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Vou conmand turn-of-the-centuri| Tanhs, 



Size doesn't ma 


Baiilesiiips and Observation Balloons 


Strategy does! 


Tbei] command BOO-fool Figblino 


mmm. 



straieoij is oil ijoii've qoI. flnd in lliis revolulionorij non-linear mar, ijoull need \\. 


Based on the classic novel by H.G. Wells 
45-minule score licensed and composed b) 


and featuring a fully remixed 
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lal retailer 











Test Drive Off-Road 2 

The Hummer is back and 
better than ever! Get 
behind the wheel and tear 
through the backcountry 
■ where the terrain is as 
unpredictable and 
threatening as the real 
thing. Puddles splash, 
mud sloshes, leaves fly 
from the wheels, trees 
shudder, logs smash 
apart, and boulders fall 
as you race to the 
finish. Off-road 
mayhem at its best! 

- Christmas 1 998 


HardBall 6 

Gives new meaning to 
“take me out to the ball 
-including all 30 
League Baseball 
and teams in 
Motion-captured 
players 
minute 
such as 

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on their 
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Test Drive 5 

Bigger, Badder, 
Faster! The clash of 
modern super cars 
with muscle from 
the past contin- 
ues. 28 cars, 

17 tracks, split- 
screen mode, 
branching 
tracks, and 
photo- 
realistic 
graphics 
make this 
the ultmate 
racing 
challenge 


- Christmas 1998 



future of gang 
Work your 
through the 
ranks by foot 
vehicle through 
destructible 
environ- 
Wage a 
man cru- 
or head to 
Arena for 


Christmas 

1998 




Download the demos at; www.accolade.com 






e 0 


vm. 


^ UNiyiJt^ FtijUN Species 

Whether you command the 
nomadic Terrans, mysterious 
Prutoss, or voracious Zerg, 
you must devise totally unique 
strategies to master the 
specialized units, abilities, 
and technologies ol each. 

O LJNeyLJflLED 

* CHITIPHIGN eUlTDR ’ 

* Construct individual ^ 

missions or entire 
campaigns with unrivaled 
^ options and ease. 


Intense Interne! CornpeTmoN 

Challenge the world with FREE* 

— O access to Blizzard’s Baltle.net. ' Up to 
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• 

O 

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Real-time light sourcing, true line ol sight, and 
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oJ 


Collector's Special Edition Boxes — Each box 
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Engage in a deadly mix of space combat, 
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is responsible for all applicable Internet lees. SlarCrafi and Battle.nel are trademarks and Blizzard 
tered trademark of Davidson & Associates, Inc. Windovre ® is a registered trademark of Microsoft Corporation. © 1997 Blizzard Enlerlainment. All rights reserved. 


Aina/inD!>rmr 


StarCroftio the best 
real-tioie strategy oame 


Purejoaifutterateit, 


Starcratt is simply 

















to win 

man to do it. It’s why 1 love my 

Illt6ns6 3D Voodoo graphics add-in card. With VoodoO Rush' 

3D technology and a full 6MB of RAM, It's a great 
2D/3D PC graphics solution . And It supports the 
largest library of titles available for any 3D accelerator. 

Now you can get one down at your local COOipUter retailer. 

My favorite feature is TV-out , It lets me connect my PC to 
my big-screen television. 1 like standing really close to 

the TV when I play. Granny says I get too close to the set, but she’s just an of lady. 

Getting close makes me feel like I’m in the game.. .kind of like I’m TUROK. Granny likes 
Intense 3D Voodoo, too, even if she sits back a ways. She says it’s a dandy 2D WindOWS" 
accelerator for her recipe database and home financial software. So listen 
to me, you young whippersnappers, if you have a PC at home, you need one of these 
Intense 3D Voodoo add-in cards. 

It's goin' make your PC a whole lot more fun!" 

Champion TUROK': 
DINOSAUR HUNTER player, 
"Gramps,''recommencls 
$99 Intense 3D Voodoo. 

INTERGRAPH 

COMPUTER SYSTEMS 

Go to #072 @ www.computergaming.com/jnfolink 



Intense 3D Voodoo delivers super-sharp graphics for 
stunning realism and intense game play. 



7 play PC games 

And if that means kickin’ some T. Rex hutt. I’m just the of 




Sutwe! 

0ebonah! 


Hrs |)[j\|)f 



FROM THE CREATOR OF FULL THROTTLE™ AND DAY OF THE TENTACLE® COMES AN EPIC TALE 
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LucasArts Entertainment Company LLC. All rights reserved. 

Go to #246 @ www.computergaming.com/infollnk 



COMPUTER 

GAMI 

k September 1998 No. 170 

MC 

The #1 PC Game Magazine 


FEATURES 





Voodoo^ and You 

T here's a whole lotta Voodoo^ goin' on, so if you 
want to get the best graphics card for your gaming 
needs, but aren’t quite sure what to buy. check out 
Loyd Case's comprehensive Voodoo^ roundup. . .179 


PREVIEWS 


Sid Meier's Alpha Centauri 

Sid's Newest Venture is Much More Than Just 
CIV 11 in Space 54 


Homeworld 

This Game Might Singlehandedly Revolutionize 
the Tired Real-time Strategy Genre 62 


100+ Hot 
New Games 


E very year, we at CGW don our 
Nostradamus caps (we like pointy 
things) and attempt to unweave 
the tangled web of products that every PR 
rep in the industry assures us will "defi- 
nitely ship by Christmas." After hundreds 
of hours of painstaking research with 
alphas, betas, and even more arcane 
builds of software, we are confident that 
this year's crop of hits (and a few duds, 
which we graciously warn you about) will 
ship sometime in the next six months. 
Really. We mean it. Would we lie to you? 
Turn the page, already. 70 


Windows 98 

s Windows 98 really good for gaming, or is 
it just more hype from Microsoft? Get the 
inside scoop on Win 98 from Features 
Jitor Denny Atkin 168 


Hunting 
Games; The 

Bubba F 


J oin CGlYs 
resident 
deerslayer, 
JoeVallina, as he locks 
his sights on the 
test — and most 
expected — new 

genre... 170 




Celebrity Deathmatches 
We'd Pay to See 

Skeletons in 
ULTIMA IX' s Closet 

Fallout 2 

DUNGEON KEEPER 2 

WARLORDS III 


HARCWARE 

Hardware News, Pipeline 

Can 3DNow! Technology Give AMD an Edge Over 
Intel?* New Riva TNT • Tech Watch 191 

Loyd Case 

Wild World of Trade Shows 193 

Killer Gaming Rigs 196 

Dell 400IVIHZ 201 

Metabyte WickedSD 204 



Asus 34x CD-ROM 205 

Abit 440BX Motherboard . . .208 
Diamond MonsterSound 
MX200 208 



GAMER'S EDGE 


Jane's F-15 

Successful Air-to-Ground Combat 


Is the Key to Success 268 

StarCraft 

Mastering theTerrans: 

Beyond Marines 272 


Gamer's Edge Tips 

ARMY MEN, FIFA 98. 

MONSTER TRUCK MADNESS 2, 

THE OPERATIONAL ART OF WAR, 

BLACK DAHLIA, and More 282 



DEPARTMENTS 

Johnny Wilson A Lesson in Seduction 

Letters Our Readers Speak Out 

Reviews Introduction 

Reviews Index: Three Months of Ratings 

Top 100 Readers Rate the Top Games 


Hall of Fame The Greatest Games of All Time 292 

CGW Online/GameSpot The Best Game Coverage on the Web 293 

On the CG-ROM Demos Are Good, Play Some Every Day 295 

Greenspeak Girl Trouble 296 


REVIEWS 



Unreal 220 



Quake II: The Reckoning . .224 

SpecOps 225 

Monster Track Madness 2 . .228 
Army Men 229 


Adventure/RPG 


X-Files 230 


X-Files 230 



Starship Titanic 236 

Sanitarium 238 



Team Apache 240 

747 Precision Simulator . .247 

Comanche Gold 247 

F-22ADF 247 



Operational 


Art of War 250 

Industry Giant 261 

Extreme Tactics 262 



Game, Net & Match 264 


Puzzles/Classics 


World Cup Monopoly 266 

Ultimate IQ Test 267 

Sorry 267 

Ultimate 3D Puzzle 267 




WEICOME TO 
YOUR 

NEW RELiQiOJ^ 

You're about to experience a Heretic revelation like 
no other. Powerfully intensb action. Divine 3-D ,wor!ds. 

Almighty weapons and spells. And awe-inspiring 
third-person gaineplay: a tfue out-of-body cxpcj’ience. 








; Revolutionary Quake®-Powcred Action 
Seeing is believing. The enhanced Quake 11 engine 
delivers fluid 3-D animation and fast-moving action, 
plus stunning special effects, and a smart camera that 
stays with the action. 


Heretic Meels;Third Person j 

You never knew it could be like this. Surrender to ir(sanely 
fast-paced action from a frighteningly immersive third-person 
perspective. Cooperative/deathmatch multiplayer (las 
never seemed so real. : 


PPlMlI P 

I I fy 'f mi i I %-? I I 

■ PREPARE ifOR THE ' j' 
SECOND COMING j 

WWW.aclivision.Cdin Heretic ll" O 1‘J'JB Raven iollwdrc Ciirpordlion. llcreliu* is a rt^ulcfed Irsdcinark 
ond Ikrclit If i> a Irddcinorl. id Ruven Sollwurc Cu porelion. Uevuhiped by Raven Sullw^rc Corpirrelion. 
Kubli.hcd und dislribukd by AclivisUm. Inc. AclivWiin* n a registered Irddcinark ul Acjivisicin. Inc. 

This product conlums siitiwurc technology licensed (roin Id Sotiwure, Inc. (“Id rcchnolugy'J). Id rechnoliigy 
(U l']'J7 Id Siillsvure, Inc. Quuke* is a regisicred Iruduinurk and Ouaku IT is o trademark ul Id Sollware. Inc. 

All Rights Reserved. AH other Irudemarks und trade rkiincs are priipcrlles oi Iheir respeclive iswners. 



'.■‘j., 



R\V€N 


Go to #236 @ wwvftBorngyjergam^TOm/lp^^ 



THE EHTIRE PIRHET IS 


Epic Scale: 20 huge landscapes allow uf 
to 32 players to battle simultaneously ir 
16 vs. 16 player combat. Play eithe 
side: Human or alien Sway. 


VDUR BHTTIEFIEID. 


Play with 32 players over the Internet, 


1st or 3rd Person Action. 


Fully 3D World. 


— Actual game screenshots except where noted. i.. 1998 Bradetbund software, Inc, ah rights resotvrid. Extreme warfare orto Bed OrO Entertamntertt are trademar 



Prepare for an epic planetary war where there are no limits to the action. 
Whether you choose to fight as the Humans or the alien Sway you'll be 
immersed in a huge campaign of bruising, epic-sized battles that will 
demand all the precisioh fighting, strategy, and courage you can muster. 


Think you have what it takes? 

Epic Battle. Epic Story. Find out by downloading the demo at: www.extremewartare.com 

Go to #199 @ www.computergaming.comyinfolink 

Bfoderbund Software. Inc. All other company names and products are trademarks and/or registered trademarks of their respective owners. 


Multiplayer Gameplay: 20 competitive 
team multiplayer missions require 
pre-battie strategy, working together as 
a cohesive unit, and- of course- a quick 
trigger finger. 


Unique Level Design: the seamless 
integration of indoor and outdoor 
environments allows you to take tunnel 
shortcuts or fight in underground 
bunkers as the battle rages above you. 


Single Player Gameplay: 20 unique, 
compelling single-player missions 
enhance the fast-paced action and 
require you to think as you fight. 





THE REAL CARS 

I’oi'sche yi I GTI. RMW M3. Piiiio/ B 
k Salecii Musiiiiig. And iiKirc. 




THE REAL TRACKS 

Laguna Seen Raceway. Scbiing hilcrnational Raceway. 

Sear.s Pcinl Raceway. Las Vegas Malor Speedway. Ruud Atlanta. 

And more ol‘ the best all-American tracks competed on for over 45 years. 


THE REAL FEEL 


Maximize your racing e.xperience with perlormance upgrades and 
authentic ntodiUcations. 'I'lmnv a tui bu in your stock car and leave 
the competition in the dust. Ullra-fme physies and handling 
^ intensil'ies tlie ttetion. 


THE REAL CHALLENGE 


S-player siimiltaneous miiltiplay and superior 
A.I. based on world-class racers. 


THE REAL EXCITEMENT 


Dangerous sprints and treacheruus endurance 
events with extreme weather and track condition: 



pccdromI 


WWW. vie. com 


REUISTEREO 


VIROI.S E’rTEHPRi 


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iTERacti ve 






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anAnaPs 


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Lhe ^nm lun you^e ^niKked. i\d\v iIh liple Jftr yoi4*«balli 
ho plunge bn i^i or lool? away. I)iil mulie ii|) yonr^niintl 
\yiillcyou slill Kave y cliolco. 

, . ,\vww.dcHH)hFapdangcot).cotT) 

^ »6 Eito.jfe iradeniJikfo^tpdsi.Bc. PliySui'tOf indihe PliySiioon lop) jre njiijirarki of Son 


You’ve been warned 


I aster 13 horrific implements, including swords, hammers, 
muskets, magic spells and your bloody bare hands. 


PlaySlailon. 


Go to #228 ©'www.computergaming.com/infolink 






IT TAKES A 
DESERT FOX 
TO CATCH A 
DESERT RAT! 


COMING FALL '98! 


ira :14 1 


\l \' 


Call (410) 933-9191 01 vhit our web site at vvww.talonsoft.com 

Go to #242 S 


c CopytighI 1998 TdlonSdlt Inc, RO. Box 43730, White Maish, MD 21236 
.computerQaming.com/infolink 


A Lesson in Seduction 

Innovation Is Nothing Without Implementation 




ing Gordon, the chief 
creative officer of 
Electronic Arts, is prob- 
ably the smartest per- 
son in the interactive 
entertainment industry. 
Whenever I've seen EA 
make smart moves (and 
that's happened more often than I 
can remember), I've seen Bing 
Gordon there, either as an outspo- 
ken advocate or as the puppet 
master pulling the strings. He has 
a significantly higher batting aver- 
age in this business than any 
other executive 1 can think of and, 
in spite of our occasional disagree- 
ments. I've probably learned more 
about this industry from Gordon 
than from any other individual. 

One of my most vivid memories 
of a "lecture" from professor 
Gordon occurred at a Winter 
Consumer Electronics Show in Las 
Vegas. I was performing my typical 
pseudojournalistic shtick of 
needling Gordon about a technolo- 
gy that EA failed to support after 
the company had made a lot of PR 
and marketing blather about It 
being the "next big thing." The 
actual technology would only be 
meaningful to longtime Amiga 
zealots, but the lesson from Gordon 
will forever ring true and resonate 


in my mind. He simply shrugged 
and said, "Hey, don't think that we 
[game producers] don't get 
seduced by technology, too!" 

I remember that statement on 
every occasion I go to a trade 
show or meet with a publisher or 
manufacturer that has developed 


some cool new technology. The 
fact is, technological innovation 
doesn't mean squat until it's 
united with design innovation. 

Like the often prescient Mr. 
Gordon, we in the gaming com- 
munity have been briefly seduced 
by technology, but we were hop- 
ing for a relationship. Where are 
the games in which you experi- 


ence relative recoil from firing a 
weapon with your force-feedback 
joystick? Where are the games in 
which you sense taking damage 
from the feedback in your con- 
troller? Where are the games in 
which you feel the controller 
being wrenched from you as you 
hit different surfaces? Where are 
the games in which you feel the 
different weights of thrust as you 
pull back on the throttle? In short, 
where are the designs to match or 
stretch the developer kits? 

Even Microsoft's new Freestyle 
Pro controller, the most impressive 
new game controller I've seen in 
years, has a problem. Its problem 
is that it is so easy to implement 


by using the joystick drivers that 
no game producers may bother 
taking advantage of its unique 
ability to read the physical 3D 
position of the controller. No one 
may bother experimenting with a 
swashbuckling game in which you 
really move your hand in the air to 
fence with the cardinal's guard. 

No one may allow you to parry 


blows by moving the controller 
swiftly in front of the screen. It 
will require real design innovation 
to match the potential excellence 
of this controller. 

At the 1998 Computer Game 
Developers Conference, I experi- 
enced an amazing new technology 
that fed electric impulses into my 
inner ear through my earlobe. You 
could dial the sensation up or 
down according to your personal 
sensitivity. It was a very fascinating 
experience and I can see it working 
well in games. However, such a 
technology would require a vision- 
ary producer/designer to see that 
the process worked throughout the 
game. Otherwise, it won't use the 


technology enough and gamers will 
just turn it off, just as many turn off 
their force-feedback controllers. 

The same principle applies to 
thunder seats, VR goggles, and 
gimbals, which give gamers the 
sense of being in a vehicle from 
the vibrations of the subwoofer 
under their seats and the sensation 
of flight from literal movement of 
their game chairs. All of these 
exotic peripherals can add to the 
gaming experience, but they'll do 
so only if the design community 
figures out ways to give gamers 
the "Ah, ha! I never knew it could 
be like that!" experience. 

Above all, let's remember the 
essence of what Bing Gordon was 
trying to tell me on that day. 
Technology by itself has no soul. It 
is only when it is implemented 
well in actual games that we 
begin to be excited by its poten- 
tial and experience a satisfying 
relationship— instead of a brief 
seduction. I think it's one of the 
most important lessons I've ever 
learned. 


BING, GOES THE STRINGS! At the 1988 Winter Consumer Electronics Show in Us Vegas. Electronic 
Arts Executive Vice President Bing Gordon (left) demonstrates a game to CGWfounder Russell Sipe. 
During this session, Gordon stated that "We are seduced by technology, too!" 


Ve been seduced by the technology, 
but we were hoping for a relationsh|f.^ 


i', computergaming. c 


COMPUTER GAMING WORLD » SEPTEMBER 1998 





“DragonFire will raise the bar for RPG/ 
Adventure games.” - GameCenter 

“Sierra pulled out all the stops for this 
beautiful game.” - PCFan 


©1998 Sierra On-Line, [nc. ® and/or design 
trademarks of, or licensed to Sierra On-Line, Inc. 
Bellevue, \V.^ 98007. .All rights reserved. 



rc the depths ol^ Atlantis. 1 here lies the answer to an 
ancient prophecy and the key to the kingdom. 


:o lace with 
creatures in; 


Prepare to use sword, dagger, axe, and bare lists to defend 
the realm-and vour life. 



• Over 25 spectacular 
spells and 70 unique 
characters to face in multi- 
player or solo challenges • CD surround sound and 

fully orchestrated score in 
Over 100 exotic stereo 

locations to explore with 

many suh-t]ue.scs • Available on PC & Mac- 

Go to #077 @ www.computergaming.com/infolink 



Original rmcsic soundtrack album also available. 
eeprc\ie\vat\v\v\v.QG5.com. Orders 1.800.757.7707 






> Top-notch 3D graphics showcase cities, 
scotched terrain, real-time lighting effects, 
and the AH-6 aA Apache combat helicopter. 


1 Test your combat skills in two full 
campaigns and i8 stand alone missions; 
mission editor provided for extended 
gameplay. 


> Interactive flight environment registers turbulence from 
explosions, blasts, and other aircraft - support for force 
feedback joysticks included! 


! Manage your team of ace pilots! 
Options inciude ski!! ratings, fatigue 
and moraie management, recruitment, 
and courts martiai. 


> Training mode with instructor feedback, 
adjustabie difficulty settings, and 
easy/advanced flight models will get 
you in the air fast. 


) Supports both head-to-head and 
cooperative multiplayer for dogfights 
over the internet, on a local network, or 
modem to modem against your buddy. 


7.rj7 7-7 


S I MIS 


98 Simis Holdings Ltd. All rights reserved. Team Apache is a trodemark 
mis Holding Ltd. used under license by Mindscape Inc. 


Go to #189 @ www.computergaming.com/infolink 

www.teamapache.mfnclscope.corr 


Dead Web? 

H ow come you have allowed the Computer 
Gaming WorldWeb site to die? It hasn't 
been updated in aimost a month. I am sorry 
to see it go. I visited it almost daily, and am hoping 
you will start refreshing it again soon. 

— Ron Raducanu 
via the Internet 

Good question. We've been wondering the same thing. Ziff- 
Davis has chosen GameSpot to be CGW'5 online provider, and 
we're currently working out a design with them. Aauaiiy, by 
the time you read this, we should have anew home page 
with cool new features, such as downloadable demos and up- 
to-the-minute news. Best of all, the URL remains vmw. 
computergaming.com. We apologize for the delay, but 
with GameSpot's reputation as the leading source for gaming 
on the Web, you'll be in good hands. 


Columnapping 

I hear tell that there will no 
longer be columns in CGW. Huh? 

— Jonathan Baron 
via the Internet 

During the summer months, as 
we pasty-faced gamers don our 
shades and venture out to the 
beach in an effort to get enough of 
a tan to last us through long winter 
months of StarCraft and Quake II 
DeathMatches, the magazine 
inevitably gets smaller. Not 
wanting to sacrifice the length and 
quality of our reviews or strategy 
features, we put a number of 
columns on summer hiatus. The 
good news is that you'll see the 
return of the most popular columns 
in a new format in next month 's 
issue. Watch for them! 

Army Men 

I recently graduated from the 
U.S. Army's Command and General 
Staff College in Ft. Leavenworth, 
Kansas, During my third, and final, 


term, I participated in an 
experimental course here called 
Military History Through 
Simulations. As a longtime war- 
gamer I probably do not have to tell 
you how excited I was about the 
course. Having been in the Army for 
more than 1 4 years, I could never 
understand why my profession did 
not make use of all the wonderful 
military simulations that were 
available in the commercial market. 
The simulations we played, 
evaluated, and then wrote about 
were all historical battles. 

As you might suspect most of 
those in the course (including the 
instructor) were old gamers like 
myself. From the V for Victory 
series to Sio Meier's Gettysburg, we 
evaluated the simulations on their 
ability to re-create as accurately as 
possible our understanding of 
actual battlefield conditions. 

So what does this have to do 
with your magazine? Not much, I 
guess, except that from time to 
time I pick up a copy to learn about 



the latest in militaiy simulations. I 
particularly enjoy your annua! 
wargame blowout, and your 
reviews help me separate the 
"wheat from the chaff" (or 
something like that). Anyway, just 
wanted to write and let you know 
that your Army has not completely 
overlooked military simulations as a 
tool for our professional devel- 
opment, and many of us eagerly 
await each new military simulation 
that hits the market. Keep up the 
good work I 

—Peter A. Martinson 
Major, United States Army 

Sweet Release 

As the release date nears, 
anticipation sets in and I find myself 
constantly calling up Best-Buy and 
checking the Internet to see if the 
game has made it to the shelves. 
After hearing the news of Unreal's 
release I quickly head off to the 
store, pick up the box, scream cries 
of thanks to God Almighty, and 
then I check the infamous system 
requirements on the bottom of the 
box. The label says Intel Pentium 
200 MMX recommended. That isn't 
a problem, I have that exact 
processor. Next I read 32MB of 
RAM recommended. Thank God I 
opted for the 64MB DIMMS! I then 
see 450MB available hard-drive 
space. Just installed new 4.3GB 
hard drive, no problems there. At 
this point I am feeling pretty good 


about myself and I wipe the sweat 
off my forehead. I turn the box to 
the back and read the Optimized 
for Intel MMX and 3Dfx. Yes!!!!! 

I have it all!!!!! 

I go home and put the shiny disc 
into my 24x CD-ROM drive and 
listen to the spinning CD purr, I 
start up the game and I am dazzled 
by the graphics and characters. I 
am blowing away aliens enjoying 
myself as if I were Bill Gates 
spending money. Then I get out of 
my tight corridor and into an open 
arena. Outcomes the Titan!!! As 
soon as he comes out, my system 
slows down as if my PC had 
"Gump" syndrome. "She can't do 
it. Captain I " was all I thought to 
myself. I read the system require- 
ments again. Nope, I wasn't 
dreaming— according to the box, I 
met the recommended system 
requirements! In desperation I 
quickly got online and read the 
most recent documentation. In 
several places I read that Unreal 
runs optimally on a Pentium II. 
NoooM! Denied!!! I thought I had 
the recommended system for 
running UnrealIII 
I write this letter in desperation 
that this never again happens to 
anyone else. Someone should make 
them pay! Game manufacturers 
should tell us, the gaming public, 
clearly on the box what actually 
runs the game well. Oh well, I 
guess for now I will have to replay 


.A 


/.compulergaming.t 


COMPUTER GAMING WORLD » SEPTEMBER 1998 





The Evolutii 

250 Watts. 6 Speakers. 3 Graphies process 



“This is the company that created the Gaming PC. 

Falcon Northwest was marketing high-end computers to 
gamers since before other computer makers knew such a 
market existed. The long tenure has given Falcon 
Northwest a distinct advantage; to be frank, nothing else 
we’ve seen comes close to the gaming power in the ever- 
evolving MACH V.” -PC Gamer 


FALCON NORTHWEST 


COMPUTER SYSTEMS 




of a Legend: 

. And the history to know how to use them 


The Falcon MACH V series of 
custom built PCs has been in 
production since before there were 
competitions to judge them - before 
there were awards to be won. In that 
history many big-name challengers 
and small-name imitators trying to 
clone our systems have come and 
gone. There will always be those that 
try to copy instead of innovate. A 
copy is never as good as the original. 
Own the legend. 


filcon Northwest Computer Sir*tem» 




COMRUTER^^^^ 

GAMING 

The #1 PC Game Magazine eWorld 


lee Uniacke 


Editor-in-Chief Johnny Wilson 
Executive Editor Ken Brown 
Features Editor Denny Atkin (Simulations) 
Reviews Editor Teny Coleman (Wargames) 
Technical Editor Dave Salvator (Hardware) 
Associate Editor Jeff Green (Adventure, Sports), 
News Editor Charlotte Panther (Ciassics/Puaies) 
Copy Chief Joe Vallina 
Assistant Editor /Ulen Greenberg 
Editorial Assistant Matthew Schaeler 
CG-ROM Editor Jack Rodrigues 
CG-ROM Assistant Thierry Nguyen 
Contributing Editors Scotpia (Adventure Games), 
Charles Ardai (Interactive Fiction), Loyd Case (Hardware) 
Founder Russell Sipe 


Art Director Dan Fitzpatrick 
Associate Art Director Steven Wanczyk 


Production Director Carlos Lugo 
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Manager Michele Kellogg 
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Address questions and feedback to; 

CGlVEditorial, 135 Main St„ 14th Floor, San Frattcisco, CA94105. 
Or you may contact us via: 

Phone; (41 5) 357-4900 
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Web site: vvww.computergaming.com 


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Address inquiries to C6W Advertising, 135 Main St., 14th Floor, San 
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■ IDB 

I:r- 

SLOW MO Unreal's no smoothy on a 
Pentium 200. 


games like Jedi Knight that are really good 
and run really well on my system. 

So, LucasArts, got any new expansions 
planned? 

— Chad Dayton 

via the Internet 

Unfortunately, our experience is that the 
so-called minimum requirements for most 
games spell out the horsepower you need to 
simplyiun thegame. You'll almost always 
need at. least “recommended"-level 
hardware to see the game running smoothly 
and in all its graphic glory. We've considered 
trying to include suggested minimum 
requirements with our reviews, but the 
problem is that "playable " is a very 
subjective term. For instance, Jeff Green, 
apparently accustomed to the slow pace of 
adventures, RPGs, and football, found the 
original release of Interstate ' 76 playable at 
640x480 resolution on a Pentium 166. Sim- 
spoiled early-adopter poster-child Denny 
Atkin, on the other hand, found it way too 
jerky at that resolution, and had to drop 
down to 320x200. (Although Denny spanked 
Jeff in thegame, so perhaps it's not such a 
subjective call after all. . . .) If you don 't want 
to drop a game's resolution down ordeal 
with jerky play, make sure you have the 
"recommended, " rather than "minimum, " 
hardware at hand. 

Which Voodoo? 

I am a poor graduate student with the 
horrible hobby of loving computer 


DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS 

In our July cover story we incorrectly 
identified Rick Goodman as the codesigner of 
Age of Empires. He was the lead designer. We 
also omitted the fact that Goodman left the 
team after the release of the game, We 
apologize for the oversight. 

Also, in our July review of Ml Tank Platoon 
II, we inadvertently listed the game with a 2.5- 
star rating. The game should have received 3 
stars, as it was listed on the reviews index. We 
regret the error. 


entertainment. I try to keep my computer 
fairly well upgraded, although I am usually 
behind the cutting edge by about 6-8 
months, for financial reasons. 1 have yet to 
purchase a 3Dfx card and am desperately 
wanting to. So here is the question. ..How 
long will Voodoo technology be usable? 

Would you recommend I save a /of of money 
and buy a Canopus Pure 3D LX for $109 (a 
Voodoo board) or wait? I may not ever buy a 
Voodoo^ card, I am not sure. But I have read 
your reviews of the Canopus Pure 3D and you 
guys gave it your Best Hardware of the Year 
award last year so you must have been 
impressed. Is a Voodoo card really worth it 
now that Voodoo^ is out? If Voodoo [1 ] will 
be good for the next two years, then I might 
go ahead and get one, but if you think it will 
be obsolete in three months I'll forget it. 

Please write back so I can make up my mind. 

— Dave Edwards 
via the Internet 

While there are already graphics cards out 
that outperform the original Voodoo chipset, 
that chipset is far from obsolete. Given that 
game developers are just now finding ways 
to harness any of the Voodoo^ features, other 
than higher screen resolutions, we feel that it 
will be early '99 before you even see games 
that really look all that different on Voodoo^ 
as compared to the original Voodoo chips. 
Even then, because Voodoo-level technology 
isn't yet even considered the low-end of the 
gaming spectrum, you can look forward to 
games running well on it well into the year 
2000. They'll be flashier on the Voodoo^ and 
perhaps run in higher resolution, but the 
gaming experience on a card like the PureSD 
LX will still be better than what you're seeing 
on a 2D-only or first-generation 3D card now. 

Another consideration is that, unless your 
system has at least a Pentium II processor 
running at 266MHz or faster, you won't see 
much performance difference between a card 
equipped with the original Voodoo chipset 
and one with the Voodoo^ chipset The 
Voodoo^ really requires a very fast processor 
to work its performance magic. 

Matrox has just lowered the price on its 
M3D PowerVR PCX2 to under $40. It doesn't 
support as wide a variety of software as do 
the 3Dfx Voodoo cards, but at that price, 
there's no longer any excuse not to have 
some 3D capability in your system. 

For more detailed information regarding 
Voodoo vs. Voodoo^, check out Loyd Case's 
feature on the subject, which begins on 
page 179. MVi 


COMPUTER CAiVlING WORLD » SEPTEMBER 1998 


/.computergaming, com 








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T he exploits of the Vault 13 wanderer are well 

known to fans of Interplay's FALLOUT, but perhaps 
you're wondering what became of our hero, last 
seen walking off into the sunset? There are no docu- 
mented accounts of the events following his heroic 
deeds. However, in the far northern wastes, a village has 
kept the tales of the first Vault Dweller alive. This tribal 
village is the home of the wanderers' descendants. 


The wastelands remain harsh 
and unforgiving, and a decade of 
drought has plagued the inhabi- 
tants. The descendants are in dire 
need of a hero to save them from 
starvation. So, the task has come to 
you, the Chosen One, the future 
leader of the tribe, to save the vil- 
lage. Like your predecessor, you 
must venture into the unknown, 
brave dangers, and find an artifact 
that promises salvation: the Garden 


of Eden Creation Kit. First, however, 
you must prove yourself worthy of 
tackling the challenges ahead by 
passing through the Cave ofTrials. 
If you succeed, you will be given 
the honor of wearing your ances- 
tor's Vault 13 suit as you embark 
on your quest. 

For FALLOUT veterans, the inter- 
face and interaction will be famil- 
iar: The game engine remains the 
same with only a few cosmetic 


changes. The character selection 
screen allows you to choose from 
preconfigured or customizable 
characters. While characters' basic 
attributes remain unchanged, there 
will be new features such as a 


hand-to-hand combat skill called 
"flaming dragon punch." Inhab- 
itants still walk in a zigzag pattern 
and can count only up to three dig- 
its when bartering. You'll still have 
the venerable PlPBoy 2000 at your 



ro/v 


COMPUTER GAMING WORLD » SEPTEMBER 199B 


iputcfgaming.cotn 



disposal during your travels, 
with its status, automaps, and 
archives just a click away. 

Fans will also appreciate 
that the members of your 
party are no longer just pack 
mules and bullet fodder. In 
FALLOUT 2, they are much 
smarter: Not only do they 
use the best weapon they 
have, they also wear the 
armor you give them. 

Nonetheless, watch your 
six. Your reputation no 
longer precedes you; it's 
alive only in the town where 
you earned it. Weary travel- 
ers will be happy to hear 
that for 2,000 bottle caps 
you can be the proud owner 
of a car. it even comes with 
a full tank of gas. ..it's just 
missing one rare part. 

As you journey through 
the many new settlements, 
you'll discover the world 
has changed, but not all for 
the better, Sex, drugs, big- 
otry. organized crime, and 
slavery have proliferated. 

This new world confronts 
you with decisions that 
have dire and immediate 
consequences. Your refusal 
to help an anxious boy 



retrieve his lost dog will 
ensure the child's death, as 
he runs headlong into a 
wooded area full of toxic 
waste puddles and danger- 
ous silver geckos. The deci- 
sions get more complex, as 
you must weigh your 
responsibilities, loyalties, 
and morals. But in the midst 
of all the fighting and bick- 
ering, there are little love 
stories that will bring a tear 
to even a mutant's eye. 

— Jack Rodrigues 


Digital Living 

Shifting From Analog to Digital 
Could Be Good News for Gamers 


T he Internet has proven to be a gale-force 
wind tossing around the giants of the con- 
sumer electronics, communications, com- 
puting, and entertainment industries. Those 
giants are now feverishly constructing 


alliances like shelters lest they be destroyed by the 
nature of this force. At the Digital Living Room— a con- 
ference convened by Upside magazine to explore how 
the consumer experience will change as the world 
shifts from analog to digital — it was clear that the 
media convergence creating the high-tech home of the 
21 St century will have a definite impact upon gaming 

The Home Phoneline Networking Alliance (HPNA) 
is the very real first step in that direction. This rapid- 
ly growing consotlium of communications giants 
{including AT&T and Lucent) announced its forma- 
tion at this show. The HPNA's lofty goal is to provide 
simultaneous Internet access and domestic network- 
ing — with Plug-and-Play simplicity — for all of a 
home's PCs {15 million US homes now have more 
than one PC, and the number is growing rapidly) at 
a consumer price (about $100 per PC for adapters). 
Instead of consumers having to wire their own 
Ethernet, however, the HPNA proposes using a 
home's current telephone wiring {every RJ11 jack 
becomes a node that moves data at about 1 
Megabit/second) without affecting phone usage. 

While other Ideas are in the works— some folks 
suggest using a home's internal electrical wiring as a 
built-in alternative (with every plug a node); others 


opt for "taking a home wireless" (the Holy Grail of in- 
home connectivity, using radio frequencies to connect 
all your consumer electronics)— theHPNA has a work- 
ing solution very close at hand. Some refinements to 
the technology are being made, and a product is 
scheduled to ship later this year. 

This presents some interesting new 
game design possibilities as families 
can stay together and play together 
(more easily using multiple PCs in 
their homes) from different rooms in 
the house. I'm sure the future holds 
another M.U.L.E. game that will do 
for the computer medium what 
Monopoly has done for boardgames. 
The days of inviting friends over to 
play games on your home PCs are 
closer at hand, and when you com- 
bine that with Net access during play, 
the possibilities are endless. 

It was also interesting to learn that 
by the year 2000 there will be 5 mil- 
lion homes with DVD players on their 
TVs, but 100 million with DVD play- 
ers in their PCs. This means that 
Hollywood must focus its DVD content toward PC 
entertainment (namely, games) and not just movies. 

Finally, for the ever-young, LEGO unveiled its 
Mindstorm Robotics Invention System. This little com- 
puter, along with a couple of motors and three sen- 
sors, gets snapped into your LEGO pieces to make pro- 
grammable robots. Programming is done by simple 
logic modules via your PC, but the hands-on learning 
value of LEGO blocks (not to mention their inherent 
fun factor) will shoot through the roof with this prod- 
uct, The play and addiction value of a LEGO robot is so 
high, I predict we'll all be taking a turn rolling around 
on the floor getting our blocks off. — Alan Emrich 


Philips DVX8000 Multimedia Home 
Theater (PC CD-ROM and entertain- 
ment software titles included) 




^.computcrfiaming.c 


COMPUTER GAMING WORLD « SEPTEMBER 199B 


CelebritjOeathmatch 


Battles We'd Pay to See, if the Lawyers Would Let Us \ 

lie US 

1 Lara Croft 

PRO: She's a gorgeous, 
no-nonsense action woman. 
sL^^^ajjP CON: Back problems, always 

wears shorts regardless of season. 

Winner: 

Lara gets jump on 

Indy in Arctic, but 
frostbite prevents 
her from pulling 
the trigger. 

PRO: Eats mysterious 

mushrooms and grows / 

to enormous size. 1 dH|l 

CON: Three-pixel plumber's \ 1 ^rj||v 

crack can be a distraction. 

The Avatar 

how's he gonna win here? 

Winner: 

Mario bounces 
from platform to 
platform with 
ease, while 

Avatar drowns 
in first creek. 

Derek Smart 

PRO; The most brilliant, innov- / 

ative, creative, and modest J m 

game designer in the | M 

history of the hobby. V jM 

CON; Doesn't take 

criticism that well. 

1 The Coke Machine 

* PRO; Can take a lickin' 

and keep on servin' cold ones. 

CON: Passive-aggressive method 

Winner: 

(The Rematch) 

Jury still out — 

Derek promises 
victory as soon 
as BATTLECRUISER 
4000.0.423 ships. 

Luke Skywalker 

PRO; Good pilot; can bring 
down tall Empire AT-ATs 
with a swipe of his lightsaber. 

CON; Whiny and hot-tempered; 
has weakness for Ewoks. 

Clolonel Blair 

PRO: Best pilot in Confed history; 
(§§». \ many years of experience. 

Winner: 

Mark Hamill 
gives up after a 
few rounds and 
takes himself 
out for a beer. 

Darth Vader 

PRO: Dark Side Force Master; 

cool suit; great voice. 1 

CON: Horrid asthma problem. ^KESt^Lyi 

■Wi 

|> ^ ^ Putt Putt 

V happy; has killer 

' i^ i sidekick. Pep the dog. 

i 

k. 4 1 /’ sometimes runs out of gas. 

winner: 

Cornered at zoo 
by Putt Putt and 
Pep, Vader Is 
goaded into 
embolism. 

Johnny Wilson 

CON: Does talk on ( ) 

Richard Garriott 
/ British) 

1 B?N ^ B 1 PRO: Has medieval act 

f*"'. /I / down pat — great hairdo, too. 

CON: Too many frilly shirts; 
been a while since last big hit. 

Winner: 

Wilson chal- 
lenges Garriott to 
a M.U.LE. show- 
down, but game 
won't run on 
Garriott's P-ll 

400. It's a tie. 


COMPUTCH GAMING WORLD * SEPTEMBER 1998 


ir.computetgaming.c 





Former Team Member Tells All 


CGW: People who don't 
know you might wonder why 
you're going on the record 
about the changes in ULTIMA. 
Can you start by explaining 
how you came to be involved 
with the ULTIMA series? 

Mike McShaffry: I started 
playing ULTIMA on the old Apple II. 
It was the most complex and 
amazing game in existence. I 
always eagerly awaited the next 
ULTIMA in the series because each 
new ULTIMA completely shattered 
the old barriers of immersion and 
realism in a fantasy RPG, It's true 
that god was in the details — flags 
waving in the breeze, mind-numb- 
ing moral messages and dilem- 
mas, and a game system that let 
you think instead of guess. It's safe 
to say that I was a hard-core 
ULTIMA player. 


About the time that 
Origin released ULTIMA VI; THE 
FALSE PROPHET (which I pre- 
ordered, to get that special ver- 
sion signed by Lord British him- 
self!), I was offered the job [at 
Origin]; it was 
like a dream 
come true. After 
all, it was 
ULTIMA that 
really captured 
my interest in 
computing and 
motivated me to 
go to college 
and get my B.S. 
in Computer Science. That was 
October 1 990. 

So, what did you do at 
Origin? 

My first project was MARTIAN 
DREAMS, an ULTIMA VI spin-off pro- 


duced by Warren Spector. I was a 
grunt programmer. . . the guy that 
let you dig holes in the Martian 
soil and push those cool mine carts 
around. Next, I was "lent" to the 
ULTIMA VII team 
for what was 
supposed to be 
six weeks. Well, I 
never made it 
back! On 
ULTIMA VII, I 
handled a lot of 
user interface 
tasks, using a 
system called 
Gumps. After ULTIMA Vli, I was pro- 
moted to Project 
Director, and got 
my first lead posi- 
tion on ULTIMA 
VIII. In addition to 
programming I 
managed the tacti- 
cal needs of the 
project on a day to 
day basis. I was 
responsible for getting Origin to 
allocate some time and budget to 
create the ULTIMA VIII patch, as 
well as the programming on the 
patch itself. We learned that man- 
aging an ULTIMA is just too big a 
job for one person to handle, so 
we created a management team 
on ULTIMA IX. 

Could you explain exactly 
what happened to ULTIMA IX? 
We printed a story some time 


Computer Gaming 
World talked to 
Mike McShaffry, for- 
mer Project Director 
for ULTIMA: PAGAN, about 
the shift from the promised 
ULTIMA IX, which Origin 
fessed would return to the 
ULTIMA tradition, and its cur- 
rent incarnation as ULTIMA: 
ASCENSION. —Johnny fflfilson 


ago about how Lord British 
and Warren Spector were going 
to get back to the core-ULTIMA. 
What happened with that? 

it was pretty obvious after 
Origin released ULTIMA VIII; 

PAGAN that the game design was- 
n't making the die-hard ULTIMA 
fans happy. Richard Garriott and 
others at Origin knew that ULTIMA 
sales weren’t accelerating as fast 
as the rest of the market; so cer- 
tain changes were made in the 
design of ULTIMA VIII to interest 
more than [justj hard-core ULTIMA 
fans. That's why the story took 
place away from Britannia, the 


scope of the game was drastically 
reduced, and the puzzles were 
more like what you'd expect in a 
game like PRINCE OF PERSIA. 
Needless to say, when the game 
was originally released there was 
a lot of negative feedback. Right 
after the release. Origin's cus- 
tomer service department com- 
piled a list of complaints. It 
weighed about 10 pounds! The 

Continued on page 294 


"As for ULTIMA 

observed that, as is traditional with their flagship series, the 
technology is being built from scratch. Yet the feel of the game 
will be much more akin to Ultimas IV through VI. As the third 
installment of the third ULTIMA trilogy (1-111, IV-Vl, VII-IX), ULTIMA 
IX is intended to be the epic of all epics-completing the 
Guardian trilogy of VII, Vill and iX once and for all. Explained 
Lord British, "We also reach back to ULTIMA IV and resolve the 
relationship between the Avatar and the Guardian. And as long 
as we were reaching back to ULTIMA IV, we decided to reach all 
the way back to Ultima I and to Mondain and his magic gem and 
tie up everything back to the beginnings of Britannia." 

—Taken from an article in the October 1995 issue of CGW 
[Issue #135, READ.ME, page 24], in which Richard Garriott 
discusses the direction he plans to take with ULTIMA IX 


A 


/.computefgamir>g.< 


COMPUTER GAMING WORLD » SEPTEMBER 1998 




Ul-GAUE 


CINEMAW 


itssre da»Qf sso£l fot P-C.ll' 


CINEMATIC 



H NEWS FLASH 


Quake III Is Dead 

John Carmack announced 
recently that QUAKE III is dead, 
Instead, td Software is work- 
ing on a new project that will 
be called QUAKE ARENA. 

According to Carmack, the 
new game will consist exclusive- 
ly of DeathMatch-style gaming: 
The single-player game will be a 
progression through a ranking 
ladder against botAls.The 
change came about because 
Carmack felt that id had been 
designing two games at once — 
the single-player game and the 
multiplayer game — with often 
conflicting goals. Choosing not 
to focus on the single-player 
game will allow id to make sig- 
nificant advances to the multi- 
player experience. 

The graphics engine will still 
be OpenGL-only, with signifi- 
cant new features not seen 
anywhere before, but it will 
also have fallback modes to 
render at roughly QUAKE II 
quality and speed. The game 
is still on track for an end-of- 
year release. 

Duke Gets Unreal 

According to a recent 
announcement from 3D 
Realms, the upcoming DUKE 
NUKEM FOREVER Will now be 
built around Epic Mega- 
Games' UNREAL engine. The 
game had been originally built 
around id's QUAKE II engine. 

DUKE NUKEM FOREVER pro- 
ject leader George Broussard 
says the team realized that the ; 
direction they wanted to go 
could be better achieved with 
the UNREAL engine. Broussard 
is confident that the game data 
will transfer easily to the new 
engine, and he expects the 
transition will set the team 
back only about a month to six 
weeks. The game is scheduled 
for a Q1 '99 release. 


SouthPeak Goes 
Looney Tunes 

SouthPeak Interactive has 

entered into an agreement with 
Warner Bros, to become the 
chief developer of family enter- 
tainment CD-ROMs featuring 
Looney Tunes, Pinky and the 
Brain, and the Animaniacs. 

The 1998 games lineup will 
include a multiplayer, arcade- 
style strategy game tentatively 



titled PINKY AND THE BRAIN: 
WORLD CONQUEST, a side- 
scrolling An/mam'acs adventure 
game, and eight LOONEY TUNES 
ANIMATED JIGSAW puzzles. 

SHRA Burns 
Rubber Online 

The Simulated Hot Rod 
Association (SHRA) recently 
held its inaugural online drag- 
racing event, the Kali/Thrust- 
Master Open Bracket Chal- 
lenge. The SHRA was created 
for users of Bethesda Soft- 
works' BURNOUT: CHAMPION- 
SHIP DRAG RACING. The presea- 
son events offered prizes of 
more than $5,000, and, accord- 
ing to SHRA founder Tim 
McArthur, the official season 
will offer bigger events and 
better prizes. For more informa- 
tion on SHRA, head to www. 
shra.com. In related news, 
Bethesda plans a September 
release for BURNOUT: CHAM- 
PIONSHIP DRAG RACING 
PLAYER'S CHOICE EDITION, 
featuring the top 10 most- 


requested features straight 
from drag-racing fans. 

Novalogic Releases 
Three Games in One 

Novalogic recently released 
WORLD OF COMBAT 2000, a mili- 
tary sim compilation that 
includes the helicopter sim 
COMANCHE, the flight sim F-22 
LIGHTENING II, and the tank sim 
ARMORED FIST 2, all for the price 
of one product. 

Also In the works at Novalogic 
is DELTA FORCE, a commando- 
style action game, based on the 
activities of the U.S. Army's top 
secret special forces unit. The 
most impressive feature of DELTA 
FORCE is that gamers can see and 
engage the enemy beyond the 
75-pace viewing limitations typi- 
cal of this kind of game, DELTA 
FORCE can be played from both a 
first- and third-person perspec- 
tive, and will include large-scale 
multiplayer capabilities via Nova- 
World, Novalogic's free online 
gaming site. The game is slated 
for a fall release. Look for a full 
sneak preview in next month's 
issue of CGW. 

ThrustMaster 
Reduces Work Force 
by 30 Percent 

In an attempt to improve prof- 
itability and increase the value of 
its stock, controller giant Thrust- 
Master recently cut 30 percent 
of its work force. With only 90 
remaining employees, Thrust- 
Master hopes to position itself for 
higher profitability. 

Although first- and second- 
quarter revenues were lower 
than expected, ThrustMaster CEO 
Stephen Aanderud said, "[the 
company] is confident that our 
introduction of new products for 
1998 will be successful and posi- 
tion the company for a strong 
fourth-quarter holiday selling 
season and beyond." 



I'.computergaming.c 


COMPUTER GAMING WORLD » SEPTEMBER 1998 






Ni: w KnemiI'S 

KliADY TO TACK TMli TOlKJHIiST HOKDI! Of StKOGOS, 


sTKMcin iKOM Tilt iiio-VMs. Thk Siai.khr, TOKKm. 


DAKOM.US, Mtnic COMMAMDtK, CaKKIKK AMI) TMK 
Qui'im Bitch hkkskii-, this Bi.ack Widow. 


14 KNTIREt.Y NKW f.EVKl.S AND 
10 NKW DKATHMATCH f.KVKt.S 


BKANI) MliW KtAt ICSIATK WfPH TMK SAMIv DYNAMIC SI»Si: 0|- KHAI 
AtID DRAMATIC VISUAC.S AS QUAKK IK' THKSI! HtW KMVIKOIIMITITS 
Wil l. CHAI,I,KMGI-; KVHI TMK HIOGKST QUAKK II ' A|-IC(ONADO. 


New PowKR-ups 

Tag ‘km and hag ‘km. Dkathmatch Si'Kafic Powkruhs-. 
THK VliNGIiANCK Si'HKRK, HUITIKR SPMKKI!, AMD AKn*MArn« 
Bomb. With kvkkything that wk'vk cookkd ui* kor 

YOU HKRK, YOU KK SlIRK TO AMMIHII.ATK AMYOMK OR 
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Thk Chainsaw, ET(- Riki.k. Disruktor. and 

Pl.ASMA niiAM, IK YOU CAn’t GET THK JOB DOMK 
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sprrriNC distance away khom you. When you heed a uthe 
KI.BOW ROOM, this BABY CI.EARS A CROWD OUT IN A HURRY. 


Pi.ASMA Beam 

With this hi-tech i.aser there’s no need to worry 
about shrai'nei. backkiring on you. This one read-y 

GETS TO THK HEART OK THE MATTER - WHATEVER IT MAY BE. 


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— I Expiosive Tipped f oechette Riki.k. Pierces through 

ARMOR AND BODY HKKORTf.ESSI.Y, THEN GOES OKK EXPIXDSIVEI.Y. 
; Now YOU SEE THEM, NOW YOU DON T. 

Go to #230 @ www.computergaining.com/infolink 





Better Ways to Torture 


T hough DUNGEON KEEPER was an excellent game, there was some room for improve- 
ment, and the expansion pack, DEEPER DUNGEONS, did little more than provide new 
levels. In the current wave of sequeiitis, the concept of the game as an evolutionary 
beast is becoming more and more 
acceptable. With that in mind, DUNGEON 
KEEPER II looks as if it will be the title we all wished 
the first one could have been. The pixelated sprites 
that were used for the creatures have been replaced 
by polygons within a full 3D world, and the overall 
look is much more polished as a result. 

While Bullfrog has managed to maintain the sin- 
ister atmosphere, the dungeons themselves are now 

brighter and clearer; this is most noticeable when 

you play from the first-person view. The water and lava 
I are also noticeable: 

I They now clearly 


In the WoHa 


I move and have 
mass and force — you can flood caverns and watch both 
heroes and minions get washed (or burned) away. 

Creatures are now designed within their own spatial 
area so that they won't cross through each other. This 
will allow single creatures to block narrow passages, 
delaying the advance of larger numbers of foes. The 
game has 20 levels and 1 7 new characters, including 
Rats and Salamanders. You can now punch and slap to 
maintain discipline, and your methods of torture have 
also been improved. In addition to torturing creatures 
conventionally in the chamber, you can look forward to 
manually pulling off their limbs. 

DUNGEON KEEPER II will include LAN and Internet multi- 
play and will support 3D acceleration. Look for a full sneak 
preview in an upcoming issue of CGW. — Alan Dykes 


Playing Lately 


CCW Survey * 

Last Month Months on Chart 

1. StarCraft (Blizzard/CUC) 

1 

2. Quake II (id Software/Actiinsion) 

2 4 

3. of Empires (Microsoft) 

1 4 

4. Might and Magic VI (3DO) 


i 5. Total Annihilation (Cavedog/GT) 


i 6. Panzer General II (SSI) 

9 5 

: 7. Diablo (Blizzard/CUC) 

3 16 

i 8. Jedi Knight (LucasArts) 

7 6 

1 8. Heroes ii: POL (New World Computing) 

6 8 

1 8. Wing Commander Prophecy (Origin/EA) v 


* Check your mailbox: We mil a survey to 1,500 randomly chosen subscribers each month. The \ 

results of Playing Lately indicate what games readers 

are blowing the most lime on, as opposed to 

j • • the readers' overall "quality ranking in.theTop 100. 

! PC Data Best-sellers ** 


\ ' i Last Monti) 

1. StarCraft (Blizzard/Cendant Software) ' : ; - 

’ 1 

2. Unreal (GT Interactive) 


' 3. Deer Hunter (GT Interactive) . 

2 . 

4. titanic Adventure Out of Time (Cyberflix) 

3 

5. Myst (RedOri)) 

5 

6. Might 8> Magic VI(3DO) 

- 

7, Cabela's Big Game Hunter (Head Games) 

4 

1 8. AniiyMen(3DO) 


9. Rebeilion (LucasArts) 

6 

10. Flight Simulator '98 (Microsoft) 

10 

•••.. ’"This list indicates what the top-selling PC games were, as . 

' alculatedbyPCPata,.for.May, 1998. 


DUNGEON KEEPER II Offers Improved 
Graphics, More Creatures, and 


COMPUTER GAMING WORLD » SEPTEMBER 1998 


I'.computefgdming.c 






Only EIDOS briNqs you tKe most 

iNNOvative aNd cKWLLENgiNq gOtVIES 






iT itl 




kIi 







(Dar)V cocoe here to seek scile)afiof) 


Others, to seek tbe felloCOsb^p 
of tf)e cof)qreqattojO. 


VoQ, voa're jQst castqq tbe joiqt. 






The Dark Projecl and the Looking Glass logo are trademarks ol Looking Glass Studios. ©1997-1998 Looking Glass Studios, Eidos Inleraclive is a Irademark ol Eidos pic. © 1998 Eidos, All Rights Reserved. 


Go to #116 @ www.computergaming.com/infolink 




EXPECT A HIT SOON 


www.eidosinteractive.com 




I 


w«vw.9idaiganies.cMi 


ID 


N T e R A 





www.computergaming.com/lnfolink 


NEW ERAIN GAMING 


Gangsters: Organized Crime 0 1998 Hothouse Creations Ltd.O 

Published by Eidos Interactive Ltd. Eidos Interactive Is a trademark of ElDOS, pic. O 1998 


EIDOS. All rights reserved. 




m|6agj|Ojr^;^uwa 










"The performance is excellent... The graphics are sharp, 
colorful, and imaginative." , 

-Gamesmania 


"New ideas to' keep ^en the most battle-hardened 
garner ifterested." 

-Hotgames^ ^ 


WWW.EIDOSlNTERACTtVE.COM 
Play DOMINlON^with up to eight others online at 
WWW, eidosgames.com with MPlayer technology. 


EIDOS INTERACTIVE is a trademark of Eidos. PLC Copyright© 1998 Eidos 

ION STORM and CXDMINION: STORM OVER GIFT 3 names and logofare properties of Ion Storm, LP. Copyright© 1998 Ion Storm. 





"Ifel’ntuitive gameplay and fast-paced, Red Alert- 
styl^^ction deserves your'ettention." 

^Gamecenter 


The best real time strategy available.. ,.92 out o 

PC Forge , " ^ 


WWW. DOMINION-STORM. COM 


I S“im, ..';r./.l 

' Go to #279 @ www.computergaming.com/infolink 








Broderbund 


1,815,882 $74,785,378 


GT Interactive 


Broderbund 


id Software 


Doom Shareware 


WELCOME TO MY NIGHTMARE 
Undead hordes, a WARLORDS 
fixture, are even more of a 
freat in DARKLORDS RISING due 
to the new, nastier unit types. 


Player Stats 

Top 10 Best-Selling Games, 1993 - Present* 

■ ;' Game • , . Company ^ . #Sold • Net Reven ue |iM 


.v' (6) . WarCraftll 

Cendant Software " 

;. 1,020,623 

'i $39,820,239 .- .I 

SimCIty 2000 

.' Electronic Arts . . 

;• "1,019,345 1: 

$43,469,189 iBI 

(8) .. 7th Guest 

Virgin cV 

.929,611. 

$40,060,258 • 

StarWars; Dark Forces 

, Lucas Arts 

928,469 i. 

$37,199,917 

‘ @ Monopoly 

Hasbro Interactive 

869,709 

$30,379,607 


•Best-selling games, as tracked by PC Data, between January 1 993 through April 1 998 


Rising Higher 


SSG and Red Orb Add New Features to Their 


you can just make your own; 
you can even edit the stats for 
the heroes, magical items, and 
army units. All in all, if SSG 
keeps on track, this "gold edi- 
tion" of WARLORDS III should 
be a good buy for WARLORDS 
fans everywhere. It should be 
available by the time you read 
this. — Thierry Nguyen 


5-Star Game 

S SG's classic and pop- 
ular WARLORDS series 
will soon give rise to 
another addition, 
WARLORDS III; 

DARKLORDS RISING. This new 
game is essentially WARLORDS 
III-I-, in that you get the original, 
5-star WARLORDS III game with a 
host of additions and general 
improvements. It's the perfect 
pack for the WARLORDS rookie, 
while still promising enough new 
features to capture the interest 
of hard-core WARLORDS III fans. 


In the Works 


DARKLORDS RISING adds 30 
new armies, 5 new Hero types, 6 
new abilities, and 15 new spells. 
Each unit, ranging from the 
numerous, but weak. Giant Bees 
to the powerful Silver Dragon 
will have entirely new art for 
both the portrait and the tile. 

The new Hero types {Summoner, 
Alchemist, Monk, Bard, and 
Barbarian) will also use some 
of the new spells, abilities, and 
artwork. 

DARKLORDS RISING will also 
include seven new game types 
and victory conditions, including 
the popular "Capture the Flag" 
game and the "Instant Chaos" 
victory, in which everyone starts 
off clustered in the middle of the 
map. Add to this a host of new 
scenarios, maps, and entire cam- 
paigns, and the shelf life of this 
game is sure to grow. 

Finally, DARKLORDS RISING will 
ship with both a scenario builder, 
to create your own maps and 
scenarios, and a campaign 
builder that will let you string 
scenarios together. So if you get 
bored with the multitude of sce- 
narios bundled in this release. 


COMPUTER GAMING WORLD » SEPTEMBER 1998 


K.computcrgatning.t 







Systems 


Total command of a 8,520 ton, 

150 meter Dreadnought class 
Corvette. 

Four bridge workstations- 
command, engineering, 
weapons, navigation. 

Detailed ship systems including 
multiple propulsion options, 
remote over ride controls, docking 
maneuvers, and much more. 
Visually stunning 3D graphics 
(includes enhanced versions for 
3Dfx Voodoo 1 and 2 boards). 


Join the Commonwealth Navy and do your part to fight the Independence War. 


...a /i/f/e nom andl/mi u a^ood 




Elfictronics @ 


WWW, : 


^ Go to #118 @ www.computergamtng.com/InfoKnk 

f.'Tik ^ U 








Sid Meier's Alpha Centauri 

Eagerly Awaited Space Odyssey Makes a Real Splash Landing 


by Thierry Nguyen 

Ithough many gamers' 
favorite path to victory 
in SID MEIER'S 
CIVILIZATION II was to 
try to conquer the 
entire world, the ideal 
method was to lead 
your nation to the stars. 
After all, if you could colonize the 
vast reaches of space, you would 
build an empire that could truly 
stand the test of time. It is here, in 
the aftermath of the successful 
space launch from Civ II, where 
SID MEIER'S ALPHA CENTAURI picks 
up the action. Designer Brian 
Reynolds maintains the style of his 
magnum opus, CIVILIZATION II, but 
he and Sid Meier throw in enough 
twists to make ALPHA CENTAURI 
more than just CIV in space. From 
what we've played so far. it could 
be the most satisfying science fic- 
tion grand strategy game yet. 

Setting the 
Galactic Stage 

ALPHA CENTAURI 's Story goes 
something like this; As the United 
Nations colonization starship UNS 
Unity nears the Alpha Centauri 
system, its leader. Captain 
Garland, Is mysteriously assassi- 
nated, and the vessel crash-lands 
onto a mysterious planet. The UN 
team selected to lead the expedi- 
tion splinters into seven different 
factions, as each member takes a 
colony pod and some colonists. 


Sid AAeier's 
Alpha Centauri 


GENRE: Role-Playing 
RELEASE DATE: Q4 '98 
DEVELOPER: Rraxis Games 
PUBLISHER: Electronic Are 


and runs off to make a colony 
with his or her own agenda. 

Before starting a game, you will 
select which faction to lead. Of 
course, as with previous science- 
fiction games (like the MASTER OF 
ORION series), each faction has 
distinct advantages and disadvan- 
tages, and these differences great- 
ly come into play later. The fac- 
tions run the gamut from God- 
loving fundamentalists to mili- 
taristic zealots to nature-worship- 
ping environmentalists. 

If you played CIV II, you won't 
have any problem with the game 
mechanics. You begin with both a 
colony base, and Formers (a 
space version of CIV ll's settler 
unit) to explore the land and per- 
form a variety of terraforming 
tasks to the alien landscape. 
Meanwhile, you will manage your 
colony's growth, research new 
discoveries, and build machines 
to expand and enforce said 
expansions militarily. And finally, 
you will run into the various fac- 
tions that have set up shop on 
the planet, and wheel and deal 
through the exchange of treaties, 
technologies, and. occasionally, 
blows between you and them. 

However, in keeping with the 
science-fiction nature of the game, 
one of the many options that can 
be toggled is "Victory through 
Transcendence only." Thus, if you 
optimize your research and sociol- 
ogy options, you can eventually 
have your people evolve into the 
next evolutionary being — super- 
humans, if you will. 

The Search for 
Intelligent Life 

The actual landscape is of 
much more importance than in 
CIV II. First off, the tiles are in true 



3D, so now your little Formers, 
Rovers, and other vehicles can roll 
up and down amongst the hills, 
instead of simply sliding around. 
Terrain supplies the three neces- 
sary variables for survival: nutri- 
ents, energy, and minerals. Each 
tile has a visual indication of how 
much of each resource it supplies, 
and the information window in 


the corner gives more details for 
you to decide how to develop the 
tile. As for the fog-of-war, you can 
either turn it on, and explore a 
black-screened landscape, or you 
can set it so that it shows you the 
preliminary information gathered 
from the probes sent earlier. You 
will get a basic layout of the land, 
but no idea where everyone is. 



A 


COMPUTER GAMING WORLD* SEPTEMBER 1998 


w.compuleff;'i'"ing.coiii 




The Calculus of 
Ethics and Other 
Dilemmas 


Y ou can peruse the bewildering paths of 
discovery through ALPHA CENTAURl's copi* 
ous flow diarts (only a fraction of the 
possible tedi paths are shown here) for the ulti* 
mate in sd-fi techno*geekness. 


O r you can watch your various adirisors 
argue over which technology to research 
(in all fairness, these guys are mudi 
more sensible than the advisors in C(V were). 
This is actually an easier process tiian in MOO II. 


SECRETS OF PUSMA STEEL 
The discovery of new tedinologies in 
ALPHA CENTAURI lets you design your 
own units, as well as build them from a 
template. 


BRIEF interlude Ae don i mink tarry 
Niven needs to worry, but the back story 
of ALPHA CENTAURI (shown in vignettes 
such as these) helps to develop the 
game's hard sdence-fiction concepts. 


to an idyllic plain. As with most 
games from these two designers, 
there are consequences. If you 
terraform the alien landscape too 
vigorously, you risk being per- 
ceived as a threat by the native 
life forms; too cautiously, and you 
will fall behind your neighbors in 
the all-important resource and 
technology race. 


tions. The other factions built their 
colonies while closely adhering to 
their basic agenda, and much of 
their diplomatic policy is based on 
that agenda. For example, I was 
playing the Human Hive, whose 
destiny is closely tied to creating a 
police state; I encountered the 
Spartan Federation, representing 


My Mind Is 
Going 

What struck 
me most about 
this build of 
ALPHA CENTAURI 
were the tech 
trees and the Al 
of the other fac- 


and perhaps bring about life 
forms for further destruction. As 
an homage to Stanley Kubrick's 
classic 2001: A Space Odyssey, 
you can occasionally run into a 
mysterious monolith that will 
inspire your units, giving them 
free upgrades of varying types. Or 
you'll find a wayward alien arti- 
fact for your scientists to study 
and thus acquire free technology, 
The most science-fictional and 
fascinating aspect of ALPHA 
CENTAURI, however, is the process 
of terraforming. Depending on 
your timetable and the technology 
level achieved, either you can sim- 
ply plant more trees imported 
from Earth or you can take a tem- 
peramental volcano and convert It 


which is a nice and realistic 
compromise. 

The various alien life forms are 
what make the landscape here 
much more interesting than that 
of CiV II. Although the more 
advanced alien species are still 
being fleshed out as of press time, 
i did get spend some time with 
the mysterious Xenofungus, 

Xenofungus serves as both a 
barrier (units have a hard time 
moving in it), and as a breeding 
ground for such beasts as Mind 
Worms or Psi Vortices. Xenofungus 
also adds a defensive bonus to 
your units— whether this makes 
up for having your units trapped 
in it is a matter of individual taste. 
Xenofungus is supposed to 
expand and destroy structures. 


i/.computergarTKng.c 


COMPUTER GAMING WORLD « SEPTEMBER 1998 






«. 27.90 


Primary oblecti 


Sanction Level RIpha, 


it.... 


munitli 











ipart home. 


LUelCDiTiE to the Here and rioixi. 

In the cold clear light of day. 

LUhere the darkness is in men's hearts, not their enuiranments. 

LUhere the Luhite hat brilliance nf RnyLuor/d 3D technolngy is applied to reality. 
LUhere the enemy is scum. But, human scum. Rs fast, sly and lethal as ynu. 

LUhere you can actually leak the enemy in the eye. Hnd ujatch him leak back. 

LUhere knpujing the right gun to pierce a bulletproof uest is as important as 
the ability to hack a security code. 

R Luorld of surueillance, secret meapons, strategy and photorealistic action. 

R uiorld ujhere 8 playable counter-terrorist agents must compete ouer 30 
deadly mission objectiues. 

LUhere up to 16 agents compete in multiplayer battles demanding stealth and 
firepoLuer in equal measure. 

Forget Hell. This is the real underixiorld. 

www.vigilance.coni 

/.computergaming.com/infolink 


THE REHL UnDERLUORLD 


^ personnel Inflict maximum possible damage at key target 







GOMINB FALL '981 


Go to #076 @ www.computergaming.com/infolink 


WWW AccessSoftware com 
1 - 800 - 800-4880 



SID MEIER'S ALPHA CENTAURI 



FAULTY TOWERS? Monotfths dotting 
the landscape give your units free 
upgrades when discovered, but they 
may also attract alien life forms. i 



CHOOSE YOUR DESTINY Factions 
differ in general philosophy and are 
given appropriate advantages and 
disadvantages. 


the militaristic survivalists. They asked for 
a trade of technologies: their Nonlinear 
Mathematics (which yielded a powerful 
gun) for my Doctrine on Movement and 
Expansion. Essentially, it was like having 
NRA Extremists asking me to teach them 
how to drive around to "spread their 
views" more efficiently. I declined and 
instead locked an alliance with the 
Morgan Conglomerate, which, in the 
best Bill Gates manner, was rapidly cor- 
nering the free market. Another amusing 
anecdote was how the Peacekeeping 
Forces (the Humanitarian UN-descendent) 
kept trying to impose peaceful sanctions 
between warring factions. 

Later on, when the factions have had 
full contact with each other, you can, sim- 
ilar to MASTER OF ORION (MOO), convene 
a Planetary Council to vote on policies 
and mandates that affect all factions, and 
to vote even for Planetary Governor. And, 
of course, as with CIV II, you can edit the 
necessary files to create your own fac- 
tions with their own philosophies and 
applicable bonuses and tradeoffs. 

ALPHA CENTAURI is a "hard" science- 
fiction title. Instead of employing the 
questionable physics of Star Wars or Star 
Trek, ALPHA CENTAURI extrapolates from 
current science fact and theory to deter- 
mine the technologies we might investi- 
gate in the future. So, items such as 


Ethical Calculus (which deeply affects 
the sociological structure of your faction) 
are found along with Superstring Theory, 
the Secrets of the Human Brain, and the 
infamous Genome Project. Every discov- 
ery is summarized with a relevant quote 
either taken from a real person or writ- 
ten by one of the faction leaders within 
the game. 

The effects of research play out into 
another new feature: unit customization. 
No, not just editing the rules.txt file and 
matching it to your own .BMP as in CiV 
II, but where you're allowed to choose 
from a list of different chassis, weapons, 
armor, reactors, and special items to cre- 
ate your own units. For example, you 
may opt to make something sporting the 
biggest gun, but having the weakest 
armor as a consequence. Or you might 
just create a supermachine that will take 
an absurd amount of resources and time 
to build. 

Finally, some discoveries yield options 
to change your society. You can make 
yourself a police state or a free state, or 
an industrial people versus an agricul- 
tural people. Other issues covered in the 
sociological outlook include health care 
and education, so you can take your 
debate on such topics out of current pol- 
itics and see how they play out in the 
game. In effect, this is how you alter 
your faction structure during the course 
of the game, as each change in society 
will add or subtract bonuses in produc- 
tion, research, morale, and so forth. 

Gameplay is more streamlined than in 
CIV II, which means you might actually 
finish a multiplayer game (multiplayer is 
still being tweaked though it will almost 
assuredly use a simultaneous turn sys- 
tem). For example, the Governor Al lets 
you specify how you want the computer 
to manage your colony — this will allow 
you to focus on the big picture and 
micromanage only as you desire. 

Whether you prefer multiplayer con- 
tests or still play most of your strategy 
games solo, ALPHA CENTAURI looks 
extremely inviting. It retains much of the 
old-school depth of games such as CIV II 
and MOO, while adding enough 
enhancements to bring in more casual 
strategy gamers. ALPHA CENTAURI should 
be yet another big hit from Sid Meier 
and Brian Reynolds when it ships this 
fall. Then again, what else could we 
expect from two of the best and bright- 
est in the business? 



www.computergaming com 


COMPUTER GAMING WORLD • SEPTEMBER 1998 




Go to #164 @ www.computergaming.com/infolrnk 





FORCE TO BE RECKONED WITH 


AMRaondonop 50' 


I HAVE AN ENORMOUS TANK BATTALION 


fit. I HAVE AN ARSENAL OF WEAPONS AT MY FINGERTIPS.,, 

ta 


I’VE DESTROYED BUILDINGS IN MY WAY 


<»' I AM ONE WITH THE CROSSHAIRS 


HicfOMlI CDipOTation. Ml tights leseneil. Hlctosoft and Urban Assault ate ellhei legistared trademaiks or trademaiks o( Miciosnll Corporation in the U.S. aniti'or other countries. 


RLDnaoppppP' 


TE rIVaTOOLS" 

Computer Graphics Solutions 


Hey hot shot, you're dead because you didn’t think. To save the Earth in Urban Assault',' 
you must manage your resources, upgrade your technologies, control your squadrons, and deploy your troops 
using an interactive map. All this at the same time you’re shooting everything in sight. 


