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THE BEST SELLING MAGAZINE FOR THE 

AMSTRAD PCW 




out 
of 

WNch ik&jMM te for you? 
our 4-page rountk|i 




LOCOSCRIPT • PROTEXT • SUPERCALC 2 



BROTHER FAX 

16 shades 

Touch Dial, Group 3 

£499 

FAX CARD 

CFAXSRi£199 



LC10 
145 



LC24-10 
199 



LC10 

COLOUR 

175 



FREE 1 DAY'S TRAINING (ahours. 

When you buy complete IBM 
compatible system. Well worth it. 

Call now for details 



ALL PRICES EXCLUDE VAT 



CANON BJ1 30 Ink Jet Printer C575 



IBM COMPUTERS 
DISCOUNT 25% 



TOSHIBA PORTABLES 
DISCOUNT 25% 



JEM 

COMPUTERS 



A500 + TV Modulator 
+ Accessories £299 

A500 + TV Modulator + 

Return of the Jedi - Custodian 

Mercenary - Warlocks Quest 

Zynapps - Hellbent - Powerplay 

Elmininator-28 Public Domain 

Games 

£320 



AMIGA 500 



Ram Expansion £99 



Second Drive £75 



COMMODORE B2000 

XT Bridge Board, 

Philips 883 

20Mb Hard Disk £1249 



SOFTWARI 



Full software list inc; 
LOTUS SAGE 

ASTON TATE MICROSOFT 

DIGITAL (GEM) Supercalc 

Mulitmate Ventura 

Smart Ability 

WordStar Clipper 

WordPerfect 

ALL ACCESSORIES AT LOW, LOW PRICES 
MIN 25% DISCOUNT ON ALL PTAS 



and 



SHOWROOM OPEN 

MONDAYS TO FRIDAYS 

9.30 to 5.30pm 



Call in to our 

extensive 
showroom in 

POOLE DORSET 



SAMSUNG 


3000 DD 


...£525 


3000 20Mb HD 

6000 SD 


£745 
. £895 


6000 20Mb HD 


£1120 
£460 

JG 

£1.99 
£2.19 


3000/Single Drive 

ON SITE MAINTENANCE 
COMES FREE! WITH SAMSUr 
HARD DISK 

21 Mb Hard Card 


32 Mb Hard Card 





COMMODORE 


MONO 


COLOUR EGA 


PC10SD £460 


£599 


£749 


PC 1 0DD £589 


£739 


£875 


PC20HD £779 


£989 


£1089 


PC 40 SD £1065 


- 


£1270 


PC 40 HD £1393 


- 


£1557 



ATARI ST 



Atari 1 Mb Explorer Pack 
£220 



Atari 1Mb + SM1 24 
£320 



SUPER PACK: 21 Games + 

Organiser Software 

Database 

Spreadsheet WP £290 



PCA20+ 
PCA40+ 
PCA70+ 
PAC286 



MONO EGA 

C1281 



£999 
£1119 
£1279 

£938 



DATAPAC30Mb £165 
38616-40Mb £1688 
386 20-40Mb £2099 
388 20-70Mb £2250 



£1290 
£1555 
£1216 

£1949 
£2389 
£2523 



VGA VGA 

WHITE COLOUR 

£1184 £1361 

£1270 £1482 

£1480 £1286 

£1089 £1286 

£1840 £2036 

£2262 £2449 

£2389 £2599 



AMSTRAD COMPUTERS 



PRINTER-' 



PCW 8256 
PCW 8512 
PCW 9512 

PC 1512 SD 
PC 1512 DD 
PC 1512 20Mb 

PC 1640 SD 
PC 1640 DD 
PC 1640 HD 30 



E312 
£379 
£399 

MONO 

£357 

£439 

£515 

MONO 

£455 

£509 

£685 



MONO 

PC 2086 SD £500 

PC2086 DD £560 

PC 2086 HD30 £720 

PC2286 DD £866 

PC 2286 HD40 £1040 

PC 2396 £1732 



COLOUR 

£439 

£519 

£599 

COLOUR 

£539 

£589 

£779 



EGA 
£634 
£874 
£865 



PC 2000 SERIES 



COLOUR 

£580 

£580 

£800 
£953 
£1126 
£1819 



12"HI-RES 
COLOUR 

£660 

£660 

£880 
£1040 
£1213 
£1905 



COLOUR 

£740 

£740 

£960 
£1126 
£1299 
£1992 



5'A" 360K External Drive for PC2000 £155 
SV<" 1.2Mb External Drive for PC2000 £165 



