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Full text of "Atari Computer Enthusiasts newsletter 1985-07"

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THE ST'S ARE HERE 


BUMPAS REVIEWS 


Well, | sold my 800. It was a real emotional experience. After all, it 
was my first computer. | learned most of what | now know on the 
machine. And it never gave me any trouble. it was never down during 
the four years | owned it. The IBM I own at work suffered two complete 
breakdowns in the first year after the warranty expired. The repair costs 
on each occasion could have paid for an entire Atari system. Of course 
| only got a fraction of the $1100 | paid for the 800. 

Now | own a 130 XE! It’s great! | believe the keyboard alone has 
boosted my typing speed by more than 10%. And | type 75 wpm the 
last time | tested myself on the 800. | type so fast on the XE that a 
character or two in each paragraph never gets to the screen when ! use 
PaperClip. | guess it has so many features it doesn't have time to check 
the keyboard buffer often enough to keep up with me! Writer's Tool has 
no problem though. If you don't type fast, PaperClip might provide you 
with the best price/performance ratio, because it does have a lot of 
features. 

The DOS 2.5 disk the club distributes has several utility files of interest. 
Of course there is RAMDISK.COM, which automatically installs a 64k 
ramdisk (it's D:8!). Then there is a program to convert DOS 3 files. 
Another program automatically creates an autoboot disk from a screen 
menu (I like this one). And there is a configuration program which permits 
you to make additional disk assignments when you have more than 2 
drives. 

One obvious omission is a means to reassign the ramdisk to something 
other than D:8. Many programs are designed to access only 2, or 4 drives. 
If a user could assign the ramdisk to any number, say from 2 through 
8, the flexibility of this ramdisk would be increased many times. | know 
one user has already patched the system to assign the ramdisk to D:4. 
| won't mention his name so no pressure will be put on him to write a 
short little article describing the patch we need to make. But maybe 
someone out there will come up with an elegant solution to this problem. 
Any takers? 

My 130 XE has an accidental feature which makes it a “one-off”, sort 
of like that postage stamp with the airplane printed upside down. My 
Control Key has the word “Shift” printed on it, just like the larger Shift 
Key below it. So far, l've found no other machine with this characteristic. 
If you know of another XE machine with “Shift” printed on the Control 
Key, let me know, I’m keeping count! 

So far, the XE runs everything I've tried, except M.U.L.E. I’ve heard 
some other Electronic Arts stuff (One on One) won't run either. Lucky 
I added a 64k board to my 400, so I can still play M.U.L.E.! The XE is 
so small, | have it along with my 400 in the same space of my computer 
cabinet which was formerly occupied by the 800. The XE is actually 
smaller than the 400, although it's a little bit wider. And with the power 
switch in the rear, my son Aden hasn't figured out how to turn off the 
machine just before l've saved a 100 sector file for the newsletter! 


OPERATION MARKET GARDEN (SSI, $50) is an operational level 
simulation of the drive on Arnhem in September, 1944 which also 
involved the multi-divisional air assault. It's for one or two players, and 
the map takes up most of a 32x31 hex grid containing 13 types of terrain. 
Ten different types of units are portrayed in the game. 

Player options also include 4 levels of play, historical or free set up, 
historical or random weather effects, hidden units, and intermediate or 
advanced play. Advanced play permits additional options and creates 
additional difficulties. For instance, supply is more difficult to manage. 
But you may order advances after combat and execute offensive and 
protective artillery barrages. Stacking is limited and Allied engineers find 
it more difficult to build bridges. Command control may be lost in the 
advanced game. Advanced players may not examine enemy units. 


Game operations include air strikes which may interdict movement, : 


or may attack ground units. Units may be built up or broken down into 
component units. Each unit's activity expends "operation points". When 
the points are gone, no more orders are given to the unit. 

Game functions are controlled entirely with the keyboard using one 
or more of the half-dozen menus provided in the game. A 16-page manual 
describes all the game functions and includes hints on play and a brief 
history of the battle. Appendices include 3 historical maps, a page of 
tables and abbreviations used, order of appearance for the units in the 
game, and a three page order of battle. Two plastic laminated maps with 
charts and tables on the reverse side are provide as play aids. The maps 
are full-color and a welcome addition to the game for plotting strategy. 

This one is tougher to win solitaire than most computer simulations. 
You'll be busy with this one for quite awhile. 


SIX-GUN SHOOTOUT (SSI, $40) is a simulation which has not been 
successfully attempted before. It's the wild west, and one or two players 
may choose from among 18 weapons and maneuver around up to 25 
types of terrain. There are ten scenarios which include historical ones 
like the Gunfight at the OK Corral. There are also 3 scenarios from 
movies, like The Good, The Bad and The Ugly. Two "typical" scenarios 
include townspeople vs. trailhands and Indians vs. “Travelers”. 

The scenarios provide a player with from 2 to 18 fighters for a total 
of up to 30 fighters on screen at one time. You can save a game in 
progress for later play. The menu options actually allow for more than 
10 scenarios as players can take a scenario as it comes, or they can 
choose to randomize the starting position and characteristics of the 
fighters. 

Commands are entered with the keyboard and include the ability to 
show the map with all the characters removed, and to paint orange 
squares over the entire area any given character can see from the ground. 
When operating your characters, you can change weapons and load 
them. You can move, fire them, or fight hand to hand. Characters can 
stand, kneel, or lie prone (for better cover, but your movement is limited). 
You can jump through windows, hide behind walls and use other terrain. 
One character can even throw dynamite! 

The program gets a little gruesome sometimes. Occasionally, you are 
offered the choice of shooting a character in the legs, the gut, or the 
chest! A big feature of the program is the option to create a personal 
character for the player. This character starts with low characteristics, 
but your character appears in each scenario and offers you the 
opportunity to add skill points and become a very powerful character 
— maybe even more powerful than Billy the Kid! 

The 24-page manual not only describes the game functions fully, but 
also includes detailed scenario descriptions and historical notes and play 
aid charts. If you like western movies, here's your chance to get into the 
action yourself! 

ON TRACK (by GameStar, and distributed by Activision $35?) is 
described as "computer model car racing". And it is! 

When | was in high school, several of my friends had slot cars which 
they raced several times a week. These slot cars were expensive. And 
to race them you needed a rather substantial slot car track. Few were 
rich enough to have their own track, so stores set them up and charged 
fees to racers. On Track is a good simulation of these slot car racers. 
The cars even spin out when you lose control, just like the slot cars. 

In this GameStar release you have 10 tracks from which to choose 
(20, if you count the ability to surface each track with your choice of 
dirt or pavement!). One or two players may play, but | suggest you make 
it two player until you get very good. The Atari embarrases me so far. 
The player may also choose one of three characters (drivers) provided 
in the program. Each driver is provided with characteristics which affect 
his driving skill and qualities of the vehicle he drives. The variations do 
not seem to be oppressive. The player's skill is much more important. 

The joystick is the controller. Left and right steers the car. Forward 
and backward shifts gears between Lo and Hi. The button is the brake. 
Menu options permit gear shifting to be automatic (a nice touch). | use 
"automatic" brakes, also, because | haven't yet developed the skill to 
do correct braking. Luckily, when you run your car off the track, it doesn't 
crash. It comes to a stop. If you just sort of graze the edge of the track, 
you can slow down or at least get started quickly again. Well, to confess, 
I really drive like a blind man. | run until | hit something. Then | change 
direction. But | have seen a player sweep smoothly around those turns, 
and it's exciting! 

Game options also include racing for the fastest time, or for the 
greatest distance. 

l've left the best feature for last: Both players' cars are on the same 
screen for the whole race! For the slot car idea this is perfect. No split 
screens, or scrolling. You can see at all times how the race is going. You 
can take the car across country (you don't have to stay in the "slots"'). 
| tried this, but when you cross the start line you don't get credit for the 
lap. 

This is the most exciting racing game for two players l've yet seen. 
You'll have many hours of fun with this one. 

— Jim Bumpas 
Co-Editor 





NEWS AND REVIEWS 


by Mike Dunn, Co-Editor 


The big excitement now is the awaiting of the new ST’s. A number 
of our members have ordered theirs (brave souls!) and they are supposed 
to be here “Real Soon Now”, or next week. The first shipments are going 
to user groups to help de-bug the machines. Speaking of the ST's, some 
Macintosh programs are almost ready for the ST. Mosaic Software's 
Twin, a Lotus 1-2-3 type program, has been announced to be included 
with the 520ST, or $99 alone. VIP Technologies are releasing another 
1-2-3 clone, The Professional which will be for a number of computers, 
including the 520 ST. This issue is our July/Augest issue, so hopefully 
a full report on a user’s experiences with the ST’s will be in the next 
issue (or maybe even sooner). 

The last local meeting of ACE was another great one, with Ralph 
Waiden, author of ACE-C, giving an impressive demo of his new C 
program for the XE, which has a built in Editor which does syntex 
checking, and, with a custom RamDisk for the XE, very quick changing 
from compilier to editor and linker — quicker than for an IBM-PC. This 
will be released as a “FreeWare” product for a $35 donation when ready. 
Since most of the development work for the new ST's will use C, this 
is a good place to start. 

The new 520ST's will come with LOGO as its prime language, so Ruth 
Ellsworth has again started to donate LOGO programs and articles for 
the Newsletter. She has also made up our first full LOGO disk for the 
library — see her article. Speaking of the libary, the KoalaPad Utility 
Disk (double-sided for $15) is really a great buy for anyone into graphics 
— one of our best disks. We also have a new public domain Modem disk 
(not the one we use and not from ACE) called The Wizard double sided 
for $10. 

We have recently discovered that for some reason not known to 
anyone, our BBS, using the MPP modem, will not allow downloading from 
Atari 1030 Modem's. We will soon have a new, all machine language BBS 
which will run 300/1200 baud, etc, and be 10X or more faster than our 
present one (and hopefully with less bugs!). 

| understand MPP (MicroBits) is now closed and undergoing re- 
organization. | was very sorry to hear that, since they were a great 
supporter of user groups and had very good products — wish them luck 
to get back again. 


VP's RAMBLINGS 


Soon the ST's will be upon us and | am just learning how to use the 
new XE. If Atari keeps on the way they are going with the new type 
machines | will be further behind then ever before. | don't know whether 
this is good or bad but it sure is fun. The new XE is a very good computer 
with a keyboard that feels good and with the added memory | hope to 
see new programs coming out for it real soon. | think that Atari is doing 
the right thing by not have too many computers in the same type of 
series. They really don't need the 65XE thus the 130XE compliments 
the 800 series. | hope that the ST series is the same way. 

We have a new board up and running as we are beta testing it. It has 
all the features of the Forem board and more without all the problems. 
It is a password board so you have to log on as before but the higher 
levels really mean something and once you have your password to the 
board it really moves fast and gives you more time to do whatever you 
want on it. Anyway check it out and let us know what you think of it, 
also tell us of any features you would like to see. 

We will be adding an ST section to the newsletter just as soon as we 
have programs and articles to print and as long as we have the material 
coming in we will print it and of course all the other features that we 
put in every month. Don't forget if you have an article or program that 
you want to share with the other members please send it to us and we 
will see that it is put in the newsletter. 

— LARRY GOLD 


THE 'C' DUFFER 


Last month we looked at some ways to get simple integers into and 
out of the new AceC programming system for Atari. An elementary C 
program demonstrated integer math operations. 

AceC allows you to use Atari's floating point math. Most versions of 
C limit you to integer math. Floating point math insures fast-running 
programs. But integer math sure can slow down the programmer. | find 
floating point is cheap insurance against the kinds of errors which | make 
in fixed point math. 

So, how do you use F.P. with AceC? None of the books on C can help 
you here. As usual, Atari is different. The 'bible' is a brief text file on your 
AceC disk, "FLOATING POINTS”. If all else fails, read the instructions, 
right? 

Our sample program will get you going. You must reserve six character 
bytes for each F.P. variable, and initialize any variable whose value is not 
set in the program (lines 50,60). Line 100 converts the input string to 
a F.P. number and puts it into a [6]. Then we 'fadd' a into sum and store 
the result in sum. After doing this for 12 iterations (line 70) we convert 
the index i to F.P., put it in n[6] and ‘fdivide’ sum by n to obtain the simple 
mean, which is stored in ave[6]. Lines 150 and 160 put the results on 
our screen with a label for each number. Line 170 holds the screen until 
you press another key. 


The function fadd(a,b,c) is like C=A+B in BASIC, fdiv(a,b,c) is like 
C — A/B, and so on. You can also subtract, multiply, and raise a number 
to a power (which doesn't have to be an integer). 


You now know how to enter numbers and characters into an AceC 
program and get output of some kind. That's about as much as | know, 
at the moment. It should be enough to let us learn to use C itself, from 
books like Kernighan and Ritchie's “The C Programming Language". 


That's because the core of AceC is much like that of other C's, and 
l'm told that once you learn to use it, C is one of the very best 
programming languages. Once you get past the UO barriers, that is. 

So consider, as you listen to your disk drive earn its keep compiling 
yet another corrected version of a hot new C function, that most of the 
software for the new Atari ST computers is being written in C ! 

Finally, learning a new computer language which requires an editor, 
a compiler, and a linker — that's three passes through your trusty old 
Atari — before you see results (if any) can definitely give you a profound 
new appreciation for the all too familiar virtues of Atari's BASIC. 

No matter how you play it, you win! 

— Dick Barkley 


DOLLAR A MEGABYTE 


Page 18 of the latest INFOWORLD reports on the new Atari CD ROM 
shown at the June CES in Chicago. For $500 this peripheral may be 
added to your ST machine. This laser compact disk player uses standard 
compact disks which can contain 540 megabytes of data. The Atari CD 
player can also play your high-quality audio compact disks when you're 
not using the computer! 

The display model in Chicago contained the entire 20-volume Grolier 
encyclopedia. Every one of the 9 million words in the encyclopedia is 
indexed. As a test, a search for the word “toothache” was made. It took 
3 seconds to find every occurrence of the word in the encyclopedia. 
There is also a “browse” mode for leafing through the encyclopedia and 
a tree structure to access individual entries. 