► 



I’VE TELEPORTED INTO MY SATELLITE. 


I'VE DRIVEN MV VEHICLES LIKE A MANIAC, 


ITORCNEDATAERKAST BIPLANE. 








Homeworid 


Relic Attempts to Launch Strategy Games Into a Bold New Direction 


by Elliott Chin 

H OMEWORLD, Relic's 

unique space strategy 
game, has already hit it 
big. Last month, we 
crowned it the Game 
of the Show in our 
report on EB.This 
month, it's the top 
strategy game to watch for in our 
fall preview feature. "Game of the 
Show?" "Most promising strategy 
game?" Those accolades don't 
happen every day for a project 
that's still in the works from an 
unknown start-up company. But 
then, it's not every day that you 
see a game like this. It's a game 
with incredible potential, Potential 
that Relic could parlay into the 
most innovative strategy game of 
the year. 

Special Kind of Magic 

HOMEWORlD's 3D universe is 
by far its standout feature. Alex 
Garden, the founder of Relic, 
wanted to make a game that 
would perfectly re-create a Star 
l^a/s-style battle, with fighters 
and cruisers swarming within a 
massive sphere of lasers, explo- 
sions, and ships. From the looks of 
the early beta we played. Garden 


CCW Online 


Want to read more about 
HOMEWORLD? See 
GameSpot's preview at 
www.ganwspoLconVfeatuies/ 
hortiewoHd. 


Homeworid 


GENRE: Strategy 
RELEASE DATE: Q4 ‘98 
DEVELOPER: Relic Entertainment 
PUBLISHER: Sierra Studios 



and Relic have succeeded in creat- 
ing a fantastic engine. But what 
about the other things that make 
this game so intriguing? Well, 
there's the campaign, which is 
persistent and unconventional. 

And then there's the attention to 
detail, with extensive combat 
commands, context-sensitive voice 
help, and dynamic resources that 
allow for economic sabotage. It's 
a package that could herald a 
new breed of strategy game. 

HOMEWORLD'S campaign will 
feature more than 20 missions 
strung together with a tight story. 
You play a race of nomads who 
are returning home after centuries 
of wandering. Awaiting you at 
your homeworid is the evil race 
that exiled you from your planet 
ages ago. Along the way, you'll 
learn more of the story by 



befriending strange traders and 
battling pirates, alien marauders, 
and the fleets of your nemesis. 

The game's campaign is linear, 
but not fixed. There are 1 4 essen- 
tial missions in the game, but also 
a dozen possible side missions 
that you can play or ignore. These 
side missions won't be necessary 
for completing the game, but they 
could offer new technologies or 
story information. 

Basically, your hyperspace trip 
home comprises the "campaign," 
while the possible stops you make 
along the way are the campaign 
missions. Hyperspace isn't an 
automatic trip. Each hyperspace 
jump requires a set number of 
resource units, while maintaining 
hyperspace requires additional 
resources. Once you run out of 
resources, you exit hyperspace. 


Then you have to harvest more 
resources to make another jump. 

Each time you exit hyperspace, 
whether due to resource shortages 
or by your own decision, the game 
will randomly choose an encounter 
from the list of essential and side 


INVISIBLE THREAT Cloaked 
fighters on the move. 



ALL 3D, ALL THE TIME 
Everything in HOMEWORLD is 
rendered in real-time 3D. from 
the ships to the nebulae to 
the explosions. 


;J ■ A „ 


MOVE OUT Moving in 3D is simple. Move the destination cursor on this disc to the desired area, 
click to freeze the 2D location and move up or down. 


COMPUTER GAMING WORLD • SEPTEMBER 1998 


ccompulergaming.com 




missions. Once you drop out of 
hyperspace, the scenario begins as 
your ship's computer alerts you to 
any events that might demand 
your attention. 

Not all the missions will be 
combat-oriented. At times you'll 
drop into the middle of a massive 
battle (sometimes appearing 
in the middle of a two-party 
engagement or as the sole target 
of a pirate ambush), but at other 
times, you might drop out of 
hyperspace to meet a tradeship 
arriving to sell you advanced 
technology. Or you might drop 
into a barren region of space, 
with sensors indicating a nearby 
derelict that requires exploration. 
These are just a few of the mis- 
sion types Relic promises will be 
in the game. 

Just as you can leave hyper- 
space to enter a mission, you can 
also leave a mission to enter 
hyperspace — even in the middle 
of a massive battle. If you are get- 
ting pounded in a scenario, you 
can actually flee, provided you 
have enough resources. Keep in 
mind, though, that the game will 
be designed so you can't just flee 
until you arrive at the homeworld. 

If you keep running away, you'll 
never harvest enough resources to 
make the jumps home. Also, 
because the gameworld is persis- 
tent, retreat might not be the best 
idea. If you flee to hyperspace 
before all your small ships safely 
dock with capital ships, you'll lose 
them, leaving you even more vul- 
nerable for the next encounter. 

It'll Come Back 
to Haunt You 

The persistent universe also 
means that decisions you make in 
one scenario will affect the rest of 
the game. One example Relic pre- 
sented involved the Galactic Storm, 
a cloud of violent energy that lies 
on the path to your homeworld. In 
one of the game's many cut- 
scenes, you'll launch probes into 
the Storm only to see them torn to 
pieces. At that point, the game's 
ubiquitous traders will arrive and 
offer you an exorbitantly priced 
Storm Navigation Kit. If you buy 


the kit, you'll be able to traverse 
the Storm unharmed. If you refuse 
or can't afford the kit, you can 
still go through, but you'll take 
a pounding and lose a number 
of ships. 

The persistent universe bodes 
well for those of us who have got- 
ten tired of having to build from 
scratch in every scenario of every 
real-time strategy game. Now, 
ships built in one scenario can be 
taken to the next. Research will 
also be persistent. If you start 
research in a scenario and then 
enter hyperspace, it will be com- 
pleted when you exit. 


The Secrets to 
Ship Design 

HOMEWORLD's array of ships 
will be impressive. There are gun- 
boats, interceptors, defenders, car- 
riers, cruisers, frigates, cloaked 
fighters, cloak generators, research 
vessels, probes, long-range sen- 
sors, and floating cannons, to 
name but a few. 

However, not all ships and tech- 
nology will be immediately avail- 
able to you. You'll have to research 
them, but not as in other RTS 
games. Instead of researching a 
ship, you'll have to research all its 
components before you gain 
access to it. Simple ships will be 
easy to figure out. For instance, 
acquiring mine-laying corvettes 
requires you to research mine 
laying. However, getting to a 
heavy cruiser might mean 
researching megaton drive, mul- 
tiple gun control, increased 
chassis strength, and advanced 
targeting system. 

The technology tree at your 
disposal is vast, but it won't 
always be visible. You'll see 
more technology as you climb 



Fuel for an Empire 

L ike other real-time strategy games, HOMEWORLD requires 
that you harvest resources. Those resources come from 
asteroids, gas clouds, dust clouds, and nebulae, although all 
gathered resources contribute to a generic pool of resource units. 
Yet the original resources look and act differently. 

As 3D objects, the asteroids and clouds react dynamically to 
what you do. When you extract resources from a cloud, it shrinks. 
When you mine an asteroid, it's drawn in pieces into the harvest- 
ing bay. However, you can forgo harvesting and use resources in 
tactical ways. 

You can ionize gas and dust clouds so that they become 
volatile energy clouds that shoot lightning forks at any har- 
vesters that come near. You can thus create a mine field and 
- deprive your enemy of potential resources. Large asteroids can 
be broken into smaller pieces by laser fire, pounding any enemy 
hulls that enter the newly created asteroid field. Nebulae can be 
harvested and charged just like clouds, but you can also hide 
inside their foggy mass and escape detection. The enemy will see 
. you only if he places probes inside the nebula. 


higher up the tree, but some tech- 
nology might be availabie only 
from certain derelicts or trade 
encounters. If you go through 
hyperspace past those encounters, 
you'll miss these technologies. 

In multiplayer, research will be 
highly accelerated, and there will 
be an option to make aii ships 
immediateiy available. 

Battle Stations in 3D 

Once you exit hyperspace and 
have an encounter, the real fun 
begins. You command ships from a 


right-click menu. Every command 
in this menu, including attack, 
move, select formations and tac- 
tics, and specials (like a carrier's 
launch command), can also be 
issued with hot-keys. You can 
move ships via a two-click system 
that pulls up an overlayed disc or 
by simply clicking on a target. 

Attacking can be as simple as 
clicking or as advanced as select- 
ing formations and tactics. HOME- 
WORLD's formations are similar to 
those in MYTH. You group ships 
together and then give them a 



STAY IN FORMATION Hie Claw and Sphere are just two of the 
many formations you can issue to your ships. Both take advan- 
tage of the 3D space to envelop their target or their charge. 


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formation. Ships then move and attack 
according to formations. Several forma- 
tions, such as the Claw and Sphere, take 
advantage of the 3D environment. The 
Claw formation looks like its namesake. 
When it encounters a target, it closes 
over the ship and attacks on all sides. The 
Sphere, by contrast, is a defensive forma- 
tion that provides 360-degree protection 
to any ship within the sphere. 

Tactics govern how your ships behave, 
There are three settings; evasive, aggres- 
sive, and neutral. Neutral is the normal 
setting, and ships in that mode will 
accomplish their missions as they are 
ordered. Ships in aggressive mode will 
fight to the death to accomplish their 
missions, even going so far as to kami- 
kaze when situations get desperate. 

Ships in evasive mode will harass enemy 
ships and expend their fuel dodging fire 
(all small ships and frigates consume fuel 
when moving, but they can be set to 
auto refuel). They'll survive by evading 
fire, but they won't be able to accomplish 
their objectives because they'll be con- 
stantly fleeing. 

Multiple Viewpoints 

To track the battle, you can rotate 
your view, zoom out until your ships 
look like ants, or zoom in until a fighter 
fills the screen. You can also lock the 
camera to follow a ship or formation. A 
minimap on the screen shows friendly 


and enemy ships in a limited sphere 
around your mothership. 

For a full view of the battlefield, you 
can switch views to a "Sensor Manager" 
that shows a full map of the scenario. All 
resources and ships can be seen from 
this view, although the map beyond your 
mothership will appear as unexplored fog 
unless you cover the area with probes. 
Just like the combat screen, this screen is 
rotatable 3D. Limited orders are possible 
in this screen so you can issue strategic 
move orders before you switch to the 
main view to engage in combat. 

There is so much more to discuss with 
HOMEWORLD, but we can't fit it all in 
these pages (for more, read GameSpot's 
preview). While the game certainly 
sounds impressive, and the graphics are 
gorgeous, several questions remain about 
the game. The build we played was a 
technology demo with limited gameplay, 
so single-player missions and computer 
Al were still works in progress. Also, the 
unit balancing, animation, and interface 
still need testing. If Relic devotes the 
same attention to these things that it has 
to the 3D engine and campaign design. 
HOMEWORLD has a very good chance of 
living up to its promise. 233 


A. 


COMPUTER GAMING WORLD « SEPTEMBERI 998 


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Index 

Abe's Exodus GT Interactive 

88 

Age of Empires II Microsoft 

141 

Aliens vs. Predator Fox Interactive 


Anachronox Ion Storm 

101 


120 

Asheron's Call Microsoft 

101 

Asteroids Activision 

129 

Axis & Allies Hasbro 

153 

Baldur's Gate Interplay 


Baseball 3E> Microsoft 

108 



Battle of Britain TalonSoft 

153 

Battleground 9: Chickamauga TalonSoft 

156 

Beneath Activision 



148 

Black and White Electronic Arts 

145 



Centipede Hasbro 

129 


148. 

Chessmaster 6000 Mindscape 

136 

Combat Flight Simulator Microsoft 

124 

Command &Conquer: 


Tiberian Sun Westwood Studios 



134 

The D Show Disney Interactive 

136 


129 

Dark Reign II Activision 

148 


124 

Diablo 11 Blizzard 

100 

Dissolution of Eternity Rogue 


Don't Touch That Dial Berkeley Systems 

136 


76 


- GAMING WOKLTJ ^ SCPTEMHKR '199a | 


Duke Nukem Forever GT lnteractive/3D Realms 

77 

Dune 2000 Westwood Studios 

148 

European Air War MicroProse 

117 

Everquest Sony Interactive 

lot 

F-16 Aggressor Virgin 

117 

Falcon 4.0 MicroProse 

124 

Fallout 2 Interplay 

101 

Fighter Duel 2.0 Infogravis 

124 

Fighter Squadron: Screaming 


Demons Over Europe Activision 

120 

Fighting Steel SSI 

156 

Fireteam Multitude 

81 

Fleet Command Jane's Combat SimulailDns 

156 

Flight Unlimited III looking Glass 

124 

Flight: Combat Looking Glass 

124 

Flyl Terminal Reality 

112 

Football Pro 99 Sierra 

105 

Force Commander LucasArts 

141 

Force Feedback Wheel Microsoft 

164 

Fox Sports Golf 99 Fox Interactive 

108 

Fox Sports Soccer 99 Fox Interactive 

108 

Gabriel Knight III Sierra 

92 

Good & Evil Cavedog 

96 

Great Battles l-Magic 

156 

Grim Fandango LucasArts 

92 

Gobble 2 Actual Entertainment 

134 

Gunship III MicroProse 

124 

Half-Life Sierra 

76 

Harpoon 4 SSI 

156 

Head Rush Berkeley Systems 

136 

Heavy Gear II Activision 

131 

Heretic II Activision 

81 

Heroes of Might & Magic III 3D0 

140 

Homeworld Sierra 

140 

IF/A-IBE C5F l-Maglc 

124 


tndiana Jones and the Infernal Machine LucasArts 84 


y.compLiU.T/icitMMii;. 



Computer 
Gaming World's 

ew Games 

Annual Nostradamus 
Simulation 


Israeli Air Combat DID 

124 

Jeopardy Hasbro 

136 

K6-2 Motherboard AMD 

Ktnfl’c Otmcr* MAcIf nS EfAl'nltu Ciarra 

164 

Aiiiy > vucAi. iTidaK oi cierniiy jierra 

Klingon Honor Guard MicroProse 

Lands of Lore III Westvwod Studios 

96 

88 

legend of the Five Rings Activision 

101 

101 

Life Hasbro 

136 

Luftwaffe Commander SSI 

124 

Ml Tank Platoon II MicroProse 

124 

Madden NFL 99 EA Sports 

105 

Man of War II Strategy First 

156 

MechCommander MicroProse 

MechWarrior III MiQoProse 

145 

Medieval HPS/Incredible Sims 

131 

153 

Messiah Interplay 

81 

Middle Earth Sierra 

'ioi 

Myth 11: Soulblighter Bungle 

124 

141 

NASCAR Racing 99 Sierra Sports 

105 

National Hockey Tonight ESPN Digital 

108 

Nations: Fighter Command Psygnosis 

120 

NBA Basketball Tonight ESPN Digital 

NBA Live 99 Electronic Arts 

108 

Newman-Haas Racing Psygnosis 

. 108 
129 

NFL Gameday 99 Sony Interactive 

108 

NHL 99 Electronic Arts 

Outburst Hasbro 

108 

Panzer Elite Psygnosis 

136 

117 

Peoples General SSI 

128 

Populous III: The Beginning Electronic Arts 

145 

Prey GT lnteractive/3D Realms 

84 

Prince of Persia 3D Red Orb 

84 

Quake II: Ground Zero Rogue 

88 

Railroad Tycoon 2 Pop Top 

148 


Redguard Bethesda 

Requiem 3D0 

Return to Krondor Sieira 

Revenant Eidos 

Rogue Squadron LucasArts 

Secret of Vulcan Fury Interplay 

Sid Meier's Alpha Centauri E^Firaxis 

Sin Activision 

Slave Zero Accolade 

Smart Games Challenge #3 Hasbro 

Star Trek: Klingon Academy Interplay 

Star Com Accolade 

StarCraft; Brood Wars Blizzard 

StarSIege; Tribes Sierra 

Stratego Hasbro 

SU-Flanker 2.0 SSI 

Super Hornet Titus 

Swords & Sorcery Virgin 

Tartan Army Eidos 

Tiger Woods 99 EA Sports 

Tomb Raider 111 Eidos 

Top Gun: Hornet's Nest MicroProse 

Total Annihilation: Kingdoms Cavedog 

Trespasser Dreamworks 

Ultima IX Orgin. 

Ultima: Ascension Origin 

Ultra Fighters hMaglc 

USB Speakers Miaosoft 

Velocity 4400 3D Card STB 

West Front TaionSoft 

Wheel of Fortune Hasbro 

Wheel of Time GT Interactive 

Wingman Force Joystick Logitech 

Wizardry VIII SirTech 

WWII Fighters Jane's Combat Simulations 

X Games Pro Boarder ESPN Digital Games 


92 

76 

100 

101 


141 

77 

88 

134 

131 

128 


156 

136 

84 

161 

101 

112 

108 


COMt'UTKft OAMIHG V/ORLO L ■ 1^98 ^ II 


COVER STORY 


100+ HOT NEW GAMES 


I t doesn't take a Nostradamus to 
foresee that more than half the 
titles covered in this year's 100+ 
Hot New Games won't ship in 1998. 

Yet, if there is one thing that we have 
learned over the years, it is that you iike to 
be in the loop in terms of the games that are 
coming. You want a iens trained on the 
future of games— and you want it now. 


It has been our tradition at 
Computer Gaming World to offer 
in our Fall Preview a far-ranging, 
early-warning view of what's com- 
ing during the next year and, in 
December's Holiday Hot 100, to 
try as near as possible (with mixed 
results) to augur the games that 
will actually ship for the holiday 
season. In that way, you get two 
hot lists, a macro- and a micro- 
look at the state of the industry. 

High-Wire Act 

In this year's list of 1 00+ Hot 
New Games, we have attempted a 
high-wire act that may be riskier 
than the divining task for Decem- 
ber's Hot Games for the Holidays 
list, We've looked at pre-Aipha 
code, Alpha code, and E3 demos 
and attempted to discern the top- 
ranked games in their particular 
genres, For the sake of controversy, 
discussion, and utility, we've given 
our expert opinions on the hottest 
games — as well as the games that 
seem likely to disappoint. 

The good news is that we may, 
at times, be wrong, The better 
news is that this has provided an 
interesting exercise for us, and 
should, as a result, make for better 
reading for you. We know you'll 
let us know. Our fall previews 
have also sought, over the years, 
to provide some sense of trends: 
in technology, in design, and in 


subject matter. This year's list is 
no exception. 

Though cynics can look at 1998 
as the year of "More of the 
Same" games, it is also true that 
those of us who are paid to be 
cynical can find evidence for that 
position in any year. Instead, let's 
focus on encouraging trends. 

Roie-playing Is Back 

Whether or not ULTIMA: 
ASCENSION will be classified as a 
role-playing game, 1998 has 
already seen the release of MIGHT 
& MAGIC VI, a rich, big traditional 
RPG. Soon, we'll be confronted 
with WIZARDRY 8, a worthy com- 
petitor for M&M VI in the lists, 
which was designed by a long- 
time WIZARDRY player, 
play-tester, tech sup- 
port. and documen- 
tation writer 
working with 
an experi- 
enced team. 

Then, we'll 
be chal- 
lenged by 
SWORDS & 

SORCERY, 
designed 
by David 
Bradley, the 
person who 
designed the 
last three 


WIZARDRY products. Finally, we'll 
see Raymond Feist's brilliant 
RETURN TO KRONDOR reach store 
shelves prior to the holidays. "The 
curse is broken! Thus sayeth 
CGW: 

Control Factors 

This year marks the release of 
some of the most interesting game 
controllers ever, Microsoft's Free- 
style Pro allows you to use body 
language to control the action on- 
screen, all with the familiar inter- 
face of a gamepad. You don't even 
have to wait for developers to fig- 
ure out what to do with it. If your 
game supports joysticks, it sup- 
ports this peripheral. Force-feed- 
back steering controllers are here 
just in time to take advantage of 
the great racing games coming out 
this season. Plus, some gamers will 
get a kick out of all of the seats 
that allow movement and provide 
feedback via sound vibrations, it's 
a wild time. 

3D Positional Audio 

We haven't seen the game 
masterpiece that uses 3DPA yet, 
but it is beginning to be included 
in games. There is nothing like 
hearing the monsters behind you. 
This type of ambient noise pro- 
vides clues as to the presence of 
your enemies and really adds a 
sense of "being there." 

WWII Flight-Sim Heaven 

After years of neglect, we're 
thrilled to see the trend of World 
War II combat flight sims. 

All of this year's crop 
have features to 
commend them. 
Jane's WWII 
FIGHTERS, 
Microsoft's 
COMBAT AIR 
FLIGHT 
SIMULATOR, 
and Micro- 
Prose's 
EUROPEAN 
AIR WAR 
have mar- 
velous look- 
ing planes, 
rich campaigns. 



great animation, virtual cockpits, 
and head-to-head action for 
everyone. You just have to decide 
which one's best for you (with a 
little advice from us, of course). 

Race Track Fever 

In the past, you had to look to 
Papyrus for authentic, physics- 
based racing games in which 
cars could be set up to handle 
realistically. Papyrus will still lead 
the way with GRAND PRIX 
LEGENDS and NASCAR RACING 
99, but Ubisoft (F-1 RACING) and 
Microsoft (CART PRECISION 
RACING II) will not be far behind 
them with the latest revs of their 
racing products. Newcomers such 
as Virgin, with its sports car sim- 
ulation, GT Interactive, with its 
late-'60s muscle car simulation, 
and Intense Entertainment, with 
its new F-1 simulation, will round 
out the field. Meanwhile, those 
who don't like realistic sims can 
opt for the experience of 
NEWMAN-HAAS RACING from 
Psygnosis or games from the EA 
racing stable. 

Small-Unit Action 

Another trend is in support of 
small-unit actions. SPEC OPS: 
RANGERS LEAD THE WAY from 
Ripcord has realistic handling of 
elite troops in the real world's hot 
spots. Meanwhile, Tom Clancy's 
Red Storm Entertainment plans to 
do even more with RAIN80W-6 
and, in the science-fiction realm, 
REBEL MOON REVOLUTION, from 
GT Interactive, is almost a small- 
unit strategy game instead of a 
shooter. 

Naturally, some of the recent 
trends in design style are continu- 
ing. We'll still see a plethora of 
first-person shooters and real-time 
strategy games over the next 
18-24 months, but it appears that 
they are about to become options 
in gaming style instead of prereq- 
uisites. We think that's healthy for 
gaming in the long run. 

So, now that you've been indoc- 
trinated by our quick Nostradamus 
impersonation, read on to discover 
the most exciting 100+ games 
currently in development. 


COMPUTCR GAMING WORLD » SEPTEMBER 1998 


computergaming. < 



m 



Works better. Plays better. 


IND0WS98 
PORTS YO 

TO PL A 




ei998 Microsoft Corporaliofi. All rights reserveo. Micros 
of Microsoft Corporation in ina UniteO States anfl/or otfii 


itnea. Other profloct ant) company 


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Microsoft* Windows^QS radically accelerates 
your access to your favorite applications. 

It does this by figuring out what programs 
you use most and rearranging them at a tiny 
micro level to be quicker and more efficient. 



C1998 Microsod Corooralion. All KJlKs teservefl. MicrosoK. Wnere do you waM lo go today?. Windows and the Windows logo 
in the United States ard/or other counlnes. -Source: NSTL A/98. Results based on drffetencos In anolicatlon load limes o 






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rage of 36%* faster, 
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100+ HOT NEW GAMES • ACTION 



DRAKAN 

Psygnosis 
(6S0) 287-6500 
www.psygnosis.cotn 
Company ETA: Q1 '99 
CGW's ETA; Q1 '99 

O f all the third-person shooters 
on the horizon, Drakan is the 
one that looks most promis- 
ing, This is the game that is 
most likely to carve its place in 
the third-person subgenre. The reason? You 
get to indulge every fantasy buff's dream: 
You get to ride a dragon. Better yet, you get 
to spit fiery breath and toast goblins and 
ogres before you. 

Drakan is an action-adventure game in 
which you play a female warrior — decked 
out in skimpy armor and wielding a keen 
blade of steel—who splits her time 
between riding a dragon into monster- 
infested skies and delving into dark dun- 
geons and caverns. You play from a familiar 
third-person perspective and journey 
through game environments that are more 


detailed and expansive 
than ToM8 Raider's, with 
both large open spaces 
and claustrophobic, 
winding caves. Because 
you can literally fly 
across the world on the 
back of a dragon, you'll 
be able to see far into 
the distance and spot 
towns full of civilians 
under attack from 
marauding humanoids, 

How you choose to deal 
with these menaces (from afar with claw 
and breath or up close with sharp steel) is 
really up to you. 

In RPG style, you'll talk to various towns- 
folk as you try to combat (what else) an evil 
threat to the realm. Once you acquire your 
dragon companion in the early part of the 
game, the rest of the world will open before 
you, including snowy mountains, dank 
swamps, sweltering deserts, and many other 


environments. You'll get to ride the dragon 
between dungeons and increase his power 
as you progress through the game. You'll 
also acquire spells and new weapons for 
yourself. Psygnosis has packed incredibly 
detailed 3D graphics, a rich fantasy setting, 
and the lure of a playable dragon into 
Drakan and is banking on the game being 
one of its hottest titles. Read a more 
detailed preview in our August feature. 


REQUIEM 

300 

(650) 261-3000 
www.cyclone.com 
Company's ETA; Q3 '98 
CGlVs ETA; Q-t '98 


C yclone's debut title. 

Uprising, was a good first 
effort, but its next game. 
Requiem, will blow you away. 
Requiem is literally a game of bibli- 
cal proportions. You play an angel 
sent to a futuristic Earth to com- 
bat the evil of the Fallen Ones. 
Unveiled in three acts, the game 
plays as a fairly nonlinear action- 


adventure, but features plenty of 
puzzles, NPCs, and quests to ele- 
vate this shooter beyond the tradi- 
tional run-and-gun mind-set. 

Aside from the divine storyline 
and more evolved gameplay, what 
sets this game apart from the rest 
of the pack are your angelic pow- 
ers (think of them as pumped up 
Force powers, a la Jedi Knight), 
You'll be able to possess enemies, 
turn them to salt, cast lightning, 
fly, summon plagues of locusts, 
and call earthquakes. There are 
nearly two dozen powers, and a 
plethora of monsters (everything 


from menacing 
cyborgs to fright- 
ening angels) 
acting as your 
unwilling victims. 
In a genre 
crowded with 
too many copy- 
cats, Requiem dis- 
tinguishes itself 
with a unique 
look and setting. 


HALF-LIFE 

(425) 649-9800 
www.valve.com 
Company ETA; Q2 '98 
CGW'i ETA; Q2 '98 

T he industry buzz touts 

Unreal, Half-Life, and Sin as 
the troika of 3D shooters that 
will take QuAKE-style gaming to the 
next level. Unreal has beaten the 
other two to market, but will it be 
the best? Not if the Valve guys 
have anything to say about it. 

Half-Life is inching closer to 
release, and all the pieces are 
starting to come together. The 
latest milestone was multiplay, 
which was up and running at this 


year's E3. Technologically, Half- 
Life will hold its own with the 
best of the 3D shooters. It will 
sport 16- and 24-bit lighting, DSP 
sound, skeletal animation, and 
higher polygon counts on ene- 
mies. The famed Al still looks 
good, although recent rumors of 
Valve looking for a new Al pro- 
grammer this late in development 
might not bode well for the final 
product. Still, the Al we saw as 
recently as several weeks ago was 
smart and organized. With inte- 
grated levels, fantastic-looking 
enemies, and prescripted events 
that present compelling narrative, 
Half-Life is one of the brightest 
shooters to watch out for. 




COMPUTER CAMINO WORLD » SEPTEMBER 1998 


v.compule/gjming.i 




ACTION • 100+ HOT NEW GAMES 



SIN 

Activision 
(310) 255-2000 
vvww.ritual.com 
Company ETA: Q3 '98 
CGWi ETA; Q3 ’98 

W e've already mentioned 
Half-Life and Unreal as 
two games that have 
the potential to turn the shooter 
genre on its head. But Sin, the 
last of this upcoming triumvirate, 
might just be the one to do it. 
Why? Well, the team responsible 
for Sin also produced Scourge of 
Armagon, a paragon of brilliant 
level design. While Scourge was 
only a Quake expansion pack, the 


quality of work there 
certainly bodes well for 
Ritual's Sin, which will 
combine Duke Nukem- 
style interactivity and 
level design that sur- 
passes Scourge. 

There are plenty of 
things for you to blow 
up in Sin, but what you 
destroy (or don't destroy) will 
affect how you navigate levels, If 
you don't stop an enemy from 
blowing up a bridge, you might 
have to take a detour through a 
new level. Sure, the level design 
will be great and the weapons 
themselves will pack some sur- 
prises, but this interactivity, which 
translates directly into long-term 
gameplay, promises to be one of 
Sin's most exciting features. 

Expect plenty of puzzles, smart 
monsters, the usual assortment of 
3D shooter advancements, and 
some raucous deathmatch levels 
to round out this potential block- 
buster title. 


ALIEN VS. 
PREDATOR 


F ox's Alien vs. Predator, in 
development for years, is 
finally nearing completion, 
and it could actually be the game 
Aliens and Predatorians have 
been waiting for. 

At this point, the most stable 
part of the game is the multi- 
play. You can be an alien, a 
predator, or a marine, with 


gameplay changing dramatically 
depending on your pick. The 
predator, with its slow but pow- 
erful weapons, can cloak itself 
and strike from concealment. 
Other gamers will see it only as 
a warping shimmer. 

The alien will be as 
insidious as it is in 
the movies, scurrying 
through hallways and 
ducts inaccessible to 
other gamers. It can 
attack from above or 
below, through ceil- 
ings or floors. Its 
attacks are short- 
ranged but strong, 
and its dying gout of acid can kill 
its attacker. The marines are at 
an obvious disadvantage, so they 
get big, nasty guns. 

Single play will feature three 
distinct campaigns. Despite the 
fact that the single-player mode 
is running a bit behind schedule. 
Fox says it will still adhere to a 
November ship date. 


Fox Interactive 
(310) 369-7000 
www.foxinleractive.com 
Company ETA:OA’98 
CGWi ETA: 01 '99. 


" P 

f'- . - ; '' 



DUKE NUKEM 
FOREVER 

GT lnteractive/3D Realms 
(800) 610-4847 
www.3drealms.com 
Company ETA: "When it’s done.' 

CGW^ ETA: Q1 ’99 

D uke Nukem Forever may 
seem to be taking forever, 
but it is starting to take 
shape — despite the delay 
incurred when switching from the 
Quake II to the Unreal engine. In 
addition to colored lighting and 
3D architecture courtesy of the 
Unreal engine, 3D Realms over- 
hauled the code to deliver more 


interactivity, true 
3D fires and 
effects, facial 
expressions on 
characters, and 
even limited char- 
acter interaction. 
What's more, 

Duke is starting 
to look like a cin- 
ematic action 
hero: He sprays 
chasing vehicles 
while racing 
down a highway a la T2, plugs 
jet-ski assassins 007-style as they 
drop from an Army helicopter, 
and blasts through mining tun- 
nels on speeding railcars (tip o' 
the fedora to Indy). 

3D Realms vows to push the 
boundaries again with ribald 
humor and risque graphics. Some 
of this will arrive in the form of a 
leggy female sidekick named 
Bombshell. There might even be 
nudity in the game, in which case 
you probably won't find it at 
Walmart. But DNF looks so great 
it's bound to be a hit anyway. 


INTERSTATE '82 

Activision 

(310)255-2000 

www.aclivision.com. 

Company ETA: Q4 ’98 
CGWi ETA; Q4 ’98 

I nterstate '82 is the sequel to 
the '70s funk-fest, Interstate 
' 76. This time around, there's 
vintage '80s music blasting away 
on your radio while you do battle 
with more autovigilantes and vil- 
lains. The plot centers around 
secret skirmishes against Central 
American governments and presi- 
dential assassins. The game's 
story will take you through sew- 
ers, down into mines, to shopping 
malls, to Las Vegas, and onto a 


secret military base (Area 49). 

While gameplay will remain 
basically the same (ride around in 
vehicles and blow up stuff), there 
will be enhancements. You'll be 
able to drive motorcycles and 
helicopters, and get out of your 
car and explore some indoor 
environments on foot. There will 
be weather effects like rain, 
snow, and fog, as well as more 
detailed graphics and (we hope) 
faster frame rates. However, 
Activision is currently saying that 
[-82 will be a hardware-only 
game, so you'd better upgrade to 
a 3D accelerator. 

There should be more complex 
levels (rather than simple open 
areas), and Activision 
says it will implement 
in-game saving. We 
can't wait to check 
this feature out. With 
its hip graphics look 
and music, and 
enhanced gameplay. 
Interstate '82 could be 
Activision's flagship 
title for '98. 



v.computergaming.t 


COMPUTER GAMING WORLD « SEPTEMBER 1998 



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TRESPASSER 

Dreamworks 
(425) 635-7134 

www.dream worksgames.com 
Company ETA: Q3 '99 
CGIV's ETA: Q4 '99 

D reamworks' (digital sequel 
to Lost World h speeding 
along like a 'raptor and 
itching fora kill. Much has been 
made about Trespasser's physics- 
based engine, but it bears repeat- 
ing. This game could present the 
most realistic environment ever in 
computer gaming. Every object in 
the game is governed by the 
rules of science. The way barrels 
float in the water, the way friction 


hinders you when you 
push boxes, the ripples 
that appear in water, 
even the way jeeps fall 
down ravines and 
dinosaurs snap back 
with each bullet fired. 
This is a world that is as 
realistic as it gets. 

But what about the 
game design? While the engine 
sounds fantastic, the design is 
still being fleshed out. For 
starters, this isn't a run-and-gun 
game. You die with one hit, so 
you have to sneak around and 
use the environment to evade 
and outwit dangers. The 
dinosaurs you face will behave 
realistically, as their intelligence is 
governed, many factors, including 
hunger, fear, curiosity, pain, and 
anger, in conjunction with the 
physics-based engine, these real- 
istic dinosaurs could wind up 
creating a world rather than a 
game. And we don't think that's 
necessarily bad. 



ilAESSIAH 

Interplay 

(949)553-6655 

www.intefplay.com. 

Company ETA: Q4 '98 
CCWs ETA; Q1 '99 

n Shiny's Messiah, you play a 
baby angel who must stop 
the devil's work on Earth. 
However, to do so, you'll engage 
in some pretty evil deeds your- 
self. Because you're too small to 
put up much of a fight, you have 
to possess and use the bodies of 
your enemies. You can walk your 
possessed body off a catwalk 
and make it fall to its death. Or 
you can walk the body through 
open flames. Then, while the 


body is burning, 
you can crawl 
along to add to 
its excruciating 
pain. Apart from 
letting you 
indulge In your 
most sadistic 
fantasies, pos- 
session will play 
a huge role in 
navigating the game's puzzles. 
You might have to inflict self- 
injury on a guard so that his 
cohorts will carry him (and, by 
extension, you) to an infirmary 
deeper into the base, thereby 
bypassing locked doors and 
sentries, 

The graphics in Messiah look 
good. Using an engine called RT- 
DAT (real-time deformation and 
tesselation). Shiny will maintain 
the optimal frame rate by adding 
or subtracting polygons from 
inconspicuous areas of the 
screen, if you want to indulge 
your most twisted desires in a 
good-looking game, watch for 
Messiah this winter. 


ACTION • 100-F HOT NEW GAMES 



HERETIC II 

Activision 
(310) 255-2000 
www.activision.com 
Company ETA; 04 '98 
CCWi ETA: 04 '98 

I n a departure from 
the traditional Hexen 
line of games. 

Raven's Heretic II will 
embrace a third-person 
perspective. Raven has done this 
in order to make the Heretic line 
a more adventure-oriented game, 
while bringing the Hexen fran- 
chise more in-line with tradition- 
al first-person shooters like 
Quake. The company hopes the 
change in perspective will further 
distinguish the differing direc- 
tions for the two franchises. 

The sort of puzzles and explo- 
ration evident in previous 
Heretic and Hexen titles will flow 
naturally into Heretic II, but the 
pacing will be a definite step up 
from that iconic third-person 
game. Tomb Raider. Expect plen- 


ty of bad guys to hound you 
throughout this game's many 
beautifully rendered locales. 

This time out, you play 
Corvus, the elf you controlled in 
Heretic. Many of the enemies 
you'll fight will be tough hom- 
bres, so the powers at your dis- 
posal will be equally strong. 
There will be many powerful 
spells at your disposal, some 
with spectacular visual effects. 
Expect this blend of intense 
action and exploration adven- 
ture in Raven's signature fantasy 
universe to arrive in stores 
sometime late this year. 


FIRETEAJin 

Multitude 
(888) 689-TEAM 
www.fifeteam.com 
Company ETA: Q3 '98 
CGIVs ETA: Early Q4 '98 

F ireteam will be an online- 
only game from start-up 
Multitude. The focus of 
Fireteam is on team play. 
Traditionally, though, team play 
on the Internet has been stifled 
by the problems of gamers hav- 
ing to type while playing. In a 
fast-action game like Fireteam, 
there just isn't time to type com- 
mands to teammates. Fireteam 
looks to solve that by supporting 
voice technology and bundling a 
headset with each game. 



There are at least four different 
game types, including gunball 
(lethal football), capture the flag, 
base tag, and team deathmatch. 
Teams consist of four gamers, 
with each gamer able to pick one 
of three different character types: 
gunner, sniper, or scout. Obvi- 
ously, each class has different 
abilities, and you'll need to com- 
plement each other's abilities 
while coordinating your actions 
via the headsets. The real-time 
speech capability should position 
Fireteam as the first Internet 
game tn really make good on the 
promise of fun and workable 
team play. Chat rooms and tour- 
naments and Multitude's 
promised support of clans will 
ensure that a commu- 
nity (which, along with 
gameplay, are the 
foundations for a good 
online game) is firmly 
supported for Fireteam. 
If you want to see for 
yourself how much fun 
this game is, just go to 
wvvw.fireteam.com. 


v.computergaming.coin 


COAAPUTER GAMING WORLD » SEPTEMBER 1998 











100+ HOT NEW GAMES • ACTION 



PRINCE OF 
PERSIA 3D 

Red Orb 
(415) 382-4400 
www.redorb.com 
Company ETA: Q1 '99 
CGW'i ETA; Q2 '99 

T he Prince is back. Like 
Indiana Jones, this classic 
adventurer-explorer has 
returned to show Lara and her 
clones just how action-adven- 
tures are supposed to be done. 
Jordan Mechner, the designer of 
the previous two Prince games 
and the animated adventure 
game Last Express, is plotting this 


third installment of 
the Prince saga. This 
time, the graphics 
and engine are pure, 
gorgeous 3D. While 
the over-the-shoulder 
3D look will be new, 
the gameplay that 
signified the previous 
POP games will defi- 
nitely be back. The 
setting is again ancient Persia, 
and the goal Is to rescue the 
princess for yet a third time. 
Mechner, the consummate story- 
teller, will weave the game's 1 5 
levels into a detailed story that 
escalates as the action increases. 
There will be quite a few enemy 
swordsmen and beguiling ladies 
to confront and subdue, but there 
will also be plenty of reflex-based 
puzzles and action sequences, 
such as jumps and evasion. The 
most striking feature of Prince of 
Persia 3D is the excellent anima- 
tion of the Prince himself, which 
rivals Lara Croft's fluidity. 


WHEEL OF TIME 

GT Interactive 
(800)610-4847 
www.gtinteractive.com 
Company ETA: Q1 '99 
CGlVs ETA: Q2 '99 

W HEEL OF Time is a tough 
game to describe. You 
play a hero who has to 
retrieve several artifacts from 
your rivals' well-defended castles. 
The conventional part of the 
game is that you travel to these 
castles, acquire some dazzling 
spell-like powers, surmount the 


traps and enemies within, and 
take what you need. 

However, while you are doing 
this, your own castle is undefend- 
ed. That's where the level design 
part of the game comes in. 

Before you leave to plunder 
enemy castles, you have to lay 
down traps and place monsters 
using a map editor disguised as 
an integral and intuitive part of 
the game interface. While the 
castle-storming part is very 
action-intensive, the castle design 
is a cerebral challenge that 
evokes the most 
intense of strategy 
games. You have to 
anticipate the moves 
and likely entry points 
of would-be robbers 
and design credible 
deterrents. 

The single-player 
part of the game 
should also add a rich 
fantasy storyline and 
some interesting NPCs. 




INDIANA JONES 
AND THE INFERNAL 
lUIACHINE 

LucasArts 
(415)472-3400 
www.lucasarts.com 
Company ETA; Q1 '99 
CGIV'S ETA; Early Q2 '99 

t had to happen. Indiana 
Jones, after seeing the fortune 
Lara Croft has made ripping 
off his signature derring-do in 
exotic tombs, has come out of 
retirement to show gamers how 
a real adventurer hunts artifacts. 
Indiana Jones AND THE Infernal 


Machine will 
be a 3D 
action/adven- 
ture set in the 
early Cold War. 
The perspec- 
tive will be 
familiar third- 
person, but the 
adventures, 
puzzles, and 
combat will be 
classic Indiana 
Jones. The 
Soviets want to build a machine 
that will open a rift to another 
dimension in order to gain great 
power, indy has to stop them by 
finding the pieces to this machine 
before the Soviets do. Thus begins 
a chase to exotic locales around 
the globe, as indy encounters 
fierce enemies, dastardly puzzles, 
and pursuing Commies. 

Expect Indy to use his wits to 
solve environmental and logic 
puzzles, as well as his whip and 
several different weapons to 
fend off bad guys both human 
and animal. 


PREY 

GT lnteractive/3D Realms 
(800)6104847 
www.3drealms.com 
Company ETA: Q1 '99 
CGIV'S ETA; 01 '99 

O ne of the highlights for us 
at E3 was being given a 
private demo of Prey. The 
game looks to be the next level 
in first-person shooters, with its 
powerful engine, advanced geom- 
etry and mind-bending potential 
for interactivity. It features an 
American Indian named Talon 
Brave, who has the ability to use 
conventional weapons and magic 
as he develops spiritually 


throughout the game. Prey's 3D 
engine abandons BSPs in favor of 
a new system known as Portal 
Technology. Portals allow destruc- 
tion of the levels in a way never 
seen before. Whole walls, rooms, 
and levels may be changed or 
destroyed, and suitably devastat- 
ing weaponry is planned to facili- 
tate this. The engine appears to 
handle huge levels and large 
reflective surfaces with no slow- 
down. It's also capable of render- 
ing scenes with much higher 
polygon counts than we've seen 
before. Prey could well be the 
most sophisticated and gorgeous 
3D game to date. 



COMPUTER CAAAINC WORLD » SEPTEMBER 199S 


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100+ HOT NEW GAMES • ACTION 



SLAVE ZERO 

Accolade 
(408) 985-1700 
www.accolade.com 
Company ETA: (33 '99 
CGWi ETA: Q4 ’99 

D rawing inspiration from 
such anime films as 
Evangelion and Macross 
Plus, Accolade's giant robot game 
Slave Zero adds QuAKE-paced 
action and a sprawling, populated 
urban environment to the 
MechWarrior formula. You are the 
sole pilot of an experimental robot 
called Slave Zero, the only thing 
standing between a wave of 
marauding evil 
robots and the 
city's destruc- 
tion. Since the 
game takes 
place in a Blade 
Runner-\ke city 
with skyscrapers 
and mile-high 
freeways, the 
possibilities for 
creating mass 


havoc are limitless. You can swing 
from bridges and gun down ene- 
mies below (taking out chunks of 
nearby buildings in the process), 
crawl up skyscrapers, and jump 
onto freeways and overturn cars 
with each thundering step. 

The action will be more imme- 
diate than MechWarrior 2's, as 
you fight multiple robots in 
intense battles in various city- 
scapes. Sean Vesce, the designer 
for MechWarrior 2 and the direc- 
tor for Interstate 76, Is creating 
Slave Zero, and he hopes to make 
gamers feel as if they're in the 
middle of an exciting giant robot 



anime film and have it be 
just as much fun as Quake 
and Mech 2. 


ROGUE 

SQUADRON 

LucasArts 
(415)472-3400 
www.lucasarts.com 
Company ETA: C)4 '99 
com ETA: 04 '99 



L ucasArts knew that the best 
parts of last year's mediocre 
Shadows of the Empire were 
the flight portions— especially 
the Battle of Hoth, in which you 
got to pilot a snowspeeder. 
destroy probes and AT-ST walk- 
ers, and rope up giant AT-ATs. A 
blast for any gamer, Star Wars 
fan or not! 

Well, LucasArts is taking that 
gameplay and blowing it up into 
a full game. This time, you play 
Luke Skywalker as you pilot a 
variety of spacecraft through 
more than a dozen free-roaming 
levels. Taking point for the famed 
Rogue Squadron, the Rebellion's 
crack fighter squadron, you'll fly 
X-wIngs, A-wIngs, Y-wIngs, and 
other ships against a gauntlet of 
Imperial fighters and machines. 
The levels you'll experience 
include familiar Star Wars planets 
such as Tatooine and Mon 
Calamari, while the environments 
include deserts, canyons, lava 
flows, and forests. Don't think 
that the missions will just be 
killing sprees, either. You'll have 
to rescue prisoners, escort con- 
voys, and conduct surgical strikes 
on Imperial strongholds. 


ABE'S EXODUS 

GT Interactive 
(800)610-4847 
www.gtlnteractlve.com 
Comparry ETA: Q4 '98 
COWS ETA: Q4 ’98 

O ur man Aboman is coming 
back, and his next game 
should truly shine. The 
biggest reason — apart from all 
the creative stuff that developer 
Oddworld Inhabitants dreams 
up — is that now you'll actually be 
able to save the game whenever 
you like. 

This time Abe must journey to 
his homeland to stop the 
Glukkons from mining his ances- 
tors' remains. The Glukkons 
(remember Mollock?) need bones 
to make SoulStorm Brew, and they 
have plenty of slaves to toil for 
them. Abe has to rescue the slaves 
and save the burial grounds, using 
sly moves, new speech commands, 
and new powers. He'll encounter 
familiar enemies, most of whom 
he can now control, and new 
ones, like Fleeches and Slurgs. 

Oddworld games are truly bril- 
liant in design and execution, with 
rich worlds and consistently clever 
challenges. This should be high on 
your list of coming attractions. 


IN THE WORKS 


S tarSiege; Tribes is under develop- 
ment and takes place in the 
StarSiege universe (what used to be 
EarthSiege before the change to a 
more rich and alien game universe). 
The main difference between this and the 
combat sim StarSiege is that you run around 
in a power suit instead of a giant robot. 

Quake H: Ground Zero is the expansion 
pack coming from Rogue, the same folks who 
created Dissolution of Eternity. It will 


have some exciting multiplayer maps and 
new weapons, including tesla bombs that 
shoot lightning at campers, proximity mines, a 
lightning gun-like laser rifle, and several 
other nasty toys. Look for it in September. 

Also from Activision is Beneath, a 3D action- 
adventure in which you play an archaeologist 
who explores huge underground caverns and 
tunnels. It should be a good-looking game with 
plenty of action and exploration. Look for it to 
arrive in mid-1999. 


Klingon Honor Guard promises to be 
another exciting first-person shooter. What will 
set it apart from the crowd is its Klingon uni- 
verse. You’ll be a Klingon, wield Klingon 
weapons, and shed alien blood across the Star 
Trek universe. Expect it sometime this winter. 

Lara Croft will be back for her diird adven- 
ture, and Core is very mindful of the fact that 
people want a real sequel and not just a rehash 
of Tomb Raider. Read our August cover story 
for the full scoop on Tomb Raider III. 


COMPUTER GAMING WORLD « SEPTEMBER 1998 


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WE ARE FAMILY 

Not everyone that joins you looks like 
you. Super-mutants, robo-dogs and 
ghouls may Join your adventure, or 
vihy not do-it-yourself by Implanting 
the brain of someone near-and-dear 
into that shiny new robot body. 


KILL SMARTER, NOT KARRER 

Improved combat AI for friends and 
foes alike. Most of 
the people in your 
own group won’t take 
that burst shot with the 
Plechette-gun, but a couple 
are probably just aching 
for the opportunity. 



SHARE THE WEALTH 

If you want to, you can upgrade 
any traveling companions with 
more dangerous weapons, 
touglier armor, or even 
teach them new skills and 
abilities. Of course, you’d 
better make sure they’re on 
your side. 






BIGGER 6* BALDER THAN EVER 

Bigger, smarter, nastier enemies than 
you’ve ever fought before. We’ve given 
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100+ HOT NEW GAMES • ADVENTURE 


GRIlUl FANDANGO 



LucasArts 
(415) 472-3400 
www.tucasarts.com 
Company's ETA; Q3 '98. 

CGlV's ETA: Q4 '98. 

G rim is the perfect 

word to describe the 
state of adventure 
gaming these days; 
There are lots of bad 
games, and a few really great 
games suffering from poor sales. 
But grim is also a word to asso- 
ciate with the genre's best 
chance for a comeback this year. 
Grim Fandango, LucasArts' 
upcoming 3D adventure game, is 
as original and exciting as any 
game we've seen this season — 
regardless of genre. 

Designed and conceived by 
Tim Schafer (the creative force 
behind Day of the Tentacle, Full 
Throhle, and other classic 
LucasArts adventures), Grim 


Fandango is noticeably darker 
than anything the company has 
done before, while still retaining 
the smart humor that has always 
set LucasArts adventure games 
apart. This time around. Schafer 
has combined his interest in 
Mexican folklore with his love of 
film noir to tell a bizarre, original 
story set in the Land of the Dead. 

The protagonist is Manny 
Calavera, a long-dead working- 
class stiff who's stuck with the 
task of welcoming newcomers to 
their new non-existence, and set- 
ting them on their five-year jour- 
ney across the Land of the Dead. 
Manny wants out, though, and, 
as the game begins, he commits a 
desperate act that soon plunges 
him into the center of a Double 
Indemnity-stjk plot full of double- 
crossing schemers, menacing bad 
guys, and femmes fatale. 


The 3D artwork, based on 
Mexican folklore and also mod- 
eled on Tim Burton's stop- 
motion animated classic movie 
The Nightmare Before Christ- 
mas, is a thing of strange beau- 
ty. The characters' painted 2D 
faces over 3D polygonal bodies 
create a look that is both haunt- 
ing and cartoony, Gamepiay- 
wise, expect LucasArts' always- 
great puzzle design and first- 


rate script. Note, however, that 
you'll "drive" the main charac- 
ter yourself, moving through 
and interacting directly with the 
environment, rather than just 
hunting for hot spots. 

Grim Fandango exemplifies a 
bold, challenging, and stylistic 
new direction for LucasArts. 
Anyone interested in the future 
of the adventure game genre 
should be excited, We sure are. 



GABRIEL KNIGHT III: Blood of the 
Sacred, Blood of the Damned 

Sierra Studios 
(425) 649-9800 
www.sierrastudios.com 
Company ETA: Q3 '98 
CGlV’s ETA; Q4 '98. 


ike LucasArts, Sierra is anoth- 
er company hoping to use 3D 
graphics as a way to jump- 
start the adventure-game genre 
and get gamers interested again. 
Although Sierra struck gold a cou- 
ple years back with Gabriel Knight 
2: The Beast Within (which won 
CGW's 1 996 Game of the Year 
award, among others), it probably 
represents — in retrospect — the 


pinnacle of FMV-based adventure 
games, both in terms of artistic 
quality and popularity. 

Now Sierra is forsaking video 
and returning the Gabriel Knight 
series to its animated roots, but 
with a brand-new 3D engine that 
will allow gamers to switch 
between first- and third-person 
points of view. Master storyteller 
Jane Jensen is once again at the 
helm, as she sets Gabriel Knight 
and Grace Nakamura off on an- 
other supernatural mystery cen- 
tered around the kidnapped 



Redguard puts you in the role of a 
mercenary redguard who, while 
investigating the disappearance of 
his sister, gets caught up in a web 
of political intrigue. As with 
Sierra's Mask of Eternity, 

Redguard is a story-based adven- 
ture, but will ask you to deal with 
a certain amount of action game- 
play, such as swordfighting. 

Unlike Daggerfall, Redguard's 
new 3D engine is gorgeous. And 
with the deep, rich backstory of 
Tamriel as established in previous 
games, Redguard stands a very 
good chance of bringing the Elder 
Scrolls series to a more main- 
stream gaming crowd. 


newborn son of a dethroned prince 
in a small European village. Jensen 
writes the best stories in the busi- 
ness — deep, intelligent, and at- 
mospheric — and GK III looks as 
though it will not disappoint. In the 
diminishing world of adventure 
gaming, Gabriel Knight III is one of 
the year's biggest events. 


REDGUARD 

Bethesda Softworks 
(301) 926-8300 
www.belhsD(t.com 
Company ETA: Q4 '99 
CGW's ETA: 04 '99 


F rom the creators of 

Daggerfall comes another 
game set in 
the world of 
Tamriel. This is no 
RPG, however 
(you'll have to wait 
for Morrowind for 
that), but is 
instead a Prince of 
PERS iA-style action 
adventure. (Notice 
a trend here?) 

Set 40 years 
before Daggerfall, 


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SECRET OF 
VULCAN FURY 

Interplay Productions 
(949) 553-6655 
www.intctplay.com 
Company ETA; Q3 '99 
CGWi ETA: Q4 '99 

I nterplay has pushed this title 
back to fall 1999, but that's 
probably a good thing. Rush- 
ing Secret of Vulcan Fury out 
half-baked would have done no 
good, and after the nightmare 
that was Star Trek Pinball, 
Interplay owes the Trekker audi- 
ence a good game. 

And this game has serious 
potential. Secret of Vulcan Fury is 
a classic Tre/rtale, penned by D.C. 
Fontana {one of the series' original 
writers) and features voiceovers by 
the entire original cast. The story 
centers around the murder of a 


Romulan ambassador on Vulcan, 
which plunges the crew of the 
Enterprise into the mystery sur- 
rounding the original separation of 
the Romulan and Vulcan races, 
\A/e've loved what we've seen 
of this game so far. The realistic 
3D graphics have to be seen to be 
believed. Now Interplay just has to 
finish the dang thing. 


KING'S QUESTS 

lUlASK OF ETERNITV 

Sierra Studios 
(425) 649-9800 
www.sierrastudias.cam 
Company ETA: Q3 '98 
CGWi ETA; Q4 '98. 

ing's Quest: Mask of 
Eternity is another foray by 
Sierra into the brave new 
world of 3D adventure games. 
Again, Sierra is taking an estab- 


lished franchise and completely 
revamping it — and, in this case, 
the changes are even more radi- 
cal. V\/ith the series' longtime 
designer Roberta Williams again 
at the helm, Mask of Eternity is 
being billed this time as an 
action/adventure— meaning that 
manual dexterity and combat will 
play a factor, in addition to the 
now-slandard adventure game 
puzzle-solving. 

Those with an open mind will 
soon discover, however, that this 
is, in fact, a King's Quest game, 
faithful to the spirit of the 1 4-year- 
old series. Once again, Williams 



has penned a high-fantasy, adven- 
ture tale set in the kingdom of 
Daventry.This time, some kind of 
destructive magical force has 
turned the inhabitants to stone, 
and it's up to Connor — the one 
person spared — to find out what's 
going on. 

A beautiful new 3D engine, a 
strong plot, and Williams' good 
instincts for what makes a game 
work should put this one over. It's 
a gamble, to be sure, but, at this 
point, the genre could certainly use 
some fresh ideas. 



GOOD & EVIL 

Cavedag Entertainment 
(425)486-9258 
www.cavedag com 
Company ETA; Q4 '99 
CGWi ETA; Q4 '99 

H onestly, we don't know 
much about this one yet, 
but the very fact that it 
exists was reason enough for us 
to rejoice. Why? Because it's the 
first adventure game in a long 
time from Ron Gilbert, the leg- 
endary designer behind LucasArts' 
Monkey Island 1 and 2 games, 
and the man also behind 
Flumongous, whose kids' adven- 
ture games (the Putt-Putt, Pajama 
Sam, and Freddi Fish series) rank 
among the best in the business— 
for gamers of any age. 

Gilbert's new game is being 
billed as an adventure/RPG/ 
strategy title, with a top-down 
perspective. What we saw (a 
pirate town, a clown town, and a 
medieval setting) was cartoony in 
the classic LucasArts vein— and 
that's about all we have to say. 
Yet, we're still optimistic. After all, 
Gilbert's record is spotless. 



IN THE WORKS 


ormally, this space would be 
reserved for all the other exciting 
adventure games now in devel- 
opment. The only problem is, 
there hardly are any in develop- 
ment right now. As was the case with RPGs a 
few years ago, the adventure game genre is 
floundering right now, and the prognosis— 
except for the games on this list — is not so 
good. So just exactly why /sthis once-impor- 
tant genre wheezing along, trying to catch 
the action, strategy, and even role-playing 
titles as they leave it in the dust? The answer, 
as is usually the case, is money. 


Adventure games are incredibly expensive 
to make, but publishers are simply not seeing 
the kind of sales they've now come to expect 
from the DiABio-style blockbuster hits in other 
genres. Even last year's most acclaimed 
titles— Blade Runner, Curse of Monkey 
Island, and Zork Grand Inquisitor — didn't 
begin to approach the sales of a Quake, or, for 
that matter, Ace of Empires. (We're leaving 
Myst and Riven out of the discussion. 
Regardless of your opinion of those games, 
they're really pop-culture anomalies.) 

Why? Maybe the slow-paced, lengthy 
nature of these games doesn't appeal to 


today's quick-fix crowd. Maybe they simply 
require way too much of a time investment, 
even for people who like this kind of game. 

And maybe they're victims of technology — 
unable to compete with the visceral eye- 
candy available in almost every other genre. 

In any event, something had to give — and 
it did. Adventure game development has dried 
up in a big way, and those still nobly pursuing 
the cause are doing what they can to expand 
the genre's horizons to reach a bigger — and 
younger — audience. We wish them the best. 
Next year, we don't want to have to write 
such a depressing lament. 





COMPUTER CAAAINO WORLD » SEPTEMBER 1996 


,'.compulefgaming.< 





(Because we’re not always going to be there to hold your trembling, sweaty little band.) 




Be warned; this is technology with 
a real “punch-you-in-the- 
gut-while-you’re-noMooking” 
brand of sensitivity. 


There’s never been anything like Intensor. So 
in order to survive it, you need to understand 
a few things. Like to begin with, you need to 
know what a Sensory Gaming Experience is. 
It’s complete immersion. It’s intense tactile 


# 

ITEM ^ 

I 

Left 2" Mid-range Diroelional 

2 

Right 2" Mid-range Directional 

3 

5.25’’ Center Mid-range 

4 

5.25” Low Frequency Tactile Driver 

5 

High-range Tweeter 

6 

Sound Volume 

7 

Tactile Intensity 


Electronics Unit 

9 

Heavy Duly Single Cord Connector 

lO 

Optional Office Chair Base 

II 

Optional Subwoofer 

I2 

Meatlphone Jack 


Fig. 1. 4 breakdown of what yoit're up against. 


feedback. It’s being able to see, hear and feel 
the game you’re playing like never before. All 
you have to do is hook it up to the audio jack 
of any system, play any game and hold on. 
You may also want to say a little prayer. 


Fig. 2. At 19 pounds. Inicnsor is designed 
for cpiick evaataiion in (he event things 
get ugly. (Shaky hands will appreciate the 
built-in molded carrying handle:) 


Remember, in this chair 
no one can hear you scream. 


College Frat Party 

10! dB 


Not everyone will have what it takes to 
handle Intensor’s patented audio system. 
After ail, we're talking 5 high-performance 
built-in speakers with 108dB output. 

speaking, that means it’s realiy 


loud. So for the neighbors’ sake, you may 
want to use the headphone jack - which you 
can do without losing any tactile feedback. 
But keep in mind — if your ears start bleeding 
you should probably turn the thing down. 







PART THREE 


Ducking, dodging, whimpering 
and other useful gaming skills 
you might want to perfect. 


Be advised. With Intensor, you’ll not only 
hear your games like never before, you’ll 
also fee) them. In your back. In your legs. 
You'll feel sensations in places you never 
even knew you had. Which means every 


engine rev, every explosion, every kick will 
seem more real than you may want it to. So 
it’s important to note that under this type of 
extreme duress, screaming in high-pitched 
tones for one's mommy is quite commoa 





Fig. 4. Arii.sfs conception ofSensorv 
Gaimn}>s effect on the human heart. 
Those with heart conditions should 
proceed at their own risk. 



Fig. 5. Note: Players attempting to 
negotiate Intensor on anything 
less than a good, stiff spine may he 
reduced to a vegetative .state. 


PART FOUR 


Any game. Any system. 

Any medium. After this, nothing 
will ever be the same. 


From movies and CDs to all your favorite 
games, Intensor isn’t just compatible with 
your current system, it actually transforms 
it. It may also do the same to you. Once 
you take a seat, there’s a new awareness. 


And there’s no going back. It's the gaming 
version of the thousand-yard stare. You'll 
recognize it in others who've “been there!’ 
Seek them out. Talk to them.This therapeutic 
approach can help preserve your sanity. 



Fig. 6. Intensor has been known to induce shock. In 
such cases, place victim flat on back, elevate legs <S to 12 
inches and coll for help. (If victim begins vomiting, 
place him or her on one side to allow fluid drainage.) 



In the event of nervous 
breakdown, .seek help ai 

www.intensor.com 

A.s.siiining you've read 
this carefully, proceed to your 
favorite gaming retailer. 





100+ HOT NEW GAMES • ROLE-PLAYING GAMES 



BALDUR'S GATE 


Interplay Productions 
(949) 553-6655 
vww.interpiay.com 
Company ETA; Q3 ’98 
CQWi ETA; Q4 '98 

I t's been a long time since there's been a 
good Advanced Dungeons & Dragons 
computer RPG— a pretty ridiculous 
delay given its status as the seminal 
role-playing experience, or at least the 
one that many of us cut our teeth on. But 
novi/ Interplay looks as if it's going to reverse 
that trend in a big way {and at the same 
time make up for its last AD&D travesty, 
Descent TO Undermountain). Balour's Gate is 
a very ambitious new title, set in the AD&D 
Forgotten Realms world, with so much going 
for it that it is, without a doubt, the RPG 
we're most anxious to see this fall. 

Sprawled out over five CDs, encompassing 
{according to the company) 10,000 distinct 
areas, Baldur's Gate is a single- and multi- 
player role-playing game unlike any we've 
ever seen. Bioware, the game's developer, 
has had one big goal in mind while making 
the game: Keep it as faithful as possible to 
the spirit of the old AD&D campaigns you 


The game's isometric view is reminiscent 
of that of both Diablo and Fallout, and com- 
bat takes place in realtime, though the game 
can be paused while you assign actions. 
Everything in the game — the combat-, spell-, 
character-, and class systems— strictly fol- 
lows the AD&D Player's Handbook rules. 
That's great for the purists out there, but 
even gamers who aren't fans of AD&D 
should be psyched for this one. Balour's Gate 
is the year's most ambitious and promising 
role-playing game. 


played with your 
friends. And here's 
where the game 
gets really cool: 

Both the single- 
and multiplayer 
versions of 
Balour's Gate tell 
the exact same 
story. Whether you 
play alone or with 
up to five other 
people over a LAN 
or the Internet, you 
are going to follow along the same epic, 
seven-chapter, save-the-world story, replete 
with about 1 00 side quests. The multiplayer 
experience is neither a persistent Ultima 
ONL iNE-style world nor a DiABLO-style bash- 
fest, but instead it lets six people campaign 
together cooperatively as the story and the 
action progress. The game is party-based, so, 
when you play alone, the computer takes the 
NPC slots. In multiplayer mode, each person 
is assigned control of one of the NPCs {and 
can drop in or out as necessary). 



RETURN TO 
KRONDOR 

Sierra Studios 
(425) 649-9800 
www.sierrastudlos.com 
Company ETA; Q3 '98 
CCIV'5 ETA: Q4 ‘98 

F antasy author Raymond £. 
Feist's attempt to produce a 
sequel to his classic Betrayal 
AT KRONDOR {now enshrined in 
CGWs Hal! of Fame) is a battle 
that's been going on for years. 
Now, finally, it may really be 
reaching a conclusion. Return to 


KRONDOR, 
developed 
by Pyro- 
Technix and 
now being 
published 
by Sierra, is 
a brand 
new 1 0- 
chapter 
story, writ- 
ten by Feist 
and set in 
his fantasy 
world of Midkemia about 10 years 
after the conclusion of his epic 
fl/ftwar novels. As in Betrayal, the 
game is party-based, though now 
all the characters are completely 
3D, modeled over beautiful pre- 
rendered backgrounds that bring 
Midkemia to life. Combat is both 
turn-based and 30, providing for 
ample tactical thinking. Don't let 
this game's eternal delays turn 
you off. Feist is a consummate 
storyteller and gamer. Return to 
KRONDOR, if it actually ships, is a 
guaranteed winner. 



DIABLO li 

Blizzard Entertainment 
(3t0) 793-0600 
www.bllzzard.com 
Company ETA; Q2 '99 
CGW's ETA; Who knows? 

L ike it or not, Diablo was the 
game that made RPGs cool 
again, winning over legions 
of new gamers and convincing 
publishers that the genre was not 
only alive, but profitable. Now 
Blizzard's megabit is coming back 
for more— and what can we say? 
Blizzard is beefing up every aspect 
of both the single- and multiplayer 


experience, fixing what didn't 
work and adding a lot more. 

The story (and Blizzard is 
promising that there will be more 
of one this time around) picks up 
where DiABLO left off— except 
that, as it turns out, your character 
is toast and Diablo is back and 
stronger than ever. There are five 
new character classes (paladin, 
barbarian, amazon, necromancer, 
and sorceress), a new skill system 
for greater customization, outdoor 
and indoor settings, a cleaner 
interface, much faster load times, 
and more. Sure, whine about it not 
being a real 
role-playing 
game and 
about 
Blizzard 
always 
being late. 
But face it: 
You're still 
going to 
want Diablo 
11 the day it 
comes out. 


[ilijL COMPUTER GAMING WORLD ■ SEPTEMBER 1998 


^.compulerfiaming.< 






ROLE-PLAYINC GAMES • 100+ HOT NEW GAMES 



IN THE WORKS 

I t's a sign of this genre's remarkable resurgence that there are far 
more RPGs — good ones — than we could possibly cover in this 
feature. Two years ago, who would have guessed it? Here are 
some of the other new titles, which we'll cover more thoroughly 
in future issues. Sir-Tech's Wizardry VIII is the long-awaited 
new game in one of the oldest (and best) RPG series ever. We should 
have a lot more on this one next month. Westwood Studios Lands of 
Lore III looks like it will be a major improvement over the previous 
edition, which disappointed many gamers after much anticipation. The 
new 3D engine looks awesome and the gameptay has a much 
stronger RPG bent than before. Sierra Studios’ Eidos' Revenant is 
another DiABLO-alike, but cool artwork and a good storyline may help 
distinguish it from the pack. Also, Tom Hall is holed up somewhere, 
pounding out his epic Anachronox for Ion Storm. 

A host of "massively multiplayer" (a term we loathe) Internet RPGs 
are on the way — though we've learned from past mistakes not to 
start hyping these before their time. Sony Interactive's Everquest is 
the most promising of the bunch, with unbelievable graphics and a 
good, strong character-development system. We hope to have a 
hands-on look at this one soon. Microsoft's Asheron's Call is anoth- 
er promising game — but, again, more on this later. One that we're 
really, really excited about is Sierra's Middle Earth, an upcoming 
Internet game set in the world created by some guy named Tolkien. 
And, finally, we couldn't get away without mentioning Ultima IX, 
now could we? What can we say? We'll believe it when we see it. 


SWORDS AND 
SORCERY: Co/uiE 
Devils, Coaae 
Darkness 

Virgin Interactive Entertainment 
(714) 833-8710 

Company ETA; Q4 '98 
CGW'% ETA; (54 '98 

V irgin Interactive's first RPG 
might not have crossed our 
radar were it not for one 
significant fact: It's the new 
game from acclaimed RPG 
designer D.W. Bradley, the wizard 
behind the classic Wizardry 
series, Like that series. Swords 


AND Sorcery promises old-school 
fantasy role-playing — but gussied 
up for the late '90s. The party- 
based RPG will feature both sin- 
gle- and multiplayer modes (with 
both turn-based and real-time 
combat) and a brand-new 3D 
engine. You'll also be able to take 
your character back and forth 
between the single- and multi- 
player game — a nice innovation. 
Along with all the chrome, the 
game will boast the kind of deep, 


detailed 
character- 
development 
system for 
which D.W. 
Bradley is 
known. With 
the potential 
to attract 
both the 
hard-core 
crowd that 
followed the Wizardry series, as 
well as newer gamers intrigued 
by the bells and whistles, Swords 
AND Sorcery is one to watch. 


LEGEND OF THE 
FIVE RINGS: Ronin 

Activision 
(310) 255-2000 
www.aclivision.com 
Company ETA: Q4 '98 
CGlVs ETA; 04 '98 

f the many Diablo- 
inspired RPGs now in 
development. Legend of 
THE Five Rings: Ronin strikes us as 
the most interesting and promis- 


ing. Based on the collectible card 
game of the same name, Legend 
OF THE Five Rings is fantasy RPG 
set in a feudal society inspired by 
Japanese and Chinese mythology 
and history. The game is set in 
the fantasy world of Rokugan, 
where you play a young samurai 
who is sent by a sorceress to 
locate the pieces of a sacred arti- 
fact. With its isometric viewpoint, 
action sequences, and multiplay, 
it does resemble Diablo — but 


what sets it apart is its totally 
unique setting. As with Fallout, 
this is an RPG that offers some- 
thing other than elfs and 
dwarves for a change. And any 
game that lets us role-play a 
samurai (whether that's John 
Belushi or Toshiro Mifune) is one 
we can't wait to check out. 


FALLOUT 2 

Interplay Productions 
(949) 553-665S 
www.interplay.com 
Company ETA; Q4 '98 
C6W'% ETA; Q4 '98 

Q uality-Starved role-play- 
ers finally hit the mother- 
lode last year 
with Interplay's Fallout, 
widely considered the 
best RPG in years (and 
undisputed choice for 
CGW's 1997 RPG of the 
Year award). Now, not 
surprisingly, a sequel is 
in the works, and while 
it may not break any 
new ground, it should 
still prove to be one of 


the more enjoyable role-playing 
experiences. Set in Northern 
California 50 years after Fallout, 
the game casts you as "The 
Chosen One," a descendant of 
your original character, given the 
task of rediscovering Vault 1 3 in 
hopes of retrieving a holy relic 
that can end the 1 0-year drought 
that has plagued the land. 
Fallout 2 uses the same engine 
(a good thing), but boasts a 
much bigger environment, better 
control over party members, 
much better NPC Al (our biggest 
complaint of the first game), and 
more. If it's half as good as 
Fallout, it'll still be a must-buy, 





v.computergaming.c 


COMPUTER GAMING WORLD » SEPTEMBER 1998 M 









■ ‘ ■ • i 

■ 1 


i 

i*t ...'Vi 

REAI 



1 

L-TIM 

IE STRATEGY 

WI1 





lUlflll 






You play games. SavageSD" 


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More realistic. How? With 


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SPORTS • 100+ HOT NEW GAMES 



iUlADDEN NFL 99 


EA Sports 
(650)571-7171 
www.easports.cotn 
Company ETA; Q3 ‘98 
CGlV's ETA: Q4 '98 

L ike the double three- 
peat Chicago Bulls, EA 
Sports is an utterly 
dominant organization, 
Though it's human 
nature to get cynical— and to 
want to root for the under- 
dogs — the fact of the matter Is 
that EA is so good at what it 
does that sometimes you just 
have to sit back and enjoy the 
show, EA's NHL, NBA, and FIFA 
games have all been completely 
awesome the last couple years— 
not perfect, not without their 
flaws, but still state-of-the-art 
models of entertaining sports 
gaming. Madden NFL, however, 
has been a weak link for a few 
seasons now, not remotely up to 
the level of its siblings. 


