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Vol 3 No 4 



AGareth Powell Magazine 



April 1986 $3* 



The Australian 

COMMODORE 




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Amiga 
steals PC 
Show - | 
official 
release 





V 



C128 Memory Map C128D User Report 

Reviews of Paradroid, Frankie goes to 
Hollywood, Racing Destruction Set 



Registered by Australia Post Publication No NBG 665§. 



•Recommended retail i^rfc^ 



1 




If you own an Apple He, 
you'd have to add all this 





to match the versatility, expandability 

and higher intelligence of the 

new Commodore 128 

(and it costs less too). 






The new Commodore 128'" personal 
computer is breakthrough technol- 
ogy at a breakthrough price, it out 
shines the Apple 3 lie In performance 
capability performance quality and 
price. It Is expandable to 512K RAM 
while the lie isn't expandable at all. 



And the new Commodore !28 hos a 
numeric keypad built right into its key- 
board thai makes crunching numbers 
a lot easier. And the commodore 128 
has graphic and sound capabilities 
that far exceed those of the Apple lie. 
But the most Important news is that 



the new Commodore 128 jumps you 
into a whole new world of business, 
productivity education and word 
processing programs while still run- 
ning over 3,000 programs designed 
for the Commodore 64'" That's what 
we call a higher intelligence. 



COMMODORE 128: A Higher Intelligence 



; C E commodore 

COMPUTER 

Keepi ng up with you. 



QtEEUAH MBfHHDfJEH S,TanfQCA22 



The Australian 

COMMODORE REVIEW 

Vol 3 No 4 April 1986 



The Australian 
Commodore Review 

Top Rear, 4 Carrington Road 
Randwick, NSW 2031 
Phone: (02) 398 5111 




Published by: 

Saturday Magazine Pty Ltd 

Publisher: Gareth Powell 
Editor: Andrew Farrell 

Advertising Enquiries: 

Ric Richardson 

or Brenda Powell 

Phone: (02)398 5111 

Top Rear, 4 Carrington Road, 

Randwick, NSW 2031 

Subscription Manager: 

Tina Spathos 
Phone: (02) 398 5111 

Distribution: 

NETWORK 

Printed by: 

Ian Liddell Commercial Printing 



Australian Commodore Review 1 



' 



EDITORIAL 



Editorial 



This month we make special welcome 
10 Paul Blair, who recently joined our 
ranks as a regular contributor to Tha 
Australian Commodore Review, in a 
technical capacity. This month we have 
the first of three C128 memory maps 
which he and Greg Perry have gone to 
great lengths to prepare. No doubt you 
will find it an invaluable aid in 
understanding further how the C128 
ticks. 

Our usual swag of game reviews, 
growing in number by the issue, along 
with the latest top ten sellers, can be 
found in Hot Stuff. Special thanks to all 
those readers who have began 
supporting our newer columns by way of 
some very provocative letters. They will 
all be answered in full in due time, whilst a 



few selected matters are being chased 
up as you read these very words, 

Amiga has arrived, along with a few 
unexpected budgetary surprises. 
Specifically a massive cut in the price of 
the basic unit, including a full colour RGB 
monitor, to a very acceptable $2495. This 
action will no doubt keep Atari busy, who 
we have wind already plan to cut the price 
on their machine. Microbee are out of the 
running and Apple may just have missed 
the boat all together - although the colour 
Mac is still rumoured. 

A line up o! 68000 machines, all 
boasting some of the most advanced 
features we have ever seen on a small 
computer - or on a large computer for that 
matter. A price war of sorts is likely to 
ensue. 




Andrew Farrell 

With software a well arriving from all 
directions, the Amiga looks set to 
survive. Is it as good, better, worse than 
its competitors? Will Jack Tramiel bid a 
hasty retreat or does he have the staying 
power to stick it out and fight 
Commodore's winner? Are the others in 
the running? 

Whatever the answers, it seems that 
we will continue to benefit from the vast 
improvements in computing power that 
have developed from such hot 
competition. 



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COMMODORE 

REVIEW 



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Th,e Australian Commodore Review 

Top Rear, 4 Carrington Road, 
Randwick, NSW 2031 



Australian Commodore Review 2 




Amiga steals 
Sydney 
PC Show 



Standing shoulder to shoulder, 
hundreds ol eager show goers had their 
first glimpse of the Amiga on the busy 
Commodore standi! m6§i i"i i 
impressed. Apple was not at all amused. 
As the colour graphics, animated 
cartoons, digitised pictures and 
impressive sound samples all blipped and 
bleeted across the large colour monitor, 
cameras clicked, flashes flashed and the 
occasional sigh was emitted from the 
mesmorised audience. 

Amiga truly stole the entire PC Show. 
An entirely new wave of people are 
venturing between the Commodore 
doors. People whom Commodore have 
never dealt with before. We certainly 
hope they can deal with this new influx of 
professional persons who can see the 
potential of the machine, which is now 
available from a select group of 
Commodore dealers about Australia. 

At the time of the show the price was 
around the $3000 mark. Now the unit is 
officially available and it sells, with a 
colour monitor, for a mere $2495. Atari is 
hot on Amiga's tail, but can not offer the 
same technical excellence that this 
machine boasts. Software availability is 
improving with companies such as Neriki 
Enterprises importing hardware add ons, 
memory expansion and a whole swag of 
excellent programs. 

Ross Bloore was certainly kept busy at 
the PC Show, endeavouring to explain 
the various intricacies of Amiga. His 
approach was friendly and easy to follow. 
A tough job, and you could not wish for a 
nicer chap to do it. No doubt the Amiga 
itself will prove to be equally as popular 
amongst its users. 





ifEcommodarE 




The Amiga has arrived...Commodore'$ National Distribution Manager, Kevin 
McBrien (left) checks the first shipment of the revolutionary personal 
computer, to arrive in Australia. Helping out are Peter Resch (centre) and 
George Delaportas. 



Strong sales 



Commodore reports strong sales in 
Australia and internationally during the 
first months of 1986. 

Australian Managing Director, Tony 
Serra, says the sales momentum from 
the last quarter of 1985 has continued 
into 1986. "Australian sales in January 
and February were up 66 percent over the 
same period last year. And there is every 
indication that March will be even better," 
he says. 

In Australia, sales successes were 
heavily based on the Commodore 64 and 
Commodore 128. 

Sates of the PC-10 and PC-20, both 
compatible with the IBM-PC, had also 
been strong, indicating a positive 
response throughout major market 
sectors. 

Commodore began the year with a back 



order of 100,000 computers - and the 
company says the level of sales is 
accelerating. 

Commodore 

International 

appoints 

new CEO 



Commodore International Ltd has 
appointed Thomas J. Rattigan as its 
Chief Executive Officer, succeeding 
Marshall F. Smith, who will remain on the 
board of directors and serve as 
consultant to the company. 

Commodore's Chairman, Irving Gould, 
said "With Thomas Rattigan's new 
appointment, Commodore is assured of a 
continuity of strong and decisive 
leadership." 



Australian Commodore Review 3 



" 






RAM RUMBLINGS 



Commodore's 
Amiga Here 
At Last 

Commodore's new Amiga computer has 
arrived in Australia - ahead of schedule - 
to meet mounting orders lor the computer 
that has stood the personal computer 
market on end. 

The first shipment of the new Amiga 
arrived in Australia last week - and 
supplies should have reached selected 
dealers by the eighth of this month. 

Commodore's big surprise has been its 
pricing of the Amiga. 

Originally believed to be in the vicinity 
of $3,000, the Amiga is carrying art 
introductory recommended retail price of 
$2,495 in Australia. 

This introductory pricing includes CPU 
with 512Kof memory, 3.5 inch disk drive 
and colour monitor. 

Commodore says that makes it by far 
better value for money than ever 
perceived by the marketplace. 

Commodore's Australian Managing 
Director, Mr Tony Serra, says the 
shipment of Amiga computers arrived 
because of a special effort by the 
Commodore factory, the freight company 
MSAS and Commodore staff, in an 
endeavour to meet a rapidly-mounting 
demand for the Amiga throughout 
Australia. 

"Orders for the Amiga had rolled well 
over 3,000 - and we were still months 
away from our supplies arriving in 
Australia," he says. 




KAll** 




"It was our original intention to release 
in late May early June. Then we were hit 
with a huge reaction from PC '86, where 
thousands of people showed a strong 
interest in buying the Amiga". 

"We had to act to reduce the 
outstanding demand as we only had a 
shipment of 2,000 due in iate in April, and 
this is still on schedule. 

"We would have been too far behind in 
back-orders, so we decided to undertake 
the special flights." 

The arrival of the Amiga, which has 
been hailed as the most revolutionary 
personal computer in years, is likely to 
spark an even stronger market reaction 
than expected and Commodore 
executives are anxious to ensure a 
continuity of supply. 

Creative organisations have shown a 
strong interest in the computer, because 
of its high-resolution colour graphics and 
the ability to synchronise animation with 
sound. 

But Mr Serra says that there has also 
been massive interest from scientists, 
business executives and traditional 
home computer enthusiasts. 

Initially, distribution of the Amiga will be 
channelled through a select group of 
Commodore dealers, simply because of 
limited quantities. But the following 
shipments will allow a broader distribution 
of the computer. 

For those dealers who have been 
chosen to carry the firsl of these rare 
machines, the Amiga should be an easy 
sale, with some shops accepting 
deposits over the past three months. No 
doubt the computing world will be awaiting 
the next arrival with much eagerness. 



Australian Commodore Review 4 



Q Bensons 




HAVING A PROBLEM 
WITH YOUR 1541? 

Are you having problems loading your 
favourite game or adventure on your 
1541 Disk Drive? Well more than likely 
its out of alignment, or well on its way, 
and you have only one choice - send it 
back to the shop for re-alignment. But 
watt! now there is another choice, 
thanks to a company who understands 
the problems that haunt 1541 owners. 

Benson Computers have just attained 
the Drive Alignment Program which will 
allow a user to re-align a drive in the 
privacy of their own home, in about 40 
mins. Not only that but the drive can be 
'FIX'ed so that 95% of the problems are 
eliminated forever. The Alignment 
program will also allow the user to 
regularly monitor the drives 
performance, so that potential 
problems can be rectified before they 
become active. 

The package comes complete with a 
'Program Disk', a 'Calibration Disk' that 
was created on an $8000 Master 
Format drive, and a very easy to read 
and comprehensive manual. Once the 
program is loaded the user is presented 
with a menu of 5 options :- 
1/ CHECK/ADJUST SPEED 
^ADJUST BUMP AND ALIGNMENT 
3/ CHECKiADJUST ALIGNMENT 
A! CHECWADJUST END-STOP 
5/ FORMAT DISK 

With this arsenal of utilities it is 
possible to restore almost any 'DEAD' 
drive to a condition that is probably 
better than when it was purchased and 
it will stay that way. No special tools are 
required for the job, just your average 
screwdriver and basic mechanical 
ability. 

This program is the best of its kind in 
the world today, and it has over 15,000 
satisfied customers around the world to 
back it up. So if your in the hunt for 
something to end the '1541 BLUES' 
then purchase the Drive Alignment 
Program V2.0 Jor only $79 from Benson 
Computers Pty. Ltd. Who knows, you 
may even be able to go into business 
aligning disk drives. So dont miss out, 
phone immediately on (008) 334 854 or 
(03) 534 0994. 




The perfect match . . 



COMMODORE 
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COMPARE THESE SPECS BEFORE YOU BUY... 


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FEATURES 



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BIDIRECTIONAL PRINT 
(COLUMN WIDTH) 
W CHARACTERS PES LINE 
80 CHARACTERS PER LINE 
66 CHARACTERS PER LINE 
132 CHARACTERS PER LINE 
(PAPER HANDLING) 
FRONT LOADING FOR 

EASY PAPER SETTINGS 
BUILT-IN TOTER STAND 
PRINT ON POST CARDS 
(SOFTWARE CGMIVSANDS) 
DOUBLE STRIKE 
EMPHASIZED 
COMPRESSED 
UNDERLINE 
SUPER/SUBSCRIPTS 
ITALICS 

DOUBLE DENSITY BIT IMAGE 
(CHARACTERS) 
9X9 FONT 

TRUE DESCENDERS 
ITALICS 

COMMODORE GRAPHICS 
(OTHER FEATURES) 
SINGLE DENSITY BiT IMAGE 
EXPANDED 
REVERSE 



RITEMAN 
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COMMODORE PRINTERS 



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Plug-compatible with Commodore* 
computers. 2 software built-in: 
Commodore* & Epson** compatibility. 

If you own a Commodore computer.. .or are thinking 
about getting one. ..you're going to want the Riteman 
C + dot matrix printer. You'll really appreciate that 
added convenience, versatility and economy. Its 
unique front loading design lets you use plain paper 
of any thickness, eliminates positioning and aligning 
problems and keeps continuous-feed paper away 
from entangling cables and connectors. Just compare 
the spec, table.. .complete with a built-in Commodore 
interface and all necessary cables and 
connectors... the Riteman C + is the RIGHT printer 
for your Commodore system. 

* Commodore is 3 registered trademark of CGmmodore Business Marines Inc. 
** Epson is 3 registered trademark ot Epson America Inc. 

Distributed exclusively in Australia by: 



anltech 

A DIVISION OF THE AM CORPORATION lTD HN£ W NSW' 



ADELAIDE: (OS) 3567333 BRISBANE: (07) 27&1766 

H0BART: (002) 344511 MELBOURNE: (03) 7959011 & 796511 1 

PERTH: (09) 27770008,2771944 

SYDNEY: (02) 643 171 U a4S408S MICKLMD: (OS) 4442645 







Paradroid 



A mean program with 
exceptionally brilliant presen- 
tation, Paradroid has won the 
praise of many overseas 
magazines. 

In a time far from now, in the lonely 
depths of outer space, a lone craft drifts 
aimlessly. Aboard are a renegade crew of 
d raids. Hyperactively marching about the 
ships decks it becomes abvious that 
they have been affected by an extreme 
dose of radionic beams. Circuits in 
disarray, the droids become 
uncontrollable. The situation is critical. 
Orginally part of a small fleet of galactic 
freighters, since abandoned due to the 
dangers of remaining nearby, the 
Paradroid looks set to be destroyed by 
its occupants. 

However, the possibility also exists 
that enemy craft may capture it and use 



the knowledge they gain to the detriment 
of the entire human race. In desperation 
it is decided to test a new prototype droid 
known simply as the Influence Device. 
Little more than a self sufficient helmet, 
complete with power supply and simple 
weaponry. However, it may also 
temporarily take full control of other 
droids, maintaining and operating all its 
available functions. 

The device overtaken will attempt to 
regain control, leading to an eventual 
burn out. Therefore it is necessary to 
change hosts regularly. On your own you 
have a low power twin laser which will 
destroy other droids. Some may require 
several direct hits, whilst the lower forms 
will disintegrate with one direct hit. 
Robots may also be rammed for a similar 
destructive effect. 

Transferring to other droids is done by 
holding down the joystick button until 
your screen representation changes 
colour. Making contact with another robot 
will commence the transfer process. Now 
begins the complex task of taking over 
the micro-circuit of your target. The 
screen displays the circuit. You may now 
choose which colour to modify from. 





Side on view of the Paradroid ship, showing dscks and elevator shafts 



Transfer under way. ..so far it doesnt 
look too promising 

Having selected it, you have but a few 
brief moments (99 time units) to activate 
wires by moving your pulsars to the most 
strategically advantageous position. 

More advanced robots are formidable 
opponents, working quickly to take 
control of a greater number of the centre 
bars. Transfer will result in the 
destruction of your current host. If 
unsuccessful you return to a standard 
class 001 Influence Device, unless you 
had no host, in which case Whammo.. 
you're destroyed.. Game Over. 

During play, the screen displays a top 
on floor plan of the level you are currently 
on. You may move to other levels using 
elevators. Scattered about each deck 
are consoles which allow access to 
important information about your robot, 
other robots, a plan of the entire deck 
you are on, and a side elevation of the 
ship. 

In the droid data library, 24 different 
droids grouped into 9 classes are on file. 
These include Disposal Robots, Servant 
Robots, Servant Robots, Messenger 
Robots, Maintenance Robots, Crew 
Droids, Sentinel Droids, Battle Droids and 
Security Droids. Finally there's the rather 
nasty 999 Command Cyborg. There is 
only ever one of these on board, and you 
can't take over this one for very long. 

You may view information about any of 
these, so long as their ranking is lower 
than that of your current host. When a 
robot appears on the screen, it contains 
a three digit number, providing details of 
the unit's class and power. Robots 



Australian Commodore Review 6 





Display of the current deck, note console points, 
status and elevator 



continue 1o operate even when off 
screen, demonstrating the extensive 
design in giving these droids a 
personality of their own. 

Graphics are detaiied, wefl designed, 
with good use of colour. Sound effects 
are also very good. I especiaily like the 
space-like feel that the graphics give, 
through the use of bas-relief - a sort of 
metalic look. The entire craft is very 
complete, as are the many robots. 
Moving around each deck is 
accomplished through the use of a 
window technique which displays a small 
portion of the level you are on. 

Scrolling within this window area is fast 
and smooth. Top stuff by any standards. 
Your view within the actual window area is 
limited to that that would be visible if you 
were standing where your robot is. 
Therefore parts of the visible area are 
obscured by pillars and corners in the 
many rooms. Again another piece of 
programming excellence. Every minor 
detail has been given major 
consideration. 

Droids may be destroyed by ramming, 
shooting or transferring. Ramming tends 
to weaken you very quickly, and is only 
best used if you are in control of a very 



powerful unit. Shooting is the quickest 
and easiest way, although some of the 
higher ranking droids may require a 
multitude of direct hits. Others are quick 
to fire back so be prepared for anything. 



The ship plan has a variety Df rooms 
and nooks and crannies. Open spaces 
are bad news, leaving you open to tire 
from robots out of view. Once you have 
fully cleared one deck, tis time to move 
on, the system shuts down - dimming the 
lights and adding a small bonus to your 
score. Clear all twenty sections of the 
ships and you'll get a more noticeable 
addition to your growing score. Then 
there are seven more freighters to tend 
to. 

Overall, fabulous graphics. Brilliant 
presentation, and most addictive. 
Paradroid is proof that all computer 
games aren't the same, even if the basic 
theme is. No doubt a potential big seller! 



Machine : Commodore 64 


Game : 


Paradroid 


Publisher : 


Hewson Consltnts 


Distribution 


: Ozi Soft 




and ISD 


Price : 


$39.95 


Graphics : 


98 


Sound : 


84 


Originality : 


88 


Presentation 


: 100 


Addictiveness : 92 


Overall : 


96 




A Class 8 Security Droid (centre of screen), in this position it's replenishing its energy. 



Australian Commodore Review 7 




Frankie 
Goes to 
Hollywood 



A Frankie Game? Could it possibly 
match the already massive reputation of 
the pop group by the same name? The 
answer is a most definite yes. Not your 
average sort of game, by any means, ft is 
an adventure, yet unlike any other that 
you will have played. 

You begin life in Mundaneiand, a very 
average suburb, {No doubt it is near a 
block of flats in Sydney which has 
actually been named Blandsville.) Devoid 
of personality, you must endeavour to 
work on the various characteristics 
needed to become a real person and thus 
enter into the pleasure dome. 

The four factors which must be acquired 
are sex, war, love and religion. By 
exploring the rooms within the houses 
lining the streets of Mundaneiand, you 
will discover many objects of use. Within 
each home are several rooms, full of the 




sort of things you'd expect 1o find in such 
a mundane environment. Washing 
machines, fridges, TVs, cupboards and 
the odd video recorder. 

Each may be searched by pointing to 
that item. A small window will then appear 
displaying what is contained for you to 
take. Apart from the occasional red 
herring, you will also find money, 
computer disks, revolvers, videos and 
less descriptive items that add to your 
personality. Partway through the game a 













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murder occurs, which you must then 
solve. 

Once you discover the body, a clue 
as to the identity of the killer is given 
each time you enter a new location. By 
returning to the scene of the crime you 
may attempt to name the murderer. The 
clues simply eliminate various suspects 
by telling you their habits and fikes or 
dislikes. This may include statements 
such as "The killer likes to gamble" or 
"Miss Average is a movie buff". To solve 
the murder mystery quickly and 
accurately, you really need to write down 
every clue as it appears. 

