non-residential 
users would pay 14 percent more than last 
year. Large industrial users may pay 19 
percent more, they added. 

The commission passed the increase 4- 1 , 
with only Mayor Dick Wilson voting 
against the new rates. Wilson faces re- 
election in February. 

'*l felt the increase was a little high and 
could have been phased in gradually,** was 
Wilson's explanation for voting no. 

If you move into a new abode, the price 
of having the gas turned on leaped from $10 
to S30. The non-residential reconnection 



charge rose from $25 to $50. 

The city also scrapped its sliding scale on 
gas prices that gave discounts to those who 
used the most, as well as abolishing reduced 
summer rates. 

The new residential rates are 46.56 cents 
per 100 cubic feet. The average home uses 
almost 1 1 ,000 cubic feet of gas in January, 
the city's coldest month. 

The old winter rates were 52 cents for the 
first 500 cubic feet, 28.8 cents for the next 
1 ,500 cubic feet, down to 11 . 1 cents for any 
usage over 100,000 cubic feet. 

City Manager Dan Kleman said at the old 
prices the city was losing money on every 
cubic foot sold. He added that even under 
the higher rates, natural gas was still a 
cheaper heating fuel than electricity. 

Chan Jones, chairperson of the Local 
Energy Action Plan's utility committee, 
argued the rate increase shouki have come 
in stages, not all at once. 




Howser from page J 

point, I've got nine. And he's right. He's 
the guy who si0» the checks. He does the 
hirmg and firing and it's his prerogative to 
move a manager if he wants to. 

CIV: If you don't manage the Yankees, 
4o you rkiftk you II manage another chib? 

DH: I haven't really thought about it. 
Becaue I still think i might be back 
managing the Yankees so 1 haven't really 
had the chance to sit down and say what I 
would do if something happens. I'm not 
real sure. 

ClfV You wouldn't wattl to stay in 
basebaU, I 'd imagine. 

OH: Well, I don't know. I'd want the 
right job in baseball. Just to take a job just 
to be working in baseball, no. But if the 
right opportunity came along I'd j>robably 
jump at something. But right nqw I'm stiB 
hired by the New York Yankees. 

CW: Are you stiil able to reflect happily 
on the season you Vc had anvway? 



DH: No question about it. I think about 
it every day. 1 think as a manager you get so 
involved with the batt dub that you never 
really go a4ay, evc» in the off-season, you 
don't think about some th^igs. And 
basically about how weH the players played, 
guys who played hurt. Horn weH we pfaiyed 
under pressure in September when we rei^ 
had to because Baltimore (fidn't slack off at 
aO. They stayed r|^ itt our heels. There are 
a lot of fond memories, of the *80 season 
and I thmk about itevery day. 

CMC: 56 hsing to Ajmsas City and the 
little dispute you have going with the 0¥mer 
hasn 'trained a ffHHiaeatomT 

DH: No, it was a good season. I have an 
empty feeling because I think we should 
have played a little better, maybe, in the 
playoffs and won everything, but baseball's 
not predictable. People are predictable, but 
over all I was satisfiMi, except we didn't get 
a chance to get in the World Series and have 
an opportunity to win the World 
Championship. 




DR. AUAM O. OEAM 
glO THOMASVILLE RD. 

(intarMctkm of Monro* 

APPOINTMENTS 



TUNE-UP « ENGINE 
REPAIR SreOALIST 

Otis Tinnell 

UMVEISITY EJUM 

TUNE-UF SERVICE MOTM REPAtl 
«7f W. TENNESSEE ST. 
TALLAHASSEE, FL 323M 

T.MAir 
■.nTEM 

MANAGER 



-I 



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DonlJusI Happen 

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Furthermore, you will earn graduate crecit towards a M^^ 
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We are regarded as the nation's finest and most prestiQ' 
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business and finarice. But, as important as our academic 
quality is our placement result. The Institute's placement 
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If you are a senior in high academic standing and loowng 
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on: 



TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 18 



CUSTOAlf 

bid 




lOREER 
lONEEII 

'••I to r»4 

I'llUfi E 

ml Kvil 



235 South 1 TWi Sfreet^ 

Philadelphia, Per ^ 

(215> 732-eeoo 



19103 



Approved by The American Bar AssociatKXi 

Rogrms Em fU CMi ToiMPd 1^ in 1^ Sto^ 
§voiiQti Aniioch School of LflMT. 



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km 




10 / Thursday, i>jovenil>cr I3» 1980 Florida Flambeaa 



7//£4 r/7£ 




Andrew Watts as the famous sieuth 

Holmes thriller 
opens tonight 

BY ROBERT HOWARD 

FLAMBKAl STAFF WRITER 

People begin to see that something more goes to the 
completion of a fine murder than two blockheads to kill 
and be killed, a knife, a purse, and a dark lane. Design, 
gentlemen, grouping light and shade, poetry, sentiment, are 
now deemed indispensable to ai tempts of this nature. 
_ ' ' — Thomas De Qumcey 

"Murder Considered as One of 
the Fine Arts" (1827) 
Tonight is the opening of the School of Theatre's most 
technically ambitious Mainstage production to date. The 
Crucifer of Blood by Paul Giovanni. Crucifer is a Sherlock 
Holmes thriller comprised of elements of Conan Doyle's 
The Sign of the Four, with other sources that look 
suspiciously like Sax Rohmer's Fu Manchu. 

Director Gil Lazier observes that since Crucifer is the 
result of an educational theatre, rather than a professional 
one, the total budget is between a third or fourth of the cost 
if it were produced elsewhere. He estimates that a regional 
theatre would have spend $2O-$30,000 — and a Ne\v York 
theatre $30(1,000 — to produce the same special effects as 
Mldiistage will give us for a fractkm of the cost. 

Holmes is known for his love of ''unusual" cases, and a 
large part of Crucifer's budget has gone towards creating 
Eptem sets and props. From the Red Gate at Agra to the 
Ponticheny Lodge, there is a /continual emphasis upon the 
exotic and mysterkms. 

Major Alistair Ross (Tim Claussen) and Captain Neville 
St4 Cliire (Randy Hyten) first meet in India as a mitiny is 
blpewii^ amoi^ the indigenous population. The trecherous 
evfn^ that are initial therecontinue their effects 18 years 
later, when Irene St. Claire (Helise Foard) is very concerned 
about her father's behavior, and consults with SbeiiodL 
Hohnes (Andrew Watts> and loba Watooo IStepben S. 
Ntal)< 

Actors well worth waddling for their "character** roles 
are Hani Metawie as Durga Dass, Jack Pinkney as Wirii 
Did, and Tim Goodwin as an Inspector LeHiide who is so 
mmtMiic he must be an elected oflfeial. 



Cmc^0mood opens imi^ 

is SI far 

(BBeral piAllc* The 




•I t:]S M ISU 
sta i Mti , $3.75 for the 




Second Stage, FAMU continue shows 



STAFF Bcraati 
Second Stage tfwatvt*i 

production of the 
Broadway bit musical 
G/fose, coatimies tcmtghl 
through Sunday at 
Tommy's Deep South 
Mtt^Hall. 
Curtains rise at 7 p.m. 



CHEAP THRILLS 



HOiila$3.50. 



The Florida AAM 
Playmaker's Guild continue 
with their production of 



Through Our Eyes tomght 
at the Charles Winterwood 
theatre on the FAMU 



A singing, dancing 



of^her Me. f Cm , 

with Langsi,^ Hoilitt 
The pr^xju.- - »w 

the Player'v 

the season, pc^...- ^ , 




How to Choose ^ Bek Budd 



WCM' /UicA filMiL {kM- 





e 



* -JJC 



(or (^$Mr ^id^t^Ji'^ 




Head fcr the mrrnitf ains. 

Of counc. • Busch belt buckle n tkc clMsicM ofc of aU. For 



ows 

^^^^^ Thmi^ Our 

V anrf Bttf, Ooti 
'^^ Ve. / GiiiV Co,.. 
tow Laugh md c 
I angston Hughe*, 
production, wtiidi i% 
jPlayerN Guild firsi of 
"ason. begins at I p.m. 





Wertmuller 



JANE BYALS 




GmMmlo GmmmU, pemrnkU mde presence m Om fMm of Lma 

Wertmuller, returns as the hero o/The SediK:^ of )i€m. The 1974 iiaUm dms 
and sex comedy will be screened tonight at 7:30 in Moore AwRtormm, Adknisskm 
is $1.50. Here, Giannini's Mimi attempts to defend his honor, with the wife of the 
man who has made h im a cuckold, 

perpetuate the miscoii^eptioo that the ahote of womca tt a 
proper courtship procectuije. 

Wertmuller explain* 'herself by sayiaft. "A j^od 
director, a good writer, is a hemuqihrocfite. The director 
loves all the womci, tovw all the men, loves aO the 
characters.*' In Swept Away, it becomes iacreasii^ 
difficult to love the boner Geaotfhw, who «ses RafMa as 
a punching bag to ven^ hb hostititles towards the 
bourgeoisie. 

For a while, ther^ is a sexual harmony and dass pc«», as 
the two struttte to survive. A huDiiiitariaa ideal CO 
the f oiefkoot in witfdi woman, powcrfid and 



Lina 

classic film 
(by on Unusual 
It^mttnl^Seao/ 

4 is the question 
the minds of the 
JiWdknccs from its 
^ in the United states 
^ giitil lis showing at 
^ Auditorium last 

.riocsday. 

k fiteiisonc in a series 
^^^^ioaaer FSU 
ugh a course focusing 
r tk changing image of 
1^ in the European 
Let's hope that her 
ajigc has changed — 

jgidily - in those five 

j\g story a simple (or 
Ik not so simple) 
^ of a bourgeois, 
cotypically "bitchy" 
in woman (of the 
Hiiiaese capitalist class) 
i the poor oppressed 

Ian crewman (of the working class,) set on her pleasure 
/somewhere in an obscure place in the Mediterranean 
II IS interesting to note that an odd misrepresentation 
ilrcady occurred. in that women are not representatively 

• ilthy ones in this world. 

wo become separated from the ship, upon her 
^■j^n[ insistence that the sailor take her out in a small 
tegh\. despite his warning that the sea is too rough. The 

- H breaks down, and they are "swept away." After 
-al days of drifting in the ocean, they come upon a 

xx'ied island and are forced to survive by no choice but a 
""^iiivc one. 

r 10 this point, they have maintained the master/slave 
. n.hip The tables- are quickly turned when the 
an katfacUa, (Mariangela * Welato), is starving and 

- iiuie. and at the mercy of Gennarino, (Giancarlo 
Gannini). the sailor. He catches a fish, fillets it, makes a 
'rc and proceeds to dine. She demands a piece of fish 
•"'ch he IS too full to eat, and he casts it intOthc|ire. 

\! this time. Wertmuller uses Gennarino's dialogue to 
he level of Raffaella (and the audience). The 

* an gives us a didactic pedantry of political tbeofy, 
?nakled with outdated Marxist jargon about the 
mssKm of the poor by the rich.«She asks, "Why did you 

ttat?" He answers, "I want to be Mte you people — 
prtAu. Don't you bum food to keep the prices upf * 
^^soforth. 

Mdla is reduced to tears and beggii«. and Gennarino 

<»ei brutal. He explms she will have to work for her 
coamiading her to wash his pants, degrading her 
•>'h such" terms as "bitch, "shit," "whore," and 

aAip ' One woBden what the GoaMMatleas of such 
•^ds have to do with the class struggle. He continuaBy 
^Hwids to her efforts wm derision. Ite not only caUs her 

^petent". but kicks and cuffs her. Continuldly. 

nfortunately. the scenes become more fearful, 
^nanno not only threatens her with rape, but does, in 
* ' rape her. On more than one occassion. Raffaella is 
^ledly beaten and abused sexually in blatant porno 
^•^^ As the horror of these scenes increases, fewer of the 
^" in !he audience arc hnighing and more women are 
'^>ng compelled to get up and leave. Wertmuller's 
^uation of this violence against the woman is so 
^^>found thai the audieBoe retohies st the means out to 
"^ifiihasanend. 

end IS, certainly no original. Love is won by brute 
Rafaella and Gennarino proceed to fall deeply into 
fkmg out a romantic, back -to- the- basics existence, 
Eluding an overabundance of sex scenes, and a reversal of 
JJ"»/5lavc relationships, a more true to life situation 
'•"the woman as oppressor 

' ^ allegory at this point is not onlv one of class struggle, 
^ also of sex struggle. Ironically, the woman figure does 
**%hi. she acquiesces, so that there is no war. It would 
J*tluit she loves being beaten and raped. These arc 
^ t^ OKftt classic scenes in the film industry 



But Wertm^ maidtatoi hw idea that one difference 
between men «id women eMs as a recurring theme m all 
of her fifans. That is,' that wOmen want to be happy, men 
wm to Uftc on the wotld. It is Gcnaariao's machisaM) 
wWch fhially disrupts their paradise. 

JUffacOa spies a \boat, and lets it pass; explaimng to 
oSanarinO that ^ Mit go "Because I love you. I want us 
to go on befaig happy.'* He proceeds to beat her in 
minishment, and the next time they see a boat, he hails it 
after she pl»ds with him not to. He explaii^ to her that he 
must go back, tliat he wants proof of "her love. He must be 
•able to prove that theii^love is real, in the real world. 

Which, of course, it is not. Bick-in class society, the 
relationship falls apart. - 

The timed Raffaella rejects him* and watches Genpanno 
tearfully chase her private helicopter as she Hies away from 
him He proceeds to curse the sea as a woman, and 
women as despicable. Gennarino has become a SKk^ 
humorous character who obviously got what he doffveo. 
The cleverest of Wertmuller's comical characteris^ 
bestowed upon Gennarino is that he is sdf-righleoas to his 
own self pity. 

One tends to have a contradictory fee tog aboy Rgf^Mfla 
because of her seU out to the original capilaHsm M who 

can blame her? ^ _^ 

One of the ways that this msuh to w«Ben to Swe^Ai^ 
has been written off is to ex|Mdog that it is an Itolta^ 
and that Italy's society b, of co«ne, Amencan. Ttos 
writer pleads ignpnmce. site ^ ^ 
seems more appropfiKe to peader We^imto ^ 
and the contrast of h^r own life to this portrait of the 
woman to Swtpt Amty. Wertmuller strove to become an 
infamous, briBtft Ml to a mWa world, to be married to 
1 man wtoi woiki ftir Iter, to have no children. She was not 
couteitt with iust betog to«ipy. she took the ^orW^ Her 
is atoiast ope of the stewotypteal "hberated 
liOMa,'* that is, a woman to ccmtrol. 

pcihgps she w» parodying the world around her, but as 
a iciylf. a kMt to Mooie Auditorium last Wednesday, after 
iHitfhte mea dteer and laugh at the beatings of a woman, 
aad««ultaiteOWiyi«ii»dte woman grimace at the violent 

- who.ifap|Oite,ii«dyioseea 



Florida Hambt^y 

'fSB 

UWCE 

^■1 ■ ■T.gliilw' I AN Iha Sicilian 



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D*«9 Oish Ptita 
rm Cm Cat 




• V « « * 9 • * 



TONICHTI! 





MARKET 




SATURDAY 

Nov. 15 

10 A.M. to 4 P.M. 
Ualoa Courtyard 

REGISTBATION 
Thru Nov. 14 

Room 318 or ^ 
University Union 

For more information 
Call 644-6710 






f t 
i 



■I 




i 





. 1 






0.V 






1': : 

til I 



laml^aii 





floom 306 UiiloiiTStiitAi^S? 




CtMUtfMAS POWnUMT MCIALI 
to tfHf . Olvt • part 

IIM MM's ymi love. A 
ir S23.M portrait now available 
S12.S0. TUmc dMrcMl ri 
t« put a 
tmc9. CatI 234-«72«. 



TWO COUPONS FOR U OF F VS 
FSU GAMC TUCS. TURN tN DAY. 
CALL 3»-4S2t SMO FOR PR. 

King tilt water btd with h wfc r for 

Mie, practically naw, price 
negotiable, contact PMt 576 744^6 

CRTaTg SPEAKERS; S 7 5 7 B S R 
TURNTABLE: $25. CALL 222 0565 
AFT 5 OR WEEKENDS. 

74 YAMAHA OT 250 LESS THAN 
Um Ml. OFF ROAD $400 OR BEST 
OFFER. MIKE StS^UIS. 

30 GAL. AQUARIUAA COMPLETE 
INCLUDES BREEDING PR. 
ANGELS SMB. S7i-1«SS EVENINGS. 

RCA STEREO-CONSOLE. NO 
NEEDLE fiSJBOR BEST OFFER. 

4 SALE 2 UF FLA COUPONS 
TUESDAY TURN-IN. BEST OFFER 
CALLl 



SUBLET: OSCEOLA HALL VVINTER 
SPRING OTRS. MEALS A/C. POOL, 
MAID SERVICE. $700 PER 
QUARTER. 10 MiN. WALK. CALL 

222 4655 

CO l1) N yTlub'aptsTbdrm for 

SUBLET TILL JAN THEN OPTION 
TO RENT. CALL ALYSSA OR 
KARCNSM^m 

i 

University Cardan Apartments is now 
renting 1 bdr apts. Sign laase until 
August tl and pay S1BB ma. ar pay 
S19S nw. and gat tlia laat manMi 
FREE! 

Catl2244M0l. 

One male needed to share a two 
bedroom house three Mocks from 

B Vk iftiimaa. 




222-9000. 



2 BR/1 B PART FURN. NEXT TO 
FSU. SUBLET DEC. 1 SltS, CALL 
CINDY 488 1450 



Take over lease Dec. 1, one bedroom 
films, great location, low util. BHIs. 
CaU tlS-WMor 576-7042. 

SUBLEASE ROOM AT 
CASH HALL FOR W/S QUARTERS 
$50 DEPOSIT LEFT, A/C BAR 
POOL, MEALS CALL 224-5742. 



FM ROOAAMATE NEEDED 2 
BDROOM 4120. it Vi UTILITIES. 
CALL DEBBIE AT 57«^70S. 



TWO U OF F COUPONS FOR 
CALL222 4392 AFTER 5 PM 



SALE. 



BE THERE TO SEE FSU BEAT U OF 
F 2 COUPONS FOR SALE, S45 EACH 

FIRM. CALL 576 7870. 




Bar and 



stools- for sale in great 
Make offer 575^372*. 



Four super wide GT Grand Prix IMag 
wtieelsincL rims Si hub caps. Great for 
smaH cars S».00aach. 575-SV9. 

2 FSU UF COUPONS 
$80 THE PAIR. 
CALLS7«-84i». 

NEW SEARS DELUXE 

TYPEWRITER. BROUGHT FOR 
$Ma. BEST OFFER. CALL 222-0134 
AFTER S. 



TWO U OF F COUPONS 
$35 OR BEST OFFER 
CALL 576 1979 



Firewood-Split your 
$25. per Vi ton 
length, many 
Call 877-5584. 



and save! 
Cat 




Naughahide coucfi-comer with cgfffae 
table. II ft. iano good condltian. 077- 

75M $100. 



Raleigh Grand Sport 10 speed 
bike $100-Panasonic sa 40 f m 
SSIk Call Jaca 877-4395. 



men's 
stereo 



901 SERIES IV SPEAKERS W/ 
CHROME STANDS, $650/PAiR 386^ 



JBL 36 SPEAKERS EXC COND. 

PR. 222 1375. 



NEED FOUR TICKETS TO FLA-FSU 
GAME. CALL 575-7413 EVENINGS 

OR WEEKEND. 

RAAMT WANTED TO SHARE 3 BDR 
HOUSE $75 PER MONTH '/a UTLES 
CALL ROBIN AFTER 8 PM 224 5774. 

F. Rmmte to share 1 bdr. Regency PR 
Apts. $110 8. */{ util. 2 biks to FSU. 
Noorsmoker. Wntr 8i Sprg Qh^ 224- 
4235. 

Female to take over lease at Osceola 
Hall. AAaals, maid service, a/c# paol. 
Call 224-17M. Will pay depoaiti 

Male/Fern, roommate wanted for w/s 
qtr. to share nice apt. at Casa Cordoba 
with 2 females, $108 mo. ^ */i elec. 
Partly fum. 5 min. from FSU-CaH Mo- 

574-7265. 

FEMALE ROOMMATE TO SHARE 2 
BEDROOM IVb BATH APARTMENT 

AT LAS PALAAAS. DEC. THROUGH 
SPRING QUARTER FOR INFO. 
CONTACT MELANIE AT 878-2394. 

FM RMMTE NEW HOUSE 4 BR, 2 
BATH $100 & SHARE OF UT. 
FURNISHED NO PETS 10 MIN. 
DRIVE FR/FSU. CALL 575 1376. 

I need a ride to and from Miami over 
Ttianksgiving. Time flexible and 
wWihg to split cost. Notify Mary at 



Be prepared for the cold weather! 
Harctty worn, heavy ^ length gray 
swede coat, quilted lining, women's 
sixv 13. New was $120, asking S60 644 
4075 before 5 p.m., ask tor Laurie 

2TUES. COUPONS FOR FSU/UfTmO 
OR BEST OFFER 576 5674 



10 speed, 25' 2" red Puch Cavalier. All 
alloy parts prime! $185 for info, call 
£4 42*1 eye. or come by the Munchie 
Wapowinuwien-day flma. 

FOR SALE— TWO COUPONS WHIC 

CAN BE TURNED IN ON TUES. FOk 
THE UNIV. OF FLA. GAME $100 FOR 
PAIR. CALL 222 4528. 



RIDE WANTED MELBOURNE 
AREA. THANKSGIVING 
WEEKEND. SHARE EXPENSES. 
BOB 222-5473. 

NEED 3 ROOMATES FOR 2 BDRM. 
APT. $77.50 EA. AND VSi ELECT. EA. 
GOOD LOCATION AND CLOSE TO 
CAMPUS. CALL SEAN 576 0441 
AFTER 5 PM. 



F-rmmt needed w/s qtr. Own room. 
Cloae to campus. of rent & util. Call 



In Leon County Special Land Sale 4 
miles south of truck route on Oak 
Ridge Road 3 acre tracts 1190 acre 10A 
tracts 1*50 acre, 20 to 48 acre tracts 
1508 per acre, terms: 13% down 5 yr. at 
1?^ interest. 

JimmyBoyntonRealty phone 222 7581. 
After hours 576 3874 for Ben Boynton 

m 



Fm rm needed share 1 br apt. Plaia 
Apts. $105 monthly plus Vt ututtias. 
CaU222-2«08. 

Roommate wanted- male or female. 
One bedroom houe 3 bk>cks behind 
Sweet Shop 708 St. Augustine Apt. 1. 

$75 a mth. V? utilities. See or leave 
message for Allan at the Omni Rest, 
after 1. 




*73 Toyota wagon, automatic, air- 
cond., mag wtwels. AM-FM; new 
paint, exhaust system. tWMB. S13Ml 
Call 575 5054 PM. 




AAake pizzas, etc. Frt. night. Sat. B 

Sun daytime. Tues.BWM. 11 5. Must 
be 18 or over. Come by Barnaby's at 
2331 Apatachee Pkwy.O:3iB1l:OOaM4r 

2 5 pm M^eekdays. 

LUNCH TIME SANDWICH MAKER. 
APPLY HOBBITT HOAGlES, TOWN 
SOUTH SHOPPING CENTER 878 
4101. 



LAST CHANCE TO GET IN 08I IT 
BE NICE TO JACK HVCCKt 
ALL FAVORS ACCEPT ED 

NUTRITION COUNSELING 
Unfvarslty Health Center Weight 
Loss, Meal Planning, etc NEW 
EXPANDED HOURS! Mornings 
10:30-12:30 MWF, afternoons 1:30-3:30 
WF 



AT BULLWtNKLC-$ 

THE DIXIE DESPERADOS 
I.. SAT. 0 SUN ROCK A KQLL 
AT ITS FINEST 



Address and Stuff envelopes at home. 
Any age or location. Earnings 
unHmitad. See ad under ~ 
Opportunities. Triple "S". 
Cajon. Haoparia. Ca. 92345. 



1972 FORD, RANCHERO, LOW 
MILAGE, AIR, PS, AIR SHOCKS. 
AUTO. PB. EXCELLENT 
CONINTION. 




FAST, ACCURATE TYPIST (45 
wpm) TO WORK LATE NIGHT 
HOURS FOR FLORIDA 

FLAMBEAU. PART TIME. CALL 
t^tl^ $UN -THURS. EVEN1N«S 
BETWEEN 7 PM AND 11 PM AT #44- 
5744. EXPERIENCE IN 

TYPESETTIND HELPFUL. DO NOt 
CALL MNM8MI BAY. TNANK YOU. 



Overseas Jobs- Summer/year round. 
Europe, S Ame., Australia, Asia. All 
Fields. S500 $1200 monthly. 
Sightseeing. Free Info. Writ»; MC 

Box ~ ^ 



W^man to help new mother 4 
day-fiexfMe. Cait 574-7844. 




CATHEAD: IT SURE WAS NICE TO 
GET OUT OF TOWN FOR A FEW 
DAYS. I HAD A MSAT TMOC IN 
VILLE. LET'S DO IT AGAIN tOONI 
LOVE, JUANITA. 

Vlrgini Henrey^ 

Your 24 hrs with the POLICE are UP! 

Give em back or -! 

Luna 

P.S. BOMBS AWAY! 



FACIAL* BODY HA I R R E A*0 V A ^ 
Permanently by electrolysis Deep 
cleaning facial treatment Regina 
%frologisl. By 

TNT HIOIAWAV CAHOC RENTAL 

Wakulla River at Hwy. 98 November 
Special: manNen this ad A 

canoes for r 
or 878 5407. 

Evary Thurs. Is T shirt ntght at 
Bullwinkies Log Cabm Wear yoor t 
shirts 8. win cash for your T shirt 
slogans Over MB warRi af prfias 

every Thurs. 



5 l^et»wtiBiai»»4e^.^? 

'TlW^lf to 




rent 2 



TYPING 

EXPERIENCED SECRETARY 
USING IBM SELECTRiC M. 
REASONABLE RATES. EDITING 
AVAILABLE. CALL 077-3004 
EVF^NiNGS/WEEKENDS. 

EXPERIENCED TYPIST 

TERM PAPERS, THESIS, 

DISSERTATIONS 

PHONE 386-8076 OR 385-6815. 



Scott, Thanks for 
Just wanted to say 
Cowboy. Lova, Dreamy. 



If 



JoaiMama, 

Allagre Nan Troppo was a great fitek, 
even more exciting than kinky sex! I 
can't wait til next time! What 
implications and imagery! Thanx lor 
an exciting eve! Catwoman. 



VOM wigflQ try a really gc 
FNVRfT is going to 
super Liebfraumilch wMa 

tonight. Try it! 



00 Wine 

have a 



F^lyuchof RAW POWERIII 
Stat Bays A the impiicatiaoB 
low Peplll 



QUALITY TYPING 



222-3374 anytime. 



Experienced in typing theses and 
dissertations, prompt service, 
reasonable rates Rhone Mrs. 
Marks 576-6913 between 8 and 5 
weekdays. 

TYPrt^G FAST 8. EFFICIENT* 
IBM ELECTRIC 
070-1517 or 3S0-4Si7. 



MARK STERLING 
H-PPY ONE YEAR 

ANNIVERSARY, SWEETHEART. I 
LOVE YOU. CHER I. 

HEY HOW 'BOUT THEM DELTA 
2ETA PLEDGESI WE LOVE YA, 

YOUR SISTERS. 



II 

Slut Boys t the li 
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23 at Tommy's 
lit 



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LETTERS RESUMES PAPERS ETC. 
8SC PG. 384-4043 



GAY PEER VOLUNTEERS 

If you are a female or male with a 

gay related concern and would like to 
talk with a trained qav oeer 
volunteer, call Dr. Lucy Kiziriar at 

644-2003, M F, 8-5. Confidentiality 
assured and no records kept 

^freIIdIbooidhom E • ~ 

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METHODS OF CONTRACE PT ION 

Mon & Thu 2:30pm, Tue 9am 
UNIVERSITY HEALTH CTR Rm 423. 
Men and women welcome. 



SHABBOTT DINNER 
HILLEL WILL HAVE 
THE DINNER NOV. 14 



Blue Keycard is honored by the 
following merchants: Nic's Toggery, 
Athletic Attic. Hobbit Hoagie 
Factory, Brewmaster's Restaurant 
(opening soon), Mac's In The Back 
Lounge, Pizza Pro, Tallahassee 
FhMMrs, The Pub, The f»hyr$t, Adam 
B Eve Campus Hairpiece, Zonkers, 
Brown's Pharmacy, The AAelting Pot, 
Annette's Women's Fashions, Great 
Bicycle Shop. Barnacle Bill's, 
McGregor's Steak House, Roger 
Nelson AAusic Store, The Outpost, Sea 
Fox Kmi9M€9K^ B Lounge, Ricco's 
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Captain's f 




Wanted: 2 FSU-W tickets. pay 
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Package plans in color from $19.50. 
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CPE labor sorfas Kvorking with scu 
Florida AFL B CIO & Tallahassee 
Peace Coalition present: William 
Wimpesinger Presdiem lam to discuss 
"Conversion to Peace" Thor., Nov. 13 
at 0 pre, Diffenba uBh Rm 201. 

SiOO REWARD 
for in formation leading to the 
identification of the person wfx) took 
our sign at THE PHYRST 
homecoming week e n d . 



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Lost brown wallet with IDs on 
11/5/80. If found plBBSa CON 
Koenig at 224 7884. 



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value. Lost in the vicinity of pool 
locker room A Flambeau office Cait 
574-5S45 or 305-8109. Ask for Margaret 
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girl tttat drives me CRAZY ! 

The Tallahassee Tiger 



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Jugglers will be in the Union this 
Friday, tossing to Reggae music. 
L^s go watch tt>em they're GREAT' 
l-OCOA^TION CIRCUS will be 

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AUCTION MARKET DAYS 
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SUNDAY NOV. W, 1pm «pm 
Great bargains, toys, appliances, 
tools, furniture, other merOimtltim 
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FlofMi 



Thursday. November 13, tftO / 15 



lattlerettes open season 
tiomorrow in Gaither Gym 

. _ . _ . m mm w m~* 



lY ANNE SHt FORD 

Vs basketball ready to break 
, .J wampcr in Jake Gaither Ciym this 
pjrtfnd as the Florida A&M Rattlereties 
a,; to Ik court for their season opener 
tfiiail cross state rival Edward Waters 

"We re a ta ' Hreak outfit/' said Head 
:acli Mickey Clayton. "We like to run 
u'jand put on the press every chance we 
t- It makes for an exciting kind of 
viftball to watch." 

might say the fans agree. Winning 
! straight home games in last year's 18-11 
he Rattlereties filled FAMU's Jake 
(.\m With a Tallahassee crowd of 
j!*' tans tor each game. 
I k'cl \ery strongly about doubling 
■a; figure this vear." said Assistant Sports 
• ' Dir-Aior Herb Reinhard. "We 
. .1 a many people as possible in to 
I <ta! least one game. Out of every 100 who 
mc the first time, I guarantee 50 will be 
'Ki for a second game. The play is that 
;wi!ing:" 

Friday night's 7 p.m. game with Edward 
marks a turning point for the 
..i^ bdskciball program at FAMU. It 

aiurcs the Rattlerettes debut as a top 
♦omen's Division 1 team, moving from 
Division I- A A. Four other Florida schools 
currently share the women's Division I 

itos with FAMU. They are: Florida State, 
Honda, the University of South Florida, 

d Miami. 