Madden NFL 99 may 
change that. First, the 
game is finally convert- 
ing to full 3D-polygonal 
graphics (as opposed to 
the "polygon enhanced 
sprites" of Madden 98). 

The result, as shown in 
the latest FIFA games, is 
fantastic. Second, the 
Madden team has 
worked hard to enhance 
the gameplayfor both 
novice and experienced 
players. Madden veter- 
ans will be very pleased to learn 
that there is finally a play editor, 
as well as a franchise mode. We 
admit to spending no time with 
either feature — so their worth 
remains to be seen— but credit 
EA for being interested enough 
to try to deepen the game. On 
the other end of the spectrum, 
EA is hoping to draw in novice 


gamers with a new "one-button" 
mode, in which a single "action" 
button on your gamepad or key- 
board will perform all actions in 
the game (the Al will determine 
what to do based on what's hap- 
pening on the field). Simplistic? 
Yes, But actually a good idea for 
the gamepad-impaired. Multiplay 
is there, of course, though 


Internet play is limited to coach- 
only mode — a limitation that 
really must end soon, (Maybe in 
a patch?) It's going to be a com- 
petitive year for PC football 
games (there are three on this 
list alone), but, for now, we give 
the nod to Madden— the best 
chance for the best marriage of 
brains and chrome. 



NASCAR 
RACING 99 

Sierra Sports 
(800) 757-7707 
www.sierrasports.com 
Company ETA; Q4 ‘98 
CGlVsETAQl '99 

O ne of the greatest auto- 
racing franchises (along 
with MicroProse's Grand 
Prix) is coming back for more 
amidst stiffer competition than in 
years past. With the rise of 3D 
graphics, a number of new racing 
sims have hit the tracks in the last 


year, including Ubi Soft's excellent 
FI Racing Simulation and the (we 
admit it) overrated Microsoft CART 
Precision Racing. But Dave 
Kaemmer and the team at Papyrus 
are roaring back this winter with 
NASCAR Racing 99, and they are 
looking to up the ante yet again. 
The new engine, also featured in 
their upcoming Grand Prix 
Legends, is perhaps the best ever 
seen in a racing sim, and the 3D- 
accelerated graphics and brand- 
new physics model are stunning. 
Another huge improvement will be 


the opponent Al, 
which, we are told, 
will react realistically 
to your moves. The 
first two games in 
this series were five- 
star mini-master- 
pieces. There's no 
reason to expect 
anything less from 
NASCAR Racing 99. 



FOOTBALL PRO '99 

Sierra Sports 
(800) 757-7707 
www.sierrasports.com 
Company ETA; Q4 '98 
CGW's ETA; Q4 ‘98 


S ierra has officially retired thi 
"Front Page Sports” name, 
but not the games them- 
selves. It was a good call, as that 
name was losing its luster after a 
few less-than-great releases. Now 
called simply Football Pro '99, 
Sierra's pigskin game has been 
rebuilt from the ground up, and if 
looking to recapture the fire that 
made it a three-time winner of 
CGW's Sports Game of the Year 


award. Like EA's Madden, 
Football Pro '99 will finally get a 
full 3D engine with polygonal 
players, bringing its arcade play 
(or at least the look of it) up to 
par with the competition, On the 
deeper end of the spectrum, the 
game's stat model will be as 
robust as ever, while a new finan- 
cial model will enhance team 
management functions such as 
drafting, free agency, and trades. 
We like what we've seen so far 
and hope that, as with Madden, 
this is the year this series finally 
gets back on track. If so. Sierra's 
entry will be the choice for seri- 
ous football wonks. 


v.computergaming.c 


COMPUTER GAMING WORLD » SEPTEMBER 1998 M 




ARIUM. 



lIJiHiBiliUll 




100+ HOT NEW GAMES • SPORTS 



NATIONAL 
HOCKEY TONIGHT 

ESPN Digital Games 
(415) 229-9100 

www.radical-entertainment.com 
Company ETA; Q4 ’98 
CGW'i ETA; Q4 '98 

ever heariJ of this one? 
Didn't know that ESPN 
was in the computer gam- 
ing business? Yeah, neither did 
we. Then, upon doing a little dig- 


ging, we discovered that ESPN 
Digital Games is actually in 
league with gaming veterans 
Radical Entertainment, designers 
of the NHL Powerplay games. 
Suddenly we got very interested. 
National Hockey Tonight is the 
next-generation version of 
Powerplay, a great game that 
never had the marketing muscle 
to compete with EA Sports. Now, 
with the ESPN branding, the 



IN THE WORKS 

T here are plenty of other worthy titles in the works to 
keep sports fans happy throughout the coming year. 

EA Sports, of course, has other pearls in its lineup, 
including NBA Live 99 and NHL 99, the latest ver- 
sions of two perennial favorites. The big wildcard for 
EA is Knockout Kings, a 3D boxing title that lets you fight as 
(or against) tons of real-life boxers, including Muhammad Ali, 
Evander Holyfield, and golden-agers such as Joe Louis and Jake 
LaMotta. The possibilities are awesome — but will it be more 
than just a glorified arcade fighting game? Sierra Sports also 
has much more in store, including a fantasy football game, an 
update to its well-received golf game, and a new basketball 
title. Basketball Pro '99. which, it's said, will bring Front 
PAGE-style franchise management to the game. (Does this mean 
we can actually fire Latrell Sprewell?) ESPN Digital Games is 
pumping out NBA Basketball Tonight and X Games Pro 
Boarder for its initial launch this fall. Again, the folks at 
Radical Entertainment know what they're doing, so watch these 
games closely. Fox Sports, not to be outdone by ESPN, is getting 
into the computer gaming business too, with two initial PC titles 
just released: Fox Sports Golf '99 and Fox Sports Soccer 
'99. The emphasis is said to be on the action side. Microsoft, 
with Baseball 3D finally out the door, is now hard at work on 
very-promising basketball and football titles. We've seen these 
games a couple times now, and so far so good. We hope to 
cover all of these and more in upcoming issues of CGW. 


hopes are higher. Accompanying 
NHT's already-proven gameplay is 
cool ESPN chrome. ESPN Sports- 
Center anchor Steve Levy and 
hockey analyst Gary Thorne call 
the games, while — and this we 
really like — a sports ticker at the 
bottom of the screen, hooked up 
to ESPN's Web site, will provide 
scores of current, real-life games 
as you play. Now that's cool. 


NFL GAMEDAY '99 

Sony Interactive 
(619) 824-5500 
wwvv.sonyinteractive.com 
Company ETA: Q3 ’98 
CGW's ETA: Q3 ’98 

layStation gamers have 
flocked to NFL Gameoay for 
years, making it easily the 
most popular football game on 
that platform. Now it's finally 
making its way to the PC, and it's 
looking strong. The game's 
arcade play is intuitive and fun 
on the PSX, and it should make 
the transition to the PC without 
any problems, A 3D accelerator 


TIGER WOODS 99 

EA Sports 
(650) 571-7171 
www.easports.com 
Company ETA (33 '98 
CGlVs ETA: Q4 ’98 

E A Sports scored the licensing 
coup of the decade when it 
signed Tiger Woods for its golf 
franchise. Always overshadowed by 



Links and Jack Nicklaus on the PC, 
the game formerly known as PGA 
Tour promises to skyrocket in pop- 
ularity with Mr. Woods on the box 
and in the game. Play with or 
against nine real PGA Tour players, 
including you-know-who, on three 
courses; Pebble Beach Golf Links, 
TPC at Sawgrass, and TPC at 



card will be required, which is 
becoming standard fare for sports 
games. The biggest news about 
GAMEDAY is that it will be the first 
football game to let gamers com- 
pete in arcade play (as opposed 
to just coach mode) over the 
Internet, through a battle.net- 
type service. This is a huge first 
and a big coup over Madden. It's 
a virgin PC title, so we won't do 
the wave for it yet — but keep 
your eyes open. 


Summerlin. The game's easy 
Internet connectivity, which 
debuted in the last PGA Tour 
game, is back, and the graphics will 
now offer 3D acceleration. Will 
Tiger Woods 99 match Links in 
terms of gameplay? Only time will 
tell. But the novelty and flash fac- 
tor of this title are impossible to 
ignore. If any golf game has the 
potential to bring in a younger 
demographic of gamers, this is it. 
And that's a good thing. 


COMPUTER GAMING WORLD • SEPTEMBER 1998 


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outcome of the war. The game's 
editor will allow you to create 
your own missions, complete 
with random elements to add a 
level of unpredictability. And as 
you've come to expect from a 


Jane's title, there's a complete 
database of information on each 
of the sim's aircraft, complete 
with video interviews of real-life 
WWII vets such as triple-ace 
Clarence "Bud" Anderson. 


WWII FIGHTERS 


Jane's Combat Simulations 
(415) 57i-7i71 
vvww.janes.ea.com 
Company ETA: 04 '98 
CCIVs ETA: Q4 '98 

I f the reaction to the game at 
the recent Electronic 
Entertainment Expo (E3) 
show was any indication, 
WWII Fighters (originally 
known as Fighter Legends) is one 
of the most hotly anticipated sim- 
ulations of the year. The reasons 
are many: Foremost among them, 
this will be one of the first all- 
new World War 1 1 sims to hit the 
shelves in years. The buzz was 
loud, though, because it's by far 
the most graphically impressive 
World War II sim — in fact, one of 
the best looking flight sims peri- 
od— slated to be shipped this 
year. Amazingly detailed aircraft, 
3D virtual-cockpits with more 
detail than you're used to seeing 
on flat bitmapped panels, and 
clouds that look as real as those 


you'd see from Row 1 8 of a 737 
make for a strong visual impres- 
sion. But there's more here than 
eye candy. The game is built on 
feedback from the long-running 
U.S. Navy Fighters jet sim series, 
so you can look forward to a 
powerful mission editor, realistic 
mission goals, and multiplayer 
support for up to eight human 
pilots on LAN or via Jane's Online 
Gaming Center. 

WWII Fighters' campaign is 
set during the Battle of the 
Bulge. Flyable aircraft include 
the P-38J Lightning, P-47D 
Thunderbolt, P-51D Mustang, 
Messerschmitt Bf-109G-6 and 
Me-262, Focke-Wulf 190A-8, and 
the Spitfire Mk.lX. Jane's is 
promising detailed flight models 
with authentic performance for 
each of the planes. The historical 
campaign is set up with branch- 
ing missions, so the performance 
of your squadron can affect the 



WARGASA/l 

Digital Image Design 
(408) 289-1411 
www.dld.com 
Company ETA: Q4 '98 
CGWi ETA; Q1 '99 


T he game with the memo- 
rable name is a bit of a 
departure for the UK's DID. 
It's as much a real-time strategy 
game as a simulation. You direct 
the strategic war, and then jump 
into the cockpit of one of 20 


different types of vehicles, ranging 
from Comanche helicopters to A- 
1 0 Warthogs to Ml A2 tanks. With 
so many vehicles^simulated, it's 
only natural that the control sys- 
tems have been simplified. Despite 
the simplified inteVface (which 
should make the game more 
accessible to strategy and action 
players), the performance and 
capabilities of each vehicle remain 
accurate. And the game's multi- 
player mode (called, of course, 


"Multiple Wargasm") is the elec- 
tronic battlefield realized— you 
can play everything from a tank 
driver to an infantryman to a pilot. 
In the early version we saw, the 
graphics were dazzling, complete 
with impressive weather effects 
and Hollywood-style explosions. 
Wargasm has the potential to be 
the real-time strategy game for 
simulation fans. 


FLY! 

Terminal Reality 
(972) 221-2264 
vmw.lerminalrenlily.com 
Company ETA: Q4 '98 
CGlV's ETA: Q1 '99 

I n the civilian category, each ^ 
of the current flight-sims 
excels in some areas while 
falling short in others. Terminal 
Reality's Fly! attempts to 
include the works in one pack- 
age. Both real and wannabe 
pilots should appreciate the 
full avionics packages for each 
of the simulated aircraft (from 


single-engine Cessnas to a bizjet), 
as well as a full airport and 
NAVAID database for the entire 
U.S. Digital elevation maps are 
included for the whole country, so 
even in areas without detailed 
scenery you'll find realistic moun- 
tain ranges and other terrain fea- 
tures. Terminal Reality promises 
that five cities will feature detailed 
satellite imagery — not quite as 
detailed as in Flight Unlimited II, 
but far better than what you've 
seen in other products with large 
scenery databases. The sim will 
include full air-traffic control, as 
well as voice communications for 
multiplayer mode. 



COMPUTER GAMING WORLD » SEPTEMBER 1998 


ACoiiipLilergaming.t 



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SIMULATIONS • 100+ HOT NEW GAMES 



PANZER ELITE 

Psygnosis 
(650) 287-6500 
www.psygnosis.com 
Company ETA; Q1 ’99 
CGlV's ETA: Q1 '99 

D eveloped in Germany, 
Psygnosis' Panzer Elite has 
the potential to be the 
Falcon of tank simulations. 
Although there's a beginner's 
mode, which lets you drive your 
tank from the external view, the 
realistic mode not only buttons 
you up inside the tank, but also 


gives you realistic view restric- 
tions from the various stations. 
Detailed terrain, complete with 
realistic buildings and individual 
trees (rather than blocky tree 
lines), makes it that much harder 
to spot enemy tanks. You'll be 
able to drive over trees or blow 
out a structure and use the 
remaining walls for cover. The 
damage model isn't table- 
based— it actually follows the 
path of a shell inside a tank and 
disables the appropriate systems 
(or crewmembers). The goal of 
the game is to 
survive the war, 
and with all the 
realism options 
turned on your 
chances of sur- 
vival are slim. 
As the war pro- 
gresses, your 
unit will even 
suffer from 
ammo and fuel 
shortages. 


F-16 

AGGRESSOR 

Virgin Interactive Entertainment 
(714) 833-8710 
WWW, vie.com 
Company ETA; Q4 '93 
CGtV'sETArQI '99 

e really had doubts 
about F-16 Aggressor. 
After all, Its mercenary 
campaign storyline seems straight 
out of Origin's old Strike 
Commander. But after some stick 
time with the simulation, we're 
surprisingly impressed with the 
handling of this simulated F-1 6. 


Developer General 
Simulations has 
based the flight mod- 
eling on a simulation 
engine actually used 
in USAF sims, and 
the company has 
also paid careful 
attention to cockpit 
systems and 
weapons modeling. 
(We hope the realism 
survives the final cut this time, 
after what happened to Sabre 
Ace.) The campaigns— set in 
Madagascar, the Rift Valley, 
Morocco, and Ethiopia — may be a 
bit fanciful, but with Falcon 4.0 
actually threatening to ship, it's 
perhaps good that F-1 6 Aggressor 
approached the campaign from a 
different angle. The scripted cam- 
paigns cast you as a mercenary 
helping to quell rebel uprisings in 
these regions. The graphics engine 
is very impressive, especially on 
high-end systems that are running 
at 1024x768 resolution. 




SUPER HORNET 

Titus 

(818)709-3692 
www.titusgames.com 
ETA: 04 '98 
CGIVs ETA: Q4 '98 

D igital Integration is going 
head-to- 
head with 
former distributor 
Interactive Magic 
by releasing its 
own F/A-18E sim- 
ulator. Although 
the graphics 
engine is an 
enhanced, 

DirectBD version 
of the one seen in 
iF-16, the underly- 
ing simulation has 
undergone dramatic upgrades. 
Hard-core simulation fans will be 
happy to know that Super Hornet 
sees the return of a ToRNAOO-style 
mission planner. Three dynamic 
campaigns— set in the Barents Sea, 
Indian Ocean, and Persian Gulf — 
are available for solo play. Multi- 
player mode supports 16 players for 


head-to-head missions or four play- 
ers on cooperative strikes. Carrier 
ops are very detailed, with crowded 
decks, crewmembers marshaling air- 
craft to catapults, and landing sig- 
nal officers grading your carrier 
(raps. The cockpit features an active 


instrument panel, authentic radar 
displays, multiple autopilot modes, 
and both fixed and virtual cockpit 
views. Although Digital Integration 
is striving for very realistic flight and 
instrument models, there are plenty 
of aids for the beginning sim gamer, 
including a simulation of the F/A- 
18E's autoland mode. 


EUROPEAN 
AIR VUAR 

MicroProse 
(510) 864-4550 
www.microprose.com 
Company ETA: Q4 '98 
CGWi ETA: Q4 '98, 

I n development nearly as long 
as Falcon 4.0, this World War II 
sim has been shown at all four 
E3 shows. What we saw this year, 
though, was a product that finally 
looks close to shipping — and one 
that no longer looks like an SVGA 
update of the ancient 1 942: 

Pacific Air War. The graphics 


have been reworked with impres- 
sive 3D card support and the best 
flak effects we've ever seen, and 
T. K. Kawahito and his team have 
done an impressive job modeling 
the sim's 20 flyable fighter air- 
craft. You'll be able to fly in both 
the Battle of Britain and the bat- 
tle for Europe in the only dynamic 
campaign to be found in this 
year's crop of World War II sims, 
The period interface and music 
set a wonderful mood for one of 
the most authentic of the upcom- 
ing WWII sims. Multiplayer sup- 
port rounds out the package. 




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ULTRA FIGHTERS 

Interactive Magic 
(919) 461-0722 
www.lmagicgameJ.com 
Company ETA: Q4 '98 
CGW's ETA: Q4 '98 

his sim from Interactive 
Magic takes an updated ver- 
sion of Eagle Interactive's 
Sabre Ace engine and moves it 
to the 26th century, when 
world superpowers are duking 
it out over the Solomon islands 
in subsonic, laser-equipped 
planes. The planes are 
launched from aircraft carriers 
that hover over the ocean. 

Sound weird enough? The 
thinking behind this rather odd 
scenario is to create a simula- 
tion that pairs the slower, up- 
close combat of World War II 
aircraft with the accessibility 
afforded by modern radar sys- 
tems. Think Aces of the Pacific 
meets Wing Commmander. We 
know, it sounded hokey to us 


as well, but the alpha version 
actually comes across as a good 
entry-level simulation. An original 
concept, certainly, but we have to 
wonder how Interactive Magic 
could think these wacky future 
fighters were the best choice 
when they could have had Eagle 
resurrect its F-4 Phantom sim? 




APACHE-HAVOC 

Empire Interactive 
(800)216-9706 
www.empire-us.com 
Company ETA: Q4 '98 
CGWs ETA; 04 '98 

R azorback Studios' Apache- 
Havoc was designed from 
the ground up with multi- 
player play in mind. Gamers 
face off in the American AH-64 
Apache and the Russian Mi- 
28N Havoc attack helicopters, 
two very different machines, 
which should require different 


approaches to 
play, The Apache 
features a modern, 
electronic, glass 
cockpit: the Havoc, 
despite being a 
newer design, has 
a traditional, 
"round dial" cock- 
pit setup. The ter- 
rain features 
raised forest 
canopies (although the early 
versions we saw had polygonal 
tree lines rather than individual 
trees), which should make for 
some interesting uses of line-of- 
sight tactics. Graphics are quite 
impressive: The helicopters and 
other vehicles feature very high 
polygon counts, and the weath- 
er effects are among the most 
authentic we've seen yet. It's 
not all that hard-core, but 
Apache-Havoc looks as if it will 
strike a good balance between 
realism and gameplay, 



NA'nONS: FIGHTER 
COMMAND 

Psygnosis 
(800) 438-7794 
wmv.psygnosis.com 
Company ETA: Q1 '99 
CGWi ETA: Q2 '99 

C oming from the studio that 
created the AGP extrava- 
ganza G-Police, Nations: 
Fighter Command should look 
good— and it does. But Psygnosis 
isn't going for style without sub- 
stance here. The game's develop- 
ers have pored over wartime 
records in an attempt to re-create 
historical missions as accurately 
as possible. In addition, a mission 


editor will let you try your hand 
at creating battles, and Psygnosis 
promises a variety of multiplayer 
game styles. You'll be able to fly 
for the Americans, British, or 
Germans, in planes ranging from 
the P-51 B Mustang to the De 
Havilland Mosquito. The graphics 
engine uses a particle system to 
create impressive explosion 
effects and realistic weather. 
Clouds look particularly impres- 
sive. especially during thunder- 
storms. All this comes at a price, 
though— at E3, Psygnosis was 
recommending a Pentium II and a 
3D card with 8MB of RAM for 
optimal performance. 


FIGHTER 
SQUADRON: 
SCREAMIN' DEMONS 
OVER EUROPE 

Activision 
(310) 255-2000 
www.activision.com 
Company ETA; Q4 '98 
CGlVsETA:Q4 '98 

T his long-delayed sim from 
Activision and Parsoft had 
some development snags, 
but the latest versions we've seen 
indicate that development is 
heading into the home stretch. By 
far the most impressive aspect of 


this World War II sim is its physics 
modeling. Dive a plane and pull 
up too hard and you can literally 
bend it— if it doesn't come apart 
from stress, Slam your landing 
gear down too hard, and the 
wheel will snap off and bounce 
down the runway. Saw off the 
wing of a bomber and it spins 
down to the ground just like 
you've seen in old newsreel 
footage. Fighter Squadron is also 
notable as the only single-player 
WWII sim in the works that lets 
you fly heavy bombers. The 
game's 30-plus missions can be 
played from any 
side, and from the 
cockpits of any type 
of plane in the mis- 
sion. A comprehen- 
sive mission-editor 
lets you create your 
own missions, and 
Parsoft's Open 
Plane Interface 
means you're likely 
to see a variety of 
add-on aircraft for 
the sim. 



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iF/A-18 CARRIER 
STRIKE FIGHTER 

Interactive Magic 
(919) 461-0722 
vwvw.imagicgames.com 
Company ETA; Q3 ’98 
CGlV's ETA; Q3 '98 

anding your plane on an air- 
craft carrier, hitting that 
arrester hook on target, and 
not going off the other side in a 
belly flop has to be one of the 
most satisfying things you can do 
in a flight simulation. And it's one 


area in which 1F-I8E Carrier 
Strike Fighter should excel, since 
former A-6 Intruder pilot Jim 
Harler is at the helm of the pro- 
ject. The basic flight engine in the 
game is an enhancement of the 
one in iF-22 v5.0 and it uses an 
updated version of l-Magic's 
Demon graphics engine, allowing 
you to fly over real-world satel- 
lite-mapped imagery. This engine 
looks best at considerable alti- 
tude. Low-level visuals aren't 
nearly as impressive. For instance. 


DAWN OF ACES 

Interactive Magic 
(919) 461-0722 
www.lmagiconline.com 
Company ETA; Q3 '98 (free beta) 

CCW'i ETA; Q3 '98. 

T ake the tried-and-true 

Warbirds simulation engine, 
replace the high-perfor- 
mance planes with fabric-and- 
wood World War I aircraft, and 
you have 1-Magic Online's Dawn 
OF Aces. Set on the western front, 
the game will feature a two-sided 
war instead of the less realistic 


four-sided Warbirds campaign. 
Among the initial flyable planes 
will be the Sopwith Camel, Spad 
S.VII, Bristol F2B, Fokker Dr.l, and 
Albatros D.Va. As with Warbirds, 
the game will be under constant 
development, and more planes 
will be added periodically, In 
some ways combat will be easier 
than in Warbirds, due to the 
slower speed of the World War I 
aircraft, but budding aces will 
also quickly learn that these early 
warplanes can be very touchy and 
must be handled with respect. 



the sea looks like black-flecked blue 
velvet. iF-22 was at its strongest 
with its dynamic mission structure 
and campaign feel. The Middle East 
flashpoint scenarios here — with 


CAPS, deep strikes, and cooperative 
missions — offer promising play 
from a campaign standpoint, even 
if the engine is struggling to catch 
up with the current state of the art. 


IN THE WORKS 


M icroProse has announced that it is developing Gunship III, a 
helicopter simulation that will interface with its M1 Tank 
Platoon II product. You'll be able to fly Apaches, Comanches, 
and other craft on the same battlefield as Ml players. Look for it in mid- 
1999. Meanwhile, Looking Glass is still keep- 
ing quiet on the feature sets of Flight 
Unlhvhted III and Flight: Combat, both set 
for 1999 releases, but the company did 
announce that the products would be distrib- 
uted through Electronic Arts. 

We recently saw some impressive progress 
on SSI's Russian-developed jet sim, Su-27 
Flanker 2.0. Along with one of the most 
impressive 3D graphics engines we've seen 
yet and the trademark Su-27 realism, the sim 
will now sport a beginner's mode. Given the 
amount of integration remaining to be done 
when we saw the sim in May, however, we 
think the projected fourth-quarter release date 
is optimistic. Look for it in the first part of '99. 

The same release projection goes for Empire/ 

Rowan's Korean War sim MiG Alley, which 
was still being shown only in slideshow form 


at this year's E3. Another delay is in store for Fighter Duel 2.0 from 
Infogrames/SPGS, which is now slated for an April 1999 release. 

Some World War II sims are still on track, however. SSI's Luftwaffe 
Commander and Microsoft's Combat Flight Simulator both look as if 
they'll make it out before Christmas. 
MicroProse’s long-awaited Falcon 4.0 
is finally in the home stretch — we've 
played a version that's practically 
feature-complete. Given the complexity 
of the sim's campaign and multiplayer 
support, though, it could spend a long 
time in tuning and debugging. We’re 
not about to make a prediction on its 
release date, but we will say that 
MicroProse's claim of a pre-Christmas 
release is plausible. 

Due to space limitations we were 
forced to omit Jane's Israeli Air 
Combat (formerly Israeli Air Force), 
DID's F-22 ADF, and Novalogic's F-16 
Viper and MiG-29 Fulcrum. You'll 
find in-depth coverage of those titles 
in last month's CGW. 



COMPUTER GAMING WORLD » SEPTEMBER 1998 


v.compiilergaming.f 
















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100+ HOT NEW GAMES 


WE'RE KIHDA 

WORRIED... 



ULTliUlA: ASCENSION 


W e're worried about Origin's Ultima; Ascension for the same rea- 
son we were worried about Ultima: Pagan — it isn't really a role- 
playing game. In the case of Ascension, gamers will have a Lara 
Croft-style view of a male avatar moving through a full-3D envi- 
ronment. Though the code hasn't yet been optimized, the game- 
play action appears chunky to us, even with minimal diaracters on the screen. We 
don't see how it is likely to reach a smooth level by the time it ships. No longer 
will characters advance in statistics and levels. Instead, accomplishing certain lev- 
els of competence will open up better skill levels. Yet, characters will only discover 
the new competence as they actually use it as opposed to the traditional feed- 
back of being told you'd moved up in level or seeing a numerical perspective. 
Further, in spite of previously announced plans to return the next Ultima to a 
world in which the "virtues" could hold sway, the emphasis will be on action. 


20th centuiy— especially since 
the Panzer General game system 
is at its best covering WWII. You 
would be wrong. Instead, this 
game looks at what might hap- 
pen in 2005, if the Chinese were 
to take advantage of the collapse 
of the Soviet Union. It postulates 
a Russian-U.S. alliance, and nearly 
20 different armies fighting across 
three dozen scenarios. It also 
seems more realistic and complex 
than typical General fare. 

All of this could be fun if we 
get enough high-tech toys with 
which to wreak havoc in the Far 
East. But it's hard to escape the 
feeling that SSI doesn't really 
know where to take its signature 
line. Let's hope this isn't Star 
General all over again. 


like Wing Commander than Star 
Control. Sure, the engine does 
look really good, but it doesn't 
deserve the name StarCon, Ac- 
colade assures us there will be 
the trademark humor and story, 
but it appears they've chosen 
flash over substance, and sacri- 
ficed the personality of the origi- 
nal in an attempt to capitalize 
on the popularity of the space- 
sim genre. 


We also realize that, although we 
like them that way, not everyone 
wants to get their A.S. in Virtual 
Aeronautics before jumping into 
the cockpit. In fact, we'd hate to 
admit to some of our more hard- 
core readers how much time 
we've spent playing simpler sims 
like U.S. Navy Fighters. But we're 
afraid Top Gun: Hornet's Nest 
goes a bit too far. At E3, the 
game's designers weren't sure if 
the flight model was even going 
to include stalls. Even the much- 
maligned SilentThunder A-10 
simulation had stalls. Beginner 
modes are fine, but we hope 
MicroProse includes at least some 
level of realism for beginners who 
get intrigued by the genre. 


T his is Accolade's fourth 
Star Control game, but 
the fact that it's missing 
the "4" after the title is the first 
indication that this isn't the Star 
Control we know and love. That 
Star Control had funny, weird 
aliens and a rich, albeit some- 
times silly, plot. It had lots of 
adventure-style gameplay with 
plenty of dialogue; fast, but 
simple, space shooting action; 
and lots of warping back and 
forth between star systems. This 
Star Control, or StarCon, as 
Accolade wants this franchise 
renamed, is nothing like that. 

It's a space sim that looks more 


Y ou might think that SSI's 
People's General would 
center on the epic struggle 
of the communists versus the 
nationalist Chinese in the mid 


kay, we'll be the first to 
[admit that many flight 
sims are rea/// hard-core. 


COMPUTER GAMING WORLD » SEPTEMBER 1996 


if.computergaming.com 




100+ HOT NEW GAMES 



W e like the idea of intro- 
ducing today's genera- 
tion to the games of 
our youth, but we'd rather see it 
done through packages such as 
Microsoft's Arcade packs or the 
MAME arcade emulator, which 
present the games in their origi- 
nal glory. Our first glimpse of 
Hasbro's Centipede showed a 
game that was inspired the 
original, but didn't play like it. 
The "classic" mode gave an 
angled overhead view of the 
gameworld, sort of like a com- 
puter pinball game. This actually 
detracted from gameplay as 
compared to the classic 2D ver- 
sion — the 3D seemed to be there 
only as a checkbox item. And as 
for the new-style play, it puts you 
down on the ground looking 
straight at the mushrooms. Sorry, 
but we're beginning to look at 
arcade remakes with the same 
enthusiasm as we do colorized 
movies..,. 


W e're worried about 
Centipede because it 
screws up the game- 
play of the classic game. So 
you'd think we'd like Activision's 
Asteroids, right? After all, the 
gameplay is little changed from 
the original. The early version 
we saw at E3 had an overhead 
view of your ship, with asteroids 
floating by rendered in lovely 
3D. There were some minor 


gameplay 
enhance- 
ments, such 
as ships 
your fighter 
has to 
escort 
through the 
asteroid 
field. But, 
overall, it 
was the old 
game with 
3D rocks. 

So what's the point? We say 
port the original games to new 
platforms, but leave the scenery 
and gameplay unmauled and 
unchanged. Who ever played the 
original Asteroids because of 
the pretty graphics? 


I on Storm's Daikatana isn't as 
far along as we had hoped, 
considering that it's slated for 



a September ship date. Some of 
the effects we saw (a demon 
summoning staff that conjured a 
transparent monster) were 
impressive, but we haven't seen 
enough of the game to judge 
whether it will meet expectations 
when it does come out, which 
we peg at sometime in early 
1 999. Our recent looks at the 
engine weren't all that impres- 
sive compared to recent fare 
such as Unreal. 

Given the fixation on graphic 
flash in this genre, Daikatana 
may be relying on its promising 
single-player play-with-a-plot to 
stand out. But what if id 
Software is right in its decision to 
can Quake ill, and it turns out 
plot doesn't matter to fans of 
3D-shooters? 


O ur British counterpart. PC 
Gaming World, called 
Tartan Army one of the 
standouts of the E3 shows. Now, 
they're good blokes over there, 
and we generally agree with 
them, but this time there seems 
to be a culture gap when it 
comes to this Eidos 
game. Their take: 

"It's a real-time 
strategy affair set 
in Braveheart 
territory— and 
absolutely breath- 
taking it looks too. 

From the top-down 
C&C-style view, the 
player can zoom 
right into the thick 
of the action, third-person-style, 
and the power, violence, and 
authenticity of the skirmish 
pitched battles prove terrifically 
exciting and really do take you 
beyond into the action— more 
like into mortal danger. Scarily 
real." Our take? "Hmm, It's Myth 
with guys in skirts.” 


C ompeting with Microsoft 
is about as much fun as a 
root canal. Just ask Apple, 
Oracle, Sun, Netscape, CH 
Products, Logitech, Thrust- 
Master... the list goes on and 
on, Well, Micro-Borg has another 
target market in its sites: speak- 
ers, Yes, the people who brought 
you the ill-conceived Windows 
Sound System have decided it's 
time to get in the speaker busi- 
ness, Only these speakers have a 
new twist; They're designed to 
replace your sound card. There's 
audio circuitry that receives 
audio data from your machine 
via the USB bus. Now part of 
this is very intriguing on paper, 
but as to how Microsoft pulls off 
the implementation is still an 
open question. There are two 
technical downsides immediately 


apparent in these speakers: First, 
if you've got traditional game 
controllers that connect via your 
sound card's joystick port, you 
may not be able to use them 
once the Microsoft USB sound 
system is live. Second, wavetable 
MIDI will use Microsoft's CPU- 
based DirectX 6.0's synth engine, 
which will sound pretty good. 


but will likely eat CPU cycles for 
lunch. These might be a good 
idea for office users, but for 
gamers, they may not be the 
way to go. 


T he formula sounds good. 
Psygnosis snags the name 
of the CART team owned 
by actor/driver Paul Newman for 
a new racing game. They feature 
Christian Fittipaldi, Michael 
Andretti, and 14 other CART dri- 
vers. Wrap it all up by licensing 
the 1 1 tracks and tossing in com- 
mentary from real ABC and ESPN 
commentators. The problem is. 



other than extra cockpit detail 
and adjustable mirrors, we've 
seen little here that's not found 
in the PlayStation version of the 
game. If we want to play Play- 
Station games, we'll play them 
on a PlayStation. 



v.compulergaming.c 


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HEAVY GEAR II 



Activision 
(310)255-2000 
www.actlvision.com 
Company ETA: Q4 '98 
CGIVs ETA: Q4 '98. 

fter the disappoint- 
ment of the first 
Heavy Gear title, you 
might be surprised to 
see the sequel head- 
ing our list of space simulations. 
We know we were. But this title 
has finally thrown out the creaky, 
patchwork MechWarrior II engine 
and replaced it with a new one 
built from the ground up. The new 
engine addresses both the make- 
up of the Heavy Gear universe as 
well as requests and feedback 
from thousands of MechWarrior 
II and Heavy Gear players. Look 


for a much more "alive" world, 
with water, lava flows, and other 
terrain features that will make for 
more interesting battlefields. 
Terrain will also have a greater 
effect on battles: Your gear will 
travel faster on a road than it will 
over grass; faster on grass than on 
sand. In addition, scaling is more 
realistic here— buildings and vehi- 
cles are more to scale with the 
Gears, which are giant robots, 
after all. You won't be able to take 
out a building with a barrage of 
laser fire anymore— you'll have to 
plant an explosive charge on it. 
The engine is 3D-only (DirectSD 
and 3Dfx Glide), so look for daz- 
zling effects unhampered by the 
need to remain compatible with 


ancient 2D graphics cards. 

The Gears are more intelligent 
here as well. Activision has spent 
much more time working on arti- 
ficial intelligence than it did for 
previous giant robot titles, and 
you'll find Gear pilots with a vari- 
ety of personalities ranging from 
aggressive to chicken. Your team- 
mates are more useful now — you 
can plot individual waypoints for 


them and you can direct them to 
attack targets from different 
directions independent of your 
actions. Activision designed the 
game from the ground up for 
multiplayer play, and strategic 
buildings such as ammo dumps 
and repair bays (no floating 
power-ups here) should make for 
some interesting attempts at 
holding territory. 




MECHWARRIOR III 

MicroProse 
(510) 864-4550 
www.microprose.com 
Company ETA: Q1 -Q2 '99 
COWi ETA: Q2 '99 

W hen the news came that 
FASA's internally devel- 
oped MechWarrior III 
title was going to become Mech IV 
and a new engine from Zipper 
Interactive was going to power 
Mech III, many fans worried that 
the game was going to be a rush- 
job to capitalize on the license. 
They're likely to be pleasantly sur- 
prised by this game, which takes 
the basic feature set that made the 
Aaivision Mech games so popular 
and adds tactical elements and a 
more modern engine. New tactical 
features let you adjust waypoints 
before a mission and alter objec- 
tives during one. You can now 
create and save up to five weapon 
groups, which can be tied to two 
triggers. Resource management, 


including real salvage of damaged 
Mech parts, now plays a part in 
extended campaigns. The environ- 
ment is now more interactive: You 
can walk into water to cool your 
Mech, or knock an enemy Mech 
off its feet by blowing a crater 
beneath it. Gamers who like a 
wide view will appreciate the abil- 
ity to target from an external view; 
traditional cockpit views will also 
be available. Slated for release in 
early 1 999, this promises to be far 
more than a stopgap until the 
FASA-developed MECH IV. 


STARSIEGE 

(425) 649-9800 
www.sierfa.com 
Company ETA: Q4 '98 
CGW's ETA; Q4 '98. 

W hile previous games in 
the EarthSiege series 
were technically impres- 
sive, many gamers complained the 
universe was not as immersive as 
that of the MechWarrior games. 
Dynamix has responded by com- 
missioning known sci-fi writers to 
create a thorough story bible for 
the series. The company's Web site 
is already packed with fan fiction 
and user-created skins for the 
Hercs (giant robots). Multiplayer 



action should be strong. Incor- 
porating feedback from a free pre- 
view release that's been available 
for months. Multiplayer mode will 
include cooperative play and pure 


deathmatch modes. For the single 
player, the easy-to-use 3D mission 
editor means that there should be 
dozens of user-created missions to 
try after the 45-plus in the game. 
Also welcome is the ability to 
record both single-player and 
deathmatch missions — no more 
"Who killed whom" arguments. If 
single-player action is as strong as 
what we've seen in multiplayer, 
nobody will be tagging this series 
as a MechWarrior wannabe. 


IN THE WORKS 

S TAR Trek: Klingon Academy is Interplay's sequel to 
Starfleet Academy. Featuring Christopher Plummer as 
General Chang (from Star Trek VI: The Apolog^, 

Klihgon Academy puts you in the shoes of a Klingon 
cadet. Much of it should be action-oriented and involve 
plenty of shooting, since you're playing the Klingons. Look for ion 
storms, asteroid fields, and nebula battles to spice things up. 
While the first game in this series had wonderful missions with 
true Trek flavor, the fighterlike combat disappointed us. When we 
get at the helm we'll report on whether these ships handle like 
battlecruisers. It's slated to beam onto shelves in October. 

Sierra Studios is developing a game based on Babylon 5, and 
we were impressed with the few minutes we got at the stick of a 
Starfury in multiplayer mode at E3. The game sounds promising: 
65 creator Joe Straaynski is supervising the script, and the 
engine uses polygon-reduced versions of the actual models used 
in the show. Sierra promises a strong tactical element in addition 
to the action. Look for it in the first half of 1999. 


'(.computefgaming.( 


COMPUTER GAMING WORLD » SEPTEMBER 1998 




ZIPPER 

INTERACTIVE 





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100+ HOT NEW GAMES • CLASSICS/PUZZLES 


CREATURES 2 


Mindscape 
(800) 234-3088 
www.creatures.co.uk 
Company ETA; Q3 '98 
com ETA; Q3 '98 

T hose lovable little 
Norns are back in 
Cyberlife's Creatures 
2, the greatly evolved 
sequel to last year's 
life simulation, Creatures. In 
this version, the new virtual 
world is more than twice the 
size of the old one and the arti- 
ficial-life technology has been 
developed even further. The new 
breed of Norns is more 
advanced biologically and 
behaviorally — a new Norn's 
brain Al is 85 percent more 
effective at storing neuro- 
concepts. allowing it to absorb 
and apply the things it learns, 
The Norns' complex internal 
system is made up of eight 


different organs and 
there are 15 different 
chemicals in each 
Norn's digestive sys- 
tem. Whereas before 
your Norn could have 
been on its deathbed 
before you realized 
that something was 
wrong with it, this time 
you are given some 
warning. Since each 
Norn possesses twice 
as many genes and organs, it is 
also much easier to pinpoint 
exactly how and why your poor 
pet died. The gap between user 
and creature definitely closes up 
In this new version. 

The new Norns have more per- 
sonality, a dramatically expanded 
vocabulary, and 120 facial expres- 
sions, A complete virtual ecosys- 
tem, including weather and sea- 



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SiUlART GAAAES 
CHALLENGE #3 

Smart Games/Hssbro 
(800) 683-5847 
www.smartgames.com 
Company ETA 03 '98 
com ETA; Q4 '98 

S mart Games will soon be 
back with another collection 
of mind-boggling brain 
teasers, and now, the company has 
puzzle giant Hasbro backing it up. 
Smart Games Challenge #3 fea- 
tUTes 20 all-new puzzle types, 
including word problems, sound 
puzzles, action games, and tradi- 
tional puzzles. You have Meteor 




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sons, will affect your Norns' 
health and actions, and Cyberlife 
is even looking into the possibili- 
ty of adding natural disasters, 
such as earthquakes and torna- 
does. The new world is filled with 
animation — each area houses 
countless plants and animals— 
and there will be plenty of excit- 
ing new toys to keep your Norns 
amused. For those who were 


overwhelmed by the complexity 
of the first game. Creatures 2 
offers a new, more user-friendly 
interface. The game can be played 
on many different levels — ^you 
can immediately plunge yourself 
right in and explore all the tech- 
nological enhancements, or you 
can have fun easing yourself into 
the game gradually. 


hundreds of different skill levels, 
ensuring that Challenge #3 will 
appeal to both novices and braini- 
acs alike. 


GUBBLE 2 

Actual Entertainment 
(408) 654-7950 

www.actualentertalnment.ee 
Company ETA; Q3 '98 
C6W% ETA; Q3 '98 



Mayhem (probably the only aster- 
oids game that relies on brain 
power, not reflexes); Rock, Paper, 
Scissors, a logic problem based on 
the old schoolyard game; Sheep 
Dog, your chance to uncover those 
hidden shepherding skills as you 
guide your flock across a hexago- 
nal grid; and many more. Although 
Smart Games has always put con- 
tent ahead of looks in its products, 
this time the developers are 
revamping the game's image, so 
expect improved graphics, better 
sound, and 3D animation. That's 
not to say that they will skimp on 
gameplay:As usual, there will be 



T he cute little alien Gubble D. 
Gleep is back — and this time 
he's got legs! Whereas 
before, Gubble traveled around in 
his space-pod, now he can run, 
jump, duck, and fly. Gobble 2 
includes 104 new levels, plus hid- 
den bonus levels, spread across 


five worlds — 

Waste Land, 

Cave Land, 

Water 
World, 

Lava Land, ' 
and Quartz 
Land, While the style of gameplay 
remains similar to the previous 
version — you help Gubble to fit 
screws into screwdrivers and drills 
into rivets— the puz- 
zles are more intri- 
cate. On one level, 
you can turn Gubble 
into a ball; another 
requires you to use 
decoy Gobbles. Some 
levels feature poison- 
shooting cannons 
that will slow you 
down, shrink you, 
take away your ability to jump, or 
even change your directional keys, 
so that when you try to walk for- 
ward you'll actually move back- 
ward, and so forth. Gamers who 
like arcade-style puzzle games 
should find these new challenges 
engrossing. 


A COMPUTER GAMING WORLD « SEPTEMBER 1998 


^.computergaming.com 




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100+ HOT NEW GAMES • CLASSICS/PUZZLES 



CHESSIUIASTER 

6000 

MIncIscape 
(800) 234-3088 
www.mincl5cape.com 
Company ETA: Q3 ’98 
CCW'i ETA; Q4 '98 

C HESSMASTER has been almost 
as far ahead of its pawn- 
poshing competition as NBA 
Live has been for PC basketball. 

But it's finally being challenged, 
which is a good thing: Promised 
features in recent versions failed to 
materialize or didn't meet the sky- 
high expectations of the game’s 
many fans. Along with the custom- 
ary graphical and engine upgrade, 
CHESSMASTER 6000 will attempt to 
accurately rate your performance, 
support PGN (portable game nota- 
tion) standards, and try to regain 
its dominance in chess tutorials. It 
also boasts a bevy of new A1 per- 
sonalities — ones that normal 
humans can beat — to go along 


with the tough computer oppo- 
nents based on legendary grand- 
masters. Let's hope these enhance- 
ments aren't as fleeting as one of 
Bobby Fischer's comebacks. 


DON'T TOUCH 
THAT DIAL 

Berkeley Systems 
(8X) 234-3088 
www.berksys.com 
Company ETA; Q4 '98 
CGW's ETA; Q4 '98 


B uilding on the huge success 
of its You don't Know Jack 
product line, Berkeley 
Systems is working on another 
quiz show game. Don't Touch That 
Dial allows true couch potatoes to 
finally put that mine 
of useless informa- 
tion to use. The 
game requires that 
you to dig up from 
the annals of mem- 
ory everything 
you've ever heard 
about commercial 
products, testing 
your knowledge 
about decades of 
advertising trivia. 

Fill in the Brand questions ask 
you to recall phrases, slogans, and 
jingles from the commercials of 
yesteryear, while Birth of a Notion 
quizzes you on the rise and fall of 
your favorite products. Although 
the game sounds promising, it's 
worth noting that this is the first 
trivia product that Berkeley 
Systems has attempted without 
the cooperation of Jellyvision. 
Whether Berkeley can maintain 
the same 
level of 
style, 
humor, 
and talent 
that made 
the Jack 
series a 
hit 

remains 
to be 
seen. 


THE D SHOW 

(800) 900-9234 
www.dlsneyinteratlve.com 
Company's ETA; Q3 '98 
CGWi ETA; Q3 '98. 


A imed not just toward kids 
but to Disney fans of all 
ages, this You Don't Know 
jACK-style quiz show tests players' 
knowledge of all things Disney. 
Questions are based on the ani- 
mated and live-action films, the 
television specials, the music, the 
theme parks, and other general 
Disney trivia, such as "What is 
Donald's middle name?" 

Gameplay follows the same for- 
mat as that of Jack; Up to three 
players can compete on one key- 
board to score D-Bucks.The game 
features over 1,000 questions, with 
question types ranging from basic 
multiple choice to true-or-false 'D- 
FIBulator' statements. The D Show 
also includes 60 bonus rounds, 
plus a huge assortment of video 
clips. The tone of the game is very 
family-oriented, but the questions, 
which span the whole Disney his- 
tory, are far from juvenile. 




IN THE WORKS 


rivia fans will be happy to hear that 
a fourth installment of You Don't 
Know Jack is in the works and 
Berkeley Systems has teamed up 
again with Jellyvision to produce 
HeadRush. another quiz-show game in the 
same vein as Jack, but aimed specifically to a 
teen audience. HeadRush incorporates all the 
attitude and humor of the Jack series, with 
questions that are more accessible to the 
youth of today. The star of HeadRush is a sar- 
castic, no-holds-barred host, who is slightly 


more hip, but no less forgiving than his pre- 
decessors. The game host's style is similar to 
Jack's (but with fewer sexual references and 
more flatulation). HeadRush features plenty 
of coo! animation, including cartoon seg- 
ments that introduce each question, humor- 
ous commercials for imaginary sponsors, and 
a high-octane soundtrack. 

Hasbro continues to dominate the puzzle 
genre with a slew of products set for release 
before the end of the year. After leading the 
boardgame-to-computer game movement 


and cornering the arcade-game conversion 
market, it seems only natural that the com- 
pany's next endeavor would be to bring two 
of television's most popular quiz shows from 
the tube to our monitors. Hasbro's PC edi- 
tions of Wheel of Fortune and Jeopardy 
look to be improvements over the previous 
electronic versions of the games we've seen. 
Both are due out in the fall. Hasbro is also 
working on PC versions of Outburst, Life, 
and Stratego, all of which should be avail- 
able before the end of the year. 



COMPUTER GAMING WORLD « SEPTEMBER 1998 


v.computergaming.c 





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Go tliere. It is your last liope to conquer tlie 






A pall of unspealcaMc evil, moLviless slau^kter 
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Heroes, 1997s turn-ljased strategy game of tlie year. 

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Darklords Rising: 

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• 31 new army types, for a total of 95 

• 5 new uniquely skilletl keroes for a total of 15 

• 9 new multiplayer games including Crusaile, 
Nortk vs. Soutli and Instant Ckaos 

• More ckallenging, acl aptakle and aggressive AI 

• Fully functional map, item and campaign editor 

• Bonus: Includes original campaign and scenarios 
from WirlorJs III: Reign of Heroes 

In skort, more adventure, deeper gameplay 
and fewer ckances for survival. 




CXlARLORDSlll 

OARKLORDS 

RISIHG 


Go to #175 @ www.computergaming.com/Infolink 



100+ HOT NEW GAMES • STRATEGY 



HOiUlEWORLD 


Sierra Studios 
(425) 649-98(X) 
www.sierra.cotn 
Company ETA; Q4 '98 
CGm ETA: Q1 '99 

T he most promising 

game of this season is 
the real-time space 
strategy extravaganza 
HOMEWORLD. from the 
fledgling company Relic. Leave it 
to a start-up to introduce a 
breath of fresh air into the strat- 
egy genre, 

The most significant feature of 
HOMEWORLD is its true 3D engine. 
The engine renders everything in 
real-time 3D, from the ships you 
control to the nebulae in the 
background, This allows for an 
unprecedented level of freedom 
in both the camera and viewing 
options, as well as the gameplay. 
You can rotate the camera 360 
degrees to get the best view of 


the expansive 3D battlefield. 

You can zoom in to see the 
markings on a tiny fighter or 
zoom out to see your mass of 
fighters and capital ships meld 
into an amorphous bubble amid 
the beautiful backdrop of gas 
clouds and nebulae. 

There will be resource gather- 
ing, as in other real-time strategy 
games, but the resource nodes 
will provide more strategic possi- 
bilities: You'll even be able to 
sabotage them to prevent your 
enemies from using them. The 
tactical possibilities in the game 
will be vast. There will be two 
sides to play, each with its own 
look and unique ships. Regardless 
of the side you choose, you'll 
command gunboats, fighters, 
cariers, battleships, massive float- 
ing cannons, research vessels, and 
many other ship types. The extra 


bells and whistles in the game 
are also impressive, including 
transparent clouds, engine glow, 
and hundreds of lines of context- 
sensitive voiceovers. 

The single-player game will 
be a story-driven campaign with 
plenty of aliens to encounter. 


Relic hopes to create a movie- 
like experience to complement 
and drive the outstanding 
gameplay. It's an ambitious 
plan, but all signs point to suc- 
cess. Read more about Home- 
world in our full preview on 
page 62 of this issue. 


HEROES OF MIGHT 
& MAGIC III 

3DO 

(650) 261-3000 
www.3do.com 
Company ETA; Q4 '98 
CGlVs ETA; Late Q4 '98 



G et ready for the third 

Heroes installment. While 
the engine and graphics are 
getting only minor polishing, the 
gameplay just keeps getting big- 
ger. There will now be eight castle 
types, 16 heroes, more than 100 
different monsters (and each mon- 
ster has an upgraded version), and 
hundreds of spells and artifacts. 
Towns will have a more detailed 
economic model, including build- 
ings that will add bonuses to your 
mine production. 

The tactical display is getting 



round two of world domination. 

At first glance, TiBERiAN Sun might 
not look like a huge improvement 
over C&C, but it is. The terrain is 
prerendered 3D, like Total Annihi- 
lation's, but it's more interactive. 
You'll be able to blow up bridges, 
warp terrain, and freeze water in 
order to cross rivers. Also, because 
the perspective will be three- 
quarters, instead of top-down, 
you'll be able to appreciate 
Tiberian Sun's 3D terrain much 
more than that ofTA. 


The units in Tiberian Sun will 
be voxels (3D pixels), so they'll 
look more real and move more 
fluidly. Expect more differentia- 
tion between the two sides' units. 
The NOD will maintain its hit- 
and-run philosophy, while the 
GDI will get an infusion of much- 
needed personality. 

There will also be night mis- 
sions, enhanced tech trees, and 
more improvements that should 
take the C&C franchise to the 
next level, 


bigger, and there will be 
a wait button for your 
troops. Artifacts are get- 
ting a slight facelift, as 
well. You have to equip 
your artifacts on a paper 
doll, so no more stacking 
five swords or flails. The 
map editor will also be 
improved, with the 
ability to rename heroes 
and towns. Lastly, multi- 
player is being fixed so 
you can move the map, 
fiddle with troops and 
towns, and not sit idle 
when it's not your turn. 


CO/lAiUlAND & 
CONQUER: 
TIBERIAN SUN 

Westwood 
(702) 228-4040 
www.westwood.com 
Company ETA; Q4 '98 
CGW’s ETA: Q4 '98 

T iberian Sun, Westwood’s true 
sequel to Command & 
Conquer, takes place a few 
years after the first C&C, and pits 
the NOD against the GDI for 


COMPUTER GAMING WORLD » SEPTEMBER 1 998 


www.computergaming.com 





STRATEGY • 100+ HOT NEW GAMES 



SID MEIER'S 
ALPHA CENTAURI 

Electronic Arts 
(800) 2454525 
www.ea.com 
Company ETA: Q3 '98 
CCWi ETA: Q4 '98 

F iraxis' latest game attempts 
to be much more than Civ II 
in space, and not just by 
employing a 3D rise to the 
mountains. Now, in addition to 
mining raw materials, you must 
harvest energy via solar collec- 
tors. Ebony obelisks — shades of 


2001: A Space Odyssey— 6ot the 
alien landscape and serve as 
unwelcome beacons for the 
native life-forms. 

In a departure from Civ and 
Master of Orion, the decidedly 
hard-core science-fiction tech 
tree extrapolates from modern 
scientific knowledge to show us 
the scarier edge of bioengineer- 
ing, and it balances that with the 
Calculus of Ethics— Sir Isaac 
Newton would be proud. In addi- 
tion to the pursuit of knowledge, 
you may try to either live in har- 
mony with the 
alien environment 
or introduce Terran 
flora and fauna in 
an attempt to 
make this world 
over in Earth's 
image. For more 
information on the 
game, check out 
our full sneak pre- 
view on page 54 
of this issue, 


AGE OF 
EMPIRES II 

Microsoft 
(425) 882-8080 
www.ensemble.com 
Company ETA: Q2 ’99 
CCm ETA: 02 '99 

N ow that Age of Empires II 
has been pushed back to 
a spring '99 release. 
Ensemble Studios will have more 
time to make good on its 
promised improvements. Age II 
will span from the Dark Ages to 
the Renaissance, with the four 
ages being: Dark, Feudal, Castle, 
and Imperial. The artwork, units. 


and buildings are all 
new. Teutonic knights 
will replace heavy 
cavalry, and cross- 
bowmen will replace 
archers. Many of the 
civs— like the British, 
Franks, and Sar- 
acens— are new, 
although some 
favorites, such as the Chinese 
and Japanese, will return, 
Ensemble will add group for- 
mations and facing; a more real- 
istic economic model; and rov- 
ing, playable barbarians (think 
Mongols and Celts). The single- 
player game will be much more 
robust, with historical cam- 
paigns (including the Crusades) 
and more involved missions. The 
design specs for Age II are very 
ambitious, and we've included 
only some of the many improve- 
ments. For a great, in-depth pre- 
view of Age II, read our July 
issue cover story. 




MYTH II: 
SOULBLICHTER 

Bungle 

(300) 295-0060 
www.bungle.com 
Company ETA: Q4 '98 
CCWi ETA: Q4 '98 

M yth blew us away with 
its innovation and 
earned our 1997 Strat- 
egy Game of the Year award, 
However, it wasn't perfect. With 
Myth II, the company hopes to fix 
what little was wrong with the 
original and deliver more of what 
gamers loved. 


While this 
game isn't a 
huge leap 
over Myth, it 
does contain 
many tweaks 
and enhance- 
ments. The 
engine is defi- 
nitely being 
polished. 
There will be 
3D flames to 
scorch the 
landscape and burn trees, moving 
shadows, smoother reflections in 
water, ambient life-forms to add 
to the realism, and 3D positional 
sound. The engine will also sup- 
port DirectBD. 

Gameplay is being enhanced 
with a more involved magic 
system and new units. Extra 
levels of "zooming out" have 
been added to provide greater 
field of vision, and unit path- 
finding has been improved. 
Bungie is also determined to 
add indoor missions, fortifica- 
tions, and castle sieges. 


FORCE 

COMMANDER 

Lucas Arts 
(415)472-3400 
www.lucasarls.com 
Company ETA: Q4 '98 
CCWi ETA: Ql '99 

F orce Commander should suc- 
ceed where Rebellion failed: 
pleasing Star Wars fans and 
strategy gamers. 

As the Alliance or 
Empire comman- 
der, you command 
troops through a 
series of ground- 
based missions 
spread throughout 
familiar Star Wars 
locales, including 
Hoth, Yavin 4, and 
Tatooine, 

Unlike Rebellion, Force 
Commander's gameplay is more in 
line with traditional RTS games 
like Command & Conquer and 
StarCraft. However, while game- 
play will be the familiar "explore, 
gather, build, and destroy" variety, 
the Star Wars flavor, gameplay 


tweaks, and 3D graphics should 
elevate this game above the norm. 

Unlike those in Total Annihila- 
tion, Force Commander's graphics 
will be full real-time 3D, with sup- 
port for 3D acceleration. This will 
provide more flexible viewing 
options and give the game a more 
realistic look. 

While you'll acquire troops in 


regular real-time strategy fashion, 
the arsenal at your disposal will 
be every Star Wars junkie's 
dream: stormtroopers, droids, AT- 
ATs, snowspeeders, TIE bombers, 
Y-wings, and AT-ST walkers. Look 
for a more in-depth preview in an 
upcoming issue of C6W. 



/.computergaming.com 


COMPUTER GAMING WORLD » SEPTEMBER 1998 





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U nlike the other strategy 
titles in this roundup, 
MicroProse's Mech- 
COMMANDER, based in the Battle- 
Tech universe, is more tactical in 
focus. As the commander of Zulu 
Squadron, you have to take Port 
Arthur from the technologically 
superior Smoke Jaguar clan. 

With its narrow scope (you 
never command more than a 


dozen mechs), MechCommanoer 
is able to provide more detailed 
and realistic gameplay. Mechs 
will be expertly animated, with 
frames for limping, jumping, and 
running. Facing, true line- 
of-sight, and interactive 3D 
terrain will play a very large 
part in combat. 

While there is no resource 
gathering in the game's lin- 
ear campaign, there is 
resource management. You'll 
have to scavenge parts and 
weapons from the battlefield 
to upgrade and equip your 
mechs. You'll also have to man- 
age your team of MechWarriors, 
who have distinct personalities 
and abilities, and who gain expe- 
rience with each mission. 

With a rich universe to draw 
upon and a narrow focus that 
enables a more detailed engine, 
MechCommander is shaping up to 
be an excellent tactical introduc- 
tion to the BattleTech universe. 


TOTAL 

ANNIHILATION: 

KINGDOAAS 

CaveDog 
(42S) 486-9258 
www.cavedog.com 
Company's ETA: Q1 '99 
CGr$ ETA: Q2 '99 

F or many gamers, Total 
Annihilation was the win- 
ner of the 1997 real-time 
wars. With 3D terrain and 
dozens of units, it captured the 
attention of many real-time 
gamers tired of wading through 
all the bad clones. Although 
Chris Taylor, the creator of TA, 
has left CaveDog, the 
team that remains is hop- 
ing to inject more game- 
play, creativity, and per- 
sonality into the Total 
Annihilation franchise. 

Rrst there will be four 
sides, split among the four 
elements of Earth, Wind, 

Water, and Fire. A classic 


fantasy plot will drive the four 
campaigns and tell a story of 
world destruction and salvation, 
There will be just as many 
units as in TA, but these troops 
will have more fantastic abilities 
and engage the imagination of 
fantasy lovers. There will be cas- 
tle sieges, as well as open-field 
battles. Magic should also come 
into play, spicing up the combat. 
There are additional features 
that CaveDog is keeping secret, 
but the team is determined to 
pour on the gameplay and make 
Kingdoms even more engaging 
than Total Annihilation. 



MicroProse 
(510)864-4550 
www.mkroprose.com 
Company ETA: Q3 '98 
CGW'i ETA: Q3 '98 




POPULOUS III: 
THE BEGINNING 

Electronic Arts 
(800) 245-4525 
www.bullfrog.ea.com 
Company ETA: ()4 '98 
CGV/% ETA; Ql '99 

A lthough we can criticize 
Bullfrog for dragging its 
feet with Populous III, we 
can't denounce the gameplay. It's 
still looking as good as it did 
when it was called The Third 


Coming. Along with the 
name change. Bullfrog has 
added 3D acceleration and 
a new storyline. 

Instead of being the 
sequel to Populous II, this 
game now serves as the 
prequel to all the Populous 
games. You still play a 
shaman, but the game now 
assumes that in this 
Populous prehistory, there 
are no gods, just dueling 
shamans fighting to become 
the god we would play in 
later Populous games. As a 
shaman, you must battle 
through 30 levels in six worlds 
and eliminate your rivals before 
you can claim divinity. 

You'll still convert wildmen 
into your subjects, order them to 
construct buildings, train them to 
become soldiers, and call down 
spectacular spells to deform the 
terrain and weaken your enemy's 
resolve, And the engine is still 
good-looking and flexible, with 
multiple planet views and a fully 
rotatable camera. 



BLACK AND 
WHITE 

Electronic Arts 
(800) 245-4525 
www.lionhead.co.uk 
Company's ETA; Q2 '99 
CGW’i ETA; 03 '99 

I f you've ever wanted to be a 
giant monster like Godzilla, 
visiting terror upon peaceful 
villages, this is your game. Black 
AND White will be the first game 
developed at Peter Molyneux's 
new Lionhead Studios. 


You play a powerful sorcerer, 
capable of shaping world events. 
As you start out, happy villagers 
scurry about the lush, hilly land- 
scape. But the good times can't 
last, since you need worshipers to 
increase your power, and that 
means disturbing the once-perfect 
world. To motivate your subjects, 
you can smack them around or 
perform "click & flick" spell- 
casting. You can also pick up crea- 
tures and breed them in a genetic 
crucible. Hybrid creatures can 

grow to gigan- 
tic proportions; 
you can then 
loose them on 
the members of 
competing cul- 
tures. You'll be 
able to switch 
views and wit- 
ness the des- 
truction first- 
hand. We can't 
wait to see 
how much 
fun stomping 
villagers will be. 


v.computergaming.c 


COMPUTER GAMING WORLD » SEPTEMBER 1998 




IT'S TIME YOU 


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BIRTH OF THE 
FEDERATION 

MicroProse 
(800) 695-«63 
www.microprD5e.com 
Company ETA;Q4 '98 
CGWs ETA: Q4 '98 

D issolve a little Civ base in 
MOO, dust with Stars, sim- 
mer in a big Picard pot, and 
you have MicroProse's recipe for 
success. Birth of the Federation— 
which chronicles the rise of all the 
various Next Generation civiliza- 
tions from the early, halting begin- 
nings of warp drive — should go 
down as the best Trek game ever, 
regardless of genre. It's certainly 
the most playable product from 
MicroProse in years. 

Like the famed TV series, every- 
thing works despite the obvious 


quirks. The Vulcans are logical, the 
Klingons militaristic, the Ferengi 
aggressively economic. Diplomacy. 
Wonders of the Galaxy, multi- 
player action — it's all here. The 
turn-based combat system even 
supports 3D cards. For more on 
this game, check out our sneak 
preview in C6kV'#166. 


CHAOS GATE 

SSI 

(415) 895-2000 
www.ssionline.com 
Company ETA; Q3 '98 
CGiV'5 ETA; 03 '98 

D espite some decent 

attempts, the definitive PC 
Warhammer game has yet 
to arrive. That should change with 
Chaos Gate, which vividly recre- 
ates the bizarre world of Space 


Marines and their 
even stranger foes 
in an X-COM style 
turn-based format. 
Not only do the 
missions seem 
exotic and varied, 
there are also defi- 
nite RPG elements 
as your squad 
develops during 
the scripted cam- 
paign. More than 
three dozen 
Warhammer 
40,000 weapons 
make an appear- 
ance, some as 
"prize elements" a 
la Fantasy General, 
and there are more 
than 20 Psyker spells featured as 
well. All of the Games Workshop 
touches, from the steampunk 
vehicles to Terminator Squads and 
even battlefield chaplains, are 
perfectly sculpted amid a haunt- 
ing gothic sci-fi backdrop. It's the 
next best thing to having hun- 
dreds of Warhammer mmatures 
on your desktop — without having 
to paint them all. 


RAILROAD 
TYCOON 2 


Pop Top Software 
www.poptopsoftwarc.com 
Company ETA: Q3 '98 
CGWi ETA: Q4 '98 


P hil Steinmeyer Is a lot like 
the author Peter David; He 
does his best work in other 
creators' worlds. Now, the man 
who helped show the industry 
there was still plenty of life in 
turn-based games with Heroes of 
Might & Magic goes cerebral real- 
time with Railroad Tycoon II. The 
design retains most of what made 
Sid Meier's original design great, 
but Steinmeyer has added 
stronger Ai robber barons, more 
strategic variety, and 16-player 
multiplayer support. The 3D 
graphics don't require an acceler- 
ator. but they still look good. You 
can micromanage your 
business, immerse your- 
self in stock trading, or 
hire managers to do 
the dirty work — leaving 
you to play with your 
virtual train set. Deeper 
and more accessible 
than the original, this is 
one of the true sleepers 
of 1998. 


IN THE WORKS 


ARK Reign \\ is also in development, but it won't ship 
until the fall of 1999 at the earliest. It is getting a com- 
plete overhaul, including a true, real-time 3D engine. The 
enhanced engine will retain Dark Reign's Ai (with 
improvements, of course), but add true line of sight, 
interactive terrain, and more realistic gameplay. All units will be 3D, 
including the infantry. Expect near unlimited zoom and a fully rotat- 
able camera. 

Caesar III is set to release later this year, and continues the city 
simulation gameplay of Caesar II, while abstracting the combat sig- 
nificantly. This is more a SimCity, urban-planning game than an 
empire simulation, although there will be citizens to manage and 


barbarians to repel. Caesar III should ship by the end of this year. 

Westwood's classic, Dune II, will resurface this summer as Dune 
2000, an update with SVGA graphics and movie-quality cut-scenes 
with professional actors, including John Rhys Davies. The campaigns 
and gameplay are pretty much the same, except for the addition of 
one or two new units. Dune II fans will want to play this for the multi- 
player support! 

StarCraft: Brood Wars, the expansion set to the phenomenal 
StarCraet, will come out sometime this fall. Blizzard says it will be 
September, but we're not holding our breath. It will include two new 
units per side, three new tile sets, and three new campaigns. See our 
minipreview in this month's News Section. 



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AXIS & ALLIES 


Hasbro Interactive 
(508)92»-3700 
www.h3sbro.coni 
Company ETA: Q3 '98 
CGlV's ETA: Q3 '98 



H asbro is more up- 
and-down than the 
stock market these 
days: For every Risk! 
or Scrabble on the 
PC, there's a Piqionary to make 
you long for the days when 
games shipped on floppies (at 
least they could be reformat- 
ted). All this should change with 
the advent of Axis & Allies, from 
Meyer-Glass Interactive. This is 
easily Hasbro's best Windows 
design since Monopoly, and it's 
potentially one of the big hits— 
regardless of genre— of '98. 

Axis & Allies is the quintes- 
sential beer-and-pretzels war- 
game, offering a grander scope 
(and even more fun) than do 


Panzer General and Clash of 
Steel. Despite its abstractions, 
Axis & Allies quaintly illustrates 
the major themes of WWII. The 
game begins in early 1942, at 
the peak of Axis success, where 
Germany and Japan must press 
hard for a strategic victory 
before the industrial might of 
the U.S. swings the tide in the 
Allies' favor. Along the way, you 
defend Karelia and China, try to 
bomb Britain out of the war, 
coordinate amphibious assaults, 
and research high-tech weapons 
like jet fighters and V-2 rockets. 

One of the secrets to Axis & 
Allied boardgame success has 
been that it easily accommo- 
dates optional rules. The com- 
puter version not only updates 
the map (ending those argu- 
ments about how many moves 
it takes to get through Panama), 


it also lets you toggle every- 
thing from factory output to the 
number of hits battleships take 
before they sink. 

Despite the rumors you may 
have heard, Axis & Allies is not 
in realtime; it doesn't need to 
be. Whether you contest for the 
world's dominance alone or in 


multiplayer mode, the pace is 
brisk, and Hasbro pians to sup- 
port every kind of multiplayer 
option from Internet and LAN to 
email, with optional time limits 
for each turn. If the develop- 
ment team retains its focus, 
look for this to be well worth 
the 14-year wait. 



BATTLE OF 
BRITAIN 

TalonSoft 
(800)211-6504 
www.talonsoft.com 
Company ETA: Q4 '98 
com ETA: 04 '98 

T he core of Bahle of Britain 
is essentially Gary Grigsby's 
venerable USAAF from the 
old Apple ll/C-64 days, with the 
advantage of a more dynamic sit- 
uation. The gameplay gives you 
less detailed tactical combat than 


does Avalon Hill's Achtung! 
Spitfire, but it gives you much 
more control over how to fight 
the campaign. 

As the Germans, you can 
launch up to 100 Luftwaffe raids 
each day. choosing your time, alti- 
tude, escorts, and pathways to the 
more than 300 targets. Defending 
as the British is challenging, 
because you never have enough 
of those terrific aircraft, your best 
pilots are always fatigued, and.... 
Well, you get the picture. 


As one would expect from a 
TalonSoft game, every fighter, 
recon, bomber, pilot, and historical 
target from the battle is included. 
Extras include modeling of leaders 
and an optional 1941 campaign — 
plus, it's fun to watch Grigsby 
being pulled kicking and scream- 
ing into Windows 95 gaming. 


MEDIEVAL 

HPS/Incredible Simulations 
(408) 554-8381 
www.hpsslms.com 
Company ETA: 02 '98 
CGlV's ETA; Q3 '98 

I ncredible Simulations, the 
Remember the Alamo! folks, are 
at it again, this time with 
Medieval, a com- 
prehensive, tac- 
tical look at field 
warfare in the 
Dark Ages. It 
features knights 
on horseback, 
shield walls, and 
stout yeoman 
with deadiy yew 
bows. And if you 
happen to run 


out of arrows. Medieval models 
just about every obscure polearm 
or bladed weapon; you can even 
hurl rocks. 