9 PIN 

MT81 £110.00 LX800 £150.00 

CIT120D C120.00 KXP1081 £120.00 

STAXLC10 £145.00 CIT180E £145.00 

Seikosha180A £115.00 LC10COL £175.00 



24 PIN 

Seikosha SL80A C235.00 LC24-10 £199.00 

NECP2200 £255.00 Epson LQ500 ....£255.00 

KXP1124 £255.00 



LASER 

Brother H18 £1400 Canon LPB8 £1275 

StarLaser8 £1230 KXP4450 £1350 

Hermes 800 £1099 HP LaserJet II £1270 

MT905 £950 



406 Ashley Road, 



TEL • 0202 • «•»> ET 



COURIER 
DELIVERY 

£5 



FUTURE PUBLISHING 

4 QUEEN STREET 

BATH • BA1 1EJ 

TEL • 0225 446034 

FAX -0225 446019 



EDITOR 

Sharon Bradley 

STAFF WRITER 

Tim Smith 

ART EDITOR 

Julie Barnes 

ART ASSISTANT 

Paul Morgan 

AD PRODUCTION 

Fiona Milne 

ADVERTISEMENT 
MANAGER 

Elaine Brooks 

PUBLISHER 

Kevin Cox 



FUTURE PUBLISHING 

THE OLD BARN 

SOMERTON 

SOMERSET -TA11 7PY 

TEL • 0458 7401 1 



MAIL ORDER QUERIES 

Sarah Richards 
TEL ■ 0458 7401 1 



SUBSCRIPTION 
ENQUIRIES 

Christine Stacey 

COVER ILLUSTRATION 



COLOUR ORIGINATION 

DP GRAPHICS 



O FUTURE PUBLISHING LTD 
1989 

3000 Plus is an independent 

publication Future Publishing Ltd 

have no link with Amstrad pic. 

We welcome contributions trom 

leaders - please enclose aSAE 

is If return of ff 
material Is required Payment lor 
'articles 

-..jrpublit 

We take great care to ensure that 



OPENING MENU 



H 



El 

m 



m 

m 
m 

E 

m 

m 



® 
® 
m 

m 
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ED 

m 



NEWS PLUS 

Clubs to join and products to buy 

DATABASES 

The best PCW buys are dissected 

LINDEX 

How to catalogue those LocoScript files 

CASE IN POINT 

Next year - in Protext 

ON-LINE DATABASES 

The PCW as a window onto the world 

ULTIMATE QUIZ 

The upgraded version of an old favourite 

PRELUDE TO A PCW 

Getting computerised? Read this 

SPEAKEASY 

David Wilson shares some wisdom 

SUPERCALC 2 

Tips, hints and traps 

LOCOSCRIPT PAGES 

Working with different-sized paper 

CP/M 

RPED explored 

GAMES 

Bridge spills and spooky thrills 

PUBLIC DOMAIN 

Another text editor - for nothing 

DAISY WHEELS 

How to avoid the mid-print crisis 

INTERFACES 

Which one does what and for how much? 

HEBRAIC TIMES 

Protext undergoes a character transformation 

KEEP IT CLEAN 

A spot of PCW maintenance 

HOW TO PROGRAM 

The finishing touches 

LANGFORD 

Sage reveries from our revered scribe 

LISTINGS 

Ready-made type-ins for your PCW 

TIP OFFS 

Page after page reveals the unknown 

GOOD SOFTWARE GUIDE 

Databases, education, comms and programming 

SPECIAL OFFERS 

Peruse at your leisure 

POST SCRIPT 

Readers' corner 

COMPETITION 

Copies of Micro Design for the lucky winners 




[U 



DATABASES 

... under the spotlight 




w 



CASE IN POINT 

Rabbi Goodhardt bends the PCW to his will 



I I II it 

PL4YEC 




E 



GAMES 

Crimbo goodies on parade 




INTERFACES 

The middle man steps out of the shade 



The Amstrad Professiona 
User Group is the officio 
support organisation for 
Amstrad PC, PPC and PCW 
owners. 

With thousands of 
members nationwide, 
the Amstrad 
Professional User 
Group has 
proved, beyond 
doubt, to be the 
essential add-on 
for Amstrad 
Computer Users. 




Members enjoy 

On-Line Technical 

Assistance, Substantial 

Discounts on Hardware 

and Software, a monthly 

Magazine, Newsletter 

and Offers, Nationwide 

Training, Welcome Pack 

and choice of quality 

Free Gift upon joining. 

Gold Card 

Membership is 

designed for the larger, 

possibly corporate user. 



THE ESSENTIAL 
ADD-ON 



Silver Card 
Membership is 
for the standard 
scale Amstrad 
User. 

For full details 
and our full colour 
brochure, simply 
return the FREEPOST 
coupon (no stamp 
required) or ring 

091 510 8787. 




r S-c 

Please send me Membership 
details of the Amstrad 
Professional User Group. 

I am resident in the U.K. 

Name 

Add ress 



Postcode. 