Having guessed the murderer, further 
points are added to your score, placing 
you closer to your ultimate goal. 

Videos which are scattered around 
the place may be inserted into video 
recorders, at which point a window 
appears in the centre of the screen. By 
moving your figure into the window, the 
window itself enlarges, exposing the 
arcade aspect of this game. In all there 
are ten different games to be played, of 
varying difficulty and complexity, 

Completing a game gives you added 
pleasure and character points. If you 
don't complete them, it's back to the land 
of Mundanesville. Some of these games 
are entered just by touching something. 

Game List 

Sea of Holes 

Move your man into the holes to warp 

about the screen. Not as tricky as if 



Australian Commodore Review 8 







^miK 




appears, just persist a little and discover 
how you can get to the bottom of this 
one. 

The Terminal Room 

Heaps to see, but what to do? Did you 
bring your floppy disk? And a pass to 
pass - plenty of windows to enter, if you 
can get there. 



Cybernetic Breakout 
Only one brick in this 
version of an old favourite. 



rather tough 



Cupid's Arrows 

This one is hard - ride from heaven to hell 
on a cloud to become a saint. On 
completion you'll get a worthwhile reward. 

Raid over Mersey side 
Shoot down the planes and bombs before 
they rain destruction on the cities below, 
Fast accurate shooting required. 

Talking Heads 

Not another pop group... no, Reagan and 
Gorbachev rap it out. Go left or right to 
choose your politics. 

Shooting Gallery 

Free 1he ducks before you tackle this 

one. Don't miss a thing if you can help it. 

WarRoom 

Just shoot everything! 



Flower Power 

Where's my incense sticks?... but really - 

just pick a bunch. 

ZTTRoom 

You can get out without completing the 

puzzle.. With a little knowledge of 

matrices and multiplication you can do 

wonders. 

If you ever make it to the pleasure dome, 
mapping is a must. Various doors lead to 
the games, while others lead back to the 
outside world. Watch for those nasty 
floating sparks, just dodge the ones 
which emerge from manhole covers. You 
can also shoot sparks, but beware, if one 
touches you it's back to the real world. 



What do we think? 

A top game, with quality graphics and 
music. Very addictive and no doubt likely 
to gain quite a cult following. There are 
some tough problems to solve, and a few 
twists that are not easily mapped. Don't 
be afraid to do plenty of exploring, and 
touch or pick up anything that looks 
interesting. 

Very impressive use of icons for the 
selection of objects and viewing of your 
inventory. This game is a breeze to 
understand. Plenty of variation, and most 
of all, this is a really entertaining game 
that will keep many amused for long 
hours. 



Commodore 


64 


Game: 


Frankie Goes 




to Hollywood 


Publisher: 


Denton 




Designs 


Distribution 


:ISD 


Price: 


d$39.95, 




c$29.95 


Graphics: 


96 


Sound: 


92 


Originality: 


90 


Presentation 


96 


Addictiveness: 96 


Value for Money: 90 


Overall: 


94 




Australian Commodore Review 9 




Racing 

Destruction 

Set 

By Andrew Farrell 

Just when you thought there 
wasn't room for one more road 
game, car game, or 
construction set for that 
matter... enter Racing 
Destruction Set. It's an all 
crazy game with some great 
panoramic 3D graphics. 

A secret to any successful game is 
plenty of variation and lots of challenges. 
When it gets down to base level, RDS has 



got the lot. There are multiple difficult 
levels, variations in courses, a variety of 
cars, different road surfaces and even an 
option to select your own gravity. More 
on ail those a little later. 

There are two ways to play the game, 
racing or destruction. Both can be a lot of 
fun. Electronic Arts have really gone the 
full swing in allowing so many variations - 
you'll probably still hear me rave on about 
them at the end of this review. Really, 
there are heaps. 

To start you must choose which course 
you wish to race on. On the disk version 
there are some fifty ready made circuits, 
19 of which are based on real life tracks. 
The other 31 are real awkward type stuff 
that really just demonstrate how much 
flexibility is allowed in designing your own 
cusfon tracks. Yes, if you can't like any 
of the 50 presets, just do your own thing. 

Next you may select the number of 



laps from one to nine. Your opposition 
may be either another human form or the 
computer itself. The background that 
scrolls around behind the track itself is 
also variable between a lunar surface, 
racing scenery, moto-cross, or abstract 
as in the picture on this page. (If it ain't 
on this page, the layout artist is hereby 
sacked!) 

Having 1hen chosen the gravitational 
pult that will be in effect you're nearly 
ready. You can have anything from any 
of the planets in our solar system, 
including a few of the moons. This can 
make for some really weird events, with 
some cars spending as much time in the 
air as they do on the ground. 

Cars., now there's something else you 
have to choose. Wow, we could be 
playing this game soon, who knows! 
There's a variety of machines to drive, 
ranging from clunky four wheel drive dead 




Australian Commodore Review 10 




weights, to sleek Mustang type material. 
All are good in their own element. Of the 
ten vehicles, all may have various 
features about them modified. These 
include engine size and extras carried. 

As you choose a machine, its various 
characteristics are displayed at the top 
of the screen. These include its name, 
weight, engine capacity and other 
associated attributes as well as the type 
of tyres it is fitted with. This may be 
changed to suit the surface you will be 
racing on. Spiked tyres go well on ice, but 
tend to be very slow on other surfaces. 
You can have knobbly tyres or slicks (for 
smooth surfaces such as pavement). 

Other nasties may be added to your 
vehicle, and its overall weight. These are 
especially for use in 1he destruction side 
of the game. Armour, oil, crushers, and 
landmines must all be considered. A fast 
car is not always the best answer to 
success on some of the gruelling circuits 
that can be devised. All your own designs 
may be saved to disk or tape for 
posterity., or any other excuse you have 
in mind. 

Your own tracks are great to make. 
Working on an 8 x 8 grid you choose the 
pieces to place In each square much the 



same as you might build a jig-saw puzzle. 
The pieces themselves may also be 
changed to suit your own needs. Hills 
may be raised or lowered, surfaces 
changed, and the whole kit and kaboodle 
made very very tough to play. You can 
expect a lot of entertainment from the two 
player option, especially once you start 
do unkind things to each other. 

What do we Think? 



When asked this question, our 
reveiwers have been known to go into 
long periods of silence. This one was 
different. The problem was more trying to 
get them off the machine long enough to 
get a word out. Well the verdict was 
pretty encouraging. 

A game that was obviously well thought 
out, not always prevalent in some 
programs. Plenty of action, variety and 
good graphics make it fun to play and to 
watch. Some things are a little weird in 
their design, making it difficult to see just 
what it is you're looking at at times. The 
cars themselves for instance are rather 
small. 

Nevertheless, a definite winner. Mega 




options to keep you amused for long 
hours. Look forward to making some 
massive jumps, chicanes and slopes. A 
good track is well worth the time spent to 
construct it. 




Machine : Commodore 64 
Game : Racing Destruction 

Set 
Publisher: Electronic Arts 
Distributor :ECP 



Graphics : 


90 


Sound : 


76 


Originality : 


88 


Presentation : 


98 


Addictiveness : 


96 


Overall : 


94 





Australian Commodore Review 11 







Mercenary 
revisited 

by Andrew Farrell 



Escape from Targ, the first 
part in this epic game 
reviewed last month, is 
certainly proving to be far 
larger than expected. After 
several late nights and early 
mornings, Andrew Farrell had 
this to say. 

I have barely scratched the surface. 
Before me a massive world has unfolded 
with much depth and complexity. The 
labyrinth of tunnels and rooms which 
exists beneath the cities surface is far 
larger than expected. Mercenary is 
worthy of much exploration. It appears 
that the two warring factions, the 
Mechanoids and the Palyars have some 
vast differences. 

Whilst the Mechanoid ground base 
seems small at this stage, the Palyar 
installations are widespread and contain 
many transporters which may relocate 
you to distant bases, even way out of the 
city limits. At this stage the following 
locations should be noted: 

3,0 - Mechanoid Base, with hanger, 
centre of operations, only small in size. 
9,6 - Palyar Base, with hanger, briefing 
room and bank. 

9.5 - Palyar Base, with hanger. Joined to 

9.6 by extensive tunnel network. 
11,13 - Palyar Base, with hanger and 
bank. Extensive tunnel network. 

34,11 - Communication Tower (Out of city 
limits) 

0,3 - Radar Tower 
75,39 - Pyramid (Out of city limits) 
81,35 - Palyar Hanger 
8,8 - Elevation 64,800 Palyar Colony 
Craft 

Tips 

Some parts of the game are difficult to 
reach and there are many snags that 
need to be given careful attention. To 



Objects To 
Find: 

Photon Emitter 

Catering 

Provisions 

Power Crystal 

First Aid Kit 

Power Booster 

Gold 

Sights 

Useful Armament 




LOCATIONS 6 PALYAR BASE 



reach the Palyar air base you will need 
the power amp, or a lot of cups of coffee. 
Having arrived, simply move slowly 
toward the base, and once you land on 
the top, press 'e' for elevator. 
Unfortunately, by the time I reached that 
stage I had made enemies of the Palyars 
and all the doors were locked. It seems 
that different doors become locked or 
unlocked depending on whose side 
you're on. 

One must be very careful what one 
shoots. 1 managed to blow the chief 
Palyar commander's brother-in-law's 
son's brand new space ship clear out of 
the sky. The Palyars were not impressed. 
They have most of the fastest craft too, 
with the Mechanoid ships appearing far 
more akward and a lot more sluggish to 
fly. With the power booster 1 got the 
Dominion Dart up to atop speed of 9900. 

Try going into a vertical dive at that 
speed. Worse still, see if you don't get a 
slight case of nausea when you get shot 
down at 64,000 feet above the city. 

More maps and information 
next month. Please, any other 
Mercenary players, write In and 
keep us up to date with any 
discoveries you may have made. 







LOCATION 3,0 MECHANOID BASE 



Australian Commodore Review 12 





UtV etllLtj 



Rock f n 
Wrestle 



From Redneck McCoy (the Southern 
farmer) to Lord Toff (the most dangerous 
wrestler in the world today) you, 
Gorgeous Grey (the blonde hero), wrestle 
your way through ten different opponents 
to become the world wrestling champion. 
To do this you have to pin each opponent 
within a time limit without being pinned 
yourself, using over 25 different moves. 

Rock 'n Wrestle can be either 
keyboard or joystick controlled. All 
moves cannot be done from the one 
position, they are all divided up into 
seven sections. The first, the simplest of 
all, is just to move around the ring. This is 
done without pressing the button and 
moving left, right, up and down; however, 
if you keep moving in one direction you 
begin to run. If you run into the ropes you 




can bounce off and gain extra momentum 
by reversing your joystick direction. 

The next is to just soften up your 
opponent by kneeing, kicking etc. After 
this he will be slightly dazed so you will 
have the opportunity to grab him. From 
this you will be able to do an assortment 
of different moves including the atomic 
drop, aeroplane spin, hit driver, body' 
slam, back breaker, arm twist, elbow drop 
and turnbuckle fly. 

By now you may be getting the 
impression that Rock'n Wrestle is a 



complex, difficult game to play, but I 
assure you that you will get the hang of it 
sooner or later. 

Rock'n Wrestle has a complete rock 
sound track with the usual thumping 
noises, and very realistic three 
dimensional figures. All this makes it a 
fun and addictive game to play. Weir 
done, Melbourne House (again). 



by Matthew Tow (14 years) 


Commodore 64 




Game; Rock'n Wrestle 


Publisher: Melbourne House 


Distribution: Melbourne House 


Price: $29.95 




Graphics: 


86 


Sound: 


92 


Originality: 


95 


Presentation: 


80 


Addictlveness: 


84 


Value for Money 


:86 


Overall: 


87 



NATIONAL 



April 



TOP TEN 



1. Goonies - OziSoft 

2. Zorro - OziSoft 

3. Rambo - ISD 

4. Hacker ■ Imagineering 

5. Rockfords Revenge - OziSoft 

6. Monty on the Run - Melbourne House 

7. Elite ■ ISD 

8. Island Caper 

9. Mercenary - ISD 

10. Frankie Goes to Hollywood 



Expected Hits 

Infiltrator - Paradroid - Blade Runner - Transformers 




Australian Commodore Review 13 






HARDWARE 



Riteman C+ 

A new approach to 

printing 



by John Blyth 

It is seldom these days that one 
can honestly say, "Why didn't they think 
of that before", but in the case of the new 
Near Letter Quality RITEMAN C+ Printer, 
built by the wellknown C-ltoh Company 
and distributed by Anitech, it seems a 
breakthrough has been made. 

The C+ stands for Commodore 
compatible plus Epson compatible. 

It is a pleasant change to purchase 
a product which has been packed in an 
easy carry box, complete with handle, 
but it is even more amazing when the 
printer is removed and you discover that 
it looks quite unlike any youu've seen 
before. 

Gone is the piaten around which the 
paper is normally bent, typewriter style, 
and instead there is a much more 
sensible arrangement where the paper 
feeds directly through the front of the 



printer, exiting at the back in one smooth 
straight line. The printer will accept 
anything from tissue paper to quite thick 
cardboard, thanks to this simple 
arrangement, and even sits on its own 
built-in stand so tractor feed fan fold 
paper can be placed underneath or in a 
myriad of possibilities for single sheet or 
fan fold papers. 

The ribbon comes in two spools and is 
even supplied with a pair of tweezers so 
your fingers don't get grubby. It's quite 
easy to mount and also ingenious in its 
operation. 

The printer came with a thick manual of 
instructions, plus a few photocopied 
sheets of updated instructions to cater 
for an updated ROM chip. 

The manual gives good examples of all 
the printer's features, such as Graphics, 
Near Letter Quality, Draft mode, 
Enhanced, Bold, Double strike, 
Compressed, and Italic print styles. 



Subscripts and Superscripts are there at 
a touch. Really just about all anyone 
would need! 

Where the manual is not so clear is 
just what Standard 1 and 2 modes are, or 
what the Plus mode is. After a fair bit of 
reading and playing around, it would 
appear that Standard 1 and 2 modes are 
Commodore 801/803 printer graphic and 
letter printing modes, while Plus mode 
puts the printer into an Epson Printer 
arrangement, which gives full access to 
all the additional features not found on 
the 801/803 printers. 

Unlike some other printers on the 
market, the Riteman C+ can be switched 
from mode to mode by both software 
control. and dip-switches. Perhaps this is 
just as well, as the dip-switches lie under 
a small panel on the top of the machine, 
and are not the easiest to change. 
Not all is lost, however, as most word 
processors allow for printer control codes 



This is the Riteman C+ printing in the DRAFT MODE. 




This -is the Eiteaan C+ printing in the NEAB LETTER QUALITY HODE. 




This is the Ritenan C+ in the UNDERLINE MQPE- 




Tnis is the Riteaan C+ in the CONDENSED HODE. 


This is the Riteman C+ in the BOLD MODE. 




Thl * *- ***" •** *-"—-" c+ in the SUPERSCRIPT MODE. 




-r^i» +• *h« R± t . m .r. c + in the SUBSCRIPT MODE. 




This is the Ritemam C+ in the ITALICS HODE 




And they w e r & al 1 jp ar i n t *=> <± 


out 


together 





Australian Commodore Review 14 



^r 



HARDWARE 



to be sent from within the program. It 
took me a number of hours of playing 
around with the new Superscript word 
processor program before I could shout 
"Eureka", and be able to swap modes 
without changing the dip-switch settings. 
How, you ask? Just set up the printer as 
a Commodore 801/803, send it the 
"change of mode" command 
(chr$27,chr$86), to change to the Plus 
mode, then set the printer up as an 
Epson and all those great print styles 
that the Commodore printer does not 
support are yours. And you never have 
to change a dip-switch again. The NLQ 
mode can also be activated by pressing 
the SEL and FF button when the printer is 
turned on. 

Physically, the Riteman C+ is an 
attractive and compact unit. It's 
reasonably quiet, and faster than the 
now defunct Commodore 802 when in 
draft mode. Remembering that the paper 
is cleverly loaded from the front of the 
machine, the controls to adjust for paper 




thickness and friction are on the left and 
right at the top of the casing. The power, 
paper out, and select LEDs are on the 
front right, along with three very handy 
button switches to select the printer on 
and off line, and paper advance by page 
or by line. 

All in alt, I am most impressed with 
the Riteman. Its simplicity of paper 
loading will win it many friends, whilst the 
quality of its print, particularly in the NLQ 
mode, is very good. The manual is at 
least as good at its main rivals, but they 
could all be better. 



The only minor fault I can find is in the 
dip-switches being internal. For most 
people this wonl be a problem, as a bit of 
forethought allows everything to be 
controlled from within a program anyway. 

For its price of around $599 
recommended retail (usually sold a bit 
cheaper though), the Riteman C+ is a 
great step forward for Commodore 
owners. In fact it leaves the competition 
wallowing! 



£t commodore 
computer centre 



128, 64, VIC20 

PC 10, PC20 and CBM8000 

LARGE COMPUTER DISPLAY — 3000 SQ FT. • WE ARE THE EXPERTS, COME & SEE US FOR 

SERVICE 




Every conceivable accessory 

Huge range of programmes (particularly education) 

Direct connect typewriters 

1 7 different printers 

Serial & Parallel Interfaces 

Monitors: colour and monochrome 

Touch tablets 

Plotters 

Disk Drives (4 different & includes compatibles) 

Desks, printer stands 

Books, labels, magazines (huge range) 



Prompt repairs by friendly experts 
Disk drives aligned (specialty) 
Easy access 
Plenty of Parking 
Open Saturday mornings 
Established 1968 
Repairs accepted by mail 
(include phone number) 



/Maxn/el| 

/OFFICE EQUIPMENT (VICI PTY. LT0.I 



162-164 NICHOLSON ST ABBOTSFORD 

(near Hoddle Street) 

Telephone (03) 419 6811 m ^^ m 



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S V \ F-aetball 
Ground 




Australian Commodore Review 15 



HARDWARE/SOFTWARE 




by Ric Richardson 

Many of you have no doubt been 
touched in some way by the Amiga's 
media circus. The centre stage being of 
course Commodore's dominance of this 
year's PC Show. 

But the other partner of the marriage 
that makes up a successful machine is 
software. And until now all the talk about 
what is available and how good it is has 
amounted to a large volume of wind. 

The real test will come within the next 
few months as a whole new range of PCs 
jostle for supremacy, an exercise which 
would truly be a non-event if the Amiga 
had a wider software base. 

So here we are, the first shipment is 
on the streets and everybody wants to 
know what software is available, where 
can you get it, what peripherals are at our 
disposal and who can help me get 
acquainted with my new machine. 

Software 

Of the 70 or so programs that we at 
the Australian Commodore Review know 
of, only a small percentage represents 
any imediate benefit for the average 
buyer. The basic list consists of 
Graphiccraft and Textcraft both at about 
$99 rrp, a series of programmers' 
packages covering most popular 
languages and some tutorial/ 
demonstration programs that are soon to 
become public domain. 

The other end of the scale consists of 
a few very well thought out specialist 
packages, Deluxe Paint, from ECP in 
Brookvale, Sydney, has quickly become 
one of the MUST HAVE items at an rr. of 
$245. From the pages of the US Amiga 
World magazine you will find that two of 
the Maxi series are here, MaxiComm and 
MaxiDesk, for around $200. 
As I feel Deluxe Paint will become a 
standard, so also will the Aegis packages 

Australian Commodore Review 16 



fare well. One of the star spangled 
features of the Amiga is the prospect of 
doing close to professional standard 
animation, and Aegis Animator (which 
includes Aegis Images) fills the bill very 
well. 

Other creative applications are 
covered by Harmony, or as it is known 
here Concertcraft, which is a MIDI 
sequencer and internal voice controller 
with a few excellent features inbuilt. 

Musicraft is also available although it 
only seems to be dealers who can get 
their hands on it. There are also the 
Mimetics range of music products soon 
to arrive at their distributors' offices. In 
fact Neriki at Crows Nest in Sydney are 
quite heavily into Amiga support with 
Aegis, the Metacomco series of 
development kits and the Mimetic range 
under their belt. To add to this they have 
also tackled the momentous task of 
devising a series of seminars ranging 
from introductory Amiga familiarisation 
right through to advanced tuition on using 
the Amiga in the music, video and film 
production industries. 