The 10 to 12 scenarios planned 
for the final release include such 
famous battles as Bannockburn — 
for all of you Braveheartisns out 
there — Stanford Bridge, and 
Hastings. And if your favorite 
obscure battle from the Wars of 
the Roses doesn't make the cut, 
just build your own with the cam- 
paign editor. By combining the 
improved interface from Zulu 
War! with the tactical richness of 
Incredible Simulations' earlier 
games. Medieval should be the 
company's biggest hit yet. 



v.compulcfgaming.t 


COMPUTER GAMING WORLD » SEPTEMBER 1998 








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and for the first time, the entire city of 
Gladstone. 


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Choose one of four familiars who can 
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gatherer, healer or thief. 


©1998 Westwood Studios, inc. Lands of Lore is a registered 
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FIGHTINC STEEL 

SSI 

(800) 245-4525 
www.ssionIine.com 
Company ETA; Q4 '98 
CGWi ETA: Q4 '98 

iGHTiNG Steel lets you relive 
famous naval surface 
engagements of WWII — no 
aircraft carriers here — in a game 
that sails far beyond Great Naval 
Battles. The wide variety of 
destructive hardware from the 
more than 90 ship classes includes 
everything from 18-inch guns to 
"Long Lance" torpedoes. While 
Fighting Steel is a real-time 
wargame (you play primarily from 
a command perspective), it also 
allows you to get intimate with 
your gorgeous vessels (you'll want 


a hot 3D accelerator card for this 
one) and micromanage to your 
heart's content. 

The four campaigns (both Axis 
and Allied) show the usual deft 
SSI touch, but it's likely that the 
multiplay options wiil spark the 
most interest. Scenarios run from 
30 minutes to an hour — perfect 
for sinking the GrafSpee during a 
lunch break. 


FLEET COAAAAAND 

Jane's Combat Simulations 
(415) 571-7171 
www.janes.ca.com 
Company ETA: Q1 '99 
CGW’i ETA: Q1 '99 

Y ou may have heard the 

rumor that Jane's was work- 
ing on an Aegis guided- 


IN THE WORKS 


ith all its 
other high- 
profile pro- 
jects, it would 
be easy to 
missTalonSoft's West Front. 
But we saw several improve- 
ments, not the least of which 
was the much faster speed of 
the game's engine from that of 
East Front. The big gun on 
the horizon is Harpoon 4 from 
SSI, which boasts full coopera- 
tion from Larry Bond, the best- 
selling author and designer of 
the paper Harpoon game. 
There's no way this will ship 
before the summer of 1999, 


however, and it could possibly 
be as late as fall '99. 

Strategy First's Man of 
War II proceeds apace with a 
simpler interface. It looks to be 
a lot more fun in multiplayer 
mode than was the original, 
though it still lacks DSD sup- 
port. Interactive Magic is 
working on another Great 
Bahles title, this one by S. 
Craig Taylor, on the Civil War. It 
wiil not use the engine from 
American Civil War. The 
rumored Great Bahles game 
on samurai in Japan was sim- 
ply that— a rumor, evidently 
begun by fans of the period. 



missile destroyer simulation to 
complement its 688i submarine 
simulation. During development, 
that rumored sim evolved into 
Fleet Command, which gives you 
command of an entire carrier bat- 
tle group, You can direct each of 
the battle group’s assets using a 
simple point-and-click interface — 
imagine the naval weapons sys- 
tems for Harpoon controlled by an 
interface that's only a little more 
complex than that of Command 
and Conquer. You can set ship 
actions, and even command indi- 
vidual aircraft to patrol or 


gamers consider this series a little 
dated now, it's still the best for 
simulating 19th-century combat. In 
this edition, the Confederacy is 
against the wall as it launches the 
last great Rebel offensive, backed 
by Longstreet's veterans from Lee's 
Army of Northern Virginia. 

Unlike in Sid Meier's Gettys- 
burg, the Bahleground system 
does let you fight an entire Civil 
War battle at once, in addition to 
numerous small engagements — 
of which there are plenty to be 
had near Chickamauga, also 
known as the "river of blood." 




Chickamauga isn't the most 
famous battle of the Civil War, but 
the Confederate and Union forces 
are very evenly matched, which 
makes this a great situation for a 
wargame, As usual, the emphasis 
is on morale and command con- 
trol, and you may toggle the latter 
to help you learn the system. 

In addition to the full-motion 
video of Civil War reenactments, 
Chickamauga sports a spiffy new 
32-bit engine. So, if this is a mod- 
est hit, you have to wonder; Could 
there be a Bahleground 10? 


intercept targets. Naval vessels for 
a wide variety of countries are 
modeled, so you can set up a con- 
flict around India as easily as one 
on the Black Sea, Although it's a 
strategic simulation, it uses the 
graphics engine from Fighter 
Legends, so you'll be able to view 
the consequences of your orders 
on an impressive 3D display. 


battleground 9: 

CHICKAMAUGA 


TalonSoft 
(880) 211-6504 
www.talonsoft.com 
Company ETA: Q3 '98 
CGWi ETA: Q4 '98 

T he most suc- 
cessful war- 
game series 
comes back for a 
limited PC engage- 
ment, which is only 
available direct 
from TalonSoft. 
Although many 


COMPUTER GAMING WORLD » SEPTEMBER 1998 


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LOGITECH UVINGiUlAN FORCE 



Wingman Force 
Logitech 
(SIO) 795-8500 
www.logitech.com 
Company ETA; Q4 ’98 
CGWi ETA; Q4 '98 

T he Wingman Force is 
leading the wave of 
third-generation force 
feedback devices. Make no 
mistake, this is a big slick: it 
takes up more desk space 
than the year-old Sidewinder 
Force Feedback Pro from 
Microsoft. However, the 
placement of buttons and 
throttle slider on the unit 
makes for a natural two- 
handed stance — one hand 


on the stick, the other rest- 
ing on the base with throttle 
and programmable buttons 
in easy reach, 

The Wingman Force is fully 
Directinput compatible and 
uses Immersion's i-Force 2.0 
technology, which is widely 
supported. The stick supports 
frequencies up to 250Hz, 
allowing for much more sub- 
tle effects; Gone are the 
sledgehammer machine gun 
recoils — unless the game 
developer intends it. 

The Wingman Force can 
connect to your system via 
either serial cable or USB. 



KENWOOD Z40X 
CD-ROM DRIVE 

Zon Research 
(408) 863-2767 
www.zenresearch.com 
Company ETA; Q3 '98 
CGWi ETA; Q3 '98 

S ometimes less is more; such 
is definitely the case with 
the Kenwood 42x CD-ROM 
drive, The drive incorporates Zen 
Research's "TrueX" technology. 
The drive really spins at a con- 
stant lOx speed (constant linear 
velocity). The 42x read speed is 
realized by splitting the laser into 
seven beams that read seven 
tracks simultaneously. The net 

' " \ 


result is read performance that's 
close to that of a hard-drive, with 
no annoying vibration and very 
fast spin-up. 

In the early days of CD-ROM 
drives, there was a promise that 
games would be run directly from 
the CD. In this era of games that 
take up 400MB of hard-drive 
space, we can only chuckle at our 
naivete. Maybe Kenwood and Zen 
Research have broken the code. 


The Z40x marks Kenwood's 
entry into the crowded field for 
data CD-ROM drives. If they can 
deliver on the promised perfor- 
mance at a reasonable price, then 
this drive could be a real winner. 


dived in. The result is a uniquely 
Microsoft spin on speakers. They 
have a fairly solid power amp — 
80 watts RMS total. The compact 
bass unit has a 6-inch, down- 
ward-firing driver coupled to a 6- 
inch passive radiator, so the level 
of mid-bass and bass is beefier 
than the driver size might indi- 
cate. There are a couple of small, 
highly sculpted satellite units. 

The unique feature of the 
Microsoft speakers is the USB 
connection. If you like, you can 
connect these puppies to your 
USB port and rip that sound card 


out. Imagine that: no more IRQ, 
DMA, or other headaches. The D/A 
converter is in the bass unit itself; 
digital data is sent out over USB 
to the speakers. 

All is not completely rosy, how- 
ever. If the game has significant 
music content, you need to have 
a software MIDI renderer (which 
ships with DirectX 6.0). However, 
that's a CPU hit that's more sig- 
nificant with slower systems. The 
sound quality, though decent, 
tends to be heavy in midrange 
and mid-bass. That's fine for most 
games, but it sounds overdone 
with acoustic music. However, 
there's a software graphic equal- 
izer that ships with the speak- 
ers, so you can probably 
tweak to your heart's 
content. 


MICROSOFT USB 
SPEAKERS 


Microsoft 
(425) 882-8080 
www.mlcrosoft.coni 
Company ETA; Q4 '98 
CGW'i ETA; 04 '98 


T he folks in the hardware 
group at Microsoft looked 
carefully at the highly com- 
petitive market for 
powered speak- 
ers. Then they 
threw caution to 
the winds and 


COMPUTER GAMING WORLD » SEPTEMBER 1998 


A 


ir.computergaming.c 






© 1998 Sierra On-Line, Inc. ® and/or ™ designate trademarks of, or licensed to Sierra On-Line, Inc., Bellevue, WA 98007. Ail rights reserved. © 1997 Valve L.L.C. All rights reserved. 
Valve and the Valve logo are trademarks of Valve LL.C. This product contains software technology licensed from Id Software, Inc. ("Id Technology"). Id Technology © 1996 Id Software 
Inc. DirectSD is a trademark and Microsoft and Windows are registered trademarks of Microsoft Corporation. OpenGL Is a trademark of Silicon Graphics Computer Systems. 







CHECK OUT HALF-LIFE VIDEOS AT 
WWW.SIERRASTUDIOS.COM 
Go to #156 @ www.computergaming.com/infollnk 


jreat Outdoors! 


^UERR^ 


IVALVEi 


SPF 15 RECOMMENDED 


K. SHOOT. LIVE 



100+ HOT NEW GAMES • HARDWARE 


STB 

VELOCITY 4400 

STB 

(972) 234-8750 
www,stb.CQm 
Company ETA: 03 ’98 
CGWi ETA: 03 '98 

T his is the first card 

announced that will use the 
powerful new RIVATNT 
(TwiN Texturing) 2D/3D accelera- 
tor. Some of the demos we've 
seen on this card have been quite 
impressive. Imagine Quake II at 
1 600x1 200 at over 30fps. Imagine 
DeathMatch Quake II at 
1 600x1 200 — you can see the 
other guy before he sees you. 

The TNT will likely be the hot 
ticket in AGP cards in the near 
future. STB's retail version will 
arrive with a hefty 1 6MB of 
125MHz SDRAM — no wimpy 8MB 
packages need apply. The Velocity 
4400 supports TV out and 
OpenGL, and is fully tuned for 
Direct3D 6.0. The TNT chip sports 
dual rendering engines on a sin- 
gle 7-million transistor chip. This 
card is a fully 32-blt rendering 
engine, and offers per-pixel MIP 
mapping and effects throughout. 

It even does anisotropic filtering. 

If you’ve had reservations about 
the image quality of the original 
RIVA 128, you won't believe that 
you're looking at a RIVA. 

The 2D performance is likely to 
be quite speedy as well, and of 
course, it will have good VGA. 
Prices had not been set when we 
went to press, but you can safely 
assume that STB will price this 
card fairly aggressively. 


MICROSOFT FORCE 
FEEDBACK WHEEL 

Microsoft 
(425) 882-8080 
www.microsaft.com 
Company ETA: Q4 ’98 
CGW’s ETA: Q4 ’98 


T he members of the con- 
troller team at Microsoft 
have spent a lot of time on 
the industrial design of this 
wheel, and It shows. It damps to 
the table with a single damp that 
you need to adjust only once. The 
floor pedals are designed so they 




won't slide on either carpet or 
smooth floors. And the desktop 
unit is short, so it should fit easily 
on crowded desktops. 

Like many such wheels, the 
Microsoft version is fairly small, 
sized more like a Formula 1 
wheel. (Aside; When, oh when will 
we see a NASCAR-sized wheel?) 
Also like many force feedback 
wheels we've seen, the forces are 
somewhat coarse— but It some- 
how seems more appropriate for 
a wheel. 

In an interesting move, Micro- 
soft is eschewing a USB connec- 
tion for this controller. Good 


force-feedback requires a high- 
speed (12Mbps) connection, and 
there were some technical rea- 
sons they couldn't go with that. 

So for the time being, you'll still 
need the same sound card con- 
nection, with supported MIDI data 
pin, as the Microsoft Sidewinder 
Force Feedback Pro joystick. 

At a bit over $200 (MSRP), it 
won't be cheap, but having the 
added pizzazz of force feedback 
plus the compact size may, uh. 
force many of us to fit our desk- 
tops with this wheel when we 
need our racing fix. 


Aim K6-2 

AMD 

(800) 538-8450 
www.amd.com 
Company ETA: Q3 ’98 
CCm ETA; Q3 ’98 

A MD is breathing life back 
into the old Socket 7 
motherboard standard 
with the K6-2, In addition to 
higher clock speeds than its 
predecessor, the K6-2 incorpo- 
rates AMD's 3DNow instruc- 
tions — 27 floating point instruc- 
tions well suited to handle the 
math needed to speed up 3D 
games. 

The K6-2 uses a 0.25-micron 
process, which will make for 


higher clock speeds while It 
generates less heat. To ensure 
that you get optimum perfor- 
mance, you do need to install 
a new motherboard (a.k.a. a 
"Super 7" board) that sup- 
ports the lOOMhz memory 
bus and AGP graphics. AMD 
has been shipping 266, 300, 
and 333MHz K6-2's since 
early this summer, 

To make sure that the K6- 
2's performance potential is 
reached, AMD has developed 
enhanced hardware drivers for 
DirectX 6,0, OpenGL 1.2, and 
Glide (3Dfx's proprietary API). 
DirectX 6 applications need to 
use the Direct3D geometry 
pipeline for best performance. 
At prices that are roughly 25 
percent lower than the equiva- 
lent Pentium II and with 3D 
performance that is potentially 
much higher, the K6-2 from 
AMD may bring high perfor- 
mance 3D games to the sub- 
$1,000 PC. SSH 


AMDn 


A 


COMPUTER GAMING WOiaO » SEPTEMBER 1998 


^.coniputergaminj'.com 





youVe in the 10th frame^ 
there’s a bucket of sweat 

dripping off your brow 

f and this shot is worth ^ 

way too much money 



-Arr:s^lngl!lji,"'£ 




PlayStation 


Go to #152 @ www.computergaming.com/Infolink 

I ^IBnraMtCorpO'aioa Cosmic 6m1iiigMPre5iai»l«eiarts olBrwsirUBciriirig arid Billlai<bCwpo«vi Bnjris«ttC[tcu9 Pro Ming isattaiJtnakc<rKQIicOI996THa Inc. PaySUIonindllvPIiySliticnlooosvetqalaedKafeTMscfScnrCoRfijtoEnlffUniMI 


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IS IT REAL OR IS IT, 


Brand new Brunswick Skins Game format 
Multi-player up to 32 players 
13 Brunswick ProStaff" Bowlers 




Intelligent bowler and crowd reactions 

State-of-the-art physics engine for 
unbelievably real pin action 




tne D'openies of tfieir respecSivt 


The measure of man 


is what he does with power. 


Pittacus 


(c. 600 BC) 



AcliVisioK 



CALL TO POWER 


www.calltopower.com 


Go to #232 @ www.computergaming.com/infolink 


IS VULil 1 


(! 



■' Woltli 'ins ^ 
' ivsc'nss'- h. 



by Denny Atkin 


hen it comes 
to Windows 
98, the best 
news for 
most gamers 
will be that 
Microsoft's 
controversial 
new operating system does 
very little to change the PC 
gaming landscape. Win 98 is 
more or less "Windows 
95.1," a fine-tuned version of 
the older operating system 
with updates to support 
newer hardware. Because the 
two operating systems share 
the same basic architecture, 
you shouldn't see any games 





PROS: Much 
better hardware 
support than 
Windows 95; 
good Web inte- 
gration; nice suite 
of built-in utilities. 

CONS; Large 
memory footprint; 
not enough new features to justify the 
upgrade price for most Win 95 users. 

Price; $90 (street price, upgrade from Win 3. 1 
or 95), $190 (street price, full version) 
Publisher: Microsoft 
Redmond, WA 
(425) 882-8080 


www.microsoft.coni 




coming out that require W\n 
98 instead of Win 95. So the 
only reason to upgrade would 
be to get the relatively minor 
updates in the OS. 

The Hard Decision 

The most immediately 
noticeable upgrade in 
Windows 98 is the contro- 
versial (at least to the U.S. 
Department of Justice) inte- 
gration of Internet Explorer 
4.0 with the operating sys- 
tem. (Netscape Commun- 
icator still works fine with 
Win 98 if you choose to 
install it, by the way.) This 
actually does have benefits: 
The integration of HTML with 
the Windows Explorer gives 
you significant power to cus- 
tomize your desktop, even if 
you disable the memory- 
hogging Active Desktop fea- 
ture. You configure the desk- 
top to act like a Web browser, 
so the mouse-dexterity-chal- 
lenged can open files with a 
single click. But there's actu- 
ally little here that Windows 
95 users can't get with a free 
download of IE 4.0 from 
Microsoft's Web site. 

More significant for some 
users is Windows 98's support 
for new hardware technolo- 
gies. Of prime interest for 
gamers is support for the 
Universal Serial Bus (USB), 


Windows 98 Setup 



EASIER SETUP Windows 98 includes more drivers on its CD than 
does Win 95, and it can use your old drivers if you're updating 
from Win 95, so most users should find tiie upgrade painless. 


which allows you to attach 
: multiple peripherals— such as 
USB game controllers— with- 
out having to deal with inter- 
rupts and other installation 
hassles. Win 98 also includes 
support for the IEEE 1394 
■ FireWire standard, a new 
i high-speed interface that may 
eventually replace IDE and 
SCSI, but which isn't likely to 
proliferate until 1999. Finally, 
there's support for DVD drives 
: and television cards— not a 
' big. deal since those devices 
generally include more 
powerful viewer software 
than the built-in Win 98 stuff, 
One enhancement of inter- 
' .est to flight simulator fans is 
• . that Win 98 allows you to add 
a additional 2D/3D graphics 
card and drive multiple moni- 
tors. FLIGHT SIMUUTOR 98 
already supports this graphics 


capability, enabling you, for 
instance, to use one monitor 
to display your instruments, a 
second to show the forward 
view, and a third to show an 
external view. Note: Driver 
support for this feature is very 
limited, and it works currently 
with only a few video cards. 

Given the growing size of 
today's games, Win 98's sup- 
port for the FAT32 disk format 
should appeal to many 
gamers. Available in later ser- 
vice releases of Win 95, FAT32 
uses smaller clusters so that 
small files take up much less 
space on your hard disk. Using 
the built-in FAT32 converter 
can increase your hard-disk 
storage, by 20 percent or more, 
depending on the size and 
nurnber of files on your drive. 

Win 98 has been hyped as 
more stable than Win 95 due 



168 COAAPUTER GAMING WORLD ■ SEPTEMBER 1998 


v.conipiiloigainins.a 





FASTER FILES The newver- 
sion of Disk Defragmenter 
can actually arrange files in 
the order in vidiich they're 
accessed by the game or 
application, tiius shortening 
load times. 

to the maturity of its code, but, 
as the saying goes, actual 
results may vary. It's no worse 
than Win 95, but I've had the 
usual share of weird Explorer 
crashes when shutting down 
the system or opening disk 
windows. Win 98 does include 
a superb System Information 
tool, which contains a module 
that can determine if a pro- 
gram has overwritten system 
files with older versions; a 
Registry repair tool; and a 
system configuration module 


that lets you modify system 
startup and INI files using a 
simple point-and-click inter- 
face. Also, if your registry gets 
scrambled and Win 98 can't 
start up, the system will auto- 
matically load a backup copy 
from the last time you success- 
fully booted. The new Windows 
Update feature can check 
Microsoft's Web site for new 
drivers and other updates and 
install them automatically— 
but it functions only if you've 
electronically registered your 
copy of Win 98 with Microsoft. 
Finally, DirectX 5.0 is now built 
into the operating system, so 
you won't have to worry about 
DirectX hosing your computer’s 
drivers— at least until DirectX 
6 ships this summer. 

Performance 

Anxiety 

Win 98 features a number 
of performance enhance- 
ments designed to speed 
performance in those areas 
where people experience 
most delays: loading pro- 
grams, and starting up and 
shutting down the system. 

The Disk Defragmenter utility 
analyzes programs and deter- 
mines the order in which they 
load accessory files and DLLs; 
it then reorders the files on 
disk for faster loading. Note 


that while this does speed 
program loading, it makes the 
files appear fragmented to 
third-party utilities, and that 
running programs such as 
Norton SpeedDisk will undo 
the optimizations. 

As for program perfor- 



THINNER FAT The FAT32 converter will modify 
your hard disk's file system to use smaller 
clusters, which means that the tiny files asso- 
ciated witii many games will take up less 
room on your hard disk. 


mance, testing with ZD's 
WinBench 98, 3D WinBench 
98, and a number of frame- 
counter-equipped games 
(UNREAL, QUAKE II, FLIGHT 
SIMULATOR 98, JANE'S F-1 5, 
and FLYING CORPS GOLD) 
showed no appreciable perfor- 
mance differences on systems 
equipped with 32MB or more 
of memory, If you have less 
RAM than that, however, 
you'll want to bring home a 


Easy tfpgvadlB? 

T he most welcome news about the Windows 98 upgrade is that It should be painless for the vast 
majority of users. While Win 95 included major architectural changes from Win 3.1, Windows 98 uses 
the same core technology. This means you can utilize your old hardware drivers, and you shouldn't 
need to replace your old software. In our testing, every game and productivity application designed for Win 
95 ran fine on Win 98. The only exceptions were old versions of disk-optimization utilities, such as Norton 
Utilities— you'll need to get an update that's compatible with Windows 98's FAT32 disk structure. 

I installed the release version of Win 98 on five Win 95 systems ranging from a 16MB P133 notebook run- 
ning the original release of Windows 95 to a 128MB PII/400 system running Win 95 Seivice Release 2.1. In 
each case, the upgrade process was flawless, with none of the headaches I encountered upgrading systems 
from Win 3.1 to Win 95. Diat said, there's always a risk when upgrading any PC to a new operating system, 
especially if you're running on older hardware or just getting around to upgrading from Win 3.1, so back up 
all data before performing the upgrade, in fact we suggest backing up your data files, reformatting your 
hard disk, and installing the OS and your applications from scratch. This may be overkill, but we recommend 
an operating system-reinstall at least once a year for performance and reliability reasons. Performing a 
fresh install of Win 98 is generally easier than installing Win 95, since Microsoft has included many more 
device drivers on the Windows 98 CD. 


couple of new SIMMs with 
your Win 98 purchase. The OS 
has a bigger memory footprint 
than does Win 95, so systems 
with 16MB of RAM (and even 
systems with 32MB with 
some recent games) will see 
much more swapping of 
memory to 
the hard disk. 
This can make 
for jerky per- 
formance in 
games. Given 
the recent 
dramatic drop 
in price for 
memory, we 
recommend 
that you bud- 
get an 

upgrade to at 
least 64MB of 
RAM if you 
decide to 
upgrade to Windows 98. 

Happy With 
What Ya Got? 

Of the PCs I updated to 
Win 98 for this article, only 
one machine received signifi- 
cantly added capability: a 
Pentium II system with a 
DVD-ROM drive, an ATI All-in- 
Wonder Pro TV/video card, 
and USB. Owners of less 
bleeding-edge systems will 
likely find that the minor fea- 
ture updates and new utility 
software isn't worth Win 98's 
steep $90 upgrade price. If 
you have a fairly new PC and 
you're interested in using 
technologies such as USB, you 
may find Win 98 a worthwhile 
.. update. Otherwise, Win 95 
users would do well to take a 
quick trip to Microsoft's Web 
page: Download Internet 
Explorer 4.0 and the Win 95 
OSR2 utility updates (www. 
microsoft.com/ 
windows/downloads/ 
Contents/Updates/ 
W950SR2/Features.asp) 
and you'll get most of Win- 
dows 98's functionality at no 
cost.ffiC7 


COMPUTER GAMING WORLD » SEPTEMBER 1998 


WtNDOWS 9a 


I 



T he deer HumEB phenomenon, as it has 

been called, has been pontificated upon 
at great length for the past few months. 

How, people have wondered, could a 
small potatoes developing 
WizardWorks produce a game on ^ ^ 

oug on the Pw towerino over 

'“‘’’‘"u^hrQuAKErpXo antl even the granddadd, 

this Cinderella story, but several "-V ^ 

,mputer Gaming World call .t alters are 

don't suhscrihe to h^^ 

■=;r2;.:=Sstrrr 

f“rH£r.,r^=Eir 
i -rs:s="-f '-3“ 

IS some virtual critters. 


COMPUTER GAMING WORLD » SEPTEMBER 1996 



THE BUBBA FACTOR 


(deer HUNTER'S EXTENDED SEASON 



D eer Hunter's Extended 
Season is really just a 
glorified Deer Hunter 
with a few new hunting 
areas and the addition 
of a black powder rifle. 
To be fair, the game 
doesn't claim to be much more 
than that in the 
first place, so at 
least WizardWorks 
is being honest. As 
with the original 
Deer Hunter, 

Extended Season lets 
you choose between 
a variety of prehunt 
options, including where to hunt, 
which weapon to use, and 
whether or not you want to use a 
tree stand and/or scents. After you 
make your initial gameplay choic- 
es, you are taken to the map 
screen for the hunting grounds 
you've picked, where you will 
blindly click around in a more or 
less random pattern, looking for 
signs of deer activity. These signs 
include rubs, scrapes, bedding 
areas, and droppings. When you 
finally find a sign of life (the signs 
in Extended Season seem to be 
fewer and farther between than 
those in the original), you click 
on the Hunt icon and you're mag- 
ically transported to that spot to 
begin your hunt. 

Once in your hunting spot, you 
click on the appropriate icons at 
the bottom of the screen to use 
cover scent and/or attractant, a 
deer call, binoculars, and rattling 
antlers. To the game's credit, the 
deer Al is actually tweaked so that 
if you start calling or rattling in an 
unrealistic manner, no buck will 
come within a mile of your posi- 
tion. The direction of the wind also 
has a lot to do with how close a 
deer will come to where you are 
waiting. To bag a trophy, you must 
take these aspects of the game 
into consideration. When you do 
finally raise your weapon to take a 
shot at BambI, your aim will grow 
increasingly unsteady the longer 
you hold the weapon to aim it, as 
if your arms were growing weary. 


Unfortunately, 
that’s about where 
the game's realism 
ends. Although the 
game does take 
into account the 
distance from you 
to the target (which 
means you 
have to aim 
higher the 
farther it is 
from you), 
any reason- 
able shot 
results in a 
kill, even 
rump and gut shots. In the real 
world, as any real hunter knows, 
a gut shot usually results in a 
long, arduous day of tracking a 




wounded, yet surprisingly ener- 
getic animal through the woods 
until it finally succumbs to its 
wounds. So why not just take a 
fleeting potshot at the animal? In 
Extended Season, you might as 
well. Of course, after the kill, just 
as in Deer Hunter, the deer's head 
is instantly sent to the trophy 
room-let's see some gutting and 
skinning sims! While some may 
think this last request unreason- 
able, they surely couldn't object to 
some post-1994 looking 3D 
graphics. The deer animations are 
decent, if primitive, but this game, 
like Deer Hunter, is a side-scroller 


DEER HUNTER COMPANION 


and nothing more. Your inability 
to move around the environment 
is frustrating, to say the least, 
although WizardWorks promises 
this feature in the upcoming Deer 
2 (which should be out this fall). 
On an up note, the game’s relax- 
ing sounds almost make up for 
your lack of mobility. 

Deer Hunter's Extended Season 
is a decent add-on to a mediocre 
game. If you liked Deer Hunter, 
you'll like this— and for a modest 
diversion, it's not all that bad. For 
the money, you could do worse. 

Publisher: WizardWorks; 
S14.99; www.wi 2 w 0 rks.com 


U nless you absolutely, positively, must own 
everything with the Deer Hunter name on 
it. The Deer Hunter Companion is a waste of 
your hard-earned dollars. Basically, all it 
includes is a strategy guide, but that guide con- 
tains no new or helpful infor- 
mation. In fact, everything cov- 
ered here regarding actual 
gameplay has already appeared 
in the booklets included with 
Deer Hunter and Extended 
Season — with the exception of 
the cheat codes, which can be 
found on the Web or in our July 
and August CG Tips articles. 

The remainder of the booklet 
consists of Outdoor i//e-style 
"Real-Life" hunting stories and 
real-world hunting tips — you'd 
be better off buying that copy of 


Outdoor Life. Even the five 
new maps are inconse- 
quential when you think of 
the hundreds of user-creat- 
ed maps now available on 
the Net. 




BFD This lame AVI movie is 
the only thing included in 
Deer Hunter Companion that 
you can't get elsewhere. 


The 

only other 
feature in this lame package is 
an .AVI video file called A Season 
to Remember. Yawn. A portion 
of Deer Hunter Companion's 
profits go to Wildlife Forever. (I 
think it was the only way the big- 
wigs at WizardWorks could sleep 
at night after releasing this rip- 
off.) Save your money for tags 
and licenses. 

Publisher: WizardWorks; 

S9.99; www.wizworks.com 


w.v'.v.computergaming.cQfii 


COMPUTER GAlVUNC WORLD « SEPTEMBER 1998 


A 





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ZIFF-DAVIS 


THE BUBBA FACTOR 


(sporting clays a a ★ j ) 


F or my money, when it 
comes to pure, simple 
gaming fun, out of all 
the games in 
this roundup. 

Sporting Clays 
gets my vote. 

The reason? It doesn't 
try to do too much, and 
what it does, it does 
damn well. The game, 
developed by Diversions 
Software for WizardWorks, bills 
itself as an "Interactive Shooting 
Simulation," and, indeed, it feels 
as if you are shooting a real shot- 
gun at real clay targets. You par- 
ticipate in a five-stand tournament 
in which you shoot at either 50 or 
100 clay pigeons (there are five 
types from which to choose). 

For such a simple little game, 
this guy is packed with user- 
defined options. You can personal- 
ize these options for up to four 
shooters. Options include the type 
of clays you want to shoot, your 
match location, the choke pattern 
size of your shotgun (at the small- 
est choke pattern, this game gets 
extreme/y difficult), and the ability 
to play with an inverted mouse. 

You can also toggle various dis- 
play options that help you stay on 
target while shooting. Among oth- 
ers, these options include Pat- 
terning, which shows where your 
shots hit; Tracking, which shows 
the path of your aim and the clays' 
trajectory; and Show Traps, which 
shows from where the clays will be 
thrown. You even choose what you 
want your shooter to yell when 
commanding the clays' release 
("Ready," "Go," or the traditional 
"Pull!") and if your shooter will 
have a male or female voice. 

Once you enter a tournament or 
choose a station from which to 
practice, you will go to a shooting 
stand. You will see your shotgun 
barrel graphic (unfortunately the 
most unrealistic and primitive part 
of the game), and a beautiful 2D 
scene of the stand and its environs. 
There is a three-step process 
involved in shooting at the targets. 



To call for the clays' release, you 
right-click once. After the clay is 
released, you right-click 
again to raise your gun. 
Finally, you left-click to 
shoot (two shots per 
release cycle). This 
process works very 
well. However, it takes 
a while to get the 
hang of leading the 
clays enough to stay on target, and 
the shotgun realistically "kicks" 
after each shot, so you have to 


recover quickly in order to 
hit the second clay. 

The animations for the 
clays' release are very real- 
istic, with the exception of 
the fur-and-feather clays, 
which look like bouncing 
beach balls from Hell. A Reid Info 
status bar at the top of the screen 
tells you which kind of clays are 
forthcoming and where they will 
originate. The smart shooter will 
heed these hints. 

While Sporting CtAYS can get a 



CHECK YOUR PATTERN SPORTING CLAYS 
has many user-defined options. 


little repetitive after a long ses- 
sion, this game is perfect for the 
casual gamer who wants a fun, 
quick diversion between meetings 
or appointments. 

Publisher: WizardWorks; 
S24.99; www.wizwork5.com 


ROCKY MOUNTAIN TROPHY 
HUNTER -k-ki 


R ocky Mountain Trophy 
Hunter tries to take the 
Deer Hunter engine a 
step beyond its humble 
origins; but while it does 
have some enhanced 
features and new game- 
play options, its gameplay is really 
just glorified Deer Hunter action. 

You begin the hunt by naming 
your player and deciding which 
weapon and accessories to use 
(the game's token new weapon is 
a .357 revolver). A new twist in 
Trophy Hunter, however, is that 
you have a set number of invento- 
ry items that you can bring along 
on your hunt. This means you must 
plan ahead regarding which ani- 
mals you want to hunt. 

There are four inventory item 
slots available in the game, but the 
fourth is always taken 
up on my hunts by 
the spotting scope. 

Prompted no doubt 
by the endless wail- 
ing and gnashing of 
teeth by reviewers 
and gamers with 
regard to Deer 
Hunter's horrible 
guess-and-click map 
interface, the folks at 
WizardWorks have 
wisely added this 



handy feature. The 
spotting scope lets 
you see any animals 
within a short dis- 
tance from your loca- 
tion on the map 
screen, giving you a 
much better idea of 
which way to go to 
find game. 

Another improvement is the 
addition of wounded animal track- 
ing. In my Deer Hunter review 
{CGIV#168), 1 lamented the fact 
that it didn't matter which part of 
the deer's body you shot, all hits 
resulted in a kill — gut shots be 
damned. In Trophy Hunter, how- 
ever, a gut or rump shot realistical- 
ly results in the animal running 
away, leaving a blood trail for you 
to follow. The news isn’t all good. 



SHOT DOWN IN FLAMES That used to be 
an elk on tiie wrong end of my Atomic 
Disemboweler 3000. 


however. Since you still can't 
move around within the envi- 
ronment, you have to go to the 
map screen and (ugh) guess- 
and-click to find the series 
of blood trails. 

You can hunt elk, moose, 
bear, and ram in Trophy 
Hunter, which is a pretty 
good representation of 
North American big-game 
hunting. There is only one 
large hunting area, 

Once the actual hunt begins, the 
game plays almost exactly like 
Deer Hunter. You use your calls 
and scents while waiting, watch- 
ing. and listening for the animals' 
approach. When an animal comes 
into range, you raise your weapon 
and shoot it. That's about it. 

One "feature," for me, makes 
this game incredibly more fun. 
Specifically, a cheat code that I 
had been dreaming of since I first 
laid eyes on the original Deer 
Hunter: a rocket launcher (called 
the "Atomic Disemboweler 
3000"), Go to the hunt screen 
and type in BGBarbecue, and you 
too can know the joy of demolish- 
ing a 300-pound moose with a 
high-explosive projectile! 

Rocky Mountain Trophy Hunter 
is a decent game, but it suffers 
from many of the problems inherit- 
ed from its predecessor. Deer 
Hunter. It's an improvement, but 
the series still has a way to go. 

Publisher: WizardWorks; 

$24.99; www.wizworks.com 


www.compulergaming.com 


COMPUTER GAMING WORLD » SEPTEMBER 1998 t 







The most anticipated RPG of the year. 


In the FORGOTiKN REALMS®, we've lived through foul pestilence, 
vicious battles, exorbitant taxes, and even the occasional dragon. But 
when HE showed up, things really started getting ugly. 

Prepare to be immersed into a world of intrigue and mystery on a 
perilous quest to rescue a storied land from impending war. Even your 
own soul is at stake as you and a party of adventurers become entangled in 
a dangerous riddle of betrayed alliances, dark prophecies and murder. 

Will you become the unlikely hero of the story, or merely another of its 
unfortunate casualties? Before you answer, the big guy here might have 
something to say about it. 

£ ■ ft Explore an immense, intricate game world - from cloud-covered 
mountains & rain drenched plains to dark catacombs & abandoned 
' temples - all meticulously rendered in lush, i6-bit SVGA graphics. 

t j. Invoke more than too spells - Freeze enemies with an icy blast 
j- from a Cone of Cold, or incinerate them with a searing stream of 
' magical flame. 

Push your leadership skills to the limit as you guide a party of up 
w’"* <^haracters, each with a personality that affects garaeplay. 

% ’ Don’t let your stubborn fighter pummel the atrogant thief - you 
may need their teamwork in your next battle. 

t ; , Create your character from six AD&D® races and 26 different 
V* classes and subclasses. You control every attribute, down to skin 
and hair color, weapons, and armor - all accurately depicted on-screen. 





Piirfgeons&.DrAeofis 


’’"A®”"®!* nEXlHS W. ADVANCED DUNGEONS S DSAGONS, ADSD. n. AOSO k,. ...1 «» TSN Wo <| 

1 license. Interplay, ihe Interplay logo and -By Gamers For Gamers ’ are liademarksot InlerWav Pted^mns AH noWs iBsarved. 'nte SioWaro '' 

logo s the trademark of BloWare Corp. All nghts reserved. Exclusively licensed and dislhOutad by Interplay ProdJcl^rts. AH oL copynghls andTmdemarks a^^rpmwrTofm^^^^^ 

Go to #163 @ www.computergaming.com/infolink 






THE BUBBA FACTOR 


CCABELA'S BIG GAME HUNTER ^ ^ A Q 


abela's Big Game Hunter suf- 
fers from a split personality: 
50 percent of the game is 
decent: 50 percent of it is 
utter crap. Let me explain. 

This is the only game in our 
roundup that makes an effort to re- 
create one of the most important 
aspects of any hunt: the prepara- 
tions that take place before you 
ever actually set foot in the field. 

Before the hunt, you get a set 
amount of money to use. With it, 
you purchase the appropriate tags 
and licenses, as well as supplies. 

Big Game Hunter has a multi- 
tude of gameplay options. You can 
choose from 9 weapons and more 
than 65 hunting accessories, which 
include specialized clothing and 
safety gear — all conveniently 
found in the Cabela catalog. You 
can hunt in Virginia, South Dakota, 


the Yukon, and Montana. The game 
features animals as diverse as 
bighorn sheep, coyote, mule deer, 
and bison (there are 12 other 
species as well). You even have to 
sight in your weapons before the 
hunti The "30" graphics here are 
nothing to write home about, but 
they do the job. 

It's when you actually take all 
of your accumulated stuff out into 
the woods that things go downhill 
fast. The in-hunt graphics are terri- 
ble. They resemble nothing even 
remotely close to the real wilder- 
ness. To make matters worse, the 
ambient sounds cut out and sound 
unrealistic. The only time the 
sound is consistent is when your 
guide pipes up to tell you where 
to look for your game. You won't 
see it, of course, as no animals are 
actually modeled into the scenery. 


Instead, when you drag your 
cursor around the part of the 
screen the guide directs you to, 
your cursor turns into a 
crosshair and an FMV video 
showing the animal begins. 

Any semblance of realism is 
immediately out the window as 
you see your static weapon and 
targeting reticle hover over the tar- 
get animal. You have a precious 
few seconds to aim at the video 
animal and fire, or your intended 



prey will bound 
away. If you do 
get off a shot, 
be prepared to 
miss — again 
and again, Once, I sighted in an elk 
with a .338 centerfire rifle at about 
75 yards. When 1 missed, the guide 
said, "The wind out here is tricky, it 
blew the bullet off course." A .338 
at 75 yards? Are you kidding me? 

If you do manage to get a kill, 
you'll be rewarded with prize 
money to finance another hunt. But 
who would want to repeat this 
lousy process? If Head Games 
could find a workable hunt engine 
to pair with the pre-hunt prepara- 
tions, they'd improve the game all 
the way to mediocre. As it stands, 
it's not worth your money. 

Publisher: Head Games; S19.99; 
www.headgame5.com 



CWILDTURKEYHUNTAA ) 


Y ou can think of Wild Turkey 
Hunter (WTH) as a pared- 
down Deer Hunter with even 
more primitive visuals. 



EARLY THANKSGIVING This 
tom is pretty far away from 
me, but one good blast should 
easily take him down. 


One thing that Wild Turkey 
Hunter really gets right is its 
sound. When you hear a tom gob- 
bling at you onscreen, you'll swear 
there's a real bird in your house. 

The ambient sounds and the two 
types of calls (a scratch call and a 
box call) also sound very realistic. 
However, that's about as far as this 
game's realism goes. 

There are five hunting areas in 
the game, and each setting has the 
appropriate species of turkey. Sadly, 
though, the environments don't 
look very realistic, and the different 
turkeys all act the same: stupid. 


Domestic turkeys have a reputation 
for stupidity; but as any turkey 
hunter knows, wild turkey species 
are very shrewd. However, in this 
game, a turkey will just meander 
right up to you when you use 
either call, whether you use it real- 
istically or not. It's then a simple 
matter to blast him onto your log- 
book screen, which keeps track of 
all your kills, Also, one shot will 
usually do it in WTH, although in 
the real world, a turkey's many 
tough layers of feathers can keep a 
single, long shotgun blast from 
being a killing shot. In this game, a 


200-yard 
blast is as 
good as 
one at 
point-blank 
range. Also, you can't move around 
the chosen hunting area, and there 
is no map screen — you're stuck in 
one place the whole time. 

If you're dead-set on going for 
toms this virtual hunting season, 
you might like this game. Those not 
so limited, however, should proba- 
bly find another stretch of woods. 

Publisher: ValuSoft/Sunstorm; 
$14.99; www.wizworks.com 





exquisite pile of gore I'm 
leaving in my wake. 


CSPORTSMAN'S PARADISE 


S portsman's Paradise is a col- 
lection of arcade games 
released in 1 996. The graphics 
are dated and terrible, the 
gameplay is erratic, and the sound 
is very bad. So why do 1 keep play- 
ing Pigeon Hunt? Because it's the 
only game I know of that lets me 
live out my fantasy of going into 
my neighborhood park and blast- 


ing all those flying 
rats that swarm me 
when I'm trying to 
eat my lunch. 

At SI 9.99, this 
game isn't a bargain, but between 
its six games (Trap Shooting Pro, 
Duck Hunt II, Pigeon Hunt, Prairie 
Dog Hunt Pro, Pheasant Hunt, and 
Fly Fishing) you should find some- 


thing you like. Just keep in 
mind that this game does 
not approach the level of 
quality of the other games 
in this roundup. By the way, 
for an updated version of Prairie 
Dog Hunt Pro. go to www. 
div5oft.com/pdhpro.html. 

Publisher: WizardWorks; $19.99; 
www.wizworks.com 


www.compiili’rRaming.com 


. I ' . COMPUTER GAMING WORLD » SEPTEMBER 199B 




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R M ;■ C E n / ? 0 V 


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The only lntel740™ based PCI 
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You don’t have to be a psychic to know AGP is the 
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delivering 2D, 3D and video all on a single card. 

Of course, that’s exactly the kind of stuff you’d 
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THAT VOODOO^ MAGIC 




^Dciossary 

Glide 3Dfx's proprietary tow- 
level API that allows game 
developers to squeeze more per- 
formance out of the Voodoo^ 
chipset. 

Pass-Through A VGA cable 
that takes 2D card’s output, and 
routes it into the Voodoo' board. 

SLI (Scan-Line Interleave) 

3Dfx's proprietary technology for 
running two Voodoo' boards 
that deliver nearly twice the fill 
rate of a single board. Each 
board draws every other scan 
line, or half the picture, 

SST Command Commands 
issued at boot-up in the 
AUTOEXEC.BAT that define per- 
formance parameters. In 
Voodoo', this can usually be 
tweaked in Display Properties 
sheet. 

TMU (Texture Mapping 
Unit) This chip, as the name 
suggests, handles all texture 
mapping operations. Voodoo' 
actually has two TMUs to 
achieve better performance. 

Trilinear MlP-Mapping An 

advanced filtering technique in 
which the renderer takes a pixel, 
its four neighboring pixels, and 
the four neighboring pixels from 
the nearest MlP-map, and calcu- 
lates a weighted average, and 
then draws that color value. This 
is the next level of filtering 
beyond bilnear filtering. 


thumbs waiting for completely 
pegged CPU to generate more 
polygons. The reason for the minor 
difference at 800x600 is that most 
of these games probably didn't up 
the polygon count much at higher 
resolutions. 

The spread on the 400MHz 
Pentium II was a bit wider — about 
10 percent from top to bottom. 

Note that 10 percent over the 
entire 3D GameGauge test isn't all 
that big a difference. Also, there 
are some mitigating issues: First, 
there were driver differences — 
some of the vendors were more 
aggressive about incorporating 
driver updates from 3Dfx into their 
releases. Some cards also had per- 
formance sliders; pushing these 
probably affected the results by a 
few percentage points. 

As an aside, users who under- 
stand how SST commands work 
can up the dock rate of cards that 
don't have performance sliders — 
but that lack means that higher 
clock rates may not be supported 
by the maker. The bottom line is 
that the actual perfor- 
mance differential is 
pretty small. Hence, 
performance played a 
surprisingly minor role in 
our scoring. 

Then there's the issue of 
how much memory to get. 
About the only 3D Game- 
Gauge score that was signif- 
icantly affected by the pres- 
ence of only 4MB of texture 
memory was F22 
ADF. It uses 
8.3MB of tex- 
tures when run- 
ning, which was 

Continued on 189 


The Pure3D II 
is an interesting 
card, but sports 
I an oddly placed 
SLI connector. 

ji 


When boards based on 3Dfx's first- 

generation Voodoo chipset came on the scene, there were only 
two companies making boards: Orchid and Diamond. Others fol- 
lowed, but for a while those were the only two boards available. 


Not so with Voodoo^ There are at 
least eight different companies 
making Voodoo^-based boards, 
and with that many players all 
delivering what seems to be very 
similar. If not identical, products, 
one has to ask, "Aren't they all 
pretty much the same?" I recently 
took a look at 10 different 
Voodoo^ cards in one huge orgy of 
benchmark testing. What 1 found 
may surprise you. 

Why Voodoo'? Weil, as of this 
writing, Voodoo' is still the fastest 
and most versatile 3D chipset on 
the market for PC gaming, deliver- 
ing very fast DirectSD, OpenGL, 
and Glide performance, it is per- 
haps this last area of performance 
that really makes the 3Dfx story so 
interesting. Glide is BDfx's own 
low-level API that many game 
developers embraced owing to 
Direct3D's shaky beginnings. And 
while Direct3D has made huge 
improvements, as have other 
accelerators, some game develop- 
ers are still writing to Glide first, 
and Direct3D when they get 
around to it. And even if this trend 
reverses itself, Voodoo' is still a 
very solid Direct3D accelerator. So, 
in Voodoo' you won't get any 2D 
functionality, but what you will 


On oor400MHz Pentium II 
the 24MB X-24 slightly outperformed 
two 12MB Voodoo^’s in SLI mode. 


get is not only Glide, but very 
performance on Direct3D and 
OpenGL. 


A Look at the Numbers 

We tested the cards on a 
400MHz Pentium II system (CGkV's 
No Holds Barred System, see page 
196} and a 200MHz Pentium 
MMX system— something that's a 
bit more representative of what 
many gamers have. If the Voodoo' 
card had a built-in performance 
slider in the control panel, we 
jacked it to the maximum stable 
setting. This actually varied — the 
MonsterSD II, for example, could- 
n’t run faster than 93MHz on our 
systems, though that certainly did- 
n't seem to hurt its performance. 

Most surprising were the results 
on the 200MHz Pentium MMX 
system, though in retrospect. I 
probably shouldn't have been sur- 
prised. Note that the difference 
between slowest and fastest card 
is roughly 1 percent — statistically 
insignificant. Also interesting was 
how little the performance dipped 
at 800x600, There are several pos- 
sible reasons: First, on a 200MHz 
Pentium MMX system, a Voodoo' 
board is host-bound, meaning that 
the Voodoo' card is twiddling its 


COMPUTER GAMING WORLD » SEPTEMBER 1998 






Challenge Your Friends 
TO Multiplay. 


Available At Retailers Everywhere 

Or Call 1-800-874-4607 


Westwood" 


DUNE"' and ©1998 Dino Da Uurenlils Corporation. Licensed by Universal Studios Licensing, Inc. ©1998 Westwood Studios, Inc. All rights reserved. WWW . WeStWOOd .COm 

Go to #249 @ www.compulBrgamlng.com/infolink 







Availahle Halloween at your local retailer. OrderUrebt at stote.gtlnteractive.com or call 1-B00-610-Gns. 


Run a sauage gaunUel of muMnlayer 
mavhem from Teamplay to teuel naclng. 


ao+screaming fast, totally Immersive 
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the seconi! cut is the deepest 


; Four cuslomlzaDJe, plavable charactars: 
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THAT VOODOO^ MAGIC 


Features Comparison 


Product 

CGW Rating 

Software Bundle 

Price (12MB unless stated) 

Canopus Pure3D II (2) (95 MHz) 

(888) 868-2533 www.canQpuscotp.com 

★ ★ ★ A * 

THE RECKONING 

S329; S279 for XL version (no TV out) 

Creative Labs Voodoo^ (90 MHz) 

(408) 428-6600 www.sQundblaster.com 

■A ir ^ A 

ULTIMATE RACE PRO, 

INCOMING, G-POLiCE 

S299 

Diamond Monster 3D (I (94MHz) 

(800) 468-5846 www.diamondirim.cotit 

A A A A A 

BATTLEZONE (large texture version), 
MONSTER TRUCK MADNESS 2, INCOMING; 

CD of playable demos 

S299;$249 for 8MB 

Guillemot GamerSD 2 [12MBj (90 MHz) 

A A A A A 

INCOMING, FI RACING (full), 

PLANE CRAZY, HEXEN 11, SUBCULTURE, 

S299, S229for 8MB 

Guillemot Gamer3D 2 [8MB| (90 MHz) 
(800) 967-0863 www.guillemotcom 

A A A A A 

RREDIINE RACER (playable demos) 


Metabytc Wicked 3D Voodoo^ {95MHz) 
(510) 494-9700 www.wicked3d.com 

A A A A A 

None 

$299 

Quantum3D X24 (93MHz) 

(888) 747-1020www.quantum3d.com 

A A A A A 

24 Piayable demos 

$699 (24MB) 

Orchid Righteous 3D II (93MHz) 

(800) 577-0977 www.orchid.com 

A A A A 

BAHLEZONE, G-POLICE (A3D enhanced), 
INCOMING (full versions), 

JEDI KNIGHT (limited vers.) 

$299; $229 for SMB 

STB Black Magic 3D (90 MHz) 

(972) 234-8750 www.stb.com 

A A A A A 

INCOMING, BATTLEZONE 

$279 


Performance Data 


Pentium II 400MHz 


Test Resolution: 800x600 



Canopus Pure30 II (2) (95MHz) 
Creative Labs Voodoo^ (90MHz) 
Diamond Monster 3D II (94IVIHz) 
Guillemot GamcrBD 2 (90 MHz) 
Guillemot Gamer3D 2 SMB (90MHz) 
Metabyte Wicked 3D Voodoo^ (95MHz) 
Quantum3D X24 (93MHz) 

Orchi d Righteous 3D II (93MHz) 

ST B Black Magic 3D (9QMH2) 
Voodoo' Reference (SLI) 



Pentium MMX 200MHz 


3D WinBench 98 


Test Resolution: 800x600 


ES! 

Canopus Pure3D II (2) (95MHz) 


Creative Labs Voodoo' (90MHz) 

gSl 

Diamond Monster 3D II (94MHz) 


Guillemot GaniorBD 2 (90MHz) 


Guillemot Gamer3D 2 SMB (90MHz) 

SCIT? 

Metabyte Wicked 3D Voodoo' (95MHz) 

KM 

QunnfiimSO X24 (93MHz) 

KM 

Orchid Righteous 3D II (93MHz) 


STB Black Magic 3D (90MHz) 

flRn 

Voodoo' Reference (SLI) 



GameGauge Total Score 

255.4 

249.2 

257.8 

259.2 
253.1 

256.9 

258.4 
252.0 

256.5 

284.6 


How We Test To l«l products, we use the fctevanl WifiBwch 98 tests to measure the CPU's 30 perfomaoce Then, to see how a system peifomis running 3D games, wt 
our own 30 GameGauge, a Election ol so games — tour OirectSD, two OpenGL The 30 GameGauge sccee is the sum ot the sU games frame tales 


COMPUTLK GAMING WORLD » SEPTEMBER 1998 






Clockworks 

ENTKKTAINMf-NT 


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■ f 

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THAT VOODOO^ MAGIC 


To SLI or Not to SLI 
3Dfx 


SLI technology and the 
^ potential performance 
boost it promises is enough to leave most 
gamers drooling. But like all things drool- 
worthy in this business, the price tag will most 
likely give you pause. So this begs the ques- 
tion: Do you really need SLI? The answer, in 
most cases, is no. Here's why: 

Voodoo^ is quite often host-bound, and sits 
waiting for the CPU to hand it more triangles 
to draw. So if a single Voodoo^ board is twid- 
dling its thumbs, then the only thing doubled 
by adding a second board is thumb-twiddling. 
No huge performance increase. And you're 
talking about laying down another S300 for 
the second board. 

Are there instances where you'd 
want that second board? Yes. If you absolutely, 
positively have to have the biggest, baddest, 
hellaciously fast setup, and you already have a 
super-fast CPU (at least a 300MHz Pentium II), 
then twin Voodooes will take you there. Or, if 


Continued from page 182 
probably the root cause of the slightly 
slower scores. The 3D WinBench score 
was slightly lower due to several scenes 
that have big texture sets. Most games 
didn't seem to stress an SMB card much, 
and they are certainly less expensive. Of 
course, texture sets in games are grow- 
ing, not shrinking, so having that extra 
4MB of texture memory on 12MB 
boards will mean less frame-rate stutter 
as newer titles come out that exceed the 
8MB cards' onboard texture memory. 

SLI can significantly boost perfor- 
mance on a fast system, but it was inter- 
esting to note that the performance at 
1 024x768 dropped off quite a bit. Still, 
an SLI-equipped system is about as fast 
as you can get today— but it ain't cheap. 

Judgement Day 

I used several different criteria for 
assigning scores. Performance did play 


Righteous 30 II 





you really want to run all your games at 
1024x768, then you'd need a second board. 
One design gap in the Voodoo^ is that, for all 
its horsepower, you can't run a single board at 
1024x768 if you’re double-buffering and have 
a Z-buffer. 

If youV6 PGady to get a voodoo^ 
board, then the way to go is to buy a single 
board, get it up and running, and see how it 
feels. If it feels sluggish (not likely), or you find 
that you're really pining for 1024x768, then 
make the second trip to the computer store. As 
DirectX 6.0 games begin to arrive that use 
multitexturing, these may necessitate a second 
board, but the thing to do here is play the 
game first, and if it feels sluggish, consider a 
second board. Otherwise, enjoy the single 
board, and consider a second when you find 
that new games are bogging down your single 
board. But, appreciate that as new games 
come out, it may not be Voodoo^ that's your 
botttleneck, but your CPU. — Dave Salvator 


a minor role, but was really a small 
consideration, I also looked at software 
bundles, price, design issues, and ease 
of installation. For example, the STB 
card is pretty bare bones, with no real 
difference in price. In addition, the 
driver installer CD launched an 
ActiveMovie video on startup — some- 
thing that actually crashed several 2D 
cards we tried. 

The Metabyte card used a substitute 
Direct3D geometry pipeline. The net 
result was a hugely boosted 3D 
WinBench 98 score. At first, an 
enhanced D3D pipeline sounds good, 
but only a handful of games use it. So 
the only real benefit at this point is a 
boosted 3D WinBench score — some- 
thing we tend to frown upon. 

Of all the cards, the Monster 3D II is 
the most polished, is slightly faster than 
the rest, and has a very solid bun- 
dle, So our top nod goes to that 
card. The Pure3D I! looks interest- 
ing, except for the weird place- 
ment of the SLI connector. The 
Righteous 3D II has a good bundle 
and seems to be slightly cheaper 
than the other 12MB cards, at least 
at the time of the review. 


The Righteous 3D II 
has just about the 
best bundle, and Is a 
bit cheaper than most 
other boards. 



■ compulefgamin^ coni 


COMPUTER GAMING WORLD ■ SEPTEMBER 199S 


Go to #164 @ vvww.computergaming.com/infoiinV; 


ATI XPERT@Play 98 SMB - The new breed of speed 



NowYouSeelt; 

www.atltech.com/cgw 


ATI’s XPERT graphics boards are available in PC! 
or full AGP 2X versions. AGP 2X includes free 
Software DVD offer. 


• Get TV on your PC with ATI-TV. 

• Check out www.atitech.com for more details 
on ATI's Windows 98 products and rebates. 


• ATI's XPERT SMB 
graphics boards are the 
only way to experience 
incredible gaming in 
Windows 98 and 
Windows 95. 

• Get SMB of power, the best 
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retailer for more details). 

• Save even more money with ATI’s cool 
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Go to #106 @ www.computergaming.com/infolink 



IN SEARCH OF THE ULTIMATE GAMING MAGHINE 


New 3DNow! Technology May 
Give AMD an Edge Over Intel 



PERFORMANCE BENCHMARKS Though the K6-2 trails a Pentium II300MH2 in many cases, AMD nonetheless turns In 
respectable numbers across the board, and. In several instances, squarely beats the Pentium II. 


WinBench 98 

AMD K6-2 233MHz 
Pentium II 300MHz 


ffnn 


C3a 


CameGauge 

[800x600] FORSAKCN 

AMD K6-2 233MHz | 

Pentium II 300MHz | 


INCOMING TVROK QUAKl QUAKF II 


427.4 

479.3 


HowWeTeStTol«tpfoduns,wei«Aer«levaiitWin8«Kh98lcsOtomesiuretlieCPU's3DperionT.,„^, „»•„ ... 
■wn 30 GameGauge a coJiKtion of six games— four DirKt30, two OpeoQl.'nie 30 GameGaoge score H the sum of the sb 


TNT to Eitplode 
Onto the Scene 

B y the time you read this, the 
first RIVATNT boards may be 
hitting store shelves near you. 

I recently had the chance to play 
with an early version of the STB 
Veiocity 4400, STB's own RIVA TNT 
board, STB was the first graphics- 
card company with a TNT announce- 
ment. In a bold move, the retail ver- 
sion of the 4400 will come in one 
flavor: 16MB of SDRAM with TV out. 

I popped this alpha part into CGW's 


I don't want to quote 

I. numbers here, but per- 

■uiucAViiiiiitil formance was better 

than any 2D/3D combo card I've seen. 
On top of that, games like QUAKE II 
and FLIGHT SIMULATOR 98 looked 
spectacular at 1024x768 and 
1 280x1 024 (respectively). 

More importantly, the image quali- 
ty was impressive. There was none of 
the dithering artifacts that were pre- 
sent with the original RIVA 1 28. The 
only polygon cracking I saw was 


inherent to the games' engines. 

The RIVATNT chip on the 4400 has 
dual rendering engines, and is 
designed to work with DirectX 6.0. 

My testing was on DirectX 5.0, but 
performance was still pretty solid. 
Some of the frame-rates approached 
single Voodoo^-like performance — 
not bad for alpha hardware and dri- 
vers. And, unlike a single Voodoo^ 
board, I could run z-buffered games 
at resolutions higher than 800x600. 

Overall, this board shows great 
promise, though I'll reserve judgement 
until I see final product. --Loyd Case 


Techwatch 


3Dfx Banshee: 3Dfx's 
first integrated 2D/3D 
accelerator. Banshee will 
be SDfx's first large-scale 
entry into the lucrative 
OEM/system-makers side 
of the graphics business, 
where about two-thirds 
of all graphics chips are 
sold. Performance num- 
bers on the as-yet- 
unannounced part are 
very sketchy, but we've 
heard rumors that its 2D 
performance will be very 
competitive, which was a 
weakness in their Voodoo 
Rush chip-set. ETA: Q3 '98 

S3 Savage3D: Rumors 
of S3's demise have been 
somewhat exaggerated. 
While their ViRGE part's 
3D performance under- 
whelmed and limped 
along, S3 regrouped, 
realized that they had to 
produce a competitive 
3D part, and has come 
back with SavageSD. This 
part is spec'd to have a 
fill rate of around 
125Mpixels/sec drawing 
trilinear filtered pixels, 
which should have S3 
competitive with nVidia's 
RIVA 128ZX. Matrox's 
G200 and Intel's i740 this 
fall. ETA: Q3 '98 

Intel Katmai: Intel's 
next round of CPUs, with 
anticipated dock speeds 
of 450-500MHZ. In addi- 
tion to the higher clock 
speed, Katmai CPUs will 
also feature what Intel has 
clumsily dubbed "Katmai 
New Instructions," a name 
given to avoid calling 
these new instruction-set 
extensions MMX2. Among 
the other things these 
instructions will speed up 
will be Direct3D's geome- 
try engine (in DX6), allow- 
ing these CPUs to crank 
more polygons per sec- 
ond. ETA: Q4 '98 


v.computergaming.i 


COMPUTER GAMING WORLD « SEPT6MBEB 1998 




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Wliethet it’s the DSS350 or DSS370, immerse yourself in the experience 


of higli intensity sound. Featuring ‘-Inefethble Surround — .3D digital sound 

T"''hi '■'"‘1 Plug& Play" for easy-installation. Philips Digital USB 
y""' ^ speikcrs. It’s not only sound you can hear, it's soimd you can feel. For more 
iiifo, call I -800-8,35-.3506 or visit_us at www.usbaudio.philips.com 

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Go to #140 @ www.computergaming.com/intollnk 








Weird, Wacky, and Wonderful 

Pipe-dreams and Reality on the Trade Show Circuit 


I n the merry month of May, I 
plunged inlji two different 
trade shows: Computer 
Game Developer's Con- 
ference (CGDC) and the 
Electronics Entertainment 
Expo (E3). I met with a lot of 
people and saw a lot of 
interesting and cool stuff. What I 
didn't see was any new trends, in 
hardware or in games. On the 
contrary, everything looked pretty 
evolutionary. 

However, this month I want to 
write about some of the offbeat 
hardware I've seen. It would be a 
mistake to pass judgement on any 
of these — it's too early to tell — 
but all of them definitely march to 
a different drummer. Some of 
these will likely be reviewed in the 
future. For now, let's dive in and 
take a preliminary look. 

Machine Gunnery 

ThrustMaster was showing an 
early prototype of something it's 
tentatively calling the Fist Fighter. 
If you've ever seen the handle on 
the U.S.Army .50 cal. machine 
gun, the Fist Fighter looks vague- 
ly like an ergonomically sculpted 
version of that handle. It's 
designed to be used with action 
games like UNREAL or QUAKE II. 


It's a full 6-degrees-of-freedom 
controller. You grab the handle 
with both hands; it has pitch, 
yaw, and roll axes. You hold 
down a button to move, and 
move the handle to point in any 
direction. It was amazingly intu- 
itive when I tried it — just like 
aiming a .50 cal. machine gun. 



attached to anything. That's right, 
it's a wheel that you hold in the 
air. (Okay, there was a cable to 
connect it to the computer.) It uses 
an accelerometer to detect the 
motion of your hands, rather like 
Microsoft's more conventional- 
looking Freestyle gamepad. A ' 
throttle slider is mounted on 
the body of the steering wheel. 

The whole affair seemed to 
work well, but since it had zero 
feedback, it was hard to tell how 
far to rotate the wheel. Still, it 
looked like a promising alternative 
to clamping a massive steering 
wheel to your desktop. 

Not a Wheel 

Then there was the Interact 
wheel. ..er. . .not a wheel. ..er. . . 


a moment. The folks at Hercules 
have teamed up with Rendition 
and Fujitsu to offer the Thriller 
Conspiracy. This is a PCI board with 
a Rendition V2200 controller and a 
Fujitsu Pinolite 



geometry accelerator. It’s aimed 
squarely at people with Pentium 
200 systems and slower who can't 
afford the cost of upgrading their 
systems. The downside is that the 
geometry accelerator only kicks in 
with OpenGL or Rendition 
RRedline games. It does nothing 


lidn't see any new trends in hardware [at E3]. 
On the contraiy, everything looked evolutional^ 


ThrustMaster may just be onto 
something here. 

Air Wheel 

Another company, SC&T, was 
showing a wheel called the Air 
Racer. What's different about this 
wheel, however, is that it isn't 



maybe a wheel. It looks a lot like a 
controller SC&T did for the 
Nintendo 64. It vaguely resembles 
a high-tech version of a wheel-lock 
pistol. You can hold the device with 
one hand (by a pistol grip, which 
has the trigger buttons). The 
body of the controller 
has a small wheel 
that vibrates if the 
game supports 
force feedback. 

Again, the idea is 
to have a driving 
controller that does 
not take up a lot of desk 
space. This one leaves me 
scratching my head, but then I may 
just be conservative. 

It's a Conspiracy 

Let's take a break from game 
controllers and look at graphics for 



for Direct3D, because DirectSD 
doesn't yet support hardware 
acceleration for lighting and trans- 
form operations. 

If you're on a tight budget, but 
want to play OpenGL games like 
QUAKE II fully accelerated, then 
this is an interesting 
board. On a sys- 
tem with a 
Pentium 133, 
QUAKE II can run 
consistently in 
excess of 20fps.At 
5149 for an SMB 
board, it's a good 
solution for gamers who haven't 
yet bitten the bullet on a 3Dfx card 
(possibly because they have no 
free PCI slots). We'll definitely 
review this one when it's out, so 
watch for it in upcoming issues. 

Continued on pege 200 


^.computergaming.t 


COMPUTER GAMING WORLD » SEPTEMBER 1998 





••• 



FlflflUV. H flEmOTE COriTROL CAR flOT EVER VOUfl BROTHER ERR BRERK. COmPLETE WITH 16 REHIDTE CORTROL ERRS 
TAREKS. THIS GHfRE LETS VOU DODGE. WEAVE. ARD 50RR THOUGH RIEH TROPIEAL JURGLES. SUA-OREREHED BEAEHES, RRD 
VOU DDR'T FEEL LIKE RRCIRG. THERE RRE DOZERS OF HIDDER PATHS HRD SEERET FERTUHES FOR VOU TO EXPLORE. RLORE. W 
THE EOniPUTEfl, THIS GRRIE WILL SERD VOU THROUGH DOZERS OF EOUflSES - ROT BATTERIES. 

HVHiLnoLE on WinDDWS«9S CD-flOm nno PLAVSTATIOfl” GHmE COASOLE I gvERVOWE l \\ 


Gremlin 


PlayStation 




TWO RECIPES FOR THE ULTIMATE GAMING MACHINE 

These are our top picks for each component.* Use this list to build your dream system, or to upgrade 
select components. All products tested using Ziff-Davis benchmarks and/or a variety of games. 



I JUO UnLDS 

BiinREO 

1 



PRODUCT 

PRICE 

WEB ADDRESS 

Motherboard 

Asus P2B-LS 

S350 

www.asus.com 

CPU 

Pentium 11/400 

S805 

www.intel.com 

Memory 

128MB Corsair £CC PCIOO SDRAM 

S350 

www.corsairmicro.com 

Disk Controller 

Built-in Ultra2 SCSI 

SO 

N/A 


Canopus Total3D/1 28V AGP 

SI 99 

www.canopuscorp.com 


OuantumSD Obsidian X24 

$699 

www.quantum3d.com 

Hard Drive 

Seagate Cheetah 9LP 

S950 

www.seaqate.com 

CD-ROM/DVD 

Plextor Ultraplex 

S225 

www.plextor.com 

Monitor 

Sony 500PS 

51,395 

www.sonv.com 

Primary Audio 

Diamond Monster Sound MX200 

S149 

www.diamondmm.com 


LFT-1 1 

S600 

www.eminent-tech.com 


3Com ImpactlQ 

S200 

www.3com.com 


Built-in Intel 10/100 ethemetchip 

SO 

N/A 


tn-WIn IQ500 

S115 

www.in-win.com 

Power Supply 

Turbocool 300 

S129 

www.pcpowercoolinq.com 


MS Natural Keyboard 

S69 

www.microsoft.com/hardware 

Mouse/Pointinq Device 

Logitech Mouseman Pius 

S59 

www.loqitech.com 

Action Game Controller 

Rage 3D 

S29 

www.thrustmaster.com 


ThrustMaster F22 Pro 

S129 

www.thrustmaster.com 

Throttle 

ThrustMasterTQS 

S149 

www.thrustmaster.com 


ThrustMaster RCS 

S129 

www.thrustmaster.com 

Drivina Controls 

TSW 

S360 

http://soli.inav.net/-thomas/ 

$7,090.00 ) 

IfEilJlf JL MBJkU 

1 


COMPOniEMT 

PRODUCT 

PRICE 

WEB ADDRESS 


ABIT BX6 

$149 

www.abit.com.tw 


Pentium 11/300 

S375 

www.intel.com 


64MB PCIOO SDRAM 

$160 

www.corsairmicro.com 


Built-in UDMA/33 

SO 

N/A 


Real3D Starfiqhter 

S140 

www.real3d.com 


Diamond Monster 3D II SMB 

$220 

www.diamondmm.com 


Seagate Medalist Pro 9.1 

$350 

www.seaqate.com 

CD-ROM/DVD 

Pioneer DR504s 32x slot load CD drive 

$80 

www.pioneerusa.com 


Optiquest Q71 

$300 

www.optiQuest.com 


Turtle Beach Montego 

S129 

www.vovetra.com 


N/A 

SO 

N/A 


Boston Acoustics BA635 

S99 

www.bostonacou5tics.com 


US Robotics V.90 

$150 

www.3com.com 


N/A 

$0 

N/A 


Elan Vital T10AB 

S90 

www.elanvital.com.tw 


Built-In, 230W 

$0 

N/A 


MS Natural 

$69 

www.micro5oft.com/hardware 


Logitech Mouseman Pius 

$^9 

www.ioqltech.com 


ThrustMaster Raqe3D 

$29 

www.thru5tmaster.com 

Flioht Controls 

CH FI 6 Combat Stick 

$49 

www.chproducts.com 

$2,448.00 ) 


*We have made every effort to ensure this information would be timely and accurate. 

However, new hardware is constantly being released, and magazine production and distribution involves an 8-10 week delay. In cases where new products were close to release at 
presstime, we have kept our current top choice so that we only recommend finished products we have tested. Lists compiled by Dave Salvator and Loyd Case. 


COMPUTER GAMING WORLD » SEPTEMBER 1998 


v.compulergaming.c 




Incoming'' Screensh^ grartesy of Ra'^- 


The future of gaming 
is no longer just in front of you. 

Introducing 360 Degrees Of Totally Immer^^^^^^ Monster Sound. 


“IF YOU CAN AFFORD JUST 
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MAKE IT MONSTER SOUND.” 

—Family PC, Sept. 97 

• Positional 3D Audio With 2 Or 4 Speakers 

• 64*Voice Hardware Wavetable 
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• Drastically Outperforms tSA Sound Cards 

• Accelerates DirectSound. DirectSoundgD. 
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• Includes Hot 3D Games Like Incomingl" 

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Enter the Monster Sound MX200 
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A 


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you’re surrounded with amazingly real, true positional 3D sound. Plug in 
either 2 or 4 speakers, strap on your headphones, and experience the 
incredible 3D positional audio for the ultimate gaming experience. Monster 
Sound MX200 brings 64 voice hardware wavetable synthesizer, with Roland 
authorized sample set, and 23 independent audio streams, creating the 
entire spectrum of realistic sound. Plus, you get Aureal’s® award-winning A3D 


technology and Microsoft’s® DirectSound and DirectSound3D to unlock the 
latest effects in your Windows 95/98 system. Better 
yet, it comes with killer 3D games like jedi Knight, | 

Outlaws, and Incoming. Get Monster Sound today and 
make the world revolve around you for a change. Accelerate yourworld. 