Day Phone Number 

Machine Type 



Send to: 
Amstrad 
Professional 
User Group, 

FREEPOST, 
Sunderland 
SRI 1BR 




uuiHim 




8000+ SY12 



NEWS PLUS 



FOREWORD 



Alive and kicking 

8000 Plus is now well into its 
fourth year and still, each 
morning, the familiar thud of the 
bulging 8000 mailbag landing on 
the editor's desk signals a 
temporary halt in the day's 
proceedings. It's nearly always a 
welcome interlude. 
The PCW, it would appear, 
is continuing to make its pres- 
ence - and its benefits - felt. And 
in unusual and increasingly 
diverse ways. 

From what we can see, 8000 
Plus readers defy easy categori- 
sation. As well as an interde- 
nominational core of priests, 
vicars and rabbis, we've got 
thesis-writing students, number- 
crunching accountants and 
family historians who can trace 
their ancestry back to William 
the Conqueror. 

Then there's the star-gazing 
astronomer contingent who 
blanch at the mere thought 
of being even so much as 
mentioned in the same sentence 
as their astrologer cousins. 
It's precisely this kind of variety 
that makes 8000 Plus very 
different from any other 
computer magazine you'll find 
on the newsagents' shelves. 
It's your combined input that 
continues to make Post Script, 
Listings and, particularly, Tipoffs 
the most popular pages in 
the magazine. 

Whether you're using your PCW 
to produce parish newsletters, to 
write your latest novel or to run 
your business, it's clear that 
there's plenty of life left in the old 
machine yet. Amstrad's recent 
spate of prime-time TV adver- 
tising bears ample witness 
to that. 

So the next time someone with a 
bigger and possibly faster 
machine tells you that the days 
of your PCW are numbered, turn 
up your collar and think of the 
latest wave of hardware add-ons 
hitting the PCW market. 
We hope that you'll continue to 
share with us news of your 
breakthroughs and the fruits of 
your labours well into the new 
year - and beyond. 
So Merry Christmas, everybody - 
and on with the show! 




Competition winners 



Last month's Typo competition has 
been won and what's more we're 
even going to tell who the winners 
are. Each of the three skillful victors 
will be receiving an lankeys Typing 
Tutor double pack. The packs not 
only contain the lankeys Typing 
Crash Course but also the Two 
Fingers or Touch Typing Crash 
Course. The problem we posed was 
to get from the word TYPO to the 
word TABS in three movements and 
by changing only one letter per 
move. Unbate your breath; here are 
the names. 

J B E Say of Colchester came 
up with the unusual solution Typo, 
tyro, taro, tars and tabs, and wins 
first prize. 

The other two winners were K D 
Fisher from Cheadle and Toby 
Thompson from London. They used 
the more popular solution of Typo, 
type, tape, taps, tabs. Well done to 
all three and hard luck to the other 
few thousand entrants. A new com- 
petition awaits you on the inside 
back page of this issue. It's your 
chance to win Micro Design 2. 



Speaking in chips 



SM Engineering of Pevensey, East 
Sussex have produced an upgraded 
model of their Speech Synthesiser 
module. We reviewed the original 
model in March and came up with a 
few quibbles. SM tell us that they 
have made the following improve- 
ments to the module. 

Instead of being a simple naked 
board, the unit now comes in a pur- 
pose-made steel box. You no longer 
have to use SM's own I/O (input/ 
output) interface because the unit 
should work with any 
Serial/Centronics interface. As a 
final improvement, there are only 
two plug-in cables to ease the pro- 
cess of connecting up the machine. 
Also supplied with the unit are a 
power supply and speaker. 

The unit is controlled by use of 
Basic listings and SM tell us that the 
new manual which accompanies the 
product contains several examples. 

The price of the unit is £35.00 
including the manual and power 
supply. For more information con- 
tact SM Engineering on 
0323 766262. 




SM Engineering have upgraded their 
speech synthesiser module 




M8 



by Tim Smith 



Capital City 



Amstrad have not had a good year. 
Due to various 'deals gone bad', 
1989 became the first fiscal period in 
the company's twenty year history in 
which they made less than astro- 
nomical profits. To put this in some 
kind of perspective, it should be 
made clear that 1 989 profits were 
£76.6 million before tax. Compared 
to 1988's £160,406 million there is 
most certainly a downturn in 
Amstrad's fortunes. But is it as bad 
as city pundits believe it to be? 

It is true that the PC2000 series 
of machines caused the company 
some headaches. Faulty hard disc 
controllers were to blame there and 
Amstrad were forced to recall the lot. 

It is also true that an investment 
in semi-conductor makers Micron 
is now worth two-thirds of its 
original value. 

These are just two factors in the 
tarnishing of Amstrad's previously 
shining exterior. The question 
which a number of financial analysts 
have been posing is whether 
Sugar will sell off parts of the com- 
pany. This seems highly unlikely to 
say the least. One year of unmax- 
imised profits does not a company 
crash make. 