A big hit overseas is the Amiga's 
adaptability in the technical industries, 
and the large availability of programs for 
drafting and architecture certainly sits 
the Amiga squarely in the serious 
business sector. In fact the number of 
technical application programs that are 
available really is surprising. 

The Rags to Riches accounting suite is 
also apparently available for around $800 
retail, although I have not seen one 
myself. 

Soon to be released will be also a 
homegrown small business package from 
Sybiz in South Australia, an important 
move as there will be definite differences 
in the needs of Australian business. 

To top all this off there are surprisingly - 
many fluent Amiga programmers out 
there already. This is no doubt a side 
benefit anticipated by all of those eager 



souls who got their Amigas straight from 
the US over the last six months. 

In fact the eager people at that hive of 
activity known as Neriki have also tapped 
some of this existing expertise and set 
up a software development group of their 
own with background in the vertical 
markets. Custom packages for graphic 
artists, television production, interior 
decorators, animators, advertising 
people and musicians are catered for. 

Add ons 

On the peripheral front there is some 
further good news. 

To date there are two good alternatives 
for those keen to use Amiga graphics. 
The Okimate colour printer at $690 retail 
is a fantastic boon, its ability to print on 
transparency film with excellent results is 
going to make overhead projection 
presentations a very inexpensive affair 
indeed. 

On the other end we have the prospect 
of an excellent colour printer for $1500 
from Epson. Both are good prospective 
acquisitions, depending on your needs. 
A hinging factor in using the Amiga to the 
full is the breaking of the "PAL standard" 
barrier. The good news is that the 
conversion can be done cheaper than 
expected. 

Many of the Amiga's most intriguing 
features are dependent on the ability to 
process video information. The 
Framegrabber (a video digitiser) and a 
Genlock device (used for mixing 
computer graphics and video signals) are 
soon to be available thanks to the work of 
Craig Schuetrumpf who apparently has 
tackled the problems involved and is 
adapting his conversion to fit existing 
and proposed video adapters for the 
Amiga. All in all the future looks a bit more 
positive than many have proposed. 



Programmer wanted 

Reliable part time Commodore 
64 programmer wanted. 

Must be experienced in game 
conversion from disk to cassette 
and "fast loading" of existing 
tapes. 

Flexible hours, payment terms 
negotiable. 

Phone ECP, (02) 949 7300 



More User Groups: 

WESTERN AUSTRALIA 
Dealer Based 



LEEDERVILLE 

W.A.C.G.U.A. 

POBox31 

Leederville 6007 

Contact: Mr N Headlam (09) 381 4398 

LESMURDIE 

VlCUee 

A Sheild Road 

Lssmurdie 6076 

Contact: MrG Padfield (09) 451 4629 

KALGOORLIE 

VICUps 
28 Dart st 
Boulder 6432 

ROCKINGHAM 

VIC Chips 

48 Hercules street 

Rockingham Park 

Contact: Dave West (095) 27 3954, Ron 

Teaque(195)27 6558 

QUEENSLAND 

SOUTH PORT 

South port User Group 

Scraborough Street 

South port 

Contact: Mr Fitzpatrick (075) 32 0061 

SPEINGWOOD 

Sid Commodora/PET User Group 

PO Box 274 

Sprinqwood 4127 

Contact: Mr G Perrv (07) 38 3295 

Dealer Based 

COOLANGATTA 

Tedita Ptv Ltd 

116 Griffith Street 

Coolanqatta 4225 

Contact: Mr P Hamill (075) 36 6722 

MOUNT ISA 

Commodore Computer User's Club 

3 Crystal street 

Mount Isa 4825 

Contact: Mr Steve William. 

Mr Peter Robbins 



TOWNSV1LLE 

Townsville Users Group 

1 Paxton Street 

Townsvifle 4810 

Contact: Mr Tone Moore 72 6454 

IPSWICH 

Commodore User Group 

P.O.Box 298 

Ipswich 4305 

Contact: 201 81 18, 202 3601 

ROCKHAMPTON 

Commodore User Group 
50 Ocean Parade 
Yeppon 4703 
Contact: Mr Goodsell 




NERIKI ENTERPRISES PTY. LTD. 

are proud to announce 
the arrival of... 




BY COMMODORE* 



JrkiJfiUi 





The most powerful productivity tool 
in today's computer marketplace! 

Designed for the professional who needs more than just a PC! 

AMIGA's graphics, sound and animation capabilities allow you to 

be totally creative, whilst improving the quality of your work. 

Neriki Enterprises are leaders in thesaies and development of 
computer systems for domestic and professional markets including: 



□ TELEVISION STATIONS AND PRODUCTION 
HOUSES 

□ HOSPITAL AND MEDICAL PRACTITIONERS 

D ARCHITECTS, ENCINEERSANoBLIIJJERS 

□ ADVERTISING 



3 EDUCATIONAL INSTIIITIONS 

□ CRAPFIIC ARTISTS 

□ USHIOVIVIERIOR DESIGNERS 
3 ANIMATORS 

□ MUSICIANS & RECORDING STUDIOS 



for a demonstration of AMIGA ring Craig SchuetrumpJ 'on 

S" (02) 9574778 

NERIKI ENTERPRISES and AMIGA 

"A Quality Team for a Quality Result" 






HARDWARE 



Commodore 128D 
User Report 

A transportable version of the 64' s 
big brother - and it's cheaper! 



Commodore's 128 has been a great 
success. No doubt this is due to the fact 
that there was a ready market of 
Commodore 64 owners out there who 
were just waiting to upgrade to something 
with a little more "oomph". 

For those who arent familiar with this 
machine, it has plenty to offer. 

Of course you get 128K of RAM to 
play with, which is used by two of the 
three different modes of operation. 

In mods one, your 128 is just like a 
standard Commodore 64. Nothing more, 
nothing tess - we hope. In 128 mode 
you have a whizz bang version of the 64 - 
there's a better BASIC, access to the full 
128K, a selection of 40 or 80 columns in 
very sturdy colour and a fast, fast disk 
drive. 

Now when we say fast here, we mean 
real fast. At full throttle the 1571 disk 
drive, as it is known, will LOAD a high 
resolution graphics picture in around 
three seconds. Well, perhaps just a few 
tenths of a second more, but I doubt 
you'll be counting. 

So now you can have all these 
amazing bells and whistles in a portable 
form. 

It's called a C128D. (The 'D' stands 
for portable?) 

In the Ihird mode, which I almost 
forgot to mention, you may use CP/M 
version 3.0. An antiquated operating 
system by some standards and yet still 
very popular amongst many old timers. 

This means you should be able to use 
thousands of existing software packages 
in the business world of the software 
arena. At the last word it seems that the 
number of users investigating the 
potential this mode offers is very few. 
Perhaps that is because so much good 
software is arriving for use in the 128 

Australian Commodore Review 18 




'tfttttmti twtfff/ffff/ff , — -, /'/// 




■*^«^-M'^-^ 



fHHlli* (tJ&lfil* tULIIJU 




The Commodore 128D has a slimline keyboard which clips into the back 



The 128D is a 128 and a 
1571 disk drive (that new 
fast one we mentioned) 
all housed together in 
one neat package. 



mode, which is far more interesting than 
dull and boring CP/M. 

So we have established that the 128 
is a good thing. The 128D is just a 128 
and a 1571 disk drive (that new fast one 
we mentioned) all housed together in one 
neat package. In my mind it is 
aesthetically and economically more 
appealing, to any person considering the 
purchase of a C128 and 1571 disk drive. 

The 128D is a smart looking beast. It 



has a solid look about it, and looks at 
home next to an IBM clone as much as It 
does beside an Amiga. The unit is 
designed to be transportable. A 
detachable keyboard clips on the under 
side of the main unit. Inside this beige 
coloured box you will find all the inner 
workings of a C128 along with a trusty 
1571 disk drive and a cooling fan. 

The cooling fan groans to life when you 
power up, rather like listening to a small 
jet aircraft warm up. The front panel 
contains a power light in the top left hand 
corner, with the power switch itself 
mounted at the front left hand side of the 
unit. To the right front is the drive with a 
drive-in-use light further toward the 
centre. 

On the right hand side are the keyboard 
connector, (an awkward heavy cord 



o 



HARDWARE 



rather than the more useful extendable telephone type cables), 
and the two joyports. There is also a reset switch for the 
computer and a recessed one for the drive. 

At the rear you will find all your normal C128 expansion 
ports and assorted sockets. These are shrouded slightly by 
two pegs for winding the power cord around when you're on the 
move. 

The cable for the keyboard remains attached at the 
keyboard end, and tucks away neatly Into a slot underneath 
the main unit. 

Your keyboard is exactly the same as a standard C128. 
Rubbers on the base stop it from sliding around; however most 
people will fold down the small legs, which elevate the rear of 
the keyboard for a better typing angle. These legs are without 
the rubber feet, which is rather annoying as that stable feel is 
immediately lost. Another minor complaint regarding the 
keyboard cable relates to its length - you cant sit it neatly in 
your lap because it just won't reach. 

Once set up on your desk top, a monitor placed neatly on 
top of it all makes for a smart looking system that is complete 
and ready for use. 

Overall the 1280 represents excellent value for money. At 
the time of writing it was cheaper than purchasing a 128 and 
drive separately. 

As far as portabality goes, it is light enough to carry over a 
reasonably long distance. I am a little concerned about the 
lack of protection offered to several prolusions from the 
casing. A little care is in order here, despite the robust look of it 
all. 

An impressive unit nonetheless, definitely worth a closer 
look before you buy otherwise. 



The 128D weights only eight kilos and is the size of a 
briefcase for easy transport 



Software Incompatibilities 

Having played around with a 128 for some time now, I 
must complain bitterly with regard to the number of 
packages which state they will operate on the machine and 
yet refuse to LOAD. I don't blame Commodore, for they 
surely cannot be held responsible, despite the fact that 
compatibility was promised. Indeed the 64 mode is, with the 
exception of one minor change, fully compatible. 

To bring out an improved drive, changes were necessary 
amd they are what is responsible for so many non-event 
bads. 

There is also talk of a small change in the video chip. 
Supposedly there are two additional registers, which some 
programs may accidentally wipe, thereby causing some rather 
odd happenings. 

Software houses are fully aware of these differences and 
have be en for some time. It would be appropriate that they 
endeavour to make the necessary changes to programs to 
ensure they will toad, or alternatively make it clear on the 
packaging that they will not. 




ATTENTION!! 
PROGRAMMERS 



Ozi Soft, a major software distributor, 

is expanding their staff and require 

bright young people for 

Technical Troubleshooting and Game 

Development on a full time employment 

basis. Salary negotiable. 

Please contact Kevin Bermeister at: 



fziVft 

The Software Publishers 

Phone; (02) 21 1 1266. 



Australian Commodore Review 19 



£ 



READERS' PAGE 



Rap Back 



Print Shop help 



In a letter published in your January 
issue, P. Thacker complained that an 
AMUST DT1Q0 printer with a Xetec 
interface would not print on a lull-sized 
page when using Print Shop. 

I suspect that Mr or Ms Thacker is 
using the wrong version of Print Shop. 
One side of the program disk is the 
version to be used with Commodore 
printers; the other side should be used 
for other printers. 

The non-Commodore side includes 
"SETUP" as an additional option in the 
first menu. If this option is selected, the 
program offers a number of different 
printers that can be accommodated. 

As the AMUST DT100 is an 
"Epson-type" printer, one might assume 
that the printer option to select is 
"EPSON MX-, FX-, RX-(80 or 100)". 
However, this is not necessarily the 
case, I found with my BMC E3X80 printer 
(which is practically identical to the 
AMUST DT80) and XETEC GPI interface 
that the only printer option that would 
work properly was "MANNESMAN TALLY 
SPIRIT 80". This may also prove to be the 
option to select for the AMUST DT1 00. 

I suggest that any frustrated 
Commodore-user who is having difficulty 
in getting "PRINT SHOP' to work properly 
with a non-Commodore printer should try 
out the various options available under 
the "SETUP" facility. It is likely that one 
of these will do the job. Once the 
appropriate printer option has been 
selected, the program will automatically 
adjust itself to suit the selected printer 
every time it is loaded. The "SETUP" 
facility need be used again only if the 
program is to be used with a different 
printer. 

It also seems that Print Shop is 
designed to use American Quarto size 
paper. So far I have been unable to find 

Australian Commodore Review 20 



any way of adjusting it to suit the A4 size 
that is more common in Australia. 

Michael Noblet 
Blackwood, SA. 

Bank Street Filer 
and Mailer 



In your January issue you said that 
Bank Street Filer and Bank Street Mailer 
are now available from Imagineering and 
thus I duly ordered these through Grace 
Brothers, Orange. 

I was advised, when I enquired a week 
later, that this software was only 
available for Apple Computers, thus I 
rang this particular software supplier 
direct when I was advised that these 
items were unlikely to be available for 
Commodore computers. 

I have used a Commodore Executive 
Computer for the past 12 months, I am 
quite satisfied with its performance and 
should be glad if you would advise me 
when and from whom these items can be 
obtained. 

F.J. Scanlan 
Orange, NSW. 

RB: Contact ECP on (02) 949 7300. They 
are the Australian distributors of the 
Bank Street series. 



C128I1571 



I am writing this letter to all those 
prospective Commodore 128 and 1571 
disk buyers who currently read your 
magazine. 

Commodore in their wisdom have made 
available two versions of its new 128 
micro computer. The standard desktop 
model (128), and the portable (128D). The 
latter has a 1571 disk drive built into the 
body of the computer, and in 



Commodore's words, "shares all the 
128's features". Unfortunately 
Commodore's pricing policies between 
machines leaves something to be 
desired. Purchasing the 128 and the 
separately available 1571 disk drive will 
put you $200 more out of pocket than if 
you purchase the 128D. Commodore 
please explain! $200 for a separate 
plastic box to hold the 1571 seems 
somewhat excessive in my book! 

Secondly, supplied with both machines 
is a CP/M operating disk. My experience 
with the supplied disk was short lived, it 
was faulty and had to be replaced by 
Commodore. The second disk was also 
corrupt ... I'm waiting for the third . . . 
third time lucky! And Commodore's 
excuse to me . . . "With software made in 
the USA, the machines manufactured in 
Germany and finally packaged in 
England, something is bound to go 
wrong". 

Dennis Nicholson, 
Burwood, Vic 




READERS' PAGE 



C64 word processor 
on tape 

I am writing to enquire about the fact 
that I cannot find a word processor for 
the Commodore 64 on tape. I really like 
your magazine, and would really 
appreciate it if you could send me the 
dealer's name and how much it will cost. 
Jason Boyer, 
Kyneion, Vic. 

RB: Try Scroller, which is distributed by 
Ozi Soft - about $30. Their phone number 
is (02) 211 1266. 

Service delay 

I read with interest (no disbelief) the 
article on page 3 of 1he February 86 
Commodore Review about the new 
General Manager of CBM Australia. He 
talks about improving dealer support, 
what about his customers 



I purchased a C64 just prior to 
Christmas and in mid January a fault 
developed and the machine was returned 
to CBM on 21 January for repair. The 
CBM warranty states that a turnaround of 
"not exceeding two weeks should be 
allowed" for repairs. 

It is now six weeks since my machine 
went for repair. 

CD. Miesch, 

West Pymble, NSW, 

Monty on the Run 

Hi! I'm 12 years old, going on 13, and I 
reckon your magazine is the best in the 
whole of Australia! 

About a month ago, I purchased a 
terrific game called Monty on the Run. 1 
think it was the best game I had ever 
bought (the music on the game was 
unreal!) but nobody I knew had heard of 
this game, nor had any other computer 
magazine reviewed it, until I saw the 
March issue of The Australian 



Commodore Review and there was my old 
friend Monty Mole on the front cover. 
Well, what can I say? You are the very 
best. 

Could you please tell me how do you 
put the pokes in a game to make it have 
unlimited lives etc etc. I've been battling 
with Monty on the Runior a while now, but 
I always crash out in the car and then it's 
back to the start again. (My highest 
score is 3800). 

Also, I reckon your mag should have a 
"Kids' Page" where us here kids can 
review games, give ideas, and hold 
competitions. It could be a first for 
Australia . . . 

Okay, thanks a lot for a superb 
magazine and keep up the good work! 

Gten Murphy 
Geelong, Vic 321 9 
Editor: Thanks for the compliments. 
Good idea about the "Kids' Page - what 
do other kids think? We're looking into 
the pokes you need, and in the meantime 
do any of you readers know the answer? 



Achieve More From 

Your Commodore 128 

From COMPUTE! Books. 



This guide to the powerful 
Commodore 128 computer 
contains a wealth of information 
for every programmer. Explore 
BASIC 7.0. Enter the world of 
CP/M. Learn how to create 
dazzling graphics and sophisti- 
cated sounds in both BASIC 
and machine language and 
much more. 




Some of the best games, 
applications, ,and utilities 
tram COMPUTE' Pub- 
lications for the Commo- 
dore 64 and 128 in 64 
mode, plus special sec- 
tions detailing the ad- 
vanced features ot the 



An easy-to-use, com- 
plete small business/ 
home accounting sys- 
tem that satisfies every 
accounting need — 
from income and ex- 
penses to property and 
investments 




Available from leading bookshops. Coming soon:- 128Machine Language for Beginners, COMPUTED Kids and the Commodore 128 



Holt Saunders 



9 Waltham Street. Artarmon. N.S.W 2064 Ph; 4393633 

*Pnces qubl&i are recommended retail only 



SOFTWARE 



Get organised! 

by Kelly Essoe 

Do you have too much stuff? You can always buy a bigger 
house, build a warehouse in the back yard, have a huge 
garage sale or (heaven forbid) throw some of that 
wonderful stuff away. Or you can do what I did: I got 
Batteries Included' s Home Organizer series. 



Commodore 64 

Price: $29.95 each (disk 

only) 

Distributed by ECP, (02) 

949 7300 



No, the Home Organizers are not the 
latest development in robotics 
technology or a band of labor-loving 
elves who enjoy engaging in magical 
midnight cleaning sessions. Nor are they 
some ingeniously contrived marketing 
gimmick to profitably dispose of a 
stockpile of used cardboard boxes (lids 
are extra). 

The Home Organizers are a series of 
eight programs for the Commodore 64. 
Based on their powerful Consultant, a 
professional database manager, 
Batteries Included created the Home 
Organizer series for those of us who want 
the same power that a larger program 
offers but without the headaches. 

No tedium here. Your Home Organizer 
takes care of alt the nasty and 
time-consuming little details of data base 
construction. Each of these dedicated 
programs has the data fields, screens 
and formatted printer reports already set 
up for you. All you have to do is enter the 
information about your stuff. And there is 
a program for just about every category 
of stuff you might happen to have stuffed 
into your poor over-stuffed house. 

For example, there is a program for 
stamp collections, "Stamps", which 
organises and keeps track of all pertinent 
information such as the country, 
denomination, size, collection set 
number(s), shape, condition, colour, 
value and any additional remarks for 
every stamp in your collection. I am not a 
stamp collector myself, but my oldest 
son is and he tells me that this particular 
program is quite thorough. 

Home Organizer's "Audio Video 
Catalog" can forever do away with the 
usually hopeless and always infuriatingly 
prolonged search for a particular album 

Australian Commodore Review 22 



or a specific film from within a large 
music and video-tape library. This 
program gives you speedy access to 
everything in your collection by title, 
author or artist, label or maker, type, 
category, play time, counter position (for 
cassettes and videotapes), producer, 
personal remarks and more. It does not, 
however, keep track of whose turn it is to 
choose the evening's entertainment. 

For anyone who ever wondered when 
a particular photograph or home movie 
was shot, who took it or even what the 
?#$%! it is anyway, "Photographs, 
Slides and Home Movies" will 
forever solve the riddle of the beheaded 
body and disembodied head. Description 
of scene, film make and type exposure, 
print size, paper type, frame type, date, 
photographer, catalog number and 
additional notes can be entered for every 
photograph or home movie. Never again 
will you have to wonder who the genius 
was who took three pictures of his own 
feet or ponder over what city and on what 
vacation the picture of the whole family 
looking tired, hot and hostile in front of a 
hotel was taken. 