Go to #145 @ www.computergaming.com/infolink 



' 1998 Diamond Multimedia Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Diamond and the Diamond logo are registered trademarks of Diamond Multimedia Systems Inc Monster Sound 
Multimedia Systems, Incorporated, 2880 Junction Avenue. San lose. CA osna. All other trademarks are the nmnerru nf their recnortiue «uun<.rc 




© 1998 InterAct Accessories, Inc. A RECOTON COMPANY. All rights reserved. Advent® and Powered Partners® are trademarks of Recoton Corporation. The AV390PL is manufactured undi 
license from Dolby Laboratories. Dolby and the double-D symbol are trademarks of Dolby Laboratories. EA SPORTS, the EA SPORTS logo, John Madden Football, and "If it’s in the game, it 
in the game" are trademarks or registered trademarks of Electronic Arts in the U.S. and/or other countries. All rights reserved. Officially Licensed Product of the National Football League Player 
© 1998 Players Inc. The Players Inc. logo is a registered trademark of the NFL Players. NFL Materials ©jl^998 NFLP. Team names and logos are trademarks of the teams indicated. All oth' 
(NFL-related marks) are trademarks of the National Football League. 



Af/P BSTTl 


IK4Idve\t 

,„ll Powered Partners* 


Available through and other fine retailers. 


With Powered Partners' 
5 channels of Dolby 
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and jaw-breaking bass, 
you'll feel that 270-pound 
linebacker breathing down 
your neck. So don't Just get 
your head in the game, get 
your whole body in it. With 
the AV390PL from Advent. 
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LOYD CASE 



brought you the Nintendo 
Power Glove are bringing an 
updated, higher resolution ver- 
sion of the Power Glove to the 
PC. In fact, they will be doing 
right-handed and left-handed 
versions. Imagine being able to 
make gestures with your 
hands to cast a spell in a fan- 
tasy role-playing game. Or 
being able to "manipulate" 
objects in a game with your 
fingers. Unfortunately, proto- 
types weren't ready by E3, so I 
have no idea what it will look 
like or how well it will work, 
but it's certainly another step 


in the slow march toward 
virtual reality. 

Dream On 

Of such stuff are dreams 
made. An idea comes to some- 
one in a moment of reflection 
or while driving through the 
city at night. It becomes solid, 
reaches toward fruition. One 
in a hundred become prod- 
ucts, one in a thousand 
become good products. I don't 
know if any of these will 
become great products, but all 
of them were insights into the 
creative mind. LKrLJ 

www.computergaming.com 


Continued from page 193 

AGP on PCI 

There's a lot of buzz over AGP, 
as well as some disagreements 
as to its true merits. However, as 
games with huge texture sets 
begin showing up, it's likely that 
true AGP accelerators will have 
some benefit. But, this leaves 
those gamers with PCI-only sys- 
tems in the lurch. 

Along come our friends at 
Real3D, the makers of the 
Starfighter. The Starfighter is an 
AGP board that uses the Intel 
740 accelerator. Now, the 1740 is 
an AGP-only part. However, the 
engineers at Real3D feel your 
pain, and have come up with a 
PCI version of the Starfighter. This 
card has a special AGP-to-PCI 
bridge chip. It has 8- or 16MB of 
texture memory (in addition to 4- 
or SMB of frame buffer) that 
looks like AGP memory to the 
i740 chip. 


It's Intense 

Then there's the Intensor. It's 
an office chair with embedded 
speakers — up to five speakers, as 
a matter of fact. One speaker — 
the bass driver — is embedded in 
a compartment underneath the 
seat. The net result is a rather 
immersive experience, though I’m 
not sure I want that much immer- 
sion. The sensation underneath 
your tailbone is, uh, difficult to 
describe. 

Additionally, although BSG, the 
folks who make the Intensor, 
claim that it's ergonomic, it's not 
ail that comfortable — but then, I 
was tired and had been walking 
my feet off all day by the time I 
got to it. This could be an oppor- 
tunity for yet-another DirectX 
API— DirectButt. 

Get a Grip 

The good people at Abrams- 
Gentile Entertainment who 


Tech Tips 


Diamond Monster 3D II and the Compaq Presario 

If you have a Compaq Presario with matching multimedia moni* 
tor, you may run into problems with a Monster 3D 11. The symptoms 
are simple; no audio when the Monster 3D II is attached. In fact, you 
may even witness that nifty volume control knob slowly turn itself 
down to zero. 

The cause is obscure. As it turns out, Compaq uses an unused VGA 
pin (pin 11) to add volume control via the Presario monitor. The 
Monster 3D II uses only the standard VGA pins. Hence, there's no 
communication between the computer and the volume control on 
the monitor. If you're one of these users, you can contact Diamond 
directly for a fix at (800) 468-5846. 

Note that other Voodoo^ users may encounter simitar problems; 
contact your card vendor for assistance. 

Ethemet Problems: Pauses in Die Action 

I mentioned this one before, but I get so much email on it that h 
deserves a second mention. Many users are trying to install small 
home networks. In the process, you may install an ethemet card and 
the TCP/IP protocol. 

All of a sudden, your games pause about every four minutes, for 
several seconds at a time. There may be several pauses in quick suc- 
cession. You are the victim of the Windows 95 TCP/IP address hunt. 
The TCP/IP software in Windows 95 installs without an IP address. 
Instead, it will periodically go out (about every four minutes) and 
look for a Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) server on the 
network. (A DHCP server assigns dynamic IP addresses to client sys- 
tems.) There are several possible fixes. First, you can hard-code IP 
addresses using 192.168.0.xxx where xxx can be any three digits. Set 
the sub-net mask for 255.255.255.0. This set of addresses is reserved 
for internal-only networks. Second, you can download updated 
Winsock software from Microsoft. Third, if you don't need to use 
TCP/IP on the local network, you can go into the Network applet in 
Control Panel and remove the TCP/IP protocol stack that's bound to 
your Ethemet card. 




DELL DIMENSION XPS R400 > REVIEW 


The Next Dimension 

Dell Delivers a Solid and Well-priced 440BX-based Pentium II Box 



by Dave Salvator 

D ell is very good at deliv- 
ering a basic box. Fora 
gamer, that means few 
extras such as game 
controllers or accelerat- 
ed game cards. But the 
basics that Dell supplies 
prove to be terrific fun- 
damental components (you can 
add bells and whistles to taste). 
New to its latest Dimension R 
series offering is a case that allows 
you to gain entry to the system's 
innards without tools. 

Other big changes include some 
components of a different stripe in 
the audio subsystem. Gone is any 
Creative Labs part, replaced by 
Turtle Beach's Montego PCI sound 
card, based on Aureal Semi- 
conductor's Vortex 8820 audio 
processor. In addition to handling 
Windows 95 audio chores and 
SoundBlaster legacy compatibility, 
the Montego is also DirectSound 
3D and A3D-compliant, meaning 
that game titles which use 3D posi- 
tional-audio should play well. In 
addition, there are Altec-Lansing's 
AC495 speakers, which have USB 
controls and support Stereo, Pro- 
Logic, and AC-3 imaging modes. 
When running in the last two 
modes, these speakers create 
"phantom" rear speakers using 
compotcr' [ 

GAMING 

R 1. D 




APPEAL: Gamers looking for a fast, 
though somewhat plain, Pentium II rig, 
PROS; Solid performance; competitive 
price; easy-opening case. 

CONS: Controllers not included; rudi- 
mentaiy BIOS doesn't allow for much 
tweaking; small Plug-and-Play 
headaches. 

Price: $3,189 

Manufacturer: Dell Computer 
Round Rock, Tews 



side-firing drivers to try to get 
sounds behind you. 

Set up is painless, with 
color-coded cabling and a big 
honkin' poster that gives step- 
by-step instructions. The unit 
uses a Phoenix BIOS, which 
provides basic adjustments for 
system-level settings but does 
not offer the granularity found 
in, say, an Award BIOS. It's a snap 
to get into the case, and the interi- 
or layout makes getting at things 
pretty easy, 1 did hit one snag, 
however; I added a Plug-and-Play 
Ethernet adapter to take this guy 
for a spin through some multiplay- 
er games, but when I brought the 
system up, the Ethernet card 
grabbed the DVD decoder's IRQ, 
and the DVD decoder in turn 
grabbed IRQ9, which was in use by 
the sound card. The result was a 
dysfunctional audio subsystem and 
an unstable system. After I went 
into the BIOS to reset default val- 
ues and disable PnP on the 
Ethernet card, all was well. 

Run, Joey Run 

I stacked this Dimension up 
against our high-end, 400MHz No 
Holds Barred (NHB) machine (built 
from some of the best components 
available), and the Dell was consis- 
tently nipping at its heels. Both 
machines use RIVA 128-basedAGP 
graphics cards, so similar numbers 
on WinBench and 3D WinBench, as 


PERFORMANCE BENCHMARKS 


CGI^'No Holds Barred* QHV 
DellXPS-B400 

3D GameCauge 

[800x600} FO/ISAKIN 

CGlVNo Holds Barred* 

DellXPS-R400 FTTV 


What's in the Box 

400MHz Pentium II W/512KB inte- 
grated L2 cache; Intel motherboard 
with 440BX chipset; 64MB SDRAM 
(running at 100MHz); STB Velocity 
128 4MB AGP (uses RIVA 128); Dell 
1000HS 17-inch monitor (with 
Trinitron tube); OVD Decoder Card; 
16.8GB UltraATA Hard-Drive; 2X 
DVD-ROM; Turtle Beach Montego 
PCI sound card; Altec-Lansing 
AC495 USB-controlled speakers; 56K 
US Robotics X2 WinModem 

well as on 3D GameGauge, aren't 
surprising. The CPU scores were 
fairly dose, though the edge here 
goes to CGW's NHB system. 

There was one notable surprise 
from the Dell; its Business Disk 
WinMark score, which came in at 
a whopping 3,250 versus the 
NHB's 2,270, This number is even 
odder considering that Deli uses 
EIDE components and the CGW 
NHB rig uses Ultra-Wide SCSI-2 
components. Turns out that Dell 
has devised a "disk performance 
driver," which the company 
claims has an enhanced caching 
algorithm; that's true to a point. 


Buiims Grsphia BmiiKss Difi 
WinMark' WinMark CW37 

(Eon 


This driver does have a more 
involved read-ahead algo- 
rithm, meaning that it tries to 
speculate what piece of data 
an application will need, and it 
preloads that data into the 
disk cache ahead of time. 

Thus, when that piece of data 
is needed by the application, it 
will be read from memory. 
What is somewhat dicey here is 
the fact that this driver locks 
down as much system memory as 
it can to make the disk cache as 
big as possible, and when it's run- 
ning in WinBench 98, that turns 
out to be an unusually high 
amount. So while this isn't cheat- 
ing per se, it may not necessarily 
reflect the kind of disk I/O perfor- 
mance you'll see when you run 
games or business applications. 
CPU usage when accessing the 
CD-ROM was another disappoint- 
ment; The Dell came in at a very 
high 73.1 percent. 

Bottom Line 

Dell has again delivered a 
stout system, and what it may 
lack in extras it makes up for in 
generally solid performance. If 
you've already got game con- 
trollers that you're fond of, aren't 
interested in building your own 
rig, and are ready to make the 
move to a high-end Pentium II 
system, then Dell's latest will 
serve you well. Lk.'tVJ 


fPUMark CD-ROM 

WinMaik WinMark 

fTTM CTTB 



•• C6IVS l%li-fnd Ultioale Game Machine ’-1024X768 iwoluiion ' 

How We Tested Toleslaoainingsyilem, wepin iiifnough 
floalinj-pcini), hatd-rfnk, and CD-ROM. We then run 3D WinBench dv „.c , 
system petfotms running 30 gamei w run our own 3D GameGauga a colleflion 


ray ol icsti starting with WinBench 98 which tes 
the svstetti's 30 porformance and see how well tendering features a 
g.trnes— four DiteclSD, two OpenGL The GameGauge so 


jrn of the six games' frame rai 


v.computergaming.t 


COMPUTER GAMING WORLD « SEPTEMBER 1998 M 





A Division of 
Interplay Productions 


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Go to #190 @ www.computergamIng.com/jnfolink 

ifllghls Reserved. [Portions 01998 Interplay Enlorlainmont Corp.AII Righis 
rs.‘ are trademarks ol Interplay Enlorlainmont Corp. Flailine Studios and the 
Licensed and disiritxjicd exduslvuly by Interplay Produclions. All oilier irac 



Bwimi 

HUHSTnmiHVOF 

[HPIIBIIITIES 1 






REVIEW • AAETABYTE WICKED3D 


Not So Wicked After All 


by Loyd Case 

I hen 1 first read 
f the press release 
I on Metabyte's 
new "enhanced 
geometry engine" 
included in the 
WickedSD, I was 
intrigued. But 
sadly, it turned out to be some- 
thing of a smoke screen. What the 
software mavens at Metabyte 
have done is replaced DirectSD's 
geometry pipeline (in DirectX 5) 
with one of their own design. 

At first, this sounds like a great 
idea, given that the Voodoo^ 



chipset is often 
waiting for the 
CPU to give it 
more triangles 
to draw, But 
when you 
realize that 
there are cur- 
rently only 
about six 
games in 
the world 
that use the 
DirectX 5 geometry 
pipeline, it's easy to get cynical. I 
suppose that running LEGO ISLAND 
faster is a good thing. Curiously, 
one app that does use the DirectX 



TEST SYSTEM 

CClV's No-Holds-Barred Machine (Pentium II 400MHz) 


5 geometry pipeline is 3D 
WinBench 98. Suddenly it ail 
became clear. 

The Wicked 3D posted the single 
highest 3D WinBench 98 score 



3Dm98 

FORSAKEN 

INCOMING 

TUROK 

QUAKE II 

QUAKE 

F22ADF 

3DCAMEGAUCE 

640x480 

1150 

159.54 

79.33 

79.25 

85.6 

113.5 

44.78 

562 

. 800x600 

789 

100.53 

57.98 

54.24 

58.1 ■ 

72 

42.25 

' 385.1 


Get it every month 



Visit our 

special UUeb site at 

http;//subscribe.computergaminguuorld.com/saue 


we ve ever seen: 
1,150 on a 400MHz 
Pentium II. Games — 
at least, the games 
most of us play — get 
no boost at all. In 
fact, theWickedSD is 
in every way a 3Dfx 
reference board 
clone. I was 
able to com- 
pare the 
3D Game- 
Gauge perfor- 
mance of the 
Wicked3D to a 
number of other 

Voodoo^ boards. While its perfor- 
mance put Wicked3D in the top 
half, the board was not the fastest 
by any measure. Since Metabyte's 
marketing pushes the 3D Win- 
Bench number quite hard, 1 can 
only conclude that the "geometry 
acceleration" is just a benchmark 
tweak of the worst kind. 

At the time we tested the 
board, the bundle was not yet 
determined. Since Metabyte 
charges pretty much full price for 
the board, it's really no bargain. 
For your S300, you get the illu- 
sion of enhanced performance, 
but your games see just another 
reference board design. B3u3 

COMPUXEft' 

GAMING 




APPEAL: 

People who 
want to run 3D 
WinBench 98 
really fast, 

PROS: Solid 
reference board design. 

CONS: "Geometry acceleration" is 
pretty much marketing hype for now; 
price. 

SYSTEM REQUIREMENTS: One 

free PCI slot. 



Price: $299 

Manufaciurei; Mciabyte 
Fremont, CA 
(510)494-9700 


w.compulergaming.ct 




ASUS CD-S340 


REVIEW 


Racing to a Crawl 

Long Spin-up Times Turn Speedy Drive Into Gaming Slug 




by Loyd Case 

I hen I first 
f installed the 
' ASUS CD- 
S340 drive, I 
was blown 
away by its 
initial bench- 
mark scores 
and by how quietlyth\s drive 
runs. It turned out to be a 
perfect case of an imperfect 
first impression. On WinBench 
98's CD WinMark, the drive 
consistently got scores in the 
high 1,700s with an access time 
of under 90msec — no slouch, to 
be sure. But as I used the drive 
more and more, I felt as if I was 
in one of those whirlwind 
courtships that suddenly go sour 
as you find out that the other 
person adores country music 
when you want to go see Pirates 
of Penzance. 

The system I used for testing 
originally had a relatively sedate 
20x CD-ROM drive, so stepping up 
to a 34x drive seemed like a 
breath of fresh air. Huge game 
installs went quickly — or so it 
seemed. Then some truths began 
to reveal themselves, like one of 
those A'-F/Zes episodes in which 
you discover that the likable young 
cop is really an ancient demon. 


34x 






The first wart was the dreaded 
spin-delay. Some ATA CD-ROM 
drives have a slight delay when 
they spin up. This can happen 
often, as most drives spin down 


after about 
two minutes. 
The S340 
seems to 
take longer 
to spin up 
than most — 
as much as 
3-4 seconds 
in some 
cases. This 
delay was 
mildly 
annoying in 
the midst of 
a turn-based 
game, but downright aggravating 
in some action games. 

Then there's the much-vaunted 
UltraATA support. Certainly it 
seemed to work in UltraATA mode 




... or take a ride on the wild side! 


fine on ASUS motherboards, but 
several other motherboards often 
locked up when accessing the CD 
after enabling DMA mode in the 
Windows control panel. Disabling 
the DMA mode solved the prob- 
lem, but it also lowered perfor- 
mance. The S340 also lacks clips to 
hold the CD in place, so you can't 
mount the drive sideways. 

The ASUS has some things going 
for it. The company built in some 
serious vibration damping, so 
there's none of that annoying buzz- 
ing you get with some CD-ROMs. 
But that's hardly enough. The S340 
may be a fine drive for a business 
user who might install software 
occasionally and play audio CDs. 
Serious gamers, however, ought to 
give this one a bye. 


APPEAL: People looking to install sof 
ware fairly quickly. 

PROS: Great benchmark scores; 
UltraATA support; competitive price. 
CONS: Spin-up delays make this a fru; 
trating drive for gamers; lock-ups on 
non-ASUS motherboards. 

Price: S80 (street) 

IvlanufactijrertASUS 
(510) 739-3777 


www-computergaming.cr 


Go to #185 @ wvirw.computergaming.com/infolink 


GAMIMG 








59 programmable functions. 2 directional pads-one for smooth, joystick-like control, one for mega- 
fast, mega-deadly digital action. Proportional flippers let you "feel” hom hard or soft to hit, sming, 






turn or kick. The neiu Kterminator game controller. Be the first on your block to 
make your neighbors say, “LUhat’s that smell?” Check out ujuJUJ.morekills.com. 


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Go to #138 @ www.computergaming.com/infolink 




RMINATOR 



REVIEW • DIAMOND MONSTER SOUND MX200 


Diamond's Sound investment 


by Loyd Case 

O ne of the holy grails of 

wavetable MID! synthesiz- 
ers in sound cards (for me, 
anyway) has been the sam- 
ples used in Roland 
wavetable audio. But the 
availability of those samples for the 
PC game player has been scarce 
because Roland has pulled back 


COM POXER 

GAMIMG 


WORLD 




APPEAL: Gamers who have been wait- 
ing for that Roland magic to return. 
PROS: Great wavetable MIDI; low 
noise; A3D positional audio. 

CONS: Mo native DOS or Windows 3.X 
support. 

Pii«:S149 (MSRP) 

Manufacturer: Diamond Multimedia 
(408) 325-7000 


from the multimedia market. 

The 4MB hardware 
wavetable on the MX200, 
created by Dream, Inc. for 
Diamond, uses samples 
licensed from Roland. 

The result is some of 
the best native 
wavetable patches 
I've heard in a sound 
card in a long time. Since 
Microsoft is creating DirectMusic — 
and API for creating dynamic music 
scores for games through MIDI — 
it's likely that good MIDI may be 
undergoing a renaissance. 

The digital audio on the 
Diamond card is no slouch either. 
This card handles audio chores 
with aplomb, whether the audio 
source is CD music or low resolu- 
tion .WAV files. When I cranked up 
the volume without playing any 
sound, the result was sweet 
silence — no annoying hash, crack- 
les, or other artifacts. 




Diamond uses an Analog 
Devices DSP {digital signal proces- 
sor) to handle the audio processing 
chores. Analog Devices licensed 
Aureal's A3D technology, and it 
works pretty well. In addition to 3D 
positional audio using two speak- 
ers, the MX200 supports two addi- 
tional speakers. We'll probably see 
more four-speaker support in future 
games, since DirectSound 3D has 
four-speaker capability. 

There’s the usual software 
bundle, including full versions of 


OUTLAWS and the 
now-familiar IN- 
COMING. In its latest 
driver release, Dia- 
mond has fixed many 
of the problems with 
digital game con- 
trollers. We were 
able to successfully 
get the Microsoft 
Freestyle and Thrust- 
Master Rage 3D game- 
pads working with the MX200 (but 
be sure to read the READ.ME file in 
the updated driver set). 

The MX200 is a polished card 
with a terrific hardware synth 
engine, a clean digital-audio sec- 
tion, and better support for game 
controllers. About the only thing 
missing is support for the new DLS 
{downloadable sample) standard, 
but the jury's still out on whether 
that standard will take hold in the 
gaming world. 2317 


REVIEW • ABIT BX6 



oy Loyd Case 

O f late, we've seen a flurry 
of 440BX motherboards 
come to market. And 
while most deliver com- 
parable performance, 
there's often very little to 


COMRUXER^ 

CAMING 


^ ^ ^ ^ 7 ^ 


APPEAL; Gamers who like to tweak 
their systems. 

PROS: Jumperless feature makes sys- 
tem setup very easy; tremendous granu- 
larity for system tweaking; good docu- 
mentation. 

CONS: It’s easy to get into trouble if 
you’re not careful; a bit on the large 
side 

Price: S170 
Manufaaurer:Abil 
(510) 623-0500 


Even if you don't overdock it, 
the jumperless feature is nice, 
because upgrades become a snap. 
At a minimum, the BX6 will sup- 
port up to a 450MHz Pentium li. In 
other respects, it's not quite as pol- 
ished as the ASUS board, but it's 
still a good pick for those into do- 
it-yourself systems. 233 


Look Ma, No Jumpers 


set one apart from the crowd. 
That's not the case with Abit's 
new BX6; it's very different from 
the plethora of 440BX mother- 
boards with its jumper-free design 
and the ability to tweak the BIOS, 
right down to the CPU voltage. 

The Abit BX6 is a little 
larger than the ASUS P2B 
we looked at last month, so 
it's a tighter fit in smaller cases. 

It has one AGP slot, four PCI slots, 
and three ISA slots {one ISA/PCI 
pair is shared). Once you install 
your CPU, RAM. and expansion 
cards, the system boots into the 
BIOS the first time. You set the 
dock speed in the system BIOS. 
Now, I don’t advocate overdock- 
ing your system, but if you're into 
that sort of thing, this BIOS is ter- 
rific. You can adjust the CPU core 
voltage in 0.05 volt increments, 
which allows you to crank the 
voltage down a tad if you boost 


the clock rate. But you 
must know what you're doing. 
Some PCI cards do not like it if 
your system is overdocked. Even 
some games don't like it; there 
have been reports that UNREAL 
runs slower on systems with over- 
clocked CPUs or overclocked 3Dfx 
cards. The general rule with over- 
docking is this: When in doubt, 
don't. However, this board will 
revert to a default 2.0v, 233MHz 
if the CPU isn't running properly. 


(iKk COMPUTER GAMING WORLD « SEPTEMBER 1998 


.'.computergaming. ( 




DEMONSTRATION: 


1 Tear out this page. 

2 Crumple into ball. 

3 Toss over your shoulder. 

► The sound this ad will make when it hits the ground 
behind you is the power of A3D™from Aureal, the 
only audio that works the way your ears do. 

No wonder game makers like Interplay and GT Interactive are featuring 
A3D in their newest titles. Experience it for yourself at www.A3D.com 



3D 


BELIEVE YOUR EARS 


Go to #271 @ www.computergaming.com/infollnk 

01998 Aureal Semfconduetor. Inc. A30 and Aureal are trademarks of Aureal Semiconductor Inc. Other trademarks : 


properties of their respective owners. 






MILLENNIA 266 


MILLENNIA 333 


• Intel Pentium ' n processor 266MHz 

• Integrated 32-voice Wavetable 

• 32MB SDRAM 

30 stereo sound 

• 4.3GB Ultra ATA hard drive 

• Advent AV009 stereo speakers 

• 17" Micron 700FGx, 

• 56Kx2 data/fax modem* 

.26dp monitor (16" display) 

• 104-key enhanced keyboard 

• 82440LX chip set 

• Microsoft MntelliMouse^ 

• 512KB internal cache. 

• Microsoft Windows' 98** 

2MB flash BIOS 

• Microsoft Office 97 

• 3.5" floppy drive 

Small Business Edition 

• 32X EIDE variable speed 

• 5-year/3-year Micron 

CD-ROM drive 

Power” limited warranty 

• 128-bit AGP Diamond Viper V330 


(nVidia), 4MB EDO SGRAM & MPEG 


$1 AAQ I 

$66/nio’ 

1,049 1 

Consumer Lease 



• Intel Pentium II processor 333MHz 

• Integrated 32-voice Wavetable 

• 64MB SDRAM 

3D stereo sound 

• 6.4GB Ultra ATA hard drive 

• Advent AV009 stereo speakers 

• 17" Micron 700F6x, 

• 56K x2 data/fax modem* 

.26dp monitor (16" display) 

• 104-key enhanced keyboard 

• 82440U( chip set 

• Microsoft IntelliMouse 

• 512KB internal cache, 

• Microsoft Windows 98** 

2MB flash BIOS 

• Microsoft Office 97 

• 3.5" floppy drive 

Small Business Edition 

• 32X EIDE variable speed 

• 5-year/3-year Miaon Power 

CD-ROM drive 

limited warranty 

• 128-bit AGP Diamond Viper V330 


(nVidia), 4MB EDO SGRAM & MPEG 


* 1,999 1 

$80/nio' 

Consumer Lease 


HARDCORE SYSTEMS 


Add K/licrosoft SideWinder" 
Precision Pro Joystick for ^S9 


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MILLENNIA 350 


MILLENNIA 400 


• Intel Pentium n processor 350MHz 

• Integrated 64-voice Wavetable 

• 64MB PCIOO SDRAM 

3D stereo sound 

< 8.4GB Ultra ATA hard drive 

• Advent AV009 stereo speakers 

• 17” Micron 700 FGx, 

• 56K x2 data/fax modem* 

.2fidp monitor (16" display) 

< 104-key enhanced keyboard 

• 82440BX chip set 

* Microsoft IntelliMouse 

• 512KB internal cache, 

• Microsoft Windows 98** 

2MBfUsh BIOS 

• Microsoft Office 97 

* 3.5" floppy drive 

Small Business Edition 

* 32X HIDE variable speed 

• 5-year/3-ye3r Micron Power 

CD-ROM drive 

limited warrant 

* SMB Real3D Starfighter 


1740 AGP 


* 2,197 1 

$88/nio' 

Consumer Lease 


• IntelPentium IIprocessor400MHz 

• AWE64 Wavetable sound card 

• 128MB PCIOO SDRAM 

* Advent AV390PL 3 piece 

• 10GB Ultra ATA hard drive 

stereo speakers 

• 19" multiscan monitor 

• 56K x2 data/fax modem* 

(18" display) 

* 104-key enhanced keyboard 

• 82440BX chip set 

• Microsoft IntelliMouse 

• 512KB internal cache, 

• Microsoft Windows 98** 

2MB flash BIOS 

• Microsoft Office 97 

• 100MB Iomega Zip drive 

Small Business Edition 

* DVD-ROM drive and PQ 

• S-year/3-year Micron Power 

decoder card*** 

limited warranty 

* 8MB Real3D Starfighter 


1740 AGP 


* 3,297 1 

$131/nio’ 

Consumer Lease 


FOR HARDCORE GAMERS. ^ ^Electronics 


'PCM 



Call 888-669-0969 or 

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THE MOST TRUSTED REVIEWS FOR 16 YEARS 




Pop Culture Icon Goes FMV, Viffth Mixed Results 


"The flawed logic and limited playability 
aside, this still would have been a 
decent game if it weren 't for the terrible 
interface and the bugs. " 

— Lance Larka reviewing 
EXTREME TAaiCS 


TltiS Month CGW Editors' Choice games are indicated in red. 

GAME 

RATING 

PAGE 

747 Precision Simulator 

★ A A * 

247 

Army Men 

A A A A A 

229 

Comanche Gold 

A A A A A 

247 

Extreme Tactics 

A A A A A 

262 

F22 ADF Red Sea Operations 

A A A A A 

247 

Game, Net & Match 

A A A A A 

264 

Industry Giant 

A A A A A 

261 

Monster Truck Madness 2 

A A A A A 

228 

OPERATIONAL ART OF WAR 

A A A A 

250 \ 

Quake II: The Reckoning 

A A A A A 

224 

SANITARIUM 


238 \ 

Sorry 

A A A A A 

267 

Spec Ops; Rangers Lead the Way 

A A A A A 

225 

Starship Titanic 

A A A A A 

236 

Team Apache 

A A A A A 

240 

Ultimate 3D Puzzle 

A A A A A 

267 

Ultimate IQ Test 

A A A A A 

267 

Unreal 

A A A A A 

220 

World Cup Monopoly 

A A A A A 

266 

The X-Files 

A A A A A 

230 

The Game Genres | 


Our reviews are 
categorized by genre. 
Not every game fits 
neatly into a single 
genre, but here's how 
we define the cate- 
gories in general: 
Action Games that emphasize 
fast yaineplay over story or 
strategy. 

Adventure Games that require 
you to solve puzzles to move 
tlirough a story line 


Classics/Puzzle Classics are old 
standbys such as Chess and 
Monopoly. Puzzle games empha- 
size problem-solving without 
requiring gamers to follow a story. 
Role-Playing A subset of 
adventure games, these stress 
character development through 
attributes. The gameworld tends 
to be large; the plot less linear. 
Simulations Highly realistic 
games from a first-person per- 
spective, including flight sims and 
space simulafons 
Sports A broad genre encom- 
passing action sports games such 


as NBA Live, strategic sports 
games such as FPS FOOTBALL, and 
even driving games such as CART 
PRECISION RACING. 

Strategy Problem-solving and 
planning are the keys here These 
games emphasize resource and 
risk-management. Includes con- 
flia-based sci-fi and fantasy 
games as well as construction pro- 
grams like SIMCITY. 

Wargames A subset of strategy 
games, these re-create historical 
conflicts from a command per- 
spective. They may be taaicai, 
operational, or strategic. 


How Do We Rate? We review only finished products, not prerelease versions. The ratings are as follows: 


A ★ Ar A ★ 

Outstanding The rare 
game that gets it all right. 
A must-play experience. 


A A A A A 

Very Good Worthy of 
your time and money, but 
there are drawbacks. 


A A A A A 

Average Either an ambi- 
tious design with major 
flaws, or simply vanilla. 


A A A A A 

Weak Seriously lacking in 
play value, poorly conceived, 
or just another clone. 


A A A A A 

Abysmal The rare game 
that gets it all wrong. 
Pathetic. Coaster material. 


i'.compulcrfi.'iming 


COMPUTER GAMING WORLD » SEPTEMBER 1998 















CENTURION 


This Iruii basket looks absolutely delicious! 
It's awfully nice of you to have me deliver it 
to your arch rival. I thought you hated each 
other? 

/ woiuler If anyone would notice an 
apple missing...? 


FARMER 


Gotta wash the stench 
of horse manure out of 
my clothes in lime for 
church! There will be a 
lot of single ladies at 
Venus' temple tonight. 
Rumor has it the priest 
IS going to denounce 
birth control! 


I’m being tran 
slums for riot CO 
tipped me a go 
some fresh mca 






career structure 
and intuitive 
interface mean 
more exciting, 
longer lasting 
gameplay. 


L'lred back to the 
rol - the Lion Tamer 
piece to round up 
or his pets. 


Build a Belter Rome 


TAX COLLECTOR 


ir you are planning to build a new Colosseum as I 
suspect, you'll need a lot more money, and a lot more 
guys like me lo gather it. People who think taking 
candy I'rom a baby is wrong just haven't bothered to 
try it. 


www.sicrrastudios.com 


Impressions. 


Inc, Bulimic; VVA'-y8l)q7, All Rjghts.RcsuWcd. 


aas Sierra On-Line, Inc. i^aiul/or dusignaie iradomarks of, or licciisutl to, Siurrn On,^.iiic, 










SI 







Things to vo ~Tov>Ar 


I. RoUNP up PRTSOl^RS for -the EtLOM PT-TS. 

II. VasTT Forum -to assess carry’s ftm/wces. 

III. F^-T^CE OOAVa^^ -TO -THE PEOPCE (a. AP0Ra^«. FAShW. 

IV. HtiRe votce coach -to heup pRac-ttlce evtu uaugh-teR. 

V. FWt urcTH chief /KinxiEC-r/zmasAAs -to ITISCUSS N^O C^UOSSES-M. 

VI. SeNP RrCVAU A BASKET- OF POISONED FRU^. 

VII. Inspect csuapo^oRs foR -thts ThuRspat’s bcoopfest 

"THE 

VIII. couuectoRs. 

IX. Lecture pubutc on benefits of pRocReattng. 

X. H^RE VTGOIUS TO PATROU -THE SL.UMS. 

XI. t-Wr CueoP^TtRA for pinner (-mas mtsht 6e -th. htsktD 

XII. StASE a fumat -thong to HA=PEN cN the uiat to -the FoRUH. 


XllX. ABS0L.u-rEL.y pon t foRGET to 


STRATEGY/WARGAMES 


CGW Reviews Index 

These Are the Games We Have Reviewed in the Last Three Months 

1 Game 

Publisher 

Month 

Page 

CGW Rating 

fiattlezone 

Activision 

June 

184 

■Ar ^ i ^ ^ 

Deathmatch Maker 2 

Virtus 

June 

195 

A A * ★ A 

Die by the Sword 

Interplay 

August 

174 

-A -k A ■'< 

Forsaken 

Acclaim 

August 

178 

A A A A A 

PI Interstate '76: Arsenal 

Activision 

June 

189 

A A A A A 

Ep Grand Theft Auto 

ASC Games 

July 

152 

A A A A * 

Hexen 11: Portal of Praevus 

Activision 

July 

148 

A A A ^ 

IP Juggernaut 

Canopy Games 

June 

192 

A A A A A 

^1 Outwars 

Microsoft 

August 

176 

A A A A 

^1 Shadow Master 

Psygnosis 

July 

146 

A A A A A 

^1 Touring Car Championship 

Sega 

Jutte 

194 

A A A A' 

Ultimate Race Pro 

MicroProse 

July 

144 

A A A A A 

■ - j 

^P Black Dahlia 

Interplay 

July 

154 


^p Might & Magic VI 

3D0 

August 

180 


pp Of Light & Darkness 

Interplay 

June 

202 

A A A A A 

fP Tex Murphy: Overseer 

Access Software 

June 

197 

AAA 

_ 

HP Bridge Deluxe 11 with Omar Sharif 

Interplay 

August 

224 

A A A A A 

Creatures Life Kit #1 

Mindscape 

June 

260 

A A A A A 

Kuba 

Patch 

August 

224 

A A -k A A 

gP Mastermind 

Hasbro 

August 

224 

A A A A A 

|iP Pharaoh's Ascent 

Ambertech 

June 

260 

A A A A A 

H Star Trek Pinball 

Interplay 

June 

188 

A A A A A 

■ 

H F'15 

Jane's/EA 

July 

160 


H iF-22 Persian Gulf vS.O 

Interactive Magic 

July 

162 

A A A A A 

M-1 Tank Platoon 11 

MicroProse 

August 

185 

A A A A A 

HP Panzer Commander 

SSI 

August 

194 

A A A A A 

Search and Rescue 

Intense Entertainment 

June 

204 

A A A A A 


Deer Hunter 

WizardWorks/GT 

July 

166 

A A A A > 

Kl Kacing Simulation 

Ubi Soft 

July 

164 

A A A A A 

FIFA Road to World Cup yy 

EA Sports 

June 

208 

A A A A A 

BM Front Page Sports Ski Racing 

Sierra 

August 

214 

A A A A r. 

pj HardBall 6 

Accolade 

August 

208 

A A A 

PP High Heat 

3DO 

August 

204 

A A A A A 

Ihe bolt Pro 

Empire 

August 

211 

A A A ^ 

Triple Play 99 

EA Sports 

August 

202 

A A A A A 

World Cup 98 

EA Sports 

August 

201 

A A A A A 


. Armor Command 

Ronin Entertainment 

June 

245 

A A A A A 

ChronX 

Dark Reign Expansion... Shadowhand 

Genetic Anomalies 

August 

220 

A A A A 

Activision 

July 

195 


Deadlock II 

Accolade 

June 

257 

A A ' ^ 

Dragoon 

Art of War 

July 

197 


East Front Campaign CD 1 

TalonSoft 

July 

195 


Great Battles of Julius Caesar 

Interactive Magic 

July 

184 


Liberation Day 

Interactive Magic 

August 

221 


Semper Fi 

Interactive Magic 

June 

254 

A A A /. 

Soldiers at War 

SSI 

August 

216 


StarCraft 

Blizzard 

July 

168 


Star Wars Rebellion 

LucasArts 

July 

172 

A A A A -A 

Storm in the West 

Schwerpunkt 

June 

258 

A A A a: V. 

Total Annihilation: Core Contingency 

Cave Dog 

August 

217 


WarBreeds 

Red Orb 

July 

189 


Warhammer; Dark Omen 

EA 

July 

178 



^.computergaming.com 


COMPUTER GAMING WORLD » SEPTEMBER 1998 


' uglTBna cntrted and own«d bj Draam Pod 9, Inc. Adhitloa U i re(lst«r«d tradenaili of Acthrfoion, inc. 9 1998 Acthritfoo, Im. AU rilllite 





AcUVisioH. 


REBUILT FROM TRE RATREGROUND UP. 

WWW.ACTIVIS10N.COM 
Go to #234 @ www.computergaming.com/infolmk 




REVIEW • UNREAL 


Real Close 

UNREAL Packs a Major Wallop, But Misses on Some Basics 


by Dan Fitzpatrick 

T he first thing you notice 
about UNREAL is the stun- 
ningiy reaiistic effects 
generated by Epic's pro- 
prietary "Fire Engine." 

You may find yourseif 
stopping repeatedly to 
gape, open-mouthed, at 
lava. You may accidentally drown 
while mesmerized beneath the 
beautifully undulating surface of a 
pond. The game has fog and mist, 
realistic halos around lights, awe- 
some textures — I could go on and 
on, but what's the point? Let's just 
say that everything you've heard 
about the engine is true. Of course, 
you'd better be packing a 3Dfx 
card. Without one, while the soft- 
ware rendering and frame-rates are 
impressive, you'll be missing a lot 
of what makes this game exciting. 


COMPUTER 

GAMING 


-VS^ORLD 





APPEAL 3D- 

shooterfans look- 
ing for the next 
big thing. 

PROS: Killer 
engine: tough 
monsters; great 
variety. 

CONS: 

Lackluster weapons; uneven level design; 
ho-hum multiplayer play. 

DIFFICULTY: Inlermediata 
REQUIREMENTS: Pentium 166 
{233MMX recommended), 16MB RAM, 
100MB hard-drive space, 4x CD-ROM, 
SVGA graphics. 3Dfx Voodoo or Voodoo^ 
recommended. 

3D SUPPORT: 3Dfx Voodoo and 
Voodoo^ (Voodoo Rush not supported), 
PowerVR. 

MULTIPLAYER SUPPORT: LAN 

and Internet (2-1 6 players); 1 CD per 
player. 

Price; S54.95 
Publisher: GT Interactive 
New York, NY 
(212) 72G-6500 





But even discounting the engine, 
UNREAL rocks. From a gameplay 
standpoint, UNREAL is as good or 
better than QUAKE II or JEDI 
KNIGHT. But it has enough prob- 
lems to keep it from achieving the 
greatness of which it was capable. 
The level design is great — awe- 
some in places— but it suffers from 
unevenness. The weapons have 
serious problems. Plus, the pace is 
pretty slow for the first few levels, 
so stay in tourist mode and enjoy 
the scenery. 

Color Me Busy 

The textures are expertly done 
and realistic— due in part to the 
fact that many began as photo- 
graphs of the real thing. But the 
often unrestrained use of color 
detracts from the textures. It's as if 
the UNREAL team looked at the id 
games and said, "Why is every- 
thing brown and gray?" and then 
went too far in the other direction. 
Admittedly, QUAKE II is a little col- 
orless, but it seems more realistic 
in the end, because UNREAL's 
bright, oversaturated colors contin- 
ually remind you that you're in a 
game. Also, many times, the game 
uses too many different textures in 
a given building or area, which cre- 
ates a jumbled-looking environ- 
ment that doesn't jibe with reality. 

Some of the levels were hard to 


churches — just about any environ- 
ment we've seen in a shooter is 
represented here, and the transi- 
tions are handled amazingly well. 

Just shoot Me 

The weapons array is problem- 
atic. UNREAL has more interesting 
weapons than QUAKE II, but there is 
too much variety (yes, that’s a nega- 
tive), and it's hard to tell which 
weapons are the most effective, 
even after playing for hours. Is the 
upgraded Dispereion Pistol more 
deadly than the Stinger? Which is 
more lethal: the Jelly Gun (the 
"GESBioRifle") grenades or the 8- 
Ball grenades? Dunno.This lack of 
clear hierarchy in weapons capabili- 
ties is a serious weakness. It's okay 
to have a multitude of different 
weapons as long as there's a clear 
reason to choose one over the other 


navigate, and there were four or 
five instances in which I actually 
had to get a pencil and paper to 
map the level in order to find my 
way out. That might add to the fun 
if you're expecting it, but i wasn't; 
and since I would map only after 
becoming completely frustrated, I 
didn't feel it was a positive aspect 
of gameplay. Cleverly concealed 
exits were part of the problem, but 
it was also because of intentional 
mazelike design, which 1 despise. 

On balance, however, many of 
the levels are extremely well done, 
and the game got much better as 
it went along. In my estimation, 
the highs of level design combined 
with the superior engine definitely 
exceed those of QUAKE 11. Another 
positive aspect 
of UNREAL's 


apparent "more 
is better" philos- 
ophy is the 
refreshing 
amount of vari- 
ety in level 
locale, which 
keeps the game 
interesting. You 
travel through 
mines, ancient 
temples, space 
ships, military 
bases, villages. 


COMPUTER GAMING WORLD » SEPTEMBER 1998 


«omputergaming.t 





UNREAL • REVIEW 


in a given situation; this is what 
makes tactical weapons choices a 
big part of the fun in a shooter. 

One huge miscalculation regard- 
ing weapons balancing is the 
Amplifier. Basically, it's a super quad 
damage that you can turn on and 
off. Judicious use (it runs out) lets 
you eas///dispatch almost all of the 
bosses in the game. Like the Invul- 
nerability power-up in QUAKE II, this 
basically ruins the game unless you 
choose not to use it, which requires 
uncommon discipline. 

Eat My Peashooter! 

By far the worst problem with 
the weapons, however, is their 
sound. Weapon sounds gotta be 
loud, much louder than the ambient 
sounds in the game. That's part of 
the fun of a gun; It goes Sang/The 
guns of UNREAL don't go Bang— 
they whimper. Also, many of the 
effects could have been much more 
dangerous-sounding. The worst is 
the Minigun. I assume it's supposed 
to be powerful since it took me 1 0- 
plus hours of gameplay to get it, 
but it sounds and inflicts damage as 
if it's shooting little packets of air. 

The GESBioRifle sounds like it's 
passing gas. 

Speaking of the GESBioRifle, 
which is (apparently) one of the 
most powerful weapons, 1 used it 
only as a last resort because I sim- 
ply hated it. Accustomed to the 
manly heft of rocket launchers and 
rail guns, I just couldn't see any fun 
in spitting little blobs of mint jelly 


at an attacking Skaarj, even when 
it would save my life. To make mat- 
ters worse, the monsters don't react 
audibly or visibly when hit by this 
weapon until they suddenly die. 

On a more positive note, all 
weapons have a secondary attack 
feature, which greatly enriches the 
tactical possibilities of battle. The 
rocket launcher (the nicely named 
"B-Ball Launcher" ) doubles as a 
grenade launcher in secondary 
mode, and the shrapnel gun turns 
into a shrapnel grenade gun, which 
is good when the enemy is farther 
away. An excellent feature, used 
well in N64's GOLDENEYE and also 
a popular QUAKE II mod, is the sec- 
ondary fire of the Assault Rifle: It's 
a variable-magnification scope 
view, excellent for picking off 
patrolling Krall from a distance. 

Some of the dissatisfaction with 
UNREAL's weapons fades after a 
few hours of gameplay and, sound 
notwithstanding, there are some 
gratifying weapons here. I learned 
to love the RazorJack, which makes 
a very nice shredding sound as it 
lops off a monster's head, leaving 
the monster groping comically for 
its lost noggin before expiring. 

A Little Too Smart 

It was hoped that UNREAL's Al 
would do new tricks (Steven Polge, 
creator of the Reaperbot QUAKE 
mod, is on the team), and to some 
extent it does. Mostly, though, the 
Al improvement consists of making 
the monsters faster. This is a big 





improvement over the pitifully slow 
beasts of QUAKE II, whom you 
could circle around and decapitate 
from behind. Not only can't you 
run in UNREAL, you also can't hide, 
and this is where the game baldly 
cheats: The monsters always turn 
to face you even when they can't 
see you, so when you reappear 
from behind a crate, they already 
have a rocket on the way. 

Some monsters are smarter than 
others, and Mercenaries, in particu- 
lar, seem to exhibit botlike tactics — 
even teamwork, in one battle with 
a pair of Mercs, which seemed to 
go on for minutes, one kept me 
pinned down with rocket fire while 
the other circled for a better angle, 
using an elevator in the process. It 
was a convincing and thoroughly 
involving fight, one I wanted to 
experience again immediately. 

The monsters have also learned 
to counter the common tactic of 
using the doorway to one's advan- 
tage. Usually you can just pick off 


monsters one by one as they come 
through, but these guys get in the 
room quickly and step to the side 
in order to let their buddies get 
through. Monsters also effectively 
used cover in some instances and 
retreated when near death. 

Although the Al is improved 
over that of QUAKE II, it's still 
inconsistent. Monsters often don't 
patrol, they just stay "frozen" until 
triggered, usually by being shot. 
Monsters who have taken cover 
often don't recognize that they are 
being pummeled from around the 
corner by grenades or razor blades, 
and are easily killed. 

Some things that should not be 
intelligent, are. Time after time I 
could not go through a door until I 
had killed a certain monster. What- 
ever happened to having a mon- 
ster drop a key? Doors that magi- 
cally unlock when a monster dies 
destroy the realism that designers 
are presumably working to create. 

Despite these criticisms, 
UNREAL's single-player game is as 
good as anything I've seen so far, 
and is arguably better. In the end, 
it's a matter of taste. But it had 
potential to be so much more. In 
addition to the single-player prob- 
lems, the hefty system require- 
ments (in the READ.ME file. Epic 
admits you'd be happiest with a 
Pentium II), lingering complaints 
of laggy Internet play, and less- 
than-thrilling multiplayer action 
(even on a LAN) drag this game 
back to reality. L'C'iVJ 


i^.computergaming.c 


COMPUTER GAMING WORLD » SEPTEMBER 1998 


You've witnessed some of the greatest moments in NASCAR's 50-year history. 







Some people will call it a collector’s item. The best selling, most realistic stock car sim 
“ NASCAR® Racing 2 — and the NASCAR®Grand National® Series Expansion Pack.Together 
in a special commemorative 50th Anniversary package from Sierra Sports. But to call it a 
collector’s item would be to miss the point. Racing. So peel those stickera. You know you want to. 


REVIEW • QUAKE II MISSION PACK: THE RECKONING 


Reckon We've 
Seen This Before 


The Latest QUAKE II Add-on Is No SCOURGE OF ARM AGON 


'm. 










LEAN, MEAN, AND GREEN You need the hefty Phalanx Cannon in order 

to take on the now-shielded Super Tank. 


by Thierry Nguyen 

laying this first official 
Mission Pack for QUAKE 
II is like watching a 
movie about unsung 
heroes in war. Sure, the 
original QUAKE II marine 
may have wasted most 
of the Strogg army and 
assassinated their leader and 
hopped away, but he wasn't the 
only marine doing his job. QUAKE 
II: THE RECKONING shows you the 
story of another marine (who was 
knocked off course during the 
drop) and his hefty contribution to 
the cause. 

Colonial Marines Are 
the Baddest 

RECKONING puts you through 
four hubs, with a grand total of 18 

computer' 1 

GAMING 

R L O 




APPEAL QUAKE 
II junkies. 

PROS: Nice level 
design; one nice 
weapon addition; 
good elements of 
changing architec- 
ture; one cool new 
enemy. 

CONS: More of the same; the other 
new enemy and weapon aren't so hot; 
the improved QUAKE II enemies are a fait 
too plentiful in some levels. 
DIFFICULTY; Intemediate. 
REQUIREMENTS: Pentium 90 or bet- 
ter, Windows 95, 16 MB RAM (24 MB for 
GLQUAKE II), 100MB hard-drive space. 

4x CD-ROM, Windows 95-<ompatible 
sound and video cards, original QUAKE II. 
3D SUPPORT: OpenGL 
MULTIPLAYER SUPPORT; TCP/IP 
and LAN (2-16 players); 1 CD per player. 
Price: $29.95 
Publisher: id Software 
Dallas, TX 
(800j idgames 



levels. These hubs cover 
goals such as securing your 
position, coordinating an 
air strike, stowing away on 
a freighter, and destroying 
a hidden moon base, Seven 
new DeathMatch levels 
offer variety, and you can 
even play through the 
game cooperatively. 

The level designs flow a 
little better than those in 
the original game — so it's 
harder to get lost or side- 
tracked — and the design- 
ers have played around 
with the architecture by 
using collapsing beams, 
falling stalactites, and an 
exploding refinery. Outdoor envi- 
ronments feature decent-looking 
canyons and caves, pushing the 
limits of the QUAKE II engine. 
Overall, RECKONING offers more 
levels with some nice additions 
evident in the later levels: 1 found 
the Moonbase level with its cav- 
ernous interior and lower gravity 
to be particularly fun. 

Double Your Fun— 
Maybe 

RECKONING gives you two new 
weapons, two new items, and 


two new enemies. Of the two 
new weapons, one is a bit disap- 
pointing. while the other is very 
cool. The phalanx cannon is little 
more than a glorified rocket 
launcher; it will, however, satisfy 
those gamers annoyed with the 
standard rocket’s slow speed and 
reload rate. The ion ripper, on the 
other hand, has ricocheting pro- 
jectiles that work excellently in 
multiplayer games (and in smaller 
rooms in the single-player game). 

The two new items are pretty 
good. The Trap is a wonderful item, 
as it converts enemies 
into health cubes; sadly. 
Traps are rare to come 
by. The Quadfire item is 
also useful, because it 
quadruples your firing 
rate, making the rail gun 
easier to use and turning 
the chain gun and hyper 
blaster into true room- 
clearers. 

Only one of the new 
enemies is done well; 
the other could stand 
much improvement. The 
Gekk, inspired by 
Aliens, is the Fiend of 


QUAKE II. It has the added bene- 
fits of acidic blood, and it can 
heal itself if needed. Having a 
Gekk jump on you in the dark 
brings back the "Oh, crapl" fac- 
tor, and they also have a nice 
swimming animation. 

The Repairbot, though, proved 
to be a huge disappointment. 
Every one 1 saw just floated there. 
I did see one heal a dead enemy 
or two, but overall, in my experi- 
ence. their presence was min- 
imal — and forgettable. 

The rest of the enemies are 
buffed-up in terms of new 
weaponry or new shielding. The 
Super Tank now has shields, the 
gladiator has shield and a pha- 
lanx cannon, the Iron Maiden has 
seeking rockets, and even the 
grunt uses hyperblasters and 
accurate laser rifles. The enemies 
populated the levels, and at 
times, their sheer numbers and 
accuracy were a bit much, 

QUAKE II diehards should enjoy 
this Mission Pack. The rest of us 
have been there before, and the 
lure of one cool new weapon or 
enemy may not be enough to 
entice us back. 233 



GOING STROGG HUNTING Uy the Trap 
on the floor like a mine and let it turn 
your foes into food. 




COMPUTER GAMING WORLD « SEPTEMBER 1998 


if.computergaming.c 





SPEC OPS: RANGERS LEAD THE WAY • REVIEW 


Rangers in the Rough 

Zombie's Ranger Game Isn't Quite So Special 


by Thierry Nguyen 

S pecial operations groups 
within the military have 
been the subject of 
numerous novels, films, 
and even games: 
Remember EA's SEAL 
TEAM? SPEC OPS: 
RANGERS LEAD THE WAY 
is the first of a planned series by 
Zombie Studios focusing on vari- 
ous special operations forces 
throughout the world, such as the 
Green Berets, the SAS, and even 
the SEALS. Problem is, the game 
does not live up to the standards 
of the forces it depicts — at least 
until you download the patch. 

Your Mission, Should 
You Choose to Accept It 

SPEC OPS takes place in various 
locations around the world, and 
the game is broken down into 

computer' 1 




APPEAL: 3fd- 
person action gamers 
into movies like Navy 
SSAlsor The Rock. 

PROS: Well-done, 
immersive environ- 
ment; realistic 
weapons and tools; 
has more gameplay 
than your average shooter. 

CONS; Bad software engine; annoying 
timer; you can control only two Rangers; 
no mapping; medioaeAl; needs patch. 
DIFFICULTY: Intermediate. 
REQUIREMENTS: Pentium 166, 

1 6MB RAM, Windows 95, 60MB hard- 
drive space, 8x CD-ROM, DirectX 5- 
compatible sound- and video cards, 
DirectX 5. 

3D SUPPORT: 3Dfx Glide. 

MULTIPLAYER SUPPORT: None 

Price: 149.95 

Publisher; Ripcord Games 

San Diego, CA 

(888) 797-5867 


www.ripcordgames.c 




DON'T EAT THE YELLOW SNOW Unlike the coloring effects in 
most shooters, those in SPEC OPS aren't there just for show; 
the Rangers are even appropriately outfitted. 


five phases, each having an over- 
all goal. A phase is then divided 
into three or four missions, which 
range from hostage rescue to the 
demolition of strategic targets. 
Before each phase, you get a 
video briefing and a list of objec- 
tives; you then pick two Rangers 
for the mission. 

SPEC OPS models outdoor ter- 
rain quite well in daylight and at 
night. Both Rangers and enemies 
are suitably outfitted for the envi- 
ronment in question, and the 
enemies even speak the correct 
language. The weapons sound 
authentic, and the small touches, 
such as a variety of sniper scopes, 
add to the overall immersion. 

The third-person perspective 
isn't anything new — and there 
are some DOOM-like aspects 
(such as picking up ammunition 
and medikits)— but SPEC OPS 
does require more strategy than 
is the norm for this genre. You 
can run around with guns blazing 
if you desire, but you'll soon find 
that it's better to exercise caution 
and stealth. 

Fire in the Hole 

It's disappointing, then, that 
several flaws creep in to prevent 
SPEC OPS from rising above the 
crowd. Rangers generally work in 


teams of four, yet you control only 
two Rangers at a time. Supposedly 
this is a control issue, but I usually 
found my Ranger buddy to be like 
a wingman in a flight sim. So, 


couldn't there be more than two 
Rangers, perhaps with you con- 
trolling the team leader? 

The Al needs some work. Both 
the Rangers and the enemy forces 
attempt to use terrain to their 
advantage, but often end up out 
of position. The computer oppo- 
nent also likes to fire weapons in 
the general direction of its foe, 
disregarding any obstacles (like 
walls) that make such actions 
useless. The timer is a bit on the 
aggravating side as well; it dis- 
courages exploration, and it's 
sometimes unfair. Also, those of 
us without a 3Dfx card (other 3D 
support is planned for a later 
patch) will be treated to a horren- 
dously slow software engine. 

After SPEC OPS' release, a 
series of patches fixed technical 
issues and featured vast- 
ly improved gameplay: 
randomized enemies, a 
more-forgiving timer, 
and better stealth 
modeling. I hope Zombie 
and Ripcord have 
learned their lesson, so 
that the initial release 
for their upcoming Green 
Beret game will be ready 
to play in Its initial 
release. 


v.computergaming.f 


COMPUTER GAMING WORLD ■ SEPTEMBER 1998 






1968, they changed the rules of 6rand Prix racing 
to cut down on driver fatalities. 


LEGENDS " 

C1998 Sierra On-Line, Inc. •and " deagnaie Irademarks ol, or liewised to. Sierra On-Uoe, Inc., Bellevue, WA 98007. Al reserved. Papyrus" and the www.sierrasports.com 
Papyrus logo are trademarta o( Papyrus Design Group. Inc. All other trademarte are the property ol their respective owrwts andare used under permission. 


Powered by 


itrauffiti'ii 



ss - ^.,0 . ... . ■■■' 






Welcome to 1967. 


Pulling out of a power slide. The g-forces throwing you around the cockpit. You realize, 
you’re sitting behind the truest 3D engine ever built. Racing the likes of Jack Brabham and 
Jim Clark. At Monza, Spa and Nurburgring. 1967 was a historic turning point in Formula 
One racing. Welcome to Grand Prix Legends''^. Racing sims wilt never be the same. 




REVIEW • MONSTER TRUCK MADNESS 2 



Off-road Obstacles 


MONSTER TRUCK MADNESS 2 Improves on the 
Original— But the Lack of Tournaments Is a Real Drag 


by Scott May 

hen you first fire 
up your engine, 
Microsoft's 
MONSTER TRUCK 
MADNESS 2 
(MTM2) seems 
like more fun than 
a new set of mud 
flaps. It's a definite improvement 
over the original MONSTER TRUCK 
MADNESS, though it can't match 
the sophistication of CART 
PRECISION RACING, Terminal 
Reality's other title for Microsoft. 

MFM2 includes 14 tracks: 11 
single-player rally and circuit races, 
and 3 multiplayer arena tracks. 

computer'' 1 

CSAMIM^ 




APPEAL: 

Racing fans 
who enjoy get- 
ting down and 
dirty. 

PROS: 

Improved 3D 
graphics, sound, 
and performance: nice variety of tracks 
and trucks: excellent controls; multiplay- 
er arena duels. 

CONS: Repetitive action; limited vehi- 
cle setup: no track editor; no tournament 
or drag race mode. 

DIFFICULTY: Intermediate. 
REQUIREMENTS: Pentium 133 (sup- 
ports Pentium II MMX with AGP), 
Windows 95/98/NT, 16MB RAM (32MB 
recommended), 30MB hard-drive space, 
4x CD-ROM drive (6x recommended), 
SVGA graphics, mouse; supports radng 
wheels/p^als, force-feedback devices, 
and Windows 95-compatible sound 
cards and joysticks. 

3D SUPPORT: Direct3D, 
MULTIPLAYER SUPPORT: Modem 
(2 players): IPX or TCP/IP (2-8 players); 

1 CD per player. 

Price: $54.95 
Publisher: Microsoft 


Redmond, WA 
(206) 882-8030 






90 



Rallies tend to include more off- 
road obstacles, such as water, 
rocks, and mud; circuit tracks, more 
flat-out racing. Both circuit and 
rally races can be set up to 20 laps 
in length. The solo tracks range 
from the mundane Farm Road 29 
to the maniacal Breakneck Ridge, 
with the occasional touch of fan- 
tasy (The Graveyard and Voodoo 
Island). Regardless of the setting, 
each course is reasonably long and 
heavy on variety. In other words, 
even the most jaded off-roader will 
find long-term challenges here. 

King of the Hill 

New to the series are multi- 
player courses, which feature an 
arena-style setting in which up to 


eight gamers compete in thumb- 
blistering action. Measured in min- 
utes (up to 20) instead of laps, the 
emphasis here isn't on beating the 
track, but rather beating up on 
your opponents to become King of 
the Hill. It's rowdy and fun, but 
ultimately less satisfying — and infi- 
nitely more claustrophobic — than 
the outdoor venues. 

Unfortunately, the designers left 
out two exciting racing options 
from the original game: drag races 
and tournaments. Okay, drag rac- 
ing in monster trucks is no great 
loss, but tournament play — the 
ability to create a custom mix of 
drag, rally, and circuit races — is 
sorely missed here. However, with 
the exception of drag races, you 

can use any of the origi- 
nal game's courses in 
MTM2, with a slight 
degradation in graphic 
quality. 

Graphics in MTM2 
are much more polished 
than those of the origi- 
nal, which suffered from 
polygon clipping, horrif- 
ic terrain pop-ups, and 
perfunctory 3D effects. 
This time out, gamers 
have a choice of soft- 
ware-only rendering. 


BIG TRUCK, TINY TOOLS Even in an 
arcade racer, monster truck fans 
deserve more than MTM2's limited 
vehicle setup options. 


Direct3D, or 3Dfx hardware accel- 
eration. On a Pentium 233 MMX 
with Monster 3D and all graphic 
amenities turned on, MTM2 ran 
extremely smooth, with tight, 
responsive controls and high 
frame-rates. Nine new variable 
weather conditions — from blue 
skies to pitch black night, and 
everything in-between — not only 
spice up the visuals, but add more 
challenges, depending on the track. 

Road Wrassling 

Player controls are also much 
improved this time around, sup- 
porting force-feedback joysticks for 
the ultimate off-road kick. I also 
found InterAct's UltraRacer PC, a 
joystick-mounted mini-steering 
wheel, to be especially responsive. 
On the other hand, truck setups 
are limited to transfer gear ratios, 
tread depth, and suspension 
strength. So, if you're looking to 
tweak your vehicle in NASCAR- 
style detail, it's likely you'll be very 
disappointed. 

MTM2 does feature nine new 
truck designs — including some 
based on WCW and NWO 
wrestling characters (along with 11 
trucks from the original). Unlike 
vehicles from the first game, these 
nitro-fueled mutations now show 
damage (especially in multiplayer 
arena competition), which eventu- 
ally impedes performance. 

There are a lot of things to like 
about this sequel, but leaving out 
several of the best features from 
the original puts you behind the 
wheel of a mediocre racer. In par- 
ticular, a promised track editor that 
would have added considerable 
legs to this game failed to make 
the final release. In the end, 
MONSTER TRUCK MADNESS 2 won’t 
quite get you to hog heaven, but 
it's the best rough-and-tumble rac- 
ing game thus far. 233 


COMPUTER GAMING WORLD • SEPTEMBER 1998 


i/.computergaming.e 




ARMY MEN • REVIEW 





WHO NEEDS CAMOUFLAGE? 
Your trusty green army 
men defend bridges over 
rivulets, make tiie desert 
even less hospitable, and 
firefight at close range In a 
train station. 


down, the game 
is enjoyable, as 
you guide your 
loyal greenies 
against tan, blue, 
and gray ene- 
mies, all of 
whom have dif- 
ferent styles of 
attack and 
defense. 

There are 
power-ups in the form of flame- 
throwers, grenades, air support, and 
more scattered throughout the 
clever missions, which take place 
over a variety of terrain types. It's 
tough, for example, to dig enemies 
out of the alpine 


Plastic Explosives 


ARMY MEN Has Great Appeal, Lousy Controls 


should be. Enemy soldiers are often 
placed where you must kneel or 
otherwise contort your soldier in 
order to shoot them. Even then you 
suffer through a random factor 
determining whether you hit your 
targets — whiie they rarely miss 
you. And call me a lame PC action 
gamer if you must, but why can't I 
save whenever I want? 

If We Had a General, 
We'd Win This War 

Neat as the little plastic toys are, 
you can't help but wonder why 3D0 
didn't use hilly 3D models and sup- 
port the major 3D accelerators. Pius, 
we've seen a lot of this before. 
Origin's CRUSADER had smoother 
controls (and better rolling moves) 
two yea5 ago, and even mediocre 
fighting games make better use of 
the PC keypad. Ali of which makes 
you wonder what the 3D0 folks 
were thinking when they devised 
such a lame interfacaYou can't 
change the mouse control, and it’s 
amazing tliat there's no gamepad 
support, since 3D0 was founded as 
a console company. 

If, like me, you find yourself 
entranced by the subject matter, 
ARMY MEN will make a fun diver- 
sion. Otherwise, wait for a patch, 
and hope that 3D0 buys a clue 
before the inevitable sequel. K'I'.v 


be taking the physics of burning 
plastic too seriously, but it put me 
in the mood for miniature com- 
bat, and after getting out my 
bucket helmet and BB gun, I was 
ready for action. 

Move 'Em Out, Boys 

ARMY MEN starts out with a 
good tutoriai — which you'll badly 
need. As you take over Sarge (the 


game's main charaaer) and 
attempt to navigate the obstacle 
training course and turkey shoot 
setup, you'll likely consider return- 
ing the game to the store in frus- 
tration. ARMY MEN has one of the 
worst interfaces of any action 
game, a bizarre mouse/key combo 
that, in comparison, makes some 
fiight-sim controls seem easy to 
use. The best way to get around 
this is to use a 
joystick, but 
even then, be 
prepared 
to have 


your 
control buttons 
suddenly reset in 
the middle of a 


mission. 

Once you get 
the controls 


by Terry Coleman 

I hen I was growing 
I up, every kid had 
^ little plastic sol- 
diers that with- 
stood the rigors of 
total war. Season 
after season, we 
fought epic battles 
in sand lots, leaf piles, and freshly 
tilled soil. We lined up our sun- 
scorched heroes and shot them 
with BB guns, bombarded them 
with dirt clods, and blew them sky 
high with fireworks. So when I saw 
that 3DO was working on ARMY 
MEN — a game aimed squarely at 
my nostalgia bone — I couldn't 
wait to play it. 

I soon discovered that ARMY 
MEN lets you do things that we 
could only dream of as kids: torch 
enemy soldiers with flamethrow- 
ers, blow off their limbs with mor- 
tars, and call in air strikes. I 
thought the design team might 


COMPUTER^ 

CAMIMC 




APPEAL; Brings 
back the joy of toy j 
soldiers, with cooi , 
explosions. , 

PROS: Great con- I 
cept; clever mis- I 
sions; flamethrow- I 
ers and tanks are a I 
hoot; goodAI. 

CONS; Terrible interface; lame save 
routine; no 3D support. 

DIFFICULTY: Intermediate. 
REQUIREMENTS; Pentium 90, Win- 
dows 95, 16MB RAM, 115MB bard-drive 
space, 4x CD-ROM, Direct Draw SVGA 
graphics, Direa Sound-<ompaiible sound 
card; supports Directlnput peripherals. 
3D SUPPORT: None. 
MULTIPLAYER SUPPORT: TCP/IP 
and IPX (1-4 players); direct modem, 
serial port (1-2). 

Price: $39.95 
Publisher: 3D0 
Redwood City 
(650) 261-3000 


V computergaming, t 


COMPUTER GAMING WORLD ■ SEPTEMBER 1998 





I 


REVIEW • THE X-FILES GAME 


X Almost Hits the Spot 

X-Philes Will Appreciate This Decent Game More Than Most 



by Thierry Nguyen 

ell. we wanted to 
believe. But 
though THE X- 
FILES GAME looked 
at first to be a 
quality title with a 
good usage of its 
show license, it 
turns out, ultimately, to be just an 
average game with a high level of 
atmosphere for the X-phile. As a 
multimedia version of The X-Files, 
it does a decent job, picking up the 
pace near the end. As an actual 
adventure game, it screams "new- 
bie" — yet there are enough prob- 
lems to annoy even veterans of the 
adventure genre. 

THE X-FlLES GAME casts you as 
Special Agent Craig Willmore, a 
more or less by-lhe-book agent. As 
the game opens, you're simply 


minding your own business, doing 
your usual antiterrorism case, 
when your SAIC (Special Agent in 
Charge— the local boss) calls you 
in, and introduces Assistant 
Director Skinner. Skinner tells you 
that two important agents of his. 
Fox Mulder and Dana Scully, have 
been missing for three days, and 
were last seen in Seattle. Your task 
is to find them. 

Hard-core fans of the TV series 
may be able to guess what hap- 
pened to our favorite duo based on 
the intro, and they will most likely 
be right when all is revealed in the 
end. The more casual fan will be 
given a plot filled with conspira- 
cies, Russian mafia dealings, and 
government cover-ups that make 
up a good mythology episode (see 
the sidebar for how the game fits 
in the show's chronology). 


images are crisp while maintaining 
a decent frame-rate. 

The acting itself is generally 
solid, with the non-series actors 
doing a decent job overall. The 
actors from the TV show have 
quite minor roles, though. Mitch 
Pileggi (Skinner) is there only for 
the first few locations near the 
beginning of the game before fly- 
ing away, and he seemed a bit too 
standoffish; perhaps being in a 
game was too new for him. Gillian 
Anderson has quite a bit of on- 
screen time; both she and David 
Duchovny are seen near the end of 
the game, and they do surprisingly 
well. They bring a lot of the X-Files 
feel and humor to the game. The 
Lone Gunman (Tom Braidwood, 
Bruce Harwood, and Dean 
Haglund) and X (Steven Williams) 
have short but functional scenes. 
Fans of The Cancer Man (William B. 
Davis) will be disappointed to hear 
that he appears in only one brief 
scene, //you die in a certain way. 

Ennui A Deux 

The actual game is essentially a 
MYST-y FMV adventure. The navi- 
gation is like MYST in that you use 
the pointer to click around a series 
of screens, but the gameplay is a 
bit more traditional. Many of the 


puzzles are inventory- and dia- 
logue-based, in that you pick up 
the right items lying around and 
you either use them correctly or 
talk to others about them in order 
to progress in the game. 

Unfortunately, these puzzles are 
what drag the game down. There 
are, thankfully, no contrived clock- 
tower or water-machine-gear 
puzzles, but alas, there is a huge 
emphasis on hotspots. A lot hinges 
on collecting evidence and examin- 
ing it. It's finding the evidence that 
constitutes the bulk of the game, 
and, at times, it boils down to 
searching large locales for a few 



computer' i 

CSAMiniC 




APPEAL: 

Adventure new- 
bies and TheX- 
Files groupies. 

PROS: Very X- 
Files in atmos- 
phere; puzzles are 
well integrated 
into plot; excellent 
FMV segments; Duchovny and Anderson 
seem to fit in; excellent auto-note taker. 
CONS; Easy; annoying timed/action 
sequences; not enough save game slots; 
short; not as much screen time for 
X-Wes stars as desired. 

DIFFICULTY: Easy. 
REQUIREMENTS: Windows 95, 
Pentium 120, 16M8 RAM, 250MB hard- 
drive space, 4x CD-ROM, DirectX 
5.0-compatible sound and video cards. 
3D SUPPORT: None. 
MULTIPLAYER SUPPORT: None. 
Price; S49.95 
Publisher: Fox InieEaciiue 
Beuerly Hills, CA 

(310) 369-7000 


www.foxinteractive.c 



DOES IT HAVE RED-EYE 
REDUaiON? The camera 
needs to be used only once, 
and even at that time, it's 
not a requirement. 