The Rattlerettes will be competing 
iinst the very best in women's collegiate 
ketball," promised Clayton. "Most of 
■ teams we'll play arc more experienced 
n ours — their basketball programs are 

redeveloped. We've got a tough season 

-■ad." 

Hie 1980^1 sa^n pits FAMU against 




SPORTS IN BRIEF 



'IJ^ TABU TENNIS CLtIB 
««ve a round robin tournament today 
^ p.ni. m room 213 Montgomery 
»tl ^ compctitofs arc 




Linda Thomas 



nationally ranked South Cvolina as well as 
such heavies as South Alabama, Bethune- 
Cookman, Tennessee State, Florida State, 
and Florida. 

With seven of last year's starters 
returning, the team can count on raqserience 
at every position. Heading the Held once 
again are All-Anierican candidates Linda 
Thomas and Stmdra Carter at wing. As last 
seasons two leading sewers, Thomas 
averaged 16.9 points a game while Carter 
brought in 14.2. Although Thomas suffered 
a brcrften aflkle at the end of list season and 
missed four games, Clayton said she's 
recm>erating well but is still only expected 
to be at 60 percoit for the <^ner. 

Adding strength to the back court, 
sophomores Evonnie Williams and Brenda 
Fogle return to run the Rattlerette attack 
from the guard spots. The two combined 
for 170 assists last year. 

Coming off one of the best recruiting 
years ever, Clayton and the Rattlerettes 
boast of their prize catch in 6-foot-4 Parade 
Magazine Ail-American Pam Johnson. 
Recruited by 180 schools, the Valdosta, 
Georgia star led her high school team to 1 19 
straight wins. She is joined by two Georgia 
All-State players, freshnum Patti Miller and 
Velda Hand at wing. 

Another FAMU recruiting catch is 
freshman Valerie Robinson from 
Dorhester. Massachusetts. Averaging over 
40 points a game for her high school team, 
Robinson was featured last year in Sports 
Illustrated for her accomplishments on the 
court. 

The team is looking for a good year. 
"We've got a lot of things motivating us," 
said team captain Sofia Hayward, a senior 
guard from St. Petersburg. **Being in 
Division I gives us a shot at the top and you 
better believe we're going to go for it!" 

THE FSU SAILING CLUB WILL 
meet tonight at 7:30 in room 221 Bellamy. 
Plans for this weekend's camping trip wiU 
be discussed. 

THE SOUTHEASTERN SOCCER 
League Tournament will be held this 
weekend on the IM fkkb. FfU plays at 10 
a.m. against Alabama and ai 3 pjn. J^ainst 




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fer; Looks like a dreadful weekend (page 16) 



Florkla Flambeau 



PAITLY CLOUDY 

Chance of shcwcn Frida> 
night, continued ikrough 
Saturday. High lempmiitfcr 
in the TOt and kms in the 50i. 
Winds win bkm 10-15 mph 



xactly what did 
licheile Wallace 
ant to accomplish? 

BYLALKA CASStLS 

FLAMKAtI STAFF WIfTEB 

nisin. a new and ccHitroversial movemciit, and 
! ihe black community were disciiMed by Unda 
ick feminist activist, writer and musician from 
► last night on FAMU campus. ' 
. -i IS best known for her critique of Michdie Wallace's 
Macho and the Myth of the Superwomtm. In it, Powefl 
that Ihe effect of WalbM:e*s book on the black 
unity was one of polarizing perspectives on femimsfn 
Mfling communication between black men and lAomea. 
latlace is accused of using feminism as a label to ipur 
roversy among blacks, and reducing political activism in 
m to the search for black manhood. 
'Had Michelle Wallace not fronted herself as a^leminlst, 
M wouki have cared (about the book). She used the 

10 make it notorious/* Powell -said, speaking to a 
oupof predominantly black women. 
^ third myth is t\m feminism is lor the middle ctafs 

ed woman. 

11 ts not dear that abortion and birth control issues arc 
working women's issues,*' Pow^ said, adding that 

IS like rape and spouse abuse span all economic and 

lines. 

PowcU also took issue with the idea that feminists who 
^ar angry" are less credible than more passive activists. 
»c Mid Wallace's critics often attacked her ••angry" 
ich even more than her political views, 
explained that terrorist tactics such as labelling 
^isis as lesbians is an tttenqft to invalidate their analyses 
appealing to ambivalent emotional responses. 
That charge is used to stop hearmg things,** she said. ••It 
women real quick and puts them in thefa- place. ** 
^1 said the most damaging myth is the black 
IS really not sexist. Arginnents that accuse black 
oi beinj; a divisive element in the black con^ufrity 

Turn to POWELL page 2 



f r 1 



1 1 A H i S S f A FOR 6H Yt i RS 



y(>i.6S,sa39 



' giiifcfci^ii^, ill'' 



Coming attractions 



_ _ abo ve. The city contmissioti yesterday ymed 4-1 to go 

Downtown Tallahassee mil have a new look in a few ahead with the new building despite the fact city and 

years when the whitewashed version of city hall is country ^overnmems miiiht consolidate, 

demaiished next spting to make way for a new Commissioner Carol Bellamy cast the lone 

building similar to the architect's conception pictured dissenting vote. 



lo get something, first you have to ask 

C-J ^ ^ tvDicallv do most ot this direct lohbvmi;. Another ^ 



B\ BART CHURCH 
n.AMM:Ai STAFF warrca 
^^'^ figures tell the story of how lucrative and how 
'ul lobbying by Florida State and Florida A&M has 

n the last few years: 

^ - I) has received more than $1.8 million for 
iions and additions to its Health and Physical 

- "!ion Building. 

• H has received SI. 8 million this year to begin 
^ lion of a new broadcasting buikling for WFSU. 
' H on will be spent to compleie^const ruction.) 
' has received $4.3 million for a Business and 
' Buiijuig. and $2.2 nriHion for a new Nursng and 
Health Building. 

lust recelNcd its share of the supplemental salary 
^^^'^ (Si s million). FAMl' received a similar amount. 

has received $6CX).0C)0 to begin planning a new 
t^uilding (full appropriations are expected soon). 
^^^aUo rccei\ed $674,000 to begin planning an addition 
Jj^'i^ library and $378,000 to improve its nuclear 
^J"J»or building. 

things don't just happen." said Pat Hogan. FSU's 
Prcsideni tor umversiiy relations and coordmaior of 



'My wife has brown bag lunches for 
legislator's wives every year.' 

— FSU President Bernie Sliger 

FSU's lobbying activities. **lt take's people working with 
people to assess our needs and communicate those needs to 
the Legislature and state government." 

Both universities have at least two registered lobbyists who 
coordinate the many lobbying activities of the universities. 

**Mv \Mfe has a couple of brown bag lunches for 
legislator's wives every year." said Bernie Sliger, FSU 
President. "Certainly my inviting key legislators and state 
officials to sit in the president's box at football games has as 
one of its purposes lobbying and influence.'* 

FAMU had a large reception for all legislators last year and 
held a dinner for members of the House Agriculture 
Committee. 

More typical lobbying methocfo employed by both 
universities include calling or visiting legisiaiors or tlieff 
staffs. Hogan and his FAMU cou«erp«rt. Roben Allen. 



typically do most of this direct lohbvmg. Another very 
important technique is providing expert witnesses tor 
legislative committees working on legislation which can 
affect higher education. 

"Legislators want information from the best possiMc 
source," said Allen 'We use experts m ihcir fields; stall 
members, alumni and friends." 

Both universities also participate in an informal coalitior 
of lobbying organizations interested in furthering highet 
education In this coalition are students (primartty 
represented by the Florida Student Association), faculty 
(primarily represented by the Umted Facirity of Flofida and 
Florida Teaching Profession) busmcis lewlers (primarily 
represented by the inihiemial couaol of M»), and the Bo«rd 
of Regents. 

Bvstncss's are beconiog lAcrewiafly isvolvcd te 
ediicaiifMial lobbyii^. WestiaglMvse, wldch recently 
pirchased a targe trac^ of laad jmr TaUaliassce. is 
cooperating with FSU on a study of the need for 
oigiMeriiig sdmi in Tallahasiee, aeoordiat to 
Support oooMS frooi auwy ptaoes. 

Im to LOBB YING. page U 



2 / Fridav November 14, I9«0 Florida Flambeau 



■ Tj' ilij 
1^' 





til*- 11 II 
mm 

tlr'V-nKiiH 



I' 




*Muckrakers' want place on campus 



rwiMsrArFWfam 

CalKfig Rortda a "muckraker's paradise/' Neal 
Friedman, former Florida State student body president and 
a staff member in Ralph Nader's Consumer Watdl 
organization, spoke about the endless possibffities studMi 
have for social research during an organizatioiMl neetiiv 
Wednesday of the Florida Public Interest Eeseaicii Oro^ 
(FPIRG). 

FPIRG is modekd after other public interest research 
groups across the country that train students in "citizenship 
skills*' so they might have a greato- voice in public policy. 

FPiRG's main areas of concern are human rigbu, 
consumer protection and corporate reform. 

The Groin's immediate goal is to get the requisite 
number of signatures on a petition so they will receive 



Powell 





Linda Powell 



from page I 

are skirling the issue, she 
said. A result of that 
critique was Powell's 
identification with a larger 
group of anti-feminists, 
Powell said, a group she 
does not claim association 
with. 

"1 got lumped into a pile 
of anti-feminists though I 
agreed with the politics. I 
trashed the book and they 
trashed the ideology/' she 
said. 

There are several 
pervasive and persistent 
myths about black 
feminism, " Powell 
explained, that are barriers 
to the fledgling movement 
concentrated in San 
Francisco and Boston. 

•'Feminism as an ideology demands that you look at 
yourself and your beliefs to see if they are still as true today 
as they might have been yesterday," Powell said. "That's 
why it is not popular.** 

One myth discussed was the idea that feminists are 
man-haters. Powell said she believes a pro-woman 
movement is not necessarily anti-male. However, she 
adamantly defends women's rights, particularly black 
women's rights, to fight violence against women by men. 
She said another myth that feminism is personal, not 



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fundi/ig under a Board of Regents rule that states each 
university is authorized to collect, on a voluntary basis, 
additional fees from students for non-profit public interest 
research, if at least 5 percent of the siudcm body signs a 
petition to authorize it. 

The refundable fee of $2.50 would appear on the fee 
statement each scme^er and be identified as the FFIRG 
fee. 

Friedman, along with other FPIRG organization 
committee members spoke at the meeting about the need 
for volunteers to give their time for the petition drive and 
other projects taken on by the Group after they receive 
funding. 

The Group also announced several upcoming events, 
including a possible appearance by Ralph Nader in 

January. 



political, maintains that racism is a political problem wlule 

sexism is a personal problem. 

**My mother would work a full day, then come home and 
pretend she hadn't," Powell said. "We maintained the 
image of the Ladies Home Journal family even though we 
weren't. We especially maintained that image for my father 
— protected his male ego, if you will.** 

The divisiveness found in the black community stems 
from lack of communication and violence within the 
culture, Powell said. Feminism, she proposed, would be a 
healing force in that culture by unifying black men and 
women through equality. In that way, Powell feels the 
struggle against racism will best be served. 

Powell's political activism began in Chicago through her 
exi>eriences with police brutality and racism. She said she 
began to identify herself as a feminist when she spent a year 
and a half with a black feminist group. 

"From feminism, I learned I was smart, that I could 
make strategy , that I could do leadership kinds of things. I 
got an ideology, a way to think and talk* about the world,*' 
she said. 

She said she also learned the value of communities and 
cultural work — that blacks can use culture to make 
political statements. As a musician and songwriter, PoweU 
said she tries to send political messages. However, she ssud 
she is sad she cannot sing many songs she was raised on 
because of their sexist contoit. 



• 



Linda Powell will speak again tonight in 126 Bellamy at 
7:30. Her visit is sponsored by the FSU Women's Center and 
the FAMU Student Government. 



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SATURDAY 
Nov. 15 

10 A M. to 4 P.M. 
UnicMi Cowtysrd 

REGBmATiaN 

Thru Nov. 14 » 

Room 318 or 336 
Universtty Union 

For more infoniiiflon 
CaM4471« 




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College Square lJ*lW.T«nn^,,, 
Mon-Sat 9 7 575-MW 



FMia i Umbt Aki Frkipy* htovcmlicr i4, 1910 / 3 



arrants filed 
or arrest 
if escaped 
ental patient: 




BhtzweU 



BU I KI HKLDS 

s are now being held for Joseph 
who was arrested after harassing 
men on the Florida State caflipus 
hen released despite officials* 
c thai he was an escaped mental 



Simpson, police do not have a suspect 9i 
yet, but they do have* a description of the 
attacker. 



••• 



The warrants, filed yesterday, charge 
. *ell with trespassing and failure to 
'in court. ^ • 

Bat/well was released on the provision 
X oui of Leon County by sundown 
i v^M-mbcf 7, or have a job or permanent 
Ndence by that time. On November 8, 
\u!*ti\ was recognized at Governor's 
^Mali. 

I S like looking' for a needle in a 
jisiack." said sheriffs spokesperson, 
Hi Simpson, "But w^'re out there 
okingforhim/* 



A Tallahassee woman reported early 
Wednesday lo the Leon County Sherifrs 
ifice that she was raped outside her 

^rimeni on Ocala Road. 
According to the woman, sbe was 
yrning home at about 1 a.m. As she left 
ar. a man approached her and said he 
o soxuaily assault her. The 
icii tried to get away but was 

V CI uic avsault, the man left the area on 

u.ording to sheriffs spokesperson Dick 



An abduction was solved Wednesday 
thr(>ugh the cooperation of the Tallahassee 
Police Department and the Leon County 

Sheriffs office. 

The incident begm at The Snack Shop on 
West Tharpe Street when a fight was 
reported in profress. Investigation by TPD 
officer Frank Dubuy revealed several men 
had demanded the return of some property 
they clafmed was theirs from Steven 
Hassfurder of 1813 Raa Avenue and also 
reportedly threatened him. 

Before the officers arrived, the men 
allegedly forced Hassfurder's 17-year old 
brother into a red pick-up truck and drove 
away. 

TPD Investigator Tony Ash continued 
the investigation and developed a suspect. 
The sheriffs office issued an all points 
bulletin for a red Dodge pick-up. Late last 
night, Sheriffs Deputy Paul Phillips and 
Sergeant Roy Sanders spotted the truck and 
apprehended Dean Michael Boccumini and 
Tony Lynn Johnson, both age 26. 

Boccumini and Johnson were then turned 
over to the TPD, charged with assault, 
aggravated battery, and false imprisonment, 
and then iransportd to the Leon County 
Jail. 

The abducted Hassfurder was freed 

unharmed. 




BBWN uNEER 





r. 



M • \ . t ■ 



\ FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY 

^ BLACK STUDENT UNION | 



i 



PRESENTS 
A CX>NFERENCE ENTITLED: 

'THE RESOUniON OF PROBLMS 
BLACK EDUCATION" 

Sat., Nov. 15 & Sun.. Nov. 16 
120 Diffenbough 



Sot. Moming Sessfon 1 0:30-1 2:00 

Topic: DilemrTKi of Bloek Students in Education 
Presentation: Dr Barbara Sizer^ore 
University of Pittsburg 

Afternoon Session 1:30-3:00 

Four Member Panel; Dr J Gant. F S U Dear^ of Education 

Df . E Martine. FAMU Dear^ of Education 

Dr Barbara Sizemore. Ass. Prof.. Univ. of Pitt 

Dr Freddie I Groocnes. Ass to Pres Human Affairs 



Sun. Afternoon Session 

Topic lmpac^ Q The Political System For Effective Block Education 
Presentation: Mr. Carl Shariff. Pres . Boord of Education. Newortc. NJ 

Panel Discussion 1^0*4:30 ^ ^ 

Members of Panel Mr C Shantt, Newark. N j Board of fcd. 

Dr . Norm Jackson. Exec Dir. Of a CofTimissiOn on Hurnon 

flelaKons 

Ms Delores Auzinno. Ass to the Chanceior 
Ms. Luciie Williams. Prin.. Bond Elementary 
Taikahassee. FL 





i 

i4 



a J 4 3 




4 / WwMmy. Novi^ier 14, 1980 FlorMa Flaiiibeau 



Florida Flambeau 



Tile Hoftda Hambeay ts puMnhcd by the Florida Flambeau Foundmon. Inc. an 
profit corporation which i% toldy rnponstMc for ibe contents of the paper 

Florida FtemkcaM FowidaiMM. lac. t km u oo m , 204 N. WooAward Avcauc. 
address. P O Boat U-TOOI. Florida Smt Vmnky, TallahatKe. Florida 323» 

Sidiic> BcUtfigricId Editor Mary Tebo 

Bob f)'l ar\ Photo Fdiior S«c\c Lk>liar 

Brad l.iston No*s Ujnor Chris FarreU 

Chris Bcockman Sports Editor Melissa Beckham. . . 



iDdcfKndrni. mm 

M4-SS0S: Mailing 

Associate Ldiior 
Associate Ldttor 
AsMciate Editor 
Art Wrccior 



A^tart, maybe 

Florida has a problem, one the state has been unwilling to address 
for far too long 

It is with thjc state's prison system; from all accounts, including a 
Legislative report released two weeks ago, the system is overcrowded, 
poorly managed and nearing a crisis point. 

Clearly the system is in need of a major overhaul. 

As the first step toward that overhaul. Gov. Bob Graham has 
appointed a full-time advisory committee to keep him informed of 
corrections problems. It's not much, and surely won't end the 
problem by itself, but the committee is a start. 

Actually, the Governor claims that the committee was not created 
as a direct result of recent disturbances at the Florida State Prison at 
Starke. Instead, Graham says the committee will follow up the work 
of the Executive Review Committee for the Department of 
Corrections, which made n six-month study and submitted a report 
a month ago. 

In its report, the Review Committee recommended that a 
permanent prison system advisory committee be established. 
The new advisory committee is to be headed by Attorney General 

Jim Smith, a choice we question without fully condemning. Smith has 
the ability to do a good job. 

As the chief law enforcement officer of the state. Smith is in a 
position to understand many of the problems inherent in the state's 
criminal justice system, and that experience should make him 
sympathetic to the plight of many inmates in Florida's prisons. 

It should. But we aren't so sure it has. Smith has had little to say 
about the wwsening conditions in Florida's prisons, while other 
government officials, such as Jacksonville Representative Arnette 
Girardeau, have taken strong and admirable stands on the unpopular 
Bsue. 

If the committee under Smith serves only to whitewash potential 
problems in the system, it will only exacerbate the situation. 

But if it acts responsibly and refuses to let off the hook a Legislature 
more-than-willing to ignore the problems, it will indeed serve as a first 

step toward a positive overhaul of the system. 

It is up to us — the public and the press — to monitor the work of 
the committee, and to judge its effectiveness. 

As for now, we can only wait and see. 



Bus riders 



It's good that the city wants to offer discount bus fares to monthly 
riders; the same procedure has been successful in larger cities, and it 
would further encourage residents to utilize mass transportation. 

We also think it's good that the City Commission decided to re- 
think the original plan offered at its Wednesday night meeting. The 
plan would offer monthly rates to students 17 and under and city 
officials only. 

That seems silly. 

Why limit it to just those groups, who, by the way, are not the core 
of bus riders in Tiiahassee. 

Offer the discount, monthly rates to all TalTran riders. The regular 
riders will benefit, and Tallahassee residents will have another good 

reason to lake to take the bus more often. 



Florida Flaaitou Foundation. Inc. Business and Advertising Office. 20b N. Vkoodward Avenue, 
phone M4^S: Mcduuype lab. 314 University Union, phone W4-S74*; Ctassified Ad Office. W6 
UmniqrtlniMi. yhane «44-$ns. 

Wkk Johnson General Manager Amy Arbogast Production Manager 

Traccy Rowe Advertisiiig Manager Jane Omican Mediatype Manager 




Florida: See it like a Marxist 



BY SAM COLFY 

FLAMBEAli STAFF WRITtR 

Florida and I enjoy the world's greatest love/ hate 
relationship. Transplanted from »he backwards 
woods of Alabama several years ago, I've fallen for 
Florida's cypress swamps, orchid ponds, blue-green 
waters and breezy coastlines. I'm also drawn, I'll 
admit, to the ugliness, the endless highways, gaudy 
roadside stands, and overbuilt cities. If this is the 
most beautiful state, it's also the tackiest, and I've 
always had this thing for trash. Florida's good for a 
lot of laughs. 

These feelings may seem contradictory, but then, 
contradiction is the essence of Florida. Even 
though its the southernmost state, much of Florida 
shares more with Northeastern culture than 
Southern. 

Even though it boasts several large urban centers, 
the style of state politics-is definitely southern good- 
old- boy. 

Such ironies are only mildly intriguing. Others 
are a little more sardonic. Florida has the highest 
incarceration rate of any state in the union, but 
criminal justice in the state is severely lacking. 

The McDuffie riots were proof of that. Once 
renowned for its semitropical lushness, the slate's 
now defaced with unsightly urban sprawl and miles 
of dredge-and-fill development. Funny the state 
with the most fragile environment should treat it so 
recklessly. 

Florida is a microcosm of the United States; it's 
peculiar geography, politics, and culture making it 
an extreme model of the disarray of the nation as 
a whole. 

So here, now, is a quickie tour of the slipshod 
state, with stops at all important points along the 
way. 

Start at Tampa Bay, the western terminus of 
Florida's high road to God— Interstate 4. 
Hillsborough County is crowded evidence of what 
unchecked boosterism can do. From there the four- 
lane heads through the heart of phosphate country, 
Brandon, where the landscape is ravaged and the 
water foul. 

1-4 ends in Daytona Beach <hi the east, where 
drive-up hed(Hiism on the beach is the rule. But the 
heart of the Christian corridor lays smack in the 
middle of the sute. God rules here, the biMe 
overriding all other law, perhaps even the 
constitution. It was the Orlando area that gave us 
the God*squad wonderwoman Paula Hawkins, and 
born-i^ain Christianity fills u least a couple of 
channds dmiy. In St. Ooud, a 3(^foot fflumlnated 
cross adorns the top of a pubfidy-owned water 
tower. 

But drive off the highway a wlnle, into onmge 
groves where m^rant campesinos pull tweNt-hour 
days in the trees yet are lucky to earn anything near 
the poverty level. Or wander through the Glitzier 
side of Orlando, not too fur' from the well-kept 
ranch homes of Wimer Park. Young girls tlftre 
barely collect the minnnum wa^ for dancing m 
topless bars. 

Nioeteenth-ceBtury writers celebrated the ea^ 
coast of Fl<M-ida for its Mmy breezes and 



AGE OF GOLL 

untouched charm. But ilic r ■ v ( .ut 
of the Indian River novs u,. ' : •• 
with corporate grout h Tiu' spa.c , a 
serve more as subsidv lo Jc. elopers as n k> 
doubt t ill the thing vmII c\cr bo •a ^^Li'^^'; ' 
is blocked off with ricw Ini; 
The inland is paved o\ci ^ 
subdivisions. Missile displays anJ .\ 
bases testify to the region's dcperu;^. 
money. 

Further south, West F^alni \\:.\ •] 
tradition as a plaviirounJ to- 
established Norihcastcrn ^scalth i ^ 
faster-living nouveau nclu' Prilm BeJ.^ 
Fort Pierce, lake Wonh 
indistinguishable tovsfi^ - .»> ■ 

connecting them, is vNall; .. ^" ^<'^h s«Jc 
car dealerships, shopp. >. .v^ iJ^' 
joints, massage parlors. 

Bui it's Miami where the irom mmi acute 
fast-moving, most hignlv developed ciiv sii 
maybe the most beautiful water in the «»te 
ffiscayne Bay. Once most of Dade Counts 
under water, but the area now faces a severe »^ 
shortage within just a few years. The nonh c 
Miami Beach is walled in with gansh. c> 
h^-rise condos, while at the south end ci*J< 
retirees five in poverty and boredom 

The Dade English-only referendum pcwnt^ 
one of that county's many pressing pn^' ' 
new law is a special case in the nghi^ard 
the nation as a whole. Cubans N^ere once » 
to Miami, their views more conservative 
rest of the populace and their dcdi. 
time free-enterprise a breath of frc 
businessmen. But a nasty cultural JasM 
exacerbated by the poorlv planned m 
refugees this year. Anglos resented 
language they didn't unders ami fhe> u^- 
being outnumbered by "foreign 
places. Many were turned do^n c- 
because they didn't speak Sp r 

The acceptance of the oru»i 
called distressing, if not de- \J. Z^^ 
HeraUmtX. in a full-page 
if there was ever a city that "^^^^ 
Miami in 1980. But the callousness of ir^ ^ 
prevailed, and one of the "1; ^ 

,»cces of law in this ^^^''''^^ "^^^^ 
vague, ethnocemric reference to Amcncw 

was adopted. 

But there's still another ^^""f^ u 
story. As a friend of mine »ar 
affairs said, much of the Cuban cotm^ 
for the referendum. 
Of course, one social coin a- 



just in Fkmda. but a!! over 
diakctk: of ctasses. The '^-^^'[-"^^^^ 
people, the harder they 're gomg to ngn 

AteefGoMraK«cckl)ia 





V 

^ • • Mnlobv Bob O'Laiy 

Jam Winpmnger 

arxist}^ I aion leader claims peace 
GOLDb t best interest of worker 




I he pretty blue-green ^ 

wind through an area 
f he space shuttle sccm«t) 
developers as it look Irf 
fver be workable. The ci*! 
high-rise condominiui 
over with gridded 
plavs and a chain < 
m\ dependence on miluj 

iFalm B<:ach siiil retains 
ind for the elite, but i 
hi wealth is giving t 
iche. Palm Bea J ii 
[rih, and dozens o! il 
;S. U.S. I, the huhv^ 
I papered on both sides 
ping centers, fast ^ 

''he irony is nn>sf run' 
I y -developed cit\ 
mI water in the si 
osl of Dade ( out ' 
a now faces a severe u 
years. The north ^ 
in with garish, cxc 
n •h. south end cM 
id hoied*"' 

ily relerenjuiii points 
n\ pressing piohlcnis. 
,c III (he riL'lituard s\Mni 
Luhans v^cre oiae \veiLoti 
icne conser\atiNC than 
„ their dedication ti> sin 
breath of fresh air lo| 
\ cultural clash devcloj 
riy planned ui'lux of 
nglos resented heannj 
iderstand. ihey didn't 
^ •* foreigners" in pi' 
rned dovsn by empl'" 
ik Spanish. 

he ordinance can oolyj 
oi depressing. The 
..^e elecuon-week cditoi 
I hat needed healing. ' 
allousnessoftheelevto 

the ugliest, most 
ountry. compile 
rencc to American cuiij 

her coniradidion to 
mine who folio- • 

contradiction app«'^ 
over the ^^orld ^ 

e harder ^^^jT^^ .^i, 
■e going to lii^hi ba.K. 



a 

BYSAMCOLEY 

fl AMBfAl SIAHWRITER 

.n Winpisinger is no starry-eyed 
; He doesn't call naively for all 
10 lay down their arms and live in 

fore\er. 

^ he some hardened revolutionary, 
L j n\s workers to take up their guns 

!he factories for themselves! 
» a \\ mpisinger is, though, is a union 

\il;he way. 

*inpisinger, president of the 
i-manonal Association of Machinists 
V ' V\ orkers, was in town last 
\xA on the FSU campus. His 
T^ec Rc gcai the economy for peace, 
(0 stave otf war, but to create jobs 

as born in Cleveland, the son of a 
• man printer, in 1925. He learned 
^^o!!\e mechanics in the Navy during 
•fl ^ar II, and his first move after 
r3i discharged was joining his hometown 
|a:Vn!Nts local. Winpisinger ascended 
through the ranks of union 
I'^i HP. and wab elected its international 
^deminl977. 

-icspiie his rapid rise to the highest 
' labor leadership, Winpisinger 
ike some labor leaders, forgotten 
^-ng class origins, 
^cn to him describe a recent meeting 
a high-ranking NBC television 
*«vc: "1 noticed he kept looking at my 
l^^and looking at my hands," holding 
^handio show the cuts and scratches. 

so fmalK he said, 'Oh, you must 
|**>cat.' It never occured to him that ail 
peomesfrom hard work.'* 
*inpisinger is known in labor circles for 
^^Wjpokcncss and somewhat radical 
He believes U.S. military 
Mures far exceed what is needed to 
nation's "territorial integrity," 
U.S. military might is actually used 
Protea the overseas interests of big 
^mationalcompames. 



Iv 



Winpisinger says the U.S. is operating 
on a war economy, and has been since the 
mid-30s. He calls for an orderly conversion 
to a peacetime economy, a conversion that 
begins with a reduced military budget. 

"I don't think the kids oi the have-nots 
should arbitrarily be called to fight for the 
interests of the haves," he feels. 

Winpisinger's views on SALT talks 
reflect his working-class background. 

**It's just like a deadlock between a union 
and an employer," Winpisinger says. "If 
you don't have some communication, you 
never solve the problem.'* 

**1 don't care how small a step forward 
SALT II represented. I'm satisfied it was 
not a step backward, and if you have even 
that smallest fraction of movement, you 
shouldn't play politics with it, you should 
keep it alive. Out of it potentially can come 
SALT III, and maybe SALT IV, and 
hopefully we can get around to disarming 
this world." 

Needless to say, Winpisinger's ideals run 
against the prevaihng mood of the nation, 
as evidenced by the conservative sweep in 
last week's election. You wonder why he 
even keeps trying. 

But Winpisinger approaches his job like 
any other worker. "You talk about worker 
satisfaction, I've got a full dose. 950,000 
Americans, some of the greatest Americans 
there are, with problems by the minute, 
have given me the opportunity to seek 
change, to speak out, to seek solutions, to 
seek understanding. It's a marvelous 
challenge. 

"And, I daresay, if cwyonc had the 
same opportunity every morning when they 
went to their jobs, we'd have a much better 
country. Most of them go out aad do the 
hard, tough work every day which keep* the 
society going, and get pitifully little credit 
for it. 

"HopefvQy, I can go out «id mata a 
httie notoriety for it and get smue crec^ lor 

them." ^ 



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TownhcNiie living fron $10,200 

Convenient to f SU, 
FAMU and Ahimnl 
Village. Just 5 inin. 
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Model Open Smday 

1 till 6PM 
Chip Miller your host 



COLLINS & ASSOCIATES 

1*^222-81 00 IBJ 



u wircliass i silt tor that snedal iisrsoo 
NlM aiwrscuitss me unusual and the exotic 
visit Tallahassee's viilaoe Market. jjl 

A beautiful selection from I 
the cities and villages of 2 
the east...to you. ^ 

Village Market Rattan 



5 
f 




Coffee A Donuts 



m. I sat. Nov. 1 5 i 




i 



5* 



t f t t 



ill 



# • 



6 / Friday, November 14, i /m; f- lohda Flambtau 



1 1. 




II, 



• in 



INBRIEF 



SCHOOL OF 

Criminology presents a 
colloqium by Dr Rohcn 
An(irv on "Psvi^ho 
Lducaiion; The French- 
C anadian Method" in 60 
Bellamy today at 12 p.m. 