The "Address Book" program lets 
you know who and where your current 
friends, enemies and business 
acquaintances are and the "Mail List" 
program not only keeps track of the 
people you know, but makes it easier to 
send them those invitations, moving 
notices, thankyou notes, Christmas 
cards or chain letters. Both programs 
keep records of names, addresses and 
phone numbers as well as allowing for a 
short remark or additional note. Probably 
intended for adding information such as 
other family members' names, birth 
dates, anniversaries or the like, I have 



found another, less conventional use for 
this space. 1 cannot use a genuine entry 
to illustrate this therapeutic application 
because many of my additional notes and 
short remarks are unprintable at best, but 
using the entry "All work and no pay... " 
for an employer might give you the idea. 

The electronic "Checkbook" allows 
you to classify, calculate and review your 
finances. Checks are entered by 
issuance name, check number and date, 
then placed into one of seven categories: 
mortgage/rent, food, clothing, 
automobile, leisure, utilities or other. 
Total monetary expenditures by either 
time period of category can be printed out 
as solid proof that there are still a few 
dollars left in the monthly budget to buy 
more stuff. 

Kitchen detail is made easier with the 
"Recipes" program. With this module of 
Home Organizer you can classify meals 
by any number of categories or 
groupings, then recall recipes by name, 
category or type, Ingredient, calorie 
content, cooking time, cooking 
temperature or quantity of servings. 
Recipes will even help you to plan out 
special diet menus or write your weekly 
shopping lists. 

The last program in the series, as it 
now stands, is the first program I used. 
"Home Inventory" was just what the 
doctor ordered: it helped turn my (ware) 
house back into a home. It also put me 
back in control. 

With "Home Inventory" and one 
three-day weekend, 1 managed to put into 
impeccable order what had taken me 
years to arrange into the total random 
chaos that my family so wryly referred to 
as home. Keep in mind that neither I nor 
Batteries Included ever once claimed 
there wasn't going to be some work 
involved. The programs will organise your 
stuff, but first you've got to tell it what 
your stuff is! 

To the country sound of Waylon and 
Willie, I loaded and ran "Home Inventory", 
chose the screen border, background 
and cursor colours with the function 
keys, followed the instructions to format 
a data disk and then pressed "1" from the 








It's a knockout ! 



Fastest selling game in 
Electronic Arts history! 
Multi award winner. 





4The No.1 U.K. Hit 



First of the 
"Tales of the Unknown". 




^Make Movies for less than $50. 



Have you met the WEEK family? 






IAL SOFTWARE F-HDW 


M 


RO-GEN 


% is 




"imm 







< Why not meet Wally and Herbert 

in the first two family adventures? ^ 



Please contact your local ECP representative: 
Vic ECP Pty Ltd, 1981 Malvern Road, Malvern East, Vic 3144 Ph (03) 211 8410 
Old Computronic, 8 Harlequin St, Sunnybank Hills, Qld, 4109. Ph: (07)273 3398. 
SA Phil Stubbs Agency, 239 McGill Rd, Maylands, SA,5069. Ph: (08) 332 9827 
WA John Mills Agency, PO Box 273, Greenwood, WA 6024. Ph: (09) 448 1137 
Tas. Tasmanian Record Company, 10 Cameron St, Launceston, Tasmania 7250. 
Ph: (003) 31 5588. 






SOFTWARE 



menu to take me to the data entry 
screen. 

The preset fields in "Home Inventory" 
consist of the item description or name, 
the serial number, colour, location, 
purchase price, current value, insurance 
coverage and manufacturer. There is 
also a field for noting what system, 
collection or grouping the item belongs 
to, if any, and a remarks field where any 
other bit of information you care to add 
about the item can be typed in. 

At the bottom of the screen is the 
command line where you choose to 
(E)xit, (A)dd or (U)pdate a record. Since 
this was the first time I had used the 
program and therefore I didn't have 
anything to update, I pressed "A" to add 
data. The prompt line immediately 
changed to read "Enter Record Date - 
press {left arrow key) to finish" and the 
cursor blinked merrily on the first field 
waiting for me to give a name to my first 
piece, 

I typed In "Commodore 64". Might as 
well start where my fingers are. 1 pressed 
<RETURN> and the cursor jumped to the 
beginning of the next field. I entered the 
serial number, pressed <RETURN> and 
continued in this manner until all the 
fields contained the specified 
information. Then with a touch of the left 
arrow key, the disk drive came to life and 
my completed first record was written 
onto the data disk. 

All through the day, like Sir Edmond 
Hillary, I slowly but resolutely scaled our 
ominous and towering Everest of stuff. At 
first the going was rough, but by late 
afternoon 1'knew I would make it. I had 
drafted the rest of my family to act as the 
emissary, research, validation, 
detective, dispersal and task force of the 
expedition. In other words, they did the 
manual labor. 

That evening, our house was almost 
unrecognisable. More than half of our 
agglomeration of stuff was recorded on 
disk and stored away, set up or 
rearranged according to its purpose 
and/or frequency of use. 

After dinner I felt it was time to test 
the system. 

The most useful and powerful feature 
of a data base lies in the user's ability to 
specify any particular field of information, 
such as "item name: table saw", 

Australian Commodore Review 24 



156B82* or "part of: stereo system" and 
have the computer search through the 
file and find the record or records that 
match the search string data. 

Conversely, let's say that ugly 
serving bowl your mother-in-law gave you 
only gets dusted off and put into use 
when she comes tovisit at Christmas time 
each year. Let's also say it's December 
first - and you cant remember where you 
put it. So, you enter "ugly serving bowl" 
into the name/description field as the 
search string data. Up comes the file 
card, and as you can see in the location 
field, you've been keeping it stored as 
Roxanne's dog food bow! on the back 
porch. 

A wild-card search enables you to 
search for a specific field of information 
without specifying all the characters in 
the search string. For example, if you 
want to search for all the items in your 
"Home Inventory" file whose colour field 
has an "e" as the second character, you 
would describe the string by typing "?e". 
The question mark is the wild card symbol 
and can stand for any character. The 
computer would then come up with all the 
stuff on file that is either red, yellow, 
beige, neutral or any other colour which is 
spelled with an V as the second letter. 

A match-anywhere-search will look for 
the occurrance of a string anywhere in 
the given field. You can use this type of 
search, for example, to find all items 
whose location is specified as being 
some room, as opposed to a shelf, a 
cupboard or the back porch. To perform 
this search you would enter "I" at the 
location field and then type "room". The 
exclamation point stands for the match 
anywhere order. 

The not-equal search lets you search 
for any records that do not match the 
previous criteria. Say you happen to be 
partial to products made by a certain 
manufacturer - we'll call the company 
"Neverbreaks" - and just about every 
household appliance in your possession 
is made by them, if you wanted to see the 
file cards on everything you owned that 
was not made by Neverbreaks, then you 
would first press CTRU9 (or RVS ON) and 
enter Neverbreaks into the manufacturer 
field. Now you" know exactly what you 
have that always breaks. 

Three other types of searches are 



supported by these programs: unequal 
search - not to be confused with the 
not-equal search - with which you can 
look for records containing data that is 
either greater than or less than some 
indicated value; the any-match search, 
which allows you to simply browse 
through the entire field of records, and, 
lastly, the key-field search, which uses 
the name/description field to display all 
the items in alphabetical order. 

In all of these different types of 
searches, you can also specify more 
than one search criteria. You want to see 
everything you have on file that is 
manufactured by Commodore, is the 
colour beige and located in the computer 
room? Enter those specifications into the 
appropriate fields and, voila! just about 
every piece of hardware in your 
Commodore system wiil be displayed on 
your screen. 

Still another marvellous offering by 
the Home Organizer programs is their 
printer reports. "Home Inventory" offers 
two different hardcopy report formats. 
The first prints in neatly laid out columns 
the item name, serial number, purchase 
price and insurance amount of every item 
in your file. At the bottom of this report, it 
tabulates the total number of items and 
the total calculated purchase and 
insurance values. 

The second report available from 
"Home Inventory* prints out all the fields, 
each on a separate line, of all the records 
in your entire file. Depending on the size 
of the file or files you are printing out, this 
report can take anywhere from forever to 
eternity to finish printing. 

I ran every kind of search, with both 
single and multiple criteria, and printed 
out a columnar report of all the stuff I had 
on my "Home Inventory" data disk so far. 
I must admit, I did this not only to lest the 
program, but also, seeing as I still had 
another two days' work ahead of me, I 
suppose I needed to be totally convinced 
that it was all worth the mammoth effort. 
It was. 

Even Jf you have not got quite as 
magnified and terminal a case of stuff-itis 
as 1 do, you will find that the programs in 
the Home Organizer series are invaluable 
helpmates and timesavers that make life 
with stuff much more fun and much less 
frenzied. 






GAMES REVIEW 



- 



Battle of Midway 



A recent trend in the field of computer games has been the 
synthesis of arcade and ad venture/strategy themes into single 
programs. 

Some players would deny that the shoot-'em-up aspects of 
arcade games have any place in the more thoughtful, 
intellectual challenges of adventures and simulations. 
However, it's always been my feeling that so long as the 
sleight-of-hand joystick bashing doesn't totally overwhelm the 
strategy elements of the game, the mixture of chance and 
hand-eye coordination which arcade elements' introduce into a 
game make for greater realism, and allow less chance for 
monotony to creep in. 

PSS's Battle of Midway is a good attempt to combine these 
two elements, and in my opinion perhaps fails only in not going 
far enough. 

Midway is certainly not the most complex strategy game 
around, although the preproduction manual I was given 
suggests that the final product will contain enough information 
to make at least half-an-hour's study of the rules necessary 
before attempting to piayl 

For those of you unfamiliar with your history, the Battle of 
Midway was a crucial point of the Pacific conflict of World War 
two. The PSS Midway manual gives full historical details, but to 
summarize briefly, the island of Midway had to be defended by 
the American carriers Yorktown, Hornet and Enterprise to 
prevent Japanese landings which would have opened up the 
way to an invasion of Hawaii and eventually the American 
mainland. 

On loading the game, from disk or tape, you must first 
select keyboard or joystick control. The control key for 
"joystick" is "S", for some reason, which caught me out first 
time since I instinctively pressed "J". Never mind. 

There are three game levels and six speeds available. 

Each game begins in Map mode. The map, which suffers 
from a distinct lack of detail, shows the island of Midway, the 
surrounding islands and shallows, and the disposition of your 
American fleets and courses of the Japanese invasion fleets. 
This last detail appears only in mode 1, which is intended 
largely for practice purposes; in mode 2 the courses of the 
Japanese fleets are not marked, and in mode 3 the Japanese 
fleet ts blessed with extra carriers. 



Com Box 

The graphics in map mode are chunky but acceptable. To 
manoeuvre your fleets you use a square cursor which is 
controlled by keyboard or joystick, and which is designated the 
Com Box. 

Your forces consist of sea fleets, search aircraft shown with 
a surrounding search area (square instead of circular, which I 
would have thought would have been more accurate) and iater 
in the game, attack aircraft. The Japanese forces are 
represented by sea fleets and attack aircraft, all of which are 
invisible on the map unless they fall within the search area of a 
search squadron. 

Units are moved by placing the Com Box over them; pressing 
the trigger so that the box changes colour; moving to the new 
positron; and pressing the trigger again. The units then begin to 
move in stages, at a speed determined by the speed option 
you selected earlier. A game-time clock at the top of the 
screen ticks over in intervals of ten minutes, and it's important 
to keep an eye on this clock since after a certain time, Midway 




Australian Commodore Review 25 



GAMES REVIEW 




becomes more likely to be attacked. 

While in Map Mode, you have the option 
to read the Unit Book, which gives the 
relative strengths of the American and 
Japanese fleets. This is apparently 
useful in working out which Japanese 
fleet you are currently in conflict with, 
though whenever t got to that stage I was 
much too busy trying to stay alive to 
worry over which fleet was trying to sink 
mel Also from Map Mode, you can get an 
up-to-date report on losses and damage 
to each fleet. 

Having used your search aircraft to 
locate a Japanese fleet - which is 
indicated by a "J" appearing overlaid on 
the search area - you can get an aerial 
view ot the fleet by pressing "FT, then use 
the Unit Book to work out which fleet it is. 

Your next task is to launch attack 
aircraft, which is accomplished through 
another menu page. This tells you which 
units are ready to launch, which are 
arming, how long it will take for them to 
battle-ready, and so on. It's a pity that 
there aren't any graphics in this section - 
it would liven things up a bit if you had an 
animated sequence of the planes taking 
off. 

There's a nice animated section when 
you guide your attack aircraft to the 
Japanese fleet - liny planes dodge and 



weave avoiding flak, and you can use 
your joystick to take the role of the 
Japanese anti-aircraft gunners and try to 
shoot the planes down with lines of tracer 
fire. Should you be unlucky enough to 
sustain an air attack on Midway island, 
there's a similar sequence in which you 
have to contend against Japanese 
fighter-bombers with your own guns. 

Direct Hit 

Unfortunately, though these arcade 
sequences are beautifully animated and 
have excellent sound effects, they don't 
contribute much to the progress of the 
game. You can never be sure if your 
shots, or those of the other anti-aircraft 
guns which are operating, are 
responsible for the destruction of a 
plane; and in any case it doesnl seem to 
make much difference, since you 
inevitably end up with the message "GUN 
DESTROYED BY DIRECT HIT" on the 
screen, and a smouldering mass on the 
ground. 

A Japanese air attack on your fleet has 
similar results, whereas a sea attack 
features a slightly different sequence, in 
which flashes on the horizon are your 
only clue to the position of the Japanese ' 
ships at which you fire your artillery. 



Hectic 

After a day of hectic searching and 
shooting, you'll have to return your 
planes to their carriers, and use the 
Launch menu to land them again, since 
they aren't allowed to fly at night. The 
game clock runs twice as quickly at 
night, but beware, since attacks are still 
possible. 

Should all three of your aircraft carriers 
fall victim to Japanese air attacks, you'll 
hear what must be the Japanese 
National Anthem, and see the Rising Sun 
emblem being hoisted. Presumably if you 
sink the four main Japanese warships, 
you'll see the Stars and Stripes - ! must 
admit I never did that well! 

Battle of Midway has many good 
features, and a full range of SAVE and 
LOAD options which make it possible to 
return to a half-finished game. It suffers, 
though, from poorly-designed menu 
screens, insufficiently integrated arcade 
sequences (they should play a much 
greater part in the game), and if anything 
a superfluity of detail on the historical 
background to the battle. Reading 
section 1 6 of the manual - "Basic Tactics 
- How to Win" - gives you so much help 
that you wonder whether the game is 
worth playing. It would perhaps have 
been better to give less detail, or, to be 
honest, to have designed a battle 
strategy game around fictional rather 
than real events. Fantasy strategy 
games have, l would have thought, 
become so popular partly because the 
element of the unexpected is very 
strong. Battle of Midway doesn't have 
much of this element - I enjoyed playing 
it once or twice, but It could have been a 
perennial favourite had a little more 
thought gone into its design. 

Distributed by: Ozi Soft 

Price: 529.95 for either disk or 

cassette 




i 



Australian Commodore Review 26 



m 








ImBmMmiLt " ,: f , j> . 



■ ■ 



J» I.. 11 "J. ' j ii ffrf i 



:f- / 



ffia 






The Commodore 128 

...so powerful, it's 3 computers in 1 




K£' 




It's a 

productivity 

computer! 



The Commodore 
128 will amaze you 
with its new genera- 
tion of powerful yet 
easy to use productivity software. 
Like 'Jane^ which allows you to 
follow simple symbols instead of 
typing complicated commands. 
And because it's so easy to learn, 
you'll have the 128 working hard 
in minutes! You get 128K of RAM 
both 40 and 80 column displays, 
and 16 colours for graphics. 




It's a family 

and education 

computer! 

Switch to 
Commodore 64 
mode and you can 
i use more than 3,000 
software packages proven on the 
Commodore 64, The World's No. 1 
selling computer. That's power - 
power for studying, word process- 
ing, education, home accounts, 
programming, fun and games 
and much, much more. 




It's an advanced 

business 

computer! 

The Commodore 
128 lets you use 
software packages 
like Wordstar, dBase II 
and Supercalq all in 80 columns. 
The Commodore 128 gives you all 
the computing power most bus- 
inesses will ever need now or in 
the future. 

Power without 
the price. $699. 







April marks the end of what I considered 
to be a teething period for this section of 
the magazine. Teething period indeedl 
The response from you, our readers, and 
people in the music industry has literally 
knocked our socks oft. A quick glance at 
this issue proves just how quickly the 
interest in computer aided music has 
grown. 

indeed it seems as if music companies 
are more interested in Commodore users 
than most computer companies. And why 
shouldn't they be, when using your 
computer for playing and learning music 
is such a healthy alternative to playing 
shoot 'em ups. That's it for editorial, so 
let me present some pertinent news for 
your edification. 

Amiga 

- yet more news 

No doubt you have been drenched with 
news of the Amiga after its release, but 
please bear with me as there is a side to 
all this fanfare that will benefit ail lovers 
of CAM (computer aided music) including 
64 and 128 users. This is due to the 
underlying interest that musicians have 
suddenly shown in the wake of rave 
reviews from magazines in the States 
and the UK. 

The simple truth is that once music 
companies pick up on the pulse of this 
swing in ideals by musicians It will be but 
a few months before we see a whole new 
range of music orientated software. 
Wishful thinking? I think not, as it has 
been proven time and again by the 
business sector that writing software for 
one machine is a lot more profitable when 
you do fairly simple modifications to 
make the program work on other 
machines. 

Australian Commodore Review 28 



With, to date, twelve completely new 
packages available for the Amiga around 
the world so far, 64 and 1 28 owners are 
bound to benefit. 

Serious business 

One company determined to do it right 
the first time is a company called Neriki, 
who are setting up a comprehensive 
support package lor prospective Amiga 
owners. An intriguing twist to the news of 
their plans was the jealousy with which 
they concealed the name of the person 
they are lining up to handle their music 
section. If in fact they have nabbed a 
muso of some repute, they will have no 
doubt a toe hold on myriad musicians and 
therefore begin the much needed 
movement towards computers that we all 
can benefit by. 



On the software front they are also set 
to receive some rather interesting new 
products of which one in particular looks 
promising. It is a sequencer that has 
unlimited tracks and unlimited 
sequences. A system that complements 
perfectly ail the real advantages of MIDI. 

Any interest can be directed to Mr Craig ^ 
Schuetrumpf at Neriki Enterprises, phone 
(02)957-4778. 

Apologies 

As you no doubt noticed in the last 
issue Musicomp Marketing have 
volunteered to be a focus for interest in 
CAM, but they have called us to 
apologise to our readers as they have not 
been able to keep up with the number of 
enquiries they are having. 

None the less we are assured all 
enquiries will be answered. As the 
manageress said, "We really didn't 
expect the deluge of interest we've had. 
Our whole business has taken an about 
face, much to our delight as we are all 
personally interested in music." 

Further enquiries can go to Musicomp 
Marketing, PO Box 248, Lane Cove, NSW 
2066. 



New from Fairlight 



A really great idea is a device from the 
famous or infamous Fairlight people 
(depending on whether you look at the 
price or who uses them). The 
Voicetracker, at $2,500, sounds as 
though it will have to do a lot to live up to 
its price, and until someone comes along 
with some software that will do the same 
thing with a computer we will just have to 
shut our eyes and pray. Now that the bad 
news is out of the way let's look at what it 
can do. 

Basically the machine takes almost any 
monophonic sound and converts it into 
an elaborate MIDI signal. It does this with 
an excellent standard of clarity and 
precision. The end result is that you can 
use a guitar, your own voice or a trumpet 
to control other instruments via MIDI. If 
you find it hard to get what you want from 
using a keyboard to control MIDI 



messages, this ig the ultimate solution. 
In principle such a chore should be 
child's play for a home computer, so 
programming whizzes, how about it! I for 
one would jump at the prospect. 

For those with the where-with-all or who 
are downright rich, the Voicetracker is 
available from Fairlight Instruments, 15 
Boundary St Rushcutters Bay NSW 
201 1 . (02) 331 6333. 




. 



At Brashs 

Rockboard Rooms 

112 can sound like IIB40. 

Or Lloyd Cole 
without all the commotion 

Or even put some bite 
into your Bach. 







For everything in electronic and computer aided music. 
See the best brand names on show: Casio, Korg, Roland, JVC, Siel, 

Technics, Yamaha, Location. 