In order to cope with all of this, 
Amstrad have been carrying out 
quite a major rethink. New manage- 
ment has been recruited from com- 
panies as diverse as the Mars corpo- 
ration and Gillette. This at least 
shows a slightly less parochial view 
than had previously been held within 
the company. 

A new subsidiary called Amstrad 
UK has been set up. This frees 
some top management to concen- 
trate on Europe, the United States 
and Australasia. It shows a realisa- 
tion on the part of Amstrad that the 



UK is simply a market as opposed 
to the market. With this in mind, 
the company have set up a central 
warehouse in Rotterdam (a mere 
clog's throw from the Essex coast). 

So with all this movement, 
where does the PCW stand? If you 
have been reading your Sunday 
papers and watching the television, 
you will have seen advertising for 
the PCW9512 and cut sheet 
feeder. This can only be good 
news for the those people who 
already own a PCW. 

But if the 951 2 is being 
pushed, does this mean that the 
8000 series is for the chop? 
This is the question we put to 
Amstrad's public relations man 
Nick Hewer: 

"When we pushed the 851 2, 
people thought that meant the 
death of 8256 - which didn't hap- 
pen. We have no plans for the 
PCW other than to keep on selling 
them. They have been doing very 
well indeed." 

With at least 600,000 PCWs 
already up and running in this 
country alone, it seems that the 
future of the machine is assured. 




Alan Sugar with one machine which 
hasn't caused him bother 




Dingbyte: What is the computer related word or phrase? 
No prizes but the answer's on page 8. 



Decembers 8000 PLUS 5 






THE WEST OF BRITAIN BUSINESS SERVICES 

You Must Add V.A.T. To Our Prices - Carriage Is FREE ! 



AMSTRAD PCW'S 



+ FREE DISC CONTAINING DATABASE, 
GRAPHS PACK, PSYCHOLOGICAL TEST + 
GAMES 

PCW8256 £326.00 

PCW8512 E408.65 

PCW9512 £447.85 

|~ WE ARE SANYO DEALERS AND THE ~] 

NEW SANYO RANGE IS HERE! | 

I I 

The newest products from Sanyo are now 
available from W.B.B.S. The MBC computer 
range is designed with the very highest quality 
in mind - and it shows. We use the MBC18+1 
386 model to run our own PC Network and boy 
does it run! If you are thinking of going PC 
contact us for full details or to arrange a demo 
at our premises. 

* THE EXECUTIVE RANGE 
I FROM OSICOM* POWER & RELIABILITY i 
I WITHOUT TEARS I 

I I 

EXECUTIVE 88/10 SOME SAMPLE PRICES 

20Mb HD/MM - Amber or Green £759.00 

30Mb HD/EGA £1067.60 

40Mb HD/MM - Amber or Green £825.95 

40Mb HD/EGA £1093.70 

EXECUTIVE 286/12.5 - WITH DISC CACHE! 
1MB RAM PLUS 12 MONTH ON SITE 
WARRANTY 

20Mb HD - Amber or Green £1088.00 

40Mb HD - Amber or Green £1328.00 

40Mb HD EGA £1599.00 

40Mb HD VGA £1675.00 

AMSTRAD PC'S - SOME SAMPLE PRICES: 

PC1512 Double Drive Mono £459.00 

PC1640 Double Drive Mono £535.00 

PC1640 30Mb HD Mono £711 .00 

PC2086 Single Drive 12" Mono £540.00 

PC2086 HD 12" Mono Display £769.00 

PC2086HD 14" Colour £859.00 

♦ ♦♦ LINK YOUR PCW TO A PC! *** 
If you wish to run your accounts on a PC but 
use your trusty PCW as a very cost effective 
workstation (and as a stand alone PCW!) send 
for details of Compact Accounts PC2PC 
system! 

OUR GUARANTEE 

I Is a bit special. If any computer or printer bought I 

I from us develops any fault under warranty we will I 

I collect, repair and return at our cost. I 

All you have to do is telephone! 

prTnters 

citizen range (2 year guarantee), nec, 
panasonic, epsom, amstrad and more! 



PCW HARDWARE 



I PACE 5.25" 2nd drive - with its own built in | 
I interface. Comes with free TDOS & external I 
I power supply. Very easy to fit. We use one I 
■for data transfer from PCW/PC/PCW! P.O.A ' 

MEMORY UPGRADE - PRICES DOWN. .£37.00 

PCW 2nd 3" drive (FD4) £113.00 

S.C.A SERIAL PARALLEL INTERFACE- 

With Real Time Clock £50.25 

WITHOUT REAL TIME CLOCK £41 .55 

MARGIN MAKER' - aligns paper £10.90 

SPIKE PROTECTOR PLUG - Helps 

protect against power surges £10.25 

I 1 

•• HARD DISCS - EASY LIVING** 

TITMATIC 20MB PCW HARD DISK ..£495.60 

VORTEX 40MB PCW HARD DISK. ...£495.60 

DIAMOND 32MB PCW HARD DISK. £459.00 

DIAMOND 48MB PCW HARD DISK. .£539.00 

THE DIAMOND RANGE CAN BE SHARED 

BY MULTIPLE PCW'S! 