UPO SPONSORS A 
Flea Market, Saturday, 
November 15 in the Union 
Courtyard from 10 a.m. to 
4 p.m. Please register in 336 
or 318 Union from 8 a.m. to 
4:^ p.m. today. Tables are 
$4 for students and $6 for 
non-students. 

**PLASTKR SAINTS 
and Plaster Sinners," a 
lecture by Dr. Fred Licht of 
Boston University, will be 
presented tonight at 7 in,249 
Fine Arts Building. 

**THE RESOLUTION 
of Problems in Black 
Education," an educational 
workshop, sponsored by 
FSU Black student Union, 
meets tonight in 128 
Diffcnbaugh. 

FIGHTING FOR OUR 
Lives" shows tonight at the 
Wesley Foundation across 
from FSU on Jefferson 
Street, at 7:30. The film 
provides excellent insight 
into the Farmworker 
struggle and is free. 

"HOW TO CONTACT 
Headquarters: Prayer" is 
the theme for this week's 
liiter\arsity Christian 
1 ellowship meeting at 7 
p.ni. in the Weichelt 
I A)iinue, 2nd tloor Business. 

IHF STUDENT 
Government Leadership 
Workshop has been 
postponed until Winter 
Quarter. 

THERE WILL BE NO 
international coffee hour 
today due to the Baptist 
dinner at 916 W. Park 
Avenue. 

THE INTERNATION— 
al Women Students will 
meet today from 4-6 p.m. at 
the FSU Women's Center. 

THE FSU WOMEN'S 
Center will hold a reception 
for Linda Powell after her 
lecture tonight. 

BSU PRESENTS 
Unity Dance tonight at 9-? 
in the Union State Room. 
Free admission. 

ere WILL PRESENT 
the film ^'Generations of 
Resistance'" free to the 
pyblic on Sunday night at 
7:30 in Moore 
Auditorium. . 







Blac 




•"WHEN MY FRIENDS COME TO AMERICA 
I TELITHEM: AMIGOSy DRINK UTE BEER. 

BUT DONT DRinX THE WATER." 




"if- 1, 




9 



Si.. 

Clei 



^ 1 • 

nil be n< 

wmX pouci 

•arty idcok| 
ittliiton fo 

md A)n^« Mi| 

vnitc \% ' 



UTE BEER mOM MIUER. 
EVERYTNHIG YOU AlWAYS WANTiD IN A BEER. 

ANDIfSS. 



^"080 Beer Brewea Dy Miiier Brewing Co . Milwaukee. Wss 



I 

i 

1 



tiui»i. Novgobcf 14. 1980 / 7 




jlack education tte topic 
jf weekend workshops 



-I, tcvoiuiiun ot Problem, .n Black 
J.- >»in be the lopic ot educational 
sponsored by the Black 
;*rLmon(BSU)on Nov. 15 and 16 
,,^l2gDiffcnbaugh. 
^nSiamore, a controversial former 

Itf cndeot of schools in Washington, 
- gd in innovative reformer in black 
jjjawyi hold a workshop on "The 
.jTj of Wack Students in Education** 
jav It 10:30 a.m. 

jBBing Marable from Cornell 
^ will speak on the ^'ideology of 



Black Education'* at 1:30 Saturday. Carl 
Shariff, president of the Board of 
Education of Newark, N.j. will present 
"Impacting the Political System for 
Effective Black Education" at 2 p.m. 
Sunday. 

•'We hope to highlight some of the 
problems invoked in black education and 
suggest some alternatives to these 
problems." said BSU President Elijah 
Smiley. 

The workshop is free and open lo the 
public. For more information contact the 
Black Student Union at 644-3248 or siop^by 
210 S. Woodward. 






LARCi 




mmmwm bring coupot 

■uffet 



Mon Fn 11 00-2:«S 
AH the Sicilian Oeep>Oiftte PilM 
& Salad Bar You Can Sat 



Wftfl 

purchase of 



$2.79 



MammgM§nMe 

ComeU educolor, will 
participate in this 
weekend's workshops 





Wesfwood srioppinq Center S7$-M4i 



Clemens appoints bipartisan committee heads 



BY MARIA MILLER 

FLAMBFAl ST\H WRITKR 

, m unprecedented move Wednesday night, Florida 
sjeSiudcnt Senate President Keith Clemens of the Action 
•wsed party lines to appoint opposition members to 
K>.N;\eral Senate standing committees. 
-.:M>eof the new distribution of committee chairs there 
♦ \ n(i majority parly in the Senate this year. Long 
:nj Aciion member John Zimnick, appointed to the 
powerful Senate committee. Organization and 
.Tcc, said, "There is basically no difference between 
. ideology. The Senate is working more towards a 
.^non form of gi.)vcrnment.** 
^ ion Senator Steve Abbatc, chairperson of Elections 
'-\)inimenis Committee, said, **it's great. The 
.X h no longer parly affiliated. * * 



Student Party's Tim Meenan, chairperson for the new 
Security and Safety Committee, felt the Services and 
Activities, headed by United Seminoles' Chris Bosler, and 
the Security and Safety Committees were relatively weak 
and only "time can tell what kind of power they will have." 

The newly formed Safety and Security Committee is 
responsible for a comprehensive plan dealing with campus 
security, the major issue at FSU this year. 

Meenan, who ran for Senator on the Student's Party sole 
platform plank advocating tighter campus security, plans 
to "lobby as a committee at the Capitol. Our first endeavor 
will be to expand the night escort service "by having it run 
off-campus, run later at night, and run on Friday and 
Saturday nights." 
Stan Baker, an independent, will head the Judicial and 

Rules Committee. 




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IMPORTANT ANNOUNCEMENT 

The Florida v. Florida State 
Game has been changed to 
Dec. 6th at 12:25 pm 

ions Will sllll be exchanged 
NEXT WEEK 

• Beginning Tues., Nov. 18 
For students who 
purchased their coupons 

last spring. 

All other coupoM 

SIMM m ntmM wen. i 

imrt. 

• NO Coupons 
will be redeemed 
the week prior to 
the Dec. 6 Game. 
• All coupons 
must be 
redeemed 

NEXT WEEK 



GO 'NOLES 



•SCATAX 



I ! 



f 







- 0 




It $^ i-iim 




Planet 




4 a I 1 « 4 I 



♦ » ' 



i ♦ 



» I ♦ » M 



* » » 



• I 



Waves 



World 

ALGUSS, AliHrta — Iranian diplomats 
yesterday Iran had begun studying the 
American repiy to its demands for freeing 
the 52 hostages but that the initkl reaction 
was not very positive. 

One Iranian diplomat said officials in 
Tehran believed Washington was stalling. 

CAIRO, EgyN — A U.S. Air Force 
transport plane taking part in Mideast 
maneuvers with the U.S. Rapid 
Deployment Force crashed during the night 
at an Egyptian air base, killing all 13 
Americans aboard. 

A U.S. Embassy spokesperson said the 
plane, a C-41 carrying 11 men and two 
women, all Air Force personnel, crashed 
shortly before midnight as it approached 
Cairo West Air Base on a flight from the 
United StalCi. 




Ronald 
Reagan 



MOSCOW — A delegation of U.S. arms 
control experts, including a top adviser to 
Ronald Reagan, said Thursday Soviet 
officials have shown no willingness to 
renegotiate the SALT 11 treaty. 

The American group, which includes 
Reagan national security adviser Gen. Brent 
Scowcroft and former U.N. Ambassador 
William Scranlon, also pressed the Soviets 
for explanations about their invasion of 
Afghanistan, their intentions toward 
Poland, and their actions in the sphere of 
human rights. 

MOSCOW — Victor Brailovsky, a 
prominent Jewish fesistance movement 
activist, was arrested yesterday on charges 
of spreadmg anti-Soviet propaganda. 

Brailovsky, a 44-year-old scientist, was 
led away at 9 a.m. by police with a warrant 
w ho took him from his apartment, his wife 
Irinasaid. 

WARSAW, Poland — Poland's 
government has drawn up a blueprint for 
rationing meat and sugar and says it will ask 
the nation's opinion. But a Gallup-style 
survey among Poles by a French firm 
showed only 3 percent would vote for the 
Communist Party if multi-party elections 
were held. 



Nation 

WAffifNGTON — The natioa's Roman 
Cathotk bishops ^terday broke with 
diorcli tradition, calMng for abolition of the 
death penalty and finking their stand with 
their opposition to abortion. "We believe 
that in the conditions of contemporary 
American society, the legitimate purposes 
of punishment do not justify the imposition 
of the death penalty,** the bishops said. 

WASHINGTON — Edwin Meese, 
director of Ronald Reagan's transition 
team, said yesterday a tax cut wiH get first 
priority next January when the former 
Catifomia governor assumes office. Meese 
also indicated that Reagan would move 
swiftly on "a number of measures related to 
the economy** but did not give details. 

WASHINGTON — Hie Senate 
yesterday approved a strong statement 
against school busing that would ban the 
Justice Department from going to court to 
end racial discrimination through that 
method. The 42-38 vote on the anti-bu^ng 
measure was a victory for Sens. Strom 
Thurmond, R-S.C, and Jesse Helm, R- 
N.C., who will be two of the new 
conservative powers when Republicans take 
over control of the Senate in January. 

PASADENA, Calif. — The giant Saturn 
moon Titan resembles "a frozen earth** 
with a dense atmosphere of nitrogen, so 
cold it may be a liquid at the surface, a 
Voyager 1 scientist reported yesterday. The 
startling discovery was revealed as the robot 
space-craft sailed away from the ringed 
planet and its moons, leaving behind what 
one scientist said was "a state of euphoria*' 
over the information and pictures being 
sent 947 million miles to Earth. 

CINCINNATI — Joseph Paul Franklin, 
a suspect in sniper kiUings of blacks in five 
states, reportedly admitted he committed 
the slaying in a call to his former wife after 
his arrest in Lakeland last month. 



State 



CLEARWATER — Pinellas County 
food stamp recipients between the ages of 
16 and 60 and able to work will have to do 
so before they receive any more stamps 
after December 6. County officials received 
$80,000 in grants Wednesday for an 
eitperiramtal program to get some people 
off welfare rotis. Beginning December 1, 
any able bodied person applyfaaig for food 
staiiqis will have to either have a job or be 
required to work free for the county. 




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LobbyingA^ 



This coalition docs not work tofether on every higher ed. 
biU and often is deeply divided on certain issues, but its 
members are all working on the same overall goal: 
improvement of higher ed, according to Hogan. 

FSU and FAMU participate in a similar coalition at the 
national levd in kMmm Congress and ttm Department of 
Education. 

"Mike Kasha (an FSU faculty member and member of 
the prestigicHis National Science Foundation) goes to 
Washington about once a month/* said Sliger. *'I and Pat 
Hogan each go about four times a year and Robert 
Johnson, the dean of the graduitte school, goes about six 
times a y«ur.** 

Sliger said he always visits Russell Long, senator from 
Louisiana, who is a friend of his. '*The secretary of labor is 
also a friend of mine; I always look him up,*' said Sliger 

FSU receives $16 million a year from the federal 
government m research money. FAMU just received a $2 
million grant from the federal Advanced institute for 
Development Programs for its Farmers* Home 
Admintstriaion Tricing Center. 

'^Rqireseiitattve Don Fu<pa was qi^e inttrumoital in 
getting that,** said Allen. 

Both universities work closely with Florida's senators 
and representatives and their staffs in Congress. Both 
institutions also participate in several national 
organizations responsible for higher education lobbying at 
the national level. Pat Hogan serves as the Florida state 
coordinator of lobbying for the American Council of 
Education. FSU and FAMU also belong to the influential 
National Association of Secondary Universities and Land 
Grant Colleges. 

How do the two universities decide what they are going 
to lobby for or against, using all of these state and national 
methods? FAMU*s lobbying policy is set by Walter Smith, 
university president. Like FSU, FAMU's lobbying 
priorities are, to some extent, set by the Board of Regents 
(BOR), which has a staff of more than 20 lobbyists and 
coordinates State University System (SUS) lobbying. 

**We plug into the SUS system and their legislative 
program,** said Allen. 

Sliger serves on the BOR*s Legislative-University 
Relations Committee, which designs the SUS legislative 
program. The SUS lobbying organization, in conjunction 
with the nine legislative coordinators (one representing each 
university) tries to get each state legislator **on friendly 
terms with at least one university," said Hogan. 

Sliger uses a President's Legislative Advisory Committee, 
made up of faculty, staff, and students, to design FSU 's 
special lobbying priorities. 

People, both inside and outside the two universities, are 
the key to designing lobbying priorities and implementing 
these. Probably the most influential and important people 
involved in FAMU and FSU lobbying are local state 
legislators. 

*'We sit down and talk to the local delegation (Thomas, 
Barron, Morgan, Price, and Thompson) six times a year,** 
said Sliger of FSU's relationship with local legislators. 



• • • 



"We tell them what we need and they tell us what our 



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chances are. 

FAMU gave a plague to Representative Herb Morgan 
and Rcprescnutivc Jack Gordon last year for their 
outstanding support of the university, according to Allen. 
"The local delegation is in our corner.** added Allen. 

Local legislators sponsor bills for the universities, 
introduce university officials to high ranking state officials, 
push t^islation favorable to the schools through both 
houses, and gmerally keep the money flowing. 

Barron, Morgan, and Thompson are all graduates of 
FSU. In all there are 24 legislators who graduated from 
FSU. 

**We stay in touch with our FSU graduates,** said 
Hogan. "We let them know what they can do foriis and we 
thank them when they do. * * 

Representative Ktogan, chair of the powerful House 
Appropriations committee, is adept, sensitive and hdpful, 
acccMrding to Hogan. 

Both univmities also have influential people on their 
staffs or associated with the schools. The Reverand M.G. 
Miles, president of FAMU*s National Alumni Association, 
helps lobbying by drumming up grassroots support for bills 
FAMU wants passed. He is assisted by Dr. Frederkk 
Milton, the Florida regional vice presideitt. 

Gus Turnbull, FSU*s associate vice president for 
SK:ademic af fair$, iised to be the suf f director of the House 
Education Conunittee. "He picked up acquaintances,** 
said Hogm- Hona Turrissi, FSU*s director of budget and 
analysis, often oflfers expert advice and information to 
various state budget committees. Turrissi was influential in 
drafting the recent faculty salary supplement bill. 

Barbara Palmer, FSU*s women's athletic director, was 
very influential in the recent passage of a large funding bill 
for athletics (to bring Florida into compliance with Title 
IX). Mary Pankowski, FSU*s director of the Center for 
Professional Development, just got a new building for her 
program. 

FSU*s athletic department was successful in getting a 
$7.9 million appropriation for athletic improvements 
passed through both houses of the legislature last year. The 
governor vetoed the bill, however. **Some of those 
appropriations may come back,'* predicted Hogan. 

FSU and FAMU are both working up their list of 
priorities for the upcoming session of the Legislature. 
FAMU will be working hard to get program based funding 
(rather than enrollment based funding for universities). The 
school will also be pushing to get a new or greatly improved 
stadium (as Barron promised in his reelection campaign). A 
new stadium would cost at least $10 million, according to 
Allen. FAMU, like FSU, will be very active in the SUS 
legislative program. 

FSU has tentatively set the following priorities for future 
session: 1) Obtain major funding for renovation and 
maintenance of existing buildings; 2) Get a Science Library 
Building; 3) Get an engineering school; 4) Get a student 
union. 

*'We do a pretty good job," said Sliger in commenting 
on FSU's lobbying efforts. '*We work at it. I'd say it*s 
pretty effective.** * 

Allen, of FAMU, said he was not unsatisfied with 
FAMU's lobbying record. 

"In recent years it's been quite effective," said Alien. 



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14 / Friday, November 14, 1980 At Week Lnd 



Apalachicola Bay sanctuary 

The River's saving grace? 



BY MAR^ IKBO 

ASStH lAII I IMffHt 

• Oysierv aren't ihc only animals that live 
on ih^ botiom of Apaiachicola Bay They 
dra\% publicity because of their palatability 
— but they are not alone. Clamworms live 
rn that silt — amphipods, isopods. 
ToMgucfish, cousins of the flounder, 
burrow through the benthos. We call it 
muck. They call it home. You won't find 
ihcm highlighted on seafood menus, at least 
not at first glance. Read between the lines 
of the entrees, though, and you'll find 
micro-moilusks transformed into blue crab, 
copcpods made shrimp. Apalachicola Bay 
is a delicate system, a network of lives 
interwoven. Its productivity is manifested, 
for most of us, in that questionable blob 
on a sahtne with hotsauce. Few see 
beyond oysters on the half-shell 'to preserve 
habitat for oysters in their whole shells. 

In an era characterized by dying rivers 
and depleted resources, Apalachicola Bay is 
an anachronism. It continues to put Out. 
Commercial fishing is still a major source 
of income in Franklin County. Science still 
treats the bay as the rare find it is —. a 
relatively natural system uncorrupted by 
industrial exploitation. In September, 1979, 
Apalachicola Hay was aw ai ded designation 
as a National Estuarine .Sanciuary, "one of 
the highest honors/* according to 
Apalachicola born-'n'-bred Bob Howell, 
'that a natural resource can receive." By 
law. a vast area of 192,758 acres of river, 
wetlands, and estuary has been set aside for 
long-term research and education. 

Honor, however, did not come without a 
tooih-and-nail struggle — and the struggle 
continues, despite the recognition. The 
.Apalachicola River's free-flowing water, 
which transports essential nutrients to and 
through the estuarine system, is an 
intolerable inconvenience for upriver 
interests who eye the Apalachicola as a 
potential thoroughfare for barge traffic. As 
Willie Brown, a tugboat captain who was 
quoted in theTaliahassee Democrat last 
September, said, **A dam might kill few 
horned toads, but it would ensure that 
people could get up and down the river 
year-round.** 

The river has been threatened with 
"improvement** ever since the Jim 
Woodruff Dam, built in 1958 at Lake 
Seminole where the Flint and 
Chattahoochee Rivers join, failed to create 
an adequate shipping channel year-round. 
Though a dam does not loom as a serious 
pi>ssibility at present, counties along the 
Apalachicola River did have to agree to a 
permit for maintenance-dredging before 
Alabama and Georgia would allow money 
for the estuarine sanctuary to be released. 




Diving for mollusks in the Bay 

Upriver heavies will most likely lean even 
harder as municipal water use by areas such 
as Atlanta will place increasing pressure on 
the tri-river system. . 

The future of the Apalachicola is made 
no brighter by the terminal constipation of 
state and federal bureaucracies. In the 
winter and spring of 1980 the Florida 
Departmrat of Natural Resources, under 
direction from the Food and Drug 
Administration, closed most of the 
Apalachicola*s oyster beds because of high 
coliform bacteria in the water. Hiis action 
was prompted by reports of sickness traced 
to oyster-eating — oysters which, as it 
turned out, did not even come from 
Apalachicola Bay. Bad publicity, however, 
once loosed, spread out of control. As 
Robert J. Livingston, associate professor in 
Florida State's Biology Departmental^ long 
time researcher into the Apalachicola's 
estuarine system, pronounced, "Regulatory 
agencies found that it was easier to shut 
down an industry than to protect manage 
it. Consequently, even though the origin of 
the bacteria remains unknown, every time 
the river floods the industry will be shut 
down." Anything that weakens downriver 
strongholds can only strengthen the 
position of upriver industrial and shipping 
interests who want to forget that the 
Apalachicola is an entity and turn it into 
an interstate. 

Awareness does not come easily. Just as 
most seafood enthusiasts fail to consider 
the origins of their seafood platters, so they 
fail to realize the need for responsible 
stewardship of natural resources. The 
Apalachicola estuarine system has been 
honored, but it has not bieen saved. Wise 
management means continuous effort — 
tireless research and on-going education. 
Livingston hopes to demonstrate through 
the Apalachicola Estuarine Sancutary that 
a natural resource can survive if sensibilities 
are attuned to its existence. 





UPO Diversions 

presents 



Jiigglers 
Tossin' to 
Reggae Music 

TODAY 

12-1 




UNION COURTYARD 

Remember Windjammer will be 
in Itie Union Courtyard Monday 1M 



^^9^^ w w ' w ww m ^ w '9 ^ w 9 'w w w ^ w w w w ^»^^^^^WW*<r^^ 




4^ • NOW SHOWING KENT THKATRESt 




ISp! 



. ■ t 
^ ,:>! 

pjri ■ 

J bM 

\ ' 

SB ^ 
PH N 

•ic' radio 

KB 

DB ^ 

I m 

tni: It 

I fed U\ 

SB h 

>: -tfiethifti: 

M\ Now 

• ' a J/ 



a Hi. 



Al Wtck\ Lnd 1 ridd>, November 14, 1980 15 




pinning the dial with All World Donnie Bee 



ASM ^<^<j'i' Hov. do ya'li 
, ' with the audicmc.' 
i Firsi. on programming: 1 ve been to 
radK) stations in my life time, in some 
^jjyi'^good and in some bad, bul there is 
. '-jdiii sfaiion that in my heart I have 
j An J that was this one. And not 
I he fact we are number one at this 
a. ru: bt ^usc of the fact of the people I 
^.,',„h Bullard. Tony Shabazz are a 
^ par! ot mc i hcrc'll be days when Joe will 
y , had mood, and it'll put me in a bad 
\nd II v^ill iH'il^^' n^^' operate like I 

o// o f each other? 
B Kigh! That's what I do, anyway, I can't 
, ' anvonc else. Bul I'm sure the idea Joe 
, .j\s lold me is that it's a united thing. At 

• .Jio siadons it's not hke that. 
va>iiia radio station recently that was so. . 

\b iriKiured'^ 

•i Structured and to the letter, ya know 
lean, it was like we were automated. It 
rioiis, !i vvas all timed and there was no 
u-ji\c. You had no personality. 
H ' li's more a talent that 1 think Joe was 
u» lor. *\iid in those three talents (Bullard, 
'^nnic and Tony Shaba//) that make up 
. he's !o(>king for a whole unique sound, 
iki I ted that he'b accomplished that sound at 

■H. You talk about jive on the air, is that 
■ "'"hin^ you work on or is that natural? Is 
Bee on the air the real Donald 

H \ins IX)nnic Bee is Donnie Bee cause 
i 1 cra/y I've always been insane. So it*s 
wural. For me to act serious is weird. To be at 
•e ot those Senator's meetings, ya know, I 
»ould l)e over in the corner where everyone is 
Javkiiig up cause I would be saying something 
•iW and cra/y. No matter how big and strong a 
H>n is, there is a song that can bring him to 
V He can be a professional fighter and there 
i a song that can bring a tear to his eyes. 
^ ^ hat sort of music brings tears to your 
' Teddy Pendergrass maybe? Anything 

li: No. You know why? Let me tell you, 
»f ause. you said Teddy Pendergrass right off 
P of your head, well wonder if 1 looked ait 
ind said Pink Hoyd or Deep Purfde. You 



OTHER VOiCES 

Every day. from 10 till I DOS A 1 1) 
BARRINGER becomes Al L WORLD 
DONNIE BEE, the kinetic master of jive on 
Tallahassee*s number one radion station, 
WANMAM (W70K The railthm radh 
veteran has been mnmi w&rkmg gigs m 
Jacksonville and mwmd this tmwn, km ke 
Mtks^'sfomuiakomeatANM, i^tmke 
works nnder one of tke best in tl^ business, 
mask director JOE BULLA RD. 

**When Bullard fiets credit (for ANM\\ 
success) it's like mv all j^et credit, " Donnie 
says. "'Here, we >e all united.'' 
I — ^— — — 
know who my favorite group is, other than 
Earth, Wind and Fire? Steely Dan. It's very 
good music. There is a prejudice in music. 
There's a prejudice in everything. Bul to hell 
with them. The music will override all of that. 
There's too many white people listening to Earth 
Wind and Fire and too many people listening to 
Steely Dan. But I am a man of music if nothing 
else. Music is my heart. Like I was saying, 1 can 
go from Teddy Pendergrass to Mick Jagger to 
Gary Pucketi and the Union Gap to Waylon 
Jennings cause music is my whole life. 

SB: What is your routine? 

DB: I wake up and come to work. 

SB: You don 7 have any breakfast? 

DB: Sometimes. 

SB: What do you usually have? 

DB: 1 have whatever, maybe an Egg 
McMuffin. It's according to the circumstances. 

SB: Maybe have someone around to cook 
something up? 

DB: That's right. Now, I'd like to 
acknowledge someone special in my life, 
Priscilla, my two-year-old daughter. 

SB: Does she listen to your show? 

DB: She sings, !ike 1 heard the other day 
(shifts into a falsetto) 'Slie's so shy.* I was 
amazed. 

SB: Sometimes ¥rhen you *re going good you 
can really move people with your voice, seqming 
into a song. Can you tell when you're having a 
good day and is it a thrill? 

DB: That's definitely a thriU. ScHnetimes it 
tuts me, you know I'll be talking then close the 
m^e ^ m 0» 'ah*in. Get Down!' Then other 



days you sit iMck and let ^mr fingers do the 
work because your mouth mm'i cooidinaie. 

As far as what I want to do eventually, I write 
songs. 

SB: Let*s chmige the subjea. What did 
think of the election last week? 

DB: (Laughter) Personally, I wasn't 
displeased, I wasn't pleased. (Looks mpl Come 
on in, Tony. (Tony SImImuez emers the room.) 
This is my right hand man here. 

SB: (to Tony ShidfoW did yom tiMc 
about the elections? 

TS: WhatiUdLthinkalNHitit? 

SB: Yeah. 

TS: h was gonna happoisooiiCT or later. 
SB: You think Ret^an wouhl listen to 

WANM? 

TS: If one of h^ aides told him to, he woirid. 

DB: m^t like WANM (laughter). 

SB: After the Section one day, J heard one of 
ya'll say, 7 have some friends that are 
RepuiHicmts. ' Was that you? 

DB: That sounds like Joseph. With his 
popularity he just may, you know. 

But Republicans. What does that mean? 
People! That's the bottom line. And as soon as, 
people can realize that you can profit more from 
good than from had then everything will he on 
the one. 

SB: On the one— that's George Ctmton, 

right? 

DB: Yeah, Clinton is the man for that kind ol 
stuff. That's him on the wail there — Uncle Jam. 
I was out in LA last year and went to World 

Funk Headquarters. 
SB: What's It like? 

DB: It's just an office (laughter). It had all his 
posters and plaques up. 
SB: I saw Funkadelic at FAMV a couple of 

years ago. 

DB: Yeah, I was there. I had to leave early to 
do a disco engagement at a club. But 1 heard 
from friends they partied for a long time. And 
that guy came out in a diaper, what's his name, 
Gary. 

SB: Schnieder? 

DB: Yeah, that's it. Snider. 

SB: How would you describe yourself? 

DB: I'm a lucks man. Did you know that the 
day we got the Arbitron ratings in (August 13) 
and found out we were number one, that was my 
birthday. First time ever WANM has been 
number one, and we find out about it on my 
birthday. 

I Uke that. 




8lie^ tougli . . . but slie sides 
witb tlM Mfetto ivy. 

Andshe'sout tobesttlM 

mob at tlMir own game. 




PARKWAY 5 

THEATRES 



COLUMBIA PICTUKP i ENTS 
A JOHN CASSA\^" : r Vll^A 

GENA ROWLAJOTDS GLORIA 

Music by BILL CONTI Produced by SAM SHAW ^j:!*:!;:!:^.:^.^':.^^. 
Written ^9* Directed by JOHN CASSAVETES ^--^ 



PLEASE CALL THEATRE FOR SHOW TIMES 



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16 / FMmy, November 14. 1980 At Week's End 




'iiii 



mi 



.■0 



1 1 ' 




7//£i4 TRE 



No mystery on Mainstage; 
Holmes play the crime 




■ lir 




lYCiOISrAMtELL 



With help from Bob Barnes* magnificent 
sets, director Oil Lazier could probably hM 
oar attentioif with a cast of talented paper 
dolls. The players he gets for The Crudfer of 
Blood BTC sometimes marginally better, often 
(freadfuily worse. 

This Sherlock Holme's mystery fairly 
crawk along, groaning. British officers Ross 
(Tim Oaussen) and St. Claire (Randall 
Hyten) steal an Indian treasure and betray 
accomplice Jonrtlum Small. (Dan Markley). 
Thirty years later, a phantom comes to 
£i^land to murder the thieves and reckum 
the treasure. 

A ponderous exposition and overlong 
conclusion determinedly stifle whatever 
suspense might accrue from this slim 
mystery; the program begs patrons not to 
reveal tt^ secret of the show, but anyone too 
stupid to solve |hese murders shoiridii't be 
gives a driver's liceiise» much tess a theatre 
ticket. 

The story, though, is played out b^ore a 
coUection of stunning^ backdrops. In the 
opening scenes, Claussen, Hyten and 
Mwrkky stumble through tier paces before 
^ mammg gates <^ Red Fort at Agra. 
Dufga Diss (Hani Kfetawie) provides some 
excellent ccmic relief. 

Back in England, the same trend 
continues. Holmes' overstuffed, bright red 
drawing room, the deep bhie and' steqple 
windows or Pontkherry Lodge, the ornate 
air of evil in an East End opium den ^eak to 
the audienoefliore doquentiv than any actor. 



Andy Watts as Holm« is adequate; 
Stephen Neal as Watson forgettable, but 
Irene St. Oair (Helisse Fotd) leaves a bad 
taste in the mouth that's lialile to remain for 
weeks. 

By the end of the first act, though, the plot 
actually shows signs of life. .Claussen 
improves as his character ages, turning in a 
spirited performance cut shiMt oofy by Ross' 
untimely demise. It's unfortunate, though, 
that his character is shaped into the 
unaecesaafly in^tii^ mold of a lecherous 
homosexual. 

' Claussen's energy is replaced soon enough 
with the brassy igniwance of Tim Goodwin's 
Inspector Lestrade, and the suddenly 
entertaining show picks up some nionientum. 
Watts' fine turn as Holmes impersonating a 
Chinese opium dealer keeps things gomg, 
and there's finall)' some action on the stage. 

It must roll out with the London fog that 
marks the murky bank of the River Thames. 
When most of the principals arrive there, we 
gasp at Barnes' latest acconq^riinient, but 
Uiere is nothing more in the story or the cast 
to interest us. The ^low winds slowly to its 
close, abnost intolerably. ■ - 

There's sdU Marlon Hecht's s^ipearaBoe as 
sailor Mordecai Smith just before the 
curtain, but his coiberanoe is just enough to 
nudoe us feel cheated by the deadwood we've 
just watched. There really is no excuse for 
Mainstage's poor record late; thoi^ 
Studio Theatre has its luts and misses, one 
never goes fearing the worst frooi the players 
but that is how I feel about MaiiKtage. 

Perhaps the grand productions strike fear 




-"ft.' 



Irene (Helisse Fordj left) swoons in the arms of Dr. Watson fStephir 
Neal) wMk Sherhck Hoknes (Andrew Watts) iooks on, in Mainstage's Cruojer 
of Blood, 



in the players too, reducing them to lifeless 
symbols in some phastasmagorical set piece. 
There is somethii^ very curious, though, 
about a show whoie finest moment comes at 
the curtain call, the actors stuck like startled 
mannequais before an overwhelming stage. 