See us at Brashs, Melbourne, Vk, and Brashs, Moorabbin, Vic, Allans, Adelaide, SA, Brashs, 
Canberra, ACT, and Elveys, Parramatta, NSW. See us soon in Sydney and Brisbane. 




Mass market 
merchants 



Music for the Masses is the foundation of the efforts of 
Mobex, the company behind Casio keyboards and 
synthesizers, Casio watches, and of late dare 1 mention, Atari 
computers. It would appear that their motto takes priority over 
their own product loyalties, as they have shown much interest 
in supporting all you Commodore users out there. Details of 
their proposals are in the pipeline, but in the meantime there 
are two items that I should bring to your attention. 

The first is the little known or little publicised advantage of 
their C2 101 synthesizer over most other brand synthesizers. 
The CZ 101 can be accessed by four MIDI channels at 
once,which means that you can use four of the synthesizer's 
different sounds at the same time, each playing its own 
monophonic MIDI signal as it comes from your sequencer. That 
is four times more use than can be had from any other brand 
synthesizer that I know of in this price range. Of course the 
fact that these features are monophonic does lessen the gap 




between it and other MIDI keyboards which are polyphonic, but 
the advantages, especially to someone buying their first MIDI 
synthesizer, are a big plus. 

The second tidbit comes with the news of a MIDI digital drum 
machine that Casio has produced that boasts tour sounds that 
can be sampled or changed by the user. More details will be 
available soon so keep a watch out for these. 

The CZ 1 01 retails for $799 and the drum machine, the RZ 1 , 
will retail for $1 195. Enquiries to Mobex, phone (02)406-6277 or 
Glyn Johnson at Farrells Music phone (02) 939-2444. ToivOpilt 
at Turramurra Music (02)440-8375. 



Candour 



Pointing out the advantages of other publications is not an 
act of insanity, rather a show of trust and confidence in our 
readers that they will remain loyal. And to follow on in that line 
of thought, it would be advantageous for those of a musical 
leaning to look at Sonics for Australian music news and 
reviews as an expansion on what you read here. Of late, 
particularly after the thrust of OS magazines towards the 
Amiga and computers in general, you can find the occasional 
CAM article. The latest issue has a review of a JMS software 
package. They are geared towards muso's so it takes a while 
to get used to the jargon. The next step is to look at the 
excellent magazines known as "E&MM" and "12 Testing", both 
with features on the Amiga of late. See, we do have the 
readers' interests at heart! 

Surprisingly all these magazines are available from most 
local newsagents. 

Roland 
helps out 

As the amount of support for CAM lovers expands, Roland 
have made available two booklets that you should know about. 
The first is quite a well written booklet explaining the basics of 
MIDI. And I'm sure they would consider sending out this 
booklet to you if you added your name to their mailing fist, 
which would entitle you to a newsletter type booklet called 

Australian Commodorg Review 30 



Chorus. It is presently being distributed within the pages of the 
Australian version of Rolling Stone magazine and has a picture 
of Gary Numan on the cover, apparently a real Roland fan. 

Please send your enquiries to Roland Corporation, PO Box 
W104, Brookvale.N.S.W, 2100. Phone (02)938-3911. 



[^Roland 
CHORU! 




GARY NUMAN 
Juwl 







'tmrntJ^&llinS Slant Magazlrt 






Thinking Music... 

. . .try passport design 

MIDI/4 plus . MIDI/8 plus 



Four Channel Recording Software 
fur MIDI Equipped Synthesizers 

MIDI/4 plus is the answer to your requests for an 
inexpensive MIDI recording system. It combines 
the power and performance of Passport's earlier 
MIDI/4, with new features that make editing and 
recording even easier. 

Working alone you can compose, orchestrate, 
aid arrange complete multi-track recordings 
using your synthesizer, dram machine, and 
personal computer. MIDI/4 plus allows your 
keyboards, drum machine, and analog tape 
recorder to work together. The four separate 
channels can control individual keyboards 
simultaneously, or the same channel can control 
several keyboards. 

You also don't have to worry about playing a 
sequence over and over again until you get it 
right When a note or measure isn't just the way 
you want it, you're just a click away from fixing it. 
With MID|f4 plus single step playback, fast 
for ward/ rewind, and punch in/out features the 
computer will help you edit any section of your 
work, without affecting the rest of the music 
you've already put down. 

MIDi/4 plus makes recording and editing easy so 
you can spend your time and energy creating the 
music. 

■ Unlimited overdubbing on four separate 
channels 

■Select from 16 different channel assignments 

■Controls one or more MIDI equipped 
synthesizers 

■ Syncs to and from tape, MIDI, and drum 
machines 

■ Punch- in/ Punch- out, Single Step Playback 
and Fast Forward/ Rewind to facilitate editing 

■Aito-correct to 32nd note triplets 

■ Fully polyphonic: digitally records all controllers 
including velocity, pitch bend, preset changes, 
aftertouch, and breath control 

■Real time tempo control 

■Over 6,000 note recording capability 



Eight Channel Recording Software 
for MIDI Equipped Synthesizers 

MIDI/8 plus is designed for professional musicians 
who need to control more than four MIDI channels 

at a time. Whether you're a single musician 
composing, orchestrating and recording your 
own work, or a live band working together, 
MIDI/8 plus lets you build a truly sophisticated 
performance system. It combines studio quality 
recording with the power and flexibility of a 
personal computer, 

Sync to an from MIDI, tape, and drum machines 
to create multi-track recordings of outstanding 
proportions . Overdub as often as you want on 
eight separate channels . .Chain sequences to 
play over as a backup rhythm track. . .Use the 
beat clock and single step play back to punch in 
and out wherever you like, so you can edit 
accurately. MIDI/8 plus will revolutionize the way 
you compose and record music! 

Since every nuance of your performance is 
digitally recorded in the computer, you can 
perform with confidence Unlike overdubbing on 
tape, you'll have no loss of fidelity in your 
recording. 

MIDI/8 plus allows your keyboards, drum 
machine and analog tape recorder to work 
together Because of its eight channel capability 
you can be rest assured that as new MIDI 
instruments become available, you won't be 
short on channels 

MIDI/8 plus is simply speaking, the most efficient 
and creative way you cart compose, orchestrate, 
and record your music. 

■Unlimited overdubbing on eight separate 
channels 

■Select from 16 different channel assignments 

■Controls one or more MIDI-equipped 
synthesizers 

■Syncs to and from tape, MIDI, and drum 
machines 

■Sequence chaining, linking and merging 

■Punch- in/ Punch- out, Single Step Playback 
and Fast Forward/ Rewind to facilitate editing 



software. 






^V£^5SPORT 






MIDI interface . 

The Computer Connection 
for MIDI Instruments 

The Passport MIDI Interface is the recognized 
standard interface in the music industry. That 
means that more software developers and 
synthesizer manufacturers are designing their 
programs around its specifications When you 
use The Passport MIDI Interface, you have 
access to the largest library of music application 
software on the market. 
The MIDI Interface syncs to and from MIDI, tape, 
and drum machines— everything you need for a 
flexible music system. With The MIDI Interface, 
you'll have the assurance that as the number of 
MIDI instruments on the market grows your 
system will be able to expand with it That's a 
great comforl in such a fast-moving industry! 
The Passport MIDI Interface is for use with: 

■Commodore 64 or Apple II +, Hie or 
Compatible Computers 

■1 or more MIDI synthesizers 

■Conventional or MIDI drum machines 

■Any analog tape recorder 



For your local stockist contact: ROSE MUSIC Pty. Ltd. in your State 

03. 699 2388 02. 750 8999 07. 52 9422 08. 223 3966 

Melbourne Sydney Brisbane Adelaide 



09. 361 8922 
Perth 



tH VT 



Computer People 
and Music 

When I first invited the idea of 
computer aided music 1 did not realise the 
advantages that I had over most people. 
An overview of programs available for 
computer aided music making does 
demonstrate a need for computer literate 



musicians with a knowledge of multitrack 
recording. As I have found this is a rather 
select few, it is a wonder that so many 
people have taken on the struggle and 
are to this day loyally expanding their 
free time trying to work out how to use the 
programs to make music. 

Don't fret, the sheer volume of interest 
in the subject will no doubt get the writers 
of such software to clean up their act. 



But in the meantime I would like to bring 
to your attention some of the gaps that 
need to be bridged for you to enjoy the 
wonderful prospects of writing and 
playing your own music using computers, 

This section will handle the mental 
blocks that come after you have learnt 
the basics of working the program you 
are using and have come to the point of 
doing something CREATIVE. Anyone can 
waffle away with some musical doodlings, 
but how do you go about writing a proper 
song? 

There is a certain magic associated 
with writing music, decidedly more so with 
lyric writing. Being magical does not 
mean that it has to be mystical, 
especially if you set an instrumental 
piece in your sights. Writing good 
instrumental music is a lot more methodic 
than you would think. Let me outline what 
is involved. 



COMPUTER AIDED MUSIC 



Who can help me? 
What do I need? 
What is available? 
Where can I get it? 
How do you use it? 




Let us help you. 

Just send a self addressed 

envelope with your 

questions, to us. 

We even have free demos of 

computer music if you send 

us a tape as well! 

Please note to send a large 

envelope and at least $1:00 

worth of stamps, we have a 

lot to tell you about! 



P.O.Box 248, Lane Cove, N.S.W. 2066 



Australian Commodore Review 32 







Bridging gaps 

In an instrumental piece there are four main areas to be 
written and arranged in an interesting way to maintain interest. 
These are percussion, bass section, chordal accompaniment 
and the lead melody line. These could be likened to drums, 
bass guitar, synth and vocals respectively, in most Rock band 
lineups. 

In our case we don't have a singer or a bass guitarist or 
whatever. We substitute these with MIDI controlled sound 
modules and play them all ourselves using our computer. 
Forget about all that! Computer aided music making tends to 
bring out the power monger in me. 

Anyway, we substitute drums with digital drum machines, 
use a bass synth for bass sounds, a normal polyphonic synth 
for chordal accompaniment, and a monophonic synth voice for 
lead vocals. The Roland MKS7 is ideal for this as is also a 
combination of a drum machine and a synth such as the CZ101 
with multiple MIDI addresses. 

Back to the theoretic side of writing. And there are a myriad 
options open to you. By far the easiest way to start your 
masterpiece is to select just one of the four groups as a 
foundation for building the rest of your music. If you have had a 
melody line humming in your head all day, why not start by 
putting that down first? It is important if you do this part first to 
put down what is called a click track in the music Industry, h is 
a timing beat like a metronome to help you keep time and to 
keep continuity in the piece. A lot of singers tend to write music 
this way, especially ballads and other melodic forms of music. 

Simply set up a track on your sequencer program with a 
"click" on each beat of the bar. This could be a hi-hat or rimshot 
on a drum machine. Next you hum to yourself the phrase that 
you have in mind and try to play it on your keyboard. !f 
necessary slow down the tempo of your click track and get it 
down with more accuracy. I recommend you experiment with 
the layering of the other tracks in this order. 
1. melody line 
2. chordal accompaniment 
3. drums and 
4. bass. 

With each step experiment with different sounds. Drums in 
particular are hard to write and I will deal with them later. 

For more rhythmic music as with Rock, Reggae and Blues, a 
different approach is needed. The drums have a much more 
important part to play in the direction of the music. And usually 
the melody line is the last thing to be layered over the top of the 
foundation of drums, bass and chords. 

An interesting effect is to think up some really good rhythmic 
bass line using a click track and to write the drums and chords 

i 5 1 13 i& 



H.H.C. 
H.H.O. 
RIMSHOT 
SNARE 
BASS DRM 



it O 

M-Li-LLI .L i I II- 



it I I 1 ' I I I J t I I I - 



around S. This is the basis of most good dance music. Think of 
Grace Jones' song "Dance to the Rhythm". 

The whole song is impregnated with a sly drum rhythm that is 
known as a lazy rhythm in 1he music world. If you listen to the 
bass guitar in that song you will hear how closely interweaved 
a set of drums and a bass guitar can be. The use of neat little 
counter rhythms and tight emphatic beats make the song 
really swing. That is part of the legacy that has been given by 
the black influence in pop music. They seem to have an innate 
sence of rhythm. 

Writing drums 

An area of particular contention is the writing of drum rythms. 
The problem is exacerbated by the fact that most people dont 
have a good feel for rhythms. A way to solve this is to get a 
drum machine with an LCD screen that enables you to 
graphically see what you are playing. The screen may look like 
this; i s 1 t$ x 



H.H.C. 
H.H.O. 
RIMSHOT 
SNARE 
BASS DRM 



i 1 3 <r 

The screen is dissected into 16 segments, each equal to 
1/16 of a bar in 4/4 time. The lazy rhythm spoken of earlier is 
obtained by limiting the bar to 12 segments of the bar; 



H.H.C. 
H.H.O. 
RIMSHOT 
SNARE 
BASS DRM 



Examples of other types of rhythms are as follows. If your 
drum machine is not gifted with such a tool as this, why not use 
a piece of paper and write out the rhythm you want on it, using 
our graphs as a guide. 

To wind up this section of bridge building I would like to 
remind you of the main points of our discussion. Remember 
that music making is not some mystical gift given to a special 
few, it is a skill that most can learn and use with self satisfying 
proficiency. Keep trying and before you know it the Rift will be 
gone. 



H.H.C. 
H.H.O. 
RIMSHOT 
SNARE 
BASS DRM 













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Australian Commodore Review 33 






Making 
Music 

Making Music is the title of one of the 
best written books on music that I have 
ever read. If you would like an insight to 
the way professionals in all areas of the 
music industry work, then this is THE 
book. Of particular interest are sections 
written by Sting, Paul Simon, Eric 
Clapton, Jeff Beck and Herbie Hancock, 
to name a few. Although published in 
1983, the book does have a section on 
computer aided music and covers the 
steps in writing and arranging your own 
songs. 

Perhaps the editor's credentials also 
add to the reasons why I am so positive 
about the publication. If producing and 
guiding the Beatles, (the biggest papular 
band in history) is his background I doubt 
any would argue with the trueness of his 
ideals. The man is George Martin, who 
has a heritage as big and as broad as pop 
music itself. 1 really invoke you not to 
miss out on this mandatory reading. 

Making Music is distributed by Pan 
Books in Sydney. 



P/lNSGOiS 



MAKING 

MUSIC 

The Guide to Writing, Performing & Recording 




Edited by 



GEORGE MARTIN 



Commodore 
Musings 



by Stephen A Walter 

Just what do you do if you own a 
Commodore and want to create music? 
You can either use the internal sounds - 
which are severely limited - or you can 
use a sound 'module' controlled by your 
computer. 

A module is basically an organ or 
synthesizer without a keyboard.lt is 
piayed either by a separate (or 'mother') 
keyboard, or a computer. It may have 
only one sound at once, or several - and 
this may include drums and the like. 

So how does it all work? Well, there are 
several systems available, and I'll start 
with the simplest and cheapest, the Siel 
Sound Buggy. 

The Sound Buggy is simply an organ 
without keyboards. It has rhythms, 
accompaniments, and solos. Nine songs 
come with the package, but you can play 
and record your own songs, and record 
them on disk or cassette. To do this you 
use a keyboard overlay. Then you 
choose a rhythm {eg Rock or Disco etc) 
and record the meiody,. Then repeat the 
procedure, this time playing the chords 
{the Sound Buggy will replay the melody 
and drums at the same time). Now, 
choose sounds, give the song a name, 
and put it on disk or cassette. Simple!]! 



A more advanced system would involve 
a MIDI Interface (MIDI stands for Musical 
Instrument Digital Interface). Basically 
MIDI just connects your computer to a 
keyboard or module. Now load up the Siel 
Multitrack Composer. 

The Multitrack Composer is designed 
for people who know about computers, 
but not about music. It doesnt use 
akeyboard or even an overlay. You just 
choose the music you want to play from 
the music store, (some music even has 
the name of the notes already printed 
next to the note). Now type in the name of 
the note, and how long you want the note 
to play. For example, if you want to play 
middle C, type in "C4 100". This will play 
the 4th C on the keyboard for 100 time 
units. 

The Multitrack Composer allows you to 
play six notes at once, and change 
sounds automatically! You can play 
something as simple as "Twinkle Twinkle 
Little Star" or as complex as Bach's 
"Brandenburg Concertos" (In fact one of 
these concertos comes as a 
demonstration). All this without you even 
having to read music, touch a note, or 
worry about timing. 

From here we could move to sequencer 
systems. A typical system would be like 
this: 




C^tmtnod&ce, 



JteybOOr^ 



OpWancA 



rtocMe- 



Australian Commodore Review 34 







THE BEST GAME OF ALL 




Computing, Mathematics, 
Art, Structure and 
Balance, infinite variation 
- Music is the teacher 
in the subtlest way, 
the way that gives great 
pleasure to all by their 
own natural expression. 

And now in a single, 
simple to use module, 
ROLAND can expand 
your computer into a 
complete music system 
-drums, bass, polyphonic 
chord blocks and melody. 
Interfaced with keyboard 
and computer by 
uncomplicated midi 
connection and 
monitored on your own 
stereo system or portable 
cassette, the ROLAND 
MK S7 gives you the 
facility of a musical 
group in a recording 
studio* That's not only 
great fun in education 
for all, but even an 
instant no-fuss tool for 
professional or amateur 
composers to quickly 
build and preview 
compositions without 
the technology bogging 
down the creative 
process. The computer 
has come alive with 
the greatest game of 
all- MUSIC. 



? p wm i JTL III 

# |n;Hi nini 4Bwr-i i m * 



g 







MKS7 



Roland 



W E 



DESIGN 



THE 



FUTURE 



*Y0UR COMPUTER WILL REQUIRE MUSIC SOFTWARE 







With this system you have a wide 
choice of software, the best examples 
being the Siei, Passport, or MusicData 
(Roland) Sequencers. 

Now what do they all do? 

First let's consider your module. This is 
an optional add-on, but a good example 
would be the Roland Super Quartet. 
An excellent description of this machine 
was made by Ric Richardson (Vol 2 No 

9). 

Briefly, the Super Quartet provides 
four sound sources; a Melody, Chords, 
Bass, and Rhythms. It has well over 140 
sounds! These four sound sources are 
on different MIDI channels. This is just 
like TV, where you can watch one 
channel, and perhaps record another on 
video. 

With a sequencer, you might record a 
solo Melody. Now go back to the start 
and record the chords. The computer will 
replay the Melody, with the same sound 
you used and play the chords with a 
completely different sound (if you wish) 
whilst busy recording the chords. Now go 
back and put down a funky bass line, and 
finally orchestrate with your digital drum 
kit. 

For beginners, this system allows you 
to play music like professionals, with 
great sounds, but you only need to play 
one note at a time. 

For musicians, you can use both hands 
on the Melody, then both hands on the 
chords, then both hands again on the 
bass, and finally both hands again on 
rhythms. Added to this is the fact that 
you can still play along on your master 
keyboard. Imagine the complex textures 
you can create with 10 hands (or more!!!) 
playing at once. 

Now how about the software? The 
cheapest combination is the Siel 
Interface and Software. The Siel 
sequencer software allows you to record 
all 16 channels of MIDI. To use the 
sequencer, press "R" to record. The 
sequencer will ask you to adjust the 
tempo (with the "+" and "-" keys). It will 
then suggest a track to record on. You 
can select your initial sound at this time. 

Now hit n F7". The sequence will count 
you in, and away you go. When you have 



finished recording, just hit "F7" again to 
stop. 

You can do this for as many as 16 
tracks. Each time you record you will 
hear the previously recorded tracks play 
back (if desired). 

To alter tracks (ie, delete or edit) press 
"E" for edit piay, and the sequencer 
prints a multi-coloured display showing 
the status and MIDI channel 
assignements of all tracks. All this data 
may be changed at the touch of a button. 

More sophistication 

The next level of sophistication is the 
"Passport" range of software. This 
sequencer operates similarly to the Siel, 
but allows you to edit, link, mix, copy, 
delete, or even transpose tracks. It also 
has the ability to "Punch in" and "Punch 
out", record, just like a multitrack 
recorder. 

Whilst the Passport has many editing 
advantages over the Siel, it is over twice 
the price and offers only 4 or 8 MIDI 
tracks to record on. 