DETAILS AVAILABLE ON ALL 

THE DRIVES MENTIONED HERE 



PCW 8000'S Wire Printer Stand £9.13 

Any width Printer Stand - Rugged £14.75 

Printer Cleaning Kit-PCW8000'S £14.60 

Mouse Mats £4.35 



MODEMS 



MIRACLE TECHNOLOGY MODEMS 

WS4000 £147.80 

WS4000PCW, c/w Integral Interface 

for the PCW & connecting lead! £147.80 

PACE - MODEMS 

LINNET-INTELLIGENT, V21/V23 £130.40 

Cable to PCW INTERFACE £13.90 



TTTTITTTTTTTTTTTTTTITTTTTTTTT-' 



BBD DUST COVER SET - 
SIMPLY THE BEST 

3 PCW8256/8512 E10.40 f- 

; PCW9512 £12.13 

• PC1640 1512 state col or mono ...£7.85 

■ AMSTRAD PPC £5.20 fc 

3, PACE DISK DRIVE COVER £5.00 £ 

OVER 800 TYPES OF COVER 
AVAILABLE! 
3 PLEASE STATE MODEL WHEN 

ORDERING 

LiiiiiiiiiriiiiiiiiiiiinrmiJ 



DIALUP-Commumcations Software £58.90 

CF2 3"FORTHE PCW/CPC X 10 £20.00 

CF2 3" FOR THE PCW/CPC X 5 £11.00 

3.5" ATHANA DS/DD DISCS X 10 £13.00 

5.25" BULK-UNBRANDED X 10 £4.35 

5.25" BULK-UNBRANDED X 25 £10.45 

5.25" BULK-UNBRANDED X50 £17.40 

DISC STORAGE 

AMS30L (AMSTRAD BRANDED) £11.00 

DS40L 373.5" LOCKABLE £8.50 

CT-3100 373.5" LOCKABLE £10.20 

CT-50 5.25" (HOLDS 50) LOCKABLE ....£8.50 
DS100L 5.25" (HOLDS 100) LOCKABLE £10.20 

PRINTER RIBBONS 
REFRESH! - BLACK RE-INKING SPRAY.E7.80 
Extends fabric ribbon life - will re-ink up to 30 
ribbons!!! 
EXCELLENT VALUE COMPATIBLE RIBBONS:- 

PCW 8256 Fabric (14mm length) x2 £6.51 

PCW 8256 Carbon Multistrike ....x2 £6.51 

PCW9512Carbon Multistrike ....x2 £6.00 

PCW 9512 New Fabric type x2 £6.00 

AMSTRAD BRANDED PRINTER RIBBONS 

PCW8256 Fabric or Carbon MS .x2 £13.03 

PCW9512 Carbon Multistrike x2 £12.17 

NEW! - COLOUR RIBBONS 
PCW8000 SERIES FABRIC: 
GREEN/RED/BLUE/BROWN/YELLOW/ 
PURPLE/MAGENTA or CYAN 

Any Two £11.80 

Any Five £27.60 

Any Ten £49.00 

I We strive hard to be the friendliest and i 
I most helpful place around with low prices | 
I and fast despatch that will bring you back i 
I for more & more I 

I I 

* MANY OTHER RIBBON TYPES AVAILABLE * 

COMPUTER PAPER 
11" x 9.5" Continuous:- 

SP/05 1 ply plain - 500 sheets £7.80 

SP/10 1 ply plain- 1000 sheets £11.30 

SP/20 1 ply plain - 2000 sheets £15.60 

DP/05 2 ply plain - 500 sheets £15.60 

DP/10 2 ply plain - 1000 sheets £24.30 

11" x 14.5" Continous:- 

1 ply plain - 500 sheets £9.00 

1 ply plain - 1000 sheets £10.75 

1 ply plain - 2000 sheets -...£22.50 

A4 - (TRUE A4) 80 gsm - Continuous:- 

500 x plain white/micro pert £12.90 

1000 x plain white/micro pert £19.95 

2000 x plain white/micro pert £33.50 

A4 - (TRUE A4) - Single Sheets:- 

Plain White - 500 sheets £7.25 

Plain White - 1000 sheets £13.75 

LABELS - WITH SPROCKET HOLES:- 

ONE WIDE 3 1/2" x1 7/16" - 500 £7.25 

ONE WIDE 3 1/2" x1 7/16"- 1000 £13.75 

ONE WIDE 3 1/2" x1 7/16 - 2000 £22.50 

ONE WIDE 3 1/2" x1 7/16 - 4000 £42.50 

NOT ONLY BUT ALSO! 