Lending libraries could make these large databases available to 
individual users who could not otherwise afford the large subscription 
costs and connect-time charges for the more expensive on-line 
databases. This development could really bring the information age into 
the average home! 

Also shown at the June CES was an Atari 260 ST priced at $499. 
This version contains a built-in 1 megabyte 3.5” floppy and 256k RAM. 

— Editors 


LOGO LITTLE BITS 


by Ruth Ellsworth 


The new ST computers will soon be here. | find myself with the 
proverbial boxes of odds and ends (in this case disk boxes) as | get ready 
for the new machine. As part of the sorting out, | am giving the club 
a disk of LOGO. The disk includes the LOGO listings ! have included in 
the ACE Newsletter, the LOGO listings | wrote last year for TURTLE 
NEWS, two instant LOGOs (one for the younger set, and one for the even 
younger set), and odds and ends as time and space permit. 

This month | want to mention the special primitives available in ATARI 
LOGO. Because of the way in which ATARI LOGO is accessed by the 
computer, users have little control over the computer memory or ability 
to change it. The special primitives in ATARI LOGO give very limited ability 
to affect computer memory. These primitives have the . (dot) at the 
beginning as a warning that they must be used carefully. They can 
destroy workspace. If workspace is destroyed through using them, one 
must restart LOGO and begin again. Four out of the five special primitives 
will not be used by beginners very often. 

The special primitive used most is the .SETSCR command. This 
command adjusts the vertical and horizontal lines on the TV being used 
so that objects are in correct proportion. For example, squares can be 
made to look truely square rather than rectangle as some TV screens 
make them appear with the default .SETSCR value. For most TV screens 
.SETSCR .8 is the correct value. 

The .PRIMITIVES command prints a list of all the Logo primitives. This 
is can be a handy reference guide during programming. We have also 
found it very useful when translating programs created at the children's 
school with different computers. 

One of the nice things about ATARI LOGO is that machine language 
subroutines can be accessed through the .CALL command. This 
command allows ATARI LOGO to do things which LOGO was not 
designed to do. The .CALL command is followed by a number (address) 
representing the starting memory location for the subroutine. 

Two special primitives allow LOGO users direct access to memory 
locations. These commands are .EXAMINE and .DEPOSIT. Both 
commands are followed by a number representing a memory location 
(address). 

The .EXAMINE (number) command allows the user to read the 
contents of a memory location. It is used for such things as printer drivers 
which check the memory locations during the run of the program so that 
the printer will preform in the way desired. 

The .DEPOSIT (number) command has very limited use in ATARI LOGO. 
The way LOGO is implemented makes most memory locations “off 
limits" to changes. There are, however a few locations which can be used 
to create fun or interesting effects. One of the things that is fun to do 
is to use the .DEPOSIT command to change the shape of the turtle. Page 
154 of the Reference Manual gives the location and byte numbers that 
can be used. We have used those numbers with the collision registers 
to make the turtle look squashed. 

Another fun thing we have done is to use the .DEPOSIT command to 
make titles for our programs that flip upside down and back. The 
FLIPPING TITLE modules at the end of this article can be used to 
introduce programs by adding the name of the program to be run after 
the line IF : VALUE x 10 [FLIPLET] in the TO COUNTER module. 

The TO START module is required because the program uses a counter. 
Counters must be set in modules outside of the modules in which they 
are used, or the value of the counter will be reset to the original value 
each time. If the counter is reset to the original value the program will 
become a “forever” program and won't go anywhere. 

A value of 2 placed in memory location (address) 755 makes text 
appear right side up on the screen. A value of 4 placed in that location 
makes text appear upside down. In the TO FLIPLET module we have first 
placed 2 in that location using the .DEPOSIT command. Be sure to 
remember when using this command that the address is placed directly 


after the command, followed by the value to be placed in that address.’ 


SETCURSOR allows text to be placed anywhere on the screen. We 
have centered the text. It could be placed anywhere desired between 
O to 23 vertically, and O to 37 horizontally. However, horizontal location 
37 is reserved. For all practical purposes horizontal numbering is from 
O to 36. 

Also listed below is a PROCEDURE PRINTER. | have used it for the 
listings used in this article. We have found this to be one of the most 
useful of all LOGO programs. It makes it easy to keep track of each 
computer session. We especially like it to keep a record of programs that 
work the way we want them. | have made all the inputs variables so that 
one just loads PRINTOUT, calls it, then follows the prompts. The best 
thing about PRINTOUT is that one can print out only the procedures 
wanted, and in the order wanted. The reason for the repeated SETWRITE 
"P: and SETWRITE” commands is to keep the printer from echoing the 
screen. Echoing makes the inputs appear twice on the printed listing. 
In response to the prompt TYPE THE NAME OF THE PROCEDURE, type 
the names of all procedures wanted separated by spaces. Be sure to 
terminate all inputs with a RETURN. 


BASIC BUGS 


(Reprint: FRANTIC, April/May, 1985) 

Have you ever tried to edit a BASIC program only to lose part or all 
of it due to a mysterious system lock-up? Here's a solution. Basic Fix 
transfers BASIC to an AUTORUN.SYS file and fixes this infamous bug, 
along with some other bugs in GET, minus zero, unary minus, and NOT. 

The biggest change in this fixed BASIC is the precedence of NOT, 
which will be HIGH (equal to that of unary minus), instead of LOW. For 
example, with the original precedence, NOT O- 1 evaluates to O, since 
O- 1 is executed before NOT. With the new precedence, this will evaluate 
to 2 because NOT O will be executed before +1. Proper use of 
parentheses will restore the original meaning. 

Other visible changes include: PRINT -O will give O instead of garbage, 
and —1 will evaluate to 1, as it should, instead of -1. See the Atari Basic 
Source Book, Appendix B, for further discussion of the bugs in Atari 
BASIC. 

Another feature is the option to choose the screen color and margin 
defaults. Change the labeled DATA bytes to the combination you prefer. 

This RAM-resident BASIC survives SYSTEM RESET and functions 
correctly in all GRAPHICS modes, at the cost of 4k less free memory. 
To return to this BASIC from DUP.SYS you MUST use option M and 
answer the prompt with address 9BBB. If MEM.SAV is applicable, it will 
be loaded and your program restored; otherwise the computer will return 
to BASIC with no program in memory. 

To create your (almost) bug-free BASIC, boot up from a disk with DOS 
2.0S, 68 free sectors, and no AUTORUN.SYS (or one you don't want), 
and RUN this program. then remove the BASIC cartridge, reboot, and 
you can SAFELY edit and run any Atari BASIC program. You can still use 
a utility such as MACRODOS by appending the BASIC AUTORUN.SYS 
file to it. An autoboot menu program can be used by appending it to the 
BASIC AUTORUN.SYS file. Use DOS menu function C with the /A option 
(see the DOS II Reference Manual for details). 

— Trent Dudley 


LOGO 


TO START 
MAKE “VALUE i 
tT 

FLIPLET 

END 


TO FLIPLET 
DEPOSIT 755 2 
SETCURSOR £15 12] 
PR "TITLE 

HATT 68 

.DEPOSIT 755 4 
WATT 68 

DEPOSIT 755 2 
COUNTER 

END 


TÜ COUNTER 

MAKE "VALUE VALUE + 1 
IF :VALHUE < ið [FLIPLET] 
END 


RAMTALKER 


by Randy Holmes 





i REM see E BHR 
2 REM xk FROM 5.7.8.T.0.5., UA. SR 
I REH KR see Mar & Jun ACE for EN 
4 REM HE articles and circuits = 
S REM XK This version uses port 2 XX 
6 REM XX for KE and KL computers ES 
7 REM XX by xx 
B REM XX Randy Holmes RE 
35 REM XIGOOOHGOOCOCOCCOHOOEIEOREOHEEROEROEOUO KE 


18 REM RAMTALKER VERSION 3.5 2/85 

zü FOR I-8 TO 243:READ Z:POKE 1536*1,7 
:NERT I:DIM PRINTS (167), FREQS (1) , AMPS ( 

1),TIH$ t4) , ARRAY (2553 

i5 FOR Izi TO 167:READ A:LET PRINTSUIÀ 

-CHRS(tAY:WNEET I 

148 QN VALC(CHRSCANS)) GOTO 168,288,248 
,278,338,611 

278 CLOSE H4:TRAP 278:POKE 752,1:7 "GI 

UE FILE NAME";:INPUT FNS:IF FNS-'"" THE 

4 68 

118 CLOSE HA: TRAP 3I8:POKE 752,1:7 "GI 
UE FILE WANE"; :INPUT FNS:IF FNS="" THE 
H Gë 

4ü8 BATA 8,212,141,14,212,141,18,212,1 
41,18,212,166,287,32,149,6,173,2,218.1 
62 

GAR I=USRCABRI“HAAELVd'} , T0) CLOSE HI 

/AB:RETURN : REM "e OND "d" IM ADR STR 
ING GRE INVERSE 

511 REM SET UP GRAPH SCREEN 

521 GRAPHICS 8:5ETCOLOR 1,8,80:5ETCOLOR 
2,8,12:CÜLOR 1 

631 PLOT 98,18:DRAÓMTO 38,188:DRAMTO Zb 
5,188:PLOT 38,108:DRAHWTO 48,158 

641 PRAHTO 215,158:DRAHTO 255,188:DRÀH 
TO 265,18:DRAHTO 38,18:DRANTO 48,G8:DR 
ANTO 48,158 

651 FOR I-38 TO 265 STEP S:PLOT I,33;P 
LOT I,398:WEXT I:FOR I-i8 TO 188 STEP i 

8:PLOT 91,I:PLOT 32,8:NEKT I: A=3i 

651 FOR I-i88 TO i58 STEP S:PLOT A,I:P 

LOT Ati, I:A-A-S:NEKT I:G05lB 288 

67i REM SET UP AND CLEAR ARRAY DER 

FOR HOLDING SAMPLE VALUES 

681 FOR I-8 TO 2Z55:0RRAY(I)-0:NERT I 
684 REM WHICH PIECE OF SOUMD (1.75 SEC 
} 

685 ? CHRS(CIZS5);"SECTION OF SOUND TO 5 
AMPLE? (1-4)":7 ú 1-8-1.75sec [2-1.75- 3. 
58sec":? n 3-32.58-4.25sec]4-4.25-7.8" 
686 TRAP 68: INPUT SEC 

687 IF SEC-1 THEM LOC-16384:G0TO 788 
688 IF SEC=2 THEN L0C-28473:60TQ0 788 
689 IF SEC-3 THEM L0C-24574:60T0 788 
638 IF SEC-4 THEN L0C-28662:G0T0 788 


631 GOTO 85 

788 ? CHRS(I2S);"DHPRING PLOT, PRESS AN 
Y KEY TO RETURN TO MAIN MENU" 

781 FOR Gi TO I5:2-98*(0X5):10C-L 0242 
S5:CDINT-8:06-8:REM SET UP COUNT FOR 3 
5 STEPS THROUGH MEMORY 

711 FOR I-8 TO 255:ARRAYCII=O: NENT I:R 
EM SET UP TO COUNT ALL VALLES AT LOC 
721 FOR Izi TO 225:REM 225 SAMPLES=1/2 
8 OF à SECOND 

73i SMPLIPEEKCI+LOC):REM GET SAMPLE Vå 
L 

741 ARRAY(CSMPLI-ARRAY(SMPL)T1:REM SET 
COUNTER ARRAY 

751 NEXT I 

761 REM PLOT THE INFO ON SCREEN 

771 TRAP 811:F0R Woi TO 58 STEP 8.196: 
COUNT-COUNT41:5MPL-ARRAY(CCOUNT):IF CON 
NT)255 THEN COUNT=@ 

781 IF üG-i THEN 881 

731 PLOT (Z-M), CIGB* H-5MPL) :0G-1 

881 DRAHTO (Z-M), (1BB* W-SMPL) :0G-1 

885 IF PEEK(764) 0255 THEM GOTO Eë 

811 NEKT H 

821 WENT Q 

8:8 7 CHRSC175);"PRESS ANY KEY TO RETH 
RN TO MAIN MENU" 

848 IF PEEK(7541-255 THEN 848 

858 GOTO 68 

388 REM PUT LABELS ON SCREEN 

358 TIMS-"TIME":RESTORE 2878 

368 MLPIADR (PRINTS) 

1188 RESTORE 2878:FüR IZA TO 8:READ FR 
EQS: ATUSRIMLP, 195,24 I, ADRCFREGS) , LENCF 
REUS) :NEXT I 

iii A-HSR(MLP,38,8, DR (TTMS) , LENCTIMS 
1) 

iiz8 FOR I-8 TO 8:READ AMPS:a-USRIMLP, 
138-1, 1841, ABR CAMPS) , LEN CAMPS2) NERT I 
: BETURN 

2888 DATA 184,2801,4,248,2,1780,248,5,18 
4,184,282,288,251,96,184,123,215,184,1 
12,214,184,104,168,104,12132,217,184 
2818 DATA 122,216,104,184,248,1215,1317, 
212,24,165,214,181,88,111,214,165,82,1 
81,215,112,215,152,248,15,155,214 

2828 DATA 105,64,133,214,165,215,195,1 
,112,215,126,288,241,132,221,158,8,122 
,228,177,216,168,8,178,16,1,116 

2818 DATA 132,213,138, 41,96,288,4,169, 
64,16,14,201,32,288,4,162,8,16,6,201,6 
4,288,2,169,12,123,218,118, 41,71 


2848 BATA 5,218,11:,218,102,8,162, 5,0, 
218,42,202,288,258,182,244,2,113:,213,1 
54,221,177,218,62,213,164,228,145 

2858 DATA 214,788,112,228,136,217,285, 
182,24,165,214,185,48,132,714,144,2,23 
8,715,218,221,162,8,137,221,288,152 
2868 DATA 36,287,F,R,E,0, U, E, N, C, Y, E,2 
QUIT, I,L,P,.M,R 