Far superior at a similar cost is the 
Music Data Sequencer from Roland. 

This sequencer features 16 recording 
areas called "Sequences", each with 16 
tracks. What this means is: normally you 
must play the entire song in, WITHOUT 
STOPPING. This must be repeated for 
every track, if you make a mistake after 
repeating the chorus for the third time, 
well... 

The Music Data sequencer, however, 
allows you to record, say, an 
introduction, on all 16 tracks, in "area" 
(Sequence) 1. You can edit and correct 
it, or just leave it for the time being. 

Now record your verse in Sequence 2; 
your chorus in Sequence 3; your Solo in 
Sequence 4; and an ending in Sequence 
5. 



All of these sequences can be edited 
INDIVIDUALLY. Ie. if you make a mistake 
in the chorus, you won't have to re-record 
the verse. 

Now your song might go something like 
this: 

INTRO - VERSE - VERSE - 
CHORUS - VERSE - SOLO - 
CHORUS - CHORUS - ENDING. 

So arrange your sequences in the 
Sequence Table like this: 

1-2-2-3-2-4-3-3-5. 

You can change it as often as you like 
at the touch of a button. As the example 
shows, I need only record the verse 
once, but you can have it play as many 
times as you wish. 

The sequencer also features 
"Quantization", a device which fixes up 
faulty timing - drums sound like they have 
been entered in step time, for example. 

All these features are made easy to 
use by the single screen display and help 
files included on disk. Also included is an 
electro-pop 7-track demonstration 
program. 

It is my opinion that this is possibly the 
finest sequencer program for the 
Commodore. 

I would suggest that for beginners or 
those on a budget the Siel system is an 
excellent introduction to sequencing, 
allowing total control of your music from 
the computer. 

Alternatively, the Music Data (Roland) 
Sequencer allows easy editing and 
variability in /our music, though some 
musical ability would be helpful. This 
software used in conjunction with a Super 
Quartet would be the supreme home 
musical system. 




Illlllll HI MUTT 

I 1 



j^jaja^t 



Australian Commodore Review 36 






SATURDAY COMPUTER SERVICES 




This is our new up to 
date catalogue with all 
the latest releases. 

For reasons of space we can't 
include everything, so if you 
don't see what you want on this 
list, please telephone us on (02) 
398 5699 and enquire about price 
and availability. 

Games 

ADVENTURE QUEST 

Explore middle earth and reach the 
black tower. 200 locations. Text. 
$29.95 (D or C) 

CONAN THE BARBARIAN 

Your goal is to find and destroy the 
vilfanous Volta. 7 levels. 
$39.95 (D) 

DALLAS QUEST 

Hi-Res adventure. JR Ewing takes 
you in search of 2 million dollars. 
$39.95 (D) 

DRAGONRIDERS OF PERN 

Alliance forming and battle 
constitute this fast paced game. 
$29.95 (D) 

DUNGEON ADVENTURE 

200 locations and 100 puzzles will 
keep you off the streets. Text. 
$29.95 {D or C) 

GHOSTBUSTERS 

You've seen the movie, now you too 
can get slimed. Back off man! 
$34.95 (D) $29.95(C) 



MAIL ORDER LIST 




Perry Mason: The Case of the 
Mandarin Murder 

Victor Kapp is dead - murdered. 
Laura is in jail, charged with his death. 
And facing trial very, very soon. 

You'll have to work fast - and smart. 
Dig into people's lives. 

The first interactive mystery to use 
the world-famous criminal lawyer 
created by Erie Stanley Gardner. It 
also represents a major breadthrough 
in interactive fiction: the cooperation 
of the characters and jury changes as 
a direct result of your interactions with 
them. 

In addition, you can do virtually 
everything a court room lawyer can 
do. 
Price: $49.95 (D) 



Nine Princes in Amber 

They tried to kill you - and 
when that failed, they stuck you 
in a private hospital with enough 
drugs to keep you out cold for 
the rest of your life. 

Well, almost enough drugs. 

You are a prince of Amber, 
fighting for the throne against 
your eight brothers and four 
sisters - all of them treacherous. 
Yet you must gain the support 
of some of them if you are to 
succeed. And that will be as 
complex and tricky a game of 
politics as you ever hope to 
play. Especially without your 
memory. 
Price: $49.95 (D) 



I have carefully looked over the entire range of software and 

hardware being offered In this mail order list, and believe that it 
is of good quality and excellent value for money. 



Andrew Farrell, Editor 



SATURDAY COMPUTER SERVICES 




INSTITUTE 

Freudian solutions may help you 
escape or you die a 1000 deaths. 
$24.95 (D) 

JUMPMAN 

See the Aust. Commodore Review 
for low down and up top of this 
game. 
$29.95 (D & C) 

OIL BARONS 

Board game as well as software. 
Dallas at home. Big game. 
$69.95 (D) 

PfTSTOP 

Classic car driving action game. 
Strategy and nerve are necessary 
$19.95 (C) 

POLE POSITION 

Experience the thrills of Formula 1 as 
you race against the clock. 
$29.95 (C) $39.95 (D) 

POTTY PIGEON 

Make your home to the tune of great 
music and superb graphics. 
$19.95 .(C) $24.95 (D) 

RETURN TO EDEN 

First Level 9 game with graphics. 250 
locations, many puzzles. 
$29.95 (D or C} 

SNOWBALL 

Huge adventure with over 7000 
locations awaiting you! Text. 
$29.95 (D or C) 

SPACE ACE 2101 

Strategic arcade real time game. 
Trade before you fight. 
$19.95 (C) $24.95 (D) 

SPY HUNTER 

Hunt spies till the cows come home 
and the chickens roost! 
$29.95 (C) 



SPY VS SPY 

Classic from Mad now comes home. 
Ingenuity + steady hand required. 
$29.95 (C) $34.95 (D) 

STRIP POKER 

R rated computer game - sizzling 
graphics! Have to see to believe. 
$29.95 (C) $39.95 (D) 

SUICIDE EXPRESS 

The future of the human race is in 
your hands once again. Arcade. 
$19.95 (C) $24.95 (D) 

THEATRE EUROPE 

Combination of strategy and arcade 
action in this popular new game. 
$29.95 (D or C) 

ZIGGURAT 

The most bewildering maze ever 
created. Is there a'way out? 
$24.95 (D) 

SUPERMAN THE GAME 

Superman and Darksied are pitted 
against one another in the ultimate 
battle of good against evil. 'Super' 
graphics and split screen action, 
$29.95 (C) $34.95 (D) 

BRUCE LEE 

Meet the master of the arts in the 
most artful form of self defence. His 
body is his weapon, and now he's 
ready to join forces with you. 
$29.95 (C) $39.95 (D) 

THE GOONIES 

Instead of playing the role of one 

Goonie, you must know and control 

the mischievous role of all The 

Goonies. See ACR Vol 3 No 1 for full 

review. 

$29.95 (C) $39.95 (D) 

ZORRO 

Multiple levels, traps, escape routes 

and tunnels are only some of the 

obstacles that form part of your 

quest. See ACR Vol 3 No 1 for full 

review. 

$29.95 (C) 39.95(D) 



HARDBALL 

Baseball that's so real and true to life, 
it's like you can reach out and touch 
it. The most spectacular sports 
simulation you will ever play. See this 
issue for full review. 
$29.95 (C) $34.95 (D) 

LAW OF THE WEST 

If you've ever wanted to strap on a 

six-shooter, pin a tin star to your 

chest and match the exploits of Bat 

Matterson or Wyatt Earp, then this is 

your chance. See Vol 3 No 1 for full 

review. 

$29.95 (C) $34.95 (D) 

KENNEDY APPROACH 

You are in charge! It's your fob to get 
all the aircraft and passengers on the 
ground, or on the way safely.The first 
speaking simulation that allows you to 
communicate between pilot and 
control tower. See Vol 2 No 8 for full 
review. 
$39.95 (D) 

THE ISLAND CAPER 

This is the sequel to the original hit 
computer game "Mad Magazines 
official Spy vs Spy". If you've played 
Spy vs Spy, then don't miss this 
exciting real time episode. 
$29.95 (C) $34.95 (D) 







STftL'NGTH HETEft 




Educational 



METEOR MULTIPLICATION 

From DLM. 

By using the keyboard, the player 
must aim his spaceship at the closest 
meteor, work out his answer, type it 
in, then shoot and move on to the 
next closest meteor until the screen 
is empty. It sounds simple, but it 
really is excellent. It makes education 
fun and exciting. 
$39.95 



Other educational games available 
from DLM are: 

Alien Addition 
Alligator Mix 
Demolition Division 
Dragon Mix 
Minus Mission 

$39.95 Each 



This is only a selection 
of the software available 
for mail order. 

Please see the next issue 
of The Australian 
Commodore Review for 
more. 

As advertisements must 
be prepared well ahead 
of publication time, 
prices are subject to 
change without notice. 



ORDER FORM 




Postage and packing on each item: please add: 



1 .25 for software 

1.50 per box blank disks 

2.50 per book 

3.75 for hardware listed 



Please apply for bulk rates. 

Orders greater than $475 obtain a FREE subscription to ACR for 1 year, or 

FREE postage and packing. 

Please list each item that you require, then add your name and address and 
post together with cheque or Bankcard number to: 

Saturday C.S. P.O. Box 189, St Pauls, Randwick, NSW, 2031 

(02) 398 5699 



NAME 

ADDRESS. 



ITEM 



COST 



Payment * Cheque enclosed 
or * Bankcard 



Add pBp 



TOTAL 



bankcard 



expiry date signature 






ADVENTURERS' CORNER 



Adventurers* 
Corner 



Adventure 



by Ed Mehrtens 

The original "Adventure" program was 
written in Fortran for the PDP-11 
computer by Crowthers and Wood, it 
contained 130 rooms, 15 treasures, 40 
useful objects and 12 obstacles. The 
descriptions in this version were very 
long and particularly witty, but it took 
200k bytes on a 16 bit machine. 
Obviously to fit this program into the 
Commodore was going to take 
considerable editing, the descriptions 
were drastically edited but the original 
dimensions were kept 

There are four companies producing 
versions of Adventure for the 
Commodore; Microsoft, Adventure 
International, Programmaand Rainbow. I 
would recommend Microsoft as being 
closest to the original with Adventure In 
ternational being the second choice, both 
are written entirely in machine code with 
A.I. being entirely in memory and 
subsequently is further edited. Ail 
versions are in text, as was the original, 
but no adventurer should be without at 
least one copy of this classic game and 
adventure addicts will have more than 
one version, and savour the differences. 

"Adventure" is a classic and I really 
reommend it as an extremely entertaining 
game. As with all games, map your 
progress as there are two difficult mazes. 

Cryptic Clues 

(1 ) Moving by magic is fast and easy. 

(2) Getting rid of the snake appears 
bird-brained. 



(3) Kung Fu or Karate deals with one 
monster. 

(4) The plants are saying something, 

(5) At the Troll Bridge {pay Troll) bear in 
mind that it doesn't have to be a treasure. 

(6) You were told it was delicate. 

(7) A hungry animal is an angry animal. 

(8) Some objects frighten some 
animals. 

(9) How are you going to carry it? 

(10) Not only dogs need to be on a 
leash, 

(11) Neptune would be able to open ft. 

(12) "Fee Fie Foo Foo"? 

(13) Was it Twisty Little Maze" 

(14) Ordinary coins are hardly 
"Treasure" 

(15) Do you have the foggest idea 
where the diamonds are located? 

(16) Rust is a normal problem. 

(17) Keys imply a lock. 

(18) How would a magician use a 
wand? 

(19) You can take it as read, that the 
final point (350) will drive you to your wits 
end. 

(20) Getting more water is the pits. 

(21) Some objects can't be with 
otherds. 

(22) Of course there are secret 
passages. 

(23) Magic works in quite a few places. 

(24) If it is described as dard, 
compared with what? 



W 





Zork III 



I have a score of six out of seven in 
this, and am completely stuck. 

1. Can the Scenic View table be made to 
send me just one way? 

2. Is it possible to bring light across the 
lake? 

3. What next after the Key Room? The 
waterfall? If so, how? 

4. What's the Puzzle Room for? 

5. What's the vial of liquid for? 

6. Is the time machine of any use, or just 
a diversion? 

I hope you can help me as both my 
patience and my sanity are going. 
S. Pillay 
Epping, NSW. 

Bastow Manor 

The answer to Rickie Pratt's question 
on Bastow Manor in the February issue is 
as follows: 

You have to go down to the Cellar and 
get suit of armour. Wear this and it will 
prevent the old man from hitting you. 
Anyway, he puts the key from under the 
crate (in the closet) in the Mailbox, so 
you will have to go outside the house to 
get it. 

Also I have gone on a bit further in the 
game myself and shall be most grateful if 
you could print these questions for me: 
{1 ) How do you pour water on robot in 
stone cell to stop robot pushing you 
back? 



Australian Commodore Review 40 



ADVENTURERS' CORNER 



(2) How do you short cut robot with 
buckets of water {three trips required) in 
empty cell? 

(3) What do you do in secret 
laboratory? 

(4) How do you get up the balcony? 

Thomas Rogers, 
Carlingford, NSW 



over 50 hits, jumped down from a plane 
and back up with heaps of gold, only to 
be snuffed by a "small spider", but it does 

get you in! 



Zork I 



Help! I'm very close to committing 
Zorkicide! My hubbie has threatened to 
divorce me if my nocturnal habits don't 
settle down along with my rapidly 
worsening language! I have Zork I and 
have managed to rise to the dizzy 
heights of Amateur Adventurer (even 
though a friend and I solved The 
Neverending Story in about two weeks). 
Very damaging to the ego this Zork 
business. 

Having bought January's issue I 
immediately went home and tried all I 
could think of to kill the thief, but only 
managed to confuse myself further. I 
brought the thief to his knees but when I 
go to finish him off, Zork tells me that 
there is no thief there and "the other 
occupant (he of the large bag) has left 
disgruntled". 

Q.16. Who the hell am I trying to kill and 
how? 

Q.17. Is there a certain place I should 
be leaving the egg? 

Every time I leave it - the bag carrier 
takes off with it and I can't get the 
(wretched) thing back because the nice 
guy sends me to Heaven! Zork then tells 
me I am a suicidal maniac - which could 
be somewhere near to the truth! 
Q.18. What significance is the green 
bubble on the central panel at the dam? 
I've tried to turn it, burn it, hit it, break it, 
attack it, get it, inflate it, cut it, sit on it, 
push it, and put "gunk" on it - all to no 
avail. 

Please can some Advanced 
Adventurer give me a few tips to help 
save my sanity and possibly my hubbie's 
as well? 

Sonja Taylor 
Stafford Heights, Qld 
PS. Thanks for the review on The 
Standing Stones, I have managed to 
amass 100,380 experience points and 



Asylum 



I am writing to you regarding Asylum 
which I have had for approximately two 
years. 

In the two years, I have been able to 
get the following: Credit Card, Silver 
Card, Gold Card, Bean Bag, 
BirdCostume, Stethoscope, Rocket Belt, 
Axe, Fuse, Sign, Copper Wire and 
Battery. 

I have gone down all corridors, into all 
doors that lean open (with some 



Taipan 

by Ed Mehrtens 



Taipan is produced by Avalanche 
Productions and was written by Ronald 
Berg. It is loosely based on the book of 
the same name by James Clavell 
(Sho-Gun. King Rat, The Noble House) 
and is set in the far east around the 
1800's. The object of the game is to 
become a millionaire by trading. It is a 
change from the usual game of "whomp 
the monsters, get the gold" and as it is 
written in assembler, it is fast. There is 




shocking surprises), tried trading things 
with all "people" (be it inmates or 
"workers") and have gone nearly insane 
trying to get that bit closer to the end. 1 
have been at this stage of the game 
close on twelve months. 

I thought perhaps you could give me 
some extra clues as to what can be done 
to make the game interesting, as being in 
a stalemate like I am is frustrating and if I 
cannot get the game out within the next 
twelve months I fee) that the game has 
not been worth it. It is frustrating when 
you type up for clues and the machine 
gives you nothing. "Please help am 
desperate for the completion of Asylum 
before I end up in one." 

Colin Awege Jnr 
Naracoorte, SA. 



good error checking and it is fun to play. 
The instructions are included on disk and 
it is easy to play, with single logical keys 
being used. 

Taipan (pronounced Dai-Bawn) comes 
from the Chinese and means supreme 
leader or big boss. Comprador (or 
compradore) is Portuguese for agent. 
The setting is the 1800's in the Far East 
based on Hong Kong. 

You have a small boat and 1he choice 
of starting with a small amount of working 
capital and a debt, or five guns and no 
debts, but no working capital. Both are 
equally good, but with the five gun start 
you have to find and defeat some pirates 
before you can get any money. From then 
on the games are identical. 

Trading is the way to fame and fortune, 
your company is based at Hong Kong and 
it is there that most of the facilities are 
based such as the shipyards, the bank, a 
money lender and your warehouse. All 
the other six places are trading centers 
only. The shipyard will repair your ship, if 
it has been damaged by pirates, but it will 
be expensive. The bank will allow you to 
deposit and withdraw money in complete 
safety, it will not give loans as your 
occupation is too risky, however interest 
is paid at 6% per year on all money 
deposited there. The money lender, 
"Elder Brother " Wu, will gladly lend you 
money, up to twice as much as 



Australian Commodore Review 41 



ADVENTURERS' CORNER 



DEALER DIRECTORY 



the cash you have at the time in fact. He 
does not consider his rates at 10% per 
month to be high, as no-one else will lend 
to you at all. but he does wish to be 
repaid. Your warehouse has a capacity ot 
10,000 units and when you are in Hong 
Kong you may transfer cargo between 
the ship and the warehouse. At this time 
you can overload your ship with transfers 
or large purchases, but naturally you 
can't sail while overloaded. To get from 
one port to another takes one month, 
prices vary from port to port and time to 
time in a random fashion. 

Trading is in four commodities: General 
Cargo, Arms, Silk and Opium. You buy 
when something is cheap and sell when 
the price is high. General Cargo normally 
ranges from 4 to 28, Arms 60 to 320, Silk 
500 to 2,800 and Opium 6,000 to 
100,000, although sometimes sudden 
fluctuations occur when the price on a 
particular item will greatly exceed these 
ranges. 

When you start you will deal mainly in 
general cargo and arms, gradually 
moving up to silk and finally to the 
ultimate cargo - Opium. Opium is a 
dangerous cargo, as officials will 
occasionally confiscate your opium and 
fine you. For this reason do not carry 
more opium than you can afford to lose, 
however opium is the big money winner. 

Other things than confiscation of opium 
can accur, warehouse robberies can 
halve your warehouse stocks, thugs can 
beat you and steal an/ ready cash, but 
by far the biggest danger is pirates. 
Independent pirates fear only the 
greatest pirate of all, Li Yuen, to whom ail 
the wise traders pay tribute. Li Yuen 
sends a message sthat he would like to 
see you in Hong Kong, post haste. He 
then asks for a donation of so much for 
the temple of the Sea Goddess, !f you do 
not have sufficient cash "Elder Brother" 
Wu can make up the difference (adding it 
to your debt of course), If you do not pa/ 
and you meet Li's pirates they will attack 
and they always travel in large fleets. I 
advise paying the tribute, as his fleet is 
extremely large. 

This is not to say that nothing can be 
done about pirates, you can fight if you 
have guns aboard your ship (not arms 
which is cargo), or you can try to outrun 
them. If you cannot seem to escape by 

Australian Commodore Review 42 



running, throw some cargo overboard for 
greater speed, you can throw all the 
cargo by pressing "*" 

From time to time you will be offered 
large ships and guns, for a price. Double 
the number of guns you have is the 
maximum number of ships you can fight 
without major damage. 

Scoring is based on the amount of 
money you have versus how long it took 
to get it. When you have over a million 
and are in Hong Kong you will be offered 
the choice to quit, your score will then be 
assessed. There are five grades 
depending on your score. All commands 
are by single Keystroke except for 
numbers. 

SOME HINTS 

(1) Pay off debt to Wu as fast as 
possible. 

(2) Keep some money in the bank in case 
of robbery. 

(3) Always leave 1 units free on the ship 
to allow purchase of an extra gun. 

(4) Pay Li Yuen's tribute. 

(5) Never carry more opium than you can 
afford to lose. 