Contact us for Dictating Machines, 

Telephones, Typewriters, Shredders, 

Photocopiers, Computer Furniture, Video 

Recorders, Fax Machines, Satalite Dishes, 

Office equipment, and office 

supplies of all types 

I I 



SOFTWARE 



EVEN THE SCORE WITH THE COMPOSERS 
PEN - *NEW* - ALLOWS YOU TO WRITE 
YOUR OWN SHEET MUSIC ON SCREEN 

ONLY £56.00 

Mini Office Pro.Plus - not 8256 £29.00 

Mini Office Pro - suits all PCWs £25.87 

I 1 

SWALLOWTAIL SOFTWARE PRESENTS: 

PRO-EAZE PCW - Invoicing, ordering, 

settlement of suppliers invoices and many 

other useful documents - 

special offer only £15.00 

WORTH GETTING PROTEXT FOR! 

I I 

WORDPROCESSORS 

PROTEXT -THE FULL SYSTEM: £33.00 

Flipper 2 - not lor PCW8256 £26.00 

Locoscriptll £18.95 

Lococombo - Locoscript II & Spetl £27.00 

Locospell II £15.20 

Locofile - database for loco II £24.20 

Locomail II £24.20 

Locofonts £15.20 

Locofont II £11.99 

TAS-PRINT 8000 £10.00 

TAS-SIGN 8000 £20.00 

DIGITA 'E' TYPE-typewriter emulator ...£24.15 

M.A.S.S. EasyLabeller £21.00 

SPREADSHEETS 

Supercalcll £34.60 

Cracker II Turbo £34.75 

Rotate: for sideways printing! £17.00 

DATABASES 

Cornix Card Index - simple to use £25.90 

Mastertile 8000 - best general use £28.00 

If you are unsure which package 

I you need for your business please ' I 

I phone and we will describe the various I 

packages in clear jargonless terms - 

but leave you to decide. 

I I 

dBase II - the 'do all' database P.O.A 

DIGITA - Datastore II £25.20 

ACCOUNTS 

Money Manager PCW (NEW OUT!) £28.25 

Money Manager Plus £24.00 

Meridian Stockmarket £25.00 

CORNIX 

Simple Accounts II - PCW £82.60 

Job Estimating v2 £65.20 

Product Costing v2 £65.20 

MICRO SIMPLEX 

VAT made simple - A/Cs system £99.95 

Micro Pub stock £99.95 

COMPACT ACCOUNTS - NEW RANGE NEW 
PRICES 

We use Compact for our own accounts system. 
The best there is on the PCW! DETAILS OF 
THE FULL RANGE & STATIONERY 
CAVALIER SOFTWARE 

Inbusiness (integrated) £130.00 

Simple Invoicing £30.39 

Diner: RESTAURANT/TAKEAWAY A/Cs.£52.13 
Homeview: ESTATE AGENTS - program .£169.95 
Newsboy: NEWSPAPER DEL - program ....£52.13 
Re-Chord: MUSIC LIBRARY - program ..£26.04 
CAVALIER SOFTWARE: FULL RANGE AVAILABLE. 

CAMSOFT ACCOUNTS:- 
PSIL - Integrated. Stock/lnv/Sales/ 

Purch/Nom £85.00 

PSPN - INT. Sales/Purch/Nom £63.90 

PPAY - PAYROLL £32.40 

PSTK (AND OTHER TITLES) £32.40 

SAGE ACCOUNTS:- 

Popular Accounts £74.75 

Popular Accounts Plus £111.09 

MAP ACCOUNTS:- 
Integrated Accounts £104.20 



DTP AND GRAPHICS 



MICRO DESIGN II: NEW OUT- ONLY 

I £36.00 I 

I MICRO DESIGN II * LOGITECH MOUSE I 

£79.00 

Stop Press, Mouse, Interface etc £60.70 

Stop Press software only £28.50 

Desktop Pub & Mouse £51.99 

Master Paint 15.45 

Master Scan £48.50 

Master Pack £54.60 

Microdraft (graphic design) £67.60 



TRAINING 



REELTIME 

TOP QUALITY TRAINING COURSE ON DISC 

WITH INSTRUCTIONS ON AUDIO TAPE 

RT-Locoscript II- PCW9512 £29.99 

RT-Locoscript - PCW8256/8512 £29.99 

RT-Locoscript II - PCW8256/8512 £29.99 

RT-CP/M use your computer! £29.99 

RT-Supercalc II £29.99 

RT-dBase II £29.99 

IANSYST 

Crash course in typing - beginners £17.20 

Two Fingers To Touch Typing £17.20 

KOSMOS - LANGUAGE TUTORS 
Choose fromn the French Mistress, The 
German Master, The Spanish Tutor, or The 

Italian Tutor each at only £13.75 

EDUCATIONAL & FUN! 