2878 OATS F,R,E,0,U, E, NL C, Y, E, DLU,T,T, 
L,P ,M,ü 


x Ç T EOM 


PROC HPCASECCARDP 42,81} 
$ 
: RETURNS THE STRING 51 THROUGH 52 
; CONVERTED TO UPPERCASE 
: 
; ñi,ñ2 ARE THE ADDRESSES OF 51,52 
; RESPECTIVELY 
BYTE ARRAY 51,52 
BYTE I 
5Si-ái 
52-02 
52t(81-51í(81 
FOR I-1 TO 5118} 
DÉI 
IF 'z}=51€1} AND SiilIl)-'a THEN 
52(0)-51(I) *('áà-' 2 
ELSE 
52(11-51t1) 
FI 
ap 
RETURNS 


rROC LOMCASECCARG 52,4812 


D 
# 


; RETURNS THE STRING 5i THROUGH 52 
; CONVERTED TO LOMWHERCESE 
5 
; 81,52 ARE THE ADDRESSES OF 51,52 
; RESPECTIVELY 
BYTE ARRAY 51,52 
BYTE I 
5i-fi 
52-82 
52(81-51í(81 
FOR I-i TO $18} 
pü 
IF 'Z)-51(I) AND SitI))='ñ THEN 
52(1)-51(1)- t'à-7'a) 
ELSE 
521) -51t(I] 
FI 
op 
RETURN 


SOLITAIRE by John Kelly 





i GRAPHICS 18: PERE 756, 2789 

2 REH XXxixxi : SN 
i REM EE SOLITAIRE d John Kelly EK 
4 SCH EE x 
5 REM EE &CE Newsletter xXx 
Ë REM XX 3552 Vine Maple RE 
7 REM Xx Eugene, Op 97485 HE 
8 REH XX ZA year SN 
3 Š : 





i8 POSITION 5,3:? #5; RER p POSIT 


TON 1,5:? ge: HIERT: POSITION 

3,7:7 16: Tye 

15 POSITION 4,9:7 #6: "DIRE 

Ü i118 

28 COLOR 1:FOR AZ-Y TO Yt3@:PLOT K,6Z: 

DRAMTO EFIBL.AZ:MEMT AZ 

22 C-UAÀ:04 SH GOTO Z6,48,24,28 

ZI REM 

24 COLOR @:FOR Zá-8 TO 9:FOR Az-1 To Z 
ñ STEP 2:PLOT K+I5+0Z,7Y+Z6+6:PLOT X415 
“AZ, Y#ZA46:HERXT AZ:NEKRT ZA 

25 FOR Zà=3 TO 8 STEP -1:FBR az-i Ta Z 
A STEP Z:PLOT K+15+06Z,Y-Z64+2S:PLOT X41 

$-AZ.Y-ZIA8425:HEXT AZIWEXT ZA:GÜTO 56 
27 REM TPE 

28 COLOR O:FOR Zà=8 TQ 1@:FOR oi TO 

ZA STEP 2:PLOT H4i54A7,¥-Z4425:PLOT K+ 
15-8Z,Y-ZAi258:NEKT Gi NENT Ze 

38 FOR Zà-ii TO (Stop AZ=1 TO 18 STEP 
2:PLOT N4154A2,Y-ZA425:PLOT ¥415-a7,7 

-Z&*25:NENT AZ:MENT ZA 

$2 Z--2:iFüR Zh-i& TO 18:7-242:F0R AZZI 
Tü 8-Z STEP 2i:PLOT Mf1548Z, ET EECH 

OT HKt15-AZ,Y-ZA425:HEXT AZ:MEXT Zå 

Z4 GOTO 56 

15 REM FUTTYS2 

3G COLOR B:FOR à7-B TO 3:PLOT K+IS+AZ, 
YtAZ+E:BRAWTO M415-5Z,Y4AZt5:HEMT AZ 

I8 FOR AZ-18 TG 12:PLOT K41549,Y44246: 

BRAMTO H*15-9, Y4AZ4B:KERT a7 

48 Z--2iFüR ZA-13 TO 15:7-Z42:F08 aziz 
TQ 8-Z:;PLOT MEISTAZ,Y4ZAT6:PLOT X415- 
AZ, Y ZAŁO: NEKT AZ:NEET Zà 

42 Z-8:FÜR AZ=1T Tü 13:27-241:PLOT M15 
tZ YtAZ+E:DRAMTO Hf15-Z,Y4A8255:MEFMT a 








GOTO 56 

REM HETER 

COLOR SIAZ-KSII:ZA-Y45:6051B 52:87- 

Mt3:ZA-YTiI:G05HB 52:07-H4517:G605HB8 52 
48 7-B:F0R AZ-14 TO 21:7-2*8.55:PLOT 8 
CISTZ,YTAZSIDRAMTO H415-Z,YAAZ45:WEET 

AZ 

sË FOR Z=44id TO Hi15:PLOT Z,Y411:0RAM 
TO 7,Y*19:WEXT Z:60T0 56 

32 PLOT AZt2,ZA:DRAHTO AZ+6, ZA: PLOT Gi 
52,2837:p8AHTO O7+6,ZAt7:PLOT AZ41,Z2A4 


1:bRAHTO A247,7041 

54 PLOT AZ*1,ZA*6:DRAMTO A247,72046:FOR 
Z-ZÀ*2 Tü ZA*5:PLOT AZ,Z:DRAHTO A748, 

ZiMEMT Z:RETURN 

S5 CHR-ASC(CÓ(C,C)):TF CHRÁ396 THEN CHR 

~CHR-IZ¥ (CHR) I1) 54X(CHR (22) 

58 CPOSICHRES+ (PEEK (756) K2563 

68 FOR AZ-8 TO 7:PQKE (AZX48) MEM NSS 

1*(YX4B1,255-PEEK(CPOS4AZ) NERT AZ:RET 

URN 

78 SH-IMT(NHM/160) 

88 UA-NUM-198x5iI 

98 RETURN 

188 IF HF THEM GOSIB 1488:RETURM 

ie5 IF IN)48 AND IM(7l(4 THEN 1588 

ii8 IF IN)49 THEM 1658 

128 FOR K-8 TO 2:0DLIN(7)4K)-D(IMHK):H 

ENT K:IM-INAI:IN(ZI-IN(2) 47 

125 K-K(7):Y-YC13) :NUM-OD CIN (722 : GOSUB 
78:605UB 28:IM(7)-IN(7)+1 

148 RETURN 

158 POKE 656,8:IF OC<7 THEN POKE 657,4 

EDC+4:2 "on 

168 IF QC-7 THEN POKE 857,15:2 " " 

178 POKE 556,8:1F CUC? THEN POKE 557,4 

NXCH+4:2 Um 

ig@ IF CU-7 THEN POKE 557,15:7 n 

1358 RETURN 

288 CI-CU41:IF CID7 THEN Cli-7 

218 GO5UB 158 

228 DC-CU 

218 RETURN 

248 Cl-Cl-1:IF CUX8 THEN cura 

258 GOSUB 158 

288 QC-CH 

278 RETHEN 

288 IF HF THEM GOSIB 1430: RETURN 

238 ST-Cl 

J08 IF IN(CIJ-8 THEN GOSUS 1516:RETURN 


2118 
iie 
i28 


IF CH-7 THEN WIUM-OP(CIN(71-11:G0T0 


NUME CCU , 81 

S28 HEI 

348 .J-8:IF CH=7 THEN COLOR 4:FOR I-a T 
Ü I8:PLOT E(CIDSI,YCIZ) :DRAHTO MICHIY+I 
YAiI)tiB:GOTO 378 

i58 IF P(CU,B8)-8 THEN COLOR @:FOR I-8 
TO JO PLOT ECCIDSI,YCJI) :DRAHTO Krut 
YO t HSG 378 

i&8 FOR I-8 TO I8 STEP 2:C6LOR G:PLOT 
SICUT, YCDI:PRANTO KOCHUJIT, YCJL Z8 
i65 IF Lie THEN COLOR 1:PLOT Krut 
i,YtJ3:BRAMTO MICID 1S1, Y C.D4Z8 

S78 NEXT I 

S88 IF CHU-7 THEN GOSUB i158:RETURN 

138 J-I2X(IN(CH3-11422 


6 


395 COLOR 8:F0R I-8 TO Z8:PLOT K(CH)+I 
,Vt8ltil:DRANTO H(CUHJSI,YUDO)tJ:NEET I 
488 RETURN 

418 IF NOT HF THEN GOSUB 1528:RETIHRH 


428 
{Ig 
448 


IF CH=7 THEN GOSUB 598: RETURN 
IF ST-CH THEM GOSUB 758:RETURN 
IF IN(CHJ-8 THEN GOSUB 638:RETHRW 


498 

468 

478 

i138 

488 NUM-C(ST,8) 

438 GOSUB 78:IF ((T5-1) OR (T5-21) AND 
((5H-1) OR (50-21) THEN GOSUB 15I8:RE 

THRE 

sE% IF C(T5-3) OR (T5-4)) AND Frau 

GR (3H-4)1) THEN GOSUB 1548:RETURH 

318 IF TUGUAti THEN GOSUB 1558:RETIRN 


NHM-C (CH, INCH) 71) 
OUR 78:T5-5H:TU-UA 
IF ST-7 THEM NUM-OD(INI231-1):60T0 


9328 IF ST-7 THEN GÜSHB 788:RETIRH 

»i8 FOR Co TQ INST) -1:NBUM-C EST, DC 
CU ,IN(CCUJI-NUM: GOSIB 78:W-HCCUJ: Y- YLIN 
(CU33:605UB. Z8: IN (CH) -INCGCUA41 

248 COST, I=: NEXT I:INGT)-O:HF-G 

3598 IF P(5T,B8)=8 THEN RETURN 

SRÉ NIUM-P(ST,8):G605UB 78:K-HUST) : Y- (08 
1:6051B 28:C CST, INCSTI ) NUM: IN (STI -1 
378 FOR I-8 TO 4:P(5T, IJ-P(CST, I41) : MEM 
T I:P(5T,5)-0 

988 RETURN 

338 IF 5TO7 THEN GOSUB 1568:RETHRH 
6808 NIIM-OD(IN(731-1):G05UB "ër NK: Y 
-Y(i:3:605UB 28:6050B 158 

618 HF-8 

528 RETURN 

&I8 IF ST-7 THEN NIM-OüD(IN(?2-1):60T0 
558 
£48 
658 
668 
578 
588 


NUM-C CST, 8) 

60518 78 

IF U& O13 THEN GOSUB 1578:RETURN 
IF 5T-7 THEN GOSUB 788:RETURN 
GO5U8 Sie 

5398 RETURN 

788 K-K(CHD : YZ Y CIN CCUS) : C CCH, IM CCHD 27 
ÜUM:GOSUB 280:IN(CIJ-INI(CITS 1 

7i8 IN(7Y-INC72-1:0D CINC71)-8:HF—-8 

728 IF IN(7I-8 THEN COLOR B:X-E(I):Y-Y 
[1:13:F0R I-8 TG Z8:PLOT K*I,.Y:bRAMTO H 
*tI,Y*IB:NEMT I: RETURN 

728 RUN DP CIN(7)-13:G05UR 78:N-E C7): Y- 
4122 GUSU 28 

748 RETURN 

758 FOR I-8 TO IN(CUJ-1:NUM-C(CU, T) :60 
SHB 78:X-H (CHI : Y-YCI):G605UB. 28:NEXT I 
768 HF-8 


778 RETURN 

788 HUM-OD(INI7)-1):G05!B 78:FL=1 

785 IF (F(SUJ OQ Uà-1). ANG CFCSUJ-8) THE 
M GOSUB 1588:RETURN 

738 IF F(SUJ QUA-1 THEN TU-F (502 : GOSUB 
1558:RETURN 

888 GOSUB 388 

818 OPCIN(CCUJ)-B 

828 IF IN(CH)-BO THEN GOSUB 728:RETHRN 


8i8 GOSUB 7318 

815 GOSHB 158 

848 RETURN 

858 IF P(CU,8)-8 THEN COLOR @:FOR I-8 
TO Z8:PLOT X(CUJ4I,YCO) : DRAWTO. XCCHI 9I 
,TCQ) 418; GOTO 875 

868 FOR I-8 TO I8 STEP 2:COLOR B;PLOT 
vrum 4I, Y (0) : DRAHTO. KCCII 4I, Y CO) F38 
878 IF I<3@ THEN COLOR i:PLOT H(CCH3*I* 
1,Y(83 :DRAWTO ECCID *IH1,YCO) 428 

875 NEKT I:C(CH,83-P CCl, 8) 

88a IF P(CU,0)-8 THEN RETURN 

8980 NIM-CICU,8) : KCK (CHI : YZ Y (82 :GOS UB. 7 
8:G605HB 28 

388 IN(CII-1 

«ig FOR I-8 TO 4:PCCU,T}=P CCU, Tt 1) NEK 
T TI;:P(CH, 53-8 

3280 RETURN 

338 IF HF THEN RETURM 

935 FL-@ 

3480 IF IN(CUJ-8 THEN GQSUS 1518:RETURN 


358 IF CH=7 THEN GOSUB 7880:RETURN 

368 NiüM-CICH,IM(CCUJ-1):605HB 78 

965 IF (Fi5IJ OQ UAà-1) AND (FCSH)-8) THE 
N GOSUB 1588:RETURH 

378 IF F(5UJ O Uà-1. THEN. TU-F (5H) : GOSHB 
1558:RETURN 

388 K-K(UZ 

338 IF 5U-1 THEN 7-Yl1 

i8ag IF SU-=Z THEN Y-Y2 

iBiB8 IF 5U-3 THEN Y-Y3 

18278 IF 5Hu-4 THEN Y-Y4 

iða GOSUB 28:F(51D-UAÀ 

1848 INCCHJ-IN(CCHJ-1:1F FL THEN RETURN 


1858 
1058 


CECU, INCCH}3=-8 
IF IM(CUI=8 THEN GOSUB 859: RETURN 


1070 K=KR(CB):YZY(CIM(CU)-11:NUM-C(CHU,IN 
tCHY-1):60588 78:G05UB 28 

1880 COLOR 8 

i898 FOR I-3i TO 45:PLOT K(CUD,YCIN(CU 
)-1)*1:DPRAWTO KICID 4Z8, Y CINCCID 1) *T:H 
EXT I 

1188 RETURN 

iiig CLR :DIM TX$(21),425(72,C9 (132 , CE 


solitsire romt 
$,11),P (6,53, D (512 , 0D (223,F (42, X C7) , YC 
131 ,IH¢€7}) : OPEN #i, 4,8, "K" 

iiis TMS$Qi)-"gm:TESCL, 1)-7" n: THS C2?2-7T 
x5 (11 :C$-"021456783TJ0K'" : àZ$- TRS 