(6) Keep your ship in good repair. 

(7) Go straight to Hong Kong when Li 
Yuen sa/s immediately. 

(8) Make Hong Kong every second trip 
early in the game, 

(9) Buy larger ships if you can use the 
extra capacity, but not early in the game. 

(10) Run from large numbers of pirates 
and dump cargo if necessary. 



DISKETTES 
SPECIAL 

5.25"SSSD(10) $24 

5.25" SSDD $25 

5.25" DSDD (10) $32 

5.25* DSDD (10) (in plastic $36 

(library case) 
3.5 SSDD (10) Fuji $56 

3.5 DSDD (10) Memorex $76 

Library case (holds 10) $4 

Memorex/Nashua/Fuji with lifetime 
guarantee 
Bankcard and 
M/Card Accepted 
NEIL CARPENTER COMPUTING P/L 
(02) 818 4220 (after hours/weekends) 
PO Box H401 Hoyal Exchange 2000 
Camaqe Overnight Courier $7 anywhere in 
Australia 



Cockroach 
Turbo-Rom 



Price: $42 (inc. postage etc.) 
Speed up program loading and saving 
with TURBO-ROM, available for C64, 
SX, 128, 1541, 1570/1. Works with 1 
or 2 Drives, Vic switch compatible. 

Does not tie up cartridge socket. 

Works with printer connected. (Some 

fast loaders don't). 

COCKROACH SOFTWARE, 

PO BOX 1154, 

SOITHPORT, 4215. 

Telephone: (075) 32 5133 

A/H (075) 32 4028 



T.V / PRINTER 
STAND 

18" TV 80 Col printer 
Durable black acrylic 

$37 

C.O.D in Sydney area 799 8447 

(Add $7 p & h 

ALL STATES) 

Cheques to: 

Cambridge Computer 

Plastics 

Suite 1/9 Queen St 

Ashfield N.S.W. 2131 



COMMODORE 64 

SATURDAY SOFTWARE 

SALES. 

Everything discounted. Don't miss 

out. Hundreds don't. 

MAY 3rd/31st - Macarthur Girls High 

School, 

Macarthur St., Parramatta. 

9.30-3.30 

MAY 10th - Manly Vale Community 

Centre, Condamine St., Manly Vale. 

9.30-3.30 

MAY 17th - Hurstville Council 

Chambers, 

MacMahon St., Hurstville, 

9.30-1.30 

For more information ring 

Data Development, 938-1851. 






PROGRAMMING 



SOFTWARE 
APPLICATION 

NOTE 4003 



Author = Bill Hindorff 

Subject = Digital Joystick Read 

Television Standard = NTSC or PAL 

This routine reads and decodes the joy stick/fire button 
data as given in the accumulator. The accumulator is assumed 
to be a value from port A or port B of CIA #1 . The routine will 
set two variables, DX and DY, which represent the two's 
complement direction vector. I.E. $FF = -1, $00 = 0, and $01 = 
1. Upon returning, the carry reflects whether or not the fire 
button is being pressed. Carry set (c = 1 ) means the button 
was not pushed, carry clear (c = 0) means the button has been 
pushed. 

a) Diagrams: The following diagram illustrates the joysticks 
values and which bits they represent. 



1230 STXDX THE FORWARD JOYSTCK POSITION 

CORRESPONDS 
1240 STYDY ;TO MOVE UP THE SCREEN AND THE BACKWARD 
1250 RTS POSITON TO MOVE DOWN SCREEN. 
1260 ; 
1 £70 AT RTS TIME THE CARRY FLAG CONTAINS THE FIRE BUTTON 

STATE. 
1280 ;IFC=1 THEN BUTTON NOT PRESSED. IFC=0THEN PRESSED. 
1290 .END 

2) Hex Dump: 

.: C200 A2 00 A0 00 AD 00 DC 4A B0 01 88 4A BO 01 C8 4A 
.: C210B0 01 CA4ABQ01E84A8E10C1 BC11 C160 80 

3) Data Statements: 

DATA 1 62,0,1 60,0,1 73,0,220,74,1 76,1 ,136,74,1 76,1 ,200,74 
DATA 176,1,202,74,176,1,232,74,142,16,193,140,17,193,96 

d) Memory/Register requirments: The routine usees 31 ($1f) 
bytes of memory as well as 2 bytes of storage. It also uses the 
accumulator, X, and Y registers. 

e) Worst case execution time is 48 ($30) cycles (or 47.04 
usees on a 1.02 MHz system). 

f) Limitations: This routine asumes that the data direction 
registers have been properly set to read digital joysticks 
artaced to port A and/or port B. The C64 does initialize the 
DDR's properly upon power-up to 255 (in $DC02) and (in 
$DC03). If the DDR's are not properly set, then the routine will 
not yield accurate results. 




Fire Button 
Bi14 

Bits & 2 

Bit 2 

Bits 1 & 2 



(top) 



BitO 




Bit 1 



Bits & 3 

Bit 3 
Bits 1 & 3 



b) Program listing as assembled at $C200 

1) Assembly 

1000 Paqe (JOYSTICK.8/5) JOYSTICK - BUTTON READ ROUTINE 

1010 ; 

1020 ; AUTHOR- BILL HINDORFF 

1030 ; 

1040 DX=SC110 

1050 DY=$C111 

1060 *=$C200 

1070 DJRR LDAS0C00; (ENTRY POINT FOR PORT A ON LY) 

1 080 DJRR8 LDY #0 :TH IS ROUTINE READS AND DECODES THE 

1090 LDX#0 ;JOYSTICK/FIREBUTTON INPUT DATA IN 

1 100 LSR A ;THE ACCUMULATOR THE LEAST SIGNIFICANT 

1110 BCS DJR0 ;5 BITS CONTAIN THE SWITCH CLOSURE 

1120 DEY ;IN FORMATION. IF A SWITCH IS CLOSED THEN IT 

1130 DJRO LSR A PRODUCES A ZERO BIT. AN OPEN SWITCH 

1140 BCSDJR1 PRODUCES A ONE BIT. THE JOYSTICK DIR- 

1 150 INY ;ECTIONS ARE RIGHT, LEFT. FORWARD, BACKWARD 

1160 DJRI LSRA;BIT3=RIGHT,BIT2=LEFT,BtT1=BACKWARD 

1170 BCSDJR2 ,BIT0=FORWARDAND BIT 4=FIRE BUTTON, 

1180 DEX AT RTS TIME DX AND DY CONTAIN 2S COMPLIMENT 

1190 DJR2 LSR A DIRECTION NUMBERS I.E. $FF-1,$00=0. $01=1. 

1200 BCS DJR3 ;DX=-1 (MOVE RIGHT) DX=1 (MOVE LEFT), 

1210 INX :DX=0 (NO X CHANGE) DY=-1 (MOVE UPSCREEN), 

1220 DJR3 LSR A ;DY=1 (MOVE DOWN SCREEN). DY=0 (NO Y 



g) Prior to using this subroutine, be sure that the accumulator 
holds the joystick reading and that the X and Y registers have 
been saved. Also see section T above, 
h) Example: The following BASIC program pokes the joystick 
subroutine into memory starling at location 49664 ($C200), It 
then calls the subroutine and displays the joystick data. The 
only difference between the example's routine and the 
assembly listing is that the fire button state has been stored at 
location $C112. 

10 C=1 2*4096 

20 FOR l=0TO34:READA:POKEI+512+CA:NEXT 

30SYSC+512 

40 X=PEEK(C+272):Y=PEEK(C+273) 

50F=PEEK(C+274) 

60 PRINT'delta x = "X.-delta y = -;Y 

70 IF F=1 THEN PRINT "fire" 

80 PRINT"S":GOTO30 

90 DATA 162.0,160,0,173,0.229,74,176,1,136,74,176,1, 

200.74, 
94 DATA 176,1,202,74,176,1.232.74,142,16,193,140.17.193 
96 DATA 106,141.18.193.96 



Australian Commodore Review 43 



r 



PROGRAMMING 



Commodore 128 Memory Map 



by Paul Blair 

Version 1 - January 1986 

This memory map has been prepared to assist programmers 
understand more about the structure of Basic 7.0 as 
implemented in the Commodore 128 computer. 

As the machine has 2 functions in Basic {as a C64 and a 
C128), the map reflects common entry points as far as 
possible. 

This reference draws on work done by Jim Butterfieid. Jim 
had access 1o early releases of tine C128, and was generous in 
his supply of information to friends. Without his assistance, 
this map would have been a long time coming. My thanks to 
him. Thanks also to Greg Perry for his assistance. 

The memory map represents our ideas of what is in Release 
of the C12S Basic ROM, It has not been the policy of 
Commodore to release memory maps to the general public, so 
we offer this map to help you get more from your Commodore 
computer. 



BANK 








Label 


C128 


C64 


Description 


D6510 


0000-01 oooo-o- 


I/O port, similar to C64 


BANK 


0002 


NA 




PC-HI 


0003 


NA 


Monitor use - Program counter MSB 


PC-LO 


0004 


NA 


Program counter LSB 


S-REG 


0005 


NA 


Processor status 


A-REG 


0006 


NA 


Accumulator (,A) store 


X-FiEG 


0007 


NA 


X-register (,X) store 


Y-REG 


0008 


NA 


Y-register (,Y) store 


STKPTR 


0009 


NA 


Stack pointer (SP) store 


INTEGR 


0009 






CHARAC 


'0009 




Search character 


ENDCHR 


00OA 




Flag: scan for quote at end of string 


TRMPOS 


000B 


0009 


Screen column from last tab 


VERCK 


oooc 


000A 


Fiag:0=LOAD1=VERIFY 


COUNT 


000D 


OOOB 


Input buffer ptr / # subscripts 


D1MFLG 


000E 


OOOC 


Flag: default array dimension 


VALTYP 


00OF 


000D 


Variable type: $FF=string 
$00=numeric 


INTFLG 


0010 


0O0E 


Var type: $80=integer $00=floating 
point (FLP) 


GARBFL 


0011 


000F 


Flag: DATA scan/LIST 
quote/garbage collection 


SUBFLG 


0012 


0010 


Flag: subscript ref / user function 
call 


INPFLG 


0013 


0011 


Flag: $00=INPUT 
$40=GET,$98=READ 


TANSGN 


0014 


0012 


Flag: TAN sign /comparison result 



POKER 
LINNUM 

TEMPPT 

LASTPT 

TEMPST 

INDEX1 

INDEX2 

RESHO 

TXTTAB 
VARTAB 
ARYTAB 
STREND 
FRETO 

FRESPC 
MAXMM1 

CURLIN 
TXTPTR 



FORM 

FNDPTR* 

DATLIN 

DATPTR 

INPPTR 

VARNAM 

VARPNT 

FDECPT* 

LSTPNT 

ANDMSK* 

FORPNT* 

FOR/NEXT 

EORMSK* 

VARTXT 

OP PTR* 

OPMASK 

GRBPNT 

TEMPF3* 

DEFPNT* 

DSCPNT 

HELPER 

JMPER 

TEMPF1 

PTARG1 

PTARG2 

STR1 

STR2 

POSITN 

MATCH 

ARYPNT 

HIGHDS* 



0015 Current I/O device # : 

001 6-1 7 00 1 4- 1 5 I ntege r value (line #, GOTO, POKE 
etc) 
0016 Pointer: next string stack entry 
0017-18 Pointer: current string stack entry 
0019-21 Stack: 9 bytes for 3 string pointers 
0022-23 General purpose pointer 
0024-25 General purpose pointer 

0028-2C 0026-2A Workspace used by multiply and 
divide 

002D-2E 002B-2C Pointer: start of BASIC (for Bank 0) 

002F-30 002D-2E Pointer: start of variables (Bank 1) 
002F-30 Pointer: start of arrays 
0031-32 Pointer: end of arrays+1 
0033-34 Pointer: string storage (moving 

down) 
0035-36 Utility string pointer 
0037-38 Pointer: limit of memory (Bank 1 in 
C128) 

003B-3C 0039-3A Current Basic line number 

003D-3E 00 7A-7B Pointer: Basic work pointer 
(CHRGET etc) 
NA Used by PRINT USING 

NA Pointer to item found by search 
003F-40 Current DATA line number 
0041 -42 Current DATA address 
0043-44 Vector: INPUT routine 
0045-46 Current Basic variable name 
0047-48 Current Basic variable address 



0018 
0019-1A 
001 B-23 
0024-25 
0026-27 



0031-32 
0033-34 
0035-36 

0037-38 
0039-3A 



003F 

003F-4A 

0041 -42 

0043-44 

0045-46 

0047-48 

0049-4A 

0049 -4A 

004B-4C 



Mask used for comparisons 
0049-4A Pointer: index variable for 



Mask used for comparison 
004D-4E 004B-4C Pointer to operator table 

004F 004D Mask used for comparison 
0050-51 004E-4F Pointer: used for function definition 



0050-51 Pointer: used for string operations 

Flag: HELP or LIST 
0054-56 $4C (J MP) + address of function 

Multiple defined for INSTR 



0052-54 

0055 

0056-58 

0059 

TEMPF1+2 

TEMPF1+2 

TEMPF1+4 

TEMPF1+7 

TEMPF1+10 

TEMPF1+11 

005A 0058-59 Used to define arrays (DIM) 

005A-5B 0058-59 Pointer: used for block transfer 



Australian Commodore Review 44 



PROGRAMMING - Commodore 128 Memory Map 



* 






HIGHTR 005C-5D 
TEMPF2 005E 

005F-60 
0061 



DECCNT 
GRBTOP i 



DPTFLG* 

LOWTR* 

EXPSGN 

FACEX 

FACHO 

FACSGN 

ARGEXP 



005A-5B Pointer: also used for block 

transfer 
005C-60 Temporary FLP Accumulator 

(Accum) 
005D-5E # decimal point digits in 

conversions 
005F Flag: used to test for decimal pt in 

strings 



0062 

0063 

0064-67 

0068 

006A 



ARGHO 0068-6E 
ARGSGN 006F 
ARISGN 0070 
FACOV 0071 
FBUFPT 0072-73 
AUTINC 0074 



MVDFLG 

KEYNUM 

NOZE* 

SPRNUM' 

HULP 

KEYSIZ* 

SYNTMP 

DSDESC 

TOS 

RUNMOD 

PARSTS 

POINT* 

PARSTX 

OLDSTK 



0076 
0077 



0078 

0078 

0079 

007A-7C 

007D-7E 

007F 

0080 

0080 

008 

0082 



0060 

0061 

0062-65 

0066 

0069 

006A-6D 

006E 

006F 

0070 

0071-72 

NA 

NA 

NA 

NA 

NA 

NA 

NA 

NA 

NA 

NA 

(see 9D) 

NA 

NA 

NA 

NA 



Sign of exponent 

FLP Accum #1 : exponent 

FLP Accum #1 : mantissa 

FLP Accum #1:slgn 

FLP Accum #2: repeat as per FLPA 

#1 



Sign comparison, Accum #1:#2 
FLPAccum#1 rounding 
Pointer: cassette buffer 
increment value for AUTO 
($00=off) 

Flag: 10K hires allocated 

Key chosen 

Leading zero counter 

Move sprite and sprite temporary 

Counter 

Key command length 
Temp for indirect loads 
Descriptor for disk error (DS$) 
Basic pseudo stack pointer 
Flag: RUN/direct mode 
Status word for DOS parser 
Pointer to decimal point 



Graphic zero page storage 



COLSEL 

MULTC1 

MULTC2 

FG 

SCALEX 

SCALEY 

STOPNB 

GRAPNT 

VTEMP1 

VTEMP2 

STATUS 

STKEY 

SVXT 

VERCK 

C3PO 



0083 

0084 

0085 

0086 

0087 

0089 

008B 

008C-8D 

008E 

008F 

0090 

0091 

0092 

0093 

0094 



NA 

NA 

NA 

NA 

NA 

NA 

NA 

NA 

NA 

NA 

0090 

0091 

0092 

0093 

0094 



BSOUR 0095 0095 
SYNO 0096 0096 
XSAV 0097 0097 



Current colour selected 



Scale factor in X 

Scale factor in Y 

Stop PAINT if not same colour 

Utility pointers 



ST = status 

Flag : STOP and RVS keys 

Tape timing constant 

Rag: $00*=LOAD $01=VERIFY 

Flag: serial character awaiting 

output 

Actual serial character waiting 

Flag: end of data block from tape 

Temporary store during input 

(tape/RS232) 



LDTND 
DFLTN 
DFLTO 

PRTY 

DPSW 

MSGFLG 

PTR1 
T1* 

PTR2 

T2* 

TIME 

PCNTR 

BSOUR1 

COUNT 

CNTDN* 

BUFPNT 

IN BIT 

BITCl 

RINONE 

RIDATA 

RIPITY 

SAL 

EAL 

CMP0 

TEMP 

TAPE1 

BITTS 

NXTBIT 

RODATA 

FNLEN 

LA 

SA 

FA 

FNADR 

ROPRTY 

OCCHAR* 

FSBLK 

MYCH 

DRIVE* 

CAS1 

STAL 

MEMUSS 

TMP2 

BA 



0098 
0099 
009A 

009B 
009C 
009D 

009E 

009E 

009F 

009F 

00A0-A2 

00A3 

O0A4 

00A5 

O0A6 
00A7 
00A8 
00A9 

00AA 

O0AB 

00AC-AD 

00AE-AF 

O0BO 

00B1 

00B2 

00B4 

O0B5 

00B6 

O0B7 

00B8 

00B9 

008A 

00BB-BC 

00 BD 

00BD 

OOBE 

00BF 

00 CO 

00C1-C2 

00C3-C4 

00C5 

00C6 



0098 # open files / index into file table 

0099 Default input device (0=keyboard) 
009A Default output { CMD) device 

(3=screen) 
009B Cassette parity during write 
009C Flag: byte read complete 
009D I/O messages: $00=nil 

$40=errors $80=all 
009E Cassette error pass 1 

Temp workspace 1 
009F Cassette error pass 2 

Temp workspace 2 
00A0-A2 Jiffy clock 

Cassette / serial temp 

Serial routine temp store 
00A5 Serial / cassette temp store 

00A6 Cassette buffer poinler 
00A7 RS232 receiver input bit storage 
00A8 RS232 receiver bit count in 
0OA9 RS232 rece iver flag fo r start bit 

check 
00AA RS232 receiver byte buffer 
0OAB RS232 receiver party storage 
00AC-AD Pointer tape buffer 
00AE-AF Tape end adrs/end of program 
00B0 Tape timing constant 

Address of tape buffer 

00B4 RS232 transmit bit count 

00B5 RS232 transmit next bi1 to send 

00B6 RS232 transmit byte buffer 

00B7 Number of characters in file name 

00B8 Current logical file 

0089 Current secondary address 

OOBA Current device 
00BB-BC Pointer to file name 

00BD RS232 transmit priority 

00BD Output character 

OOBE # blocks left to read / write 

OOBF Temp to collect byte 

00C0 Cassette motor control flag 
00C1-C2 I/O start address 
00C3-C4 Pointerfor general use 



FN BANK 00C7 



RIBUF 
ROBUF 



NA Tape read / write data 

NA Bank for current 

LOAD/SAVE/VERIFY 
NA Bank where current file name(for 

FNADR) 
O0C8-C9 00F7-F8 RS232 input buffer addresses 
00CA-CB 00F9-FA RS232 output buffer addresses 



GLOBAL screen editor variables 

KEYTAB 00CC-CD 00F5-F6 Keyboard decode pointer (Bank 

15inC128) 
IMPARM 00CE-CF NA PRIMM utility string pointer 

NDX 00D0 0OC6 Number of characters in keyboard 

buffer 

Australian Commodore Review 45 



PROGRAMMING - Commodore 128 Memory Map 



KYNDX 00D1 



NA 



KEYIDX 


O0D2 


NA 


SHFLAG 


00D3 


028D 


SFDX 


00D4 


OOCB 


LSTX 


00D5 


00C5 


CRSW 


00D6 


00D0 


MODE 


00D7 


NA 


GRAPHM 


00D8 


NA 


CHAREN 


00D9 


NA 



SEDSA OODA-DD NA 
SEDT12 OODE-DF NA 
KEYVAR OODA-DF NA 



Number ol programmed chars 

waiting 

Flag: index to function key string 

Flag: shift key $00=no shift 

Copy of LSTX for rollover 

Last key pressed 

Input from screen / keyboard 

Flag: 40/80 columns: $00=40 

columns 

Flag: text/graphic mode 

Character base: $00=ROM, 

$04=RAM 

Pointers: MOVLIN routine (2 adrs) 