••• 



Tke Cniqfer4i/Bhod coatiMMs iMighi 
and San., aiM w« play eidi Urn.. 
Sat, and Saa throagk Dec. i. CartttB i» 
•:1S p.m.; tkkets are $3 for ^lifia. U 



If you want grease, go to a gas station 




BY CHRIS FARRELL 

ASSOCIATE EDITOR 

Second Stage Theatre Company's rollicking production 
of Grease borrows its 50s characterizations straight from 
Sha Na Na, teevee's syndicated iaff-riot. And while realism 
is seldom chief among the virtues of musical comedy, this 
show's excesses on the side of anachronistic nostalgia make 
//ap/Ty Days look like a documentary. 

If Grease were a TV show, you could change the channel, 
or at least turn it down. Trapped in the front row at 
Tommy's, one can only cringe and count the faults. 

The script is surely to blame for many of them. A bare 
bones tale of teenage summer lovers reunited in the fall is 
studied with many songs and little substance. We never 
know what droogish greaser Danny (Larry Richman) and 
Catholic snit Sandy (Nancy Williams) see in each other, 
why they broke up, or why They walk off arm in arm. 

We do know why the Burger Palace boys steal hubcaps, 
the Pink Ladies tease their hair, and the kids make out 
when the two groups get together. It's the 50s! 

Just to make sure no one forgets, story and song drop 
iooessaot references to the era, like '*I like Ike " and Sandra 
Dee to fungoo and zip guns. 

Nobody ever does anything in this play and nothing ever 
happens. There's foona be a gang fight, but there isn*t, and 
Rttao (St^hanie^niyer) gets in^egnant, except she's not, 

and Dini^ and Sandy get together, sort of. Oh yeah, 

- -" * * - * •■ 



. There is no motivittioii for liadividual behavior in the 
play. No single character develops anything you could 
recognize as a character. If I had met Doody (Casey 
Sandors) and Kenickie (David Bates) five mini^ afler the 
curtain dosed, I'd be luurd pressed to tell them ^lart. 



If ^Grease' were a TV show, yoo 
could change the channel, or at least 
turn it down. At Tonuny's aringe wbA 
count the faults. 



With the price of watching this cast attempt dialogue, 
confusion is a smaU price to pay for a sketchy plot. 
Whenever WilllMns had to talk to someone she was 
absolutely terrified, Richman meiely inept. DJ Vince 
Font»iie was adequate wkh pre-wrktes chatter, dow death 
when he bad to ad Ub. Only the Pink Laiies' Mts of 
buaness relieved the mess, with lUzzo, Juhe (Leslie 1. 
SoMi), and Frcneliy QfiM Brariiter) 



Even with whole groups on the stage, the Burg 
never accomplished much beyond a bi/arreb 
version of a JD*s pugnacious sneer Thev all looke(i \e 
relieved whatever the cast exploded in u) song ^ 

And explode they did. Grease 's hot rod foff^f^ 
or stuck in fourth gear. The continuing bombastjf 
was occasionaUy exhilarating, but choreo^rapf^ 
Sturgell was more adept at scaling big movcN 
stage than Lc Wilhelm. 

The singers should have taken ihe.r lead fraffl»»*^ ] 
The combo wasn't miked, though the 
musicians proved with sublciy and ugw>r thai 

have to run to rock . ^ 
At moments, when its hell-on v^hecl^ direw ^ 

overpower the audience. Grease ^"J" ..| 
spectacle. Mike Vescio's brief ^^^^^^^^^Lg^ 
School Drop Out" is a magic ^^^^^^'^^ 
soothing. The show's opening conceit " 
reunion — is handled expertly and the costwaw 
fun. 

Second Stage wants to buy their own 
$3.50 admission to Grease will help ttol- i"*^ ^ 
be better advised to sa\e shows 
have a place to put them. 



Dftf- 



MMkHal. 



y at Toi»»? » 



I I 




At Week's Fnd f -ijj-. N -^rniN- !4 'Q^n ' J7 



A L E N D A R 



BY VICKI ARIAS 

H AMBfcAli STAfT WWTEI 

\ (It Iheatre presMts Dvcffir tf Stkod oa 

onighi and Saturday at 8:15 p.m. Tk:kcts arc 

. jdeni^ and S3 75 for the general public. 
^ Stage prestnts Gretise at T«My*s toniglil, 

'^g^v and Sunday at 7 p.m . Tickets are $3.50. 
fv( ScM of Music presents an opera by Giacamo 

llssni. Suor Angelica and Gianni Schiggi tonight and 
llisfdav at 8; 15 and Sunday at 2:30 p.m. in Ruby 
laond Auditorium Tickets are $1.50 for students and 
.•:;'i/fn^ and S3 for general public, 
jr. M Licht ol Boston University speaks tonight on 
' Saints and Plaster Sinners," a topic on stucco 
It^ji. in room 249 of the Fine Arts Building at 7. An 
llfcnnaireaTtion t(>ll()ws. 
yrxhihii b> William Harper opens tonight at the Four 
liicrv at Governors Square Mall from 7-9. Harper, 
,c..si and metalist, shows his unique collection of 
,<hcs, pendants, amulets and precious stones. The 
-isi IS free and continues through December 4. Gallery 
.nareTut day through Friday 10a.m. to 4 p.m. and, 1- 
[if'Tr *eekcndv 

IK) sponsors a hlea Market this Satorday iii tbt Unioa 
-nard The Market opens at 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and 

on IS in 336 from 8 a.m. to 4:30 today, 
.ps and Cages: Impending Disasters^ by Mary F. 
uii, o on display this weekend in Nrir Orleans, 
I umiua at the Contemporary Arts Center. 
Mi.artisaRS and performers can now np to 
cipate in the annual conunitnity Celebration of the 
^ s to be held Sunday, December 14, at the R.A. Gray 
Jmg For more information call 222-0829 m 893-6123. 
WFSI TV AuMai Ancllon cotttfnnes tonWit and ends 
jriiy. Lines arc open from 7 p.m, to midnight, call 644- 

HMff Masic presents David Cordle's Doi:toral recital 

Jf^ pano this Saturday at 8: 15 p.m. in Music School North. 
JiRbrs and Frisbce throwers perform to Renae this 

r noon in the Courtyard. 

^ Faciky Exhibkion M the Fine Arts Gafiery doses 

^ 1 ohman, MeMo, Croziar, Creekmore combo wiO 

rm Sunday from 4-8 p.m. at Meddan Place 



apartments dnbhouse. A $5 admission entitles celebrants to 
champagne and hars d'oeu^res. Call 576-9474 before 
Saturday to make reservations. 

MUSIC 

Kkco^s: Barbara Winfield and Spare Time, Top 40 rock 
and country, tonight and Saturday, no cover. 

Lncky Horseshoe: Red Dog. rock and roll, tonight and 
Saturday; Yonders, Sunny Blue and Red Dog. Sunday . 

Bullwinkles: Dixie Desperados, tonight, Saturday, and 
Sunday. Julie Howard and Jimmy Lohman, acoustic 
guitars, Friday in the Beer Garden. 

Maxim's: Lohman and Meilo, acoustic guitar, tonight 
and Saturday. 

Downunder: Homeward Angel, original rock and roll, 
tonight and Saturday, 9p.m.-l a.m.. Students $1, general 
public $2. 

Sweetbay Studios: Implications, post modernist pop, 
tonight and Saturday. $2. 

Tommy's: Slapstick, primal rock, tonigl^t and Saturday. 
$2. 

SaHey HnR: B.B. Jam rocks for free tonight at 9. 

FLICKS 

Moore Auditorinm: tonight, Lm Cage Awe Folles, 7:30, 
9:30, $2; Glen or Glenda? (I changed My Sex) plus Sex 
Maniac, 1 1 :30, $1 ; Saturday, The Song Remains the Smne, 
7:30, 10, $1 .50; AninudFtam, midnight, free. 
. Varsity Triple: Private Ber^amin, (2:30>, 4:45. 7. 9:15; 
fM&ween, (3:30), 5:30. 7:30, 9:30; The Rose, 4:40, 9:35 
fAm AU That Jazz, (2:20), 7:15. 

Mknde Triple: Coal Miner's Daughter, (2:10), 4:40. 
7:10. 9:40; Ordinary Peopk, (2), 4:30. 7. 9:30; Elephant 
Mm, (2:15), 4:45, 7:15, 9:45. 

Parkway Fife: Rough Cut, (1:30,3:30), 5:30, 7:30, 9:30; 
Gloria, (2), mg Brawl, (1:45, 3:45), 5:45, 7:45. 9:45; Terror 
Train, (1:45. 3:45), 5:45. 7:45. 9:45; Rock' Fever, (1:45, 
3:45). 5:45. 7:45, 9:45. 

CapM Cinemas: WUhout Warning, 1:30, 9:20; The 
Private Eyes, 7, 9; It's My Turn, 7:15. 9:15; Thi 
Awakening, 7:20, 9:30. 

Mugs & Movies: Brubaker, 7, 9:30. The Island, 7:15. 
9:45. 12. All seats 99 cents. 

Nortliwood Matt: Julia, (1:30,3:30, .5:30), 7:30, 9:30. 
$1.50 

Tallahassee Mail: Alligator, Up in Smoke. Call theatre at 

385-9000 for sho»*r times. 



Music 



BY BILL WADE 

ILAMBKAl WRITI R 

^or.Anfielica (The Angelic Sister) and Gianni Schiggi, 
■•ot^as by Giacomo Puccini, are to be performed this 
' vKend by the FSU School of Music. Directed by Eugene 
'^Wahl, this plans to be an enjoyable two hours of lyric 
'^'^wJy with /4/rj^e/iraand comedic charm with Schiggi. 

'f you shy away from opera because it is austere, or you 
«not understand it, despair not. Both operas arc 
^««Wc. and arc to be performed in English. According to 



Dybdahl. the intent of these performances is to provide an 
expressive vehicle for stedents in all aspects of the arts and 
to give the student-body-at-large an opportunity to 
experience opera in a non-threatening environment. 

Performances will be held this evening and tomorrow 
at 8:15 p.m., and Sunday at 2:30 p.m. in Ruby Diamond 

Audit(mum. ^ 

Tidcets wtU beavailable at the door. Admission is $3 for 
adults, $1.50 for non-FSU students, and free for FSU 
students with a validated LD. 



arrell guests on D-103 talkshow 

xk*» chrtt&; r»romkf»«; tf) feature I 



FItOM STAFF RCrORTS 

"vou Associate Editor Chris Farrell joins host Ira 
r Sunday night at 10 on WOWD-FM's '*Spc«k^asy 
" call-in talk show, 
farrell, cultural savant and modern anisic afficianado, 
*l^^dtiscussing popular bemsic witii Schorr and call-in 



participants. The show promises to feature numerous and 
varied examples of its topic during its two hours. 

In addition to his work at the Flambeau, Farrell has been 
published in Creem and Slash magazines. He has. also been 
pinched on the cheek by Iggy Pop. 
The number for "Speakeasy P.M." is 386-5141. 



FREE TOWING 

(50 MILE RADIUS) 

If We do The Work 

24 Hours 

IN CASE W ACaOEf^lT CAIX... 

SEMINOLE I 

''AINT ft BODY I STe-iBl?! 
o^«*aoP«iATon 4214MliWClODVIiUE 



3ilteilAWFORDVILLE liO 
TALLAHASSEE. FL. 





BRINiiKEir 

7m 9:30 



THE I9»JUID 

11 

7:1 &• 9:li5i l2lM 



ALL SEATS 99C 



UP 



FILMS 



Wf Wf m^t^tUF mi^^j^ SBBWWI^^^^^^^^^' ^^^^^^ 

LA CAGE $2.00 
CLENOA7$1.00 

UDapp$i.so 

7:30,9:30 



FRIDAY 

At 11 tMi Mil ?SILi 

the stran^Sest things happen 

FRIDAY 11:30 



BELA 
lUGOSIj 



CLEN OR CLENDA? 
plus: THE MAMIAC 

SATURDAY 



7:30,10:00 



wmrm 



EASTERN 1 
FEDERAL | 
THEATRES ft 


mom n*-UM | 

VaraityS 


DtLII STEMO 

THE ROSE 

(& m 




GOLDIE HAWN 

SIS 




PRIVATE 
BENJAMIN 


O f 








HE CAME 
QMEFO 





mom 

Miracle S 

TttS THOMAS VILLI t<|AO 



ANTHONY HOPKINS^flP^y 



A PARAMOUNT PICTURE ' 



AiMV KKSAi.PirnnRE i 

.ewwLMViJCiAH n Y STV l.** ALL WIjMTO 







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18 / Friday, NovcmHrr 14. ]9^0 Florida Ffambeau 

lassified Ads 



Aoom 308 Union. Open 9 AM^i? 
Deadlm^12 noon the day 



9FSU/UF TICKETS 
iSO Each Call 224 2710 
Ask For Claudia 



THE ALPHA GAMS ARE HAVING A 
GARAGE SALE 
SAT NOVEMBER 15 9AM-1PM 
273S RAINTREE CIRCLE 
LOTS OF GOOD BUYS! ! 



GIRLS BIKE 35PD RALIEGH. 
SEWING MACHINE FREEARMHAS 
ACC. 222 3795 BEFORE 6. 



Recordsmith rock albwins frwM $2-3 
FSU Flea Market Sat. lt-1. Come 
See! Large selection of current artists 
& collectable golden's oldies. If you 
don't find what you want come by 
Rec^ordsmitti at Ml W. Gaines located 
just a few blocks south of campus* in 
front of the junk ft treasure store. 



VIVITAR SERIES 1 70 210MAA 3.5 
ZOOM LENS WITH CANON FD 
MOUNT. $275.00 LIKE NEW. CALL 
COURTLANO AFTER 6PM 222-2235. 

ONE FSU UF COUPON FOR SALE 

$30 OR BEST OFFER CALL 224 6542. 

CLASSICAL A JAZZ FANS 1 Pf^ 
OCM TIME WINDOW SPEAKERS. 2 
MTHS. OLD. 57«'13t9 $645. 

FSU V FLORIDA TICKETS-GERRY 
AFTER 11PM ALL WEEKEND. 
LEAVE $ A PH f S76-4745. 

FOR SALE 2 FLA. GAME TICKETS 
GOOD PRICE!!! CALL 576 2975 
KSS^ TRYING. 

SUPER GARAGE SALE 
Furniture & Carpet remnants. Cheap 
Forest Heights, 1313 Sharon Rd. 
Saturday 9am to 5pm 



Girls )00^o rabbit fur jacket size 7-9 
$50 girls leather jacket size 7 $35 4" B 
& W tv $50 call 877 2670. 

CHRISTMAS PORTRAIT SPECIAL! 
This year be diff. Give a part of 
yourself to the one's you love. A 
regular $25.00 portrait now available 
for $12.50. These charcoal renderings, 
•re sure to put a smile on someone's 

TWO COUPONS FOR U OF F VS 

FSU GAME TUES TURN IN DAY. 
CALL 222 4528 $100 FOR PR. 



King size water bed with heater for 

sale, practically new, price 
neqotiable contact Phil 576 7466. 



CRAIG SPEAKERS: $75. BSR 
TURNTABLE: $25. CALL 222-0565 

AFT 5 OR WEEKENDS. 



'74 YAMAHA DT 250 LESS THAN 
2,000 Ml. OFF ROAD $400 OR REST 
OFFER. MIKE 575 2615. 



30 GAL. AQUARIUM. COMPLETE 
INCLUDES BREEDING PR. 
ANGELS $100. 576-1055 EVENINGS. 

TWO U OF F COUPONS FOR SALE. 
CALL 222 4392 AFTER 5 PM. 

Four super wide GT Grand Prix Mag 
^'heels incl. rims & hub caps Great for 
small cars $50 00 each 575 5879 

NEW SEARS DELUXE 

TYPEWRITER BROUGHT FOR 
$360. BEST OFFER. CALL 222-0136 
AFTER S. 

Firewood-Spltf your own and save! 
$25. per ' ; ton truckload. Cut into 
length, many won't Deed splitting. 
Call trf-SlM. 

Naughahide couch corner with coffee 
table. 11 ft. long good condition. 877- 
7596 $100. 



BOSE 901 SERIES IV SPEAKERS W 
CHROME STANDS, $6S0/PAIR 386 
7757. 

Be prepared for tr»e cold weather! 

Hardly worn, heavy ^4 length gray 
suede coat quitted lining, women's 
Si7c U New was $120, asking $60 644 
4075 before 5 p m , ask for Laurie 

2 TUES. COUPONS FOR FSU/UF. $40 
. OR BEST OFFER 576 S671. 

10 speed. 2S*V' red Puch Cavalier. All 
at toy parts prime? $185 for info, call 
576-4261 eve. or come by ttie MuncMe 
Wat oi > i« Union-dsirtime- 

in Leon Cdunty Spe^tlf Land Sale 4 
miles south of truck route on Oak 
Ridge Road 3 acre tracts 1850 acre IDA 
tracts 16S0 acre, 30 to 40 acre tracts 
1500 per acre, terms: 13»b down 5 yr. at 
12*o interesl. 

JimmyBoyntonRealty phone 222 7581. 



FOR SALE-TWO COUPONS WHICH 
CAN BE TURNED IN ON TUES. FOR 
THE UNfV OF FLA GAME StOOFOR 

PA'P CALL 7?7 i5?9 



. . reservations now. Tharpe 
St. Market 8i Flea Market booths by 
the Da/, Week or Month. Buy Sell 
Trade. Reservations ^4 5590 or 315^ 
4i«t. foo^f24 w. mmmW 

FOR SALE 4 FSU VS UF TUES. 
FOOTBALL COUPONS. BEST 
OFFER CALL 575 3075. 

Yard Sale, moving must sell. Plants, 
antique clotttes, baskets, furniture, 
books, housetiold goods. Sat. Nov. 15, 
10 4 2125 Bellevue Way 575 5858. 





1972 FORD, RANCHERO, LOW 
MILAGE, AIR, PS, AIR SHOCKS. 
AUTO, PB, EXCELLENT 
CONOITJON. SKMiW. 




'SUBLEASE RM CASH HALL MALE 
OR FEM. MEALS MAID SERV. 
POOL & BAR A/C STOYRM* W/S 
QTRS. $040. EA. CALL 224-6516 AFT 

6. 



Sublet 3 br house beautiful fenced yd, 
carpet, washer, porch, quiet St., new 
kitchen appliances, A/C, avail, now 
or Dec. 1 $300/mo. Nr WMfMrop PUFk, 
free fuel oil, 877 9988 



CAN LEASE lAAMEDIATELY! 
Sublet 1 bdr furn. apt. $210 monthly 8> 

eiec. pool, laundry, cable TV. ONLY 
2 blocks from FSU 224 2180 after 3. 



University Garden Apartments now 
renting 1 bedroom apt. $185/students 
$195/ non-student. Open end lease- No 
last month rent. Call 224-0608. 



2 bdr. duplex $160 mo. 
224- 3 1 52 very large. 



Now 575-285», 



SUBLET: OSCEOLA HALL WINTER 
SPRING QTRS. MEALS A/C, POOL, 
MAID SERVICE. $700 PER 
QUARTER. 10 MIN. WALK. CALL 
222-46S5. 

COLONY CLUB APTS 1 BORM FOR 
SUBLET TILL JAN. THEN OPTION 
TO RENT. CALL ALYSSA OR 
KAREN 224-9303. 

One mate needed to share a two 
bedroom house three Modes from 
campus. $14Q/mon1ti It Va utilities. 

222 9800. 



Take over lease Dec. 1, one bedroom 
turns, great location, low util. Bitts. 
Call 893-0034 or 576 7042. 

SUBLEASE ROOM AT 
CASH HALL FOR W/S QUARTERS 
$50 DEPOSIT LEFT, A/C BAR 
POOL, MEALS. CALL 224 5742. 



FM ROOMMATE NEEDED 2 
'BDROOM $120. & '/2 UTILITIES. 
CALL DEBBIE AT 576-9705. 




Need cash? Got any baseball cards or 
Other trading cards to sell? Call 
Larry, 893 3873. 

ROOMMATE NEEDED - 

LOOKING FOR A MAT. NON- 
SMOKER TO SHARE 2BD APT IV2 
mi from campus $140 & ' 2 UTL 81 
PHONE CALL WALT 224 8726. 

NEED FOUR TICKETS TO FLA-FSU 
GAME CALL 575-7413 EVEMIN6S 

OR WEEKEND. 



RMMT WANTED TO SHARE 3 BDR 
HOUSE $75 PER MONTH ' 3 U TLES 
CALL ROBIN AFTER 8 PM 224 5774. 

F. Rmmte to share 1 bdr. Regency Pk 
Apts. $110 8t util. 2 biks 10 FSU. 
Non-smoker. Wntr & Sprg Qtrs. 224- 
4235. 

Female to taite over lease at Osceola 

Hall. Meals, maid service, a/c, pool. 
Call 224-1796. Will pay deposit! 

FEMALE ROOMMATE TO SHARE 2 
BEDROOM 1'2 BATH APARTMENT 
AT LAS PALMAS. DEC. THROUGH 
SPRING QUARTER FOR INFO. 
CONTACT MELANIE AT 878 2396. 

Fm" rmmte new HOUSE 4 BR, 2 
BATH $100 8i SHARE OF UT. 
FURNISHED NO PETS 10 MIN. 
DRIVE FR/FSU. CALL 575 1376 



ft • 



Happy Birthday Xathy Seymore 

(Onmmday) 
Love. Cathy and Cathy 



HEY FAWCETT 
HAPPY BIRTHDAY 
ANOTHER ONE BITES ^ HE DUST 



NEED 3 ROOMATES FOR 2 BDRM 
APT $77 50 EA AND '4 ELECT EA 
GOOD LOCATION AND CLOSE TO 
CAMPUS CALL SEAN 576-0661 
AFTER 5 PM. 



F rmmt needed w/s qtr Own room 
Close to campus. ' 3 of rent & util. Call 
576 4392 



Reliable. Dependable person w/ car 
to assist in managing sandwich shop. 
Must be availaole 7am ipm AAon thru 
Fri. No weekends For appt. call 386- 
8800 between 2 :30 4 30 pm M-For576- 
5719 Sat. & Sun. after 10 am. 

Experienced acoustic guitar teacher 
to teach beginner. Call R.K. Branson 
644 4720 or 306-8127 after 5 : 30 



NINJA and WALRUS FACE 
Are yoo ready to Get Down Get 
Funky, and Get Loose •■ the 
Jugglers hxlay, as the Reggae beat 
thrives!. Then we'll Start our w t elwnd 
ritual at ttie Downunder. 

Rastaman 



0»d books for collectors and readers 
Tliomasvilie has 2 dee^s- v.rg.nia 
Breedlove on Themasviiie Road about 
2 miles before town Signs 00 left »»2 
228 0073 And Dick Rieber 439 S 
Manseii St. rear. 912 226-7415 by 
appelntmeni only or by cttance 

FLEA MARKET EVERY WEEKEI^D 
Sat 9 til 81 Sun 1 $:X Tharoe Sf 

Market & Flea Market 900^924 



FEMALE DRUMMER WANTED 
FOR WOMEN'S PUNK ROCK SAMO. 
CALL 644 4007 or 644 6577. 



E-XMAS SALE with coupon $| off 
Magic Set Expires Nov 22 Magic Fun 
Shop Univ Plaza wi6 w Tenn 



NEED TUTOR 
NEGOTIABLE 
NANCY 224-8550. 



FOR QMB 3200. 
PRICES. CALL 



FAST, ACCURATE TYPIST (65 
wpm) TO WORK LATE NIGHT 
HOURS FOR FLORIDA 

FLAMBEAU. PART-TIME. CALL 
AMY SUN.-THURS. EVENINGS 
BETWEEN 7 PM AND 11 PM AT 644- 
5744. EXPERIENCE IN 

TYPESETTING HELPFUL. DO NOT 
CALL DURING DAY. THANK YOU. 



Overseas Jobs Summer/year round. 
Europe, S. Ame., Australia, Asia. All 
Fields. $500- $1200 monthly. 
Sightseeing. Free Info. Write: IJC 
Box 52 FL5, CoTona Del Mar, Ca. 

92625. 



Make pizzas, etc. Fri. night. Sat. 81 
Sun. daytime, Tues. 81 Wed 115. Must 
be 18 or over. Come by Barnaby's at 
2331 Apalachee Pkwy. 8:30-11 :0e am w 
2-5pmMmkdays. 




Retired secretary. Accurate typist- 
good speller- for papers, dissert., 
theses. Reasonable. Linda Durbin 576- 
1988. No calls after 10 p.m. 



FLIGHT INSTRUCTION 
Jeff Ryder-FAA Certified 
222-6527 



I string tennis 
service. Lowest 
Bill at576H»86. 



racquets. One day 
prices in town. Call 



TYPING 

EXPERIENCED SECRETARY 
USING IBM SELECTRIC II. 
REASONABLE RATES. EDITING 
AVAILABLE. CALL 877-3694 
EVENINGSAVEEKENDS. 



THESIS, 



EXPERIENCED TYPIST 
TERM PAPERS, 
DISSERTATIONS 
PHONE 386-8076 OR 385 6815. 

TYPING FAST EFFICIENT 
LETTERS RESUMES PAPERS ETC. 
PG. 386-4843 



TYPING-LET ME MAKE YOUR 
PAPERS LOOK GOOD! NEAR 
CAMPUS 75C/PG SUE. 222-9637 

EVES. 

Guitar lessons: Folk, Blues, C & W flat 
& finger picking, bottleneck. Dave 
Greenwald 222-7749, 7 11 pm. 



Quality Typing of Dissert., Themes, 
etc. Call 644 6031 or 224 3546/Sue. 

ReasonabI 



Excellent, quality typing using an 
IBM Seiectric II. Experienced in 
typing term papers, flMSes, 
dissertations. 576-9354. 



MINI WAREHOUSE UNITS 

6x6 available larger sizes $14.50 up. 
Call us at Lakewood Mini Warehouses 



386 4191. 



LEASE 
YOUR FURNITURE! 
wide variety 
immediate Mivmy 
Option to Buy 
FURNITURE MART RENTALS 
1206 S. Adams 



Edited Typing IBM Seiectric II 
Reports/Resumes/Letters/Disaert. 
575-7171 Mission Rd. Area. 

TYPING IBM DISSERTATIONS 
THESES TERM PAPERS. CALL 
PAT DIXON 386^1255. 

WILL DO TYPING IN MY HOME 
TELEPHONE 385 9689 KEEP 
TRYING 



Red Man, (Read) 
Come to your senses soon 
And we can be together by, June. 
If you decide to pass me by, 
"You'll regret it" is my reply. 
Please, take me for framed no nH>re 
And I'll quit being such a bore 
Love, Your "Taken For Granted" 
Girl 

Who graduated from WOLFSON 
HIGH SCHOOL? Who graduated in 
1976? Who lives in NefMune Beach? 
Who fives at 815 Lipona? 1718 
Bellevue? 206 Cttapel Terrace? 

HAPPY BIRTHDAY #24 TO OUR 
BIG BROTHER BOBBY JOC 
FAWCETT. 

LOVE AND KISSES THE ZTA'S 

DEAR MARK, 

THE FIRST SIX MONTHS WERE 
OUTRAGEOUS, AND I'M LOOKING 
FORWARD TO THE NEXT SIXTY! I 
LOVE YOU VERY MUCH HERMAN 
TOO! MUCH LOVE AAARIA 

CONGRATULATIONS] 
NEW ALPHA CHI OMEGA BIG 
BROTHERS: ROB, DANE & WES. 

CHI OMEGA 

Get psyched for ttie 3rd annual Alpha 
CM/Chi Omega barn dance 

LOVE! ALPHA CHI OMEGA 

Catwoman: 

You're right, super flick! But what 
can't you wait 'till next for? The 
movie or kinky sex? *TEE HEE* So 
hiings may be a little different but we 
sure make a fun night on tfie toMml 
Love, Joe AAama 

PEEBLES ne. PAM 
THOUGH NOW A TEEN NO MORE 
YOUR INNOCENT CHARM HAS 
LONG AGO TRANSCENDED 
ADULTHOOD. HAPPY BIRTHDAY 
FROM ONE WHO CARES. APT M. 

DEAREST NEW WAVE: 

It's SO hard for me to say, and even 
harder for me te understand: 
YOU'RE A VERY SPECIAL 
PERSON TO ME and yet I'm not sure 
If ttiars right. I feel $0 very strange, 
cuz at times I feel so close fe yee, and 
then some times I don't. 

Can you help me understand and fe 
know what I mean te your 

Tkanfcs & Love, 
L.R. 

DO YOU WANT 50 YD LINE SEATS 
FOR U OF F VS. FSU GAME. YOU 
'CAN HAVE THEM 1st DAY TURN 
IN. 2 COUPONS FOR $100. CALL 222- 
4528. 

UPO TRAVEL DEPT. SPONSORS 
DISNEY WORLD TRIP 2 DAYS, 1 
NIGHT EVERYTHING INCLUDED 
BUT FOOD $35. SEE LIZ 322 IN 
UNION OR CALL 644-6710 or 576-8074 
NOV. 22-23. 

LAST CHANCE TO GET IN ON IT 
BE NICE TO JACK WEEK! 
ALL FAVORS >^CEPTED 

NUTRITION COUNSELING 

University Health Center Weight 
Loss, Meal Planning, etc. NEW 
EXPANDED HOURS! Mornings 
10:30-12:30 MWF, afternoons 1 : 30-3: 30 

GAY PEER VOLUNTEERS 

If you are a female or male with a 

gay related concern and would like to 
talk with a trained gay peer 
volunteer call Dr. Lucy Kiziriar. at 
644 2003, M F, 0-5. Confidentiality 
assured an d no records kept. 

•FREE TO GOOD HOME* 

YELLOW COUNTRY DOG, 10 
MONTH OLD FEMALE LAB, 
LOVES KIDS, NEEDS SPACE TO 
RUN. MOVING, MUST FIND HER A 
NSW HOME. CALL 644-S7iS 1-4 pm. 

KUNG FU 
A new center for ttie Martial Arts. 
Now forming classes 214 W. College, 
224-7708 next te Groat Bike 



THIRSTY WOMEN NEVER HAD A 
BETTER FRIEND THAN POOR 
PAUL. FREE MICHELOB EVERY 
DAY 3-4 PM, 8-9 PM. POOR PAUL'S 
POURHOUSE 618 W TENNCSSEE. 



BALLOONS UNLIMITED 
Balloon Bouquets • Costumed 
Delivery available- Call 3a6-i63i 



microcomputer consulting 
system design programmma 
•Mugging. Barry McConneli S7S tM5. 

AUCTION MA^ET DAY S 
IN THE OLD TURNERS STORE 

NORTHWOODMALL 
SATURDAY NOV 15, 6pm 11pm 
SUNDAY NOV. 16, Ipm 6pm 
Great bargains: toys, appliances, 
fools, furniture, otf>er m e r cha nd i se 
Sp onsored by Temple Israel 

TNT HIDEAWAY CANOE RENTAL 

Wakulla River at Hwy. H. November 
Special: mention this ad 81 rent 2 
canoes for the priceof 1. Call 1-925^12 

or 878 5607. 



BACK AGAIN AT BULLWINKLE S 
ARE THE DIXIE DESPERADOS, 
m„ SAT. a SUM. ROCK A ROLL 
AT ITS PINEST. 