The Bluescreen 
Where I Acted 

Before delving into the negative 
aspects of the game, 1 might as 
well comment on the acting, since 
it's obviously more important in 
this game than in most. The FMV 
in this game is first-rate. After 
installing QuickTime 3.0, you can 
play the cut-scenes in high-quality, 
24-bit video in letterbox format. 
These scenes actually look a lot 
cleaner and more professional than 
those of other games that feature 
FMV. The sets look real, and the 




Ek COMPUTER CAAAING WORLD -SEPTEMBER 1998 


iT.computergaming.c 









irs DA BOMB This bomb is one of a few annoying 
timed action sequences. At least you're not fiddling 
with wires, a la MYST. 


measly hotspots. What comes to mind is 
searching the warehouse on disc 2 for 
four pieces of evidence, or the large 
freighter; the Tarakan, for three items and 
one location in particular. I clicked and 
searched for a hotspot on eve/y screen 
until I struck gold. This was a case in 
which I knew exactly what to do, but 
doing it was what aggravated me. 

Also, there are a few inventory-based 
puzzles, but not enough. You hardly use 
the computer station on your desk, as 
only a few crucial puzzles are solved 
there. Most of it is just pure filler to round 
out the atmosphere. Your PDA is only 
good for two things: traveling and taking 
really good auto-notes (I found myself 
looking at these to get a hint as to what 
to do next). The email is minimal (it was a 
bit fun to forward random mail around 
and see what kind of reply I'd get), and 
the address book had no use whatsoever. 


The other various 
gadgets, like flash- 
lights, night-vision 
goggles, and the 
camera, were used 
once each for fun. 
Unlike SPYCRAFT, 
which had great puz- 
zles that made excel- 
lent use of the toys at 
hand, THE X-FILES has 
toys mostly for show. 

The Saved and 
The Loaded 

Another problem 
involves action sequences that will annoy 
some adventurers. The difficulty can be 
tweaked, and you can set the sequence to 
reload after every botched attempt, but 
still, I was often annoyed as I tried to fig- 
ure out what I was doing wrong or how I 
could shoot my weapon faster. 

The game's sequencing is another 
bummer. While the game allows you to 
travel anywhere in the course of the 
investigation, sometimes you have to do 
things in the right order in order to pro- 
ceed. I spent the longest amount of time 
in the game on disc 2, simply because I 
overlooked one small item. 

The game provides you with only 3 
save slots, which are simply not enough 
for an adventure game, i was hoping for 
1 0 slots, and I was cramped with 3. As for 
branching, the most it amounts to is how 
you die, and whether or not you get 
Astadourian (the female lead) in the end. 





THE EARTH IS 


MY MOTHER. 


ONLY 


THE EMPIRE STANDS 

BETWEEN HER AND THE CYBRID 

DARKNESS. THOSE WHO 

UNDERMINE THE EMPIRE BETRAY 

HUMANITY. MY BROTHER 
HAS BROKEN HIS 
HOLY OATH AND LEADS 

THE REBELLION. I WILL 

STRIKE HIM DOWN IN HUMANITY'S 

NAME. FOR I AM THE 


OF RETRIBUTION. 



v.computergaming.c 


COMPUTER GAMING WORLD * SEPTEMBER 1996, 


& 1998 Sierra OnTino, Inc. All riglils reserved. 










Call our new Ger 
Medieval hint line 
1-900-CALL-LiTH* 

^Available when 
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Today’s Show Topic: 

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3 

IPRODU 

C 

T 

IONS 






THE X-FILES CAME • REVIEW 



THE X-FiLES GAME is 
ultimately a novice level 
adventure game with a 
healthy dose of X-Files 
atmosphere, From the 
superimposed date, 
location, and time in the 
comer to the fact that 
you are playing a male- 
female duo— everything 
has an X-Files ke\ to it. 

A competent adventure 
gamer is looking at 
about 15 to 20 hours of 
gameplay, depending on 
how stuck you are look- 
ing fora hotspot, and 
how long you decide to fiddle with the 
gadgets to enhance the atmosphere. 

THE X-FiLES was too short and too 
easy, with the exception of some of the 
action sequences, but the atmosphere 


manages to pull the game up enough to 
earn an average rating. The ending hints 
at a sequel, and I hope for a more chal- 
lenging and less annoying game the next 
time around. K'I'.'i 



HONOR ISA 

SHAM WHEN IT STANDS 



O f course, some fans are wondering where the game fits in the 
X-Files mythology. Considering that X is still alive, and that the 
game involves the black oil but not the bees, the game's setting 
is definitely within the third season, taking place after the two-parter 
Piper Maru/Apocrypha and before Herrenvoik (when X dies). There is 
no grand insight into the workings of the black oil, but there is a nice 
twist involving the oil in the story. 

Also, the game has references both obvious and obscure for hard- 
core X-Files fans everywhere. I immediately recognized Jose Chung's 
novel. From Outer Space, but didn't notice how "Craig Willmore" was 
also the name of the boy mentioned in the "Hate him; wouldn't want 
to date him" scene from Syzygy. 


ON A PLATFORM OF 
SLAVERY. HERE ON MARS, WE'LL 

NEVER BOW OUR 

HEADS FOR THE IMPERIAL 
CHAIN - NEVER! IN THE END, 
FREEDOM'S THE ONLY 

TRUE LIGHT AGAINST DARKNESS. 

THE EMPIRE'S GOING TO 


HAVE TO LEARN THE 
HARD WAY: 



BLOOD AND STEEL 


i'.computergaming.f 


COMPUTER GAMING WORLD « SEPTEMBER 1998 


01993 Sierra On-Line. 


I rights res 











IN 2829, HUMANITY HAS SPREAD THROUGH 


THE SOLAR SYSTEM. WHEN CIVIL WAR 


BREAKS OUT, IT BURNS 


ACROSS WORLDS 








ON VENUS, MERCURY, AND A HOST OF 


MOONS, BROTHER is locked 


WITH BROTHER IN 


DESPERATE BATTLE, 


WWW.STARSIEGE.COM Dynam;x- 


[ignts leserved. S and TM designate trademarks cl or ircenseu to S'erta On-bne. Inc 

Go to #150 ® www.computergamlng.com/infolink 








■4i 


111 

I 




Q 






.V '' 

• : 






. ;• ■ 

t- ■■ 






REVIEW • STARSHIP TITANIC 


Lost in Space 

Diagnosing a Mad Spaceship Isn't the Fun Ride It Should Be 


by Charles Ardai 

here's a great bit early on 
in Douglas Adams' new 
game, STARSHIP TITANIC. 
You've just been shang- 
haied onto a derelict 
spaceship that is manned 
by a crew of eccentric 
robots who have asked 
for your help in fixing the ship's 
central artificial intelligence. 
Unfortunately, they have declared 
most of the ship off-limits to you 
because they've decided that you 
are a third-class passenger. In order 
to get upgraded to second class 
(and thereafter to firet class), you 
have to go to your third-class state- 
room deep in the bowels of the 
ship and collect an in-flight maga- 
zine awarding you a free upgrade. 

When you get to your room (no 
easy task), it's a minuscule, appar- 


CGMPUTEK 

GAMING 

WORLD 




appeal- 

hitchhiker’s 
Guide fans willing 
toput upwrth a 
frustrating inter- 
face to play in a 
Douglas Adams 
universe. 

PROS: 

Impressive visuals by Oscar-winning set 
designers; occasionally funny bits. 
CONS: Poorly designed, confusing 
interface; weak conversations with 
robots; too often, it's not really funny. 
DIFFICULTY: Easy. 
REQUIREMENTS: Pentium 100, 
Windows 95, 16MB RAM, 16Me hard- 
drive space. 4x CD-ROM, Windows-com- 
patible SGVA graphics, 1 6-bit sound 
card. 

3D SUPPORT: None. 
MULTIPLAYER SUPPORT: None. 
Price: S49.9S 

Publisher; Simon and Sdiusler 
New York, NY 

(888) 793-9972 


wvYW.starshiptitanic.c 





ently empty cube 
with a colorful 
Mondrian paint- 
ing on the back 
wall. When you 
start clicking on 
a control panel, 
the various 
squares and rec- 
tangles of the 
Mondrian paint- 
ing slide out into 
the room. The big 
red square is a 
comfy chair; the 
narrow white 
rectangle is a 
"floral enhance- 
ment" (a vase of 
flowers); and so 
on. Your room is so small that only 
certain combinations of its modular 
furnishings can be in use at any 
time. Your goal is to find and turn 
on the TV set (which will then 
announce your award), but it's way 
up at the top of the "painting." To 
get to it, you have to climb on the 
bed, but the bed can't support your 
weight unless you first open the 
dresser under it, and you can't 
open the dresser if you have the 
bed open, but you can’t fully close 
the bed if the TV is out. . .. I've 
changed some of the details so as 
not to give away the solution, but 
you get the idea. 

While the puzzle here is pretty 
simple, the conceit is clever, the 
visuals are fun, and the interface 
doesn't get in the way. It's neither 
a brilliant puzzle, as was getting 
the babel fish in Douglas Adams' 
1984 game THE HITCHHIKER'S 
GUIDE TO THE GALAXY, nor a bril- 
liant bit of mind-bending comedy, 
as was the biscuit gag in Adams' 
fourth Hitchhiker's novel — but it is 
a cute sci-fi riff on the classic state- 
room scene in the Marx Brothers' 

A Night at the Opera, and it did 
bring a smile to my face. 



WHAT'LL YOU HAVE, SIR? 
Weil, how about a bar with 
some nonplayer characters 
to talk to? 


A game full of such bits could 
be quite a lot of fun to play. Alas, 
there is a reason I've spent so 
much time talking about this one: 
Most of what comes after this 
scene (and everything that comes 
before it) falls short of this mark. 

Go Ahead and Panic 

Once upon a time, Douglas 
Adams made his living (and his 
reputation) with words: firat his 
radio script for Hitchhiker's, then 
the novels themselves, and finally 
his two text-only computer games 
for Infocom in the '80s. This was a 
good thing, because Adams, like 
Lewis Carroll before him, has a gift 
for making words do what he 
wants. Few people can create an 


entire surreal world with a few 
sentences the way Douglas Adams 
can, or can write laugh-out-loud 
satire like Douglas Adams, or use 
language in such marvelously out 
of kilter ways that you find yourself 
quoting them back to friends years 
later. ("The ships hung in the sky in 
much the same way that bricks 
don't" is a personal favorite.) 

But words are passe in current 
society, nowhere more so than in 
computer games. Text-only games 
have been out of fashion for 
roughly as long as mummification, 
but in the current post-MYST envi- 
ronment it's not even enough for 
adventure games to contain graph- 
ics; they have to contain abundant 
opulent gorgeous, soaring graph- 
ics, almost to the exclusion of any- 
thing else. So what did Douglas 
Adams do to give STARSHIP TITANIC 
the best chance it could have for 
success? He hired a pair of 
Academy Award-winning set 
designers and had them fill the 
game with opulent gorgeous, 
soaring graphics; rotundas and 
canals, entryways and exits, muse- 
um-sized exhibition rooms, and 
(once you get upgraded) huge 


COMPUTER GAMING WORLD » SEPTEMBER 199B 


/.coinputergaming.c 







STARSHIP TITANIC • REVIEW 




staterooms that look like some- 
thing out of a 1930s movie. Heaps 
of art-deco decorations, even on 
the robots. It’s a joy to look at. 
When being poled down the canal 
In a robot gondola, you'll go oooh. 

But "gorgeous" and "funny" are 
two very different things, and so 
are "gorgeous" and "playable." 

Too much of STARSHIP TITANIC is 
gorgeous, but it's neither funny nor 
playable. To begin with, it's hard 
just to find your way around. You 
move in discrete steps (in the fash- 
ion of ZORK NEMESIS rather than, 
say, DOOM), but the environment 
gives you too few visual clues to 
feel comfortable that you know 
what you're looking at from step 
to step. A disorienting blurring 
effect used between every two 
steps doesn't help either. 

No Room Service 

Too much of the time a move 
leaves you staring into a wall from 
what feels like three inches away. 
You can’t really get started in the 
game until you go to your room, 
which should be a simple matter of 
riding an elevator to the correct 
floor, but because of the three- 
inches-away graphic style, i spent 
hours wandering around the ship's 


central well hunting for the right 
elevator. The problem? The fact 
that there are two elevators on 
each side of the well rather than 
just one becomes apparent only if 
you walk past the elevators and 
then turn back twice. Othenwise 
you can see only one of the eleva- 
tors at a time (and since they look 
identical, you conclude that only 
one exists). This isn't clever puzzle 
design; it's just a pain in the ass. 

Later, when you get to your 
floor, you have to pick out the right 
room from a stacked set of cabins, 
but the way they're stacked will 
leave you bumping into walls and 
turning around and around in 
place. For a long time, I couldn't 
figure out how to get out of the 
elevator, simply because the door is 
drawn in a way that doesn't look 
like a door. Elsewhere in the game 
you use a "pellerator" for horizon- 
tal travel through the ship, but it's 
hard to figure out how to leave the 
pellerator, because the side with 
the exit looks exactly like the side 
that holds the control panel. "This 
is very confusing, I know," says a 
robot voice. It sure is. 

Once you figure out how to find 
your way around, you have to 
wrestle with the main interface, 
which has sepa- 
rate sections for: 
your inventory; 


Random Bits of Comedy 

Then there are the puzzles, 
which are a tolerable lot: The dis- 
membered waiterbot in the restau- 
rant wants different music playing 
and elsewhere you find a robot 
orchestra and a recording device; 
the bartender needs to make a 
cocktail containing a "pureed flock 
of starlings," and elsewhere you see 
birds flying around a fan; and so on. 
Some are easy, some hard, but none 
is especially funny. Meanwhile, ran- 
dom bits of comedy go on around 
you, as the ship's computer makes 
silly announcements, and a de- 
ranged parrot squawks "i don't like 
the roof of my mouth!" Douglas 
Adams himself crops up here and 
there, as the voice of this and the 
face of that. 

But for all the effort, the game's 
just not very funny. Where STARSHIP 
TITANIC excels is in beautiful visuals, 
and those are a dime a dozen in 
adventure games these days. The 
puzzles are a little better than aver- 
age, but just a little. It's unlikely that 
anyone will enjoy STARSHIP TITANIC 
half as much as Legend's uglier, but 
much funnier, CALLAHAN'S CROSS- 
TIME SALOON. 

It’s a shame, because Douglas 
Adams is such an enormous talent 
(not to mention a passionate and 
knowledgeable gamer), but it seems 
highly likely that this TiTANIC's suc- 
cess will resemble that of its nauti- 
cal, rather than that of its cinematic, 
namesake. 


the controls of external objects, 
such as the pellerator; and talking 
to the robots. The conversation sys- 
tem, hyped on the game's packag- 
ing as a "cutting-edge natural-lan- 
guage text parser, enabling com- 
plex and entertaining conversa- 
tions," is the biggest disappoint- 
ment. While it is true that you can 
type in plain English sentences and 
get some response from the 
robots, the robots seem to under- 
stand very little of what you say to 
them, judging by how often they 
dodge your questions, interject non 
sequiturs, and generally carry on 
like first cousins to the venerable 


natural-language hoax "Eliza." You 
end up trying to think of some- 
thing to say that the robots might 
possibly understand, but you usual- 
ly fail. And, anyway, how much is 
there that you might conceivably 
want to discuss with the robots? 
After, "What's going on?" and 
"Can you help me with X?" it's not 
like you're going to start chatting 
about Sartre. 


www.compuleigaming 


COMPUTER GAMING WORLD » SEPTEMBER 1998, 



REVIEW • SANITARIUM 


Crazy, Man 



SANITARIUM Isn't Exactly a "Good Time, " But Its an Awesome Adventure 


by Jeff Green 

ow this is a case of 
good timing. At exactly 
the moment when I 
was beginning to com- 
pletely despair for 
adventure games, along 
comes a title that 
renews my faith in the 
genre. SANITARIUM, designed by 
DreamForge Intertainment (makers 
of ANVIL OF DAWN and 
CHRONOMASTER) is a compelling, 
original, and affecting story, one 
that reminds you that adventure 
games — at their best — can pull at 
your heart and brain as solidly as 
any motion picture. And, for me, 
this one does it better than any 
adventure game since GABRIEL 
KNIGHT II. 

The opening cut-scene sets the 
story. A man, sitting at his comput- 
er, makes a phone call, excitedly 

compcixer' 1 




APPEAL: 

Adventure gamers 
liungerng for a 
serious, deep 
story. 

PROS; 

OuCtanding plot 
and design; good 
integration of 
puzzles into gameworld; striking graph- 
ics and music that realize the game's dis- 
turbed vision. 

CONS: Some navigational annoyances; 
bad game-stopping bug (now patched); 
weak voice-acting; a few action 
sequences may frustrate some game5. 
DIFFICULTY: Easy. 
REQUIREMENTS: Pentium 90, 
Windows 95, 16MB RAM, 30MB hard- 
drive space, 4x CD-ROM drive, 1 MB PCI 
video card, mouse. 

3D SUPPORT: None. 
MULTIPLAYER SUPPORT: None. 
Publisher; ASC Games 
Stamlard, CT 
(203)327-3366 


v.ascgame&com 






reporting that he has made a 
breakthrough on a problem he has 
been researching. He heads off in 
his car — but it's been sabotaged, 
and he careens off a cliff. When he 
awakes, he finds himself covered in 
bandages and apparently the resi- 
dent of a horridly nightmarish 
insane asylum — with no memory 
of who he is or how he got there. 

This is the situation in which the 
game puts you, as you assume his 
identity and try to cope with the 
circumstances. Who are you? 

Where are you? How much of this 
is really happening and how much 
is merely in your mind? Now, it 
might not sound like the most orig- 
inal idea for a game, but where the 
story goes, and how it gets there, is 
unexpected and cool — all of which 
compels you to keep playing. 

Walk This Way 

SANITARIUM, a three-CD game 
that plays faster than most single- 
CD games, is divided into nine 
chapters, with each chapter taking 
place in a different setting. Some 
locales are in "reality"; some are 
not — and it's not always clear 
which is which. 


The game is linear in the 
extreme: You cannot advance to 
the next chapter without complet- 
ing the current one, and in each 
chapter most puzzles need to be 
completed in a particular order. So 
if you're stuck, you're stuck. That's 
the bad news. The good news is 
that the game is relatively easy 
(actually, very easy for experienced 
adventure gamers), so nothing 
should hold you up for very long, 
assuming your synapses are firing. 

The puzzles themselves take the 


form of every adventure gaming 
puzzle you've ever tackled: object 
manipulation, code deciphering, 
logic, tone puzzles — even a few 
lightweight action sequences. Like 
the plot, the puzzles aren't partic- 
ularly original or ground-break- 
ing, but they are extremely well 
integrated into the structure and 
mood of the game. Even when I 
had to fix a broken piece of 
machinery (something I loathe), it 
was within a logical context in 
the gameworld. Nothing ever 
feels like dumb, gratuitous puzzle- 
solving. Well, I take that back. The 
action sequences did feel dumb 
and gratuitous, and I'm not exact- 
ly sure what the designers were 
trying to accomplish. Mercifully, 
they're brief and not too tough. 

Toys in the Attic 

To match its subject matter, 
SANITARIUM features an appropri- 
ately grim and disturbing graphic 
look. The isometric views are 
detailed and atmospheric, effec- 
tively conveying the main charac- 
ter's often outrageous, altered 
states. And while the backgrounds 
remain static, the numerous small 
touches — an empty can rolling 
down a street, for example — help 
to bring the scenes to life. 


COMPUTER GAMING WORLD ♦ SEPTEMBER 1998 


^.computergaming.< 





THArs GOHA HURT tmpaled 
bodies are among the grue* 
some visuals found through- 
out tile game. This one is def- 
initely not for kids. 


As you solve puzzles, the game 
rewards you with a steady stream 
of cut-scenes — most are either 
flashbacks or pieces of remem- 
brance — that flesh out the unpre- 
dictable story without ever giving 
too much away. The cut-scenes, 
which play out in 3D graphics in 
letterbox form, are noirish, 
moody, and eminently satisfying. 

"Disturbing" actually just 
begins to describe SANITARIUM. 
Though the game has a "Teen" 
{13 and up) rating on the box, be 
forewarned that the subject mat- 
ter and imagery are not for the 
squeamish. Like Harlan Ellison's 
I HAVE NO MOUTH, AND I MUST 
SCREAM, this is most definitely for 


adults. Images such as impaled 
bodies, deformed children, and 
the like abound — and some of 
the puzzles themselves (like dig- 
ging up the body of a dead child) 
put you into the main character's 
private psychological hell. 

For those who can take it, 
though, the payoff is immense. 
The chapter set in "the Mansion," 
in which a young girl explores a 
house full of ghosts, is actually 
sad; and by the end it achieves a 
moment of emotional resonance 
that I've never before encoun- 
tered in a computer game. 

Rocks 

SANITARIUM is not, however, 
without its problems. 

The biggest bummer is a hor- 
rendous bug that stops many 
people's game (including mine) 
dead in Chapter 2. You must 
download the patch from ASC 
Games' Web site before you 
start playing (the company 
reports that the patch is being 
included in newer boxed 
copies), or you'll have to start 
your game over. 

Navigation can be a bit 
annoying. You manipulate the 


main character by holding down 
the right mouse button, but it's 
sometimes difficult to get where 
you want to go, or to know 
where you're even supposed to 
go or how to get there. Worse, if 
you accidentally click on a stair- 
case, you trigger a "walk 
up/down staircase" script that 
you can't interrupt. There are 
also some pixel-hunting puzzles 
that could have benefited from 
larger, or easier to see, hotspots. 
The one time I got really stuck 
in the game wasn't because I 


didn't know the puzzle 
answer— it was because I never 
discovered the dang pixel that 
would let me do what I knew 
was the right answer. 

Some bad voice-acting also 
mars the game — unfortunately, 
most is from the main character, 
whose overacting and bad tim- 
ing almost wrecks it. I say almost 
because the story is strong 
enough to carry you through. 

Finally, while the game main- 
tains a creepy tone and is excel- 
lently paced, I couldn't help 




feeling that it petered out a lit- 
tle toward the end, especially in 
the Aztec section, which was far 
closer to MYST-clone blather 
than anything I would've 
expected in a game this good. 

Dream On 

In the final analysis, it's just 
too hard to seriously come 
down on a game that does so 
much right, and which — in 
terms of both subject matter 
and presentation — soars head- 
and-shoulders above everything 
else in the adventure genre. If 
you can deal with the often hor- 
rific subject matter and imagery 
and can get past the minor 
annoyances, then SANITARIUM is 
well worth the money, especially 
for anyone who has been long- 
ing for a serious, adult game. 
Flaws aside, SANITARIUM is the 
best adventure game released 
so far this year. 


/.computergjfning.< 


COMPUTER GAMING WORLD » SEPTEMBER 1998 



REVIEW • TEAM APACHE 


Copter Command 

Leadership Is the Key to Success in This Helicopter Sim 


by Robin G. Kim 

( ampaigns in most combat 
flight sims are purely 
episodic affairs. You get 
briefed, fly a sortie, get 
debriefed, then repeat the 
cycle. There is nothing 
wrong with this formu- 
la — many classic titles 
have employed it to excellent 
effect — but original it is not. 

Enter TEAM APACHE, a sim that 
subtly transcends this shopworn 
convention by bridging the gaps 
between missions with seamlessly 
integrated gameplay rather than 
with mood-breaking intermissions. 
As the commander of a U.S. Army 
AH-64A Apache attack helicopter 


COMPUTER^ 

GAMING 

wo R L D 




APPEAL: Flight- 
sim gamers who 
are willing to sacri- 
fice hard-core real- 
ism for a novel 
and atmospheric 
sim that mixes 
leadership respon- 
sibilities with mis- 
sions that are action-oriented. 

PROS: Interesting campaign storylines; 
well-crafted missions; involving interac- 
tions with crew members; excellent 
sound effects and 3D-accelerated graph- 
ics; good use of digitized speech 
throughout; powerful mission builder. 

, CONS: Somewhat jerky flight-model 
feel; no mission recorder; lackluster 
frame rate without a 3D card; campaigns 
rather short. 

DIFFICULTY: Intermediate. 
REQUIREMENTS: Pentium 133, 

1 6MB RAM, 250MB hard-drive space, 4x 
CD-ROM drive, 2MB graphics card, 
sound card. 

3D SUPPORT: 3Dfx, ATI Rage Pro, 
Rendition Verite 2100/2200, Direct3D. 
MULTIPLAYER SUPPORT: Modem, 
serial cable, LAN, Mplayer (2-8 players); 

1 CO per player. 

Price: S49.95 
Publisher: Mindscape 
Navaio, CA 
(415) 895-2000 





company, your job isn't over when 
the aircraft land: It's just beginning. 

Unless you choose to deactivate 
the game's crew-management 
option, you have a huge responsi- 
bility even before you start either 
of TEAM apache's two cam- 
paigns — you have to pick your 
flight crew: 8 pilots and 8 copilot/ 
gunners (CP/Gs) from a pool of 32 
candidates. As you flip through the 
dossiers, each of your potential 
crew members introduces himself 



in a unique voice. Their tempera- 
ments range from enthusiastic to 
coolly professional to downright 
grouchy ("My call sign's 'Pluto.' 
That's after the god of the Under- 
world.. .not the damn dog."). While 
the deliveries are definitely "Holly- 
wood," the exaggerated accents 
and mannerisms give each crew 
member a distinct character. 

Once the campaign is under 
way, you carry out command duties 
on the ground in realtime. These 
include ongoing personnel man- 
agement, allocating repair tasks to 
maintenance crew chiefs (this can 
be automated), tracking spare 
parts, and planning missions. Being 
the boss in this sim is no picnic. 

The burden of command weighs 
heavily indeed when your entire air 
crew is exhausted and half are 
physically ill from combat stress, 
your maintenance team is spent 
from working through the night 
trying to make your damaged birds 


flyable again, and you haven't 
recovered from the previous flight 
before a new mission is handed 
down from above. 

Hot Spots 

TEAM apache's two campaigns 
consist of sequences of scripted 
missions. The first pits your compa- 
ny team against drug cartels and 
Marxist guerrillas in Colombia. The 
second (which can be played only 
after completing the first) deploys 
you in support of a NATO effort to 
repulse a Russian assault through 
Latvia. Although the campaigns 
are essentially linear, damage and 
casualties do carry forward across 
flights, and search-and-rescue mis- 
sions are called after any Apaches 
are shot down. 

The second campaign is longer 
and considerably more difficult 
than the first. Not only are the 
Russians better equipped than the 
Colombians (the Russians have got 
mobile SAM and AAA vehicles 
while the guerrillas are toting 
rifles), but your men also don't 
seem to get any rest between cam- 
paigns — they arrive in Latvia dead 
tired, and go downhill from there. 



PAN AND SCAN The free- 
panning virtual-cockpit 
view in TEAM APACHE fea- 
tures a fully functional 
instrument panel. 



I EAM APACHE comes with 

a mission builder utility 
( capable of producing 


' stand-alone scenarios that are 
1 as elaborate as the ones 


included in the game. Each 
group of friendly and enemy 
units placed on the map can 
be issued several types of 
orders. Basic orders are a 
sequence of commands that 


are followed by a default. Each ; 
command can call for a unit to = 
remain in place, advance, 
implement a mobile defense, 
trigger another unit to do J 
something, conduct an artillery ; 

YContlnued on pg 242 : 


CO/V1PUTER GAMING WORLD ■ SEPTEMBER 1998 


; eomputergoming.c 







SOUTHPEAK' 


REVIEW • TEAM APACHE 


NIGHT LIFE 

The only practical cockpit 

view option at night 

the full-saeen 

PNVS (Pilot's X 

Night Vision / 

Sensor) dis- / 
play, fore- / 
ingyouto | 
switch 1 ^ 

views \ . :m.. 

when you \ 
wantto \ " - 

check your \ 
instruments. 

The PNVS image ^ 
dims realistically after 
bright flashes from rockets 
or explosions. 



ROCKET MAN Your available 
weapon types include two 
types of unguided rockets, 
laser-guided Hellfire mis- 
siles, Stinger air-to-air mis- 
siles, and the integral 30mm 
chain gun. 



FLIGHT PLAN The mission 
planner gives you consider- 
able flexibility in customiz- 
ing your route and default 
rules of engagement. The 
only major shortcoming is 
that you're not able to split 
your team among multiple 
flight paths. 


You receive scenario back- 
grounds, text briefings, detailed sit- 
uation reports, and occasional 
newspaper clippings; and all are 
exceptionally well done. Less linear 
than the missions themselves, this 
intelligence varies according to 
how your team is doing while 
imparting a sense that you are only 
one part of a larger war machine. 


Construction Zone 


I barrage, and so on. Four 
^types of contingency 
.^orders can also be 
given. These 

( specify what 
command 
i sequences 
! should be 
' executed 
f when the unit 
^ encounters ene- 
mies, takes fire, 
suffers casualties, or 
receives a trigger event 
from another unit. 

With these tools, you can 
stage a variety of land battles, 
with opposing ground forces 
merrily blasting away at each 

Apart from the campaigns, the 
game features an instant-action 
mode, interactive training missions, 
and 16 single missions, as well as 
a flexible mission builder to let you 
create more. Multiplayer options 
include deathmatch, capture the 
flag, convoy attack/defense, and 
cooperative single missions (but 
not campaigns). 

There Is No "I" in Team 

The commander himself doesn't 
fly any combat sorties, so during a 
mission you will assume the per- 
sona of whichever pilot was 
assigned to the lead gunship. 
Barring shortages of air crew or fly- 
able helicopters, you can choose to 
allocate two, four, or six aircraft for 
any particular flight. You get to 
select weapon loadouts only as 
you ready for campaign missions, 
and all of your Apaches must be 
configured identically. 

The list of wingman commands 
is extensive, allowing you to direct 
your wingmen collectively or in 
groups. Maintaining enough situa- 
tional awareness to exploit this 
tactical freedom can be difficult, 
however. Though part of the prob- 
lem is true to life (the "A" model 
Apache simulated here lacks 
radar), much of the blame rests on 
communication limitations in the 
sim. Wingmen cheerfully state their 
relative positions when you ask 


^Continued from pg 2AQ ■: 

other using guns and antitank t 
guided missiles. Their shots | 

are not very accurate, but the ; 
fireworks make an exciting j 

backdrop for a gamer's fiight. | 
For added spice, enemy attack c 
helicopters or artiiiery support 
for the gamer can aiso be ' 

thrown In. j 

The interface is easy to \ 

use, enabling you to whip up ^ 

a custom mission in just a 
few minutes; and the group 
copy and paste feature faciii- 
tates the creation of larger 
scenarios. For those who 
enjoy tinkering, this utility 
can significantiy extend the 
iife of the game. 

them, and they will report in when 
they spot targets — now if only you 
could get them to tell you where 
those targets are! 

TEAM apache's flight model is 
simplified, with a kind of "super 
ground effect" helping you avoid 
high-speed ground contact, but 
overall aircraft performance seems 
believable. The feeling of flight 
would be good if not for a strange 
jerkiness that makes it difficult to 
execute smooth, gentle turns. 
Avionics modeling is fairly accurate 
functionally, though it does lack 
the painstaking attention to detail 




; Tim* n tfltvica: 7 yri 
Timt « AH.e4: a yr* 
Slalut; Usriltd 


found in LONGBOW 2. Spotting 
ranges are relatively short, particu- 
larly with enemy infantry, making 
frantic firefights a common occur- 
rence. Even against vehicles, slow, 
stealthy bob-up tactics rarely come 
into play. Combat in TEAM APACHE 
is clearly action-oriented. 

Al Is My Copilot 

The CP/G position in theAH-64A 
Apache's front seat is reserved for 
the Al — you can fly only from the 
pilot's seat in back. Consequently, 
you rarely get to see the targets 
that you attack as anything more 
than a designation symbol on the 
screen unless you're right on top of 
them. Your CP/G will call out the 
type of target he has in his sights, 
but because all voice messages are 
queued sequentially, other radio 
chatter can cause his message to 
come late or not at all. Activating 
the target ID display option allevi- 
ates this problem. Unfortunately, 
no similar work-around exists for 
delayed or canceled missile launch 
warnings — which has predictably 
dire consequences. 

The sim boasts gorgeous graph- 
ics with a 3D accelerator card; 2D 
graphics are pixelated and slow by 
comparison. Especially impressive 
is the broad array of weather 
types, including varying cloud 
cover, rain, fog, snow, and thunder- 
storms with lightning. The game's 


' 

W- 


.SMTptsn vary ttruns out. ptobaNy as a catun 

’ Bt CBiPbat Uo(a*a and parlormanca iiava tuHarad 
-notlcably. causing cancarn uxata in>nga urprova soon, 
.'(hair itgni status could oa In ;aspardy. 

Siinpton's i« sernutly latiguad ana naads soma rasi 


1^ HAVE A 
; . : TALK 


CHECKING IN It's important to visit witii all the pilots and CP/Gs 
occasionally. They will tell you (using digitized speech) how 
they're doing, which, combined with detailed textual status 
reports, allows you to monitor their fatigue and morale levels. 
Pep talks can be given as necessary. 





COMPUTER GAMING WORLD ♦ SEPTEMBER 1998 







REVIEW • TEAM APACHE 



V 


ve 


I U 'J 

I A kli.r 


1 


1872, J, Sterling 

Morton gave the world a 
great idea. He created a 
holiday unlike any other, 
Arbor Day. 

This is the 125th Anni- 
versary of Arbor Day, the 
tree planters’ holiday. 
This year The National 
Arbor Day Foundation 
asks you to plant Trees 
for America, and provide 
for their care. 

Trees Make a World of 
Difference. Trees make 
our cities and neighbor- 
hoods more liveable. 


They create quiet places 
to enjoy, give wildlife a 
home, and increase proper- 
ty values. 

This year, plant Trees 
for America. For your 
fi-ee brochure, write: Trees 
for America, Tire National 
Arbor Day Foundation, 
Nebraska City, NE 68410. 



The National 
' Arbor Day Foundation " 

www.arboi'tiay.org 





he differences among your 
crew members in TEAM 
A APACHE go much deeper i 
: than just their voices and person- ■ 
alities. Each person is rated in the 
following categories: tracking 
ability, reaction speed, navigation- 
. al ability, day-fiying skill, night- 
flying skill, rocket accuracy, sit- 
uational awareness, composure, 
stamina, and compatibility with 
others. These ratings directly 
determine how a crew member 
. will perform in the air. For exam- 
' pie, a broadly skilled CP/G in the 
; front seat of your AH-64 will find 
targets faster and track them 
. more accurately than a mediocre 
(or very tired) one. Since these are 
; prerequisites to putting your 
weapons on target, the quality of 
the guy in front obviously bears 
• directly on your combat effective- 
ness. The way the sim represents 
: this is particularly well done. You 
^ can actually see your CP/G scan- 
ning his sensors in a search for 
targets, then slewing the target- 
ing cursor over to one he finds, 
and trying to keep it there with a 
^ speed and precision consistent 
with his skill level. 

Dealing with the imperfections 
of your air crew may get frustrat- 
ing at times, but it is also realistic. 
Real human beings are fallible, 
unlike the totally efficient 
automatons you get to work with 
in some sims. 


audio effects are also excellent, especially 
the roar of the engines and rotors on 
your Apache gunship. 

With its emphasis on audiovisual 
splendor and its toned-down realism in 
both flight and systems modeling, TEAM 
APACHE should prove to be an attractive 
combat flight package for casual sim 
gamers. But when you add to that the 
two engrossing — though unfortunately 
somewhat short-campaign plotlines 
and the atmosphere-enhancing air crew 
interactions in and out of the cockpit, 
even serious sim fans may want to give 
this title a closer look. SSU 


COMPUTER GAMING WORLD « SEPTEMBER 1998 






OPTIMIZED FOR 
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P.O.Box 13491 

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REVIEWS 


Passengers, Rotors, 
and Missiles, Oh My! 

On-Time Landings, Air Superiority, and Tank Busting 



747-400 Precision 
Simulator 

A ★ A ★ ★ 

Publisher Aerowinx 
Price: S219 

www.chsdist.com/hiflight7store/ 

A S a kid, did you dream of being 
a pilot? Big money, world trav- 
el, dates with flight attendants, 
managing one of the most complex 
vehicles in existence? Well, 747- 
400 PRECISION SIMULATOR from 
Aerowinx won't help you with the 
first three, but it’ll bring you as 
close as you can get to the last 
without renting time in an airline's 
full-cockpit sim. 

Don't buy this sim if you're look- 
ing for the chance to sightsee. The 
program is designed to be a fully 
realistic simulation of the cockpit 
of a 747, and while the systems are 
simulated in great detail, there's lit- 
tle in the way of graphical flash. 

The program uses the same visual 
trick used in older full-cockpit sim- 
ulations: It sets your flights either 
at night or in inclement weather, 
during which simple city and run- 
way lights actually create a fairly 
realistic experience. 

The level of detail in the instru- 
ment systems is nothing short of 
astounding. With the autopilot and 
flight-director functionality, you can 



sit back and let the plane fly itself. 
But when you do want to take con- 
trol, nearly every switch you'd find 
in a real 747-400 is here — from 
the navigational displays and 


engine controls to the passenger 
seat-belt light switch. A full data- 
base of the world's airports is 
included, and weather and wind 
shear are simulated with frighten- 
ing authenticity. 

What's missing? Besides the 
outside view, very little. The biggest 
improvement would be air traffic 
control (ATC) while en-route. In the 
current version, ATC guides you 
only during takeoff and approach. 
Also, the documentation explains 
all the instrument systems, but 
includes almost no information on 
actual flying procedures. 

747-400 PRECISION SIMULATOR is 
a pro-quality sim, and it comes at a 
pro-quality price. But real pilots 
who want to know what it's like to 
fly the big iron, or sim pilots who 
are looking for a truly realistic 
experience (and who don't mind a 
little outside reading to get up to 
speed), will find lots of value for 
the money. — Denny Atkin 


Red Sea Operations 

A A A A A 

Publisher: Infogrames/DID 
Price: $20 

www.did.com 

R ed sea OPERATIONS is an add-on 
disc for DID's F22AIR 
DOMINANCE FIGHTER (ADF). The 
package adds three new campaigns 
as well as an AWACS tour of duty to 
the sim. Created by Sim-Tech, which 
developed ADF's built-in missions, 
RED SEA OPS is targeted at the seri- 
ous sim fan. All missions start on the 
runway, rather than en-route to the 
target Missions are well crafted, 
with interesting tasks such as escort- 
ing U-2s or hunting SCUD missiles. 

The real meat here, though, is 
for fans of ADF's AWACS mode. 

Not only is there an entire AWACS 
campaign, but the other three tours 


of duty also include 
AWACS missions. 

Each of the campaigns 
is set in the early 21 st 
century, in the same geo- 
graphic region as ADF. Alas, 
you won't find any new 
terrain or aircraft here. 

More annoying is the fact 
that the disc includes ver- 
sions of the missions for 
both pre- and post-patch versions of 
ADF. Why not just include the patdi 
on the CO, since it has 500MB of 
free space? 

Is RED SEA OPS really worth it 
when F22 TOTAL AIR WAR, which 
will include a dynamic campaign, is 
just around the comer? While it 


doesn't add as much to the game 
as most expansion discs, there's 
plenty of play value here for $20, 
especially if you enjoy the strategic 
AWACs mode. — Denny Atkin 


Comanche Gold 

A A A A A 

Publisher: Novalogic 
Price: $44.95 

www.novalo9iccom 

C OMANCHE GOLD supercharges 
last year's COMANCHE 3, more 
than doubling the number of mis- 
sions available to you in this action- 
oriented helicopter sim. New envi- 
ronments are added, including 
Cambodia and Indonesia. In keep- 
ing with Novalogic's new trend of 
consulting real military experts, one 


of the new campaigns is designed 
by a helicopter pilot and former U.S. 
Army liaison to Boeing/Sikorsky. 

Along with the 40-odd new 
missions, COMANCHE GOLD now 
includes a full-featured editor, 
which lets you create your own. 
Other improvements include sup- 
port for 800x600 resolu- 
tion (you'll need a fast 
Pentium II for this), 
weather effects (such as 
rain and snow), and new 
vehicles (such as the AC- 
130 gunship). There's 
better wingman control, 
and his Al has been 
improved. He's still not 
that swift, but at least he now 
looks to see if you're in the way 
before firing off a missile. 

You'll now be able to find 
partners for COMANCHE'S superb 
cooperative missions on 
Novalogic's free Novaworld 
server. Unfortunately, I didn't 
experience the silky-smooth play 
afforded by F-22 RAPTOR when 
playing COMANCHE GOLD. Nova- 
logic, however, seems to be com- 
mitted to continuously improving 
its online support. 

With new missions, a full- 
featured editor, and numerous 
sim improvements, there's more 
here than you'll find in the typi- 
cal "gold" package. It's worth 
checking out for COMANCHE 
owners as well as for other 
action-sim fans. — Denny Atkin 



wvrtv.eompulefg.iming.c 


CO/\4PUTER GAMING WORLD » SEPTEMBER 199B 





.MICROPROSE. 


FALCON 4.0 IS NOW CLEARED >0R FfNAl APPROACH 


Go to #1 57 @ www.computergaming.comflnfollnk 



REVIEW • THE OPERATIONAL ART OF WAR 

Art for War's Sake 



A Reward for Armchair Generals Who Can Think on Their Feet 


by Jim Cobb 

T he Germans call it 

Fingerspitzengefuehl: the 
instinctive ability to com- 
mit the right mix of 
forces at just the right 
time and place to com- 
pletely confound the 
enemy and leave your 
side master of the battlefield, This 
feel for combat distinguishes oper- 
ational decisions from the cool- 
ness of strategy and the immedi- 
ate, hot-blooded responses to tac- 
tical situations. This ability cannot 
be taught — if it could, every war 
academy class would produce a 
Robert E. Lee or Erwin Rommel — 
nor has it yet been fully simulated 
by any strategy game. Regardless 
of the amount of unknowns tossed 
into each combat algorithm, play- 
ers have been able to calculate 
with a good degree of certainty 


GAMIMG 




APPEAL: 

Anyone remotely 
interested in an in- 
depth operational 
wargame. 

PROS: Innovative 
approach to time 
and movement; 
comprehensive 
weapon system and organizational fea- 
tures; smooth interface for such a com- 
plex game. 



CONS; Steep learning curve; no LAN or 
Internet play. 


DIFFICULTY: Advanced. 


REQUIREMENTS: Pentium 90, 
Windows 95, 1 6MB RAM, SMB hard- 
drfve space, 2x CD-ROM, SVGA graphics. 
3D SUPPORT: None. 
MULTIPLAYER SUPPORT: Email, 
hotseat (1-2 players); 1 CO per player. 
Price: S49.95 
Publisher: lalonSofi 


Fotesr Hill, MD 
(800) 211-6504 




UM, WHERE ARE WE? If you forget the mission objectives, you 
can access the briefing at any time. And if you're allergic to 
hexagons, you can turn them off. 


when and where a particular move 
would work. 

All this is about to change, 
however. Veteran designer Norm 
Koger {AGE OF RIFLES, TANKS!), 
given a free hand byTalonSoft, 
has developed a system that 
forces gamers to develop their 
instincts as well as their arith- 
metic. THE OPERATIONAL ART OF 
WAR (ART) covers campaigns 
from 1939-1955 (roughly WWII 
through Korea). It has the level of 
detail and realism that we've 
come to expect from both Koger 
and TalonSoft. What sets this 
game apart from all other turn- 
based strategy/wargames is its 
innovative combination of time, 
movement, and action. 

Turn, Turn, Turn 

Turns are divided into 10 tacti- 
cal rounds, but the passage of 
these rounds is not marked, so 
that you cannot predict exactly 
when the turn will end. A battle 
will use a percentage of these 
rounds based upon the number of 
units involved, the distance 
attacking forces move to engage, 
and the intensity of combat. One 
informational screen gives an 


estimate of the percent of the 
turn used, but this may be based 
on faulty intelligence. Thus, a bat- 
tle that you might expect to use 
10 percent of a turn might actual- 
ly use 30 percent when the 
defender throws in unexpected 
reserves — this tends to keep you 
on your toes much more than 
does the typical turn-based game. 

The crucial effect of long bat- 
tles is that the movement points 
of the attacker's other units are 
reduced by the percentage used. 


Thus, a battle that was to open a 
hole for armor may use up that 
armor's capacity to exploit the 
enemy's weaknesses. Conversely, 
moving units before resolving 
attacks eliminates opportunities to 
plunge through gaps. Players must 
judge which point is critical, how 
much force is economical to do 
the job, when to attack, and what 
movement can be saved. ART 
demands that you understand the 
capabilities of the forces engaged 
and the flow of battle; gamers 
who obsess over how to achieve 
that 6:1 odds ratio may find them- 
selves quickly lost. 

Not that understanding a force’s 
capability is easy; it's more of an 
art than a science. Sure, the vari- 
ous units sport the usual move- 
ment, attack, and defense factors. 
But what isn't evident is that these 
factors merely scratch the surface: 
They are derived from more than a 
dozen different other factors that 
include supply, morale, equipment, 
and formation. An undersupplied 
armor division, for example, may 
roll through a garrison but be held 
up by a battalion of well-trained 
and well-positioned antitank guns. 
To be successful, you must com- 
pare the 93 different unit types 



^ COMPUTER GAMING WORLD • SEPTEMBER 1998 


/.computergaming. com 





The most revolutionary 
action/strategygameofitskind.Noth- 
ing comes close to offering such an 
exciting combination of strategy, 
team-building, realistic, three-dimen- 
sional graphics and true-to-life 
special forces action. ONE SHOT 
KILLS. The ultimate goal is to save 
yourself and the world from deadly 
terrorists. You must successfully 
complete 17 unique missions, and if 
you die, the game isn’t over: 
THE WORLD IS. 



nom 

a 


T 

i 



^ ^ ■ 

J 1 K 1 







REVIEW • THE OPERATIONAL ART OF WAR 



with the terrain and troops to be 
attacked, while also considering 
the supply, transport, support, and 
air superiority conditions. To attack 
without considering these factors 
is to throw away the economy of 
time and force necessary for victo- 
ry. And if all this isn't complex 
enough for you, let me add that 
ART employs a multitude of scales. 
Units can represent anything from 
squads to corps, and they have the 
capacity to break down and 
recombine into different forma- 
tions. Likewise, movement scales 
vary from battle to battle. 

It's All Right 

The nice thing is that ART's 
interface and graphic approach 


help you sort through the compli- 
cated decision-making process. 
The Map Panel takes up three- 
quarters of the screen and shows 
the details of the scenario map, 
located in a smaller window. You 
can get info on terrain features at 
a glance simply by moving the 
cursor over the area in question. 

Left-clicking on a unit brings it 
up in the Unit Panel, showing 
both its 2D NATO symbol and 3D 
icon (as well as the three base 
combat values referred to earlier). 
Right-clicking on a unit brings up 
all the action options— changes 
in formation, embarking on 
planes, and so forth— and also 
gives you vital information on the 
unit and its parent formation. 



LiBlZs 


ORDERS OF INTIMIDATION The control panel (here showing 
unit info) has a frightening 24 buttons. But oniy the first 
eight actuaily affect piay; the others modify displays and 
present reports. 


including its present condition 
and any special abilities. 

While the sheer amount of 
information can be intimidating, 
the mechanics themselves are 
pretty simple. Movement is a 
matter of right-clicking on the 
objective. To enter combat, you 
right-click on an enemy, and the 
pop-up menu then allows you to 
set single- or 
group attacks, 
as well as the 
intensity of con- 
flict. The conve- 
nient "Plan an 
attack" option 
shows the six 
hexes adjacent 
to the defender 
and all avail- 
able support 
units. Left-click- 
ing on a unit 
commits it to an 
attack: but if an 
unit's organiza- 
tion prohibits it from full coopera- 
tion, the attack will be penalized 
(shown by a black pennant). 
Depending on what is known of 
the defender, this screen will esti- 
mate results and time expended. 
Battles are resolved at any time 
during a turn with an after-action 
report that shows the flow of 
combat, the number of casualties, 
and the battle's end result. The 
effects of battles on each force 
are calculated automatically each 
turn, and, in keeping with the sur- 
prise nature of each battle, some 
results will trigger events such as 
poison gas and nukes. To put it 
mildly, this game is never boring. 

Roll With It 

ART is certainly comprehensive: 
It comes with 18 scenarios that 
employ every type of combat 
unit— from famous WWIl armored 
formations to guerrillas to ski 
troops. And while the graphics are 
hardly as sexy as those in the lat- 
est 3D shooters, they do a good 
enough job of highlighting the 
troops and terrain— especially 
given how easy it is to create 
your own scenarios with the map 
editor (see this month's CG Tips 


article for advice on creating your 
own maps). 

The computer opponent is one 
of the best I've seen in any strategy 
game. Because of the constantly 
changing nature of each turn, the 
Al must formulate a long-range 
plan, as opposed to the usual num- 
ber-crunching employed by most 
computer opponents. After a while. 


however, you will probably want to 
battle against a human general, 
and this is one of the few areas in 
which ART fails. TalonSoft did a nice 
job with play-by-email for this 
game, as your PBEM files are com- 
pressed nicely when sent; the 
game plays okay via hotseat as 
well. But this is one of the rare 
turn-based games that cries out for 
Internet and LAN play because of 
the constantly changing flow of 
play. Even though Internet play is 
advertised on the box, it isn't in the 
game — shame, shame. 

Other than this flaw, however, 
it's hard to find fault with ART. The 
game's depth and range is breath- 
taking: Every element of opera- 
tional combat is fully represented, 
and the elements that make up 
fighting units' characteristiG are 
wonderfully simulated. The abstract 
concepts of air superiority and 
naval support are handled so 
cleanly that they are almost invis- 
ible. THE OPERATIONAL ART OF WAR 
is one of those rare games that 
combines many common elements 
with sparks of insight and innova- 
tion, transcending all predecessors 
and creating a new standard for 
operational wargames. 2317 



CLOSE QUARTERS This inset view gives you a 
good look at the 3D unit icons, comparable to 
those of PANZER GENERAL II. 


.COMPUTER GAMING WORLD ■ SEPTEMBER 1998 


iputergaming.c 







SYSTEMS SPEC 


PROFILE AND INTERVIEW ON • COMMANDOS 


P yro Studios of Madrid, Spain has created an intrigu- 
ing departure from the glut of real time clones. 
With the publishing muscle of Eidos Interactive 
behind them, Pyro has unleashed the "Dirty 'h 
Dozen". "Commandos; Behind Enemy Lines" is a 
real-time tactical wargame masterpiece that confi- 
dently encompasses the RPG, Strategy, and Puzzle game 
genres. Gamers can finally enter a world that tempers the 
reality of stealth combat with the bravado and fun of the 
big screen war epics. 

Commandos is all about gripping, non-linear gameplay 
with strong, lovable characters that you lead in and out of 
lethal danger. Your goal is to keep your team alive while 
they stick it to the formidable German War Machine of 
WWIl. They are your boys.... your "A-team". Ignacio 
Perez, lead Game Designer, has lovingly crafted missions 
from the actual history of the WWIl Commando forces. 
Each mission briefing is presented in the authentic 
movie-reel style of the era. Historical missions, troops, 
locations, vehicles, armaments — it’s all painstakingly 
recreated for your battleground. Couple this with several 
missions based on hit war films such as "the Dirty Dozen, 
the Great Escape, Force Ten from Navarone", and you 
have a recipe for hours of entertaining adventure. 


Eidos Inte 


n t 


explodes on 
real-time tactical 
combat scene with 
the refreshingly 
spunky Commandos. 





53 

:q 

o 

:o 

s 

p" 



PROFILE AND INTERVIEW ON • COMMANDOS 




C ommandos takes place in the early 
days of WWII, when the Allied War 
effort was unable to stop the 
Germans from overtaking Europe. 
In the British Military, Lieutenant 



Colonel Dudley Clark was not going to let 
them trample freedom, and to counter the 
axis, he formed the Commando Regiment. 
The Commandos ranks were formed from 
exceptionally skilled combat men. Some 
were misfits and outcasts, some company 
men, who shared a common vision —victory 


over the Germans. Their mission was to 
sneak in, kick ass, and get out. The results 
are legend. We now give you the chance to 
re-fight their battles and create your own 
history. 

The game is played in real time. There are 
over twenty compelling missions that take 
place over four geographical theatres of 
war: Norway, North Africa, France, and 
Germany. Your combat team of six 
commandos will respond -to you via voice 
and gestures. Each Commando has certain 
combat skills and weapons while possessing 
a "unique” temperament. Since you are 
behind enemy lines, you are always 
outmanned and outgunned — but you are 
not outclassed. Use your combat stealth 
and ingenuity to complete your goals. You 
are in charge. 

Every mission has several secondary 
objectives that need to be achieved to 



complete 

the primary objective. 

However, once you successfully 
complete your mission, you must still get 
your team out alive amid the chaos. 




Oommandos offers the complete gameplay package;- 


• Luscious 16bit graphics in a high resolution 3D world with a realistic. Interactive environment 

• Real-time scalable camera capable of multiple camera windows with resolutions up to 1024x768 

• Over 1000 world animations of 450 authentic WWII vehicles, weapons, soldiers, and buildings based 
on 3D renders 

• Realistic WWII video scenes and music complete the immersion into the Commando world 

• Six Commandos with unique voices and personalities as well as weapon and combat skills 

• Tenacious German unit Al stalks your boys with sight, sound, and even smell 

• Career Mode tracks your mission to mission performance and rewards you for 
tactical genius 

• Secret 20th mission that can only be unlocked by good career performance 

• Co-operative multiplayer for 2-6 users with the ability to save your score for the 

• Multiplayer voice communication and competition trees on the Mplayer 
gaming service 

• Complete training camp allows you to hone your skills before facing the enemy 


Competitors can ofi'er some of our features, but 
they cannot give you the "total gaming package".:;, 
that Commandos: Behind Enemy lines delivers 

- Eric Adams - US Producer 



Go to #276 @ www.computergaming.com/infolink 


COMMANDOS 


PROFILE AND INTERyiEW ON • 



A focus on three 
Commandos feature 
make this game a 


Enemy AI - there are seven unique German 
soldier units in Commandos. Add to this 
mechanized and marine units, and you have a 
challenging mix of opponents. The enemy actually 
uses sight, sound, and even smell senses to detect 
your men. The Germans actually see your 
footprints, hear your actions, and cal! for backup. 
Each unit has a unique combat disposition; some 
will shoot you on sight, while others will take you 
captive. 

Career Mode - in Commandos, you start 
as a Lance Corporal and earn promotions through 
your skillful completion of each mission. The game 
actually tracks your performance. If you reach a 
certain rank, you will be given the honor of 
completing the infamous 20th mission. Fear not, 
we have created an extensive training camp to 
hone your skills. 


killer 
s that 
classic. 

Co-op Multiplayer-inCommandos, 
you can join up to five of your friends and take on 
the Germans together. You have access to all 20 
missions. As always, the game will monitor your 
performance and rate you at completion. You and 
your team can play via TCP/IP, IPX, or on the 
MPlayer service. Voice communication is offered 
only on MPlayer. 



Up to six fully lunclional camera w'ews 


Producer Questions and Answers 


W e were able to pry the 
US Producer, Eric Adams, 
away from an intense 
Commandos Multiplayer game to 
ask some tough questions. 

Q: What is your role in this 
project? Why is Commandos 
shipping in North America in 
August, while the European 
version is out now? 

A: I have multiple roles. Foremost, I 
work with Pyro Studios to enhance 
game elements for the North 
American market. This work also 
entails quality assurance, Mplayer 
implementation, gameplay 
balancing, and market research. In 
addition, I assist our terrific Sales 
and Marketing team in getting the 
good word out about this 
revelation to the public and press. 


We are holding the North American 
version to allow time for more 
promotion, and more importantly, 
to implement several user 
requested features. 

Q; What do you mean by 
''revelation"? 

A: Commandos is a revelation of 
gaming ingenuity and innovation. 
Pyro Studios has done an amazing 
job on their first title. This game 
literally offers several layers of 
Intense gameplay. We supply 
real-time action and intrigue for 
the RTS crowd. We promote the 
use of tactics and strategy in an 
ultra realistic WWiI environment for 
the hard core wargamers. 
Commandos also features unique 
puzzle elements and RPG like 
characters. Finally, we have created 


a game that plays at your pace, 
whether you are a hard core gamer 
or new to games. 

Q: Commandos came out of 
nowhere to become a sleeper 
hit. What is its future? 

A: There is a lot of great user buzz 
about this game. The gaming 
community has embraced both the 
content and presentation of 
Commandos. The Commandos 
demo is one of the hottest 
downloads on the Internet. I get 
an incredible amount of user email 
asking where to find it or begging 
for more missions. Be assured 
Commandos is coming your way in 
August. "Its sequel future looks 
bright!" 



Games Domain Review 

"ConiEiaBdos, i’rora these 
earliest glimpses, looks 
to be one of the more 
innovative titles on the 
horizon. It offers 
gameplaji that should 
entice both action and . 
strategy fans, and 
blends features from 
games of both genres 
into a combination that 
really hasn't been seen 
before”. 

Jeff Kang - Games Domain Review 

Computer Gaming World 
"...the mission design, 
WWII setting, and basic 
gameplay set this game 
apart. Overall, the 
game is incredibly 
promising.lt could 
become a real-time 
strategy sleeper hit." 
Elliot Chin - CGW 

Combat Simulations Online 

"Commandos is the Best 
Strategy game at EJ." 
Maurice Fitzgerald - Combat Sim. 

Online Gaming Review 
"If, like me, you're a 
big fan of movies like 
the Guns of Havarone and 
the Dirty Dozen, 
Commandos: Behind Enemy 
Lines, is sure to appeal 
to you. Blending subtle 
elements of Syndicate, 
Jagged Alliance, Castle 
Wolfenstein (the 
original), and Escape 
from Castle Colditz, 
Commandos easily stands 
out as one of the more 
original RTS games to be 
released this year." 

Chris Jensen - OGR 


Go to #276 @ www.computergaming.com/infolink 



ADVEHTORIAL 



Tiny is a man who prides himself in efficiency 


Inferno actually likes playing with fire 


rjiomas "Inferno" 

Bio: Thomas Burned his thumb at a young age and actually 
liked it. Since then, he has devoted his life to the 
taming of fire and flash. Inferno is your demolition man 
If he cannot Break a lock, he will gladly apply a little 
THT to open it. He seems to also have a fascination with 


EIILIST 


w w vf . e i d 0 s 1 n t e r a c t i ve . c 0 


This French Chameleon packs a nasty cyanide bitel 


’ Dechamp 

Bio: Rene is brains oi' tbe Comiaandos. He is a 

skilliul Prench linguist oi manj' passions. Foremost, 
he loves tricking German soldiers and leading them to 
their deaths. He is your spy — your access into 
German strongholds. He also is very handy at the 
"silent" kill. 







loves both test driving and firing at German equipment 


/ 0 ( 

Bio! Luke btays true to h.is Britisli Aristocratic roots 
in most cases, but he is a rascal with the ladies and a 
sucker ior high stakes snooker. He is simplj' the best 
man in the Commandos ranks with the sniper riile . a nice 
chap with a quiet and lethal demeanor. 


Bio: Sid is a tough guy from IJow York. Ho iu your 

orpert or aoythiog «ohahloal. it It uaaa gaaolir - 
ha oaa drrva rt. Whar. not taasing Tiny, Sid la oitan 

varlatlaa 


TO LAY 

^commandos/commandos .html 




Bio: Fins is literally irora down under - underwater 
that is. When on land he is oiten in i'oul temper, 
but get him in water and he is a periect gentlemen. 
Some say he is part iish, but to the Commandos he 
is the ultimate uiarine specialist. Hake sure he 
keeps the Harpoon gun pointed away i'rom the rest 
oi' the team . 


Go to #276 @ www.computergaming.com/lnfolink 



AND INTERVIEW ON • THIEF - THE DARK PROJECT 


The foa 
Project ^ 


Wt'r ■ 

Thief: The Dark Project 
Infiltrates Your PC 

u Before Death came, the liars were made to 
feast upon the hands of the thieves and the 
thieves were made to ingest the tongues of 
their liar brothers. And we praised the Master 
for his judgments. 

This passage from the Hammer Book of Tenets sets the stage for EIDOS 
Interactive and Looking Glass Studio's Thief: The Dark Project. Prepare 
to enter a mythical world of swords and mystery, with a touch of 
steam-age technology thrown in for good measure. This interesting 
mix makes for a dark and volatile environment in which to set this 
incredible new game. 


You play Garrett, a tough thief in a tough city, Garrett makes his living by 
stealing pricey baubles from decaying royalty. He has also been known to 
do contract jobs for the right price, and that is just 
how things in Thief start out. As Garrett, you are hired by your good 
friend, and fence, Cutty, to steal a sword from the Bafford mansion. 


Go to #116 @ www.computergaming.com/infolink 


As early as this first mission, the complexity and detail of this new dark 


world is apparent. The graphics 


FEATURES 


First Person Stealth-Action 
game. 

Direct 3D 

Sneak your way through 14 
Levels. 

Advanced A1 has guards 
call for help and sound 
alarms. 

Explore and realize a ' 
detailed techno-medievai 
world from the rooftops 
above to the sewers below. 


! simply stunning, and Looking Glass 
has worked closely with 3Dfx and 
other 3D card manufacturers to 
enhance these effects in accelerated 
modes. The lighting is excellent, 
which is important for an 
environment where hiding in the 
shadows is the only way to survive. 
In addition, the level design 
encourages exploration in all 
directions like a real city and less 
like a typical linear game. When 
breaking into a building, for 
example, there may be multiple 
points of entry. 



PROFILE AND INTERVIEW ON • THIEF - THE DARK PROJECT 


Some may be more difficult to 
enter, but less tightly guarded, 
while other, more obvious 
entrances will have more guard 
presence. 

Unlike most of today's 1st 
person shooter games, in Thief, 
you are not a one-man arsenal. 
Your primary weapons here are 
your stealth and cunning, 
paired with your sword and 
bow. Throughout Thief you will 
find different types of arrows to 
aid you in your missions: Use a 
Water Arrow to extinguish 
torches burning on the wall, 
creating instant shadows to 
sneak through ! Or switch to the 
explosive Fire Arrow when 
being subtle is no longer an 
option, or when you need to 
light up dark corridors. Other 
weapons include the 
Noisemaker Arrow, 
which generates the 
sounds of footsteps 
wherever it lands. This 
arrow is perfect for 
distracting a solo 
guard, giving you a 
chance to come up 
from behind and slide 
your sword through 
his fifth and sixth ribs. 

Although these special arrows 
are helpful, it's not always a 
simple feat to get past the 
guards. An advanced sighting 
and hearing Al enables the 
guards to see you if you don't 
take care to stick to the 
shadows; they can also hear 
you walking on certain 
surfaces. However, if you're 



stealthy enough, it only takes 
one strategically shot arrow to 
relieve the guard of his duties 
forever! 

One would think that all the 
dead guards Garrett leaves in 
his wake might arouse 
suspicion from the others 
making their rounds. For the 
first time ever in a first person 
game, this is actually true! 
Other guards will come across 
dead bodies and run off to 
sound alarms, just as they 
would in real life. Of course, 
there is a way around this 
potentially incriminating 
predicament. Garrett can pick 
up guards' bodies and stash 
them in dark corners, or 
submerge them underwater 
so he can go about his silent 
business undisturbed. 

The use of 
sound in games 
has always 
helped to create 
a mood and 
warn of 

upcoming 
dangers, but the 
revolutionary 
use of sound in 
Thief brings the 
stealth and sneaking aspects of 
the game to a new level. Using 
the new Aureal A3D sound 
technology. Looking Glass 

promises an immersive 

experience never before 

achieved on the PC. 

The A3D technology enables 
specially equipped soundcards 
to broadcast sound in 3D, so 
when action is occurring behind 
Garrett, the player will actually 
hear it behind him, 

In-game sound provides a sense 

of realism that cannot be 
matched in any other way, and 
getting the sound to occur in 
3D heightens the experience 
and brings the game to life. 
Imagine sneaking down a 
hallway and hearing a whistling 
guard approaching from 



behind. This sense of 
anticipation and suspense 
would not be possible without 
3D sound and cannot be 
matched in any other game 
available today. 

Without a great storyline, it 
would be difficult to fully realize 
the potential of all this great 
technology. Thankfully Looking 
Glass has taken care of that 
aspect too. 

As a thief for hire, Garrett has 
his share of enemies, and not 
many friends. The only person 
Garrett can trust is Cutty, his 
fence. Cutty gets Garrett jobs 
and buys goods off him that are 
too hot to sell on the 
open market. As the game 
begins, Garrett has a good 
thing going. After Cutty gets 
him the Bafford job (Garrett's 
first mission in Thief) things 
'^become more difficult and 
complex as an intricate story 
begins to unfold. 

Garrett crosses paths over the 
course of the game with the 


SYSTEM REQUIREMENTS 


Windows 95/98 

Pentium 166 or better 

3D accelerator recommended 

16 Megs of RAM 

Direct X 5.0 or better 

Uses Aureal A3D Sound 

Technology 


Developer: Looking Glass 
Publisher: Eidos Interactive 


www.eidosinteractive.c 


"The graphics 
are simply 
stunning, 
especially 
on a 3D 
accelerator 
card" 


3DFX Biography 

Looking Glass Studio and 
3Dfx have been working 
closely during the develop- 
ment of Thief: The Dark 
Project to bring a heightened 
sense of realism to the game 
through incredible graphics. 
Because of the stealthy style 
of gameplay, there are many 
graphic effects that transcend 
simply making the game look 
better and actually make the 
game PLAY better, in 
addition to the standard anti- 
aliasing and speed increases 
that players enjoy when 
employing a 3D card, 3Dfx 
and Looking Glass are 
developing enhanced lighting 
effects to bring out subtleties 
of light and shadow, very 
helpful when trying to sneak 
past a guarded entry. 
Enhanced special effects for 
magic and explosive 
weapons as well 
as fire, smoke and 
transparent water effects 
bring alive the dark 
underbelly of this sinister 
city. Transparent "ghostlike" 
monsters add to the surreal 
atmosphere. "Looking Glass 
Studios is upping the ante in 
accelerated gaming by 
creating a game that both 
looks and PLAYS better when 
taking advantage of 3Dfx 
technology." 

Scott Sellers, CTO Software, 
3Dfx Interactive, 3Dfx. 



Go to #116 @ www.computergamlng.com/infolink 


ADVERTORIAL 






• THIEF - THE DARK PROJECT 



Thief; The Dark Project 
Infiltrates Your PC (continued) 


The Thief Interview 


could design an entire game around just 
that concept. 


First Person Shooter does not? 


First, can you tell me a little bit about 
Looking Glass? What games have you guys 
done in the past? 

We did Ultima Underworld 1 & 2, which 
were among the first Ist-person 3D games 
to be released, and are considered by many 
to be classics. We did a science-fiction 
actlon/RPG title called System Shock, and 
we've done a couple of groundbreaking 
flight simulators; Flight Unlimited 1 and 2. 


What gave you the idea for Thief? 

Thief is a logical extension of the things we 
liked the most about System Shock; specifi- 
cally, sneaking around and ambushing the 
enemy. We discovered that we 
got more of an adrenaline 
rush from tense, 
stealthy gameplay 
than from straight- 
up butchery, and 
we realized 

W' ■■ 


Thief Is pretty different than the standard 
First Person Shooter, how were you sure 
that the Steal-Action was the way to go? 
Here at LG, we don't really view Thief as a 
"shooter" any more than we did our prior 
games. We think that the 1st -person 3D 
genre has lots more to offer players than 
shooters alone, and we'd like to do our part 
in turning players on to some other possi- 
bilities of the medium. We make the sorts 
of games that we're interested in playing. 
We've also been reassured about the 
soundness of our design now that other 
stealth-based games like GoldenEye and 
Commandos have hit the market and are 
doing well. 


At various parts of the game it's advanta- 
geous not to kill the next person you come 
across, but to silently hide in the shadows 
and evesdrop. Was this a design considera- 
tion or just something that you were able to 
do with the engine? 


It was intended from the beginning to be a 
key part of the design, because it's a cool, 
immersive way to provide clues to players, 
and pull them into the story at the same time. 


What exactly is your role on the project? 
I'm the Project Leader. I try to keep 
everyone else on track, and 
do lot of interviews. 


I also 


What features does 
Thief have that 
your standard 


Hammerites. These religious 
fanatics have no tolerance for 
Garrett or his profession. As the 
game progresses, Garrett has 
multiple encounters with the 
Hammerites and their 
trademark warhammers. There 
is nothing worse than fighting a 
fanatic; they have no sense of 
reason. You can't bribe them 
and they don't take to being 
conned. Life in a Hammerite 
prison is nothing to look 
forward to. 


Gee, where to begin . . . the biggest dii 
ence is that we're building a world the 
complex and detailed enough so that 
player can really make plans and think ti 
cally, and wherein the Ais are smart 
tough enough so that you can get some 
satisfaction from outwitting them. Bot 
tine: it's more fun to be Batman than it i 
be Superman. 


Do you think that Thief will help revolut 
ize the first-person gaming market? 
We'd like to open peoples' eyes to some 
ferent possibilities of the genre; we tl 
that Thief will provide some incredible e: 
riences to players who are tired of the s 
old thing and ready for something r 
When all is said and done, what matte 
that it's fun. We're having a blast mal 
Thief, and we can't wait to play iti 


How complex is the storyline? 

It's pretty involved. One unique aspec 
the story is that you get pieces of it from 
ferent sources and have to put them tog 
er yourself. You read books and set 
view occasional cut scenes, overhear 
versations, and piece together various o 
clues. As a player, you can decide 
deeply you want to immerse yourself ir 
story. 


How many different weapons are there 
Sorry, that's classified. I will say that w 
got some that you've never before seen 
PC game. 


Does Garrett have any other tricks u( 
sleeve? 


He might, but he's not saying. 


designed so that 
they can be 
accomplished entirely by 
sticking to the shadows and 
pick-pocketing guards that hold 
items vital to completing an 
area (keys for example). 


lends ^ 

another — 

layer of realism to 
the atmosphere of this Looking 
Glass story. 


Garrett also has run-ins with city 
and palace guards, as well as 
creatures from a dark and 
mysterious underworld. In 
Looking Glass’s attempt to 
center the game around stealth 
aspects, some levels are 


Between each mission is a cut- 
scene, setting up the details of 
the next mission. Some of these 
are simple, objective describing 
animations, whereas many 
others advance the plot of the 
game. The style of these is that 
of a hand painted image, 
sprinkled with computer 
animations. The effect is as 
striking as the game itself, and 


All in all. Thief is top-notch. 
From the solid controls and a 
fantastic lighting system to the 
artificial intelligence and 
gripping storyline. Thief is 
poised to put a new spin on the 
first-person action game genre. 
Thief: The Dark Project is 
looking to carve out its own 
niche and strike silently in the 
night, like a thief in the dark. 