1128 FOR I-i TO 13:az$=" "READ 
&7$:THS CIX7-56,1X7) -AZ5 : NEXT I 

115@ FOR I-8 TO 5:FüR J-8 TO 5:cCLI, d= 
B:P(I,.D-8:NEXT J:FOR J-8 Tü iiiI, J 
-B:WEHT J:HEXT I 

ii68 FOR I-8 TO Z2I:0D(LIJ-8:NEXT I 

1170 FOR Lä TO 4:F EI} -@:NEXT I 

ii88 FOR Iza TO 7:X(I1-21*IX312:Y(I3-IX 
12:NEMT I:E(73-269 

113@ FOR I-8 TË 12:Y(I)-IX12:HWEHT I 
1288 Y1-8:Y2-22:11-64:Y4-236:Y (1117128 
1218 POKE 756,224 

i228 IN-8:FOüR Izi TO 4:FüR J-1 Te 13:8 
(IN)-IBBKITJ:IM-INt1:NEMT J: NEXT I 
1238 FOR I-5i fü 8 STEP ~i:K-INT CRND (8 
)ECIS 13) : TZD CH) : P CK) P CI I P CI) T: NEXT 
I 

i248 IN-8:FO0R Izi TO 6:FOR J-8 TO I-i: 
PET, J2-DP CIN) : INCIN41: NEXT J:NERT I 
i258 FOR I-8 TO B:CCI, B)-DCIN) : INCIN41 
:WEXT I 

1268 GRAPHICS 8:POKE 718,8:POKE 752,1: 
COLOR 1:POKE 782,15;POKE 712,4 :MEM-PEE 
K(88) *PEEK (822 X256 

i288 FOR #2254 TO 258 STEP 2:PLOT E,8: 
PRAMTO K,168:MEKT K 

i298 FOR I-8 TO 6:NUM-CII,83:605H0B 78; 
X-X(IbE:Y-Y(0)1:G05UB. 28: NERT I 

iza FOR I-B TO 6:INCI)-I:NEET (Oh? Lë 
-ü 
1718 
i:280 
1338 
81 
i348 
ii58 
1768 
i:78 
izse 
1336 
1488 


GO5UB 188:6G05UB 1468 
Cl-a:üc-8:M-KCCUJ:G05UB 158 
POKE 764,255:GET Hl,ü:ü-à-32*(023 


IF 
IF 
IF 
IF 
IF 


ñ=42 
GE z 
GEF 
A-86 
8-68 


THEN 

THEN 
THEN 

THEN 
THEN 

IF à-78 THEN 

IF #=69 THEN 

1418 GOTO 1330 

1428 GOSUB 1600:7 "DO YOU MANT TO END 

THE GAME? (Y/NJ"::GET #1,8 

1438 IF AQ89 THEM GOSUB 1466:G0TO 123 

a 

1448 RUN 

1458 GO5UB 1688:END 

1460 GOSUB 1588:7 “ARROWS MOVE, E-END 
GAME FIFOUNDATION N-NEKT CARD, P=PICK 
UP CARDS, D-DROP"; 

1478 RETURN 

1488 GOSUB 1600:7 “YOU'VE ALREADY PICK 


GOSUB 
GOSUB 
GOSUB 
GOSUB 
GOSUB 
G05UB 
1428 


208:G0T0 1338 
Z48:G0T0 1336 
198:G0TO 1338 
280:G0T0 i738 
4108:60T0 1338 
9378:G0TO 1628 


7 


ER UP à CARD";:GOTO 1618 

1498 GOSUB 1588:7 "THERE ARE NO MORE C 
ARDS IN THE DECK YOU MUST PLAY WITH 
THE CARBS SHOMING"::GOTO 1618 

1510 GOSUB 1688:7 "THERE ARE NO CARDS 
HERE TO PICK UP; :G0TO 1618 

i528 GOSUB i1688:7 “YOU DO NOT HAVE ANY 
CARDS TO DROP'";:GOTO 1618 

1538 GOSUB 1688:7 "YOU CAN'T PLAY BLAC 
K ON BLACK"; :G0TO 1619 

1548 GOSUR 1588:7 “YOU CAN'T PLAY RED 
QN RED";:G0TO 1518 

i558 GOSHB 1588:2 “YOU CAN'T DROP Git 
X5(UAK7-56,U0X7):7 "ON TOP OF A'";TESCTU 

x7-6,TUX7) ; :GOTO. 1618 

1558 GOSUB 1688:7 "YOU CAN'T DROP CARD 
S HERE";:GOTO 1618 

1578 GOSUB 1608:7 “YOU CAN ONLY DROP & 
KING HERE";:GOTO 1618 

1588 GOSUB 1588:7 "START YOUR FOUNDATI 
ON WITH AN ACE'"::GÜTO 1618 

1530 PATA M ACE, THO, THREE, FOUR, FIV 
E, SIR, SEUEM,N EIGHT, NINE, TEN, JACK 
, QUEEN, KING 

16808 POKE 656,2:P0KE 657,2:7 CHRS(156) 
:CHRS (1561 ; CHRS (253) ; : RETURN 

i618 FOR PAUSE-i TO J@@:NEXT PAUSE:GQS 
UB 1468:RETURN 

1628 IF F(1341Z OR FC22 (13 OR FOI 
OR FCA) X11 THEN GOTO 1ZZ0 

16:8 GOSUS 1600:7 "WINSTE CARE TO 
PLAY AGAIN? (Y/N)"U;IGET Hi,A:IF 6478 
THEM RUN 

1625 IF A=78 THEN RUM "D:MENUPLIS" 

i648 GRAPHICS B:CLR 

i558 IN(7)-IN(Z)-1:4UER-B:BUER-G:IF ON 

-i5 THEM BUER-D(51):AUER-D (58) 

i568 IF IN-51 THEN BUER-D(51] 

1678 FOR UU-B TO IN(7):D(5i1-UUJ-QD (INC 

7)-UU) :HEXT UU 

1588 IF BUER)B THEN D(51-UUJ-BUER 

1638 IF AUERDB THEN UU-UUTi:D(S1-UUl-Ó 

VER 

1788 IN-51-UU:IN(Z)-0:IN-INti:IF BYER? 

8 THEM IN-IN-1:G0TQ 128 

i888 IF IND51 THEN 1438 

1818 QD(INCZJ)CDCIN):IN-INT1:GO0TO 125 











i REM xxi Kata Ett ODER SS 
2 REM X* SEE JUNE '85 ACE pg. I ex 
Z REM RE LEXICON JULY 1985 — Hx 
£ REM Se John R. Kelley xx 
5 REM Xx ACE NEWSLETTER xx 
6 REN XX xx 
7 REM xk Eugene, OF 97495) KE 
B REM xx id year xk 
3 REM 3 KKK Ke 
18 GRAPHICS B:POKE 752,1 


iS PĒKE 718,8 

28 DL-PEEK(568172565XPEFK (551) 

£S POKE DL*7,7:PÜKE DL *8,6:POSITTOM 4, 

1:7 "L EKTET bE 

i8 POSITION 21,2:7 "sunonums - antonym 

gt 

i$ POSITION 2,4:7? " This program provi 

des the user twn hundred words, the: 

r SYNONYMS and " 

i18 7 ANTONYMS to develop word skills. 
The NORDS are commoniy used ones and 
are" 

45 ? "Presented in a Multiple choice f 
orMat to make it easier te choose the 
Cor" 

sa ? "pect answer, To use the pregran, 
seli- ect SYMONYM or ANTONYN and the n 
umber? 

25 7 "af MORES te be learned. The sour 

c8 of the WORDS was WEBSTERS New Colle 

giate! 

58 7 "b5birtionary. 





PPY LEXICOGROPHY R 
88 POKE DL+2Z,6:POKE DL+24,6;P0SITION 
2,17:? "DEUISED RY";POSITION 22,17;? # 
JORN R, KELLEY" 

£5 POSITION 7,i13;7 "Hit EXTTIIE to beg 
words." 

38 IF PEEKISI2731-6 THEN GRAPHICS 3:69 
10 igp 

LOTTO 38 


$£2801,51H5 1201, ANTS (20) , AN 
[20),MHMZ C23, BL 2 28) , T £23 

DIM SAMES £283 , DIFFS (793 LSC" 

SAMES HBIEK THE SYNONYM" 

PIFFSCUPICK THE AWNTONYE' 

REM 

128 TEMPS-AN35:81$-4N55:0-:87 

iz5 ÜPEM His B, K; 

£28 GRAPHICS BIPÜKE 789,4:PQKE 718,15: 

PUKE 712,15:POKE 752,1 

1:2 POKE 788,.556:3COBE-B 

138 7 :? "To pack the SYNONYM. type 5 

D? 3? "and hit gappi a 


un 
^d 


NES u 


b 


La bnt P 
"Do Së 


E 
m 
w f 


na 


037 ? :? 
:? "To pick the ANTONYM. type ‘A 


:? "and hit Bair 


Pe 


D 
"0 Qe ` Gel 
"EE «| 

AN 


3 
si 


LEXICON 


i42 INPUT L$ 

142 IF L1$-"3T7" THEN 158 

i45 IF LS$-"AN" THEN 1:318 

i47 IF L$ O "SY" DR LS? "AN" THEN 142 

i58 7 ;? ;? "How many words would you 

like"; :IMPUT NUMBER 

i55 FOR TOTAL-1 TO NHHBER:? "RU 

157 POKE SL+7,7:PQKE OLt8,6:POKE 788.2 

iż 

i68 POSITION 1,2:7? SAMES 

151 POSITION 25,2:? “KORO H';TüTAL 

162 PAKE DL*3,7:POKE DL*18,7 

165 POSITION 21,3 

178 AHN5-i335*IMNT(2BGXRND (022 £ 11 X5 : RESTO 

RE ANS: MEAD HORDS:REAR ANSS:READ ANTS 

i75 7 MORBS:?7 :7 :? 

iga FOR I-8 TD A 

19@ T(I)-13254 INT£2838XRND CBS FLIES ITF T 
(Il-àN5 THEN i198 

288 FOR J-8 TO I:IF I0 04 AND TDi 
THEN POP :60TO 139 

218 NEXT J:WENT I:J-i4INTIRNDCBIK583;fh- 

8:FÜOR I1-1.10. 547, Të E: 

228 IF T<. THEN RESTORE Tia): READ WOR 

PS READ TEMPS:READ ANTS:? TEMPS :A-áh*i: 
GTZ 258 

218 ? pusi 

Zap NEXT I;? 

258 RN 

268 GOSUR S88:IF Niíi DE Mi?5 THEM POS 
ITION C, R GOTE 268 

278 IF 84424 THEN i18 

288 SCUüRE-SCOREf1:6053UB 1788:7 
5,z28:7 "500d!";POKE 28,8 

298 IF PEEKi(283i£98 THEM 238 
388 ETR 248 

ii8 5GSHUHR 1388;PDSITIDON 80,2:? "Sorry, 
the answer: " 

iS POKE GLt7,7:POKE DLT8,7 

328 POSITION 25,.2:? 55:7 :7 "Hit Hai 

dT" te continue." 

318 POKE 754,255:GET Hi,A:IF 6402155 TH 

CN Ie 

348 7 "RU":NERT TOTAL 

498 POSITION 1,2:7 GAMES 

$18 POSITION 2.5:7 "out of ": NUMBER: " 

questions, you answered":? 

428 7 SCORE;" correctly. Your score is 


: POKE 8 


a if: 
2 D 


418 7 INTLUOCURE/NUMBERIK18BT8,51, z" 


415 7 :7 “SGT for more words, EM t 
e quit." 