EAT LUNCH AT THE PHYRST 
WITH A FRIEND! 



Soft Contact Lenses 
Hard Contact Lenses. 
24 hour Contact Lenses. 
B li L Contact Lenses. $50. 
Dr. Allen Dean, 222-9991. 



Blue Keycard is honored by the 
following merchants: Nic's Toggery. 
Athletic Attic, Hobbit Hoagie 
Factory, Brewmaster's Restaurant 
(opening soon), AAac's In The Back 
Lounge, Pizza Pro, Tallahassee 
Ftowers, The Pub, The Phyrst, Adam 
& Eve Campus Hairplace, Zonkers. 
Brown's Pharmacy. The Melting Pot. 
Annette's Women's Fashions, Great 
Bicycle Shop. Barnacle Bill's, 
McGregor's Steak House, Roger 
Nelson Music Store, The Outpost, Sea 
Fox Restaurant & Lounge, Ricco's 
Lounge, Chjality Inn Southernaire, 
Captain's Lounge. 



HOLIDAY PORTRAITS 
Make Special Gifts. ..But fine 
photographic portraits take time. 
Package plans in color from $19.S0. 
Call Delmar Studk>s at 224 3824 

Stereo World: Save 20% on any Lay A 
Way for Christmas delivery Just 
$10.00 starts your Lay A Way on JVC. 
Sansui, Technics, Akai, Pioneer, 
Infinity, Onkyo. Ar. and others. Ask 
about our easy terms. Hours- 12-6 pm. 
Closed Sunday md Monday. 

Per Infematienal Rock... 

•***lggy Pop**** 
Slut Boys & Implications 
Nov. 23 at Tommy's w/ guest 



THE PUB 
No Cover Charge! Winko LJIZZ. One 
Man Band-Raftlme, Dixie Land, 
Bluegrass, Singalong, A Urban 
Cowboy Music. Piano, Banio, 
Trumpet, String Bass, Harmonica, 
Drums and More!! From 8pm til- 
Prf .# Sot. ontf Sim. 



Oh My, 

THE IMPLICATIONS! 
Fri. A Sat. Night 
Sweetbay Studio B 



COMING NEXT 
•ULLWINKLE'S 
ROTA6ILLA DUO. 



TUESDAY TO 
IS THE 



irs a Reck 'n Roll 1st fer T^fewnf 
Iggy Pop 

Slut Boys A Implications 
Nov. 23 at Tommy's w/ guest Joan 
Jet 



HELP! Skipping town to escape all 
obligations MUST SELL a oair of 
Audio Lab 81 speakers $120 or 
offer. Call Steve 385 6892 ro 644 550$. 



$600 REWARD 
for information leading to the 
identification of the person who took 
our sign at THE PHYRST 
homecoming weekend. 





LOST 

CAMEO AND OPAL RINGS WITH 
AIGNER PURSE REWARD!!222 
5995 



-*f 



collars C#.»»M^*. ' 




-Ci 



"5 K 

Caicu'Ator foianc 
Biag P*rii,f»« J. 



Lost tan wallet w all my IDs. Lost in 
Prince Manor ParkingLot »ov. IV 
Please caN Omi 9^m% or »7 7141 
(work) 



fiplil 



STEP UP TO A HEALTHIER YOU. 

USE STAIRS! 



/MARC MALCOM RMT 
Massage therapy A relaxation/stress 



Giant reward for rings lost m 
Library. WIH pay more than R>ng 
Kingl PleMe return. Call Stacey 644^ 
3991. 



^4 



'4 



iiiong the| 
^om Lof 
•ealfh of 
llcam av a "i 
Amcru 



THE 



NMUUBZ 



10% 



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S,ngal«n9' 



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the day before 




C«mtr iMt V* 

-»«<» hitfltlly ^* 
«• LOW In nit VK . 

Or own 
V |0. If 



With ici' 
CM! 



icuiafof found n/12 m b. 
ag Parking io» c«ti /:4l 
tw««n 6 & 7 fmi to klentitv 

»')Nb A A' A H TALLY TF 
OTS CA.. BETH 




P08TE 
AT MEDIATY 




medicnyp 



WINKO IJI«^ 

M Man Mat, 



4 .0^010^^* 



Florya 



igorous competition awaits 
fSU harriers this weekend 



BY DARItN ANDREU • 
^»MM ToTm:nAi«KM; 

. ^ , ^eminolc cross country team 

wriic a new chapter in How Vm 

^ Won this weekend as they tmvd 

ItionK of Mount St. Helens for the 
A omen s Cross Country 
lip in Seattle, Wash, 
pulled the rug froBi under 
^0 year champions Alabama, 
•^e regionals two weeks ago by 
meshing a Londoner, a 
>o northeastemers and three 
a> vvell as two new coaches. 
ylK. the magic will still be there 



Ir 




■The biggest thing was to win our region, 
Mvme as the number one team for 
IC explained the first year harrier 
Roger Smith. "Everything we've 
'■ f all has been geared towards the 
J national championships, 
at we do in these meets that wiB 
r-v barometer to measure our success.*' 

. weekends ago at the regionals the 
i was forecasting a hi^ pressure 
l uscaloosa, Al. But ensotionally 
d for the meet, the Lady 'Noles 
) weathered the competition in a 
tnnce Smith termed a "t(^ team 
We won with seven team members, 
vtii individuals.** 

his team thing, it*s quite food ay?" 
^ Mvpret Coomber, the Seminoles 
?r one niiuier, and most experienced 
i the seven. A former *72 Olympiui 
London, England, she brings her 
^ of international experience to the 
isi "freshman**, in search of a degree 
\iiericafl competition, 
iietttting from the 29-year-old 
's experience are junior team 
inDwienAndreu andfellowHoridians* 
^ EUe and Bunny Bradov, both 
niB. Also on the squad are 
"^ores Gale Grant, a Canadian, and 



Mary mmk% and Lisa Rhodcn, who hail 
from New Jersey and Philadelphia, 
respectively. 

* 'We have proven we tfe for ml and we 
win do it again itt the aatiooals," promised 
Rhoden. 

Last year the Lady 'Noks feO to a low 
22mi ninkins at nationals and are 

determined to improve on that 
performance. With numerous noted 
distance powers such as bst year's winner, 
NC State, as well as Oegon, Penn State, 
UCLA, and Cal Poly., competition wiU 
undoubUbly be stiff. But Smith is 
^Mi^dmt. 

''We have the character to run well. We 
run saying not 'where mm I, imt where is 
the team,* *'he said. And what's exc^g is 
that we are very consi^ent. You can set 
your watch by us!" 

Not as consistent because of usuries but 
equally as determined to do well this 
weekend is the men's team under John 
Brogk, which steps to the line Satmrday m 
its Regional Competltkm inGreenville,SC. 
"We've got as good a chance as anyone,'* 
Brogle predicted about a n^et that is 
expected to draw at least 40 teams. "This is 
the largest region in the country and in my 
opinion, the toughest." 

Only the top five teams in the region will 
advance to next weekend's national 
competition, in addition to the top six 
individual qualifiers. 

TheSeminolequalifying effort will be led 
by Larry Greene and Herb WiUs, who may 
quHSSy Mhriihialiy if the team doesn't, 
%ogle noted. Also competing will be Larry 
Shackleford, coming off a sprained ankle: 
John Modge, Brett Hoffman, Doug 
Overfdt and Marc Trigg. 

"We're looking forward to this meet," 
Brogle added. "Qualifying for nationals is 
a goal we'd like to accomplish this year but 
k will take a strong performance to realize 
that goal 



FLAMBEA U PICKS 



BY WAYNE DEAS 



The curtain is up and the acton are on 
stage for the final scene n the box office 
smash hit, Gtms Wkgrw I'm GoUm New 
Ytmr's Day. Yes fdlks, this tiiow wii rank 
r^t up there wkh such biggies as Gofir ir/i* 
the Wind. Jmm, and AbboimnlCe^tta 
Meet FnmkmtMn. It roBs drama, susfKBse, 
and comedy faito one giant packafe and 
proraiies to have hi^ Its auiBenoe on thdr 
feet dapping and shouting, whBe the rest arc 
caught b et w ee n bewikkrment and anger. 
%iff ff i fl te widi disoleasure. 

Well, tltts season has oerttttidy brought 
great drama. With Florida losing to second- 
ranked Georgia in the test 63 seconds of the 
game on a desperate, Ust gasp 93 yard 
touchdown pass, only the "Burning of 
Atlanu" scene in Gable and Le^'s 
masterpiece can mulch it. 

Guess Whm Pm Gomg Year's Day 
depicted the essense of suspense when 
linebacker Paul Piurowski body slammed 
quarterback Jeff Quinn to salvage a 18-14 
Florida State victory over Nebraska at 
Nebraska, with 13 seconds on the clock. And 
how about when heralded runner (I mean 
steamroller) George Rodgers of South 
Carolina fumbled the football away on the 
Georgia 15 yard line to end a game winning 



drive which woohi have mmd Geoigia's 
undefdMcd record. Now HM can oidy be om- 
done by the death scene in Jaws which saw 
the massive Ckcat While Sh»k blown to biit. 

And comedy! What pun ea wwd y l 

Then Nnmber One Alabama's 
tottch^nlest defeat at the hMds of 
Mississippi (?) was simply hilarious. And the 
light of None Dame's scramble hke a Tiddler 
cr^ on the beach for a 3-3 tie agat^t 
pathetic Geo^ Tech can only be surpassed 
by the obese Costdlo's record-brcakmg 100 
yard iksh after his first look at Frankenstein. 

So what will the final scene of this 
blockbuster foretell. Read on, because N-vules 
having a 4-0 record last week and a 20-9 mark 
as a prognosticator, 1 also moonlight as a 
sneak preview movie critic. 

Alabaaui (S-1) vs Notre Dame (74>-U: 
Neither of these two should even be allowed 
to vie for the National title in the Sugar Bow I 
considering the caliber of the teams they 
floundered against. But that's poll bowl 
politics and the odds are in favor of the 
winner going. They should both be cursed 
with a tie. Unfortunately no witch doctor is 
available. Alabama by 7. 

Georgia (94)) vs Auburn (5-4): AP says 
Georgia's Number One. UPI says Georgia is 
Number One. That's hogwash. Auburn by 9. 



FSU hosts SESL soccer tourney 



BY CHRIS BROCKMAN 



It's a soccer pfaiycr's dream and a soccer 
fan's dream come true this weekend cm the 
Intramural Fields as nine of the South 's top 
soccer teams vie for the Southeastern Soccer 
League Chanqnonship. 

The FSU soccer chib, defending champs m 
the M-ycar-old tournament, will open the 
weekend's shite with a 9 a.m. match with 
AhdNnna.The chib then playi agahiSaturday 
at 3 p.m. versus Georgia Tech. 

"We are among the favored teams, ' ' noted 
chib president Rosano DiGiovacchino, who 
organized the event with Paul Dirks and 
Bemie Waxman of IM department. "We're 
among the best teams and w e have the home 



field advantage. Last year we ceruinly 
weren't favored.** 

Saturday's schedule has, in addition to the 
two FSU contest, Mississippi State meeting 
Florida and LSU taking on Auburn at 9 
a.m.; Florida and Tennessee. LSU and 
Kentucky, and Alabama and Georgia Tech 
clashing at 12:30, and at 3 Mississippi State 
takes on Tennessee and Kentucky meeu 
Auburn. 

On Sunday, the semifinals are slated for 9 
a.m., the consolmion game will be at 11 and 
the championship match will be at 1 p.m. All 
games will be played on the IM fields and the 
tournament trophies will be awarded 
immediately afterwards. 




The 
Spirits Shoppe 

83fo © . 



^^OLD FASHIONED GENERAL STORE 

Maiuoa Straat 

^OSSFROMGANDY PRINTERS) 

^^«»iiB It , we've got it or we'll get It 



Slav Warm 

M like a 

mUUam haakil 



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clotkiN 



Cobles 



Bookcases 
Used Books 

Sheets & Pillows 
Curtains. Drapes 
K^han Utensils 

* 

unt with student l.D. 



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Florida Flambeau 



cfjOHDir 

N^arm but nmy today «itN 
50 percent chance of ihoi^^er*. 
Lous m the 50i tontiht. 
Cooler tcmpcraittres 
tomorrovk . 



^ns ^ >uytMBtR 17. im 

issension 



S£R VINGTALLAHASSLL FOR M YEARS 



VOL. U, mi 49 



among the troops 

olitical views differ 
n the evangelical right 

BY VICKl MONKS 

!, ; c cleciion hoopla over the spectre of a 
pgi/cvJ ^cv^ Chrisiian right*' taking over WashiiigtOB wiB 

Even if it has not materialixed, the idea is loo attractnv to 
^anv people to just fade away: 30 to 6© waSBkm Bora 
1. thinking wkh a singk iniiid and iMtt on 

r d conservative program on America. 
. .cxaies of such a movement, the myth is more 
^ hanthercality. For the detractors, the spectre wiB 

. useful object of fear. Few wiB profit from the 
ion that the ''evangefical bloc" is fraoght with 

sider Larry Jones. Here is a bellowing, Bible- 
jRfring Born Agfan pnactm if there ever was one. An 
ilahoma evangelist, he opens his Sunday morning sermon 
liirChnstianBroadca^iniNetiMMt witha lande i^ainst 
dxevih of the ERA. asserting the amendoKnt has a rider 
would give bomoeexuak equal ri^ts and allow them 
lodi in the pubfic schools. 
iHi then he goes on to other issues: "Rk* ChriitiMS are 
ffilly raping Third World countries.*' he dedares. "Hiey 
i«o poor coumiics and pay workers a doBw a day just 
wane they can get away with it, and that's wrong. There's 
|oi to be some more equal <fistribution .* ' 
Ob foreign policy: "Our foreign poUcy dqiends on how 
iich Amercan BKmey a invested in a country and not on 
m homanitariui or Chntai prnMiples. AH the aid does is 
M off t he ri^ to mmtt hi a country. It's a business deal. 
II mot Christian." 

On domestic moraMty: "This country is spending $35 
idiion a year OB advertising to say that Jesus was wrong, 
^'re telling you wtet kind of tins or that you've tfit to 




Jeny FlUwdi o/ Morai Majority m&y not deas po¥mfid 4ts Um^inetL Though he dmms lo represent 
CMrtkms^htrnMythmisnoiihecme 

have. Every day 14,000 people starve to death. 1 don't have 
to have Calvin Klein blue jeans so everybody can look at the 
label and say 'hey, he's cool.' I can spend SI 5 on a pair of 
jeans and send the other $15 to help feed a hungry child.*' 

On the environment Jones opposes strip mining because, 
he says, Christians must serve as ''stewards*' to protect 
God's creations. 



Or consider this 39-ycar-old mother of three cMldren« « 
former school bus driver and bakery manager hi CTiappaqua, 
New York, who now devotes her working life to fulfilling her 
''mission" as a ^'born again, charismatic, evangelical 
Christian." Her name Is Lorraine Wolfson. 
"This business oi mMim pcmes and leHgiori is very 

Turn to EVANGELICAL page 8 



Playmate says she exploits Playboy 



B\ ni FFN M.LISTON 

SPH Ul rO THI FLAMSEAti 

Thedo\^ntown Hihon was full of the 
^ the Rorida Stereo Expo on Saturday, the 
Kcond day of Custom HiFi's Sale 
^ravaganza. The Florida Room om the 
<coiid floor brimmed with salespeople in 
((durts, buyers, lookers, monntaias of 
^Waem. and a Pktfboy Playnutte. 
1.12 Glazowski, t^fOl* Miss April,, sat 
^Bd a desk lAMiognbiy too sinall, 
*<or»phing 5x7 glossies of herself. Wary of 
5*'»dyti2ing women Imervlewers, she had 
noted to know if this prospective 
«miewcr "was a feminist** or would be 
^crested in discussing '^emii^ crap." She 



'^"^ ben warned about 



who seek 



"ont 



at ions with Pfaqmmtes to tctt theai g 



^ * npioited they are. 
She disagrees. 
*f shouldn't have worried. To convince 
conitni and opiniooatcd woman of being 
J would not only have been 
e. but equally foolish. She praises 
t unities" Pleyboy has given her, 
' about her appraisal of her salary 
aphing selfportraits and meeting 
^ ^he sees herself as the exploiter, and 
'V»6(ii her supplier of an exhorbitant. if 
^'teouicd yUary. 




Gkaawddf pktymme 



EML: Do Playmares really \^riie iheir owft 
data sheets, or are they done for you. 

LG: We write our own data sheet and 
stuff like that, but an editorial person writes 
up the rest. ,^ 

EML: Are your quotes in the article 

atxuraie? 



LG: /^l^nteiy tt the type of magazioe that 
has to ^ipeal to the pi^, so they kind of 
^iced up what I said, and some of the things 
they worded differently. Actually, they 

rewtemostofit. 

EML: W9^^ you become a burmy? 

LG: A Playmate; 1 got started with 
Playboy }mi out of curiosity. . . I was in the 
25th Anniversary Playmate Hunt last 
January, and 1 never expected to get 
accepted. . .it just happened. . .1 was just in 
the right place at the right time. 

EML : What did your parents say ? 

LG: My parents freaked out. . .they were 
pretty upset about it, but 1 wasn't living at 
home at the time, so it was OK. They were 
mad for awhile though. 

EML: Are you the oldest child? 

LG: No, I have one older brother. . . 

EML: So this was the first big thing to 
happen to you? 

LG: I think I made history in my 
neighborhood. . they've accepted everything 
so far though. I've done a lot of travelling, 
and a lot^ot opporiuniiies have opened up for 
me since then, so now they're kmd of proud 
of me ! i ed to be a secretary. 

EML Do your parents ktm the issue 

Tarn to PLAYMATE, page 6 



Angry wdmen mark 
assault locations 

vnrtm miss tsimf- ation al 
ANN ARBINI, — A itoup of 

ang'ry fcmate vigilantes,, sa>ing **wiwien. are 
just afraid to go out at night," sprayed 
bright red signs proclaimir% "A Woman 
was Raped Here" m. about iS0 hicaiioRS 
around the a^. 

The s^ woe the w^ark of about 70 
women, w^ used cans of red paint to 
conduct what they called the "guerilla 
jictton** after dark Thursday in the 
hopiedty t^the University of Michigan. 

Members of the group asked not to be 
Jdoitified by name for fear of crifntnal 
charges Thtn said the signs were painted at 
spots where women reportedly have been 
sexually assaulted in th».past two years 'no 
show ever> one the kind of fear which v mm 
everywhere, but sppifically here m Ann 
Arbor, havetohvcwiii^rydav " 

Ehune Siskoof tl» FSU Women s center, 
whiehiias bcai organizing tr stem the 
rising assault rate in Tallahassee, said she 
thou^t such tactics helped publicize the 

IMToblem. 

**l think it sensitiw the wsue." she said. 
"Rathe^ll^ offer a dry statistic, it helps to 

offm n^^rong miOre cO'ncrete, something 
that really brings it home " 





HI * • 



ait' 



r. 

1^ 



Slit- 




2 / Monday, November 17, 1980 FkMri^ fiuiibeaii 






MONDAY, NOVBMM1 17, 1980 



Student Government wants YOU 



VOLUME 1 




OL 




Annual Gator Gig Delayed 

OK all you Gator Hatin' 'Noles, here is the official 
word on THE Game. The yearly whipping of that 
obscure university somewhere in the dusty 
backwoods of central Florida will take place on 
Dec. 6, 1980 at 12:30pm EST in Doak Campbell 
Stadium. ALL TICKET COUPONS MUST BE 
EXCHANGED THIS WEEK. There are to be no 
coupon exchanges the week of the game. 

The ABC television network will broadcast the 
carnage live and in color, so get your Garnet and 
Gold and show America who is really the ^\ team 
in the nation! GO NOLES!!! 



FOR YOUR INFORMATION 

Stndrat Employment Office offers job lutings 
for part-time jobs available in Tallahassee. Need a 

tutor- or typist? Come see us. We're located on the 

second floor of the Union. 

Students With Children, 3 to 4 years of age, 

who wish to be considered for enrollment in the 
Education Research Center for Child 
Devebpment, shouki go to the Center office at 
37Q Hall Drive (near the Stone Building) for 
informatk>n and applications. The application 
period runs from November 17 to 26. For more 
information call the Center office at 644-4280 
from 8 am to 4 pm. Fees are based on a sliding 
scale. 

UPO International Speaker will be speaking 
later this quarter instead erf on November 18. 



Office of Student Body Vice-Prcsidcnt- 

• Volunteers needed to put announcements on the 
Student Government sign board. Males preferred. 
Please contact Johnetta Mallory at the S.G. Office 

or call 644-1811. 

Florida Students Asaociation-$l 0,000. 00 Minimum salary, based on 
ability. Position now open for Executive CHrector. This is a FULLTIME 
position, based in Tallahassee. Qualifications required: Excellent 
communication skills, research al^lity, knowledge of legislative process, 
admifiistrative and managerial skills, and knowledge of student needs and 
concerns. The executive director, chief administrator of the Rorida Student 
Association, Inc., shall be responsible to the Board of Directors for fiscal 
management: including assisting the Secretary /Treasurer in the preparation 
and presentation of financial statements to the Board of Directors at regularly 
scheduled meetings or upon the request of any member of the Board The 
executive director will also be responsible for newsletter. The executive 
director shall conduct day-to-day business of the Florida Student Association, 
Inc. in accordance with the policies of the Board, and shall serve as the 
primary spokesman for the Board. 

Submit resuems and letters of recommendation to Rob Auslander, Room 
224 University Union. Florida State University. 

DEADUNE FOR SUBMISSION IS DECEMBER 12, 1980 




Nov l"-) S(T!4h s*.:, -J,,, 

Nov r. 

Nov 



MEETINGS, MEETIMCS 

Garnet And Gold Key membership 
meeting on Nov. 17, 1980 in Longmirc 
Lounge at 7:30 pm. There will be voting 

on new members. 

College Republicans will meet 
Tuesday at the Plaza Apt. J-1. Sally 
Monore, Presdient of Republican Women 

of Tallahassee will speak on 
"Republicanism". Refreshments will be 
proved by Bev Shoupp. 
Seminole Dive Club meets every 
Wednesday at 6pm in Rm 118 Bellamy 
to plan weekend dives to the Gulf and 
local spring and sink dives. Don't let your 
gear rot in the closet— come )oin us and 
dive more often. If you are interested, but 
unable to attend the meeting, pi^u^e call 
Mark Chalklev at 576-6649. 



Circle K Service Club mtv:^ 
Tuesday in Rm 49 Bellamy Dn 
your chance to get involved m : 
worthwhile organization. 
FSU Women's Center will hold 
.general meeting on Tut'^dav. Nov !^ 
7:30 pm. Winter quarter program 
and projects will be discussed For im 
information please call 644-4007 
Government Students Associttk) 
presents another informal g» ' 
meeting. Country selection for 
Times for D.I.S. classes Winter 
and Bake sale and upcoming Carua^ 
Thursday night at 6:30 in room 0^ 
Bellamy Bldg. 




SPECIAL EVENTS 

Humanities Union of Graduate Students presents Dr. Audrey Wilson of 
the FSU program in the Humanities in a discussion of "Faust", Thursday, 
Nov 20, at 3:30 pm in Rm 128 Diffenbaugh. A musical presentation is 

included. 

**Froni Montgomery to Memphis,** the story of Martin Luther King, Jr., will 
be shown at 7:30 Tuesday night, Nov. 18. at the United Ministires Center, 
548 West Park Ave. Dr. Herbert Alexander, professor of Education at FAMU, 
will lead a discussion following the film. This presentation is part of a series, 
"Significant Peacemakers of the Twentieth Century." 

BSU, FAMU and FSU Student Senate present Johnny Makatini of the 

African National Congress in a discussion of blacJt nationalism, on Monday, 
Nov. 17, at 7:30 pm in Charles Went wood Theatre on the FAMU campus, 
and again on Tuesday. Nov 18, at 2:30 pm in Rm 67 Bettamy. The liim 

"Generations of Resistance" will also be shown. 

16th Annual UPO Mackigal Dinnen will take place on Dec. 4, 5 and 6, in 
the University Battrocnn. lhas festive oecaskm is a tiacMtion wliidi OHitinues to 
improve with age. Tickets are $10 per person, and cover an e)«:e^t meal 
of Beefe BiHgundy... House of Sliger, scones, and flaming plum pudcitoig, as 
well as the music «ul merriment <^ the Madrigd singers. Tkdcets are avi£ible 
in fkm Ui^ Tldiet Oifk:e. 




Mainstage, Music & Moore 

FSU Mainstagc Theatre presents Cn^*^ 
Blood, a new Sherlock Holmes Mystery bv^^; 
Giovanni. Performances will be Nov 1^ /^ ; 
& 22, and Dec. 3, 4, 5 & 6 Fm n 
informatk>n contact the Theatre Box Uiuc« 
644>6500 or 644-6501. 




FSU School of Music presents a series of 
Special Events. Jazz Ensemble. Tues. Nov. 18- 
8:15pm Ruby Diamond;Kenneth Gilbert, 
Harpsichord-Guest Artist. Fri. Nov 21-8: 15pm 
Music Sch. North; UF & FSU Men's Glee Clubs. 
Fri. Nov. 21-8: 15pm Opperman Music 
Hall;Trombone Ensemble, Sun. Nov. 23-8: 15pm 
Opperman Music Hall. 

MwteaAtifonM 

Monday-Casablanca Rroihers 
Tuesday-Seven Brides for Seven Brotn^r 
Wednesday-P S. Stay As You Are 
Thursday A Cteckwork Orange 

Friday-All That Jazz ^ 
Satuiday-Wiffner Brothers Cartoons 





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Nov 18-DeGraff Open He 
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Nov 21-D€viney Th«m» 

wtth movie "Shain;!^' 



Club meets evity 
i^elldmy. Don't nniss 
!t involved in I'lis 
ion. 

ieiiter will hold a 
uesday, Nov. 18 at 
juarter proyramm ag 
discussed l or more 
ill 644-4007. 
[ents AMOclati< 
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iectio n for H a i v . ; r^| 
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pcoming Carv^^- 



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Moore 

■pes Mystery by Pau 

Nov. 19. 
{ & 6 For nior* 
Ltre Box OiUce 




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I [oons 




\atural gas rate hikes may 

^arm city's energy future 



IRHC FALL FROl $ ■ 



IVDANNIVOGT 

oitiiral ga^ in homes is three to 
^ efficient as using it to spin 
^ wAt ekcuiciiy at the city's 

,«,r«tablishing a strong policy of 
ZZ the city's gas network now, 
could avoid the expense of 
-0 the ctty's etectricity plant in ten 

[nd «A ■'^"^^ 
Utoinfliieiice the city's energy policy 

» it will be prepared for the 

as I steadily growing Tallahassee is 
-r.id»ftceiiithc 1990s. 

\a is chairperson of the Utilities and 
Services Committee of the 

ini«ee/Uon County Local Energy 
: an Program. LEAP for short, the 

P WIS formed last January to answer 
/. lob Graham's challenge to make 

law a model community for energy 

;n«ioa in Florida. 

ioncs, a semi-retired consitlUuit 
I Kirac^ engineer, is opposed to the way 
City CoBBDission imposed a hike in 
ifilgis prices last week. 

'• *as the strong position of a city gas 
.:iant that the gas system should be 
Jed drastically and quickly — it's 
itagnani for 15 years," Jones said 
day in a telephone interview. 
.>ing the rates would directly counter 
recommendation. We (at LEAP) would 
ttvcdone it in two or three stages." 

ncs also observed the rate increase 
I as large as it seemed at first, since 
a^aty used to add a hefty fuel adjustment 
i ardiaie to each gas bUl, making the old 
9pear disproportionately lomr than 



"The key issue," Jones maintainad, •% 
that gas is a superior fuel that deserves a 
premium price because of its lack of 
pollution, ease of handling, the less 
expensive equipment required to burn it, 
and the fact that gas delivered to the 
customer is three to four times more energy 
efficient than gas burned at the power ptet 
to make electricity." 

LEAP'S six month progress report HQfi 
end use efficiency (ratio of energy output to 
input) is between 20-28 percent for gas used 
to make electricity at the city's Arvah 
Hopkins Power Plant, compared to 85 
percent , for gas-fured hot water heaters, 
furnaces and boikrs. 

"Going to gas would postpone 
indefinitely the need to add another boiler 
generating station at Hopkins," Jones 
claimed. 

However, not everyone takes Jones at his 
word. Longtime City Commissioner James 
Ford said that when Hopkins was being 
built, several years ago, he heard almost the 
same claims made against gas and in favor 
of oil for use as fuel at the power plant. 

Jones feels the situation has changed. 

"About 80 percent of the oil used at 
Hopkins is imported, while 99 percent of 
the gas used is domestically derived, "Jones 
observed. "And that oil is imported from 
very unstable countries — and recent events 
underscore that. 

"Natural gas also has an additional 
safety factor in that it is adaptable to 
synthetic fuel programs. The boilers can be 
a^^pt^irf to synthetic coal gas easily," he 
said. 

"In the event natural gas supply drops m 
the next 50 years, synthetic natural gas will 
be ready to take over," Jones said, adding, 
"the controls on it are now being lifted 
nationwide." 



Center defends abortion practices 



BY DUNNE GREGORY 
ruMKAu STAFF Warm 

'*Wt Lynn Hayes, who claims shfe 

hospftilizcd after an incomplete 

at the Feminist Womoi's HealA 

terofTalbhassee, filed suit agamst the 

in Leon County Circuit Court on 

^.formalpracticc. 

* is not the first time in its sbi year 
'he Health Center hia been sued for 
^aaicc after abortiwis. 
fast five other malpractice suits have 
fiied against the Health Center, 

r^'m misdiagnosis of the mge of 

i^'^n^-y and other complkratiotts 

^ng from the abortion process. 

J-^'y Grev. a spokesperson for the 
r'^Center said. "Hospitals and private 
?et sued all the ume and it doesn't 

- n the newspaper." 

explaine^i it is the policy of the. 
ij^^hat anyone has the right to sue for 
l^^iceand they support that right. 
.^^^ ri!ed suit after she was billed bv 
(ttt^f ^'^'"^rial Regional Medical 
Tjn ^'^'^''^^^^on after an abortion 
^"^'at the Health Center, according to 
dTr^' W Corry. Hayes 

;»ked ihe Health Center to pay the bill 
|. /J^^^^ldihai they would "think about 
at this point that Hayes 



^ a lawyer. 



The resultant brief, filed at the Leon 
County Cira^ Court, states that Hayes is 
fiHng for damages in the amount of $5 ,000. 

Corry said he thought the problem 
stemmed from a lack of cooperation 
between doctors in Tallahassee and the 
Health Center, particularly in the foUow-up 
care provided after the abortion. 

Kenda Joyner, a member of the beard ot 
dkectors at the Health Center, explained 
that follow-up examinations after an 
aborrion are usually conducted by lay 
health workers employed by the Center. 

Joyner also asserted that the 2 percent 
com^ation rate for the Health Cem«^« 
bdow the nauonal average of about 5 or 6 

^Joyner explained that after an anti-trust 
suit brought bv the Health Center^in^ 
several doctors in the Faiiahassee area W 
fettled out of court several years ^. 
doctors in town have been more 
cooperative in providing health care 
services to the Center, but there are suU 
problems in that area. 