Pointers: SAVPOS 

Programmable key variables 



LOCAL screen editor variables 
(40/80 change maps out) 

PNT 00E0-E1 00D1-D2Pointer to screen line /cursor 

USER 00E2-E3 00F3-F4 Colour line pointer 

SCBOT 00E4-E7 NA Window lower limit 

SCTO 00E5 NA Window upper limit 

SCLF O0E6 NA Window left margin 

SCRT 00E7 NA Window right margin 

LSXP 0OE8-E9 00C9-CA Input cursor log (row, column) 

INDX 00EA O0C3 Current input line end 

TBLX 00EB O0D6 Position of cursor on screen line 

PNTR 00EC 00D3 Row where cursor lives 

LINES 00ED NA Max number of screen lines 

COLUMN 00EE NA Max number of screen columns 

DATAX 00EF O0D7 Current char to print 

LSTCHR OOF0 NA Previous char printed (for ESC 

test) 

COLOR 0OF1 0286 Current colour to print 

TCOLOR 00F2 NA Saved attribute to print 

(INST/DEL) 

RVS 00F3 00C7 Flag: reverse mode on/off 

QTSW 00F4 00D4 Flag: quote mode 

INSRT 00F5 O0D8 Flag: insert mode (>0=# inserts) 

INSFLG 00F6 NA Flag: auto-insert mode ($00=off) 

LOCKS 00F7 NA Disable SHIFT/C= CTRL-S 

SCROLL 0OF8 NA Disable screen scroll, line linker 

BEEPER 0OF9 NA Disable CTRL-G (bell) 

00F9-FA UNUSED 

PAGE 1 

FBUFFR 0100-FF Processor stack area 

XCNT ' 0110 DOS loop counter 

DOSF1L 0111 DOS filename 1 length 

DOSDS1 01 1 2 DOS disk drive 1 

DOSF1A 0113-14 DOS filename 1 address 

DOSF2L 0115 DOS filename 2 length 

DOSDS2 01 1 6 DOS disk drive 2 

DOSF2A 0117-18 DOS filename 2 address 

DOSOFL 01 19-1 A BLOAD/BSAVE start address(SA) 

DOSOFH 011B-1C BSAVE ending address (EA) 

DOSLA 01 1D DOS logical address 



DOSFA 01 1E 
DOSSA 01 1F 
DOSRCL 0120 
DOSBNK 0121 
DOSDID 0122-23 
DIDCHK 0124 



DOS physical address 
DOS secondary address 
DOS record length (REL files) 
DOS Bank # 
DOS disk ID 
Disk ID check 



PRINT USING work area {C128 only) 



BNR 

ENR 

DOLR 

FLAG 

SWE 

USGN 

UEXP 

VN 

CHSN 

VF 

NF 

POSP 

FESP 

ETOF 

CFORM 

SNO 

BLFD 

BCGFD 

LFOR 

ENDFD 



0125 
0126 
0127 
0128 
0129 
012A 
012B 
012C 
012D 
012E 
012F 
0130 
0131 
0132 
0133 
0134 
0135 
0136 
0137 
0138 



Pointer: beginning number 

Pointer: end number 

Flag: dollar 

Flag: comma 

Counter 

Sign exponent 

Pointer: exponent 

# digits before decimal point 
Flag: justify 

# of positions before decimal point 

# of positions after decimal point 
Flag: plus or minus 

Flag: exponent 
Switch 

Character counter 
Sign number 
Flag: blank /asterisk 
Pointer: beginning of field 
Length of format 
Pointer: end of field 



PAGE 2 



BUF 

FETCH 

FETVEC 

STASH 

STAVEC 

CMPARE 

CMPVEC 

JSRFAR 

JMPFAR 



0200-AO 0200-58 
02A2-AE NA 
02AA NA 
02AF-BD NA 
02B9 NA 
02BE-CC NA 
02C8 NA 
02CD-E2 NA 
02E3-FB NA 
02FC-FD NA 



Basic input buffer 
Bank PEEK subroutine 

Bank POKE subroutine 

Bank compare subroutine 

JSR to another Bank 
JMPto another Bank 
Function execute hook 



PAGE 3 

ERROR 0300-01 

IMAIN 0302-03 

ICRNCH 0304-05 

IQPLOP 0306-07 

IGONE 0308-09 

IEVAL 030A-0B 

IESCLK 030C-OD 



C128 /C64 
0300-01 Vector to $4D3F/$E38B-output 

error message 
0302-03 Vector to $4DC6/$A483-main 

system loop 
0304-05 Vector to $430D/$A57C-tokenize 

routine 
0306-07 Vector to $5151/$A71A-L1ST 

routine 
0308-09 Vector to $4AA2/$A7E4-RUN 

routine 

030A-0B Vector to 

$78DA/$AE86-eval routine 
NA Vector to $4321/NA -escape token 

crunch 



Australian Commodore Review 46 



PROGRAMMING - Commodore 128 Memory Map 





IESCPR 


030E-OF 


NA 




IESCEX 


0310-11 


NA 






0312-13 


NA 




CINV 


0314-15 


SAME 




CBINV 


0316-17 


FOR 




NMINV 


0318-19 


C64 




IOPEN 


031A-1B 






iCLOSE 


031C-1D 






ICHKIN 


031E-1F 






ICKOUT 


0320-21 






ICLRCH 


0322-23 






[BASIN 


0324-25 






IBSOUT 


0326-27 






ISTOP 


0328-29 






IGETIN 


032A-2B 






ICLALL 


032C-2D 






EXMON 


032E-2F 


NA 




ILOAD 


0330-31 






ISAVE 


0332-33 






CTLVEC 


0334-35 


NA 


£ 


SHFVEC 


0336-37 


NA 




ESCVEC 


0338-39 


NA 




KEYVEC 


033A-3B 


NA 




KEYCHK 


033C-3D 


NA 




DECODE 


033E-49 


NA 




KEYD 


034A-53 


0277-80 




TABMAP 


0354-5 D 


NA 




BITABL 


035E-61 


NA 




LAT 


0362-6B 


0259-62 




FAT 


036C-75 


0263-6C 




SAT 


0376-7F 


026D-76 




CHRGET 


0380-9E 


0073-8A 




CHRGOT 


0386 


0079 




QNUM 


0390 


007C 




Subrout 


ines to 


fetch f 




INSRAO 


039F 


NA 



Vector to $51 CD/NA -escape 

token print 

Veciorto$4BA9/NA -execute 

vector 

Unused ($FFFF) 

Vector to $FA65/$EA31-1RQ 

Vector to $B003/$FE66-Break 

interrupt 

Vector to $FA40/$FE47-NMI 

interrupt 

From $FFC0 to 

$EFBD/$F34A-OPEN routine 

From $FFC3 to 

$ F1 88/$ F291 -CLOSE routine 

From$FFC6to 

$F106/$F20E-CHKIN routine 

From$FFC9to 

$F1 4C/$F250-CHKOUT routine 

From $FFCC to 

$F226/$F333-CLRCHN routine 

From$FFCFto 

$EF0S/$F157-CHRIN routine 

From $FFD2 to 

$EF79/$F1CA-CHROUT routine 

From $FFE1 to 

$F66E/$F6ED-STOP routine 

From $FFE4 to 

$EEEB/$F13E-GETIN routine 

From$FFE71o 

$F222/$F32F-CLALL routine 

Vector to $B006/NA - Monitor 

Vector to $F26C/$F4A5-LOAD 

Vector to $F54E/$F5ED-SAVE 

Vector to $C7B9/N A-Print CTRL 

chars 

Vector to $C805/NA-Print SHIFT 

chars 

Vector to $C9C1/NA-Print ESC 

chars 

Vector to $C5E1 /NA-keyscan 

logic 

Vector to $C6AD/NA-store key 

Vector to $FA80/NA-keyboard 

matrix tables 

IRQ Keyboard butter 

Tab stop bits 

Line wrap bits 

Logical file table 

Device number table 

Secondary address table 

CHRGET subroutine 

CHRGOT entry 

Check for number 



Shared RAM fetch subroutine 
($03A6) 



INSR01 


03AB 


NA 


INDRA1 


03B7 


NA 


INDRA2 


03C0 


NA 


ZERO 


C3D2 


NA 


CUBNK 


03D5 


NA 


TMPDES 03D6 


NA 


FNBNK 


03DA 


NA 


SAVSIZ 


03DB 


NA 


BITS 


03DF 


NA 


SPTMP1 


03E0 


NA 


SPTMP2 


03E1 


NA 


FG-BG 


03E2 


NA 


FG-MC1 


03E3 


NA 



BANK 



VICSCR 



0400-07E7 
07F8-07FF 
0800-09FF NA 



Shared ROM fetch subroutine 

{$0392) 

INDEX1 indirect fetch 

INDEX2 indirect fetch 

Numeric constant for Basic 

Set by BANK cmd tor SYS POKE 

PEEK 

Temp for INSTR 

Bank ptrfor string-number 

conversion 

Temp work area for SSHAPE 

Accum #1 : overflow digit 

Temps for SPRSAV 

Packed fore /background colour 

nybbles 

Packed fore/multicolour 1 nybbles 



40-column screen memory 
Sprite identity area 
Basic pseudo stack 



Absolute Kernal Variables 



SYSVEC OAOO-01 
DEJAVU 0A02 



PALNTS 


0A03 




IN STAT 


0A04 




MEMSTR OA05-06 


0281 


MEMSIZ 


OA07-08 


0283 


IRQTMP 


0A09-0A 


029 F 


CASTON OA0B 


02A2 


KIKA26 


0A0C 


02A3 


STUPID 


OA0D 


02A4 


TIMOUT 


OAOE 


NA 


ENABL 


0A0F 


02A1 


M51CTR 


0A10 


0293 


M51CDR 


0A11 


0294 


M51AJB 


0A12-13 


0295- 


RSSTAT 


0A14 


0297 


BtTNUM 


0A15 


0298 


BAUDOF 0A16-1 7 


0299- 


RIDBE 


0A18 


029B 


RIDBS 


0A19 


029C 


RODBS 


0A1A 


029D 


RODBE 


0A1B 


029E 


SERIAL 


0A1C 


NA 


TIMER 


0A1D-1F 


NA 


XMA 


0A20 


0289 


PAUSE 


0A21 


NA 


RPTFLG 


0A22 


028A 


KOUMT 


0A23 


028B 


DELAY 


0A24 


028C 


LSTSHF 


0A25 


028E 


BLNON 


0A26 


00CF 



NA Vector: Basic restart 

Kernal warm/cold start status 

vector 

PAL/NTSC system flag 



■82 Bottom of memory pointer 
•84 Top of memory pointer 
■AOSave for IRQ during tape 
TOD sense during tape 

Tape read temp 

Tape read IRQ indicator 

Fast serial timeout flag 

RS232 enables 

RS232 control register 

RS232 command register 
96 RS232 user baud rate 

RS232 status register 

RS232 it bits to send 
9ARS232 baud rate full bit time 

RS232 receive pointer 

RS232 input pointer 

RS232 transmit pointer 

RS232 send pointer 

Flag: fast serial internal/external 

Decrementing jiffy register 

Keyboard buffer size 

CTRL-Sflag 

Flag: key repeat $80=ail, $40=none 

Delay between key repeats 

Delay before key repeats 

Delay between SHIFT/C= toggles 

Cursor mode $00=blink $FF=steady 



Australian Commodore Review 47 






PROGRAMMING - Commodore 128 Memory Map 



BLNSW 


0A27 


OOCC 


BLNCT 


0A28 


OOCD 


GDBLN 


0A29 


00CE 


GDCOL 


0A2A 


0287 


CURMOD 0A2B 


NA 


VM1 


0A2C 


NA 


VM2 


0A2D 


NA 


VM3 


0A2E 


NA 


VM4 


0A2F 


NA 


LINTMP 


0A30 


NA 


SAV80A 


0A31 


NA 


SAV80B 


0A32 


NA 


SAV80C 


0A33 


NA 


SAV80D 


0A34 


NA 


CURCOL 


0A35 


NA 


SPLIT 


0A36 


NA 


FNADRX 


0A37 


NA 


PALCNT 


0A38 


NA 



Cursor blink enable $00=flash 
Cursor blink counter 
Character under cursor 
Cursor colour before blink 
VDC cursor mode (when enabled) 
ViC text screen/char base ptr 
VIC bit map base 
VDC text screen base 
VDC attributes base 

80 col routines work area 



VDC cursor colour before blink 
Split screen raster value 
Save .X during Bank operations 
Jiffy adjustment for PAL systems 



MONITOR stores (C128 only) 



XCNT 


0A80 


HULP 


OAAO 


FORMAT 


OAAA 


LENGTH 


OAAB 


MSAL 


OAAC 


SXREG 


OAAF 


SYREG 


OABO 


WRAP 


0AB1 


XSAVE 


0AB2 


DIRCTN 


0AB3 


TEMPM 


0AB4 


CURBNK 


OACO NA 


PAT 


0AC1 NA 


TBUFFR 


0800-BF 032 


RS232I 


0C00-0DFF 


RS2320 


OEOO-OFFF 


PHKBUF 


1000-09 NA 


PHKDEF 


100A-FF NA 


DOSSTR 


1100-30 



Compare buffer 



Current function key ROM bank 

Physical address table 

Cassette buffer 

RS232 I/O buffers 

System sprites 

Programmed key lengths 

Programmed key lengths and 

definitions 

DOS output buffer 



Graphics variables 

1131-38 
Line drawing variables 

1139-48 
Angle routine variables 

1149-4F 
Circle drawing variables or general use variables 
or shape and move shape or graphics variables 

1150-6F 

ADRAY1 117A-7B 0003-04 Vector to FLP-fixed routine 

($84B4) 
ADRAY2 117C-7D 0005-06 Vector to Fixed -FLP routine 

($793C) 
LP EN 11E9-EA NA Light pen X,Y values 

OLDLIN 1200-01 003B-3C Previous Basic line number 

Australian Commodore Review 48 



OLDTXT 1202-03 003D-3E Pointer: Basic statement for 



PUCHRS 1204-07 NA 
ERRNUM 1208 NA 
ERRLIN 1209-OA NA 

TRAPNO 120B-0C NA 
TMPTRP 120D NA 
ERRTXT 120E 



CONT 

PRINT USING chars ( ,.$) 

ER = Error type 

EL = Error line number (FFFF No 

error} 

Line to go to on error (FFxx none) 

Hold trap # temp 



TEXTTP 1210-11 End of Basic (Bank 0) 

MAXMM0 1212-13 Basic program limit $FF00 

TMPTXT 1214-15 Used by DO loop 

USRPOK 1218-1A 0310-12 USR program jump 

RNDX 121B-1F 008B-8F RND seed value 

Music Stores 

1220-71 
Interrupt Stores 

1276-80 
Sound Stores 

1281-FF 



START 1C01 
BASIC 
2000-3FFF 
4000-FBFF 

BANK 1- 

0400-FBFF 



0801 Normal start of Basic text 

Screen memory (hi-res) 
RAM memory (hi-res) 



Basic variables, arrays, strings 



BANK 14- (Same as Bank 15, except-) 
D0O0-DFFF 



Character generator ROM (same 
as C54) 



BANK 15- 






4000-CFFF 


A000-C000 Basic ROM 


D0OO-D030 




40-col video chip 8564 (Same as 
64) 


D400-D41C 




SID sound chip 6581 (Same as 64) 


D500-D50A 


NA 


MMU 8722 memory setup registers 


D600-D601 


NA 


ao-column CRTC 


D800-D8E7 




Colour nybbles (Same as 64) 


DC0O-DC0F 




CIA1 6526 (IRQ) (Same as 64) 


DDOO-DDOF 




CIA2 6526 (NMI) (Same as 64) 


DF00-DF0A 


NA 


DMA controller 


E0O0-FEFF 


EO0O-FFFF KERNALROM 


FF05-FFFF 


FF81 -FFFF ROM: transfer, jump table'cy 



Basic 7.0/2.0 ROM ROUTINES 
Label B7.0 B2.0 Description 

BCOLD 4000 A000 
A003 



BWARM 4003 
4006 



JMP COLD START ($4023) Start of 
Basic ROMs 

JMP WARM START ($4009) 
JMP $A84D IRQ S/R 






PROGRAMMING - Commodore 128 Memory Map 



BASSFT 


4009 


E37B 


INIT 


4023 


E394 


INITCZ 


4045 


E3BF 


TINKLE 


4112 


NA 




41 7A 


NA 




41 8D 


NA 


INITMS 


41 9B 


E422 


IIMITV 


4251 


E453 


INITAT 


4279 


E3A2 




42CE 


NA 




42D3 






42D8 






42DD 






42E2 






42E7 






42EC 






42F1 






42F6 






42FB 






4300 






4305 




CRUNCH 


430A 




CRUNCH 


430D 


A57C 


ESCLK 


4321 
43E2 




RESLST 


4417 


A093 


OPLIST 


46FD 


A140 


OPTAB 


4828 




ERRTAB 


4S4B 


A19E 


ERROR 


4A82 


A437 


GONE 


4AA2 


A7E4 


NEWSTT 


4AF6 





Warm start routine 

Cold start routine 

Initialize Basic 

Bell 

Set preconfiguration registers 

Set up sprite movement tables 

Print "COMMODORE Basic 7.0..." 

Set Basic links initialize vectors 

CHRGET routine to move to $0380 

Indirect fetches:from ($50) Bank 

from ($3F) Bank 1 

from ($52) Bank 1 

from ($5C) Bank 

from ($5C) Bank 1 

from ($66) Bank 1 

from ($61 ) Bank 

from ($70) Bank 

from ($70) Bank 1 

from ($50) Bank 1 

from ($61 ) Bank 1 

from ($24) Bank 
Crunch tokens ($AF8A) 
Crunch tokens ($0304) 
Escape token crunch ($030C) 
Check if keyword found 
Table of Keywords 
Keyword vectors 
Operator vectors ($AF6F) 
Table of error messages 
Find message (.A) start of error 
mess 

Read and execute next statement 
($0308) 

Set up statement for execution 
($AF90) 



CONT 

ESCEX 
STOP 

END 
GETFMN 

OROP 

ANDOP 
DOREL 
HiDERE 
ERROR 

MAIN 

HOHUM 

MAIN1 

LNKPRG 

INLIN 



FNDLIN 

LINGET 

LIST 

QPLOP 

ESCPR 

NEW 

RUNC 

CLEAR 

LDCLR 

STXPT 

RETURN 



4B34 
4B3F 
4BA9 
4BCB 
4BCD 

Setup 

4C86 

4C39 

4CB6 

4D2A 

4D3F 

4DAF 

4DC6 

4DCD 

4DE2 

4F4F 

4F93 

4FAA 

4FFE 

5017 

5047 

5050 

5059 

5064 

50A0 

50E2 

5151 

51 CD 

51 D6 

51 F3 

51 F8 

5238 

5254 

5262 



A857 Update CONT pointer 
NA Execute/trace statement 

Skip statement ($0310) 
A82C Perform STOP 
A82F Perform END 
4BF7 B3E1 
FN reference 

AFE6 Perform OR 
AFE9 Perform AND 
B016(S/R) Perform COMPARE 
C474 Print "READY" 

Output error ($0300) 

BREAK 
A480 Ready for Basic ($0302) 

Ready ($AFA5) 
A49C Handle new line 
A533 Rechain lines ($AF87) 
A560 Get Basic line 

Search Basic stack 

Insert in stack 

Check if room for more 

Copy stack pointer 

Set stack pointer 

Delete from stack 
A613 Find Basic line ($AF8D) 
A96B Get FLP number ($AF9F) 
A69C Perform LIST 
A6C9 LIST subroutine ($0306) 

Escape token print ($030E) 
A642 Perform NEW ($AF84) 
A659 Get ready to RUN ($AF7E) 
A65E Perform CLR ($AF8 1 ) 
A677 Reset stack 
A68E Back up text pointer 
ABD2 Perform RETURN 




P 



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All on one disk - for only $12.95! 

And If you missed out on the previous Issues of our Disk Magazine, now's your chancel 
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