448 POKE 754,255:GET Hi. ott A0 155 ñN 
b A042 THEN 448 

458 IF ñ-155 THEN 1:8 


455 7 3 eee 


e€ p DE 
z ` 


8 


468 7 " EHASIIEFTIBCSHBU 

478 ? " Eee FOR 1-1 
TÜ JHTINEKT I:GRAPHICS B:END 

888 C-PEEK(88):R-PEEK C84) 

885 POSITION C,R:? BLS: TRAP 885:Y-1:5- 
D'RURS mm 

S18 POSITION CtY-1,R:7 "a"::POKE 754,2 

SO:GET HL, A:POSITION CtY-1,R:IF 801256 
THEN 825 

815 IF Y)1 THEN Y-Y-1:? ©" "::MIIMS-NIMS 
(1,Y) 

828 GOTO 318 

825 IF fici55 THEN 7? " ":60TO 848 

828 HIMS(Y,YY-CHRO(CA):IF Y-1 THEN 5-à 

815 7 CHR$(A);:Y-Y*1:G0TO Sie 

848 POKE ADR CNUMS) .S:NI-UAL (NEMS) RETU 

RH 

i288 REM XXX CORRECT ANSHER 33x 

1218 SOUND 8,:5,18,18:F0R PELAY-i TO 1 

o:MEXT BELAY 

1228 SOUND 8,:1,160,18:F0R DELAY-1 TO 1 

9:MEXT BELAY 

12:8 SOUND 8,29,19,18:FOR DELAY-1 Tü i 

NEET BELAY 


1248 SOUND 8,80,8,8 

1258 RETURN 

1288 REM HEE WRONG ANSWER S/R WHE 
1218 SOUND 8,78,12,8:FQ0R J-8 TO 5:FDR 


K-B TO 7:HEXT K;NERT J:50UND 8,8,8.8:7 
UR"IRETURN 

1318 REM 

1:48 7 :7 :? "How many words would uou 
like"; : INPUT NUMBER 

1345 FOR TOTAL-1 TÜ NUMBER:7 ën 

iisB POKE DL*7,7:POKE DLi8,5:PO0KE 788, 

2117 

1355 

1766 

1355 


POSITION 1,2:7 DIFFS 

POSITION 25,2:7? "MORD HU TOTAL 
POKE BLt9,7:PQKE DL+18,7 

1178 POSITION 21,2 

1:75 AN5-1395S+INT(788FRND(8141)#5:REST 
ORE ñNS:REñD HORDSIPEñD SYNZ:READ ANSS 


1188 7 WORBS:7 :7 :? 

i385 FOR I-@ TO £ 

1:38 TEL -APPS+INT C2QBERND CBI 41145: TF 
TCT} -ANS THEM i749 

13395 FOR J-8 TO Z;IF I4 ANB TITE] 
3 THEN POP :G0TO 1138 

i488 NEKT J: WENT T: JritInT (QHD (8245354 
=B:FORB Izi TO $37 I;"} ms 

i41B IF T<. THEN RESTORE T£A3:READ HQ 
ROS:READ SYNS:READ TEMPS:? TEMPS: a-ati 
:G0TO0 i438 

1428 7 og 

1436 REKT 1:7 

i435 N-Hi 





by John Kelly 


1449 GOSUB 888B:TF Hili OR E15 THEN pa 

SITION C,R:G0TO 1448 

1445 IF N12). THEN i465 

1458 SCORE-SCOREt1:G050B 1788:? :POKF 

85,28:? "&Good!":POKF 28,8 

1455 IF PEEK(28)(38 THEN 1455 

i468 GOTO 1488 

i465 GOSEE 1388:POSITION 9,2:7 "SOorrg, 
the answer: " 

1467 POKE DLt7,7:POEKE GZ fk 

1478 POSITION 25,2:7 AN5$:2 :7 "Hit Hi 

to continue," 

1475 POKE 764,255:GET RI ett A0 155 T 


HEN 1475 


1488 ? “R: NENT TOTAL 

i438 POSITION 1,2:7 DIFFS 

1435 POSITION 2,5:? "Qut of ";NUMBER:" 
questions, you answered':? 

1588 ? SCORE;" correctly. Your score i 


sr 


1585 ? INTCCOSCORE/NUMBER)K18048,5) :"', 


1 


1518 ? :? “HRT for Bore words, E 
B to quit." 

1515 POKE 764,255:GET pi ott AO i155 ñ 
MD A042 THEN 1515 


1528 


BATA 
BATS 
BATA 
DATA 
BATA 
DATA 
BATA 
BATA 
DATA 
BATA 
DATA 
BATA 
BATA 
bats 
BATA 
DATA 
BATA 
BATA 
BATA 
BáTñ 
DATA 
BATA 
BATA 
BATA 
DAT 
DATS 


IF ñ-155 THEN (rg 
dE EH 
? "ENER ru 1- 


SEII:NEXT T: GRAPHICS o: END 





ABATE, DIMINISH, INCREASE 
ABILITY, TALENT, INCAPACITY 
ABSENT, AWAY, PRESENT 
ACCOST,ADDRESS,AUDIP 
ADVERSE, CONTRARY, FAVORABLE 
AGITATE, ARQUSE, PLACATE 
ALLOH, PERMIT, FOREIE 
ANNTETY, FEAR, ASSURANCE 
APPEASE, PACIFY, AROUSE 
ARRANGE, DEVISE, CONFUSE 
ASSIST, HELP, HINDER 

ATTACH, AFFIX, SEPARATE 
AUTHENTIC, GENUINE, FALSE 
ñHKHARD , GAUCHE , ASROIT 
BANISH, DISMISS, ACCEPT 
BANAL, TRITE, NOVEL 
BEAUTIFUL, COMELY,HOMELY 
BEGET, PRODUCE, BESTRGY 
BENEATH, BELOW, ABIYE 

BIGOT, FANATIC, LIBERAL 
BLESS, EXTOL, CURSE 

BONDAGE, SLAVERY, FREEDOM 
BORGER, EDGE, CENTER 
BUOYANT , RESILIENT, BEJECTED 
BURDEN, ENCUMBER, LIGHTER 
CALAMITY, ADVERSITY, FORTUNE 


2118 
2115 
2148 
2145 
2158 
2155 
2168 
2165 
2178 

175 
2188 
7185 
2198 
2135 
2288 
2285 
2218 
2215 
2228 
2225 
2218 
2215 
2248 
2245 
2258 
2255 
2268 
2265 
2278 
2275 
2288 
2285 
2238 
2235 
2388 
2185 
2118 
2315 
2120 
2125 
21:8 
2115 
2348 
2145 
2358 
2155 
2158 
2165 
2178 
2375 
2388 
2385 
2398 
2335 
2488 
2485 
2418 


BATS 
DATA 
BATS 
DATA 
DATA 
BATA 
BATA 
DATS 
BATA 
BATA 
Bñ Tš 
SATA 
BATA 
SATA 
BATA 
DATA 
DATA 
SATS 
DATA 
BATA 
DATA 
BATA 
BATA 
BATA 
DATA 
BATA 
DATA 
BATA 
BATA 
DATA 
BATA 
BATA 
BATA 
DATA 
BATA 
BATA 
DATÀ 
BATA 
SATA 
DATA 
PATA 
BATA 
BATA 
PATA 
BATA 
BATA 
BATA 
DATA 
BATA 
DATA 
BATA 
BATA 


‘BATA 


DATA 
DATA 
BATA 
BATA 


CANCEL ERASE, ENACT 
CALLOUS ,UNFEELING, SENSITIVE 
CAUSE, INCENTIVE, EFFECT 
CAUTION, PRUDENCE, ABANDON 
CHARGE , ACCESE, ACOLITT 
CHERISH, VALUE, REJECT 
CLEVER, TALENTED CLUMSY 
COMPOSE .FASHION, DESTROY 
CONCISE, INCISIVE, VERBOSE 
CONTAIM,EMBODY,EMTT 
COURAGE, BRAUERY .COMARDTCE 
CRAFTY. CUMMING, CAKRDIB 
CURRENT, PRESENT, ANCIERT 
CURT, ABRUPT, SMOOTH 
DAMAGE, DEFACE, REPAIR 
DERASE , DEGRADE, RESTORE 
BECEIT, GUILE, CANBOR 
DEFEAT, CONQUER, SURRENDER 
BELAY, DETAIN, HASTEN 
DEMIR , DOUBT, DECIDE 
DEPART, LEAVE, REMAIN 
BETACH, CURTAIL, ENLARGE 
DISCREET, TACTFUL, RUDE 
DIVERSE ,BISTINCT, ALIKE 
DOGMA, DOCTRINE, CONDUCT 
DOUET, DISTRUST, BELIEF 
DRIVE, FORCE, INDUCE 
EAGER, FERVENT, APATHETIC 
EASY, SIMPLE DIFFICULT 
EDICT, DECREE, INTENTION 
ELECT, CHOOSE, REJECT 
ELEVATE UPLIFT, DEPRESS 
ELUDE, AVOID, MEET 

EMERGE, APPEAR, VANISH 
EMPLOY, UTILIZE, DISCARD 
ENDURE, SUSTAIN, SUCCIHMB 
ENTIRE, TOTAL, PARTIAL 
ERASE, CANCEL, ENACT 
EKALT, ELEVATE, DEBASE 
FACE, FRONT, BACK 

FAILURE, FIASCO, SUCCESS 
FEAR, DREAD, COURAGE 
FICKLE , CHANGEABLE, CONSTANT 
FOLLOW, COMPLY, QUOID 
FORM, FASHION, DESTROY 
FORMARD , ADVANCE, RETARD 
FREEDOM, LIBERTY, BONDAGE 
FRIGHTEN, SCARE, 5Q0THE 
FURNISH, PROVIDE, BIVEST 
GAIN, REACH, LOSE 

GARNISH, ADORN, DEBASE 
GENTLE, TAME, FIERCE 
GENEROUS, UNSELFISH, GREEDY 
GIGANTIC, ENORMOUS, SMALL 
GLOOM, DARKNESS, LIGHT 
GLUM, MOODY, MERRY 

GLORY, HONOR, CONTEMPT 


9 


2415 
2428 
2425 
2418 
2435 
2448 
2445 
2458 
2455 
2458 
2465 
2478 
2475 
2488 
2485 
2458 
2495 
2588 
2585 
2518 
2515 
2528 
2525 


Pa Pe Bà puy be bäi bé Pa 
Hi On pn a o gn un 
Wi ED CO "XJ an 

Q sn mm un Ku 


ha 
EI 
Ai 
Du 


ax 


2688 
2685 
2618 
2615 
25728 
2525 
2618 
2bi5 


2648 


2545 
2658 
2655 
2568 
2655 
2678 
2575 
2688 
2685 
2698 


BATA 
BATA 
DATA 
BATA 
BATS 
BATS 
BATA 
BATA 
BATA 
BATA 
BATA 
BATA 
BATA 
BATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
PATA 
DATA 
BATS 
PATA 
BATA 
EATA 
BATA 
DAT 
DATA 
DATA 
DATS 
DATS 
BATA 
DATA 
BATA 
DATA 
BATA 
DATA 
BATA 
BATA 
BATA 
BATA 
PATS 
BATA 
BATS 
BATA 
BATA 
BATA 


DATA 
BATA 
BATA 
BATA 
BATA 
BATA 
BATA 
BATA 
BATA 
BATA 


E000, VIRTUOUS, FUTL 
GRACE, BEAUTY, HOMELINESS 
GRADUAL , DELIBERATE, SHIFT 
GRANT, AALLOT, CONFISCATE 
HAIL, GREET, VOID 

HAPPY, CHEERFUL DEPRESSED 
HARASS, TORMENT, COMFORT 
HARM, DAMAGE. BENEFIT 
HASTEN, HURRY, BELAY 
HEAVY, SERIOUS, LIGHT 
HESITATE, FALTER, PROCEED 
HONOR, ESTEEM, CONTEMPT 
HORRID , AMFUL, BEAUTIFUL 
HUMBLE , MODEST, PROUD 
IDEAL, PERFECT, ACTHAL 
IGNORANT , (NL EapRER , FDICETED 
ILLUSION, FANTASY, REALITY 
IMMATURE, CHILBISH, MATURE 
IMPART, INFORM, HIDE 
IMPROUE,HELP,IMPAIR 
INCLUDE, CONTAIN, OMIT 
INDOLENT, LAZY, ALERT 
INSULT, WRONG, PRAISE 
TRRITATE, ANNOY, GRATIFY 
JARGON, DIALECT, BARBLE 
JESTER, CLOMN, SCHOLAR 
JOYOUS, HILARIOUS, SORBQWFEL 
JUMELE , CONFUSION, ORDER 
JUST, FAIR, BISHONEST 
JEER, MOCK, PRAISE 
JUSTIFY, EXCUSE, ELAME 
KEEN, SHARP, BLUNT 

KILL, SLAY, SAVE 

KINDRED FAMILY, STRANGERS 
KISS, CARESS, SPHRN 

KNACK, SKILL, INABILITY 
KN0H, COMPREHEND, DOUBT 
LABOR, ENDEAVOR, LEISURE 
LANGUAGE, SPEECH, GIBBERISH 
LATENT,HIDDEN,UISIBLE 
LEAN, DEPEND, RAISE 
LESSEN, DECREASE, EXPAND 
LIBEL, SLANDER, APPLAUSE 
LIVELY, ACTIVE ,.LISTLESS 
LOGICAL, VALI, SPURTOUS 
LUSCIOUS, DELECTABLE, UNSAVORY 


MADNESS, INSANITY, SANITY 
MALICE, GRUDGE, AFFECTION 
MANY , NUMEROUS, FEM 
MANAGE, CONTROL. ABANDON 
MEASURE, TEST, GUESS 

MEND FIN, HURT 

METTLE, BRAVERY, FEAR 
MIGHTY, STRONG. FRAGILE 
NAIVE, INNOCENT, HORLDLY 
NARROW, BIGOTED, TOLERANT 


jexjr or 


7695 
2788 
2785 
2718 
2715 


sd 
haz 
E 


PATH 
PATA 
HATA 
SATA 
SATA 


PATH 
BATA 
SATA 
BATA 
BATA 
BATA 
DATA 
BATA 


768 PATA 


kW 
n4 (qu 
tm Wi 


Pa PO Pa Fé 
d nd 
a 
^ 


ma 

CD su 
E m t 
Gi Wm ou 


Pa 
iol 
vela 
om 


EM 


CO Cp nus Co 
zl En qu gm nn 
Ei att Um < 


sm 


pos 


Cp th um 
ae d) RO we " 
un wa Gh n 


pa bi ma Fo Fa Po ba Per ba bs Py 
ma n uo 
"d 
an 


D 
p 
Ka 


pa 89 bai Po Fa PA wir Fi PO Pe. 