Go to #11 6 @ www.computergaming.com/infolink 


INDUSTRY GIANT • REVIEW 


Industrial Disease 

INDUSTRY GIANT Comes Up Short Across the Board 



APPLIANCE PARK The layout of INDUSTRY GIANT looks a lot like 
SiMClTY 2000, but without the number of options. Check out the 
wasted space on tiie interface, too. 


by Tim Carter 

ike so many other games, 
INDUSTRY GIANT Is an 
incomplete product that 
should never have left the 
warehouse. What's worse, 
the design and program- 
ming flaws here are com- 
pounded, as usual, by 
insultingly bad documentation. I 
know that it's possible to write a 
decent manual for a computer 
game; it still happens occasionally. 
Why 1-Magic seems incapable of it, 
I have no idea. 

The Clock Is Running 

As the title suggests, INDUSTRY 
GIANT is a game of corporate 
development and market domi- 
nance. It offers a multitude of sce- 
narios and campaigns covering a 
time period roughly from the 
1960s through the 21st century. 

You must borrow money to build a 
manufacturing and retailing empire 

computer'' 1 




APPEAL: For 
chronic RAILROAD 
TYCOON addicts 
who need a 
methadone-like 
substitute. 

PROS: Looks 
nice at limes. 

CONS: Bad doa; no variation in game 
speed; unexplained glitches in trans- 
portation system: weak premise. 
DIFFICULTY: Intermediate. 
REQUIREMENTS: Pentium 90, 
Y/indows 95, 16M8 RAM, 2MB hard- 
drive space, 4x CD-ROM, DirectX- 
compati'ble sound and graphics. 

3D SUPPORT: None. 
MULTIPLAYER SUPPORT: None. 
Price: S29.95 

Publisher: Inieractive Magic 
Research Triangle Park, NC 
(800)789-1534 



supported by your own transporta- 
tion system. Winning is generally 
determined by profit and your abil- 
ity to drive your competitors out of 
business (or take them over). 

The game is played in realtime, 
but for some unfathomable reason, 
the designers couldn't see their 
way clear to add variable speeds or 
a decent pause function. The clock 
runs the whole time you are mak- 
ing decisions or researching your 
options. Since you need to select 
and purchase retail and manufac- 
turing outlets and build your own 
transportation system, it can take 
you a year or more of game time 
just to get your first product to 
market. Once you're well into the 
game and your empire is function- 
ing smoothly, you're left sitting 
around waiting for time to pass. 

While the game ran smoothly 
for the most part, at times the lack 
of information seemed like a bug. 
For instance, if you plan a trucking 
system badly, say, by putting too 
many trucks on the same road, 
your trucks will stack up outside 
your depot, and the ensuing traffic 
jam may halt your entire distribu- 
tion network. Unfortunately, you 
have no way of knowing why 
some trucks refuse to move; the 


computer won't notify you of the 
problem or identify the bottleneck. 
Sometimes the bottleneck is invisi- 
ble: I once had trains stopped out- 
side completely empty stations for 
no apparent reason. This can be 
extremely frustrating, particularly if 
your empire is vast, with complex 
and overlapping routes and inter- 
dependent supply systems. 

Bill Who? 

The technical hiccups in 
INDUSTRY GIANT are bad enough, 
yet they pale beside the conceptual 
flaws. Winning in INDUSTRY GIANT 
is all about transportation net- 
works and competitive retailing. 


While I can see the logic behind 
the retail aspect, is there any major 
corporation today that actually 
depends on a wholly owned, effi- 
cient railway network for its suc- 
cess? You don't see the Justice 
Department chasing after Bill 
Gates because his trains refuse to 
carry Netscape, do you? 

Even more unrealistically, you 
can't research new products — they 
just come on the market according 
to a preset schedule. Thus, you 
have no fights over patent rights, 
no competition for technological 
advantages, no pacing the market. 
Moreover, while it's possible to 
advertise, I found it almost never 
made financial sense to do so. 

Instead, you are left juggling 
train schedules and creating a pro- 
duction system that can efficiently 
supply a retail empire with a range 
of goods. There's nothing wrong 
with a game that simulates this, as 
long as it doesn't claim to be repli- 
cating or even pretending to repli- 
cate contemporary business. 

Beating your competitors in 
INDUSTRY GIANT has little or noth- 
ing to do with the quality of your 
products. The game assumes that 
all are equal, and that demand is 
constant. Thus, there are no 
rewards for researching or produc- 
ing better widgets (or software), I 
can't help thinking that this is a 
reflection of the way 
INDUSTRY giant's 
producers view their 
own market. Clearly 
they don't see the 
value in developing 
complete, quality 
products, or investing 
in ancillary goods 
like, say, documenta- 
tion. I can only hope 
that the real-life mar- 
ket is just a tad more 
discriminating than 
the one simulated 
here. R'i'.'J 



OK " . ♦ 


BUILD THOSE BIKES But don't worry 
about making the best bike. Just make 
sure your product ships more effidentiy 
than your competHoi^s. 




www.compjicrgaming.com 


COMPUTER GAMING WORLD » SEPTEMBER 1996 i 




REVIEW • EXTREME TACTICS 


Extreme Tedium 

Some Nice Touches Are Lost in a Sea of Bugs and Cliches 


by Lance Larka 

T he story is a familiar one: 
a dying world, scarce 
resources, two compet- 
ing clans with different 
ideologies, only one will 
survive.. .(yawn). What's 
the point? Why would 
anyone wish to play this 
severely overused strategy plot 
line? Well, having the ability to 
customize your units (including 
their Al tendencies) is a good 
place to start. Unfortunately, 
despite the integration of these 
long overdue features to the 
genre, EXTREME TACTICS still failed 
to pique my interest. 


A Pinch Too Little, 
a Year Too Late 

In this flimsy imitation of better 
strategy games, you play either the 
altruistic Hammerhead or the 
baneful Bloodfox clans in the dual 
11 -mission linear campaigns, 11 


COMPUTER 

GAMIMG 


-WORLD 




APPEAL: 

Collectors who 
need every sci-fi 
strategy game. 
PROS: Vehicle 
design, customiz- 
able Al, and unit 
experience are 
welcome addi- 
tions. 



CONS: Incredible number of bugs; bad 
interface; a story so canned it's tin. 


DIFFICULTY: Easy. 


REQUIREMENTS: Pentium 120, 
Windows 95, 16MB RAM, 30MB hard- 
drive space, 4x CD-ROM, SVGA graphics; 
supports Windows-compatible sound 
cards. 


3D SUPPORT: None. 
MULTIPLAYER SUPPORT: TCP/IP; 
(1 CD per player). 


Price: S49.95 

Publisher; Piranha Interactive Publishing Irc. 
Tempe, Arizona 
(602) 491-0500 


.extreme-tactics. 




SAND IN MY POCKET When zoomed-in, the impressive detail doesn't 
help much, since units that are firing at you are off-screen. 


one-player skirmish mis- 
sions, or head-to-head 
against up to three other 
players over the Net. In 
terms of actual play, you are 
forced to use the ancient 
stratagem of han/est, build, 
and overwhelm to withstand 
the enemy's initial wave 
attacks and complete the 
rather bland missions. 

The main innovation of 
EXTREME TACTICS is the 
design-unit screen, in which 
you match up standard body 
types, movement methods, 
shielding, scanners, and, of 
course, weapons to make 
the perfect vehicle for what- 
ever tactical situation you're 
in. The other innovation is being 
able to modify your units' Al 
behavior, from pursuit ranges to 
automatic repair triggers. 
Unfortunately, the Al frequently 
ignores your settings. 

All your units are built and 
remotely controlled from your 
comfy Mobile Command Center 
(MCC). Logically, if your MCC is 
destroyed, you lose the mission. 

It's too bad that the logic ends 
here. All units in the game have a 
starting to-hit percentage that 
grows in relation to their battle 
experience. The more they fight, 
the higher the percentage gets. 
And if the unit dies, the experience 
is lost, but why? If the units are 
controlled remotely from the MCC, 


doesn't it make more sense for the 
controllers /ns/c/e the MCC to gain 
experience and keep the increased 
to-hit percentage from unit to unit 
instead of losing it? 

Error: Operating 
System Not Found 

This game still would have been 
decent if it weren't for the terrible 
interface and the bugs. The inter- 
face is your standard sidebar but- 
ton array with menu functions, 
mini-map, and main map. Both the 
main map and mini-map can be 
zoomed, but doing so removes so 
much area from the main map 
that you can't even see to the 
extent of your units' visual range, 
and it makes moving your units a 
definite chore. 
But when the 
view is zoomed 
out, the units 
are so small that 
I had trouble 
telling which 
was which, and 
selecting indi- 
vidual units in a 
pack was next 
to impossible. 
The mini-map is 
so skimpy on 


detail that you often can’t even 
tell the difference between friendly 
and enemy forces with it. There is 
a set of buttons on the bottom of 
the main screen that is quite use- 
ful. Included are such things as 
Repair, Center on MCC, and Re- 
treat to MCC. These buttons are 
nice, but they block a section of 
the main screen (and the items sit- 
ting there, making it difficult to 
see or select those items). 

I found too many bugs to list 
here, but I'll pass on a choice few. 
After loading a saved game, many 
of my units' Al settings had been 
reset to the factory defaults, and 
areas of the map that I had 
explored before the save were 
covered up. What's most annoying, 
speeding up the game only affects 
the movement rate of units... not 
the amount of time it take to build 
them or repair them, which makes 
the already slow build-up process 
exceedingly tedious. 

I applaud Piranha and developer 
Media Station for attempting to 
add some long overdue features to 
the strategy genre, but I give them 
poor marks for focusing only on 
that and skimping on what in the 
end is the most important feature 
there is: enjoyment. 23I17 


COMPUTER GAMING WORLD ■ SEPTEMBER 1998 


v.computergaming.c 





Exploration 

Expansion 

Exploitation 

Extermination 



Manage Resources; 

' Acquire and hold asteroids 
' Mine asteroids for minerals 

• Generate and transfer power 

• Buy/Sell resources, ships, and 
votes to the guild for credits 


interactive Magic* 

P.O.Box 13491 

Research Triangle Park,NC 2770^,«^ 


Dynamic 3D solar system with 
all asteroids in constant orbital 
motion creates unique challenges 
as resources and territory move 
over time. 


Multiplayer capabilities for up to 40 
players via LAM, Internet, and play-by 
email, featuring cooperative and 
competitive play. 

Design and construct modular ships. 
Options allow for specialization; 
offensive, defensive, construction, 
Inalffftrteince, tracking and ^h/eying. 


Visit your local retailer or call 1-800-789-15^ for additional information 
Go to #085 @ www.computergamihg.com/infollnk 




REVIEW • GAME, NET & MATCH! 


Not Pong 

Finally— A Game That Gets Tennis Right 


byTasos Kaiafas 

T ennis, like track or horse 
racing, doesn't aiways 
transiate weli to a com- 
puter game. It's difficult 
not to view it as little 
more than an advanced 
game of PONG, which is 
absurd — PONG doesn't 
even have a net. 

But seriously, many computer 
tennis games in the past have 
admittedly conveyed an experi- 
ence similar to that of PONG: Hit 
the ball back and forth until some- 
one misses, They lacked the com- 
plexity of real-life tennis, mostly 
because all the players were simi- 
lar in ability. Fortunately for tennis 
fans, GAME, NET & MATCH is dif- 
ferent. If you overlook the cheesy 
title and ■70s-style box art, what 
you'll find inside is a well-thought- 
out tennis game with a lot of 


CCfMRUTeK 

GAMIMG 

wo R L D 




APPEAL: 

Anyone who’s 
been waiting for a 
decent tennis 
game. 

PROS: RPG-like 
character cre- 
ation; tlioughtful 
design; good con- 
tioi; Internet play, 

CONS: No difficulty levels; easy first 
sen/es; mediocre Al. 

DIFFICULTY: Easy. 
REQUIREMENTS: Pentium 133, 
Windows 95, 16M8 RAM, 100MB hard- 
drive space, 4); CD-ROM drive, 2MB 
graphics card (DirectX compatible), 
DirectX 5.0. 

3D SUPPORT: DirecOD-compatibie 
cards, 3Dfx. 

MULTIPLAYER SUPPORT: LAN, 
Internet (2 players); 1 CD per player. 
Price: 139.99 

Publisher: BlueByte Software 


Schaumburg, IL 
(847) 995-998! 




great features, but one 
that might get a bit too 
easy after a while. 

TENNIS RPG? 

The first place to go in 
the game is, obviously, 
the training area. There, 
you can learn the con- 
trols and get a feel for 
the game. A ball machine 
at the other end of the 
court fires the kind of 
shot you want to practice 
against; deep or short 
ground strokes, lobs, and 
cross-court ground 
strokes; random ground 
strokes and lobs; or com- 
pletely random shots. You 
can also practice serves, 
but because of the way 
you serve in the game, 
there's not much need for 
practice — once you get 
the timing down, you 
won't miss the first serve 
much during a match, 
unless you try something extreme. 

On the court, you can play a 
single match against the computer 
or against another person {on a 
LAN or over the Internet) by 
choosing from a few male or 
female characters with different 
ability levels, then selecting the 
court surface (clay, concrete, grass, 
or carpet) and the number of sets. 

The real fun in GAME, NET & 
MATCH comes from creating your 
own player for season play and 
entering him or her in various 
tournaments and competitions for 
prize money and ranking points. To 
create a player, you first choose a 
character, then you distribute 30 
points among six characteristics 
(with a maximum of 10 points 
each): forehand, backhand, volley, 
service, speed, and strength. 

Throughout the season you can 
choose from a list of competitions. 
The game lists date, location (with 



PRAaiCE MAKES PERFECT Turn on the ball 
machine to fine-tune your game. 


on your style of play. For 
example, if you like to play 
a serve-and-volley style, 
your serve and volley lev- 
els will increase after each 
competition. If you don't 
score many backhand 
points, your backhand 
ability won't improve. So, 
as the season progresses, 
your player continually 
gets better with experi- 
ence — as in an RPG. 



a nice variety of arena graphics), 
court type, and prize money for 
each tournament, and the more 
the prize money the tougher the 
opponents. Enter an upper-echelon 
competition before your player is 
ready and you might not make it 
past the first round, losing valuable 
time and ranking points in the 
process. You have to be smart to 
make it to the big time. 

The best part is that your play- 
er's abilities increase, depending 



PLAYER DIMENSION The 3D- 
rend«^ players look best 
through a 3D card, though the 
game doesn't require one. 


FORTY LOVE 

GAME, NET & MATCH 
has a lot that will please 
tennis fans. However, smart 
tennis players will find cer- 
tain strategies that a com- 
puter Al will repeatedly fall 
for. It also seems that your 
racket hits balls that 
should be too faraway, 
making the game a bit too 
forgiving. Another oddity is 
that computer players can 
dive for balls, although I've 
never seen my guy do it — and 
there are times when I wished he 
would have. 

More advanced players will be 
harder to beat no matter what 
you throw at them, and it even 
seems that computer opponents 
get better and worse at different 
times during the match, adding a 
dynamic element to their game. 
But once you get your player up 
to top-caliber status, you'll be 
hard to beat by a computer oppo- 
nent, which really points to a 
glaring omission: difficulty levels. 
Not only can you get good 
enough to beat computer oppo- 
nents regularly, but it's also a bit 
too easy to simply hit the ball no 
matter how new your player is. As 
with serves, you'll make an 
unforced error only if you try 
something extreme. But then 
that's what it usually takes to 
beat the best. S32J 


k COMPUTER GAMING WORLD » SEPTEMBER 1998 


^.computergaming.cQtn 










•W'- PLAYERSs 

NFL and GameDay are regislered trademarks of the National Football League. Officially llcertsed product of the NFL Players and NFL Properties. The NFL shield design Is a registered trademark of the 
League. Team names, nicknames, logos and other indicia are trademarks of the teams indicated. TM/© 1 998 NFLP. Players Inc logo Is an official trademark of the NFL Players 
© 1998 Players Inc. Windows 95 Is a registered trademark of Microsoft Corporation. 3Dfx Interactive logo Is a trademark of 3Dfx Interactive, Inc. Game developed by 909 Studios. 989 Sports is a 
uademark of Sony Computer Entertainment America Inc. © 1998 Sony Computer Entertainment America Inc. The ratings icon Is a trademark of the Interactive Digital Software Association. 

Go to #060 @ www.compuiergaming.com/infolInk 













REVIEW • MONOPOLY WORLD CUP '98 


Do Not Pass GOOOOOAL! 

Buy and Sell Soccer Franchises in MONOPOLY WORLD CUP '98 


by Charles Ardai 

hen they were 
called upon to 
dress MONOPOLY 
in Star Wars trap- 
pings last year, 
the folks at 
Hasbro 

Interactive threw 
themselves into the assignment 
with obvious passion, and adapt- 
ed every element of the game 
that could be adapted. They've 
done likewise with the WORLD 
CUP '98 edition. You've got FIFA's 
22 top-ranked soccer teams in 
place of the traditional properties; 
France's four largest stadiums 
instead of railroads; stadium 
lighting and soda concessions in 
place of utilities: "Home" and 
"Away" cards in place of 
"Chance" and "Community 
Chest"; soccer-bali shaped dice; 



GAMING 




APPEAL: 

Soccer fans, _ prefeCfiStW 

gamers who want , - ^ 

to try MONOPOLY 
with a twist. 



PROS: Plenty of 
customization; 
great animation; 
two new game 
features provide real soccer flavor. 
CONS: The new gameplay elements are 
random rather than skill-based; repeated 
animation soon becomes familiar. 
DIFFICULTY: Easy. 
REQUIREMENTS: Pentium 100, 
Windows 95, 16MB RAM, 4x CD-ROM, 
SVGA graphic, Windows-compatible 
sound card, DirectX 5.0, 

3D SUPPORT: None, 
MULTIPLAYER SUPPORT; LAN, 
Internet Gaming Zone (up to six playere); 
1 CD per player. 

Price: S29.95 

Publisher: Hasbro Imeiactive 
Beverly, MA 
(508) 921-3700 




and beautifully animated human 
players in place of the familiar 
shoe, iron, and top hat game 
tokens. 

When you land on a property, 
you'll hear that team's national 
anthem play while an animation 
shows the players in their native 
landscape. End your turn and your 
player kicks a soccer ball gracefully 
across the board to the next player. 
Land on "Go to Jail" and Unde 
Pennybags benches you while the 
crowd boos. The two major differ- 
ences between the WORLD CUP 
edition and the STAR WARS edition 
(other than the use of Scotland 
rather than Dagobah for Baltic 
Avenue) are that the WORLD CUP 
edition doesn't limit its customiza- 
tion to mere cosmetic changes, and 
that the WORLD CUP edition is 
actually playable. 

World Cup Rules! 

STAR WARS MONOPOLY boasted 
tons of animation and clips from 
the films, but the game ran slowly 
as a result. This edition has just as 
much animation, but it's blessedly 
free from delays. The clever open- 
ing and dosing sequences stutter a 
little, but the game itself runs 
smoothly and swiftly. 


Furthermore, once you got past 
the surface changes in the STAR 
WARS edition, all you found under- 
neath was ordinary MONOPOLY. 
Here, you have two new game ele- 
ments, one of which comes into 
play each time a player passes 
"Go": Either the player has to face 
off against Uncle Pennybags for 
two penalty shots or two randomly 
selected teams face each other in 
an automated "match play." If you 
score a goal on both penalty shots, 
you win the use of a third die in 
subsequent turns — you get to roll 
all three dice and choose which 
two you want to use. Scoring on 
only one penalty shot has no 
effect; and if you miss both penalty 
kicks, you lose a 
turn. 

In the auto- 
mated match 
play, the team 
that wins (which 
the computer 
decides random- 
ly) changes 
places with the 
team directly 
ahead of it on 
the board; the 
losing team 
changes place 


with the one directly behind it. In 
other words, if you happen to own 
the most expensive property when 
you lose a match play, you sudden- 
ly find yourself owning a less- 
expensive property. It's not that 
you trade teams with the other 
player— it's that the value of your 
property changes, as if Vermont 
Avenue moved uptown to become 
a purple property while St. Charles 
Place became a light-blue "bar- 
gain" district. 

These "World Cup rules" add 
not just extra soccer flavor but new 
strategic dimensions as well — so 
much, in fact, that people who care 
nothing about soccer will enjoy 
playing the game. The only short- 
comings are that the new elements 
don't come into play often enough 
and they are based largely on ran- 
dom results rather than on gamers' 
decisions. Still, they are the first 
new MONOPOLY gameplay rules 
since Parker Brothers agreed to 
canonize the "Free Parking rule." 

MONOPOLY WORLD CUP '98 will 
find its natural market among soc- 
cer fans, who'll enjoy it as a keep- 
sake or a novelty. But others will 
enjoy it, too, for bringing a wel- 
come breath of fresh air into the 
somewhat musty traditions of 
MONOPOLY. And everyone will 
enjoy watching Pennybags dive to 
make a save. It's a treat to see the 
old gent get some exercise, CKd'.'J 


COMPUTER GAMING WORLD « SEPTEMBER 1998 


v.computergaming.< 







• REVIEWS 


Brain Drain 

An IQ Test a Tile-matching Puzzle, and Board Games for Bored Gamers 


The Ultimate IQ Test 

★ ★ A A 

Publisher; Virtual Entertainment 
Price: S24.95 

www.virtualentcrtaininent.com 

C alling a game THE ULTIMATE 
IQ TEST is begging people to 
ignore it. Most of us got our fill 
of IQ tests back in grade school 
and would not voluntarily submit 
to more. If you choose to ignore 
this one, though, you'll be miss- 
ing out on something consider- 
ably more entertaining than its 
name suggests. 

As I remember them, IQ tests 
contained hundreds of tedious 
questions and took hours to com- 
plete. This one contains only 30 
questions and has a 60-minute 
time limit; more importantly, the 
questions are not just tough, 
they're tantalizing. What two dif- 
ferent three-letter words can you 
insert between "CON" and "ENT" 


to produce nine-letter words? 
What number should replace "X" 
in the sequence "25, 22, 15, X, 
10,19, 24"? 

Finish the test, 
and the game 
scores your perfor- 
mance in each cat- 
egory (math, ver- 
bal, spatial, knowl- 
edge) and displays 
your IQ. You can go 
back over the test 
for explanations of 
the questions you 


got wrong, or get yourself in the 
mood for your next test with five 
classic brain-teasers. The brain- 
teasers are overly familiar and not 
presented with the panache of 
SMART GAMES, and some of the 
supporting material for the test 
itself is trite ("Most people, by defi- 
nition, are of average intelligence," 
intones a host), but, otherwise, THE 
ULTIMATE IQ TEST does a good job 
of living up to its name. 

The answers, incidentally, are 
"TIN," "DIM," and "A." And if you 
can figure out why "4" is right in 
five minutes or less, this test is for 
you. — Charles Ardai 


Sorry 

A A A A 

Publisher: Hasbro Inieractive 
Price: S19.95 

www.hasbroin1eractive.com 

I f you've ever played the board 
game Sorry, you'll remember 
how great it felt to land on 
top of your opponent and 
send him back to the start, 
or even better, to draw the 
much sought after Sorry 
card that allowed you to 
bring a new pawn out of 
the your home base and 
send another player back. 
Sure, Hasbro's new com- 
puter boardgame edition 
allows you to do all that. But even 
when you're playing in multiplayer 


mode, if you don t have a friend 




sitting across the board from you 
when you do the dastardly deed, 
the glee factor is somewhat 
watered down. 

The object of the game is to get 
your four pawns out, around the 
board, and safely back to their 
home base before your opponents 
get to theirs. In 
the classic game, 
you pick up a 
card from the 
center prior to 
each turn, which 
gives you 
instructions on 
how to move. In 
the CD-ROM 
version there's 
also a strategy 
option, whereby 
your cards are 

dealt before the game begins. It's 
up to you to play your hand as 
strategically as possible. Other than 
that, the gameplay is the same as 
that of the original game. 

SORRY is clearly intended for 
kids. The cute animation allows 
your pawns to morph into different 
shapes as they move around the 
board. If you're about to kick 
someone back to the start, your 
pawn might turn into a spade and 
bash your opponent into the 
ground; if your pawn makes it 
home, he might curl up in bed and 
go to sleep. While younger gamers 
will enjoy this upbeat adaptation of 
the board game, adults should stick 
with classics like SCRABBLE or 
MONOPOLY. —Charlotte Panther 


Nahan: The Ultimate 
3D Puzzle Game 

A A A A 

Publisher: GlobalStar Software 
Price: J19.99 
www.globatstar.on.ca 

Y OU know you're really hooked 
on a game when you can still 


see the game pieces flashing 
before your eyes after you've left 
the computer. One of the first com- 
puter games to have this effect on 
me was Activision's SHANGHAI, a 
game in which you must remove 
pairs of sufficiently exposed tiles 
until you clear the board, or can no 



longer move. While NAHAN's 
gameplay is similar, the game 
sadly lacks that mesmerizing quali- 
ty of SHANGHAI. 

The tiles in NAHAN are rectan- 
gular rather than hexagonal (you 
can also play a three-dimensional 
version using cubes). Players can 
select from various tile sets and 
layouts and can listen to a variety 
of uninspired (but unobtrusive) 
mood music. Points are awarded 
for each pair of tiles removed, for 
removing a significant number of 
tiles, and for completing a game 
quickly. If you lose a game, you 
can replay it or watch the com- 
puter play it. Hints are also avail- 
able. You can also use an editor 
with some nifty controls to gener- 
ate new layouts. 

The biggest challenge in playing 
NAHAN is not the gameplay itself, 
but dealing with the visual assaults 
of riotous colors, clashing back- 
grounds, and tiles that are often 
hard to distinguish from one 
another. The added factor of having 
to rotate layouts to see all playable 
pieces makes this game even more 
"challenging." — Petra Schlunk 


w.coinputefgjmmg.com 


COMPUTER GAMING WORLD ■ SEPTEMBfR 1998 




STRATEGY • CHEATS • WALKTHROUGHS 


Jane's F-1 5 


Moving Mud Is the Key to Success in JANE’S F-1 5 


by Tom "KC” Basham 

H ere's the problem: The 
Iraqis are up in arms 
again, preparing to 
launch a full-scale inva- 
sion into a neighboring 
country. The United 
Nations peacekeeping 
force has to persuade 
Saddam to stay at home instead. 
The President has given the word 
and your F-15E squadron takes off 
on a series of preemptive strikes. 
You're going to war, and everyone 
expects you to hit your targets 
when you get there. 


Ground-Pounding 

Many of us have more fun duel- 
ing at 20,000 feet than moving 
mud, but the F-1 5E Strike Eagle 
exists primarily to blow up things 
on the ground (for tips on F-1 5 
air-to-air combat, see last month's 
Gamer's Edge strategy piece). 
While it inherited reasonable air- 
to-air capability from the original 
F-1 5 design, it's very unlikely it 
will ever be used in that role. The 
U.S. Air Force has only four or five 
dozen E-model airframes in its 
inventory, and it's not going to 
waste them on air-to-air missions 
when it has F-1 5Cs and F-1 6s to 
carry out the job. Consequently, if 
you're going to have any fun in 
JANE'S F-1 5, you'd better be good 
at making ground targets explode. 

Basically, executing air strikes 
has two major steps: Designating 
a target and delivering ordnance. 
Of the two, designating the target 
is usually the most labor-intensive. 
There are several ways to desig- 
nate targets, depending upon 


See the Review 

JULY ISSUE • 4.5 STARS 



DAMAGE ASSESSMENT As exciting as it is to be near ground zero vidien your 
bombs go off, it generally puts you into a very vulnerable position. 


what equipment 
you're carrying. 

You can use a 
Maverick's seek- 
er head to find 
and acquire a 
target, use the 
infrared camera, 
create a high- 
resolution map 
(HRM), or simply 
click on an 
object inside the 
HUD field. Each 
method is best 
suited for specif- 
ic scenarios. You 
don't need to be 
familiar with all 
targeting meth- 
ods to enjoy 
JANE'S F-1 5; but 
the more types 
you're comfort- 
able with, the 
more options 
you'll have during combat. 

1 find that I generally rely on 
HRMs, occasionally clicking a tar- 
get of opportunity that suddenly 
appears in the HUD. Using the 
HUD, however, requires that you 
be able to maneuver the mouse 


and click on specific pixels, and it 
isn't a reliable method under most 
circumstances. Also, I tend to click 
just a bit beyond desired tar- 
get, since I've found that free-fall 
weapons in F-1 5 have a tendency 
to fall short of a targeted location. 


In the case of a building, I usually 
aim for the top of the building, 
which actually signifies a point on 
the ground just past the building. 
This isn't very realistic (in real life, 
I'd aim for the base of the build- 
ing), but it substantially improves 



COMPUTER GAMING WORLD » SEPTEMBER 1998 


n.computergatiiing.c 





SWEET RELEASE tfs always beneficial to be as far as reasonably possible from 
enemy air defenses when you release your payload. 


my hit ratio in the game. One 
caveat: If you plan to ripple- 
release multiple bombs, set the 
target point slightly ahead of the 
target. The trailing bombs will fall 
past the first one. The distance 
between impacts depends on the 
interval between releases. If you 
aim directly at (or just beyond) the 
target, your later bombs will prob- 
ably sail harmlessly past. 


The Pause That 
Refreshes 

F-15 includes an outstanding 
feature: The MPDs (Multipurpose 
Displays) continue to work even 
when you pause the game. The 
best way to locate and designate 
targets is to select the desired 
radar mode, let it paint the area a 
couple of times, then press the 
Pause key, While the action is 


Combat Loadout 

C arrying the right mix of ordnance is crudai to the success of 
every mission. During Operation Desert Storm, F-1SEs initially 
carried a mix of two AIM-? missiles and six Rockeye cluster bombs 
(CBUs). When the airto-air threat proved to be nonexistent, crews 
moved to 12 CBUs or 12 Mk 82s (occasionally carrying Mk 84s). 
Toward the end of the war. F-15Es finally received a significant 
number of laser targeting pods, which allowed the widespread use 
of GBU-12 lasei^guided bombs. 

As with the various avionics modes, it's not really necessary to 
use every type of weapon. Try to find a few weapons that you can 
reliably deliver on target A mix of Mavericks and LGBs is an excel- 
lent all-purpose loadout when available, although such powerful 
weapons may be overkill against soft targets. CBUs are great for 
wide-area attacks and generally don't require the same predsion 
delivery as an iron bomb. CBUs, though, don't pack as much punch 
and may be unsuitable against hard targets. 

Don't waste a lot of weapon pylons carrying aiMo-air weapons 
unless the mission specifically calls for antiair activities. You'll gen- 
erally have dedicated ai^to-air fighters handling CAP, sweep, and 
escort duties. Every alMo-air missile carried means fewer bombs 
and therefore less damage to the enemy. 


appropriate 
location. 

You may 
think, "That's 
cheating!" 

Given the prod- 
uct's emphasis 
on realism, how 
can anyone pos- 
sibly suggest 
such a brazen 
cheat as actual- 
ly stopping the 
game? Well, 
remember that 
the F-15 sports 
a crew of two. 
The USAF isn't 
really big on 
giving joyrides 
in multimiilion-dollar jets, so 
before they install a back seat in a 
fighter they have a good reason. 
The guy in back (GIB) isn't there 
to sightsee; he's busy managing 
weapons and targets. The pilot, 
meanwhile, is busy flying the air- 
craft, trying not 
to get shot or fly 
into a mountain. 

While F-15 isn't 
as detailed as 
real life, there's 
still a lot of 
work to do, and 
it's hardly "real- 
istic" to expect 
a single person 
to complete the 
work of two 
people in real- 
time. Using the 
pause function 
during strike 
missions lets 
you better simulate two distinct 
crew members with one player. 

Here's the Pitch 

Once you designate the target, 
it's time to move in and kill it. 

Now, we all know that it's gener- 
ally a very bad idea to make mul- 
tiple passes over the same target. 
Anyone you didn't kill on the first 
pass will be waiting for you the 


second time around. Antiaircraft 
guns, shoulder-launched SAMs, 
and even small arms fire will likely 
greet your return. Sometimes, 
though, you have no choice. You 
may have missed the primary tar- 
get, gotten only some of the spec- 
ified structures, or encountered a 
system failure of some sort. Lives 
may depend on your making 
another pass. That's why I like loft 
bombing. 

With loft bombing (described 
on page 4.62 of the manual), you 
lob free-fall bombs by executing a 
well-timed pitch-up maneuver. The 
result looks much like an under- 
hand softball throw. The maneuver 
has its flaws: You can attack only 
one structure per pass (an airfield, 
for example, may have numerous 
buildings that you need to 
destroy), and it's more susceptible 
to alignment problems. Still, it 
keeps you farther away from the 
target and any surface-to-air 
weapons. Since this delivery 
method leaves me in a climb, I roll 
135 degrees immediately after 
release, pull hard on the stick, and 
slice the nose back down. Once I 
get the air- 
craft back 
on the deck, 

I level out, 
extend away 
from the 
target, circle 
around, and 
attack it 
again from 
another 
direction. 

I learned 
another 
trick while 
using loft 
bombing 
several 

years ago flying TORNADO. I rou- 
tinely lobbed bombs over hills, 
never climbing high enough to 
expose myself to return fire. To 
use this trick in F-1 5 you will have 
to acquire the target somehow. Try 
popping up 40 or more miles 
away from the target and isolat- 
ing it in an HRM. Quickly dive 
back to the dirt, proceed to the 
nearest hill, and toss a bomb 



GET A FIX Start the process of 
designating your target by mak- 
ing an HRM (high-resolution map) 
of the target area. 


^omputergaming.c 


COMPUTER GAMING WORLD - SEPTFMRFR 





JANE'S F-15 




GET THE HELL OUT! Roll and pull off the target after releasing your bombs— don't 
continue straight into the air defenses. 


^ 0.911 

A 1.0 9.0G 


! TGI 

6 s.a 

\ otjjio tPGLL 

\ flUTO LOFT > 


• t m rn rySSmmm ' nJI-LI, - 

DON'T DELAY Start the attack early enough so that you have time to line up 
before the TPULL counter expires. 


STAY ON TARGET A good lineup witii 19 seconds 
before the pitch-up maneuver. 


much the way a coworker tosses a paper wad over a 
cubicle wall at work. 

Loft bombing requires more practice than AUTO or 
CDIP modes. First, you have to initiate the attack 
from an appropriate distance. If you try to start a loft 
attack too close in, you won't get the proper HUD 
symbology (specifically, you won't get the TPULL 
counter). You must be careful not to roll the air- 
craft — even slightly — when you initiate the pull-up. 
The slightest roll will pull the nose off the target and 
sling the bombs off to the side. As with all bomb 
runs, align your heading with the Azimuth Steering 
Line (ASL) and fly straight and level for several sec- 
onds before initiating the climb. If you can't achieve 
proper lineup before the climb, or if you let the air- 
craft roll as the nose comes up, pull off and prepare 
for a new attack run. 

Granted, you are exposed during the sudden 
pitch-up, but I generally find that my total exposure 
time is less than in a direct attack, and I can turn 
away from the target sooner. Loft bombing is not a 
"magic bullet," though, and should be one of many 
attack techniques at your disposal. Every technique 
you master increases your chances of successfully 
executing and surviving each new attack. 2317 


insMgte Mhe MavcricU 


T he AGM-65 Maverick comes in several variants. The AGM-65A/B/D 
models use a 125-pound shaped-charge warhead designed for 
antitank warfare. These models dive on the target in an effort to pen- 
etrate a tank's more vulnerable top armor. — 

The AGM-65E/F/G variants, meanwhile, carry f 
a larger, 300-pound warhead designed for 
better peneU'ation. The E/F/G versions are 
used primarily against fixed structures and 
ships, wKh the F version aiming for the 
waterline of a ship. The different models 
use a variety of guidance methods. The 

AGM-65A/B models are television-guided; 

the AGM-65C is laser-guided; the AGM-6SD/F 
models use IR guidance; and the AGIVI-65E ; 
uses an improved laser guidance system. I 

The Maverick has a long history. First test - ^ 

flights were conducted in 1969, with the AGM- 


AGM-65A reaching operational capability in 1972. Final delivery of 
some 5,000 missiles to the U.S. Navy occurred in 1994. The first combat 
usage was in Vietnam during January and February of 1973, scoring 13 
hits out of 18 launches. Israeli aircraft 
fired 50 Mavericks during the 1973 
^ Yom KIppur War, claiming 47 successes 
S (42 hits and five near misses intended 
rV;.- i to disable, not destroy, targets). In 

1975, Iranian aircraft scored 12 hits out 
i of 12 launches against Iraqi tanks. 

More than 5,100 Mavericks were fired 
i jn Operation Desert Storm, with offi* 

cial reports claiming approximately a 
I 90 percent success rate for TV- and IR- 

variants and approximately a 
i 60 percent success rate for the 

MAVERICK Maverick's laser-guided variants. 



in-”"" I 


j|j 



iBEH 

H 


COMPUTER GAMING WORLD » SEPTEMBER 1998 






BASEBALL 

NEXT a E N E E A T I O N BASEBALL 


CORRECT! 


Congratulations, the answer is False 
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made VR Baseball 2000 for. 




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always wanted. 


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• First same out for 



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Available Summer of 1 998 


Complete In-game experience with 
heckling fans, PA announcer and players 
talking smack to one another. 





The most current rosters and statistics for 
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Everything a baseball purist wants. 


rt'.t'fsports.ci 


w.majQtieaguebasebail.cc 




O 1998 Interplay Produaions. Vfi Sports, VR Sports logo, VR Baseoai 
Vou Gotta Have Game are IraOemarks of Interplay Productions. All 
reserved. Major League BeseUall Irademarlis and copyngltls are used ' 
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Licensee - Major League Baseball Players Association, Windows and t 
Windows '95 logo are registered trademarks ol Microsoft Corporation. 


Go to #164 @ www.computergaming.com/infolink 






StarCraft 

Master the Terrans 


m 




g-jiry. ■■ • 


’eW't] 


■ I ,. .J Si ^ »95» 1 

COMBINED ARMS Terran units are designed to complement one 
another. While marines might fall before heavier troops, a 
marine/tank/firebat combo is tough to beat 




by Elliott Chin 

I n our previous 
two strategy 
articles, we dis- 
cussed general 
tips. Here, we 
begin the racial 
breakdowns for 
STARCRAFT. This 
month, we start with 
the Terrans. 

The Terrans have 
perhaps the most ver- 
satile lot of units, 
with some quick and 
cheap infantry and a 
fair share of durable 
heavy hitters. Terran 
players must also 
always remember to 
make use of the SCV’s 
ability to repair 
units. Terran mecha- 
nized units aren't as 
cheap as Zerg units, 
nor as durable as 
Protoss units, so the 
equalizer is their abil- 
ity to be repaired. 

Terran players also need to remember to employ combined arms. 
Whereas Zerg players can get by with just hydralisks or mutalisks, 
and Protoss players can wipe out the opposition with just a few 
zealots, Terran players really need to build a force of complementary 
units. While it is certainly harder to coordinate, the Terran attack 
force, when composed of a proper mix of combined arms, can be 
devilishly hard to defeat. 

Now we'll break down each unit and its natural roles. When 
you're reading up on a particular unit's usefulness, make sure you 
take into account the type of damage it inflicts and the kind of 
target it is classified as. Read the "Hints, tips, and other informa- 

tion" folder in the STARCRAFT README. HLP 

_l file for a detailed list of the damage and 
size type of each unit. 





See the Review 


JULY ISSUE • 5 STARS 


A 


COMPUTER GAMING WORLD « SEPTEMBER 1998 


Marine 

Strengths; Marines, which are 
cheap and quick to produce, are 
great cannon fodder and antiair 
units, Put them in bunkers for excel- 
lent defense. If you use them on the 
offensive, always research the stim- 
pack ability and the range upgrade. 
Without the range upgrade, they are 
at a terrible disadvantage against 
hydralisks and upgraded dragoons 
(when in bunkers, marines won't be 
able to fire back since those two 
units have better range). Also, since 
they deal normal damage to all tar- 
gets and have a very fast rate of 
fire, they remain useful versus 
enemy infantry and heavy units. 
Marines, when paired with goliaths, 
make excellent air deterrents. They 
are good against mutalisks, but only 
if you research at least one armor 
upgrade and stim packs. Marines 
are also good as siege tank support. 



Weaknesses: Marines are 
zealot fodder. Because they die 
easily, don't expect them to bail 
you out when hydralisks and 
zealots overrun your defenses. 
Marines are toast versus siege 
tanks, especially because they 
willingly stand in neat little clus- 
ters— easy siege tank targets. 

Marines have the 
following ability: 

Stim Pack: Using a stim pack 
costs 10 hit points to the unit, but 
doubles the unit's attack rate and 
speed for approximately 1 5 sec- 
onds. Use it on the offensive to 
make marines and firebats espe- 
cially nasty. Since they die easily, 
you might as well give them a stim 
shot so they go down blazing. 


www.computefgaming.com 




STARCRAFT 


Firebat 

Strengths: Firebats are good for one purpose: burning through infantry. They are 
the Terrans' answer to zerglings and zealots. Their splash damage adds to their effec- 
tiveness. Employ them to stop zealot rushes. Research the stim pack ability and use that 
just before firebats meet the enemy so they can close the distance quickly. The firebats' 
attack is not canceled by a Dark Swarm. Also because they are melee units, they can 
attack tanks without being hit by the tar- 
geted tank. In addition to dismantling 
zergling and zealot attacks, firebats pro- 
vide good ground support for siege tanks. 

Weaknesses: Firebats are ineffective 
against hard targets such as ultralisks and 
goliaths. They can't attack air units. You 
shouldn't use them for much besides tak- 
ing down zealots, zerglings, Terran 
infantry, and hydralisks. 



Ghost 

Strengths: Ghosts are best as sup- 
port versus enemy Terrans or Protoss. 
They can neutralize all Terran and 
Protoss mechanized units, call down 
devastating nuclear strikes, and cloak 
themselves. Faced with the durability 
and overwhelming power of scouts, 
battlecruisers, and carriers, ghosts are 
the Terrans' best answer. 

Weaknesses: Ghosts are nearly 
useless versus the Zerg, since lockdown 
does not affect any Zerg unit. Also, 
ghosts deal plasma damage, which 
means they are do only quarter dam- 
age (2.5 damage per hit) to hard tar- 
gets like tanks, ultralisks, and wraiths. 
Don't use them for much besides nuke 
calling and metal target lockdowns. 

Ghosts have the following 
special abilities: 

Lockdown: Lockdown freezes any 
mechanized unit and cancels any of its 
special abilities. Arbiters decloak all 
their surrounding 
units, carriers recall 
all interceptors into 
their bays, science 
vessels can't initiate 
abilities or even 
detect cloaked 
units. The duration 
of lockdown is 
approximately one 
minute. Locked- 
down units can be 
attacked and can- 
not fight back. A 
ghost that has kill 


energy can neutralize two enemy units. 
In many cases, the ghost's lockdown is 
the only thing that can negate a mas- 
sive carrier or scout attack. Six ghosts, 
which cost a total of 600 resources, 
can effectively castrate an army of 12 
carriers, which costs at least 7,800 
resources. 

Cloak: Upgrade the ghost's energy 
so that a fully charged ghost can be 
cloaked and still fire off two lock- 
downs. Always cloak a ghost before it 
calls in a nuke. 

Call Nuclear Strike: Ghosts can 
also call down nuclear strikes. When 
you want to put this ability into play, 
make sure you first research cloaking 
and the sight-range upgrade. The 
ghost must sit for approximately 1 5 
seconds before the nuclear missile 
strikes. During that time, he is vulnera- 
ble to attack. If the ghost is spotted 
while he is cloaked, place a defensive 
matrix on him with a science vessel to 
ensure that he lives long enough to 
call down the nuke. 




www.godziliaonfine.coiTi 

Go to #197 @ www.computergamlng.com/infolink 


GAMESTORM. 


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lOHD i I 1 1 1 ii'. f.i lOZll.lA fipsigiiarer.ofiyiltjhU'd WfJtkjof 

t,. I All.iK. mod 

iiii'.'Slti'.. lyyiH-wiiiopoh!; Imu.H iive.Iru.,AllIlii)lin l(i vvv'd 


CMPOLIG r. 


/.computergaming. ( 


COMPUTER GAMING WORLD • SEPTEMBER 1998 


MYTHIC" 




STARCRAFT 


Vulture 

Strengths: Vultures are excellent 
scouts. The good thing about them Is 
they are only slightly more expensive 
than marines and can be repaired. Don't 
use them unless you research spider 
mines and the speed upgrade. With the 
speed upgrade, they are the fastest unit 
in STARCRAFT. A group of vultures can be 
a quick-response team in allied games to 
help bail out your buddy. Because of their 
superior speed, Terran players can 
engage in hit-and-run attacks versus 
zealots, firing and then running away, 
and almost never getting hit in return. 
However, this tactic takes considerable 
baby-sitting of the vultures. 

Definitely use vultures to lay down 
mines at choke points and near extra 
resource nodes. The mines won't be trig- 
gered by enemy peon units, but they will 


act as nice spy units. Placing the mines at 
town entrances will not only alert you to 
attacks, but also take down some 
Invaders as well. 

Each vulture gets three mines. Once 
they are deployed, the mines stay 
cloaked until they are triggered by a 
nearby target. Each mine does 125 nor- 
mal damage. It affects ground targets 
only, but It injures all units in its area of 
effect. All ground units except peon units, 
archons, and other vultures 
will trigger a mine. 

Weaknesses: Vultures, 
like firebats and ghosts, 
deal plasma damage, 
which is best against small 
infantry. Their otherwise 
impressive 20 base dam- 
age is reduced to 10 versus 
medium targets like 
hydralisks and 5 against 
hard targets like ultralisks. 

Use them only against 


small infantry and peon units. They can- 
not attack air units. 

Siege Tank 

Strengths: Tanks are mediocre 
weapons in tank mode, but in siege 
mode, they are hands-down the most 
devastating ground attack. You must 
research siege mode if you intend to use 
tanks. Set them up out of the range of 
towers and bunkers and you can just 
raze enemy defenses with impunity. 
Remember that the siege tanks' splash 
damage in siege mode w/7/harm enemy 
units in a Dark Swarm. Siege tanks in 
siege mode also make excellent defenses 
when you pair them with bunkers and 
missile turrets. 

Siege mode makes the tank immobile, 
but increases its range and bumps base 
damage from 30 to 70. While In siege 
mode, the tank also does 
splash damage. Unlike the 
firebat's splash damage, 
the siege tank's splash 
damage will hurt friendly 
units as well. Keep this in 
mind when you select tar- 
gets. To make up for its 
increased range, a siege 
tank in siege mode can't 
hit targets right next to it. 
Weaknesses: Tanks 
can't attack air units, nor 
can they attack close-range 
targets when in siege mode. Thus, you 
must always provide them with escorts. 
Have firebats handy to take down zerg- 
lings and zealots (both of which destroy 
tanks with surprising ease) and also have 
either goliaths or plenty of marines for 
ground-to-air support. This sort of forma- 
tion (tanks in siege mode with firebat 
support up front and marine/goliath sup- 
port at the sides) is one of the game's 
most powerful combinations. 




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STARCRAFT 


Goliath 

Strengths; Goliaths are excellent 
antiair weapons. They are good against 
scouts, guardians, wraiths, transports, 
and other 
hard air tar- 
gets. They 
also have a 
ground 
attack, which 
helps when 
they are 
defending 
islands. In 

those cases, they provide as much antiair 
support as a missile turret, but they can 
also field a good ground attack when 
shuttles manage to drop off ground 
attackers. Their range is good, being the 
same as that of a fully upgraded marine 
or a hydralisk. They provide excellent air 
support for siege tanks. 

Weaknesses: They are too expen- 
sive to use as ground fodder, so support 
them with marines or firebats if you 
expect zealots or zerglings to accompany 
an air attack, Because they deal out 


explosive damage, their effectiveness 
against mutalisks and scourges is dimin- 
ished {half damage only). Don't rely on 
goliaths against Zerg air units. If you're 
facing scourges and muta- 
lisks, use more marines. 

Dropship 

Strengths: Can carry 
up to eight slots of units. 
Terran infantry each take 
one slot, vultures and 
goliaths take two slots, and 
tanks take four slots. 

Weaknesses: They are slower than 
other transports once the other trans- 
ports acquire speed upgrades. 




Wraith 

Strengths: Wraiths are good against hard air targets such as scouts, battle- 
cruisers, carriers, and guardians. If you use them, you must research their cloaking 
ability, which makes them very useful. Without it, they are a waste of money. A 
team of cloaked wraiths can be hell against expansion towns. Send a group of 
them to patrol the map and strike down any new bases the enemy is erecting. 
Destroy any cloak detectors first and then start attacking units and buildings. 

Weaknesses: These guys are pretty expensive for such weak units. They have 
few hit points and fall easily to scourges, scouts, and mutalisks. Moreover, their 
explosive air attack operates at half strength against mutalisks and scourges. 
Don't rely on them to combat those two units. Their ground attack is also pretty 
weak, so don't use them unless your purpose is cloaked harassment 




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STARCRAFT 



Science Vessel 

Strengths: Science vessels can 
initiate three special abilities. In addi- 
tion, they can automatically detect 
cloaked units. Especially when fight- 
ing other Terrans it is crucial to have 
science vessels accompanying your air 
forces in order to detect cloaked 
enemy wraiths. Their special abilities 
are essential for victory versus 
Protoss and Zerg forces, so don't 
neglect the research and production 
of science vessels. 

Weaknesses; Since science ves- 
sels have no attack, you need to pro- 
vide them with escorts. Plus, because 
of the short range of their abilities 
and their low hit points, they can be 
downed quite easily. 


Irradiate harms organic units only, so 
all Terran and Protoss mechanized 
units are immune, as is the archon. 
Use irradiate to eliminate clusters of 
hydralisks, mutalisks, guardians, and 
marines, all of which bunch up when 
they attack. You can also use this 
spell defensively by casting it on a 
mechanical unit that is under attack 
by melee attackers. Cast a defensive 
matrix to extend the mechanical 
unit's life, and then an irradiate on it 
so that it hurts all eligible, nearby 
units that are attacking it. 

EMP Shockwave; This ability 
completely drains all shields and 
energy in an area of effect. It's most 
effective when used against Protoss 
units (it effectively halves their hit 
points), but it's also useful for deplet- 
ing the energy of queens and defilers 
before they can get off a broodling or 
dark swarm. Because dragoons, 
scouts, and carriers tend to bunch 
together when they attack, one EMP 
shockwave can affect an entire group 
of units. EMP fired into a suspected 
area of cloaked wraiths will also 
decloak the wraiths by robbing them 
of their energy (provided you strike 
the right place). EMP affects both 
units and buildings. If you are nuking 
a Protoss camp, EMP the target area 
just before the nuke hits. The EMP 
will rob the buildings of shield^ and 
the nuke will then be able to destroy 
the targeted buildings. 


The science vessel has the 
following special abilities: 

Defensive Matrix: This ability 
bestows 200 bonus hit points on a 
single unit. Like Protoss shields, these 
bonus hit points take full damage 
from any attack, regardless of the 
type of damage dealt. The defensive 
matrix will run out after 90 seconds 
or until the 200 hit points are lost. 
Science vessels come equipped with 
this ability. 

Irradiate: This ability poisons a 
single target and damages any units 
next to the afflicted unit. Irradiate 
drains 1 99 hit points at a rate of 6-7 
hit points per second. Multiple irradi- 
ates will not accelerate the drain. 


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COMPUTER GAMING WORLD » SEPTEMBER 1998 


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STARCRAFT 



The cruiser has the 
following ability: 

Yamato Cannon: The yam- 
ato cannon takes approximately 
5 seconds to power up, after 
which it can deal 250 damage to 
a single Target, 


Battlecruiser 

Strengths: Battlecruisers serve a 
highly specialized role. Always research 
their yamato cannon and energy 
upgrades and then use them to destroy 
towers and large ships like carriers and 
arbiters. On island maps, they are espe- 
cially good, since siege tanks can't take 
down towers on islands. Battlecruisers are 
actually good deterrents to carriers, since 
the cruisers can go toe-to-toe against 


them. If you provide it with the proper 
escorts, a battlecruiser fleet can be a very 
formidable force. 

Weaknesses: With their slow rate of 
fire, they are especially vulnerable to 
multiple scourges and hydralisks. Escort 
cruisers with wraiths or have marines 
underneath. Also, don't rely too heavily 
on them for your main force. They are too 
expensive and too easy to destroy, 

Psionic storm, plague, and ensnare are 
especially vexing for battle- 
cruiser owners. Thus, target high 
templars and defilers as soon as 
you spot them. 



A s you can see, the Terrans have some formidable 
units, but many require support to fuliy achieve 
their potential. While Terrans are the first race you 
are likely to play, they will probably be the last for you to 
master. But when you do, you will find them to be the most 
versatile race to play. Just remember to always think ahead, 
because the Terrans are at their worst when reacting. 
Whereas a Zerg player can crank out three hydralisks if they 
get surprised, or a Protoss piayer can muster some resis- 
tance with just two zealots, Terrans are really at a disadvan- 
tage if caught off guard. So make sure you master the art of 
combined arms and take the fight to your enemies. S32] 



The Perfect Counter 

1 Af hsn playing the Terrans, you'll undoubtedly get trounced at least once by a 

V V horde of each unit type. Here are the best counters for all the units that 

could potentially end your reign. 


liuJijiJ'jij 

Zergling 

-Rrebats or bunkered marines 

Hydralisk 

..Siege (mode) tanks, spider mines; irradiate 



rUIiitalicV 

-Stim-packed marines and goliaths; irradiate 

rimrHmn 

..Wraiths, goliaths, and/or irradiate 

Zealot 

..Firebats 

Dragoons 

..Lockdown and/or siege tanks 

Reaver . 

-Lockdown, air units 

High Templars. 

Jrradiate and/or siege (mode) tanks 

Scouts 

- Lockdown and/or cloaked wraiths 

Carriers 

-Lockdown 

Arrhnn 


Siege (mode) tanks 

-Wraiths and/or lockdown 

Battlecruisers . 

-Lockdown 

Cloaked wraiths 

-Scanner sweep, science vessels, lockdown 



COMPUTER GAMING WORLD ‘ SEPTEMBER 1998, 



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The Operational Art of War 

W hen you try to create a new scer^ario, the good news is that you have a really power- 
ful editor at your disposal. The bad news, however, is that you have a really powerful 
editor at your disposal... and it’s easy to get overwhelmed by all the options. So, here 
are some brief tips to help you out: 

• If you've ever tried to create levels for most games (especially most 3D shooters), you'll be 
pleasantly surprised at how much the fill, draw, and blob functions simplify map making. I was 
able to create one map in less than 20 minutes, after a little practice. 

• To create terrain features for your map, dick on one of the 41 hexagon types, then click-and- 
drag. Don't worry about scale at first, because you can adjust the scale later by merely resizing 
the borders of 
the map. 

• Keep your 
first battle 
design simple. 

Consider using 
2D unit icons, 
especially if 
you've played 
boardgames 
before. 

• If you 

decide to use 3D 
symbols (yes, we 
know, the tanks 
are way cool), 
keep in mind 
that the 3D icons 
look like 2D on 
some scenario- 
editor screens. 

• If you feel 
really cocky, you 
can use a bitmap 
editor to create 
your own icons. 

Just don't forget 
to distribute the 
modified files for 

your symbols to your friends, or they won't be able to play your scenario. 

• Creating forces is equally simple: You just pick a unit type and add squads, individual vehi- 
cles and guns, setting unit characteristics with a couple of clicks. You can create entire forma- 
tions with the copy function, almost as if you were using a word processor. 

• For your first few attempts at creating a scenario, don't mess with the climate or the trig- 
gers for theater-wide events. It's too easy to screw up a scenario until you have a feel for bal- 
ance. Remember, the flow is very different from your average turn-based wargame. 

• The devil is in the details. This "ground-up" approach of creating a historical scenario from 
scratch requires extremely accurate Orders of Battle and Tables of Organization and Equipment. 
A little insight into troop quality and morale wouldn't hurt, either. For those of us without hun- 
dreds of battle books in our home collection, a valid library card is always a good idea. 

Good luck! —Jim Cobb and Terry Coleman 





Spec Ops 

H aving trouble taking out the scuds in Korea or 
blowing up that news van in Honduras? 

Here's a cheat for you not-quite-Rangers: 

First, press Alt-Shift-V. You should hear a clicking 
noise. Check your inventory, and you'll find a new 
item: the viewmaster. When you use the viewmaster, 
the screen 
should flash 
blue and your 
Ranger will 
jump. The view- 
master not only 
makes your 
Ranger invul- 
nerable, it also resets the timer every time you use it. 
Note that if you switch Rangers, you need to press 
the key combination again in order to obtain the 
viewmaster. — Thierry Nguyen 


Monster Truck Madness 2 

H ere's a goofy trick to try: When driving past 
rivers or lakes, detour for a quick dip. You'll 
find that your truck continues to work even 

though it's com- 
pletely under- 
water. The track 
announcer's 
voice will also 
be garbled, as if 
your sound card 
is submerged. 
— Scott May 


Army Men 

M y advice when using the flamethrower is to 
stand still; 
you are, 
after all, made of 
plastic. But if you are 
invulnerable (see the 
cheat codes below), 
you can run while 
using the flame- 
thrower by tapping 
the fire key and mov- 
ing the joystick (or 
keypad, if you insist) in the direction you wish to go. 

To invoke the following cheats, hit Esc, then type 
the following codes: 


Kahuna You get Explosions, the 

Omniscient view, and Invulnerability 
Telekinetic -.Lets you teleport Sarge any- 

where in the gameworid using the scroll mode 


Note that these codes should work with the ARMY 
MEN cheats from last month's hints and tips article. 
— Terry Coleman 


COMPUTER GAMING WORLD « SEPTEMBER 1998 





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Black Dahlia 

Type in these codes when engaged in the appropriate puzzle: 


Leadhead Solves stained-glass puzzle at museum 

Loghouse Opens cabin-shaped lockbox from Louie's loft 

Turnkey Opens Louie's dresser 

Masteriock Opens Winslow's safe 

Ringding Reveals the correct seal on the scepter at the museum 

Arthur Solves the table puzzle in the Raven's backroom 

Cancan Opens the door in the trance sequence 

Triangle Opens door to the Raven's backroom 

Pressure Opens the secret door near pressure gauges In sewers 

Barbell Opens second door in sewers 

Nimble Solves the candlestick puzzle in Raven's backroom 

Sunspot Opens the planet-door at beginning of second act 




FIFA: Road to World Cup 98 



W hile in the player edit screen, change any player's 
name to one of the codes below to activate 
the following cheats: 

DOHDOHDOH Crazy ball 

URLOFUS Invisible walls 

XPLAY Hot potato 


While we didn't experience any problems using 
these cheats, as always, we recommend that you 
back up your save game files (especially any FIFA 
RTWC 98 campaign) before trying these out. — Terry 




Tank Commander 


Speed Kills! 

• At high speeds, there's no way you can quickly come 
to an absolute stop. This means that you'll lose the first- 
shot advantage. 

• Often, you won’t see enemy positions until they bang 
on your rear. 

• At high speed, the motor in your tank kicks out at the 
worst possible time. 

• Go too fast and you'll either outrun your support or 
collide with them while maneuvering. 

• Throttle speed five is the highest reasonable battle 
speed. Go faster only when evading barrages or air 
strikes and when trying to make the time limit. 


Use Your Platoon! 

Your other tanks will do a lot of work for you if you 
let them. If you're up against a time limit, use the S and 
Shift-1, Shift-2 keys to have somebody else deal with 
harmless things like trucks or MG nests. Your |ob is to 
take out those killer antitank positions and, of course, 
to make it to the designated objective. 

To make this work, choose the right formation. If 
there's high ground or cover to one flank, echelon toward 
it. In constricted terrain, form a wedge. Use a line only 
when you zero in on the last target. — Jim Cobb 



lU COMPUTER GAMING WORLD » SEPTEMBER 1998 



Order Free Product Information @ www.computergaming.com/infolink ADVERTISER INDEX 


1 INFO# 

COMPANY 

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■ info# 

COMPANY 

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246 

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76 

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Links Extreme 

58 

130 

Mad Genius 

Gun Metal 

86-87 

79 

Access Software 

Links IS 1999 Edition 

278 

100 

Micron Electronics, Inc. 

Millenia 

210-211 

261 

Accolade 

3Dfx Multi-titles 

2-3 

157 

MicroPfose 

Falcon 4.0 

248-249 

232 

Activision 

Activision's Civilization 3 

166-167 


Microsoft 

Motoaoss 

29 

234 

Activision 

Heavy Gear 2 

218-219 


Microsoft 

Urban Assault 

60-61 

236 

Activision 

Heretic 2 

12-13 

* 

Microsoft Windows 

WIN 98 Gaming ad 

73-75 

230 

Activision 

Quake II MP2 

38-39 

189 

Mindscape Entertainment Division Team Apache 

24 

105 

Alienware 

Alienware Systems 

287 

141 

Monolith 

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232 

233 

American Softworks Corporation Sanitarium 

106-107 

142 

Monolith 

Rage of Mages 

93 

106 

ATI Technolgoies, Inc. 

Xpert @ Play 

190 

143 

Monolith 

Shogo Mobile Armor 

94-95 

271 

Aureal Semiconductor 

A3D 

209 

94 

NovaLogic, Inc. 

FI 6 

135 

177 

Bethesda Softworks 

Red Guard 

85 

128 

NovaLogic, Inc. 

Mi929 

137 

220 

Blizzard Entertainment 

Starcraft 

4-5 

129 

NovaLogic, !nc. 

novaworld Gaming Services 

177 


BSG 

Intensor -Survival Guide 

97-99 

118 

Ocean/Infogames 

Independence War 

53 

68 

Chips & Bits 

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288-289 

* 

ORIGIN Systems, Irrc. 

Alpha Centauri 

78-79 

154 

Creative Labs 

Sound 

157-159 

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ORIGIN Systems, Inc. 

Ultima AKension 

C8 

145 

Diamond Multimedia Systems, Inc Monster Sound 

197 

* 

Panasonic/Ripcord 

Enemy Infestation 

151 


Dreamworks Interactive 

Trespasser 

68-69 


Panasonic/Ripcord 

Space Bunnies 

144 

87 

Earthlink 

Earthlink Network 

89 

’ 

Panasonic/Ripcord 

Special Operations 

80 

276 

Eidos Interactive 

Commandos 

C5-C7 

140 

Phillips Media 

USB Speakers 

192 

276/116 Eidos Interactive 

Commandos/Thief 

253-260 

134 

Piranha Interactive Publishing 

Dead Reckoning 

122-123 

228 

Eidos Interactive 

Deathtrap Dungeon 

18-19 

137 

Piranha Interactive Publishing 

Morpheus 

64-65 

279 

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Dominion 

50-51 

268 

Psygnosis 

Global Domination 

125 

115 

Eidos Interactive 

Eidos Interactive 

41 

260 

QuickShot 

GenX 

66 

277 

Eidos Interactive 

Rnal Fantasy Vll 

46-47 

108 

Real 3D 

StarFighter 

178 

158 

Eidos Interactive 

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44-45 

199 

Red Orb Entertainment 

Extreme Warfare 

14-15 

116 

Eidos Interactive 

Thief: The Dark Project 

42-43 

175 

Red Orb Entertainment 

WarLords III; Dark Rising 

138-139 

111 

Eidos Interactive 

Tomb Raider III 

48-49 

229 

Red Storm Entertainment 

Rainbow Six 

251 

92 

empire 

Stars 

109 

270 

531 

GX3 Launch 

104 

257 

Falcon-Northwest 

Falcon Mach V 

26-27 

90 

Sega Soft 

Vigilance 

56-57 


Fox Interactive 

RC Racer 

194-195 


Sierra On-Li'ne 

Caesar Hi 

214-216 


Fox Interactive 

X-Files: The Game 

126-127 

135 

Sierra On-Une 

Grand Prix Legends 

226-227 

210 

Fujitsu 

BioPunx 

130 

156 

Sierra On-line 

Half Life 

162-163 

138 

Gravis 

Exterminator 

206-207 

no 

Sierra On-Line 

Nascar 50th Anniversary 

222-223 

176 

GT Interactive Software 

Blood II 

184-185 

77 

Sierra On-Line 

Quest for Glory 

22-23 

235 

GT Interactive Software 

Emergency 

102-103 

150 

Sierra On-Line 

StarSiege 

234-235 

173 

GT Interactive Software 

Retaliation 

82-83 

* 

Sierra On-Line 

Sta6Iege 

231 

170 

GT Interactive Software 

Total Annihilat'on 

30-31 


Sierra On-Line 

StarSiege 

233 

171 

GT Interactive Software 

Warof the Worlds 

a-C4,1 

187 

Sierra On-Line 

Tribes 

142-143 

114 

Incredible Technologies 

Golden Tee Golf 

188 

126 

Sir-Tech 

Jagged Alliance II 

121 


Interact Accessories, Inc. 

Interact Accessories 

198-199 

* 

SouthPeak Interactive 

Dark Side of the Moon: Gun 

241,243,245 

84 

Interactive Magic 

iF-18E 

160 

* 

Symantec 

NCI 2 

113-116 

85 

Interactive Magic 

MalKari 

263 

242 

Talonsoft 

Westfront 

20 

86 

Interactive Magic 

Spear Head 

110-111 

107 

THQ 

Bass Masters Classic 

67 

188 

Interactive Magic 

UltraFighters 

246 

152 

THQ 

Brunswick Bowling 

165 

72 

Intergraph 

Intense 3D Voodoo 

6-7 

153 

THO 

Red Jack 

36 

190 

Interplay 

Alien Intelligence 

202-203 

185 

Thunderseat Technologies 

Thunderseat 

205 

163 

Interplay 

Baldur's Gate 

174-175 


Total Entertainment Network 

PGL 

149-152 

166 

Interplay 

Fallout 2 

90-91 

205 

Virgin Interactive Entertainment Recoil 

132-133 

164 

Interplay 

VR Baseball '99 

59, 189,271 

160 

Virgin Interactive Entertainment Sportscar 

16-17 

197 

Kesmai 

Air Warriors 5 

281 

252 

Westwood Studios 

C&C Tiberian Sun 

146-147 

197 

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Aliens 2 

275 

249 

Westwood Studios 

Dune 2000 

183 

197 

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Gamestorm 

283 

255 

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Lands of Lore III 

154-155 

197 

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Godzilla 

273 

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Yamaha Corporation of America Waveforce 

212 


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Save Time and Money 
Ordering Games by Phone! 


Local Stores don't always have the 
games you're looking for or the 
expert advice you need. Take a 
few minutes to browse the next 
few pages and shop with the cour- 
teous, experienced salespeople in 
Computer Gaming World's JUlail 
Order JUlail! 


Chairman and CEO Eric HIppeau 
Chief Financial Officer Timothy O'Brien 
Presidents 

ZO Publishing Claude P. Sheer 
ZD Market Intelligence Bob Brown 
ZD Comdex and Forums lason Chudnofsky 
ZD Brand and Market Services Terri Holbrooke 
ZD Internet Productions Dan Rosensweig 
ZD Education William Rosenthal 
ZD Television Larry W. Wangberg 

Senior Vice Presidents Rayna Brown (Human Resources) 
Oaryl R. Otte (Planning and Development) 

Vice Presidents Steve Gtadystewski (Information Services) 
J. Malcdm Morris (General Counsel and Secretary) 

Mark Moyer (Controller) 

Tracy Nadi (Human Resources, Operations) 

Treasurer Thomas L. Wright 

Corporate Sales Joe Gillespie (Executive Vice President) 

ZD Media Network Jeff Bruce (Executive Director) 
Scon Murphy (Executive Director) 

Rita Burke (Executive Director) 

ZD Brand and Market Services 
Brooke Cotrell (Vice President, ZD Brand Marketing) 
Michael PerkowskI (Vice PresidenL Client Marketing) 
Elda Vale (Vice President, Corporate Research) 

Herb Stem (Vice President, ZD Brand Management) 
Gregory Jarboe (Director, Corporate Relations) 


President Claude P. Sheer 

Executive Vice Presidents 
Don Byrnes 
ChiisDobbrow 
Jack Dolce 
A! OiGuldo 
Thomas McGrade 
Michael J. Miller 

Senior Vice President Nancy Newman 

Vice Presidents 
Bob Bader 
John Dodge 
Kathleen Goodwin 
Roger Herrmann 
Jonathan Lane 
Eric Lundquist 
Jim Manning 
Charles Mast 
James F. Ramaley 
Paul Somerson 
Mark Van Name 

Executive Director, Licensing Gertrud Borchardt 
Director, Benchmark Operations Bill Catchings 
Director. ZD Labs Lauren Black 


Editorial Director, New Products I 

HU 


III Machrone 


COMPUTER GAMING WORLD (ISSN 0744-6667) is published monthly by 
Zilf-Davis. Copyright © 1 998 Ziff-Davis. Alt Rights Reserved. Material in 
this publication may not be reproduced in any form wilhoui permission. 
If you want to quote from an article, write to Chantal Tucker, One Park 
Avenue, New York, NY 1 0016-5602, or fax 21 2-503-5420. 




ZIFF-DAVIS 


Computer Coining IVoild 




J 

For reprints, please call Ziff-Davis 
reprints at (800) 825-4237. 


COMPUTER GAMING WORLD • SEPTEMBER 1998 


/.computcfgaming.c 




“The EREY" 


Intel Pentium II 300MHz MMX 
Intel 440BX Motherboard S1 2KB 
AAVID Cooling System 
64MB SDRAM {PC>100) 

3,5* Floppy Drive 
Hercules Terminator 2x/i w/8MB 
with Intel 1740 Chipset 2X AQP 
Diamond Monster Voodoo II w/8MB 
6.4GB Ultra-ATA Hard Drive 
SoundBlaster AWE 64 PnP 
Altec Lansing AC$45 
Subwoofer & Speaker System 
Toshiba 32X CD-ROM 
ATX FulhTower Case w/300 Watt 
Power Supply (Dual-Fans) 

KoolMaxx Video Cooling System 
lOA-Enhanced Keyboard 
Microsoft 2-Button Mouse 
Diamond Supra 56K V.90 FaxfModem 
Windows '98 Operating System 
Latest Drivers Installed 
Free Installation & Configuration of 
Favorite Games 

PRICE: $i.Baa.aa 


"The HIVE-MIIMD" 

Intel Pentium II 400MH2 MMX 
Intel 440BX Motherboard S12KB 
AAVID Cooling System 
64MB SDRAM (PC-100) 

3.5* Floppy Drive 
Hercules Terminator 2x/l w/6MB 
with Intel 1740 Chipset 2X AGP 
Diamond Monster Voodoo II w/12M8 
11.5GB Ultra-ATA Hard Drive 
SoundBlaster AWE 64 PnP 
Altec Lansing ACS48 Powercube 
Subwoofer & Speaker System 
Toshiba 32X CD-ROM 
ATX Full-Tower Case w/3D0 Watt 
Power Supply (Dual-Fans) 

KoolMaxx Video Cooling System 
104-Enhanced Keyboard 
Microsoft 2-Button Mouse 
Diamond Supra S6K V.60 Fax/Modem 
Microsoft Sidewinder Precision Pro 
Windows '98 Operating System 
Latest Drivers Installed 
Free Installation & Configuration of 
Favorite Games 

PRICE: SS,E 3 a.aO 


AltEH 


■■c Svsxems 


seems ▼ 


□ 39B Souttmet I2B Street MtartV. FI 


Toll Free: 1-800-494-3382 
WWWJUIENWARE-PC.COM 

Cusiombe veer own dream machine 


12eMB SDRAM (PC-100) 

3S* Floppy Drive 
Hercules Terminator 2x/l W/8MB 
with Intel 1740 Chipset 2X AGP 
Dual-Diamond Monster Voodoo il's 
24MB (Sean-Llne Interleave Mode) 

11.5GB Ultra-ATA Hard Drive' 

Iomega Intemat Zip Drive 100MB 
Diamond Monster Sound MX200 
SoundBlaster 16 PnP 
Cambridge Soundworks Microworks 
Subwoofer & Speaker System 
Hitachi 2nd Generation DVD Player 
ATX Full-Tower Case w/300 Watt 
Power Supply (Dual-Fans) 

KoolMaxx Video Cooling System 
104-Enhanced Keyboard 
Microsoft 2-Button Mouse 
US Robotics 56 V.90 Fax/Modem 
Microsoft Sidewinder Precision Pro 
Microsoft Sidewinder Gamepad 
Windows '96 Operating System 
Latest Drivers Installed 
Free Installation & Configuration of 
Favorite Games 

PRICE: 93.Eaa.aa 

NEW! IIMTENSOR BAMI/VE CHAIR 

add: fS 9 S.aO (substltuta spsakers) 

Duality Manitars 

17* ViewSonic V773 .26DP add: $325.00 
19*VlewsonlcV95 .26DP add: $595.00 
21* ViewSonic P810 .250P add: $1,050.00 


Product rtamea used In this publlcsUan ore Cradetnarhe of their companies. 