Animal, Mineral, Vegetable £11.99 

World Wise £11.99 

TOPOLOGIKA - other titles available. 

Giantkiller, (maths adv. 9-16 yrs) £12.85 

Yes Chancellor! (UK Economy sim) £12.83 

REACH THE TOP WITH LCL - serious stuff! 

LCL: Micro Maths 8-Adult £20.90 

LCL: Micro English 8-Adult £20.90 

H Buy both and get £4.00 off total! H 
SCHOOL SOFTWARE 

Better Spelling - age 9-adult £11.99 

Magic Maths - age 4- 8 £11.99 

Maths Mania age 8 12 £11.99 

Better Maths - age 12-16 £11.99 

Physics - Chemistry or Biology age 12-16 
(each only) £16.00 



LEISURE 



***GET RICH QUICK - PERHAPS?*** 

Pro-Hunter (racing better aid) £39.00 

Pro- Pools (forecasting aid) £34.60 

*** ADVENTURE GAMES *** 

I Scapeghost!! £15.00 | 

iHeadcoach American football £15.00 | 

I World of Soccer £14.00 I 

I I 

Leather Goddesses of Phobos! £19.80 

Hitchhikers Guide to Galaxy! £19.80 

Tau Ceti II £15.00 

Space Pilot P.O.A 

Blackstar £12.00 

Fish! £16.30 

Lancelot - 3 Adventures in One £12.83 

Jinxter £17.20 

* THE PROFESSIONAL ADVENTURE WRITER* 

♦ WRITE YOUR OWN ADVENTURES!*. .£18.00 

Time and Magik - 3 games £10.22 

Acheton £12.83 

Kingdom of Hamil £12.83 

♦ •SIMULATIONS ** 

Heathrow Traffic Control + S.B £12.83 

A.C.E (Air Combat Emulator) £12.83 

A.C.E + JOYSTICK + INTERFACE £26.00 

Tomahawk - Helicopter Combat!!! £15.40 

Starglider-SCI F1 Flight Sim £15.80 

** ACTION ** 

Tetns £15.40 

Living Daylights £10.40 

Brian Cloughs Football Fortunes £10.00 

Head Over Heels £10.20 

Classic Collection II - 3 games £12.20 

♦♦TABLE GAMES ♦♦ 

I 1 

I ♦NEW-BRIDGE PLAYER I 

I GALACTICA-NEW^ I 

I** MASSIVE DISCOUNT*^ £16.60 I 

I I 

Bridge Player 2000 £10.40 

Colossus IV Bridge £12.00 

Clock Chess 89 - very powerful £14.00 

Colossus IV Chess £13.60 

Trivial Pursuit £15.20 

World of Snooker £11.80 

Steve Davis Snooker £10.20 

Classic Games 4 Compilation £15.40 

I Please note this advert constitutes just a i 
I tiny part of our range of products (see | 
I 'Not Only But Also') above. If you do not I 
I see what you need here please do not I 
hesitate to telephone - 



CALLERS WELCOME BUT STRICTLY BY APPOINTMENT PLEASE 
If you see anything we sell being sold cheaper elsewhere phone us before you buy - Office open 9a.m. to 5p.m. MONDAY TO FRIDAY. 

Postage is FREE but YOU MUST ADD VAT 
Export orders currently not taken. This advert constitutes an invitation to treat - not an offer. Goods & Prices etc. subject to availability - trading conditions available upon request. 

Alt trademarks ack. Cheques/P.O.'s payable to "W.B.B.S." 

WEST OF BRITAIN BUSINESS SERVICES DEPT 8/12, CAPEL TOBI, FFAIRFACH, LLANDEILO, DYFED. SA19 6PR 

TEL: (0558) 823782 SALES & 24 HOUR CREDIT CARD ORDERING 

OR PLACE YOUR CREDIT CARD ORDER BY FAX 9am-10pm Mon-Fri. (0558) 823923 

GOVT DEPTs / LOCAL & EDUCATIONAL AUTHORITY ORDERS WELCOMED. 





NEWS PLUS 



Strange enhancement 



The Mini Office Professional Plus 
saga drags on. Earlier this month 
we received a press release from 
Database Software which 
trumpeted an 'enhanced version of 
a bestseller to be launched for the 
PCW. The release went on to 
inform us that, "... it combines all 
the best features of the original title 
(Mini Office Professional) and all 
the major enhancements of its 
successor, Mini Office Professional 
Plus, but excludes the spell 
checker and thesaurus. The new 
package will also include All in One 
Business Computing, the book by 
John Hughes worth £1 1 .95, plus a 
new user guide and a quick 
reference guide." It continued, 



"Spell checker and thesaurus 
modules will be made available to 
purchasers of the updated Mini 
Office Professional for an 
additional £10." 