Joyner also stated that ^J^^'''' 
Rafai.who Performed the abom«« and 

was also named ;i:^\;ZtJ^ 
Hayes , .s no longer ^^^^ ^he 
Center. Joyner indicated 
Center before the suit was fOed, but did noi 

explain his reason ^oi^^ 



FWida F1anib4 ay Moiwfiv. N o vc ii ttigr ft. I9w 3 



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4 / Moaday, hiovcmber 17, 1960 Floriia 



Florida Flambeau 



The Honda Flambeau is published by the Florida Flamboui Foundauon, Inc. an 
profit corporation which is solely responsible for the coiMcnis of the p^jMr. 

navMa FlMibcM Fowidaiion. Ik. Newsroom. 204 N Woodward Avenue. piMNK 
address. P O. BmU-lWI. Florida Sute University. Tallahassee. Florida 3230i. 

Sitlncy Bcdingfidd Fditor Vlar\ Tebo 

Bob O'l ary Phoio hdiior Sieve Dollar 

Brad Lision News Editor Chris FarreH 

Clim BrockHian Spons Editor Mdissa Beckham 



independent, noo- 
§•♦■3305; lliilii^ 

Associate tdiior 
Associate Ediior 
Auociate Editor 
An Director 



Learning about torment 

We can imagine the quaver in Jesse Hdm's voice last week as the 
North Carolina Republican encouraged fellow senators to bar the 
Justice Department from initiating court action to enforce sdiool 
busing. "How long are we going to allow the federal bureaucracy in 
the Justice Department to torment the little children in America?" he 
asked. 

School busing, Sen. Helms knows, is not a torment but an imperfect 
solution to a knotty problem. We will all have to bear the ill effects of 
the tonic until a cure or a better remedy comes to light. Unfortunately, 
the Senate's precipitous action could aid busii^ just as it begins to 
pay off. 

Certainly, school busing in the United States has been inconvenient 

at best, and often far worse than that. Violence from anti-busing 
parents and between pupils have marked attempts to segregate schools. 
And it is probably better for children to attend schools in their own 
neighborhoods, though this never seemed an article of faith with 
whites when generations of blacks were bused across town to aU 
bkick schools. 

According to a study just released by Catholic University, though, 
what busing may have b^un to buy for us is int^ated neighborhood 
schools. That's the result of school desegregation's attribution to the 
sharp increases in housing integration. 

Helms* question, stripped of its demagoguery, is **Must we have 
school busing?" Diana Pearce, author of a report based on the 14-city 
study of busing and desegregation, has an answer. Yes, she writes, we 
must have busing "but not indefinitely. If we have metropolitan 
school desegregation, we will have housing integration — and we will 
see the end of busing." 

Broad school desegregation programs, the report explained, taught 
wl^e families they could avoid busing because integrated areas are 
exempt from discrimination plans. In Charlotte, N.C., integration has 
increiksed by 32.7 porccitt since bimog began in 1970. Rktoond, Va., 
saw only 19.5 percent increase in those years. 

Quite often, busing is the only available alternative in' forging such 
broad desegregation plans, and suits brought by the Justice 
Department are often the only means of mandating busing. 
Destroying an admittedly imperfect, even unpleasant tool for fighting 
discrimination just as it begins to work is wrong. Watching the Senate 
destroy the only tool available for integrating schools is a horror. 

That horror may become the hallmark of the new Senate, though 
the old liberals who didn't vote on the busing amendment deserve 
blame for this particular injustice. 

Sen. Kennedy, a liberal who was there, asked "How long will it be 
before le^slation is before thb chunber to remove enviromooital 
cases, prisoner petitions, welfare cases or any other type of case from 
Jo^ice's jurisdiction. . ." 

It's a food ^utestion. The solutions proposed by liberals to social 
prolilems are often unwieldy and annoying, only occasionally 
successful. For all their flaws, though, they represent an 
acknowledgement of the problem. 

• If the conservative answer, though, is to attack these flawed 
solutions and ignore the underlying problems beneath, we may all 
soon learn what torment really is. 



Florida Flambeau Foundauon. Inc. Business and Advertisins Office. 206 N. Woodward Avenue. 
MMiTS; Mediatype lah. 314 Vwimkg Um. phow M4-5744; CT wi m a i Ad OfTice. m 



Rick Johnson General Manager 

Advcftisinf Manner 



Amy Arbogast Production .Manager 

Mtdiliypc ^tanager 




PIRG puts student work to wor 



BY WAYNE BASFORD 

SPECIAL TO THE FLAhOEAU 

"This country has more problems than it should 
tolerate and more solutions than it uses.*' Ralph 
Nader wrote these words in 1971 in a book called 
Action for a Change.*' This book, co-written t>y a 
young attorney named Donald Ross, was a 
landmark book. It tM students how they have the 
potential to become a truly effective force for social 
betterment. It tokl students how they could become 
a force to ensure the application of solutions to 

problems. In essence, it told students how they 
could form a Public Istarest Reiearch Group 
(PIRG). 

As a result of this book, students have a model to 
organize around. And organize they did. On 
hundreds of campuses all across the country, 
students petitioned their fellow students to ask for 
their endorsement of the PIRG concept and the 
PIRG funding mechanian. Most campuses were 
successfully petitioned and the PIRGS were 
established. Some campuses, however, were 
thwarted by the administrators. The students of 
Florida State University fall into that category. 

This failure in 1973 did not deter the students of 
Florida. Other organizing efforts were attempted, 
none of them quite reaching the goal of a strong 
Florida PIRG with a stable funding base. However, 
this year we are committed to succeedii^ in our 
organizing efforts. 

What isaPIRG?APIRGisanorganizationthat will 

enable students to have impact on the social, 
economic, and political issues confronting Florida. 
It is student initiated, student funded, and student 
controlled. It works on issues as diverse as 
consumer rights, human rights, environmental 
preservation, government reform, and corporate 
accountability. The goal of the PIRG will be to 
articulate its research in the media, before the 
various councils of State and local government, and 
when necessary, in the courts. Students will be 
aided in such endeavors by a professional staff with 
expertise in legal, scientific, and social science 
areas. 

ThiDk of the possftiffito: 

•Why can't chemistry students do an analysis of 
pollutants in our water? It would be a learning 
experience and the data collected could be used to 
solve an important problem. 

•Why can't political science students work as 
lobbyists for the public interest in the State 
Capitol? 

•Why can't econortc s students study th^ liical 
effect of banning non-returnable bottles? 

•How about Biology students studying the 
e^ecftioffoodadcfitivcs on our bodies? 
' •Do«n't H make sense to try to diamid soaie of 
the CBormous amount of work that coUege stodenu 
do iolo socially constructive pro jeds? 

Tlink of the c tto t mo i is anouai M work tkat 
coBcfr ttedents do. And each ifoaner it is raid by a 
prof«<x-, graded, tfae» thrown out. If oaly i 



GUEST COLUMK 




<Ui»mAii£Uiilitlmi^< nn . m. .i. ^ — ^ - - *' ' ■ 

tremendous bank of research to bdp us 
society. 

And that's what PIRGs are doini 
country. Thousands of students arc it. 
academic credit for working on PIRG 
Most of them are learning more do ' ' 
project than they would in the average 

The FPIRG organizing commiitec x 
we have just begun to scratch the surfa. 
potential. We believe that when studc- 
with a professional staff to do in-dcptr 
followed up by public education. Imga!; ' 
lobbying, a great deal of social chanfc u 
achieved. 

• Why should students be left with dicmot^-i 
or rallies as their method for achievmi ^ 
change. Demonstrations and marcho arc li 
tactics but they are not the onlv tactic. Nowhcrti* 
written that students should limit thcimehes «f 
tactic. 

Sometimes there is no substitute for 
research to buttress your arguments fof^ 
change. Sometimes a lawsuit is more eficcti^f 
a rally. Sometimes a little lobb)ing car r 
further than a march. 

The point is simply that studenls ^ 
things if they use their heads as wdaiB 
College students are taught iMny W^"** * 
know how to do research, write repor*' 

speaking. . ^ 

There is no reason that $tude«i 
all their knowledge and sk^s to 
society. There is no reason why some 
students do for school caaaoi oc 

meaningful. . . f ,, 

PIRG is the perfat vehicle 
involvement because it focuses sii^ ■ 
constructive channels. It ^J*^", 
college campuses all across the cwm* 
work here too. . .^-Jrtr 

If,o.woiUdliketog«.nvo^«'J^T- 

took for our big P'R^^" ^-^ 

Oecemfcer 3. Your mvdvoiw"' 
MCcasofPIRG. . com*""' 
The FPItO L., 

^ . . . T. nw Jim Crews 

of student invol^f^^iDl^^ail 




percent erf" the icrm pafiers eoHey 

UKfttl 












wrote 



It'' 




for 
a»4 



iprnecul 



Jim 



THcar 

[ipfircn' 



[ii>r;:;. 
'f*»f fffi' 

ion n 



I 



1 

i 

i 
1' 

i 

i 




to wor 

COLUMN 



research to help us imiHov^ 

i'lkCis arc dome acrow " 
Is of students arc gc:: 
working on PIRG projcc 
learning more doing a IMK 
|uid in the average clasv ':; 
ji/iiig committee belicu-s 
to scratch the surface of oui 
(e that when students combii 
staff to do iji-depth 
>lic ecUicaiion, litigation, ir 
Icai ul social chwife CMl 

us be left with dewonsti 
nethod for achieving social 
It ions and marches are 
at the only tactic. Nowhciehij 
should limit themsdves to < 

I is no suMtute for in^^ 

your arfymeats for 
„ lawsuit it inoitc'^*^^^'' 
[a little tebbyins «" 

ly thirt students can cha"! 
sir heads aswdl as their bcK 

Itaughtmanyujrfi^sk^^^^^^ 
icarch, write reports. <lo pw*' 

„ Uiat sttdwB should no" 
, ^ sunk to WP 

sciMOl cMUioi be 

„rfec. vehicle fo'^^ 
.,, focuses student ene. «> 

..,s. It tas 



,o get involvfd P'«»2;„j 

,6 of .he UmverM >U«2; 
'^g PIRG «iucan^« 

ganiiing C""**"^ Sm' 

•his Thu»d.y W ,„ 
Crews, crews •» « 
-n. involvement 
X held ai 7:30 in I IT 




Waves 



World 



IMIfftP PBEikji l.N Tl.ll>AnO!S AL 



PIKING — China said yesterday the Gang of Four, 
H Hv MaoTft-Tuag'twidow facuig triiri wkh six odio' 
;s. murdered more than 34.000 people and 
jcJ a half-miOion citizois durmg the Cultural 

If^oiuiion. 

The charges were detuled in a section of the book-long 
: rT>cnt against the 10 accused which was released to 
Axn^ in an extracml^Ntfy bricfli^ at the fcMrogn 

-n.^lry. 

ICRtiSALEM — Thousands of Israeli workers staged a 
f-lKHir rally outside Prime MInialer McMMhcm Bcgii*i 

i^c yesterday to firotest what they called Begin*s 
(jioinic failures 

TbeaiMioimcement Friday of an 1 1 peiccm infUttioa rate 
October — the highest moalMy f^ure m thim yws — 
added impetus to the rally. 

BANGKOK, Thffiland — A series of explonons that 
apparently started with an accident in a secret rocket 
factory ripped through Thailand's munitions center 
yesterday killing at least 37 people and injuring more than 
)». 



Nation 



WASHINGTON— Sen. Henry Jackson, D-Wash., said 
mtcrday gasoline prices could reach $1.90 a gallon in 
coming months as a result of the Iran-Iraq war — even if 
the fighting ends right away. 

WASHINGTON — The economy will need up to 15 
million new jobs in the next decade just to keep pace with 



the expanding American labor force as more women and 
baby boom members seek work, a congressional report said 

yesterday. 

LOS ANGELKS — President elecr Ronald llcnpMl said 

yesterday he will carry out his campaign promise to cut 
taxes and take other steps which wiU result in '^prosperity 
that will be shared by all.'* 

ASHINGTON — Sen Strom Thurmond, who will be 
chairman of the Republican Senate's Judiciary Committee 
next year, said yesterday he favors repealing the 1%5 
Voting Rights Act to remove federal control of local 
affairs. 

ATLANTA — The president of the Southern Christian 
Leadership Conference said yesterday he suspects the FBI 
is still spying on the civil rights group — but not the Ku 
KIuxKlan. 

Joseph Lowery said the SCLC was aware of FBI 
infiltration in the 1960s, but did not confront known or 
suspected informers because the organization had "nothing 
to hide." 

LOS ANGELiS — Brush fires fanned by 80 mph winds 
scorched more than 25,000 acres of tinder-dry hillside 
yesterday, destroying scores of half-million-dollar homes, 
forcing thousands to evacuate and leading to at least one 
death. 

LOS ANGELES — With trash piling up at the rate of 
9,000 tons a day, city officials met yesterday with leaders of 
three striking unions and said they hoped to end the four- 
day-4^ wikkat walkout by today. 

Mayor Tom Bradley joined the weekend nqiotni^s 
aimed at ending the dbpute ova- a 1 percent difference in 
wages mid benefits. 




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MOST CREDIT CARDS 



6 / Monday, November 17, 1980 Florida FlambeM 



Playmate 



fromf&gtl 



you rein? 

LG: My brother has it, but Vm not sure 
about my mother or father. . .1 don't ask. 

EML: The Playboy arricie gives the 
impresskm tkm you're a "strong OUkoUc" 
who ha come to terms with a different set of 
morals despite it. How accurate is that 
description? 

LG: Well, 1 travel a lot and work mostly 
on weekends, so I only go to mass when I 
can. . .but I'm still a Catholic. . .1 fed that if 
God (Udn*t want me to be in Playboy, 1 
wouldn't be. . «it*s oo.big deal though. 

EML: How do you feel about your Pope's 
recent pronouacemmt on "ht& commkied 
by a man ageinm Im w^"m^ful? 

LG: That's sXfy, i think if a man kx>ks at 
his wife with lo^, she's hicky. . . 

EML: Why was I toU when I called <d)out 
this interview that I could talk to you if I 
dicbi't go info "femm^ Uberation crap?" 
Was that your phrase or just that of the 
person I spoke to? 

LG: Wctt, he said that. . .that's another 
instance where things sometime get mixed 
up. . .1 have just heard a lot of things from 
girls who've had women interview them, and 
they just got reaiy hassled about being in 
Playboy. . .1 don't know if it's just jealousy 
or if they want to really stick it to you or 
what. . .But fortunately, the year I've been 
travelling, I haven't experienced any trouble 
with women. . .1 guess I just kind of asked 
them Are you okay — is she gonna be 
OK. . .is she gonna give me a hard time or 
what» you know, because Til be rude if she 
does. . . I don't think 1 aslied if you ware a 
feminist though. . . 

EML: Do you think that the women who 
get incensed by your c^ppearance in Playboy 
are just by nature jealous or what? 

LG: Oh definitely, lots of jealousy in this 
job, that's why 1 don't like it. . .1 like it but I 
really don't. . .^omen who I know who 
know I'm in Playboy just give me a hard 
time. . .they think I'm after their husband or 



boyfriend. . .and I'm not even working. . . 
and I resent thai because I'm still a person, 
and 1 expect to be treated like one. . Jn my 
business and my personal life. 

ilmerruption) Young make: Vk» cm I have 
ymar autograph ? 

LG: You sure can, as soon as I finish my 
interview. . .and um. . .what was 1 saying? 

EML: Jealousy. 

LG: Oh yeah. . .1 hate this image people 
expect me to live up to just because I'm in 
Pk^yboy, . .1 mean I look ugly sometimes 
too, and my hair doesn't always look good. .. 
people think that 's me in^ magazine, and 
it's not. . . 

EML: What would you like to say to these 
people who hassle you? 

LG: Well, I do tell people who tell me that 
thatlamcxploitiiigP/iTyZw^— I'm theone who 
travels allover and makes $300 a day, and I 
made a helluva lot of money for the 
centerfold. » .and Playboy is a clean 
operation — you don't do anytlmig ^at you 
don't want to, and now I luive enough for a 
sportscar, and I have the advantage. . .these 
people who give me a hassle, they don't 
know. . .they're just jealous of what I have 
and what I've done. . .1 mem, what have 
they done lately? 

EML: Are you interested in moving up 
the Playboy ladder? 

LG: No, this is it for me. . .this has been 
enough. . .1 want to go to school or 
something. I want to experieuce scMnelhuig 
new. 

EML: Have you read the article in the 
Village Voice this week about I>orothy 

Stratten? 

LG: The Village. . .? 

EML: The Village Voice out of New York, 
Anyway, in the article, Teresa Carpenter says 
that "one of the basic tenets of the Playboy 
philosophy is that a woman can be 
possessed, *' and it was the vcuious people in 
Dorothy's life that tried to possess her, and 
her willingness to be possessed, that set the 
stage for her death. What do you think? 

LG: Wdl, I only m^ Dorothy a few times. 




but I think in her case that was probably true. 
Her husband was very possessive, and just 
wouldn't let her go. . .he didn't want 
anybody else to share her. I've met guys like 
that, and you can tell they just want to get 
you into bed. I like to be domioaled by a 



man, but I have to keep mv own mmd • v 
(Another interrupt ion f Youn 
Can I have your autograph ? 
LG: Uh, yeah. . . 
Young mate: Can you tmAe thai (M 

Dave? 



Research shows that beauty is more than 'skin deep 



BY MICH AEL STROUSBEIK; 

FLAMBEAU STAFF WRrTER 

WANTED: Attractife Yong Laiks.Who Can Stop 

Traffic 

WANTED: Women with Poise, PiriOiiMty, TaM & 

^auty for Scholarship Coatest 

WANTED: Women with Leadership, Sciiolattk 



Aristotle called it 'Hhe Gift of God"; Theophrastus 
catted it "The Mute Deception." 

Whatever definition is ascribed to it, beaitty plays a large 
role in everyone's hfe. The three BM>st controversial issues at 
Floricfai State in tiM last six months proved that. 

As different as the controversies were, the FSU 
Scholarship Pageant, the Wine & Cheese Cellar 
advertisement for beautiful women, and the 19§0 
Homecoming elections were all underscored by one 
common denominator — beauty and our reactions to it. 

The pageant was held mostly for scholarship purposes 
bitt critics asked what schokuriy purpose the evening gown 
and swimsuit competition serv«l; the Wine & Cheese Cdlar 
needed widitional waitresses bm critics asked what traffic- 
stopping women had to do with waitresMig. Homecoming 
PrUiccss candidates put up posters to inform students they 
were in the nmaing but critics asked what kind of 
infomuttioh pictures conveyed. 

Omyes of exploration and superfididity were traded on 
all thfee issues. As liways , only tine im able to defte the 
controversies. But what tune caanot defuse, according to 
Hmne ft Family Life instructot Sharya Crotsman, is 
AoMrica's **obsessk>n" with good-looking peof^. She 
even goes as far as saying that we live in a ''pervasive 
beauty culture." 
'*Good looks," she stated, "are a cuttural impenoive." 
Nonsense, we s^r as a natioii. You cm't judge a person 



by his or her looks — everybody knows beauty is only ddn 
deep. Only the superficial could think otherwise. 

John Brigbam, associate professor of psychology 
disagrees. He thinks this is one case where wlutt we hqt Is 
not moessarily what we 



'Until the last 15 years," smd BrigharaL, "k's m& if 
psychologists believed peo]^ when they said attractiveness 
was not an important Hurtor in their lives. But when we 
actui^ started lookii^ at k, we found it ranks high — 
h^her than anything else in a lot of atuatioiis." 

Brigham bases his statement on hundreds of research 
reports which diow that Americans place more emphasis on 
attractiveness than they care to admit . 

According to Brigham, saying ''Beauty is only skin 
deqj" seems to be just that — a saying. 

Grossman feels we've learned the importance of good 
looks early in childhood in characters such as Snow White, 
Afice in Wonderland and Cinderella. In these and other 
characters like them, beauty is always matched with 
desirable • traits like friendliness, virtuosity and 
intelligence. Ugliness, on the other hand, is almost always 
associated with villainy and moral turpitude. 

It isn't just as children that we get this message. As adults 
we get it all the time. Moite and television unswervingly 
portray the hero as attractive and the vilhan as loathsome. 
Grossman asks whea the last time an ugly, or even an 
average-looking, wonum played the lead in a love story. 

On any given show, it is the beautiful people who possess 
material goods, h h the beautifel people who are loved, and 
it is the beautiful people who find succe» and happiness. 

Cromum feels that the mesiate from the rae^ is all too 
clear. "To be attractive," ^ concludes, •% to be 
dcarabte. . To be ima^ractive is not only und^kabie, it's 
imthinkable." 

How intaa mt thM liiedia stereotypes traasfeited to 



everyday life? Perfectly, according to the research 

Beginning with parents and children, there arc 
indicating that parents categorize their children s bcfa 
according to the degree of their attractiveness 

In a study where the only variable change 
attractiveoess of the child, the misbehav ior of gocK. 
kids was perceived by role-playing parents as iesw 
and temporary in nature. But the same misbeha*^ 
attributed to the unattractive children was ^ 
"serious underlying personality fla^^ " ^ 

Many studies have also shown that teachers tenJ ?•> . 
the stereotyping effects of physical attract.venes^ ma^ 
cUttsrooms. In one of the experiments, teachers ^ 
to rate the scholastic and social abilities of ^^^""^^^ 
had never seen before. The teachers ,onsistenil> ?^ 
the attractive children as being mure likely lo r» 
grades and interact better with others 

On the aduh level, the greatest amount of fw» 
focused on dating. The results are almo^'J^ 
Atuactiveness was found to be the most ""P<^^ 
For the most part, these results cariic ^'^^rj^ 
were unfamiliar with each other, but what ^ 
people *'get to know each oihcr^" ^ ^T^jiaf 
magic hold? Resulu arc varied. Some siuuio 
does. But others do not bi^t 

An interesting sidelight to all this .s "^^^^^ 
the **Halo effect."In a well-known ^"^^'"^[^ • 
asked to rate the attractiveness ot a . 
looked the same) when he walkeJ 
girlfriend — a woman made up to be aui^ 

ugly. nrtdJook'^^ •^"^ 

When the man walked in with the 8^^^ 
subjects rated him as significantly more 
he walked in with the ugly woman 



« 




VR-5C 



^>^^ VECtDPWB 



VR-5(X 



|o keep my own nmid too. . . 
Truptkm) Ymuig mole: 

you make that oat to 



deep' 

ing to the research. 
cfaOdren, there are studies 
zc tlieir chiWrcn s behavior 
attractiveness. 

variable change vvas the 
misbehavior of good looking 
ying parents as less serious 
,ut the same misbehavior 
ic children was seen « 

Haw." ^ ^ 

n that teacher^ tend lo brif^ 
lical attractiveness into th^ 
,menis, teachers were asked 

al abilU.es of children th^ 
cherscons.sienilN pcrcc^eU 
g more iikeiy to gci i^o^ 

'cLTlmount of research 
, 3,, almost too obv^us 
ihe most Hiiportantf^ 

^scame from ^"^^^^^^ 
but what about aft^r Uie 

her?- Does bea«tyJoj^ 
. Some studies $ho«f 

„lU.s.swhatBriib^f, 

>wncxperimem P^^^ 
•ss of a man 

,p lo be either oe» 
ntly more tivrnv 



ick Struggle featured tonight. .* . 



fBOMfTAFFRFJt)rrS 

, , Sogfh Africa" will be the theme of a lecture 
,efllBd by Johnny Makatini, United Nationt 
Soatk Africa's black guerilla force, the 
mooif Congress, tonight at 7:30 p.m. in Florida 
^ M and at Roridft State tomorrow U 2:30 



The Af ric— Nrtio— I 
as well as an armed 
within South Africa to win ecoBonk aad potttic^ 
cwwfu i uti s from the afliteaailQrf^aovcnaeal. 

The kciuret are sponsored by FAhfU Sti^ott 
Govenment, FSU Bbch StadHM Uirioa. aai the Geal0 
for 



and black leader remembered tomorrow 



^.^ Honuumery to Mmpkis, a two 
^ on the life and work of dvU righte 
Miftin Luther King Jr. wiil be 
the United I^Mstries Center 

'30 p.m. 

Alexander of Florida A&M wiU 
30 tke significance of IHai and 
i.isoflBoa afterward. 



This is the sixth of the "Significant 
Peace-makers of the 20th Century" aeries 
featured by the Center. 

King was assasinated in Memphis, 
Tennesaee in 1968. Prior to that he became 
the youngoit man ever to win the Nohd 



The Ui^d Miiditries Co^ is located at 
S4S Weat Pwit Ave. 



IN BRIEF 



smmm u)v:s to rick'S" and rick's is 

CiaMan.a and Casablanca is the movie tonight on the 
Dfilm Series at 7:30 in Moore Auditorium. Admission 

KL Wll I BK A FRATERNITY MANAGERS' 

xiay at 4 p m in 214 Tally followed by a sorority 
nccnni' a I 4:30. 
nif IM ( ROSS COl NTRY RUN WILL BE HELD 
:4 f (mic bv the IM office and sign up. 
LTA sK.MA MFMBERS CONTACT ONE OF 
aitowing officers; Tamara Payne, 644-3620, or Laurie 



U.$. MARINE CORPS 

Platoon Leaders Class 




ELIGIBLE: College 
fshmen, sophomoTes, and juniors; 

I'aCOMMISSlOMNG TRAINING: Two 

s^x week training sessions during two 
h"''ner uacations. 

mmc LOCATKM: 

p5€. Quantico, VA 

M-CAMPUS TRAmmC: None 

BNKnON REOUIRBMENT: Must be 

molkd in College as a full time student. 

"^TE OF COMMISSIOimiC; M PLCs 

I ^^commissioned Second Lieutenants 
r^iately after college graduation. 

FARTIMC PAY: Up to $18,700,00 

Mnnuotfy. 

^ Int8iiigenc8 ONlctr 
'|»fTf Police ottlcer 
^"•^nic Control 
*sing otiicir 
- 1 Olficep 
,J«ici ofticer 

niodt omcep 
'^'"anicaiions 
i otticep 



\:t3 H«Mi IM 

1I« 



ino 





TANTLY FOR 

lass rings 

NO OTHER JEW' 

10 3 00 M F 



1^ 



Reynolds, 644-3640. 

GEOGRAPHY STUDENTS: ORGA^ilZATIONAL 

meeting for Gamma Theta Upsilon, a geography honor 
society, today at 4 p.m. in 315 Bellamy. Plans for canoe trip 
and field trips will be discussed. 

ATTENTION ADULTS! WANT TO BRUSH UP ON 
your reading and writing skills? Lots of grandparents and 
parents have decided to come to the FREE classes and 
catch up on their education. For more education call 487- 
1414. 

GENERAL SCIENCE IS OFFFRLD AS AN ADULT 
evening class at Godby High School on Monday evenings at 
7. Stop by the Godby High School office on any Monday 
evening to register. For more information call 489-1325. 



SPECIAL DOUBLE SAVINGS 

on your 
COLLEGE RING 



ftOjQO dtocomit on an UMriiMi 

FantaaMc trada^n vahiaa onyour 
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to 

ORDER 



Ptaoo. Union Stora 

Omo. liov. Itr 19# at Timo ta. 

Dopoait required 



.-4 p.m. 



OL 




<t VARSITY SH 
TENNESSEE Si 




for most maior universitits 

implav tdiool prMt or cotiect orna- 
ments for all codeges Give appropriate 
ornaments to alumnus student or sup- 
pofter of any school . Appreciative gift for 

la . - 




LacMSV 

in snimmering spun satin are embla- 
zoned on both Sides mVn your univer- 
sity^sr ' ■ * ^ - 



OmaflMals Available: 



Micnigan Stale 



• Alat>ama 

• BaN State 

• Bowling Green • Missouri 

• Central MidMgan • Nebrasiu 

• CineiniHa •NorttnMSlwn 

• Clemson • Notre Dame 

• Eastern liicti«an • Otw Umversity 

• Ftoridi •omsm 

• Florida SMi • Okianoma 

• Illinois • Oklahoma State 

• indiani 

• Iowa 

• lowaSiato 

• Kansas 

• Miami (Ra ) „ 

• Miami (Ohio) 

• Michigan 

^.Sfaa. ppti J A I'-i <i J i>pd. 
(mdudfSil shipping/ rwi(}!>ng charges) 



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P 0 Box 21 187 



ScJioot 

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9ese« Mi 3ftu»m 



.Lil.4ihlL fiJlii,liHiliiiliyiiffliuiiiL..._ __ 



lliijilf^i^Jaiiii^iiMitiiiiliii 



I II ..... ui[E(i^L{.i.il[jLiiuiki . , I I .kb<ix.„L^I AMkik tiU . 



„.,iii,tJ.M. .j„ljiil,.L .tkJ&i^ili,. i,iillli..i..,i,i„LiU( lIl. .teA.lilLiilii MU, .^diNiliiL, k..Llu,«iil,ly,liUJ ... L,.L.,M,lLii 



liii|||yjbli^l:tiiiftkili.:!l[:ilM:!!ll;Uil;i|.;i 



uiijlLLl.^.ky^liLli^iliLdllL< Luiintiiklh. I 



.i.tjLi^j^i.j.LiLlhu.iillllJlil.ilLijJ^y. jk.l.iUl*Lifc)ik9»J.J.Lillie^lFdlJFik 



£(bii^Lt!i!i>ii!iUiyiiiiiiiiii;ii!ii 




f I 



• / Monday. November 17, 1980 FleiMa FlaiiikcJNi 




■fit! 





ijli 



"'•"'Ullj'"' 



I 



h i III 




'4 



Evangelical 



din Nazi 




4&B§fwnm It afanost reminds ne of wtet 
Germany. I don't Wkt btxng iunped i 
politicatty with this group trying to tell people hoir to vole. 
I thnk M hii«f people fed the mie way. 

"The picsf has got it mixed up. They haven't taken the 
tone to taOc to ofdinary evangelicals and see how many ones 



'Christianity is an individual thing with each person. No 
two people have the same exper ie nce with it Each has their 
own and each ministers in his mm way. 

**l think it's hi^^ortant to vole — I believe all that — but 
1 cast my vote and see who wins and I don't care about it 
after thi^ I don't think much about who's in Wadungton. 
And I'm too busy doing my ministry." 

Wolf son and Jones are just two evangelicals out of many 
who have tried in vain to shatter the image of an enormous 
''Christian right" that is monolithic in its thinking, passive 
in its acceptance of a few self-proclaimed spokesman, and 
tineatenmg m both its size and unaninuty. 

Iowa evangeKst Harold Hughes, the former governor 
and U.S. senator, is among them. "To say you've got to 
believe this or that in the political arena or you are not a 
Christian is i^isohite bhttpheny," he dedares. "There are 
strong evangelicals across the nation who are totally 
opposed to what the New Right is doing." 

Indeed, Hughes believes that most of the stellar lights of 
the New Right have strayed far from Jews' teaciung cm the 
issues of peace and concern for the poor. 

Even evangelist Billy Graham is now preaching against 
the "insanity and madness'* of the arms race, and calling 
upon the faithful to actively oppose all nuclear arms. That 
is hardly the message issuing from TV evangelist Jerry 
Falweirs much celebrated Moral Majority organizitfion, 
which calls for a massive build up of arms. 