LI WÉI oi WÉI s e WÉI wë s sQ éi 
vi On CO "up cn CD DI vi dë d 
ER CD m mmo ¿n m c) $m WM um 


Ai 
^l 
CP 


Di 


FA P 
VI 5 
Ai 
an 


= PAT 


BATA 
bats 
Bats 
SATA 
SATA 


5 BATA 


DATA 
PATÀ 
BATA 
BATS 


| BATA 


RATE 
Bata 
HATA 


: HATS 


DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
PATH 
SATA 
Dš TË 
DATË 
PATS 


| PATA 
| BATA 


BATH 
BATS 


s BATS 


DATA 
Sata 


8 PATR 


BATS 
DATA 
BATA 
BATA 


| PATA 


BATH 
BATE 
BATA 
BATA 


a BGTE 


BATA 
BATA 
BATS 
GATS 


7335 BATA 


cart 


MOTIFY,INSTRUCT,DELUDE 
KOBLE, EMINENT, MEAN 
NEAT, TRIM, DIRTY 
NURTURE VALUE, REJECT 


QSEDIENT, COMPLIANT, OBSTINATE 


ÜBLIGE,COMPEL.PERSIADE 
OBSCURE , VAGUE, CLEAR 
ORTAIN, ACQUIRE, LOSE 
OIGUS , MEAN, DECENT 

OPEN UNLOCK, CLOSE 
PACIFY, CALM, ARDUSE 
PANIC, ALARM, CALMNESS 
PART, PIECE, WHOLE 

PERIL, DANGER, SAFETY 
PERSIST, LAST, QUIT 
PLEAD, BEG, DENY 

POLLUTE, CORRUPT, PURIFY 
PROPEL, MOVE, STOP 
QUAINT, COD, ORDINARY 
QUICK, FAST, SLOH 

QUIT, STOP, CONTINUE 
QUESTION, ASK, ANGKER 
RACKET, NOISE, QUIET 
RAPID, FAST, Si 0H 

RAVAGE, DESTROY, CONSERVE 
REACT, REPLY, IGNORE 
HUSH, HURRY, DELAY 
RUSTIC, RURAL, URBANE 
SALARY, MAGES, GIFT 
SEIZE, RESTRAIN, RELESSE 
SELECT, CHOGSE, REFUSE 
5QUABBLE, ARGUE, AGREE 
START, BEGIN. END 

STINGY, GREEDY, GENEROUS 
TACT, FINESSE, BLUNDER 
TAMGISLE , PHYSICAL, SPIRITUAL 
TENACITY, PERSEVERANCE, SLOTH 
TERSE, BRIEF, LERGTHY 
THMART, FOIL, FULFILL 

Hi TIMATE.FINAL,.FIRST 
UNCERTAIN, HAZY, CLEAR 
UNDER, BELOW, ABOYE 
UNIFORM ORDERLY ERRATIC 
UNTAMED, SAVAGE, GENTLE 
USUAL, COMMON, RARE 
USCART, EMPTY, FULL 
VAGUE, HAZY, CLEAR 

JALIL, LEGAL, VOIE 
VERBAL, GPOKEM, WRITTEN 
Uil Gap, GRASS, REFINED 
WAGES, PAY, GIFT 

HATUE, RENOUNCE, UPHOLD 
WRANGLE, QUARREL, HARMONY 
WRONG , FALSE, RIGHT 
ECK , GESTROY. MAKE 
YEARNING ,.CRAYING , AVERSION 
YIELB, GRANT, REFUSE 
YOUTHFUL, YOUNG, OLD 

ZEAL ARRIR, APATHY 
7EALGUS, EAGER, CODE 
ZENITH, SUMMIT, SESTH 


BASIC 


8 BEM SAUE"DIBASICSK.RAM" 

18 BATA 184,164,1:2,285,184,1:3,285, 18 

4,112,284,184,111,2603,184.184, 153 

i4 PATA 287,165,282,41,63,74,111,204,1 

692,8,1865,1:2,282,171,1,211,2 

if BATA 2,141,1,211,165,284,241,185, 168 

;1312,284,168,127,1065,287,288 

22 BATA 18,177,285,145,28:z,136,15,242, 

248,18,234,177,202,145,285,136 

26 DATA 16,242,1721,1,211,41,253,141,1, 

211.345,12 

88 REM 1824 is the start of the casset 

te buffer. If you use cassette & have 

used page 5, then lower RAMTOP to 

85 REM 159 and Jet &-256X153 

38 4-1824:I-à:REM The -i above is not 

part of code, It just stops the loop 

188 READ KIIF K>-8 THEN POKE I,H:I-I*i 
:G0TO 188 

2808 DIM K$ (1278), 6$ {1278} 6$ CHRS C8) ASC 

1281-CHR$ (83:65 (21-065:REM AS can be wh 

atever you want, I used CHRSiBI, 

785 BEM hearts, as a demo point only. 

218 7 "ENTER A STRING TO BE SAVER..." 

228 INPUT KS:IF K$-'"" THEN 488 

218 IF LEN(XS)4128 THEM HS CLENCHS3412- 

a5 

748 ? "ENTER IH OF RAM SECTOR Te WRIT 

E (8-53) 

258 INPUT IDNO 

258 IF IBNO<@ OR IDNO?63 OR INTCIDNO)4 

IONO THEN GRAPHICS 8:7 :? GOTO 248 

278 KUSREA, ALR (KS), IDNO, 81 

286 GOTO 218 

igg 7 "ENTER IDH OF RAM SECTOR TO READ 
ca-l ''; 


z s 53 
rs 


4iü8 INPUT IDNO 


428 IF IDNO<@ OR IDN0)6I GR INTCIBNG < 
PISNO THEN GRAPHICS 8:7? ;? :GOTO 248 
425 KS(128)1-" ":REM Must be used or pr 
agram will not work. 

4:18 K-U5SR(A, AGREMS) , TENG, 1? 

448 7 K$ 

438 GOTË 488 
588 REM To Put 
change line 38 


program into a string, 
to read I-1:DIM F$t761. 


585 REM Change 
: IF z8 THEN 
88. 

318 REM Change 
& to ADR(FS), 


line 188 to read READ K 
FSCT)-CHRS EK} : I2151:6.1 


lines 278 and 438 fram 


10 


BK RAM 


i88 REM BASIC FIX - USE WITH BOS 2.85 

118 OPEN 31,8,8,"D: AUTORUN,SYS";FOR I= 
i TO 183:READ J:PUT Hi,J:HEHT I 

128 D.255,255,41,155,215,155,165,18,14 
1,179,155,165,11,141,188,155 

i38 D.165,12,141,65,155,165,12,141,67, 
155,208,3,32,84,21,162,8,163 

148 D.12,157,66,3,32,86,228,169,144,13 
1,185,163,3,157,66,3,1692,21:1 

i58 5.157,68,3,163,155,157,62,31,1523,17 
,i57,74,3,32,86,228,169,156 

158 D.433,213,169,188,133,225,168,8,13 
2,212,122,224,162,4,177,217 

178 D.145,224,288,208,242,238,213,2I8, 
225,282,288,242,210,5,16? 

188 B.178,133,18,169,155,173,11,169,65 
,i3,12,169,155, 133,17, 163 


198 REM NEXT BYTE I5 LEFT MARGIN (2) 
288 2.2,133,82,162 

218 REM NEKT BYTE IS RIGHT MARGIN (33) 
228 DB,13,1311,05:,162 

218 REM NEKT BYTE I5 LETTER LUMINANCE 
248 b.282.141,197,2,162 


REM NEXT BYTE IS FOREGROUND COLOR 
D,148,141,128,2,162 

278 REM NENT BYTE I5 BORDER COLOR 

288 D.8,141,288,2,24,26,32,153,2:,163, 
255,132,8,48,28,162,64 

238 D.141,05,155,162,21,141,67,155, 162 
,159,141,173,155,163,2: 

Tae 5.141,188,155,32,117,155,76,8, 168, 
63,58,155,8,156,255,187 

Jia FOR I-i536 TO 1562:READ J:PQKE I, 
;:NEXT I 

128 POKE 2586,8:1-0U5R(1516,48128,1824) 
:IZUSR (1535, 40968,7168) :POKE 2606,2 
738 5.184,162,16,162,11,157,65,5,184,1 
57,63,Z,104,157,58,Z,184,157,73,2,184, 
157,72,3,76,86,228 

148 D.FOR Izi TO 73:REAR J:PHT Hi,J:MNE 
KT I:CLOSE HI:END 

158 D.87,172,87,172,228,188,172,181,17 
2,228,228,76,152,78,163,75 

i68 b.168,191,173,172,175,172,76,172,1 
31,118,155,112,156,76,181,121 

178 D.158,159,138,153,248,1,75,34,162, 
282,288,1,936,76,84,162 

188 B.240,4,73,128,133, 212, 76,186,171, 
32,81,218,169,7,133,192 

138 D.76,134,188,225,2,227,2,43,155 


258 
z68 


BEE Fe ee s— Sr E =E ~f Eet $2 Te BC e S E ong 


1 REH J3HGOGCOOCGOCOOHIOOOOERICRHENAEROER GER HERE 
2 REM XX FILE COPY XXK FILE TAPE — XX 
i REM XX REVERSER 3/12/81 XE 
4 REM SS JOHN R. KELLEY EK 
3 REM BE 688 st. 28TH AVE kx 
& REM XX PORTLAND, OR 37214 xx 
7 REN ENKER 


48 DIM NAMES C281,05t1831 , XX 5 C1) 

bü DIM ELT5T5 (93, MYLIST$ (33, RLISTS (9) 
78 MAMES-"REUERSE'' 

88 GOSUB 238 

38 OPEN dH1,4,8,"K:" 

i88 ? "HelcoMe to the game of (ayaa 


iig ? "Po you need instructions (Y/W)" 
::605HB 878:IF EMH-41 THEN GOSUB 1888 
128 ? "RHow many digits would yout:? " 
like t1-9)"; 

i38 GESUG 878:MAK-EK 

i4@ ? KK; 

158 IF MAX< OR Moving THEN ? “SSorry., 
.0nly numbers between I-3'":G0T0 128 
i&8 GOSUB 428 

i178 THRN-TURNt1 

188 ? ugu 

138 ? "TURN E ":TURN 

288 7 :7 "Reverse how many? ": 

218 GO5SUB 878 

2280 R-MH:? B; 

Zi@ FOR HH-i TO 288:NEXMT HH 

248 IF RXZ ÜR RIMAN THEN 278 

258 GOSHB 628 

GOTO 178 

? "Can only reverse from Z - "MAK 
;;" digits":FOR WI TO 1288:NEFET HH 
GOTO igg 

LES) 

GRAPHICS 2 

POKE 718,8 

FOR Izi TO LEN{MAMES) 

POSITION vii. 

? Dë NAMES (LEN CNAMES]-I4+1, EN CNAME 


SOUND 8,IMT(RND(OYK255141,18,12 
FOR MI TO 88:NEMT HH 

K-Md1 

NEXT I 

SOUND 8,8,8,8 

POSITION 3,5:? fi5;"by" 

POSITION 4,7:7 H5;" john F kelley" 


RETURN 
FOR K-1 TO MAX 
MYLISTS(K,K)-"B'":ELISTS CE, K) =" 8" 


448 NEXT K 

458 FOR Izi TO MAK 

468 RN-INTIRND CBE) XMAR1 1 

478 IF ELISTS(RM,RNM) Or "B" THEN 458 

4&8 MYLISTSII,II-STRSIDRN) :ELISTS (AN, RH 

J-STR$ CRN} 

438 NEXT I 

588 GRAPHICS Z 

s85 POKE 718,8 

518 K-34INT(MAK/23 

528 FOR Izi TO Max 

338 GRAPHICS Z:POKE 718,8 

POSITION X,4 

? HO;MYLISTS (1,13 

SOUND 1, INT CAND (83 #10934 (741) 181 

8:MM-5:6051B8 638 

978 SOUND 1,8,18,18:MM-5:G05HUB 698 
388 K-H-i — 

538 NEXT I 

642 SUUND 1,8,8,8 

518 RETURN 

628 FOR 5-1 TO R 

538 RLISTS(R-5t*1,R-S5t1) -MYLISTS (5,5) 

648 NEXT 5 

558 MYLISTSICI,RI-RLISTSCL,R) 

666 IF MYLISTS-ELISTS THEN 728 

£78 GOSHB 588 

588 RETURN 

698 REM 

788 FOR WATT-i TË HMW:NEMT WAIT 

718 RETURN 

728 FOR I-i TD 3 

738 GRAPHICS 2:POKE 718,8 

7ES POSITION 5,4:? H6;MYLISTS 

748 SETCOLOR 4,INT(URND(8)*163,8 

758 FOR ü-i15 TO Zü STEP 8.5 

768 SOUND 8,2,18,18 

778 NENT Q@:501ND 8,8,8,8 

788 NEKT I 

738 ? “You won in ";TURN;" turn’: :IF 
TURNO 1 THEN 7 "g": 

888 7 '"!";SETCOLOR 4,8,8 

818 TRAP 848:7 “Mould you like to play 
again (Y/Wl''; 

828 INPUT A$:IF oct, (gn THEN 848 
8:8 TURN-@:POP :? "K'":GOTO 128 


848 7 "Thanks FOR playing!":FOR Izi TO 


SS3:MEXT I:GRAPHICS B:EHD 
878 REM 
888 SOUND 8,288,18,8:F0R M5-1 TO i88 


838 REKT WS:50UND 0,8,8,8:POKE 754,255 


988 GET Hi, KH: KK=KK-48 
318 TRAP 328 


11 


328 TRAP 34567 

3:8 RETURN 

1888 POKE 752,1:? “You will be given 
Some scraMbIed":? “numbers from í te + 
he nusber you" 

i818 ? "choose, £ 3-9 1 Hit (Zëgitii : Ga 
SEB 878 

1828 ? "RBg reversing blocks of number 
s trg"i? "to unscramble them se they a 
re" 

18:8 ? "in the usua! erderíi1-33 Hit [B 

HTT; Coup 878 

i848 7 '"EWhen you reverse a block of n 
uMbers":? "The reversal always starts 
from the: 

1858 7 "left. For example..Hit HARD 
:GOSUE 878 

1968 ? "Rif you reverse Z numbers of t 
his":? “combination: 6421725 unu would 
get" 

1878 ? 

are!t:? 
:GOSUB 


"2461725, Only the 6, 4, and 2 
"reversed, Ready? Hit Gag: 
#78: RETURN 


aT Ch mna 


BYTE FUNC INDEX (CARD 41,873 


D 
D 


; RETURNS THE POSITION OF STRING 52 
; IN 51, RETURNS 8 IF FAILURE 


;: 81,82 ADDRESS OF 51,52 RESPECTIVELY 
: 
BYTE ARRAY 51,52 
BYTE I,J, TEMP 
5i-ñi 
52-42 
If 51(81)-52:8) THEM 
FOR I-1 TO 51(8)-52(8)41 
pn | 
FOR J-1 TO 52(8) 
P0 
IF SifT+J-43=52¢5) THEN 
IF J-52108) THES 
RETURN CI} 
FI 
ELSE 
ERIT 
FI 
ob 
0D 
FI 
RETURN (8) 


™ Handler 


& REM K:HANBSLER 

7 DIM FUD 

i8 GRAPHICS 8:7 "HK: cpeatort:i? í? "che 

tki 

15 LI NE-ipg2:TRAP 38 

Zë FOR Krol TO L@:REAG BYTE 

i8 TOT-TDOT-4BYTE 

48 IF TQ7}999 THEN TOQT-TaT- 

SB MEET X:READ CHKSHUM 

EB IF TOTO CHESHH THEN ? “data error i 

n line "ILINE:ENL 

78 LINE-LINEt18:G0TQ0 28 

SH IF LIWE¢iz@@ THEN 7 “missing a 
line i ERD 

iag ? “Enter DEU:IFTLENAME'"; 

185 7 "treating file..." 