Go to #105 @ www.computergaming.com/infollnk 





'T0M8 RAIDER III' Lara'S Off lo even more exotic locations this 
time arounb, from Itie blistering deserts of India to the lush islands 
of the South Pacific. Now you can choose your own destiny by 
selectino the order in which you play each ot the four different 
Revamped game engine, new reflection system, vastly 
Al, new special effects (rain, snow, fire, & morej. 

Eidos (Aclion) 

Release: 11/98 PCI 


CCD 


CHIPS&BITSinc. 


POB 234 DEPT 11029 
ROCHESTER, VT 05767 
INT’L 802-767-3033 FAX 802-767-3382 


Setectio" 



fighters ot WWIl with unprece- 
Oerited elfecis, terrain, & aircralt 
detail. Contains training missions. 

IIGHitR^UEGENDS 

variable difficulty levels, a branch- 
ing campaign, realistic flight 
dynamics, & sophisticated Al. 
Planes break apart, awesome 
crashes & explosions, with realis- 
tic clouds, smoke. & tire. Virtual 
3-D cockpits with working dials. 

EA (Simulation) 
R.,..:IU9a^ 


‘GRIM FANDANGO' You control 
Manny Calavora, who as travel 
agent for the Department of the 
Dead brings people to the Land ot 
the Dead. Characters come to lile as 
lolk-an style skeletons in this 
adventure story ot emfaez 2 iement & 
redemption, Inspired by film noir & 
Mexican folklore, the game features 
wildly exaggerated hot rods, more 
than 50 mysterious characters, & 
90 locations, all in stunning 3-D, 
Lucas Arts (Adventure) 

<S5(ESe 

iH 'Ti ' 

^ Th 

'SIN' As the leader ol HARD- 
CORPS sec-force, armed with an 
array of weaponry and pitted 
against mean and ugly mutants, 
you must inliltrale the drug cir- 
cuit and bring it's master mind to 
justice. Driveable vehicles, seam- 
less multi-player gameplay over 
LAN, modem, or Internet. Quake 
3D Engine enhancements Include 
log & water effects, translucent 
models, and improved physics. 
Activision (Action) 


‘DUKE NUKEM FOREVER' Duke 
is back and badder than before in 
this retooled sequel. Or. Proton 
has taken over Area 51 & nuked 
Las Vegas. Making use of the 
Quake II engine, the team at 3D 
realms promises not to disappoint 
with new weapons, new villains, 
and lull 3Dfx support. Multiplayer 
options & incredible lllelike envi- 
ronments. 

GT Interactive (Action) 


i'Jj : J 

‘AXIS & ALLIES' puts you in the 
middle ol realistic WWIl action! 
Spearheading your country's mil- 
itary drive, you decide where & 
when to strike, S whether you 
make a strategic bombing raid, 
sneak sub attack, infantry attack, 
or anti-aircraft barrage. Buy 
armaments, develop secret 
weapons, & lake over territory. 
Solo play or up to 5 players over 
LAN, modem, or Internel. 

Hasbro (Strategy) 
R=l.ase:9/98 

BIPm'IiIiPI 




COMPUTER GAMES: SIMULATION 




PnJCE 


1943 Euro An War 
3D Naval Batilas 
AH-MD Lonobow? 

ATF 98 
All Warrior 3 
Babylon S 

Brnout Champ Oragrcng 
Conlitmed Kill 
Cvbeisiiike2 
Dawn ol Aces 
Deep Six 

Evil Cote.Fallen Cities 


i S45.9E 


F-15 


F-16 Agressor 
F-16 Viper 
F-22ADF 

^22ADF Red Sea Ops 
F22 Tolal Air War 


FLYI 


09/98 »a.99 
12fl7 S3S99 
08/93 S48.99 
12/97 S36.99 
09/98 $48.99 
0S/9B $39.99 
09/98 $42.99 
09/98 $42.99 
11/98 $44.99 
09/98 $48.99 
11/98 $39.99 
03/98 $38.99 
08/98 $48.99 
09/98 $45 99 
12/97 $44.99 
09/98 $15 99 
07/98 $48 99 
t2«B $46.99 


Tin: RriExs: 

MlgAley 09/98 

MpnslBf Truck Maiinss 2 06/98 
MoloRacerGPO Oa.rSS 

Moiopross Madness 09/98 

Moiorhead 07/9S 

NascarRacing3 12/98 

08/98 $48.99 Nalions Fighter Command 11/98 




12/98 $54.99 
11/98 $47.99 
11/96 $4599 
02/98 $33.99 
10/93 $39.99 


8 $44.99 


!d for Sp 


08/98 $42.99 
11/98 $48.99 
:t War 08/98 $46 99 

ullBurn 06/98 $46.99 

immander 11/98 $48.99 

itOOil2 04/98 $39.99 

Flight Sim 08/98 $46.99 

m 98 09/97 S52.99 

m Triple Pk 07/98 S17.99 

r3 12/98 S52.99 

10/98 $4699 


Nev/man Haas Racing QB/96 

Panzer Commander 05/98 

PanzerEllie 11/98 

Phantom Ace 09/98 

Recoil 11/90 

SHOGO: Mobile ArmrDiv 11/98 

SU-27 Flanker 2 04/99 

Scrran Demons Europe 11/98 

Silent Hunter 2 09^6 


Starslege 


Super I- 


el 2000 


Sponscar Supreme GT 11i'9t 


Super Touring Cars 
TOCA Touring Car Chmp 
Team Apache 
Test Drive OH Rd 2 
Tie Fighieis W/Relrnce 
Too Quh 2 Hornets Nesi 
Ttans-Am Racing 63-72 
WAP.lsiaeliAirFrc 
Waibuds 3D 
Wing Comm S: Propticy 
X-Com Interceptor 
X-Wmg Collector's Srs 
X-WngV Tie W Bine Pwr 
X-WnguTleCmpI 
X-Wng vTie Fghlet 
iF-22i,«0 
iF/A-18 CSF 


09/96 S45 9! 
07/98 $46.91 
09/93 S43 9 
08/98 $45 91 
06/98 $46.91 
11/98 $44.91 
09/98 $32.91 
09/98 $48 91 
09/98 $36.91 
11/98 $44 91 
11/98 $44.91 
12fl7 S419I 
06/98 S45.9I 
06/98 $29.9! 
09/98 S39.9I 
12/97 $24 9! 
05/97 $46.91 
03fl8 $35 9“ 
07/98 $38 91 


COMPUTER GAMES: HARDWARE ' 


Conlrollers 

ACT Powerramp Coni 04/98 $35 

CHFieCombatstick 11/95 $59 

CHFI6Fightersllck 1196 $84 

CH Force FX 12/96 $95 

CH Jane's Combi Sick 0797 $69 

CH Joystick Switchbox 1197 $24 

CH Pro Pedals 1294 $79 

CKProTliiotlle 0396 $84 

CH Vlilual Pilot Pro 12/94 $75 


Gravis Grp Sind Alne 039 7 $69.99 SallekR4 Racing WhI 

Gravis PC Gamepd Pro 1196 $26.99 Saltek X-36 ConlSys 
Gravis Xtrmlnair Game Pd 06/98 $43.99 Saltek X-36T System 


10/98 S92.99 
b5/9^S1(i7.99 
11/93 $89 99 


erFFWhl 099BS149.99 Sailek xe-30 Coni Sys d4r98 S39.99 


drFrSIIProPdD9.98 $89 99 Space Orb 360 
.ndrlli Rcng Wl 0893S109.99 Suncom SFS Throttle 
'anlherXL 0198 $62.99 TMF16TOS 

)rg3DJ5tk 09/98 $59,99 TM F22 Pro 

irg 3D Pad 0898 $44,99 TM Fisl Fighlor 

lash 04/98 $49.93 Thorn EmTSW2 Whee 


Sound Cards 

Diamond Monster MX200 C693S139.9I 
Sound StaslBf PCi64 0598 $95.9: 
Tun Beach Montego A30X 06'98 S99.9i 


0695 $114.99 
I ,10/96 5129.99 
: $53 99 


Video Carils 

Canopus Pure 3D 212MB 0698 $329 9 
Dmn'dMnsli30IM2MB 069 6 S2699: 
DichdRghls3DIM2MB 0S98S289.9: 
Q30 0bsdn2 PCiTV 24MB 0696 $649.9' 


COMPUTER GAMES: ACTION' 


Banlezone 0398 $43 99 

Blood 2 1198 $48.99 

Citizen Kabulo 1198 $45.99 

DFJsdi Knight W/Sllh 0998 S4B.99 

Daikalana 11/98 $39.99 

Dark frees JedlKnghl 1097 $46.99 

Oealli Trap Dungeon 0696 $39.99 

Descents 1298 $48.99 

Descent Freespace 0698 $46 99 

Oelhkarz 1098 $42.99 


Duality 
Flesh Feasi 
Glams 
Giuntz 


Half III 


Heavy Gear 2 
Herelic2 

Inteislale 76 Arsenal 
Intersiaie 82 
Max Payne 


1098 $46.99 Messiah 

0598 S3S99 Prey 

1298 $48.99 Quake 2 

1098 $34.99 Quake 2 Mission Pk 1-2 

0996 $48.99 Redneck Rmp Rides AgK 

0299 $48 99 Requiem ’ 

1298 $49.99 Shadowman 

0398 $3899 Sin 

0499 S46.99 SpecOps i 

1196 S47.99 StarTiekKIIngonAcadmi 


COMPUTER GAMES: SPORT! 


AMF Pro Bowl 3D 03/96 
Baseball Mogul 99 0798 

Big Game Hunter 0398 
Big Game Hunter Add-On 0798 
Deer Hunler 0298 

Deer Hunter Companion 0698 
Deer Hunter ExiSeasn 0598 
Expert Pool 1198 

FIFA Road Wrid Cup 98 1297 

Game. Net i Match 0798 


S19.99 

$28.99 

$19.99 

$15.99 

$18.99 


Hardball 6 


Golden Tee Goll 96 0696 $39.99 MS Baseball 3D 

GoH Pro: W/ Gary Player 04/98 $41.99 MaddenNFl99 

GolCEMe Collection 0398 S19.99 NBA Live 99 

04/98 $44 99 NCAA Football 99 

04/98 $22 99 MFLGameday99 

1297 S35.99 NHL Hockey 99 

0998 $44.99 NHL Powerplay 99 

0697 $33.99 PBA Bawling 2 

0797 $29 99 PGA Tour Pro 

0996 $48.99 Rocky Min Trophy 


JackNicklausGoll5 
Xndckdul Kings 
Legends al FB 98 
Links LS 98 
Links LS 99 



Starship Troopers 1298 S4$.9 

Starsiege: Tribes 1096 $439 

TombRaidera 1197 $37.9 

TombRaiderS 1198 $419 

Tomb Rader Gold 03/98 $25.9 

trespass/ Jrssic Park 09/98 $48 9 

Unieal 0698 $39.9 

Unreal Level Pack 0998 $24 9 

Wrath 1298 $43.9 

X-Com Alliance 1296 $47 9 


Super Match Soccer 0898 $42.9 

Supremo 96 0898 $39 9 

Tiger 99 0898 $44 9 

Tiger 99 TPC Courses 0898 $189 

Tiger 99 TduinameniCis 0890 $18.9 

VillualPool2 11/97 $32.9 

ViRuhl Pool 2 DVD 0698 $45.9 

Virtual Pool 2 W/Mse 0598 $44 9 

World Cup 98 0598 $44.9 

Worldwide Soccer 98 0997 $39.0 


20,000 Leagues 0999 $48.99 

71llGuest2111hHour 1195 $14.99 

7lhGueslW95 10/97 $19.99 

Abyss: IncldnlEuropa 0896 $43.99 

Alien Ealh 0698 $42.99 

Allen Inlelligence 0998 $45.99 

Badlands 1098 $48.99 

Black Dahlia 0298 $39.99 

Blade Runner 1197 $39.99 

Crime Killer 1098 $39.99 


COMPUTER GAMES:' ADVENTURE 

seol Monkey Is 


1197 $35.99 Mys12:Riven 

0998 $4899 Mysl2: Riven DVD 

mango 09/98 $47.99 Nocturne 

le Castle 1096 $48.99 Of Light 6, Darkness 

Darkness 0898 $42.99 Omikran 

>rld 0898 $48.99 Overseer 

es Infrni Mchne 02/99 $48 99 Prince ol Persia 3D 

TianPfolci3 0298 $39.99 Quest lor Glory 5 

ikol Eternity 1298 $48.99 Redguaro 

IS 0996 $44.99 Sanitarium 


$35.99 ' 

$47.99 

$46.99 


9 $41.99 ' 

8 $34.99 
3 $48.99 
3 $48.99 

9 $52.99 
3 $39.99 


1198 $47,9 

S 1298 $44.9 

IhFed 1298 $52 9 
ngHnrGid 1196 $46.9 
AMssn 0498 $19.9 
VIcnFiy 08.98 $48 9 
ne 1298 $46.9 

inlureGame 0696 $489 
InoslrDVD 1298 $47.9 
nqulsilor 10/97 S39.9 


HINT BOOKS 


Action 

Daikalana 0898 

Half Ue 0698 


8 $18.99 
8 $14.99 
8 $13.99 
8 $15.99 
3 $15.99 


Adventure Role-Playing 

20.000 Leagues Under Seal}2/99 $17.99 FAIghl 8 Magic 6 0593 

Curse ol Monkey Isle 0198 $15.99 Revenani 09.98 

Gabriel Knight 3 0993 $17.99 Thiel Dark Piojeci , 10.98 

Homewortd 0898 $16.99 Ultima 9:Ascenslbn 1296 

King's Quest 8 0698 $16.09 SImulallon 

Prince of Persia 3D 11/90 $16.99 AH-64D Longbow 2 11/97 

Quest tor Glory 5 0696 $16.99 Falcon 4,0 ’ 0998 

RsluinloKiondor 01/99 $16.99 Mechwair 


$16.99 

$16.99 

$16.99 

$16.99 


X-Files Adventure Game 0698 $16.99 Slaisiege 


I 0998 


$16 99 
$16.99 
$18 99 


0398 $ 
0698 S 
11/98 S 
0798 S 
04/98 $ 
099 8 5 
0598 $ 


Ace In me Hole 1097 $39.99 

Aladdin & City ol Sin 04/98 $32.99 

Arabian Nights 03/98 $39.99 

AsiaX 1195 $29.99 

BJ Babes 0198 $25.99 

Babe Patrol 1095 $19.99 

Beverly Hi Call Gris 0796 $12.99 

BuslyBabes4 1195 $35.99 

Cabin Fever 079 7 $34.99 

Car Wash Angels 0997 $36.99 


celebrity Nudes' 


COMPUTER GAMES: ADULT 


10/96 

1296 

06/98 

0995 


3 $34.99 NeiEiotiQue 


6 $39.99 

5 $19.99 

6 $28.99 
6 $05.99 


NinhlwatchlntS 0796 $29' 

t^ornoPoker 12/95 $36' 

Private Plsr Park 2 0896 $44 < 

RomsoHSixPkO 0696 $29' 

Ropes & Chains 02/96 $19 S 

Sex With Fairah 0598 $42.' 

Space Sirens 2 0995 $34.' 

Strip Fighter 1096 $39.1 

SIrip Poker Pro 2 1295 $39.1 

Virtual Valerie 2 0895 $32.1 


^iipsaeiTS IN 







www.cdmag.com/chips.html 
or call 1-800-699-4263 


Source Code 11029 


COMPUTER GAMES: STRATEGY 


&C2:Tit)enanSun 
i C Covn Opmons 
S CRA enter SIrke 


09/98 S42.99 
11/96 S22.99 

.1 06/98 S1S.99 
10/97 S-11.99 
05/99 S48.99 

I 09/98 S29.99 
12/98 $47,99 
05/96 $34.99 
09/96 $43.99 
12/98 $4899 
03/96 $19 99 
04/97 $12.99 
11/96 $25.99 
09/95 $19.99 
12/98 $48.99 

11/96 $2299 

:(l 06/98 $46 99 
12/95 $1999 
03/96 S 
11/96 $23.99 
11/94 $22.99 
03/96 $35.99 
11/98 $46.99 
11/96 $1999 
10/97 $36 99 
08/98 $39.99 
09/97 $39.99 
10/98 $39.99 
03/98 $42.99 


Dommjni Species 
Dominion Slorm 
Duel. Moge W^ts 
Dune 2000 
Dungeon Keeper 2 
Dungeon Keeper Gold 
Errperor of Fadng Suns 
Entrepreneur 
Extreme Taclics 
Force Comm sn tier 
Galactic Mirage 
Gangsters 
Glotial Domination 
Guardians: Agnis dst 
Heroes M&M 2 

Heroes M & U 3 


10/96 $45.99 
06/96 $35 99 
09.98 $48 99 
07/98 $39.99 
12/98 $45 99 
04/98 $39.99 
01/97 $18.99 
10/97 $38 99 
08/98 $48 99 
11/98 $4999 
07/98 $44.93 
It/98 $35 99 
09/98 $39.99 
09/98 $46.99 
1 1/95 $25 99 


Malkari 

Master of Magic 
Master of Orion 
Master ot Orion 2 
MeenCommander 
Missn FiciCybrstrm 2 
M/th 
Myth 2 
Populous 3 
Railroad Tycoon 2 
Rainbow $i< 

Reach for Stars 2 
Rebellion 

Rebellion W/Sirt Gde 


l.ordsReaim2 11/96 $1999 Soldiers at War 

Lords ol Magic 12fl7 $26 99 Star Control 4 

MAX 12/96 $15 99 Slar Trk Slarlll Comm 

MAX 2 06/98 $44.99 Slarcrafl 

MIG Duels Planeswalker 02/98 $26 99 Starciall Expansion 

Magic.ihe Galhering 03/97 $15.99 Siarcratl Insurrection 

Maiesty. Empire Darkinds 05/99 $48.99 Slarcrafl Retaliation 



COMPUTER GAMES: WAR 


l$t Aitbome Normandy 
le de Camp 2 
llleol Srilain1940 
ttlegrnd Bull Run 
Iltegrnd Chlckamagua 
ttregrnd Getlysbrg 
'll Wat Experience 
ise Combai 2 
ise Combai 3 
igonsIntheMisI 


08.'98 $39.99 
01/98 $44.99 
11/98 $44.99 
05/97 $21.99 
09/98 $43.99 
12/95 $18 99 
10,98 $46.99 
1197 $42.99 
1293 $48.99 
0598 $23.99 


East Front 
East Front Camp 
Great Bitles Hannibal 
Harpoon 4 
Napoleon 1813 
Napoleon in Russia 
Oper An Wr Exp P 
Opemonl An ol W 
Over the Reich 


1197 $3499 
07/99 $46.99 
10/90 $42.99 
0597 $17.99 
1-2030896 $22.99 

0698 $39 99 Storm in 
1196 $33.99 TankResi 


Sid Meier's Getlysbrg 
Steel Panthers 2 
Steel Paniheis3 
Steel Panthers Arsenal 
Pnthers Cmp 1-2ea 


eWesl 


Panzer General 2 1097 $33 99 Third Reich 


1098 $42.99 
02/98 $33.99 
10/97 $26.99 
11/96 $19.99 
11/97 $26,99 
0598 $36.99 
0896 $15.99 
0493 $33.99 
0598 $39.99 
1096 $29.99 


Tigers on Prowl 2 12/96 $41.99 

VViclory Bundle 1195 $27.99 

Wat Along the Mohawk 07/98 $28.99 
WarinEasIRoslDV 04/98 $24.99 
War In Europe 05/98 $39.99 

War In me East Crimea 04/98 $24.99 
War in the East: Izyum 0493 $24.99 
War In me East: Kiev 0498 $24.99 
War in the East: LBningrad0498 $24.99 
West Front 0998 $44.99 


BOARD GAMES 


/anced Ctvilizalion 
/anced Sguad Lead! 
/anced Third Reich 
ica 1830 
! ol Renaissance 
xanders Generals 
tienl Empires 
ilanche: Irtvsn Illy 


12/94 $20.99 
0195 $39 99 
1294 $23 99 
1294 $25.99 
1294 $37.99 
1294 $38.99 
1097 $52.99 
12/96 $42.99 
0195 $32.99 
0195 $29.99 
0195 $27 99 
1194 $39.99 
0397 $32.99 
1194 $38.99 


Baiiieicch 4m Ed. 
Berts olWat 
Blocks ol War 
Britain Stands Alone 
Brilannia 

Campaigns CmI War 
Circus Maximus 
Colonial Diplomacy 
Condottiere 
Crisis Sinai 1973 
Desen Fox Deluxe 


1294 $21.99 
0598 $42 99 
0698 $32 99 
0195 $32.99 
12/94 $19,99 
0295 $1999 
12/94 $11,99 
0195 $42,99 
0197 $38 99 
0995 $29 99 
1296 $2999 
11/96 $39,99 
0195 529.99 
05/96 $32 99 


Hannibal 

History ol the World 
Knighimare Chess 2 
Llonhean 
Midway 

Napoleon's Bailies 
Panzerbiiia 
Piercing the Reich 
Rebels & Redcoats 2 
Republic of Rome 
Saratoga 

Sink ihe Bismarck 


0397 $16.99 
1294 $2999 
0396 $32 99 
1294 $27.99 
0698 $13.99 
1097 $35.99 
1294 $19,99 
12/94 $24.99 
1294 $18.99 
09/35 $29.99 
0495 $25,99 
12/94 $29.99 
06/98 $24.99 
12/94 $26,99 


fine 1194 $49.99 

ilviIWars 0698 $9.99 

SUSI Battle 08/96 $24.99 

rArnhemFoli 1294 $12.99 

ipenoWar 06/98 $39.99 

Al Gettysburg 03/97 $31.99 

Telluride 0496 $36.99 

1941 1195 $37.99 

Europe 0195 $14.99 

12 0195 $34.99 

iBr40K 1194 $59.99 

opie 1294 $29 99 

I 12/94 $44.99 

ihips Iron Men 12/94 $19.99 


ROLE PLAYING GAMES 


$0 DM Guide 
imityPlayHB 
IS 4 EqurpmenI Guide 0595 $16.99 Deva Spark 

Magica4thEd 0895 $25 99 Eanhdawn Companion 

lolCthulnu 0295 $18.99 GURPS Rulebook 

IdtnolNighhVampro 1196 $13.99 Heavy Gear 

ispIracyX 0996 $21.99 


0295 520.99 Cyberpunk 2020 0595 

04/98 $24.99 Deadlands Rulebook 1097 

0295 
0695 
02/95 
0895 

Ciiromcles 04/98 




m8nthyf:£mprol£lves03/98 523.99 Mactoss2 


0495 S 


Mage 2nd Ed. 0295 $21.99 

Mechvmrnor 0795 $13.99 

MERP2Sol1covei 1095 $16.99 

Planescape Mon Comp 2 0996 $14.99 

Ritls 0695 $21.99 

Robolech 0495 $11,99 

Shadowrun 2nd Ed, 1294 $20,99 

Star Fire 3rd Edilion 05/98 $17.99 




m Trilogy 3 
1 2nd Ed, 
imer Fantasy 


0197 $25.99 
09.96 $24,99 
0197 $7.99 
0295 $24.99 
06/95 $24.99 
02/95 523.99 
09/96 $7.99 
02/95 $24.99 


COIVIPUTER GAIVIES: ROLE PLAYING 1 1 

inox 1198 $48.99 LanttsolL 

; Gate 0698 $46.99 Migni 4 M 

0197 $34.99 No* 

! 0399 $48.99 Rage Of M 

dellfite 1297 $22.99 Revenant 


10,37 $44.99 
1198 $46 99 
0698 $39.99 
09/98 $39.99 


Thiel The Dark Pfjcl 
Ultima 9 Ascension 
Ultima Online 

. Underworld 2 


feGrdnsDst 10/97 $28.99 Wizardry 8 


FREE GAME OFFER! 


Spend the specllled amount on any in-slock sollwara and choase one liee 
IBM game from the corresponding list. Request must be made at time ol 
order. Oiler good on In-stock seltware only, while supplies last. Limit 2 per 
cuslDRier. Valid through 9/298. 

SPEND $60 

Wages ol War CO, Fable CD, Disciples el Sleet CO, Bridge Olympiad 3.S 
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). MC & Discover accepted. Checks held 4 weeks. Money Orders under S200 same as cash. COD S8. Price, release, availahilily, shipping times 

ifier not Quarafileed & are subject to change at any time. Hardware may require added S&H. Within 10 days defectives repaired or replaced at 
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: 'per order' charge is charged once per order placed, the 'per item' charge 7 —^; — ^ 7 7 rr-; 

iharoed once lor each item ordered and the -per shipment- charge is §1 caneS? fi!lw?rid 

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be allocated to a 12 issue subscription to Computer Games Strategy Plus. pUswomeni sliss |i oo ssm $1300 $200 s!oo 


as CHIPS 4 BUS iw 



'WEST FRONT’ is a fast 
paced. platoon-level 
game of WWll tactical 
combat. Play in 
Campaign, random bat- 
tle, or preset scenario 
format. New mission 
types & character pro- 
motions, new terrain fea- 
tures (N. Africa & 
Europe), 50 new scenar- 
ios, 6 new Campaign 
games, & 16 player 
Internet/LAN mode. Full- 
function map & scenano 
editors let you create 
your own battles from a 
database of 500 equip- 
ment & unit types. 


Talonsoft (War) 
Release: 9/98 PC CD 




liiiiy oEiiy im: 


N.Africa & Europe. 6 commandos 
with unique abilities. 25 accurate- 
ly modeled weapons. 6 active 
light 

!r on I 

internet. & Mplayer. 

Eidos 

""'“"PCCD 



‘MYTH II: SOULBLIGHTER’ is the 
sequel to Ihe hugely popular 
Mylh: The Fallen Lords, & features 
an improved engine with animat- 
ed 3-D models. 4x finer terrain 
mesh, & new lighting model. 


ambient lile, & pov/erful 
spells. Also includes Improved 
palhlmding,AI,& new units S ter- 
rain. More net fun with individual 
& team rankings and In-game 
Bungle (Strategy) 
Release: 11/98 




PC CD 



'DUNE 2000' This multiplayer 
update ot Dune II has translucent 
shroud effects and smoke trails, 
real-time lighting, and panicle- 
effect explosions. Play one-on- 
one on the inlernel or with 8 on a 
LAN. All 27 missions have been 
updated and feature new FMV 
mission briefings and cutscenes 
with 6 dilfereni actors. Repair or 
sell structures & create teams to 
carry cut orders. 

Virgin (Strategy) 




PC CD 



'FALLOUT 2' This sequel to the 
popular roleplaying game has a 
new cast of mutants, droids, 
ghouls, lizards, & flesh- eating 
plants. It features Improved 
Artilieial Inleltigence, a car, new 
armor, & new weapons. Give 
strategic commands to your party 
members, tell Ihem to heal Ihem- 
seNes, slay put, & even teach 
Ihem new skills & abilities. 

Interplay (Roleplaying) 
^Release: 11/8. 



'BALDUR’S GATE' Is set In the 
legendary Forgotten Realms cam- 
paign world, Features a transpar- 
ent interface and gameplay that 
uses a real-time modification of 
the ADD rules system. There are 
over 60 monsters to fight, you 
control a party of six each with 
unique abilities and personas. 


Interplay (Roleplaying) 
Release^8/98 


Go to #068 @ www.computergainlng.com/infolink 






CGW’S MONTHLY READERS' POLL 


E ach month, 2,000 C6H/ subscribers are selected at random to rate 100 computer games. The results of that poll are combined 
with the results of previous months to yield a cumulative average for the best plays in gaming. If you receive a ballot, please 
return it with your ratings so that other gamers and game publishers can benefit from your feedback. 


1 TOP ACTION GAMES 


1 1 

1 

Quake II 

Activision 

8.64 

4,5 

U 2 

2 

Quake Pack 2: Dissolution 

id Soflware/Roaue 

8.60 

5 


3 

Quake Pack 1: Scourqe 

id Soflware/Ritual 

8.60 

4.5 

4 

4 

Jedi Knight: Dark Forces II 

LucasArts 

8.49 

4.5 

5 

5 

Jedi Knight: Mysteries 

LucasArts 

8,44 

4 

6 

6 

Tomb Raider 

Eidos 

8.00 

4 

7 

7 

Quake 

id Software 

7,98 

5 

8 

8 

Moto Racer 

EA 

7,75 

4 

9 

9 

The Need for Soeed SE 

EA 

7,74 

N/R 

10 

10 

Tomb Raider II 

Eidos 

7.73 

4 


is t ' ■ t. 



TOP ADVENTURE GAMES 


07 


The Pandora Directive 

Access 

8,15 

N/R 

3 


Blade Runner 

Westwood/Virqin 

7-81 

4,5 

4 


Twinsen's Odvssev 

Aaivision 

7.65 

5 

3 

5 

Realms of the Haunting 

Interolav 

7.46 

4.5 

6 

5 

Rama 

Sierra 

7.43 

4.5 

7 

8 

The Neverhood 

DreamWorks 

7.41 

4 

8 

5 

Last Express 

Broderbund 

7.40 

4.5 

9 

9 

Circle of Blood 

Virgin 

7.39 

4 

10 

- 

Zork Grand Inquisitor 

Activision 

7.27 

N/R 



TOP CLASSIC/PUZZLE GAMES 


1 1 You Don’t Know Jack 2 B erkeley Systems 8 .34 4.5^ 

2 You Don't Know Jack 3 Berkeley S^stem5_ 8^09 4 

3 3 You Don't Know Jack M ovi es Berke ley Systems 7.96 4,5 

4 6 Worms 2 Micr oPro se 7.73 4 

5 5 Smart Games Challenge 2 __S^rnaft Games_lnc. _ 7.70 5 

6 4 You Don't Know Jack Sports Berkeley S ystem s 7.^__4.5_ 

7 7 You Don't Know Jack TV Berk eley Systems 7.57 . 2.5 

8 - Shanghai pynas_tY Actiyisbn 7.38 3 

9 8 Power Chess Sierra 7.31 N/R 

10 9 Lose Your Marbles SegaSqft 6.74 4.5 


TOP SIMULATION/SPACE COMBAT 





EA 

8.49 

5 

r ^ 

2 

Wing Commander: Pronhecv 

Orioin 

8.43 

4,5 

3 

4 

F-22ADF 

DID 

7.98 

4,5 

4 

_ 

F-15 

EA 

7.76 

4,5 

5 

5 

MechWarrior 2: Mercenaries 

Activision 

7.72 

4.5 

6 

6 

Fighters Anthology 

EA 

7.65 

3,5 

7 

8 

Flight Unlimited 2 

Looking Glass 

7.50 

4,5 

1 8 

_ 

Ml Tank Platoon 

MicroPtose 

7,43 

3,5 

9 

7 

Flight Sim 98 

Microsoft 

7,35 

3.5 

pio 

9 

X-Wing vs. TIE Fighter 

LucasArts 

7.16 

3,5 



TOP SPORTS GAMES 


n 


FIFA Road to World Cup 98 EA Sports 

Links LS Access 

8-5?,. 

8.58 

4.5 

5 

3 


NHL 98 

EA Sports 

8.55 

4 

4 


NBA Live 98 

EA Sports 

8.30 

4.5 

5 


Jack Nicklaus 5 

Accolade 

8.19 

5 

6 

4 

NASCAR Racing 2 

Sierra 

8.15 

5 

7 


Grand Prix 2 

MicroProse 

7,94 

5 

8 


NHL 97 

EA Sports 

7.86 

4.5 

9 

9 

Diamond Mind Baseball 7.0 Diamond Mind 

7.84 

3.5 

10 

7 

NBA Live 97 

EA Sports 

7,83 

4,5 


TOP ROLE-PLAYING GAMES 






1 

Might and Magic VI 
Diablo 

New World ComDutirxj 8.77 
Blizzard 8.55 

4,5 

4,5 

3 

7 

Fallout 

Interplay 

8.26 

4,5 

i 

3 

Hellfire 

Sierra 

8.04 

4 

5 

4 

Daoaerfall 

Bethesda 

7.08 

4.5 

6 

_ 

Shadows Over Riva 

Sir-Tech 

6.56 

N/R 

7 

5 

Lands of Lore II 

Westwood 

6.25 

N/R 

8 

6 

Meridian 59 

3 DO 

5.41 

3.5 

9 

7 

Ultima Online 

Orioin 

4.82 

1.5 

LIL 

- 

Battlespire 

Bethesda 

4.02 

N/R 


TOP STRATEGY GAMES 





!«rTT?T'rrFW' 

irffTTT 

TOTS 

1 '' 

1 

Heroes II: Price of Lovaltv 

NfwWnrkiCcxnoutinQ 8.95 

5 

•A1 7 

_ 

StarCraft 

Blizzard 

8.75 

5 

3 

3 

Heroes II 

NewYMlCcmoucrxi 8.60 

5 

4 

4 

Red Alert 

Virgin/Westwood 

8.55 

4,5 

5 

5 

Red Alert: Counterstrike 

Virgin/Westwood 

8.24 

4 

6 

6 

Total Annihilation 

GT Interactive 

8.22 

4,5 

7 

7 

Age of Empires 

Microsoft 

8.04 

4,5 

R 

8 

Civ II: Scenarios 

MicroProse 

7.94 

4 

9 

9 

Civ II: Fantastic Worlds 

MicroProse 

7.93 

4 

10 

10 

Jaq Alliance: Deadly Games Sir-Tech 

7.52 

4 


1 TOP WARGAMES 







H 1 

1 

Steel Panthers Camp. Disk 

SSI 

8.44 

4 

y 7 

3 

Steel Panthers II Camp. Disk 

SSI 

8.43 

4.5 


7 

Panzer General II 

SSI 

8.43 

5 

4 

4 

Sid Meier's Gettysburg 

Firaxis 

8.19 

4.5 

I 5 

5 

Steel Panthers II 

SSI 

8.07 

4.5 

I ^ 

7 

Battleground: Napoleon 

TaionSoft 

7,89 

4,5 

7 

6 

Battleground: Shiloh 

TalonSoft 

7.88 

5 

8 

8 

Battleground: Bull Run 

TaionSoft 

7.80 

4 

9 

10 

Tigers on the Prowl II 

HPS 

7.77 

4 

10 

9 

Battleground: Antietam 

TaionSoft 

7.76 

5 


Pk COMPUTER GAMING WORLD ■ SEPTEMBER 1998 


ii.computergafning.e 


Games on unnumbered lines are tied with game on line above, ★ = Top game of genre. Red = New Game, AD = Adventure, RP = Role-Playing, SI = Simulation/Space 
Combat, ST = Strategy, WG = Wargame, AC = Action, SP = Sports, CP = Classic/Puzzle, Games are retired after two years and become eligible for the Hall of Fame. 


1 


Heroes II; Price of Loyalty Mew World Computing 

ST 

8,95 

5 

51 

48 

Moto Racer EA 

AC 

7,75 

4 

2 

- 

Might And Magic VI New World Computmg 

fiP 

8.77 

4,5 

52 

50 

The Need for Speed SE EA 

AC 

7,74 

N/fi 

3 


StarCraft Blizzard 

ST 

8.75 

5 

53 

63 

Worms 2 MicroProse 

CP 

7,73 

4 

4 


Quake II Activision 

AC 

8.64 

4,5 


52 

Tomb Raider II Eidos 

AC 

7.73 

4 

5 


Heroes II Mew World Computing 

ST 

8.60 

5 

55 

48 

MechWarrlor 2: Mercenaries Activision 

SI 

7.72 

4.5 



Quake Pack 2: Dissolution id Software/fiogue 

AC 

8.60 

5 

56 

61 

Smart Games Challenge 2 Smart Games Inc. 

CP 

7,70 

5 



Quake Pack 1: Scourge id Software/ftilual 

AC 

8.60 

4.5 

57 

- 

F1 Racing Simulation UbiSoft 

SP 

7,66 

5 

8 


FIFA Road to the World Cup 98 EA Sports 

SP 

8.59 

4.5 

58 

53 

Twinsen's Odyssey Activision 

AD 

7.65 

5 

9 


Links LS Access 

SP 

8,58 

5 


51 

Fighters Anthology EA 

SI 

7,65 

3.5 

10 

12 

NHL 98 EA Sports 

SP 

8.55 

4 

60 

54 

Triple Play 98 EA Sports 

SP 

7.62 

3 



Diablo Blizzard 

RP 

8,55 

4.5 


55 

Battleground: Waterloo TalonSoft 

WG 

7.62 

4.5 



Red Alert Virgin/WesMvood 

ST 

8,55 

4,5 

62 

58 

You Don't Know Jack Sports Berkeley Systems 

CP 

7,58 

4.5 

13 

10 

Longbow 2 EA 

SI 

8,49 

5 

63 

71 

You Don't Know Jack TV Berkeley Systems 

CP 

7,57 

2,5 


11 

Jedi Knight: Dark Forces II LucasArts 

AC 

8.49 

4.5 


57 

Crusader: No Regret EA/Origin 

AC 

7.57 

4,5 

15 

12 

Steel Panthers Campaign Disk SSI 

WG 

8.44 

4 

65 

- 

Battlezone Activision 

AC 

7.54 

5 


29 

Jedi Knight: Mysteries of the Sith LucasArts 

AC 

8.44 

4 

66 

59 

Jack Nicklaus 4 Accolade 

SP 

7.53 

5 

17 

15 

Steel Panthers II Campaign Disk SSI 

WG 

8,43 

4,5 

67 

60 Jagged Alliance: Deadly Games Sir-Tech 

ST 

7.52 

4 


14 

Panzer General II SSI 

WG 

8.43 

5 

68 

77 

Flight Unlimited 2 looking Glass 

SI 

7,50 

4,5 


18 

Wing Commander; Prophecy Origin 

SI 

8.43 

4.5 

69 

63 

Realms of the Haunting Interplay 

AD 

7,46 

4.5 

20 

16 

You Don't Know Jack 2 Berkeley Systems 

CP 

8.34 

4,5 


72 Myth Bungie 

ST 

7.46 

4.5 

21 

17 

NBA Live 98 EA Sports 

SP 

8,30 

4.5 

71 

62 

Interstate '76 Activision 

AC 

7.44 

4,5 

22 

19 

Fallout Interplay 

RP 

8.26 

4,5 


83 

Virtual Pool 2 Interplay 

SP 

7,44 

4,5 

23 

20 

Red Alert; Counterstrike Virgin/Westwood 

ST 

8.24 

4 

73 

- 

Ml Tank Platoon MicroProse 

SI 

7.43 

3,5 

24 

25 

Total Annihilation GT Interactive 

ST 

8.22 

4,5 


63 

Rama Sierra 

AD 

7.43 

4.5 

25 

- 

Jack Nicklaus 5 Accolade 

SP 

8.19 


75 

67 

The Neverhood DreamWorks 

AD 

7.41 

4 


25 

Curse of Monkey Island LucasArts 

AD 

8.19 

5 

76 

63 

Last Express Red Orb 

AO 

7.40 

4.5 


20 

Sid Meier's Gettysburg Firaxis 

WG 

8,19 

4,5 

77 

70 

Dungeon Keeper EA/BuHfrog 

ST 

7,39 

4,5 

28 

22 

The Pandora Directive Access 

AO 

8.15 

N/R 


69 

Circle of Blood Virgin 

AD 

7.39 

4 


23 

NASCAR Racing 2 Sierra 

SP 

8.15 


79 

- 

Shanghai Dynasty Activision 

CP 

7.38 

3 

30 

28 

You Don't Know Jack 3 Berkeley Systems 

CP 

8.09 


80 

63 

PGA Tour Pro EA Sports 

SP 

7.37 

3.5 

31 

27 

Steel Panthers II SSI 

WG 

8,07 

4.5 

81 

89 

Steel Panthers III SSI 

WG 

7.33 

3 

32 

32 

Hellfire Siena 

RP 

8.04 



73 

Flight Simulator 98 Microsoft 


7.33 

3.5 


32 

Age of Empires Microsoft 

ST 

8.04 

4.5 

83 

74 Tripleplay 97 EA Sports 

SP 

7.32 

4 

34 

31 

Tomb Raider Eidos 

AC 

8,00 



76 

Achtung! Spitfire Avalon Hill 

ST 

7.32 

5 

35 

34 

F-22 ADF MovaLogic 


7.98 

4.5 

85 

78 

Power Chess Sierra 

CP 

7.31 

N/fi 


36 

Quake id Software 

AC 

7.98 



82 

Age of Rifles Campaign Disk SSI 

WG 

7.31 

4 

37 

37 

You Don't Know Jack Movies Berkeley Systems 

CP 

7.96 

4.5 

87 

- 

Zork: Grand Inquisitor Activision 

M) 

7.27 

NJR 

38 

34 

Civilization II: Scenarios MicroProse 

ST 

7.94 


88 

78 

MDK Piaymates/Shiny 

AC 

7.25 

4.5 


38 

Grand Prix 2 MicroProse 

SP 

7.94 


89 

88 

X-COM; Apocalypse MicroProse 

ST 

7,24 

4 

40 

42 

Civilization II: Fantastic Worlds MicroProse 

ST 

7.93 


90 

85 

Lords of the Realm II Sierra 

ST 

7.23 

4 

41 

43 

Battleground; Napoleon In Russia TalonSoft 

WG 

7.89 

4.5 

91 

- 

Grand Theft Auto ASC Games 

AC 

7,20 

2 

42 

40 

Battleground; Shiloh TalonSoft 

WG 

7,88 


92 

81 

Baseball Mogul Infinite Monkey 

SP 

7,19 

4 

43 

39 

NHL 97 EA Sports 

SP 

7.86 

4.5 


86 

Obsidian SegaSoft 

AD 

7.19 

4 

44 

55 

Diamond Mind Baseball 7.0 Diamond Mind 

SP 

7,84 

3.5 

94 

90 

Leisure Suit Larry 7 Sierra 

AD 

7,18 

3,5 

45 

40 

NBA Live 97 £A Sports 

SP 

7.83 

4.5 

95 

87 

Close Combat: A Bridge Too Far Microsoft 

WG 

7.17 

4.5 

46 

44 

Blade Runner WestwoodMrgin 

AO 

7.81 

4.5 

96 

95 

X-Wing vs. TIE Fighter LucasArts 

SI 

7,16 

3.5 

47 

45 

Battleground: Bull Run TalonSoft 

WG 

7,80 

4 

97 

93 

Imperialism SSI 

ST 

7,15 

4.5 

48 

47 Tigers on the Prowl II UPS 

WG 

7.77 

4 

98 

97 

FIFA 97 EA Sports 

SP 

7.11 

4,5 

49 

- 

F-15 EA/Otigin 

$1 

7.76 

4,5 

99 

83 

Star Wars Rebellion LucasArts 

ST 

7,10 

3 


46 

Battleground: Antletam TalonSoft 

WG 

7.76 

5 


92 

FPS Football Pro '97 Sierra 

SP 

7,10 

4.5 


/.computerganiing.< 


COMPUTER GAMING WORLD • SEPTEMBER 1998 


HALL OF FAME 


Welcome to the Cooperstown of Computer Games. Games that broke 

the records, established the benchmarks, and held gamers in delighted trances for hours untold. 


Alone in the Dark (l-Motion, 1992) 

Lovecraftian horror goes 3D, with shifting camera angles 
adding to the creepy atmosphere. 

The Bard's TalefEA, 1985) 

Pioneered three-point animation, 3D color mazes, 
and automapping. 

Battle Chess (Interplay, 1988) 

The Franklin Mint of computer chess games, with violent 
and funny animation disguising a solid chess engine. 

Betrayal at Krondor(Dynamix,1993) 

As rich and imaginative as Raymond Feist's world itself. 

Chessmaster (Software Toolworks, 1 986) 

The Cadillac of castling, it gets better with each version. 

Command & Conquer (Virgin/Westwood Studios, 
1995) Moved beyond Dune II with innovative features 
and multiplayer play, ushering in the current real-time 
strategy game explosion. 

Day of the Tentacle (LucasArts, 1993) 

Offbeat sequel to Maniac MANSioir; the interactive 
equivalent of a classic Chuck Jones cartoon. 

DOOM (id Software, 1993) 

Revolutionized PC action games and network gaming; 
now surpassed in technology, but not gameplay. 

Dungeon Master (FTL Software, 1987) 
Trend-setting graphics, digitized stereo, and great hack- 
and-slash from a decade ago. 

Earl Weaver Baseball (EA, 1986) 

Revolutionary physics-based baseball game pleased both 
aCTion and statistics fans; still unsurpassed more than a 
decade later. 

Empire (Interstel, 1978) 

WWIi in space, this mainframe transplant brought 
elegant mechanics, depth, and unending replayability to 
the PC. 

F-19 Stealth Fighter (MicroProse, 1988) 

A "thinking man's" sim, with great missions, in which 
sneaking around is as fun as dogfighting. 

Falcon 3.0 (Spectrum HoloByte, 199!) 

Tough, detailed jet sim widi ambitious Al, graphics, and 
connectivity to match its realism. 

Front Page Sports Football Pro(Dynamix, 1993) 
Physics-based system, good Af, and unmatched career 
play make this the ultimate in pigskin play, 

Gettysburg: The Turning Point (SSI, 1986) 

First variable order of battle changed the look of all 
American Civil War games on the PC. 

Gunship (MicroProse, 1989) 

Great character continuity, R&R for fatigued pilots, and 
even sick leave; best chopper fare until Jane's Longbow. 

Harpoon (360 Pacific, 1989) 

In-depth modern naval battles in real-time, based on the 
world’s Cold War fears. 

Kampfgruppe(SSI, 1985) 

Its WWII East Front armor battles were a success on 
multiple platforms. 


King's Quest V (Sierra On-Line, 1990) 

Redeiined the graphic adventure with new parser and 
VGA graphics. 

Lemmings (Psygnosis, 1991) 

The lovable cartoon Lilliputians were hits on every 
platform. 

Links 386 Pro (Access Software, 1992) 

Topped the leader board in graphic and realism for its era. 

AA-1 Tank Platoon (MicroProse, 1989) 

Realistic sim that properly focused on armored formations 
rather than on single vehicles; good mission designs. 

Master of Magic (MicroProse, 1994) 

The atmosphere of Magic: The Gaiherihg with the 
sophistication of Civ. 

Master of Orion (MicroProse, 1993) 

Remarkable diplomatic Al; deep and varied technology 
tree; aliens required radically different playing styles. 

Mech Brigade (SSI, 1985) 

Improved Kampfgruppe system for modern armored 
battles. 

MechWarrior 2 (Activision, 1995) 

A serious treatment of Mech design and resource 
management, combined with complex and addiaive 
battles, legitimized "giant robot simulations." 

Might & Magic (New World Computing, 1986) 
First-person, maze-based RPG with huge environment 
and tough combat. 

M.U.L.E.(EA, 1983) 

A landmark multiplayer strategy game that had no 
weapons of destruction, just cutthroat competition that 
made economics fun. 

Panzer General (SSI, 1994) 

Entertaining wargame with an elegant interface, great 
campaigns, strong Al, good graphics, and impressive 
sound. 

Red Baron (Dynamix, 1990) 

WWI air combat with great graphics, incredible realism, 
and a versatile replay feature. 

The Secret of Monkey Island (LucasArts, 1990) 
Comedy that set new standards in writing quality and 
social sensitivity, 

Sid Meier's Civilization (MicroProse, 1991) 
CGLV's #1-rated game of all time; indescribably addictive 
world-conquest/exploration game. 

Sid Meier's Pirates (MicroProse, 1987) 

Combines pirate adventure, action, RPG, and strategy to 
make the most successful hybrid of all time. 

Sid Meier's Railroad Tycoon (MicroProse, 1990) 
SimCity meets 1830 with robber barons for emphasis. 

SimCity (Maxis, 1987) 

Urban planning with fascinating consequences and 
challenges: the first great software toy. 

Starf light (EA, 1986) 

Depth, great characters, and a good sci-fi storyline set 
early RPG standard. 


Their Finest Hour (LucasArts, 1989) 

VWVII sim with great campaigns, realism, and many 
crew-member options. 

TIE Fighter (LucasArts, 1994) 

Most satisfying Star Wars space-combat game to date 
lets you live on the dark side. 

Ultima III (Origin Systems, 1983) 

Coherency and surprising subtlety emphasized role- 
playing, and set the tone for later Ultimas. 

Ultima IV (Origin Systems, 1985) 

High-concept RPG explored meaning of virtue and put the 
role in role-playing. 

Ultima VI (Origin Systems, 1990) 

RPG as morality play, replete with moral choices and 
realistic environs. 

Ultima Underworld (Origin Systems, 1992) 

The first truly 3D RPG, and still the most convincing; its 
dungeon walls were nicely "painted” with texture- 
mapped graphics. 

War in Russia (SSI, 1984) 

More realistic than Eastern Front, it captured the essence 
of the largest land campaign in history. 

WarCraft II (Blizzard, 1996) 

More cerebral than most real-time strategy games, it 
offered deceptive depth and personality to spare. 

Wasteland (Interplay, 1986) 

Derived from Mike Stackpole's Mercenaries, Spies, and 
Private Eyes, this is the definitive postapocalyptic RPG. 

Wing Commander (Origin Systems, 1990) 

A hot spaceflight engine, unfolding story path, and great 
characters. 

Wing Commander II (Origin Systems, 1991) 
Darker story, grittier feel, sound card advances, and 
tougher Al made this a sequel of sequels. 

Wing Commander III (Origin Systems, 1994) 
Surprisingly satisfying FMV space-opera didn't lose the 
essence of the space-combat game. 

Wizardry (Sir-Tech Software, 1981) 

Defined the computer RPG with maze-based viewpoint 
and atmospheric spell names. 

Wolfenstein 3-D (id Software, 1992) 
Smooth-scrolling action blastfest cleverly updated the 
original, and put shareware back on the map. 

X-COM (MicroProse, 1994) 

Premier tactical squad-level engine combined with alien 
tech research and pop culture for a sci-fi game nearly as 
addictive as CiviiiZATioN. 

You Don't Know Jack (Berkeley Systems, 1996) 
Fresh and irreverent, Jack turned trivia gaming on its 
collective ear to become the first mainstream CO-ROM 
with a gleeful gameplay bite. 

Zork (Infocom, 1981) 

The progenitor of adventure games on the PC; its humor 
and challenging puzzles seem timeless. The game has 
since spawned a number of sequels, none of which has 
equalled the original. 


COMt'UTEK GAMING WORLD « SEPTEMBER 1998 


/xciniputuiganting.i: 


CGW ONLINE 

GameSpot: CGW's Home on the Web 

Turn to GameSpot For the Fastest Online News and Reviews in Gaming 

■■■ iff-Davis has combined the talent and expertise of Computer Gaming World, 
m GameSpot, and ZDNetXo bring you the best gaming resources on the Web. 
m Whether it's the latest game demos, breaking reviews, detailed strategy 
mm articles, hot scoops, or online forums, you'll find everything you need to stay 
on the cutting edge, 



If you're looking for the fastest online news and reviews in gaming, turn to the 
experts at GameSpot. Here's a brief overview of what you can expect on 
GameSpot over the next few weeks. To see these articles and others, point your 
browser to http://cgw.gamespot.com, 



strategy Guides 

Even expert gamers need help with a game 
from time to time. That's why when we do a 
strategy guide at GameSpot. we don't sell you 
short. For the hottest games. GameSpot's 
editors try to provide you with all the help you 
need, from start to finish. Through this 
commitment. GameSpot has built a solid 
reputation for providing the best strategy 
guides available — for free — anywhere on the 
Worldwide Web. 

Now, we've taken these great strategy 
guides and put them under one roof. It's called 
GameGuides.com {www.gameguides.com) 
and it's a one-stop shop when you need help 


a a isit GameSpot for demos, hints. 

\t tips, strategy guides, and more 

W for the games covered in this 

issue. Just enter www.gamespot.com 
into your browser to find the fol* 
lowing gaming essentials: 

Demos and Patches: 

ChronX 

Spec Ops 

Deer Hunter 

Monster Truck 

Die by the Sword 

Madness 2 

Buck Dahua 

Sanitarjum 

Grand Theft Auto 

Team Apache 

Shadow Mashr 

F-22 Ain Dominance 

Tripie Play 99 

Fighter 

Ultimate Race Pro 

Comanche Gold 

WarBreeds 

Extreme Tachcs 

Strategy Guides; 

Industry Giant 

StarCraft 

Jane’s F-1 5 

Deer Hunter 

StarCraft 

Army Men 



Designer Diaries 

Have you ever wondered what's going 
on behind the scenes while those much- 
anticipated games are in development? 
GameSpot's Designer Diaries follow the 
progress of game designers like Jane 
Jensen, embarking on her third Gabriel 
Knight game for Sierra On-Line, and Tim 
Schafer, who's currently working on Grim 
Fandango for LucasArts. Tom Hall also gives 
GameSpot readers regular updates about 
Anachronox, the new game he's developing 
at ION Storm, and Brian Reynolds, the lead 
designer of Sio Meier's Alpha Centauri writes 
about how that project is coming along. And 
there's more, so check out the Designer 
Diaries on GameSpot 


Demos 


them available for download! Fora 
mere S4.95 (through a secure 
transaction site) you'll get a book- 
quality guide — fully searchable and 
printable — right on your hard drive. A 
full assortment of official strategy guides 
will also soon be available, so be sure to 
bookmark this new site. 


with the games you're 

playing. Through GameGuides.com you can 
access GameSpot's library of great, online 
strategy guides. We've also taken a select few 
of those guides, redesigned them, and made 


GameSpot has the most thorough and 
regularly updated game demo libraries on the 
Web. You'll find demos of many of the games 
that we've reviewed recently, including Spec 
Ops, Monster Truck Madness 2, Sanitarium, 
Team Apache, Comanche Gold, Extreme Taqics, 
Industry Giant, and more. S3U 


/.co/nputergaming.c 


COMPUTER GAMING WORLD » SEPTEMBER 1998 






Continued from page 35 
ULTIMA IX core team went over 
this with a fine-toothed comb, and 
we decided, along with Richard 
and Warren, that we should get 
back to the original ULTIMA design 
formula. ULTIMA IX was going to 
be a game inspired by ULTIMAS IV 
and VII and nothing else. When I 
think of that game design I get 
chills; it was going to be awe- 
some. Our development plan was 
pretty simple; the old ULTIMA VIII 
team split into two parts. One 
group was going to develop 
CRUSADER while the other group 
designed ULTIMA 
IX. When 

CRUSADER was fin- 
ished they would 
come back to 
ULTIMA IX and we 
would put world 
building and other 
tasks into full 
force. The problem 
was this; CRUSADER 
ran late and when 
it finally shipped no one came 
back to ULTIMA !X! A full year into 
our development we suddenly dis- 
covered we had no team to imple- 
ment the design. Things weren't 
all bad. however, because 
Electronic Arts had given Origin a 
mandate to make sure that the 
ULTIMA franchise was reestab- 
lished by ULTIMA IX, no matter 
how long it took. 

Over a long period of time, the 
new ULTIMA IX team was built. 
[The team] rebuilt our skills to 
include 3D graphics and Windows 
95. By the summer of 1 996 the 
team was in full production mode 
and we were finally making 
steady progress on our schedule. 
The basic design that gave me 
chills was still there. 

Everything changed because of 
ULTIMA ONLINE. In December 
1 996, the ULTIMA IX team was 
told that everyone (save two pro- 
grammers) was to begin work on 
ULTIMA ONLINE immediately fol- 
lowing the Christmas holidays. 
ULTIMA ONLINE had been upgrad- 
ed from a small research project 
to a corporate strategic title by 
Electronic Arts, and it needed to 


ship by the next summer at all 
costs. The crazy part of this story is 
that it was the right decision at 
the time. MERIDIAN 59 was 
already in public beta test and we 
all figured that if ULTIMA ONLINE 
didn't make it out by summer it 
wouldn't make a big splash in the 
industry. Besides, we knew that 
ULTIMA IX could ship anytime and 
be successful. So we presented a 
stiff upper lip and went onto the 
ULTIMA ONLINE 
project. 

Not everyone 
came back [to 


playing Ultima iX right now and 
loving every minute of it. Oh well, 
who knew? 

As a member of the ULTIMA: 
PAGAN team, how did you feel 
about CGW's description of the 
game as ULTIMA; MARIO? 

I thought it was an accurate 
description of the game. The irony 
is, that's the game the team set 
out to make. We wanted to create 
a game with more physical puzzles 


managers are never forgiven for 
shipping a low quality product, 
even if it was on time. I had hoped 
that ULTIMA IX was going to 
change all that and restore our 


“I feel that the 
'xloregfifeM tiusii&'iig takeBii with ULTIMA: 
ASCENSION is 
terrifyingly similar 
to the one we took to 
design ULTIMA VIII" 


ULTIMA IXj. Some were fired, and 
some, including myself, resigned 
before returning to the project. 
Others stayed on ULTIMA ONLINE. 
Many more resigned shortly after 
returning to the project after real- 
izing how the project's direaion 
had drastically changed while we 
were on ULTIMA ONLINE. Of the 
original 23 team members, only 
1 1 are still on the team. Of those 
1 1 , 7 are artists (which is why 
ASCENSION looks so fantastic). 
None of the original designers, 
save Richard Garriott, remains on 
the team. Only one programmer 
remains on the team who worked 
on ULTIMA VIII. Most importantly, 
none of the original ULTIMA IX 
team management remains. The 
most contributing factor that 
changed ULTIMA IX is this 
extremely high turnover. 

[In] hindsight, there were no 
big-splash online-only games at 
E3 that year. ULTIMA ONLINE could 
have taken an extra year to get 
really clean and stable and no one 
in the industry would have beaten 
them to the punch. The ULTIMA IX 
team would have remained intact, 
and you would probably all be 


fans' confidence in the product. To 
be honest, I don't know what will 
happen and I won't try to predict 
it. ULTIMA: ASCENSION will certainly 
be very different that what ULTIMA 
fans expect. 

I feel that the direction being 
taken with ULTIMA: ASCENSION is 
terrifyingly similar to the one we 
took to design ULTIMA VIII. 233 


and less conversa- 


tion than ULTIMA 
VII: THE BLACK GATE 
or ULTIMA VII: 

SERPENT ISLE. The 
design was inspired 
largely by PRINCE OF 
PERSIA. One thing 
you must remember 
about ULTIMA VIII is that it was the 
first product released from Lord 
British Productions (a producer 
group at Origin headed by Richard 
Garriott) after Electronic Arts 
bought Origin. The team's goal 
was to ship ULTIMA VIII by fiscal 
year’s end. We achieved that goal, 
but at the cost of the product's 
quality. I know now that project 


COMPUTER GAMING WORLD « SEPTEMBER 1998 


/.computergaming.c 


ON THE CC-ROM 


Reach for the Stars 

This Month's CG-ROM Has Something for Gamers of All Stripes 

i: 


I f you haven't bought into the StarCraft 
craze yet, here's your chance to check 
out the five-star, CG-Choice-winning 
real-time strategy game. CGW 
managed to secure this exclusive, 
five-mission prequel campaign that 
sets the stage for the full game. If 
you prefer more action with your 
sci-fi, then you'll probably want to 
load up the demo for Descent: 

Freespace, one of the better space 
sims out there. 

Action aficionados should also 
check out Die by the Sword and Spec Ops, 
And for strategy gamers who aren't into 
sci-fi, we have Commandos and Liberation 
Day. Sports fans can see how England and 
Brazil stack up in World Cup 98, and 
adventurers can play a dashing corsair in 
RedJack: Revenge of the Brethren. Finally, if 
you want some entertainment during your 
coffee break, fire up the cute shareware 
game Pop! The Balloon Puzzle Game. 




Disappointed with the Worid Cup 
results? Put your own soccer skills to the 
test and see what kind of performance 
you turn in. 



How to Use the Disc 

'he CD is Autoplay-enabled and should begin when you 
load it into the CD-ROM drive. Otherwise, select Run 
from the Program Manager in Windows 3.x, or Start 
Menu in Windows 95, and type D;\RUN-ME (where D 
is the letter of your CD-ROM drive) to run it straight 
from the CD. You may type D:\iNSTALL to create a 
CGl^program group on your Windows desktop for 
future fun. Many demos require the disc to be in 
the CD-ROM drive in order to run; therefore, we 
recommend installing the demos from our disc. 


How to Get the CD-ROM 

T o subscribe to the CD-ROM version of the 
magazine, call (303) 665-8930. If you already 
receive the magazine without the CD, you must wait 
until your current subscription expires before receiving 
the CD version. Please address subscription complaints to 
cgw@neodata.com. Neodata is a magazine fulfillment 
house which is not owned or operated by Ziff-Davis. 


September CD Titles 


PRODUCT NAME 

PLATFORM 

DIRECTORY 

EXECUTABLE 

C&C Tiberian Sun AVI 

W95 

tiberian sun 

sizzle.mov 

Commandos 

W95 

commandos 

cQmmandos.exe 

Descent; Freespace 

W95 

freespace 

f 5 demoi 0 .exe 

Die by the Sword 

W95 

die by the sword 

dbts_demo.exe 

DirectX 5.2 

W95 

directx 

dxsetup.exe 

Earthlink opt 1 

W95 

earthlink1\win95 

setup.exe 

Earthlink opt 2 

W95 

earthlink2\win95 

setup.exe 

Flight Uniimited II patch 

W95 

fu2 upgrade 

fu2upgrade.exe 

Liberation Day 

W95 

liberation day 

ldaydemo.exe 

Overseer patch 

W95 

overseer patch 

tex5b101.exe 

Pop! 

W95 

pop 

installpop.exe 

RedJack 

W95 

redjack 

redjack.exe 

Sanitarium 

W95 

sanitarium patch 

sanipatch1.exe 

SpecOps 

W95 

spec ops 

so_demo.exe 

StarCraft 

W95 

sc_cgw 

setup.exe 

World Cup 98 

W95 

world cup 98 

wc98_english.exe 






Play the prelude campaign of one of the 
best real-time strategy games ever. 


Eidos' latest real-time tactical game offers 
unique gameplay m a setting. 


COMPUTER GAMING WORLD • SEPTEMBER 1998 







Girl Trouble 


Or, a Philosophical Meandering on the Merits of Polygonal Butt Jiggle 


I am a guy. 

I hope this doesn't 
come as too much of a 
shock to my friends and 
members of my family, 
who presumably stopped 
questioning my gender 
around the time I turned 
30 and — aware of impending 
sag— I finally gave up on the 
hot-pants-and-halter-top look. 

As a gamer, I'm glad I'm a 
guy. Because, as a guy. I con- 
stantly get to have my baser 
instincts satisfied by the inces- 
sant pandering of the computer 
gaming industry. Exhibit A: Lara 
Croft's breasts. Actually, let's 
make that Exhibits A and B. The 
thing is, we don't really need to 
catalog all the examples, do we? 
Because there are so many of 
them and we all know what they 
are. It just seems to me that the 
knuckle-dragging, frat-house 
mentality of game designers and 
publishers is reaching a fever 
pitch of late, and I'm not sure 
what it means. All I know is, I'm 
suddenly seeing polygonal cleav- 
age wherever I look, and, after 
looking many times (because it's 
my job, as a journalist). I've 
decided that I'm offended. 

Please, everyone, let's all put our 


clothes back on and calm down, 

■ ■ ■ 

Let's take, for example, the 
recent Electronic Entertainment 
Expo in Atlanta. Here we have a 
convention dedicated to showing 
off the latest, cutting-edge com- 
puter technology — a monument 
to human scientific, mathematic, 
and creative thinking — yet the 



unenlightened, mouth-breathing 
pig (I took drama classes in high 
school), and visited the SegaSoft 
booth, where I had my picture 
taken with the latex-clad 
Vigilance babes. Here's the deal, 
though; I admit that not only do 
I not even know what this game 
is, or care, but I also didn't even 
bother to find out while I was in 
their booth. All I did was stand in 
line with the other sheepish- 
looking losers and get my picture 
taken. Then i moved on. Since I 
can honestly say I'll never play 
this game, the question is: Did 
they get what they wanted? 

Elsewhere at the convention, I 
was treated to an enthusiastic 
demonstration of SPACE BUNNIES 
Must Die, an amusing-looking 


my female friends in the industry, 
or female gamers in general, 
deal with this stuff. You really 
have to hand it to them for stick- 
ing around. Because if the tables 
were turned, we couldn't handle 
it. As soon as some group of 
women designed a first-person 
shooter with a male protago- 
nist — let's call him. say, Dirk 
Manhandle — prancing around in 
a butt thong, shaking his tuhkus, 
we'd flee from our computers 
ASAP and find the nearest base- 
ball game or car to repair. We 
wouldn't play this game for one 
minute, lest anyone see us do it 
or, even worse, we found our- 
selves actually enjoying it. 

What I really want to say to 
any woman, girl, or grrl reading 


know is, I'm suddenly seeing 
‘po^l'ygonal cleavage wherever I look. ^ 


atmosphere of the show resem- 
bles nothing so much as an auto 
industry convention circa 1950. If 
it wasn't enough for you that 
every other game on the show 
floor featured jiggly half-naked 
female protagonists, you could 
always just ogle the jiggly half- 
naked booth babes, whom the 



Tomb RAiDER-style action game 
that might be cool. If for nothing 
else than the fact that Bo 
Diddley and the Reverend Horton 
Heat are on the soundtrack. 
However, rather than focusing on 
elements like — oh. I don't 
know — gameplay, a huge por- 
tion of the demo was spent 
demonstrating how the female 
protagonist's butt jiggle was 
more "fluid" than Lara Croft's. 
This was a feature. This was 
important. This was something a 
programmer spent time on. This 
was supposed to make me like 
the game. And you know what? 

It half worked. 


I'm kidding, but !'m not kid- 
ding. Honestly, I don't know how 


this magazine, then, is this: I'm 
sorry. We suck. I'm glad that 
you're hanging in there, forming 
guilds, writing Web 'zines (try 
www.grrlgamer.com fora 
great one), and generally not hat- 
ing our guts. Okay? Thanks. 

All right, so much for that. Are 
we alone again, guys? Cool. 

Yo, bro — have you checked 
out the legs on that FORSAKEN 
chick? Mama! Somebody hose 
me down here! 

What Jeff doesn't realize is 
that his blatant attempts to 
reach out to female gamers, 
while still embracing his funda- 
mentally sexist viewpoint, are as 
transparent as they are pathetic. 
Go ahead and call him a girly- 
man at jhgreen@zd.com. 


Computer Gaming 0744-6667) is published monthly by ZiH-Davis, Inc, One Paik Avenue, New York, NY 10016. Subscription talc is S27.97 for a ore-year subscription (12 issues), Canada and all 

other countries add St6.00 for surface mail. Postmaster: Send address changes to Computer Gammg World, RO. Boc 57167, Boulder, CO 80328-7167. Canadian GST registration number Is 89371 0442 RT. 
Canada Post Internationa! Pub's Mail Product (Canada Distribution) Sales Arjtcemem No. 1058649. Periodicals postage paid at New York, NY 10016 and additional mailing offices. Printed in the U.S.A. 


COMPUTER GAMING WORLD « SEPTEMBER 1998 


v.contputergijming.c 



DON'T LET 

COMMANDOS 

SNEAK UP ON YOU. 


COMMANDOS: Behind EnemyJ^ncs and Eldos liHeraWiye are iraaSmarks ot EIDOS Pic. ©1997-^9^ Eidos. All Rights 



FINS 


You send in your nautical expert to single- 
, handedly remove a gunboat from the 
' Nazi fleet. He will prove invaluable to 
you in all, your naval operations. 


Not always satisfied with being the get- 
away driver, you allow Tread to hone his 
skills in cibse.combat. He considers it R&R. 


SPOOKY 


TREAD 




V 

. ^ - ' 


S' 

' - 1- 

'■ A NT. o 


, V ■ ■ < 



1 




\ 


- II s ‘ 

\ '. 


.. 


' 'ij ■ 


r’ 


Your^fihest draft pick, this former French 
spy master leads a ra^id on an unsus- 
pecting Nazi U-Boat. Use him widely for 
infiltration and sabotage rnissibns. 

r- ' 


You CONTROL EACH COMMANDO 



THE DIRTY HALF DOZEN 


IDOS 






Play the DEMO! Buy the game! 

www.eidosinteractive.com 


I 



DMKjE 


Gall In your sniper to weaken. 
^ enemy fortifications and 
expose this Nazi stronghold 
|V to a weapons raid. To him 
^ every Nazi looks like the one 
that took'out his family. 


You.send in your pyro lovin' munitions 
expertto take out enemy mobile missile i 
^capability. Apparently, there's plenty of I 
I dynamite to go around. ’ 


INFERNO, 


When the going gets tough, you 
Ik send in your fiercest warriprto 
9 finish the job. Tiny takes^out a 
f communications center without 
the usual supporting cast., \- 
O I" ' ’ ^ ’■ . 



^ .* ' * , 



A i>; 1 

V 


— 

‘ 7* 




I N D E N E M Y L I N 


’’A r^alrtini^ strategy sle, eper."— Computer Ganringi World. , ’ 

“Excellently rendered terrain and briljiarit A| ' "4^-" 

make this a fantastic combat simulation.''-rT.Gamespot ^ 

Go to #276 @ www.coniputet^aming.cEjni/Infollnk 




ORIGIN 


Eyperignce A Ullorld Beyond Imaqination 


The Fontoiy Gaminq masterpiece 


www.ultima-ascension.com 


We create worlds™ 

ttnrigtl INI ORen SnteM. be. ItllM, CMCUI. He beau WorUi si assicitirt le(H an tmknaiki ei reftitnad intearti el ORIEIH Sratna, lac. 
IS rttili nunel, Orlfb It w Eiettmlc titi cu^.