But then, the Falwell message doesn't square well with 
that of the powerful, evangelical Southern Baptist 
Covention, either. It recently passed a resolution urging 
curbs on the nuclear arms race and a shift of funds from 
weapons to basic human needs. 

Other evangelicals have organized poUtical action groups 
to fight for human and civil rights, an end to world 
hunger, assistance for the poor, controls on pollution and 
other measures they believe are consistent with the 
teachings^f Christ. 

And many evangelicals are simi^ going about their 
political and religious work wkh no attention to the 
machinations in Washington. Tom Hess, director of the 
Maryland-based Christian Restoration Ministries, an active 
charismatic movement, says he probably didn't vote for 
anyone because "no candidate represented what Jesus stood 
for," even though ail three presidential contmdm were self- 
avowed Born AgainChristians. 

"A lot of Christians see no hope in the political system at 
all, ' ' Hess contends. ' 'Thdr only hope is in the Kingdcmi of 
God." 

The evident diversity in the ranks of this Christian army 
is borne out by the poJIsters who have studied them. 

Nationally, the Gallup Poll concluded that nearly one- 
fifth of the U.S. population (about 30 million) may be 
described as "evangelicals," meaning they have had a j 
"born again" experience, they evangelize others and they 
believe in a literal interpretation of the Bible. But apart 
from those similarities, Gallup found few signs of political . 
unanimity. ! 

"Evangelicals are by no means monoUthic in their views, 
as indicated by their opinions on nine voter issues," he 
wrote. Indeed, 54 percent favored "government social 
programs as a way to deal with social problems," while 53 
percent supported the ERA. Only 41 percent favored a ban 
on all abortions, meaning the majority would approve at 
least some types of abortion. 




The Falwell message doesn't square 
well with tbat af tli€ powerfsU 
evangelical Southern Bapttet 
ConvertiOB. 

CaiiforniB pollster Marvin Held found dmt nenriy one- 
quarter of aO Gaiifomians call themselves Bom Afun 
Oirbtiaaf. But wink half of thera favored Ronald 
a majority disagreed with Reagan's opposition to the ERA. 
And, th^ divkled almost equally on a cimtitutional 
amendment banning abortions. 

Field asserts that the size and unifonn^ of the "New 
Christian Ri^t" is "grossly overstated." "I thi^ a lot of 
pe(^ who are simply deeply rdigioia —.and some who 
are not — are getting classified as peopte in this 
movement," he said. 

As for the nionolltliic nature the movement. Fields 
contends it "flies in the face of existing data winch shows 
that this movement is made up of a lot of segments or 
factions, winch have a common base perhaps in deq;> or 
fervent religiosity, but which, in a number <^ other ways, 
are highly disparate. * * 

I^eld ate befieves that evangelicals proM>ly '^represent 
a high prop<Mrtion of the non-voting puUic. For them, 
organized pcditical activity is «i unna^nal act," he said. 

The notion of mOKons oi evangelical voters following a 
few self-prodaimed leaders, like Jerry Fahvdl, is also off 
the mark, he said. "Thelaigeragroupinoursociety, theless 
able are their 'leaders' to motivate them. There is a greato' 
llkdihood they win frapnent. " 

That would be just fine as far as Walt McCuiston is 
ccHicmed. McCuiston tends to a flodL of some 3,000 Bom 
Again Christians at the Peninsuki Bible Ouirch in Palo 
Alto, California. "It is the variations that are the gemiis of 
making the body of Christ work," hesays. "That means a 
single polttkal view shouU never override individuality 
<tf each Christian.' 



BCSlll ty fawK page 6 

••There seems to be an unfonuruic Mm«.^ 
said Brigham, "that if vou'rc ^nh a ticm^J' ' 



99 



makes >>oii better in the eves ot _ 
iKMft male and female observers ** 

There are also studies on job promotion 
unattractive people arc seen as luckv ' 
and "irfesponsiblc" when they faU. 

In contrast, success for attractive peopk « 
"direct result of personal efforts " «b,u r" ' 
attributed to -situacons beyond thdr control ^ 
psychologists conducting the experiment sajd- "li. 
what is beautiful good; what is bcauufuiaite 
for what is good.*' 

Perhaps the most fascinating qudy dcab r-* 
correlation between beauty and pcr^uaswo |i ^ 
proven time and again that a spi-aker who forT 
states an intention to persuade an audience .HI 
effectiveness reduced. Perceived as someone i 
interest, the speaker will not come across as -ru. * 
Beauty seems to the one exception to this harj-uv 
Researchers employed a beautiful womin lo 
opinion on a substantive issue in front of a rra:? a. 
The greatest opinion change wa> cflccicd wik 
expressed a personal desire to intluence. 

The psychologists were shocked. Again, their • 
went against every persuasion rule in the books. The: 
showed that a beautiful woman not only o\r: ~r 
negative impact due to the attribution of ultcm • - 
but her effectiveness is actually mcreased by I SUU6 V 
to influence. 

So what is behind this "beautiful is good" «cra< 
According to Sociologist Gerald .McDonald, it mi\ • 
simple human attempt at congruenc>. "Basic Sc 
Psychological theory," he said, "points to the fKt ihs 
strive to make our attitudes, beliefs and cofsi 
consistent. It is inconsistent information \o - 

unattractive person who has ouistajidiflf pc;>w 
traits." 



Wanted 




UPO Presents 



delivery 
persons 

Part or full time. 
Flexible hours and days. 
Must t>e at least 18. 
Must have own car 
and insurance. 
Must be able to mjnk 
weekends^ 

$3.10 an hour to start 
plus mileage and 
tips 

Apply in person 
between 4:00 pm 

and 6:00 pm. 
St any location 



(A 
O 

ON 
O Q. 



*1980 Domino's Pizza. Inc 





ARLO EfUTHHIE 

and 
Shenandoah 

2 ShOWS-MOV. 21SF7:30 iimm 

Ruby Diamond Aud. 
Tickets $4.00 

incMs M sM M» MM iMii sfiict. iNwf mt-imV ; ^ ^ 

•w. Ii. -oasis Mconis-MrttifQM Maii-snMni ■■■■■ 
Fw ttUMr liHruiiM CM in at HHm 



lo 



ih ro le.' 

-....:! r 

■■'•'''hi'' 
H\ A i 



ifulsc* 
Gmnm Sr 
n of 
inatKl 
and tesi 
allof I 
greed'. I 
liro ' 
l<kr 
rr 

^ih nghtfl 

'. the 

10. l\ 

•lU, al i| 
I. with 



t • ^ » - • • , 1 . 



jpera lovers face some hard times 



FtMridj H i w h i ay .MofKSa>. November 17, tW / f 

fip flu HP flp 11111^ 



n promotion iiMt| |>,|j^ 

tail. 

tiractivc people li iie„ 
effortt/' Willie fiilurc 
ond thdr contvol.'* Ai ihd 
rxpcrimcntiiid: "Notoabis 
- bcMtf^italtoreipQariUr 

Hng ttudy deals wHIi iIk 
ind pmuaskm. It hai bcw 
a speaker who fonhri^l) 
ie an audieiioe wiO have 
ed as someone with a 
- across as trystworthy 
on to tys hatd-fast rale, 
autiful woman to sute her] 
in frontof a male audience, 
e was effected when $he| 
rifluena;. 

pocked. Again, their results 
rule in the books. Their sti 
lan not only overcomes tl 
tribution of uherior motives,] 
I V incraned by a stated desire 

autiful IS good" stcrci i .[x '| 
[aid McDonald, it may be 
ongniency. "Basic Social 
I, "points to the fact that wt 
ps, beliefs and cogniiionsj 
It information to hasc ai 
IS outstanding pcrsonaiU] 



BV BII I WADE 

fwjygh the operas produced this weekend by the FSU 
^ of Music promised to be sheer entertainment and 
"^l/ cultural enlightenment, they were rarely 
Urjimng or cnli^htcrimg. Walking into Ruby Diamond 
'^ofiutn Saturday night for Suor Angelica and Gianni 
\gt both operas by (iiacomo Puccini, one exf^cted to 
'..Jc^mng of lyric beauty and comedic charm, only to 
^ cad a K-Mart blue-lighi special. What makes the 
-sx lascocun all-ihe-more frustrating is thai t^icre were 
^beautiful individual performances. 
3(fore dealing with thai frustration, though, here are 
.-hesof the operas: 

\u<jf AriKehca (Sister Angelica) is the tragic story of a 
- -" s lovf for her illegitimate child. When the curtain 
*e find ourselves in the convent of Santa Maria at 
Ual> in the mid- 19th century. Angelica has been a 
lienbcr of the convent seven years, and she has been put 
l-rf for being an unwed mother. The Mistress of Novices 
> !o the sisters that a year ago, on this date, tlie font in 
jjlc of the courtyard was illuminated by God, and, 
ame day, one of the nuns died. A visitor is 
. ad It turns out to be Angelica's aunt, the Princess, 
she hasn't seen in over seven years. The I*rinccss*s 
r»>ion is established; Angelica is to sign over her portioii 
ff inheritance from her parent's death to her sifter sO 
r may use it as dowry. Angelica reluctantl)' does so, 
earn of her son's death. Ridden witli sorrow, 
.a prepares a potion (the also is a boicanist) to 
xnmit sukride. Suddenly realizing that she has committed 
r unforgivable sin, she prays to the Virgin Mother for 
lardon. A light streams fnom above, and all is forgiven. A 
questionable plot, lethargic use of reduti^'es. but a 
|»iiiifttl score, ncmetheless. 

GitHmSchkd k true opem bnffo. JJxmAf biised on a 
lidion of Dante's Inferno, it is the story of Schicci's 
Uderaaation to the Nether Regions for fiddfyiiig the hat 
lidiiiid testament of Buoso Donati. In the opera, Buoso 
ovestHof his vast fortune to the friars of Floremx, instead 
pitti greedy relatives. One of Buoso's nephews. Rinucdo, 
pares to marry Lauretta, Sehicci's daughter, but .is 
hrbidden to because she has no dowry, and her father is a 
Uinmoner. The relatives are ttp8et,#and plot to match the 
iNittli rigbtflilly due to the friars. Rimiccio su|{gests that 
htj get Schicd to help them because he is **nobody*s 
bi' ; the rehithres reluctantly agree. A hiwyer, Amantio di 
Ueoiao. is summoned and he poses as Buoso to draw up a 
ir» will, all the while reminding the relatives that forgery is 
M, with a pcntlly Of parnwiieat exik f rom Fl^^ 



MUSIC 



amputation of all fiofen. ("FareweO, dear Florence...! 
must salute you with amputated 5ngers**). When the new 
will is drawn up, Schicci leaves a majority of the wealth to 
Ahnself, for use as his daughter's dowry. Tins is a truly 
charming opera — hideed, one that ^sm Pacami justice. 

SuorAngeHca was sptaittered wHh p r obi e ms . Let's start 
with the unparddnahie shi. To use piano to do Aofelica is 
not only tacky, chintzy, gauche and amateurish, but 
totafly self-defeating. As if this is not enough, it 
was telly performed. 

On a brighter note, Judith Ooud (The Princess) gm an 
excdient performance, and Kay Lowe (^ster Angelica) was 
ffawrlett. The rest of the cast rmiged from passable to good. 

Dogger, as the Monitor, had a fine voice, but, 
of being stem and solenm, came off as Glenda, the 
Good WiuA of the North. 

The overall effect was drowsy, and lacked any save for a 
few ten (eq^edtlly "Senza nMuraia, o banbiBo" — 
Bravol). 

Gftmn/ SdkknV on the whole, w» much better. Sets, 
costuiM, performances, acting, and verve were far 
improved from the near-requiem of Angelica. 
Comptiments to maestro Eugene Djrbdahl. Though flawed, 
Bradley Robinson's performance was excellent. Laurels 
also go to Eileen Koyl (Zita) and Roy Delp (Simone). The 
lovers (Susan Patterson and James Blanton) however, were 
merely adequate. 



^ O Diversions pres 

C$fy^s(» Mash 





Iggy Pop tickets on sale 



Reft! rock and roll conies to TsMuttsee about m often 
Hiiliey^s comets, but locals a dose encounter with 
genuine article when iggy Pop drops In at Tommy'i 
Sunday night. 

Tickets to see the man WFSU once labeled **too latenise 
for airplay" now on sale at the Record Co-op and 
T<MRBiy's. $6.50 boy^ you a heiq>ing hunk of raw fiower, 
ph» hometown faves ^tboys and iraplicatiofls and 
former Runaway, Joan Jett. 

There are a ttmited number of tIdieU on Mie, so 
up now for a chance to see the Detroit hadhoy. Doion f 





pii:rcr»ase of 



^? . ^^^^ ' 




■ I 



cCa 



; IDEAS 
FOR CHRISTMAS? 

DUST COLLECTORS 



CAN HELP 



Windkimmer 

TODAY 



K5> 



tM. It. 





Coiirhar4 




We have a large adlMtiMi of fftoe Jew^ry artthMit the 

high retail prices. Or trade In your old Jewelry or 
coiaa for <3ah or for unusual gifts of gold or silver. 



Dust Colleetora 



222-3524 i 



* 5 * ^ r 












Mrmdav, November 



1980 Florida Flambeau 




Classified Ads 



ftoom 306 Union. Optnt*!?!' 
Deadline 12 noofySTZ^^' 



CAN LEASE l/MAAEOtATCLV! 
SuM«t 1 bdr furn apt tlW montMy li 
•lac. pool, laumfry. c«l»le TV ONLY 
2 MSCttt from FSU 224 21« affw 3. 



COLONY CLU» ARTS 1 80RM PO« 
SUBLET TILL JAN. THEN OmON 
TO RENT CALL ALYSSA Oil 
KAREN 224 9303 



Overseas Jobs Sommer/year roMMf. 
Europe, S Ame , Australia, Alia. AR 
Fields $500 $1200 monthly. 
Signtseeing. Fraa into, wrrif*; iJC 
Box S2 F1JI^ 
92425 



OCAil SILLY AND SENTIiHeNTAL 

I LOVE YOU TOO 
THE HORNY BEAST 



NEED TUTOR 
NEGOTIABLE 
NANCY 224-tS90. 



FOR QMB 3200. 
PRICES. CALL 



DEAR TEDOYBEAR, 

ADMIT IT. 

u can:t handle o.t. 

LUV. HANGOVCR KID 



)971 REMBRANT 12 X 40 Windl 

furnished lot 4 a valley 
Gainsville $4000 for add. Ir 

call m^mwm •.n-sM cs.t. 

■•cordsmitti rock, jazz A soul albums 
at lew prices. Offennq 10% discount on 
all merchanidise Wed ii/l9 thru Sat. 
11/22 with this ad, located at Ml W. 
Gainas in front of the Junk B 
i» f.sm 9 hMm «M.-S«1. 1:3 
^Hfsf SdVPfB df I 



University Garden Apartn^ents is now 
renting 1 bdr apts. Sign lease until 
August and pay SIM mo, or 
SlfS mo. and tm 
FiliCI 

Call 224^M0i. 



or pay 



Leases for Winter and Spring at 
Osceoia now available call 224-9197. 



ticket for FSU FLA GAME FOR 

SALE $50 CALL 222 4493. 



FOR SALE TWO FLA. COUPONS 
REDEEAAABLE TUES. CALL 3IS- 
•0MORM4-aM7. 



FOR SALE 2 FSU U OF FLA 
COUPONS tlOO. CALL 644 1155 ASK 
F OR HUGH OR JEFF. ^_ 

THREE COUPONS FOR FSU UF 
TUES. TURN-IN DAY. CALL 57A 2902 
ANYTIME. 

STCRBO AM/FM TURNTABLE 
SreAKlKS $15 222-9Blf. ASK RMI 



Take over lease Dec 1 large iwo 
badroom two bath Berkshire AAanors 
tarn a iiw u ti . Can Stacay at 57*-t974. 

MALE OR FEMALE NEEDED TO 

SUBLET ROOM AT CASH HALL W/S 
QUARTERS: MEALS, A/C, BAR, 
POOL. CALL 224 4403. 

PRINCE MANOR APTS. 1 BR. FOR 
SUBLET LARGE APT NICE 
ATMOSPHERE CALL 57*-t99t #103. 



Ho di*a btglietti par il taatro domaini 
»ara. VogHo wn coiwpiBwi maacMo. 

Sono una signorina di vantf anni. Ho i 

capelli neri Sono bassa e ricca Mi 
interessa L uomo aito con i capalli 
biondi e occhi bid. tdlalafiaiiiiil at 

numero644 5192 



Blue Kaycaird ^ honored by tt*. 
followliit merchants Nic's ToooerT 

^fcwry, Brawmatter s Rest 
fapankig aaen). Mac s m 

Lounge, Piixa Pro 
FkMwors, Tr»e Pub 
tt Eve Campvs 
Brown's Pttarmacv. 
Amette's Women s 



STEP UP TO A HEALTHIER YOU. 

USE STAIRS! 



P rofeM tanal coaching for Isngers! 
Actors! Intensive concentration on 
characterization and body movement 
Phone 576 6775 after 7pm class or 
private. 



DO YOU WANT 50 YD LINE SEATS 
FOR U OF F VS. FSU GAME. YOU 
CAN HAVE THEM 1st DAY TURN 
I N 2 COUPONS POR SMI. CALL 222- 

4528. 



Tallahassee 
The Phyrst, Adam 
Mairpiace. Zonkers 
T he Melt ing Pot. 
PaaMons, Great 
Bicycle Sfiop, Barnacle b.k* 
McOragpr's steak House. Roger 
Nelson Music Store Ovjtposf Sca 
Fox Restaurant i. Lounge. Hkco s 
Lounge, Quality mn SagMiarnaire 
Captain's Lounga. 

Soft Contact LanaML " 

Hard Cantact Lenses. 

24 hour Contact Lenses 

B 4 L Contact Lenses. tS0.aa.HiBr 

Dr.Aii«oOean,2M^. 



■AT LUNCH AT THE PHYRST 
WITH A FRICNDi 



FSU UF COUPONS FOR SALE! $60 
CALL WAYNE 644 6694 OR M4-474S 
AND LEAVE A MESSAGE. 




FSU UF TICKET 4 SALE S25. CALL 

177 3537 AFTER 6 30 



Stereo World: Save 20% on any Lay- 
A-Way tor Christmas delivery. Just 
SIO.OO starts your Lay-A-Way on JVC, 
Sansui, Technics, Akai, Pioneer, 
Infinity, Onkyo, Ar, and others. Ask 
about^r easy terms. Hours-12-6 pm. 
I Manday. 



9FSU/UF TICKETS 
S90 Each Call 224-2710 
Ask For Claudia 



VIVITAR SERIES 1 70 210MM 3.5 
ZOOM LENS WITH CANON FD 
MOUNT. «275.00 LIKE NEW. CALL 
COURTLAND AFTER 6PM 222-2235. 

CLASSICAL & JAZZ FANS 1 PR. 
DCM TIME WINDOW SPEAKERS. 2 
MTHS. OLD. 574-1309 $645. 

FOR SALE 2 FLA. GAME TICKETS 
GOOD PRICE!!! CALL 57«*2f75 
KEEP TRYING. 

Girls 100% rabbit fur jacket siie 7-9 
$50, girls leather jacket size 7 135, 4" 
B&WTV$50 Call 877 2670 



RMMT WANTED TO SHARE 3 BDR 
HOUSE $75 PER MONTH V3 UTLES. 
CALL ROBIN AFTER 8 PM 224 5774. 



'74 YAAAAHA OT 250 LESS THAN 
2,000 Ml. OFF ROAD S4i» OR BEST 
OFFER. MIKE 575-2615. 

10 speed, 25'/?" red Poch Cavalier. All 
alloy parts prime! $185 for Info, call 
576 4261 eve or come by the MuncMe 

Wagon in Union daytime. 



In Leon County Special Land Sale 4 
miles south of truck route on Oak 
Ridge Road 3 acre tracts 1850 acre 10A 
tracts 1650 acre, 20 to 40 acre tracts 
1500 per acre, terms; 13% down 5 yr. at 
12**o interest 

JimmyBcyntonRealty phone 222 7581. 
After hours 576 3874 for Ben Boynton 

Be prepared for the cold v^attier* 
Hardly worn, heavy ^4 length gray 
suede coat, quilted lining, women's 
sue 13. New was (120. asking $60. 644 
4075 before 5 p.m., ask for Laurie. 

Firewood-Split your own and save! 
$25. per i/i ton trucfcload. Cat into 
length, many wont need splitting. 
Call 877-SS04. 



NEED 3 ROOMATES FOR 2 BORM. 
APT. $77.50 EA. AND V4 ELECT. EA. 
GOOD LOCATION AND CLOSE TO 
CAMPUS. CALL SEAN 576 0661 
AFTER 5 PM. 

F rmmt needed w/s qtr. Own room. 
Close to campus. Va of rent 81 util. Call 
576^4393. 

Need ca^? Got any baseball cards or 

other trading cards to sell? Call 

Larry, 893 3873. 





NEEDED: VOLUNTEERS FOR A 
TOUGH JOB LOWERING 

FLORIDA'S DRINKING AGE FROM 
19 TO 18!! MUST SHARE A 
COMMITMENT TO DUMPING THIS 
LAW! GROUPS AND 

ORGANIZATIONS WELCOME. 
WRITE JUNIOR, 1410 W. SLiGH 
AVE. TAMPA, 33604. 



Address and Stuff envelopes at home. 
Any age or location Earnings 
unlimited. See ad under Business 
Opportunities. Triple "S". 16243-Z2 
Caion, Hesperia, Ca. 92345. 



'72 Toyota wagon, automatic, air 
cond , mag wheels,- AM-FM; new 
paint, exhaust system, timed. $1390. 
Call 575 5054 PM 




•SUBLEASE RM CASH HALL MALE 
OR FEM MEALS MAID SERV 
POOL & BAR A/C STOYRM W/S 
QTRS $040. EA. CALL 23e^M AFT 

6. 



ATTENTION LADIES 
PHOTO TESTS ARE BEING HELD 
PENTHOUSE/OUl Style magazines. 
Top pay, no experience reqt>ired. 
Send name, address, phone and 
photo. PHOTO SEARCH Box 13253 
Tally, Fl 32308. 

Need Accurate Typist to be display Ad 
typesetter Mon. Fri. between 12 noon 
and 7 p m approx. 25 hours a week 
Please Call Amy at 644-5744 between 7 
p.m. and 11 p.m. Da aat caN during 
day. ^ 

Reliable, DepaadaMe parson w/ car 
to assist In managing sandwich shop. 

Must be available 7am Ipm Mori thru 
Fri. No weekends. For appt. caul 300- 
8800 between 2 30 4 : 30 pm M-F or 574- 
5719 Sat. 81 Sun. after 10 am. 



Sublet 3 br house beautiful fenced yd, 
carpet, washer, porch, quiet St., 
kitchen appliances. A/C. avail, 
or Dec. 1 $300/nH>. Nr WintMrap 
free fuel oiL 877- 



2 bdr duplex $140 
224 3152 very targe. 



Experienced acoustic guitar teactter 
to teach beginner. Call R K. ~ 
644 4720 or 386 8127 after 5:30. 

FAST. ACCURATE TYPIST («S 
wpm) TO WORK LATE NIGHT 
HOURS FOR FLORIDA 

FLAMBEAU. PART TIME. CALL 
AMY SUN.-THURS. EVENINGS 
MTWSCN 7 Wk AMD 11 PM AT 644- 
Sf44. KXPCRIKNCE IN 

TVPCSCTTIMO HELPFUL. DO NOT 
CALL PIMMMS DAY. THANK YOU. 



Backpacking expadlttan la the Chisos 
Mts Of Big Bend National Park. 
Includes transport from Tallahassee 
Accomodations trail food and 5 days 
8. nights in Big Bend 6, Mexico. Dec. 
13 23 $300 contact Rolling Thunder 
River Co Box 88 Almond N C 28702. 



UPO TRAVEL DEPT SPONSORS 
DISNEY WORLD TRIP 2 DAYS, 1 
NIGHT EVERYTHING INCLUDED 
BUT FOOD S3S. SEE LIZ 322 IN 
UNION OR CALL 644-471B ar SIIMI74 
NOV. 22-23. 



TNT HIDEAWAY CANOE RBMTAL 

Wakulla River at Hwy 98. November 
Special: mention this ad 4 rent 2 
canoMfor the price of 1. Call 1-t2S^i2 



I string tennis 
service Lowest 
Bill at 57A-02M. 



racquets, 
pricct In 



One 



TYPING FAST EFFICIENT 
LETTERS RESUMES PAPERS ETC. 
85c P6.; 



GAY PEER VOLUNTEERS 

If you are a female or male wHIip 

gay related concern and would like to 
talk with a trained gay peer 
volunteer, call Dr. Lucy Kiziriar at 

«44-20e3, M-F, 0^5. Confidentiality 
asstirad and no records kept. 



WANTED STUDIOUS NON-SMOKER 
FEM. RM. MATE STARTING JAN. 
$105 81 Vi UTIL. CALL 222-4493. 

ATLANTA! RIDE NEEDED TO AND 
FROM OVER THANKSGIVING 
WILL SPLIT COST CALL LOR«44- 

2391. 



ROOMMATE NEEDED TO SHARE 1 
BEDROOM APT. AT REGENCY 
PARK. CALL BOB 222-6323. 

Two non-smoking female graduate 
slu. share 3 bdr. turn, house a mile 

Hwn 1 1 central heat/a $90 81 '/b uti. !■ 
$90 deposit. Call 576-0768 evenings. 

Roommate wanted for Wtr. Qtr. 
female nonsmoker rent $70 month and 
V4 utI. T 81 Campus Apt. phone 224- 
3275. 

Female to take over tease at Osca<rta 
MalMMa^ maid service, a/c, pool. 
Cill fi4-1>M. Will pay deposit! 

NEED FOUR TICKETS TO FLA FSU 
GAME. CALL 575-7413 EVENINGS 

OR WEEKEND. 



TYPING- LET ME MAKE YOUR 
PAPERS LOOK GOODI NEAR 
CAMPUS 75C/PG SUE. 222-M37 
EVES. 

Guitar lessons: Folk, Blues, C & W flat 
8i finger picking, bottleneck. Dave 
Greenwald 222-7749, 7-11 pm. 



LEASE 
YOUR FURNITUREI 

Wide variety 
imw i a dla fe deUvery 
Option to Buy 
FURNITURE MART RENTALS 
1206 S. Adams 
224-4388 

WILL DO TYPING IN MY HOME. 
TELEPHONE 305-0609. KEEP 
TRYING. 

Edited Typing IBM Selectric II 
Reports/Resumes/ Letters/Dissert. 
575-7171 Mission Rd. Area. 



*FREE TO GOOD HOME* 
YELLOW COUNTRY DOG, 10 
MONTH OLD FEMALE LAB, 
LOVES KIDS, NEEDS SPACE TO 
RUN. MOVING, MUST FIND HER A 
NEW HOME. CALL 644-5785 1-4 pm. 



$600 REWARD 
for information leading to the 
idantif icatfen of the person who took 
our sign at THE PHYRST 

homecoming weekend. 

NUTRITION COUNSELING 
University Health Center Weight 
Loss, Meal Planning, etc. NEW 
EXPANDED HOURS! Mornings 
10:30-12:30 MWF, afternoons 1:30-3:30 
WF 



MINI WAREHOUSE UNITS 

6x6 available-larger sizes $14.50 up. 
Call us at Lakewood Mini Warehouses 
306-4191. 




TYPING-IBM-DISSERTATIONS 
THESES-TERM PAPERS. CALL 
PAT DIXON 386-1255. 

TYPING 

EXPERIENCED SECRETARY 
USING IBM SELECTRIC II. 
REASONABLE RATES. EDITING 
AVAILABLE. CALL 877-3694 
EVENINGS/WEEKENDS. 

Quality Typing of Dissert., Themes, 
etc. Call 644-6031 or 224-3546/Sue. 
Reasonable. 




METHODS OF CONTRACEPTION 
Mon 81 Thu 2:30pm, Tue 9am 
UNIVERSITY HEALTH CTR Rm. 
AAen and women welcome. 



COMIC BOOK FANS 

The Co-op Book Store has a complete 
line of Marvel and DC Comic books 
on the stands earlier than any place 
in town. They also carry Fanzines 
and U adergia BH d Comixli 652 W. 
Tenn. 

CW. OUINN MEDICAL CLINIC 
Has moved to 1815 S. Adams Street, 
next to Baker's Pharmacy! For more 
intormatton please call 576-7790. 

Wine & Cheese Cellar 

Tallahassee's Finest Sandwiches! 

—NOW IS THE TIME!— 
ARE YOU READY? 
(ARE WE READY?) 
Rolling Mothers will perform your 
fav arite^ sawgs and mora— Uye at 

I'm not you're Steppin' Stone but 1 
on down to Tommy's Nov. 23 tor 

••**iggy pop*^ 
Slut Boys A implications w/ Joan Jett 

Address and sNiff envelopes at home 
Earnings unlimited. Offer, send $1»00, 
Refundable, to: Triple "S". 18043-22 
Caion, Hesperia, CA 92345. 



Children of tne world 

Put Camel — on tlie walls— 

Your making carpels af tr eadm Hte A 

garbage sortirtg. 

BUT ITS liO«AM6l D.B. 



Juggling Reggae 
« clas^ ad 



ad 
a 



Scarlett 

Thanx for the 
you put in Fri 
Oassy Woman. 

Rastaman 

P.S. Come hear WINDJAMMER 
today, and don't miss LOCOMOTION 

CIRCUS Thurs. 



in Reverend Boykin will be 
. And that's something ya 
wanna miss! 

••••Iggy Pop**** 
SKit Bays/Nov. M/lmplicatiens 

WINE ACHEESE CELLAR 

Wine Bar opening Thursday Niglit, 5 

until 10 pm. 



•Robin Richards 
Birthday Angela 
P.S 



Happy Belated 21 
Kim Neva A Bud. 
last Thurs. 



To the Bellamy Girls: 

Were interested, why not. We will be 

at your sorority house Tuesday for 

dinner Maybe we will see you there. 
We have ways of finding out things 
also. Call. 

John and AL 

LIBERATE SOUTH^FRICA! 
Lecture and film by Johnny MakatinI 
United Nations Observer for ttie 
AFRICAN NATIONAL CONGRESSr 
SaaMi Africa's Black Guerilla Force. 
Man. Nav. 17, 7:3apm at famu Toes. 
Mav. 1A 2:38pm Rm 67 BaMamy, FMI. 



HAPPY BIRTHDAY TO THE KVK 
KEYSER FROM THE PEISER AND 
FRIENDS LOVE YA 



A POOR GIRL IS RICH AT POOR 

PAUL'S. .25 DRAFT '/a PRICE WINE 
EVERY MONDAY POOR PAUL'S 
POURHOUSE, 618 W. TENN. 

DANIEL'S FOR HAIR SPECIAL!! 
Precision cut reg. $8 NOW $7 includes 
shampoo, conditioner, A cut. Call Maw 
222 1112. Good thru Dec 31, 1980. 

THIS MONDAY 4 EVERY MONDAY 
IS BULLWINKLKS LOG CABIN 
WORLD FAMOUS OONO SHOW 
WITH KIRK DOIH>VAN. $90 laS 
PfllZS. 