RESTORE i888 

DPEM Hi1,8,8,.F$ 

TRAP Zhe 

FER Koi TO 18:REAG BYTE 

PUT HL, BYTE: NEMT š 

REAR CHESUM: GOTO id 

IF PEEK(19534)5 THEN ? "Error '':;PE 
Ey r135]: 1 FRA 

Zig CLOSE Bir? 

ed! END 

i688 BATA 255,255,28,24,.251, 

41, 58,287 

i818 BATS Z4.i 

33,12,25 

ip28 BATA 163,74,133, 
72,163,128 

1832 BATA 35,141,232, 2 

248,144 

1848 BATA 


igg 


data 
INPUT F3 


^L 
1 
= 


h wn RD G 


A ` dës, (q Pä ke 
Kai 


Fa hu ` Ze prie Jee pes 
Ka 


v oun 
"m Gi 


"UAwecome...file compiet 


BATA 34,153,28,5,25,12,05, 14, 17,1 
tera PÀTA 
+24, 6566 


18BE Hara J 


GEET DZ AKTE ECKE KEE 


1188 RATA 25,75,171,24,182,74,2,41,8,7 
40,831 

1118 BATA 56,171,28,15,141,28,15,172,2 
7,:5,178 

dd BATA i41,22,15,76,171,24,32,151,7 
4,176,243 

1128 DATA 42,12,222,14,177,224,75,255, 
14,172,528 

1148 DATA 27,15,248,29,72,12,215,14,18 


4.12,143 

1158 DATA 232,14,145,224,76,255,34,172 
,27,15,584 

1188 BATA 12,216,14,284,22,15,2908,9,28 
15,288.4,158,126,55,95,158,1 
36,189,55,2,281,17,288,15,18 
2,281,192,144,24,141,27,15,1 


i288 DAT 
72,282 
i218 DATA 
,iB58,1855 
i2z8 DATÀ 171,95,171,25,15,133,224,19272 
,208,288,6:2 

12:8 PATA 5,168,216,148,27,35,132,225, 
35,172,848 
1749 DATA 1,211,148,1I8,55,158,9,148,14 
;218,781 
1258 DATA 148,14,212,168,252,148,1,211 
,292,14,197 
i288 DATA 18,32,1058,8,36,172,:8,35,148 
21,836 

278 BATA 21i, 
448,124, ži 
1288 SATA 218,218,26,315,288,1,2318,27,.3 
3,158,211 
1236 BATS 1,95,8,8,8,8,8,224,2,225,7353 


3,141,26,15,172,25,15,157,76 


473,27,35,157,77,3,76,171,34 


158,654,148,14,212,164,16 


ix88 DATA 2,8,.14,8,80,8,0,0,8,80,735 
iJi REM # Jig BYTES 


ACTION 


; DEMO TO SHOH HOM TO EMBED CONTROL 
: CHARACTERS IM ACTION! TO HSE THE 

; ACTION! EDITOR AS A HORD PROCESSOR 
: FOR AN EPSON MNK-30 PRINTER 

1 bu John Logan 


EEEG.EMBEDDED CONTROL KEYS 





EFEH 

TEST START 

„CTRL M EMLARGES ONE LIE 
TEST LINE 

sCTRL 0 SHRINKS 

TEST LINE 

-UTRL R CANCELS 


12 


TEST LINE 

kEFSC ESC E EMPHASIZES 

TEST LINE 

EFESC ESC F CANCELS 

TEST LINE 

kGESC ESC G DOUBLE STRIKES 

TEST LINE 

EHESC ESC H CANCELS 

TEST LINE 

GEGGESC ESC E ESC ESC G DOES BOTH 
TEST LIME 

EFEHESC ESC F ESC ESC H CANCELS BOTH 


TEST LINE 
E4ESC ESC 4 ITALICS ON 
TEST LINE 
SESC ESC 5 ITALICS OFF 
TEST LINE 


TEST LINE 
al TRE I INDENTS 
NENT LINE 


CTRL L FORM FEEDS TO NENT PAGE 
ESC ESC ñ CTRL A TÜ CTRL Z SETS LINE F 
FEB TO 1 TO 26 /72 


ESC ESC 8 CARCELS EVERYTHING 


TQ PRIHTOHT 

PRINT CTYPE THE TITLE] 

HAKE “TITLE RL 

SETHRITE "P: 

PR TITLE 

PR IJ 

SETHRITE [I] 

PRINT [TYPE YOUR NAME AND THE DATEI 
MAKE “NAME RL 

SETWRITE "P: 

PR i NAME 

PR I] 

SETMRITE i] 

PRINT [TYPE THE NAME OF THE PROCEDURE] ` 


MAKE “FRO RL 
SETHRITE “P; 
PG : PRO 
SETHRITE [1 
END 


THREE ACTION PROGRAMS 
by JOHN LOGAN 
PRINTER ACT 012 
CTRLKEYSACT 005 
NAVAJO ACT 018 


PRINTER.ACT documents how to enter EPSON printer codes in an 
ACTION! program with examples of each feature. 


CTRLKEYS.ACT shows how to embed control characters in an ACTION! 
source document. This allows one to use the ACTION! text editor as a 
word processor with printer control. 


NAVAJO.ACT draws a bargello needle point, a patchwork quilt and an 
abstract mountain in a Navajo style. Push the joystick trigger to change 
patterns. Push the stick left & right to select color register; push it up 
& down to change color value. 


; PRINTER CODES IN ACTION 
; by John Logan 


meoce Newsletter 
HGp/Z Vine Maple Or 
HEuaeng, OR 97485 

; eid year! 

; July 1385 

PROC PRINTER 

OPEM €2,"P:",8,8) 


PUTD12,271 PUTD (2, 'E) 

PUTO (2,141 

PRINTBE CZ, "PRINTER CODES "3 

PRENTOE TEI UD DS AA 
PHTD(7,27) PUTD(2,:F) 


; Rem SET LINE FEED 
PUTDCZ,273 PUTD(2,'3) PHTBC2,783 


PRINTDE (2, '''3 
PRINTPE(£2,"STANDARD PRINT") 


PRINTDE C2, "EMPHASIZED STO  PHTD(C2,27) 
PHTP(2,'E1' 

PHTD(2,27) PLTD(2,'E3 PRINTDE(C2,"EMPHA 
SIZEP STD") 

PRINTDE(C2,"TO CANCEL PUTD(2,273 PITD(2 
SM Di 

PHTD(2,273 PHTD(2,'F3 PRINTDE£Z,"CANCE 
LLED") 


13 


PRINTDE(2,"DOUBLE STRIKE PUTP (2,273 PU 
TP(2,'5) ") 

PHTD 2,27). PUTD (2, 'G) PRINTDE(Z,"DOHBL 
E STRIKE 5TD:!) 

PRINTDE(C2,"TO CANCEL PUTD(2,27) PUTO? 
DN KM 

PHTD(2,27) PITDU2,'H). PRINTBE(2, "CANCE 
LLED) 


PRINTBE C2, "ENLARGED PRINT PITD(2,14)'3 


PHTD (2,143 PRINTDE(Z,"EMLARGED PRINT " 
/ 

PRIMTDEX2, "CANCELS AUTOMATICALLY AFTE 
R Eñ LINE FEED") 


PRINTDEC2, "CONDENSED PRINT PITD (2,15) 
de 

PHTD(2,151 PRINTBECZ, "CONDENSED PRINT 
" 

PRINTDECZ, "TO CANCEL, PHTD (2,181") 


PHTD (2,18) PRINTDE:I2,"CANCELLED''3 
PRINTBEL2,""} PRINTDE (2 , moi 


PUTOC2,143 PRINTDE C2, "COMBINATIQNS:'') 
PUTD (2,14) PRINTDE(C2,"STD. ENLARGED") 


PUTD(2,27) PUTOCZ, 'E3 

PUTD CZ, 14) PRINTDECZ, "ENLARGED + EMPHA 
SIZEB"} 

PHTD (2,27) PUYTDIZ, E) 


PHTD12,271 PUTD(2,'6) 

PUTG{Z,14) PRINTBECZ, "ENLARGED + DOUBL 
ET? 

PHTG{2,27] PHTOCZ,'E} 

PHITP (2,143 PRINTDECZ,"ENLARGED + DOUBL 
E + EMPHASIZED) 


; 376 LINE FEED 
PHTD (2,273 PITD(2,'23 


CLOSE C21 


RETURN 


USING THE UNUSED 


Here are a couple of recent articles describing how to use some of 
that extra memory in the XL (and XE?) machines. — J.B. 


X:HANDLER 
Using the XUs Extra Memory As a Device 
[Reprint: MACE, June, 1985] 


The Atari XL computers have an extra 16k of RAM hidden beneath 
their ROM. This is why the XLs boast 64k RAM while the 800s have 
only 48k. However, this extra memory almost always goes to waste. 
There are many new products coming out soon which will use it, but 
currently there are very few programs besides the Translator Disk and 
DOS XL [and Flight Simulator Il — ed.] which utilize it; most don't even 
know about it. In BASIC and all other languages the XLs still have the 
same amount of free memory as a 48k 800. What good is the extra 
memory if it is not used? 

This program allows you to access 14k of the extra 16k as device X: 
(2k is always allotted to I/O space). You can do most things with it which 
you can do with any other device: You can SAVE "X:", LOAD "X:", PRINT 
to a channel opened to X:, GET from a channel opened to X:, etc. You 
can also NOTE and POINT as with a disk drive. The X: device will not 
be killed by RESET. Anything saved to it will be completely invisible to 
everything except the X: handler itself. Do not use X: when the 
DOSXL:XL file of DOS XL is in use, or DOS will be clobbered. 

To use the program, type in the BASIC listing. It will ask you for a 
filespec (D:AUTORUN.SYS or C:) and then create the file ... After 
rebooting the computer or loading the file from DOS, you will have device 
X: at your disposal. From BASIC try LIST "X:" when there is a program 
in memory. The screen will flicker as the ROM character set is switched 
on and off. This flicker serves the same purpose as the beeping of the 
disk drive. Type NEW and then LIST the program to verify it is gone. Now 
type ENTER "X:" and LIST again. Ta da! It's back. If the X: handler should 
lock up the computer and leave a bunch of squiggly lines on the screen, 
press RESET and try the operation again. Check to make sure you typed 
in the program correctly. 

HOW IT WORKS 

CIO, the Central Input/Output utility in the operating system, organized 
I/O by devices. Each device has its own handler (or driver), which is a 
program which has the routines necessary to communicate with that 
device. There are five device handlers resident in the OS ROM: the screen 
editor, E:; the display handler, S:; the keyboard handler, K:; the printer 
handler, P:; and the cassette handler, C:. Each has a vector table with 
pointers to five routines: OPEN the device; CLOSE; GET a byte from the 
device; PUT; get the STATUS of the device; and do a device-dependent 
or special XIO command. Some of the routines in each handler are not 
used, because you cannot input (OPEN Zchan,4,...) from the printer, or 
output (OPEN Zchan,8,...) to the keyboard. The five resident handlers 
have their vector tables in order in ROM starting at $E400 (58368), each 
having 16 bytes allotted to it. There are the six vectors of two bytes each, 
a JMP to the power-up initialization of the device, and a spare byte. CIO 
keeps track of where the vector tables for the handlers are by keeping 
a handler address table, HATABS, which starts at $31A (794). Each entry 
in the table takes up three bytes: the designation letter (E, S, K, etc.), 
nd the two-byte address of the handler's vector table. Additional entries 
can be added to the table; the D: handler is added upon booting DOS, 
and the X: handler is added upon loading this program. Whenever UO 
is done, a call is made to CIO, which tracks down the device handler 
and takes care of everything. 

At the beginning of the program is a routine which makes X: RESET- 
proof. It steals the DOS re-init vector and changes it to point to the X: 
re-init routine, which restores both the D: and X: entries to HATABS after 
each RESET. Following this is the X: vector table, and then the actual 


routines. These routines are similar to ones used by Bill Wilkinson for. 


his program which used ordinary memory as a device from the 
September, 1982 COMPUTE! magazine. Near the end of the program 
there are two routines which manage the OS ROM while bytes are being 
read or written to the RAM underneath it. Before disabling the ROM to 
expose the RAM underneath, all interrupts which use the ROM must be 
disabled, because if an interrupt occurs when there are no ROM interrupt 
routines the system will crash. Bit zero of PIA chip location $D301 
(54017, formerly PORTB in the 400/800) controls the state of the OS 
ROM, and bit one controls the state of BASIC ROM. There is also a routine 
which makes sure all reading and writing of data skips over the !/O chip 
region from $DOOO to $D7FF (53248 to 55295). 

The X: device is useful as a RAMdisk. It is much faster than floppies 
and can contain up to 14k of data without giving an error. This is the 
equivalent of over 100 single density sectors. Random access can be 
obtained after opening X: by using NOTE and POINT with the low and 
high bytes of the desired address instead of the sector and byte numbers 
of a disk. X: can be opened for append by OPEN £Zchan,9,0/'X:". X: is 
perfect for temporary, fast storage. Have fun. 

— Ken Alexander 





HIDDEN XL RAM 


(Reprint: HAUG, June, 1985) 


This program is a slight modification of one written by Kirt Grittner 
and printed in the March, 1985 MAAUG Newsletter of Madison, WI users 
group. It shows how to use the 8,192 bytes of RAM under BASIC to store 
and retrieve 64 different 128 character strings (8,192 bytes). It's almost 
like having Microsoft string arrays. The April A.N.A.L.O.G. has a RAM 
OS program in it which lets you access the 14k of RAM under the 
operating system. | believe the key to using over 56k of RAM with BASIC, 
in the 800XL, may well lie within this program and the one in the April 
ANALOG. f 

The 76 bytes of machine code are in lines 10 through 26. It is located 
into the cassette buffer by line 100. Lines 200 through 270 show how 
to load the 64 X$s. Lines 400 through 490 show how to retrieve any 
one of the 64 X$s. This will provide FREE space to store the pointer file 
for 2730 random access records, or whatever else turns you on. 
Operation of the program is FAST. There is nothing in the screen operation 
to tell you BASIC (and the OS) was turned off and on. It will NOT work 
with a 400 or 800. | revised it to make it relocatable, and then used the 
cassette buffer, as that is used only when doing a coldstart with a disk. 
Cassette users should use the STRING version. Anything put in a 
protected area of RAM can be passed from one program to another, 
therefore your RAM sector data could be passed from one to another 
program, unless you do a coldstart. 

Kurt Grittner was going to tell the Madison, WI users group how to 
access the rest of the 24k at their next meeting. | hope he and the group 
are willing to share the procedure with the rest of us. 


NEXT 
MEETING 
WED. 
SEPTEMBER 
ITH 


14 


ENHANCED BASIC 


Enhancements to Basic, by First Byte, Box 32, Rices Landing, PA 15357. 


Do you ever get the feeling something is missing from Atari BASIC? 
After all, lots of publication articles are about BASIC automatic 
numbering or renumbering programs. BASIC english error message 
programs, BASIC block delete programs, converter programs, and most 
of all, how to talk to DOS from BASIC. Well, as you probably already 
know, there's just so much you can put in an 8k ROM cartridge. But worse 


yet, Atari BASIC sometimes locks up, and Rev. B BASIC has more 


problems. 
This presents the Atari BASIC user with several options. You can buy 
a “real” computer (not unless it plays Star Raiders and Joust!). You can 


buy a full function BASIC such as Microsoft BASIC, or BASIC XL from. 


OSS. They are somewhat expensive and no always 10096 compatible 


with Atari BASIC. There are also programs such as Monkey Wrench from’ 
Eastern House and some other disk based packages which “enhance”. 


Atari BASIC. 

Well, a couple of months ago, | mailed $14.95 off to First Byte for their 
Enhancements to Basic program. ETB is advertized to work on all Ataris 
with a minimum of 48k of RAM and revision A, B, or C Atari BASIC. | 
really wasn't expecting much for $14.95, but hoped for something which 
would eliminate the half dozen BASIC utilities I’m always loading when 
entering and debugging BASIC programs. What | received far exceeded 
my expectations. 

First of all there was a letter of apology from the president of First 
Byte for the delay in shipment. It seems they decided to revise the 
program so it would be compatible with several Atari DOS's (Atari 2.0, 
2.5, 3.0, OSS DOS XL, SpartaDOS). 

The program creates a boot disk which customizes itself to your 
particular flavor of Atari computer hardware and version of BASIC. It then 
generates a disk based version of BASIC. This means 400/800 owners 


no longer need to insert the cartridge. XL/XE owners do need to boot: 


with the OPTION key held down. First Byte also claims to correct the 
documented causes of 800 and 800 XL system lockup and the 16 byte 
memory expansion bug of Rev. B BASIC in the 800 XL. This alone should 
make the deal attractive to the XL folks with Rev. B BASIC who think 
it's ridiculous to have to send another $15 to Atari to get a BASIC which 
works (maybe). 

Cold start boot displays a screen with your name, address, and serial 
number (how do they customize this thing for $14.95?), and a title bar 
across the top of the screen. The title bar indicates the type of computer 
on which the program was initialized (800 or XL/XE) and the type of 
DOS the program recognized at boot time. A menu then allows selecting 
three levels of enhancement: Half, Full, and Full with Trace. These modes 
use approximately 4k for half mode and 8k for full and full trace modes. 
Thus, the less the enhancement, the more memory for your program. 
It should be interesting to see if First Byte can modify the program to 
make use of the expanded memory in the new Atari XE. 

| first appreciated the display of error messages in english instead of 
cryptic codes. No more looking for the book. The next nice touch is the 
availability of a HELP screen. ETB then adds the following immediate 
mode commands to BASIC: Automatic line numbering and renumbering, 
delete a block of lines, display disk directory, rename disk files, lock and 
unlock disk files, format disk in single or double density, and list or change 
the variable names used in a program. 

Other commands provide for DOS access, protecting a BASIC program 
from editing, sending screen output to the printer, setting screen margins, 
key board lock, key delay/repeat rates, key click disable, hex to decimal 
conversion and a binary load file for recovering erased DOS 2.0S files 
is available. 

You can also set up the keys 4,5,6,7,8,9 and O in conjunction with 
the Control or Control plus Shift keys to print strings of characters to 
the screen with a single key stroke (if | could just get that with 
AtariWriter!). This is great for printer control codes and repetitious 
command or string entry. 

Last but not least is a program mode trace function. This function sets 
up an alternate screen to which program lines are printed as they are 
being executed. Commands are available to switch between screens at 
any time, allowing you to observe the lines which are the source of 
program bugs. This is great for debugging nested loops or for just figuring 
out the flow of that old program anyway. The documentation is relatively 
complete with about 30 pages of plain english and lots of caution notes 
to point out the got-yas. 


The program does take up memory space, but you are allowed to 


specify the level of commands you will need to use. Several commands, 
such as margin width, key click, key repeat rates, etc. would probably 
be better used if they were definable during the system setup. It would 
be nice if you could choose screen default colors at setup time also. On 
an Atari 800, the program crashes (dead screen and keyboard) if you 
fail to remove the BASIC cartridge. First Byte does give fair warning that 
ETB is designed to aid in the writing and debugging of BASIC programs, 
and that it really offers no advantage when simply running utility or game 
programs. 


First Byte offers a 30 day full refund guarantee. When is the last time 
you heard that on a software package? It’s really refreshing to find a 
company willing to put its money where its mouth is and offer a 
professional quality program at a very reasonable price. 

— Ron Robinson 
Florissant, MO 


PAPERCLIP 


Review by Mike Dunn, Co-Editor 


(Batteries included, 30 Mural St., Richmond Hill, Ontario, 
L4B 1B5 Canada, $70) 


For several months | have been receiving advertizments about this new 
word-processor for the Atari and how is was as good as or even better 
than the “big” word-processors such as WordStar, Perfect Writer, etc. 
Then the results of a contest in Canada among various computers and 
programs costing up to $20,000, reporting that the Atari version of 
PaperClip was not only the "Best Buy”, but comparible to the bigboys. 
Other than thinking that Batteries Included should be congratulated for 
being one of the very few companies coming out with a major new 
product for the Atari, | thought that they were sending me a lot of "Hype". 

| finally received a copy, and can say they do have a real winner, about 
as good for most uses as the "bigboys". 

You begin reading the very clearly written 155 page manual, which 
first tells you to back up your disk! The program comes with a “key” 
which plugs into your joystick for protection, allowing you to make back 
up disks. Similiar to the key from the Synapse program Filemanger 800, 
which is not too surprising since one of the authors of PaperClib is Dan 
Moore, the author of SynFile+. 

You can then customize your word-processor to your needs, setting 
many items such as screen margins (with scrolling to a larger than 40 
column screen if you like), the size of the two windows, color of screen 
(I like the black letters on white background), printer features for most 
any printer, including allowing you to make a custom one with 
microjustification, Macros, and many other items. You can even use an 
AutoSave to disk and use the editing arrow keys without the control key 
if you want. You can then save your options, and they will automatically 
come on each time you boot up your disk. 

When you start typing, the first thing you notice is the beautiful 
character set with true descenders which are very easy to read. 

Besides the usual editing functions whihc all word-processors have, 
there is an Undo command, Multiple Global Substitution, Tags, 
insert/overwrite toggle, and a Letter Swap toggle allowing you to 
transpose letters as well as a Word Swap Toggle-feature | really can use 
but have not found on an Atari Word-processor. For students, there is 
a word count. 

There are the usual Printer formatting functions as well as some 
unusual ones such as MicroJustification, three lines of Headers or Footers 
or both, and the ability to use a conditional page break (eg. to make sure 
a table is all on one page). There is also a very nice print preview option. 
Unlike many other word-processors, the editor options are different from 
the printer formatting, so you can make both the same or both different. 
You can use a 40 column screen and an 80 column printer, or an 80 
column scrolling screen with an 80 column printer. Double column 
printing is done by printing both columns at the same time, and you can 
print to the disk drive for modem use. 

There are also some special functons available — a nifty calculator 
for math functions which prints the answer, ability to make a Table of 
Contents and User defined commands, are just some of them. Mail merge 
is easily done, as well as Macros for “boilerplate” (repeating the same 
phase with a single keystroke). 

If all this is not enough for your $50, there are some utility programs 
thrown in, including a very extensive printer driver maker, and a graphics 
dump allowing you to display and print Koala or Atari Tablet, LightPen, 
Synirend, B/Graph, Fun with Art or Atari Paint pictures either with your 
document or by itself. 

What doesn't this program have compared to others? It does not have 
a spelling checker, you can only get 80 columns on the screen by moving 
a 40 column window, and when typing very fast (faster than | can type 
but Jim Bumpas can type 80 words a minute) it seems to lose an 
occasional character. There are so many commands that it is difficult 
to remember them, although the prompt line on the bottom helps a lot, 
as well as the built in Help files. | understand that a spelling program 
will be availble soon, as well as an 80 column cartridge — then PaperClip 
will have everything! | have not used the Writer's Tool (O.S.S.) which is 
Jim's favorite, but PaperClip would be hard to beat. 


15 


Atari Computer Enthusiasts 


A.C.E. is an independent, non-profit and tax exempt computer club and 
user's group with no connection to Atari Corp. We are a group interested 
in educating our members in the use of the Atari Computer and in giving 
the latest News, Reviews and Rumors. 


All our articles, reviews and programs come from you, our members. 


Our membership is world-wide; membership fees include the A.C.E. 
Newsletter. Dues are $14 a year for U.S., and $24 a year Overseas Airmail 
and include about 10 issues a year of the ACE Newsletter. 
Subscription Dep't: 3662 Vine Maple Dr., Eugene, OR 97405. 


**President— Dick Barkley, 2907 Wingate, Eugene, OR 97405 
503-344-5843 
Vice Pres-Larry Gold, 1927 McLean Blvd., Eugene, Or 97405 
503-686-1490 

Librarians-Ron and Aaron Ness, 374 Blackfoot, Eugene, Or 97404 
(503)689-7106. 

Editors — Mike Dunn, 3662 Vine Maple Dr., Eugene, Or 97405 
503-344-6193 

Jim Bumpas, 4405 Dillard Rd., Eugene, Or 97405 

503-484-9925 

E.R.A.C.E. (Education SIG Editor)-Nora Young, 105 Hansen Lane, Eugene, 
Or 97404 /503-688-1458 


Send 50c stamps or coin ($1 overseas) to the Ness' for the new, updated 
ACE Library List-new in May 84 ! 


Bulletin Board 
(503) 343-4352 


On line 24 hours a day, except for servicing and updating. Consists of 
a Tara equipped 48K Atari 400 with a TARA keyboard, 2 double-density 
double sided disk drives, an Epson MX80 printer, a MicroBits 1100E 


TYPESETTING 
FROM YOUR COMPUTER 


ATARI OWNERS: If you.have a modem, text editor, and com- 
munications program to send ASCII files, you should consider 
the improved readability and cost savings provided by 
TYPESETTING your program documentation, manuscript, 
newsletter, or other lengthy text instead of just reproducing it 
from line printer or daisy-wheel output. Computer typesetting 
by telephone offers you high quality, space-saving copy that 
creates the professional image you want! Hundreds of type 
styles to choose from with 8 styles and 12 sizes “on line’ 
And it's easy to encode your copy with the few typesetting 
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COMPLETE CONFIDENTIALITY GUARANTEED 
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PUBLICATION DESIGN, EDITING, & PRODUCTION 


Editing & Design Services 


30 East 13th Avenue be Eugene, Oregon 97401 
Phone 503/683-2657 


Modem; running the FoReM Bulletin Board software distributed by 


MicroBits. SortFinder 1.2 


A composite index of Atari related articles from 5 popular comput 
periodicals from Apr ‘81 to June ‘83, including ACE. Only $6 for AC 


Best of ACE books moos bom: 


Volume 1 contains bound issues of the ACE Newsletter from the first 


issue, Oct 81 to June of 1982 Jim Carr, Valley Soft 


2660 S.W. DeArmond 


Volume 2 covers July 1982 to June 1983 Corvallis, OR 97333 


Only $12 each ($2 extra for Airmail). Available only from: 


George Suetsugu 
45-602 Apuapu St 
Kanoehe, HI 96744 


PNTAR 
Computer 


NIHUSIASIS 





PM € e 


2662 Vine Maple D: £ugene OR 97405 


FIRST 
CLASS 
MAIL.