MONDAY NITE 
MOST OF OUR CLASSICAL 
COLLECTION WILL BE PLAYED 
ON MONDAYS AT THE LUCKY 
HORSESHOE BAR 

MARC MALCOM RMT 
Massage ttterapy 81 reiaxation/slrass 
management counseling 222 0550. 



Licensed 
system 



m kr aca m pai e r cansalfing 
— pratrammint 



THIRSTY WOMEN NEVER HAD A 
BETTER FRIEND THAN POOR 
PAUL. FREE MICHELOB EVERY 
DAY 3 4 PM, 8 9 PM POOR PAUL S 
POURHOUSE 618 W TENNESSEE. 

HOLIDAY PORTRAITS 
Moko Special Gifts But fme 
photographic portraits take time 
Package plans in color from $19 SO 
Call DelmarStlldiaaat2l4-3B4.• 



RiHlwd!«|ii^ 

resptctaMfiBiiil. 



LOST LADIES ANTIQUE GOLD 
WATCH AT V. TECH GAME 
FAMILY HEIRLOOM! REWARD!!! 
CALL EVE. 224-1041 TERR I. 



Lost gold cross pen in or around Oiff . 
on AAon., Nov. 10. With initials SMF in 
script. Please caN S7I8-004S. 

2 U OF F COUPONS FOR SALE $70 
FOR PAIR OR BEST OFFER. CALL 
575-0374. 



LOST 

CAMEO AND OPAL RINGS 
AGNER PURSE - REWARD!! 
222-5395 



WITH 



Lost tan wallet w/ all my IDs. Lost in 
Prince Manor Parking Lot Nov. 11 
Please call Dan 576-2211 or J77 7141 
(work) 

Giant reward for rings lost in 
Library. Will pay more nun Ring 
King! Please return. CaU Macey 644 
3391. 



Our 
Savh 
Plan 
Saves 
Lives 

Civem 



Pound, (adies watch. 

Health Cent(?r last 
7464 and identify 



near FSU 
Call 418 



Found medium/small black dog 
collars. Call 844-0023 to ktontify. 



two 



Lost 9/29/80 Opal earring sentimental 
viHwe. L^t in the vicinity of pool 
locker room A Flambeau office. Can 
576 5565 or 30S-OIOI. Aak tor Margaret. 

Reward! ! 



Lost brown wal 
11/5/80. If found 
Koenig at 224 7884. 



let 
Pl 



w 



th IDs on 
call Bruce 



Calculator found 11/12 in 
Bidg. Parking lot. Call 
between 6 81 7 pm to identify 



Business 
224 1918 



FOUND A WATCH TALLY TENNIS 
COURTS. CALL BETH 576 8281 



Manny 

SPECIAL OF THE M 

FRIED eiMPf 

Good Mon ^ufl 
5 9pm 

$3.95 $3/ 

1630N t^o"" 

2221320 



Largest in l ^ 





• I 




Kichard Nixea. 

"IwMcomplcteiv 
respecUMeiwiill^ 
■ly Mediatype 
resume." 

Rffl. 314 



644 5744 



Our 

Saving; 
Plan 
Saves 
Lives 

Give Bloodll 



1630 N Monroe 
222- 1320 



t COIN LAUNDRY 

? l^irKeNt m town-60 nuich.r 
i Closest to campus 

I Air CotidttioM4r0^j l 
J its W. Vlrolnla St 



m 




tohb V Bo Wdcn accepts bowl bid while wife Am waves an orange 



Rwlo by Bob 0 Lary 



It's another 'Orange' year 



BY CHRIS BROCKMAN 

II AMR^^l SWWTS IJ>ITOR 

i sptni a year in Miami one night. 

Ite'sall ! could think ot as the fact thai 
rtif Florida State Seniinolcs would once 
j:3in '^pcnd New Year's Day in the Sun 
skmK mchorcd ilsclt in my brain. The 

! indkafKni that FSU would return to 
Hcnc o\ lis 24-7 defeat at the hands of 

nkiahonia Sooners less than a year ago 
- about 15 minutes before 6 o'clock, 
H Hour tor Bowl bids. 

\B( rv. which was airing the Notre 
Dame A la ha Ilia game, started flashing 
•^Hvihlc (prohabic) bowl pairings on the 

-c; I irsi ihc Sugar Bovsl: Georgia, SEC 
^mps uiih iheir 31-21 win over Auburn, 

aid he matched against the winner of the 
^D-'Bama game, (tveniually Notre Dame, 
'•Owiors.) 

That didn't really surprise many of the 
^^icrs. coaches and press gathered in the 
imei and Gold Room of the FSU 
<iliouse. 



JOCKBEA T 



Then the C otiiMi Bowl predictions were 
^^and interest perked up a bit. ABC 
''cdStmthwwf Conference champs Baylor 
^mmi the losers of the Crimson Tide- 
»«>ng Irish battle. And no mention of 
^Seminoles. It proved to be writing on 
^^all and thoughts of a 23 story hotel 
h onK one working elevator, maids who 
" ' fiaNa mules and valets who not only 
^your car but your keys as well began to 
dreams of Dallas in the winter and 
of putting the nation out of its misery 
3^ iCalK shooting JR. 

THE CALL 

It wasn't until nearly fifty minutes 
" ^>:33 p.m. that the '^officiar' caH 
trough. It was executive director of 
'J^^^"^'^ Bowl Dan McNamara and 



Sports Information Director Mark Carlson 
promptly cut him off (so much for 
Freudian slips). But they called back and 
this time it was Nick Craig, president of the 
OB committee, who asked to speak with 
FSU Coach Bobby Bowden. 

"I'm greatly honored to issue the Florida 
State Seminoles an invitation to participate 
in the New Years Day Bowl game to play the 
Big 8 champion (the winner of 
Saturday's Oklahoma-Nebraska game)," 
Craig said, and was then drowned out by 
cheers. 

"Thank-you, we appreciate the 
invitation, and we accept it," Bowden 
answered. The FSU mentor, who has led 
the Tribe to three bowl games in five years, 
had already accepted the OB's invitation 
earlier when Billy Vessels had extended the 
invite at exactly 6 p.m. Bowden had been 
watching the Notre Dame game at Attorney 
General Jim Smith's house with 
representatives f rom all three major bowls, 
he revealed, and at about a quarter till six 
had made the decision to accept the OB bid 
if they extended it. 

THE PLA VERS REACT 

Before getting on the line with Craig, 
Bowden conferred with team captains 
Reggie Herring and Ken Lanier and 
informed them of the bowl bid. It was the 
first the duo had beard of their second trip 
to Miami. Itorrii^, wbo is iisuaUy affable 
and witling to talk with the press, tooked 
disgusted ami teft the room before the 
official invitation had been delivered. 
Lanier accepted the news calmly. 

**Just gotta roll with the punches." the 
big tackle noted. "It's kinda out of our 
hands, but Vm glad w^c got a major bowl 
bid." 

**l hate it," flared wide receiver Dennis 
McKinnon, who was outside of Campbell 
Stadium, where Bowden announced the 
bowl bid to wailing fans. **But it might 
give us the crown (NCAA National 
Championship) and that's what matters." 



I 





ALL SEATS 99c 



TNf xmrn 



|7,l9i0 / II 




IMPORTANT MNOUNCEMENT 

The Florida v* Florida State 
Game has been changed to 
Dec. 6th at 12:25 pm 

Coupons Will Still he eMclianged 

THIS WEEK 

• Beginning Tues., Nov. 18 
For students who 
purchased their coupons 

last spring. 

All older coupons 

r"^ • NO Coupons 

will be redeemed 
ttie week prior to 
the Dec. 6 Game. 

• All coupons must 
be iredeemed 



GO 'NOLES 



[ft' 



f 



t i 



it; 




■ 



J . a 




Florida Flambeau 



OjOUHY 
Chance of sliowtfi UKlay 
with hi|0i tempemma m the 
rmd Uk mad torn looiihi tii 
(he 30s. 



^:^jYJ^OVEmER 18, 1980 



SERVING TALLAHASSEE fM 68 YEARS 




iVhat John Sullivan says about it all 



imust have lost my good sense/ 
e quips upon entering politics 



DANM V(K.T 

i> probably the most 
man in [ eon County. 
rKcnil) bcai out a host of write- 
'f'dates to prolong Sullivan 
, .ontrol over the county's 
A^ns office, succeeding his mother 
a *ho was supervisor for 16 

he county commission may 
iSimiopay back ten years worth of 
if It sides v\ith former write-in 
idaic Cliff Mason, who accused 
Sullnans of violating the state's 
!inepotism laws in 1971 when 
•*'!nv allegedly was promoted 

John Sullivan gives his side of the 
in the following interview, 
ictcd yesterday in the elections 

ur mother has been supervisor for 
■■'■} ears; what rote will she play in 
administration? 
She's akeady told me after the city 
T ions in February she's planning on 
visiting grandma in Oriando or 
^ lister in Atlanta, shc*s not gonna 
o»n. It's gonna be sink or swim 
' myself, and I really expect to 
•wjustfine. 

' ' 'rnrtj your point qJ view 

V" i< K^ii on I he ha/lot. 
Mama made a last minute decision 
"f'Tc. I'm not gonna criticize her 
J!, li s her right to do it. When 

* decided thai. 1 decided, well might 

* run. It's been kinda kicked 
»ound for years: 'Oh, one day you'll 

supervisor.' And my standard 
"^meni -when I lose all my good 
yeah, 1 guess I'll gel into 



politics.' Well, I must have lost all my 
good sense, 'cause now I'm in politics. 

The Democrat's editorial Sunday 
. . .that I ought to resign and have, 
a special election in February. Nope. If 
I did resign the governor would 
appoint somebody, there wouldn't be a 
special election, that's not the right of 
the law. The Democrat, they get their 
wild things going. 

Was it premeditated at ail the way 
she resigned and you got on the ballot? 

She'd been up in Atlanta visiting the 
brand new grandbaby and flying back 
home she said 'What's more 
important, going another four years in 
the rat race or retiring and spend time 
with the grandma and the grandbaby 
and all that stuff, so she decided bail 
out now, retire now. If you look at her 
financial statement you can tell she's 
not gonna be hard up for money. 

/ hear y 'all are the richest family in 
the courthouse. 

Not quite. Judge (John) Rudd is 
probably the richest. 

Mow did your family get its money? 

Back in 1952 daddy ran for sheriff, 
there were seven people running and he 
was the frontleader, my grandfather 
George Sullivan had been county 
commissioner in the 30s and 1 guess it 
was an old political family sort of. 
I>addy ran for sheriff and out of seven 
he came in last. He borrowed money 
for the campaign and he was in debt, 5 
no cash coming in, so what do you do? | 
You move out west of town and he S 
bought this real mansion with 80 acres ^ 
for $4,000. You know that's gotta be a | 
real mansion: I was about five when we E 
moved in, and 1 feU through the floor. 

Tidrn to SULLIVAN, Page 7 




John SuUivUMf recently elected Leon County Supervisor of Elections, claims he and 

his /not her never broke the County's anti- nepotism law 



Klansmen found innocent in Greensboro slayings 



FROM STAFF tETOrrS 

^•KUNSBORO, N.C. — An all-white iary found si\ 
Wansmt-n and Nazis innaoettt of murder and riot charges 
^^^^^ J»Uiying of five comiiiiHHSts gunned down at a 

^ to the KUn'' rally last fall. 

^ juf ' (>f six mea Md six women, after hearing testimony 
^2}^' Md iUHng through a mountain of evidence, 

•■waled s^ytn days More rendering a verdict In the 

trial in North Carofoa bbtory. 
'^wind innocent of first degne mtiriter and Momy riot were 
«'>Und Wood, 25, and Jack Fowler Jr., 2«, both of 
HMon-Salem; and fCbnsmen Coleman Pridmorc, 37, and 
rjj**^ Morgan, 28, both of Lincolmon; Jerry Smith, 33, 

and Da%id Matthews, 25, Newtoa* 
SenBity at the courthouse was tight as it had heen during the 
***Wal. 




stationed on rooftops surrounding the courthoiee to head off 
any possible violence by Klansmen or the comffiURbts, who 
have labled the trial a "farce." 

The defendants were arrej»ted after a Nov. 3, 1979 r^ by 
the Communist Workers Party ended la a fierce two-m«ate 
gunbattle. 

Videotapes by newsmen, which made Bp the hrwrt of the 
prosecution's evidence, showed a caravan of Nazfe and 
Klansmen stop in front of the rrfly. A stkk fight broke out Mi 
then there was a te^ of gonthr. 

Th« trial lasted five moa.ii^. The proseortioa argoed sctf- 
defense, saying the defendants fired oat of Igar for tlM^ Rvcs 
and that scientific evidence presented by tie g^fcrMM^ fitted 
to coBC^vetv Ml asy of the ddendaiite to the shots M 
feRed the communists. They also cfateed 17 of the 39 ^ots 
fired in the guiibaitie ouae from tfit coamNmists. 



attorney Robert CahooB m Ms M argHMt **11k tratb » 
that they were not expect vkileacc They were beat m a 
fwaceftti expresskM of the lofe of dKir coMtry aad its flag.** 

Prosecirtors, however, argued that tfie deiendpnfe wcat to 
^ raly fartent on reveage, ^Icr ctaifc h ig wMi the ly a iw a iit s 
four months earier hi the CUaa Grove coaonpity near 
WMon-Salenu r- 

'*They the defeotets came to Greensboro lateat oo one 
thh« and one oa^, to disrapt that raly,** arid AiOstaal 
EMstrkt Attoraey JjMnes Conaa. "They cant dowa here 
laoldRg for a flillt, Mdte M HiitidLe i^oiit ^ 

He idM arted te jarora to overfook the fact that tt» dtad 

two of thoB yoang doctors — were co m w a n lr i s. 

'^Tiiy were live tam bclagii aad they had a right to Wk 
jttMl ^ bad a rliM to tb^ bcMi w Mli«r haw abborrcat i 
may M theai to be, or hoar a b borret yaa bm^ M tbni to 
be," Coman told the Jary. 



I • 






Graham calls legislature 
into special session today 



UNIT KI> PRJSS INTFRNATIONAL 

Gov. Bob Graham laie yesterday called a 
one-day special session for today, asking 
lawmakers lo broaden his power over the 
statewide grand jury, but the new House 
speaker threatened to cause him trouble. 

House Speaker Ralph Haben said Graham 
broke a committment to the Legislature when 
vetoing $7.2 million in university funds this 
summer and that a move might be made to 
override the vetoes. 

Haben of Palmetto threatened to use the 
grand jury bill to force the Senate into 
joining the House in the override of the 
separate university appropriations, including 
funds to improve two football stadiums. 

Haben and other House leaders apparently 
sCil^are upset over losing a court battle over 
Graham's vetoing of $8.8 million in pay 
raises for university faculty. 

Incoming Senate President W.D. 
Childers of Pensacola said he wants the 
grand jury proposal passed, but doesn't 
favor taking up any vetoes. 

Graham aides met with legislators most of 
yestercby afternoon, trying to get Childers 
and Haben together. No agreement was 
reached, so the governor decided to call the 
special session anyway. 



As things now stand, legislators will meet 
at 10 a.m. to formally elect Haben as 
successor to House Speaker Hyatt Brown 
and Childers as successor to Senate President 
Phil Lewis, then witnesses the appointment 
of commitie Chairpersons. 

They will go into a special session at 2:30 
p.m., considering a bill enabling the Florida 
Supreme Court to grant Graham's request 
for expansion of the jurisdiction of the 
statewide grand jury on land purchases by 
the Cabinet to include recently-uncovered 
drug smuggling operations. 

Some "mid-west coast" operations have 
been detected, Graham said, which are taking 
place in more than one judicial circuit, 
creating problems for the courts and state's 
attorneys. He is trying to avoid the $21,100 
expense ot calling a separate grand jury. But 
the Supreme Court said recently current law 
doesn't allow an on-going grand jury's probe 
to be broadened. 

"I expect efforts to be made to override 
the vetoes, but I also expect them to fail,'* 
said Graham lobbyist Ronnie Book. 

The special session is scheduled to end by 
6:30 p.m. Tuesday, but Graham might keep 
legislators at work longer if necessary, .Book 
said. ' 



Committee heads announced today 



UNIfliinrlSlSfNTERNATIONAL 

l^qgislators* w^e kept in the dark Uke 
everyone else yesterday having to guess who 
will get the most powerful committee 
assignments under House Speaker Ralph 
Haben and Senate President W. D. Childers. 

Haben and Childers make the 
appointmems during today's sp^ial session. 
A few of the choices are obvious, but most 
are difficult to determine and Haben and 
Childers are keeping their decisions a secret. 

Lawmakers hopeful of getting important 
assignments quizzed reporters yesterday or 
joined the guessing game. 

Most of the legislators who hdd power 
under House Speaker Hyatt Brown and 
Senate President Phil Lewis will keep it, 
although they may not have the same 
committee chairmanships. 

Dempsey Barron of Panama City will 
.remain as Senate Rules chairman, deciding 
which bills get a chance at passage and 



helping Childers in the body's day-to-day 
operations. 

Sam Bell of Daytona Beach, who was 
Brown's majority leader or floor captain, 
likely will be Haben 's rules chairman. There 
is speculation that Barry Cuton, Haben 's 
running mate for the largely ceremonial post 
of speaker pro tempore, will be the new 
majority leader. 

Jack Gordon of Miami Beach hkely will 
remain as Senate Ways and Means 
Committee, Haben aleady has announced 
that Herb Morgan of Tallahassee will stay on 
as House Appropriations Committee 
chairman. 

Other probable Senate appointments are 
John Vogt of Cocoa Beach as commerce 
chairman; Harry Johnston of West Palm 
Beach as head of a newly formed finance and 
tax committee; Pat Frank of Tampa as 
education chairman; and Robert McKnight 
of Miami as natural resources chairman . 



House rookies learn the ropes 




UNrrEDPRfSS INTERN ATIONAL 

The smallest class of House rookies on 
record got some tips from oldtimers 
yesterday on what to do and not do. 

The 18 freshmen, ranging in background 
from a school bus driver and wounded 
Viet man veteran to the first firefighter ever 
sent to the legislature, sat around a table in a 
House hearing room for several hours 
without saying a word. 

The speakers included Speaker-elect Ralph 
Haben, Republican Minority Leader Curt 
Riser and Allen Morris, chief clerk of the 
House and the state's top Goverameat 
historian. 

It was informal. Ingoring a ''no smoking 
this side" sign right behind them. Rep. 
Berhard Kimmel, R-West Palm Beach, 
puffed on a pipe and Rep. Jim firodie, R- 
Miami, lit up a cigarette. 

1 didn't see the sign," Brodie said. 



Haben tokl the roc^cics to go to Morris for 
assistance. 

** Allen Morris is the House of 
Representatives," he said. "From time to 
tiuM, he talks about retiring and we get really 
nervous. I have asked him to stay and I hope 
he'll stay forever. 

"There'll never be another mail living like 
Allen Morris," he said. 

Morris, talking to his 21st freshman cla^. 
told the new members not to avoid lobbyists 
because "they are possessed of facts and 
figures you will need to arrive at balanced 
judgements." 

In the 1980 session, he said, more than 
4,000 persons registered as lobbyists. 

The freshmen perked up when Morris tokl 
them that 28 of Florida's 37 Governors as 
well as many congressmen and cabinet 
members cut their political teeth in the 
legislature. 




BY MICHAEL McCLELLAND 

FLAMBEAU SFAFF WUTEI 

Will WaUace, OEeeutive director of the 
Florida Student's Anodatkm, has tendered 
his resignirtkm to the board of directm. 
Wallace will continue as executive director 
until Feb. 1, or until the FSA naoKs his 
replacement. 

The FSA \& the mam lol>byiiii orgaiuzittkm 
for students in the State Umversity system. 
Wallace, a former studoit body preridem A 
Florida Atlantic University, has been director 
of the FSA since August of 1979. 

"It's been sort of a growing realization 
that I need to move into something other 
than lobbying," Wallace said. "It's time for 
roc to make plans for the future." 

Wallace plans to continue living in 
Tallahassee, and to pursue a career in the 
private sector. Although he said he would be 
available to the FSA as an advisor, Wallace 
does not plan to continue his career as a 
lobbyist. 

"I couldn't lobby for another organization 
as whole-heartedly as for the students, so 1 
won't go on as a lobbyist," Wallace said. 

Wallace tendered his resignation well in 
advance, he said, so the FSA could find and 
train a replacement before next spring's 
legislative session. Still, Rob Auslander, 
Florida Slate student body president and 
chairperson of the FSA, was not pkased to 
Wallace leave. 

It wiU definitely be a loss for the 




House Speaker-elect Ralph Haben 

I freshmen at the Capital in preparation for today 's session 



FSA director resigns 



organization," Auslander swd. 
the experience and the knowledge 
the issues we're going to face m 
session." 

Auslander has already initia 
wide search for a successor to the 
year position, although he hop^ 
qualified replacement withm 
Auslander said that the FSA - 
application for the director 
early December, and name a rep**^ 
Wallace shortly thereafter. 






Will Wallace 



utting ties witu South Africa 
p best interests of U.S.' 



s\\1 M »l F V 

\> in the best 
• • ■ ' nited States 
Aiih the 
rt'girntr in South 
.,assoona.spos!>ible. 
*av the message 
h. fohnny 
^ r. ;!ic United 
, > ohscTNcr for the 
National ( oniTCSs, 

nc Honda 

. , .it 

s ; cak again 
: .Tiiiit: at 11:15 in 
- u He! lam y on the 
; ^'j'c c.nnpus. 
\"..in National 
a black anti- 
'vd group in South 
Ihough lor years it 
as a non violent 
^roup, the past two 
have seen it grow 
1 n L' 1 V militant, 
. 'o giicnlla warfare 
• Xtrican authorities 
: Jov^n tighter on 

aril. 

'akatini believes the 
. ol the U.S. to 
r. with U.N. 
iutions calling for an 
J go against South 
a have helped keep the 
me in power. 

n spite of countless 
>luiions adopted by the 
ianization of African 
y. (he organization of 
non-aligned countries, 
: the United Nations 
ig for the severance of 
Jmaiic, economic, 
tary and nuclear ties. 



the United States has 
continued this collaboration 
he said **They've 
continued to arm the rt^mt 
to the teeth." 

And that only breeds 
contempt for the U.S., 
Makaimi feels. 

"People are going to 
become very anti- 
American. What has 
happened in Iran, may 
happen sn South Africa 
tomorrow," he said. 

*Mt*s a hostile act against 
not only the oppressed 
people of South Africa, but 
the Third World as a 
whole.'* 

According to Makatini, 
continued ties between the 
U.S. and other Western 
nations with South Africa 
only threatens international 
security. 

''There's a growing 
danger that continued 
investments in South Africa 
could lead to military 
intervention in Africa,' he 
said. And a war on the 
African continent, he 
added, would be 
catastrophic. 

According to Makatini, 
African nations 
"welcome'* the aid of Cuba 
in Hberation struggles like 
the one in Angola. *'In 
South Africa, we sing songs 
(in honor oO the Cubans." 

In fact, the U.S. 
continues to support the 
apartheid government, 
other Afrkan nations are 
driven further toward the 



■a? 




Johnny Makatini 



Soviet camp, Makatini 
believes. The Soviet 
Union is "one of many 
countries'* implementing 

the UN policies, he said. 

"But it's not the leading 
country," he's quick to 
add. "That country is 
Sweden." 

Since Makatini sees the 
downfall of the white 
regime as inevitable, he 
feels there would be an 
economic advantage in the 
U.S. severing lies with 
South Africa. That 
advantage lies in the 
region's abundant natural 
resources and proximity to 
tanker lines. 

"South Africa will 
continue producing raw 
materials,'* he said, as 
evidenced by the continued 
exportation of chromium 
and other ores from 
Zhnbabwe. 

"But what will be the 
attitude of So^ Africa if 
they feel the U.S. has 
stabbed them in the back?" 



This robbery easy to trace 



BYCURTnELDS 

II AMKAU STATF WHItl 

( odwin, owner of Tatty*s Oyster 
r»as been collecting signed d(^ biUs 
H)*^ customers for four and a half 
Harly yesterday momii^, sonmne 

''^v!cd them. 
Jin^t toGodwin.he showed up for 
^^terday morning to find that 
had forced his or her way into the 
- am earlier, besides losing most of his 
( odwin also discovered that a 
V ol beer, some snack food 
ai d a pistol left to htm by his 
• • had been taken. 

m\ tirst dollar and put it up on 
" i d Godwin. **Sonie of my 

J N BRIEF 

^^AcH^Rs in transition" 

^ be held lomght at CCIS in 110 

Millar 6:10. 

^^OMKN'S CENTER HOLDS A 

'al meeting tonight at 7:30. Winter 
Jmmink: will be discussed. Call 644- 
onniofmation. 
^'^^ NKIING CLUB MEETS 
fl^' in 201 Education at 7:30. Trips will 

"TORACT MEETS TONIGHT AT • 

lamy. 

ETA SIGMA-4LL ftfeHMEIIS 



customers wanted to be first and so they all 
put one up. It just grew from there.'* 

Since that time, the coDection has grown 
and included the names and addresses of 
people from all over the country. 

**What Tm worried about most is the 
pistol that my father left me,** said 
Gockwia. 

The bills that were taken total 
approximately $200 and are all $1 bills.They 
have someone's name and address in black 
or red magic marker across the face. 

"We have $200 worth in signed bills 
floating around the city," said Barry 
Burngarner. Tallahassee police information 
officer. "That should make them pretty 
easy to spot.** 

contact one of the following officers: 
Tamara Payne 644-3620 or Laurie Reynolds 
644-3640. 

••FROM MONTGOMERY TO 
Memphis" a film on Martin Luther King 
Jr. shows tonight at the United Ministries 
548 West Park Avenue, at 7:30. 

JOHNNY MAKATINI OF THE 
African National Congress discusses black 
nationalism today at 2:30 in 67 Bellamy. 

CHESS CLUB MEETS TONIGHT AT 7 
in 346 Union. 

THE WILDERNESS CLUB MEETS 
tonight in 118 Bclamy at 7. 

STUDENT fOUNDATHW MKTS 
tonight at 9 at tl»Hecht Home. 



Flofida ¥ lambeaa Tuesday. NovciiU 

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4 / Tuesday. November 18, 1980 FloiM* 





#1 



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1: 




Florida Flainbeau 



rhc Florida Flambeau is published by the Florida Flambeau Foundation. Inc an 
profit ccKrporaitaii which i& soldy renxxisil^ for the contorts of the paper. 
Florida Flambeau f ouMtoioa. Inc. Newsroom. 204 N. Woodward Avenue, phowe 

address. P O Box U-7001 . Florida Stale University, Tallahassee. Florida 32l». 

Sidnts BtdingfieW Editor Mar\ Tcbo 

B<»b (> l ary Photo Editor Steve Dollar 

Brad 1 ision News Editor Chris Farrdl 

( hris Brockman SpOTts Editor Meli^iMi Beckham 



independent, non- 
644-SS09{ MaHinf 



Assoctaie fcdilor 
AsNCMaie Editor 
Assoi ate Editor 
An Director 



Unleashing Strom 

Strom Thurmond has hit the ground running. 

The South Carolina conservative suddenly found himself in a 
powerf ul position after the GOP sweep in the recent elections, and the 
former Dixiecrat seems to be salivating at the possibilities before him. 

In the new, Republican -dominatedSenate that will be inaugurated 
this January, Thurmond will chair the Judiciary Committee, Ted 
.Kennedy's old stomping ground. 

Under Strom, there was apt to be some changes, but even we 
didn't realize how far-reaching tlwy would be. Or how sudden. 

Already, not three weeks after Reagstn's victory, Thurmond has 
expfcssed a desire to repeaA the 1965 Voting Rights Act and to restore 
the death penalty to the federal criminal law. 

Neither of these acts were a part of Reagan's conservative campaign 
package, and it is uncertain whether the president-elect will support 
them wholeheartedly. Nonetheless, Thurmond , with his new-found 
sway, is likely to stand tough on these two deniands, which means bad 
news for civil rights in the upcoming decade. 

The Voting Rights Act requires states or other jurisdictions covered 
by it to get prior federal approval for any political changes — such as 
redrawing legislative districts — that could affect minority voting 
rights. 

Originally the law allowed federal intervention to assure suffrage 
r^hts for minorities; for years such intervention was necessary. 

Admittedly, the law is not quite as necessary as -it once was, but 
Thurmond's reason for a repeal — to get the federal courts out of 

local affairs — is just a mite suspect. 

Discrimination is still an integral part of American culture, and it 
isn*t naive to believe minorities need some proteaion of their rights. 
The Voting Rights Act allows for such protection. 

As for getting the feds out of local affairs, it sounds suspiciously 
like the old state's rights argument to us. Of course, that argument is 
no doubt popular these days; it's in tune with the anti-big government 
song this country is singing. 

But responsible government should never go out of fashion., and the 
Voting Rights Act is the work of responsible government. 

As for the death penalty, we've expressed our opinion many times 
before, and need not rehash our arguments here. Except to say that, 
quite obviously, we disagree with the enduring Senator's view of 
criminal justice in this country. 

During the campaign we feared a Reagan presidency, feared his 
right-wing extremism. Unfortunately, we must now make a dubious 
appeal to his more moderate instincts, in hopes that he wiU stem the 
rising tide of reactionary thought flow wdting up in the semte. 



Correction 



A sentence in yesterday's Flambeau editorial on busing was garbled. 
It should have read: Violence from anti-busing parepls and between 
pupils have marked attempts to desegregate schools. 

We apologize for any iilconveoience the mot may have caused. 




Florida Flambeau Foundation. Inc. B u wiess and 
phone 644-4075: Mcdiatype lab. 314 University Ui 
Umvcrsiiy Unioa, ptanc M4-5n^. 

Rick Johnson General Manager 

Tracey Rowe Advertising Minnri 

Lmuie Soma Busmen Manlier 



Office, N. Woodwvd Avenue. 
<«4-574«: Clanincd Ad Onkc. »6 



Amy Art>ogast Production Manafcr 





a male normative universii 



BY CAROL MARBIN 

FLAMWAU COLUmraST 

On page four of the FSU Winter Bulletin, under 
the title Notkc of Non Discrimination, it reads: 
''Policy Statement: The Florida State University is 
committed to non-discrimination because 
of... sex... This committment appNes in all areas 
with students, faculty, and other University 
perscMmd. It addresses recnMig, hiring, training, 
promotioiM and applicabte employment 
conditions." 

Rule nurata' one of the bureaucrntic logic m tb&t 
the best way to handle a substantive problem is to 
correct it by instituting policy. Rule number two is 
that polides are only as effective tm tk«^ people that 
enforce them want them to be. 



In 1947 Florida State University was transformed 
from a college for women to a coeducational 
institution. Since then FSU has steadily become a 
male normative, male dominant institution. 

For the first several years, an intensive period of 
affirmative action was implemented, with the 
expressed purpose of recruiting an equitable 
number of male professors to the university faculty. 
The program was quite successful. In fact, it was so 
successful that male faculty have effectively outrun 
female faculty in every department with the 
exception of traditional women's field's, such as 
Home Economics and English. 

To correct this tendency, the University set as its 
goal in 1973, that women faculty should reflect the 
percentage of women in the population at large. 
This was again modified in 1977, so that the goal 
was to include women in faculty posts, according to 
the proportion of women in PhD programs. 

The astute observer wil