All this for £39.95. Well, this 
sounds suspiciously like the Mini 
Office Professional Plus which we 
reviewed in the September issue. 
The only enhancement seems to 
be that Database have removed 
the spell checker and thesaurus. 
On phoning Database we were told 
that the changes had been made in 
order "To catch the Christmas 
market and because there were so 
many problems we have not 
included the spell checker and 
thesaurus." 

An interesting point to note is 
the fact that the version of Mini 




Mini Office 

PROFESSIONAL 




An enhanced Mini Office Professional Plus? Yes, they've taken bits away 



Office Professional Plus which we 
reviewed and which did include the 
two now-missing modules also 
sold for £39.95. John Hughes' 
book, the new user guide and 
reference sheet also accompanied 
this package. 

The person to speak to at 
Database for more information is 
Chris Payne on 0625 878888. 



Is it a bird? 
Is it a plane? 



-No it's PCWSuperDOS from 
Encyclosoft. Many of our readers 
will be aware of CP/M, the 
computing side of the PCW which 
comes on your systems discs. 
Many people find it unfriendly or 
plain complicated and so don't 
make full use of it. This is where 
SuperDOS comes in. The DOS 
part of the name stands for Disc 
Operating System and is aimed 
at replacing the 'unfriendly' CP/M 
A> prompt. 

Encyclosoft claim the following 
improvements. 

The A> prompt is replaced by a 
desktop environment closely 
modelled on LocoScript's disc 
management screen. It introduces 
four new 'built-in commands' 
including COPY and IFNOT which 
the company maintain will be useful 
in batch files (we assume they 



mean Submit files). SuperDOS 
also includes a built-in text editor 
for keeping reminders and to-do 
lists. The system will require 51 2K 
of memory and, unlike CP/M, it has 
not been designed with hard disc 
users in mind. 

Aside from these two caveats, 
the system sounds like one of the 
most exciting developments for the 
PCW market for quite some time. 
If it runs according to the 
specifications given, it may well 
open up the non-LocoScript side of 
the PCW to users who would not 
have dreamt of using it. At the time 
of going to press, Alan Paterson of 
Encyclosoft was in Germany and 
unavailable for comment. The 
package should be on sale from 
December 11th at £29.95. The 
company provides an added 
incentive to the prospective buyer 
with a utility called PTR.COM for 
8256 and 8512 owners. 

This program provides a 
second printer command line at the 
bottom of the screen. This will 
contain information on current 
paper settings and printer codes 
(bolds, italics etc) all of which, 
according to the company, can 
be changed at will. PTR.COM 
costs £7.95 or, if ordered with 
SuperDOS, £34.95. 

Contact Enyclosoft on 
0270 811890. V^ 



CLUB 



The PCW World's your oyster 

A rather smart press release hit the Club 
News in-tray this month. Printed out using 
what we can only assume is a freshly re- 
inked ribbon (50p a shot for members) it 
comes from PCW World User Group. This 
group of PCW users are based in Cradely 
Heath in the Black Country. 

According to founder member Gerry 
Austin, the club now has well over 300 
members and is "...growing at a rate of 50 
new members a month." The club offers 
such facilities as laser printing for a price, 



PCW- World 

LOCOMOTIVE SPECIAL 



3 Packs of Locomotive software to be won - see inside 




PCW-World 's newsletter, very smart and issued 
quarterly. You'll be well chuffed. 



as well as ribbon re-inking. Gerry says, 
"While our prime intention is to advise and 
save money for PCW World members, our 
goods and services are available to all, but 
we must charge non-members the 
commercial rate. These are, however, just 
about the cheapest you will find." 

The club also carries a large Public 
Domain software library. This is said to 
contain well over 70 discs with more new 
titles coming in every month. Members get 
free access to this service (aside from the 
price of a disc) while non-members will 
need to pay an additional £1 copying fee. 
The library contains files as diverse as 
graphics utilities and the King James 
version of the Bible. 

8000 Plus readers of a 
technical/programming bent will be 
pleased to know that Geoffery Childs is a 
member and 'technical adviser' to the club. 

Aside from all of the above mentioned 
goodies and services, PCW World also 
publishes a rather impressive-looking 
quarterly review which is output from a 
laser printer. Members are actively 
encouraged to contribute to this journal. 

Membership costs £9.95 per year. If 



you would like to find out more about what 
would appear to be quite a professional 
outfit, you should call PCWWorld on 0384 
66269 or send an SAE to: PCWWorld, 
Cotswold House, Cradely Heath, Warely, 
West Midlands, B64 7NF. 

Fun while it lasted 

Mike Zanker of the Leeds PCW Bulletin 
Board wrote to us with some sad news. 
Due to the fact that he has moved to 
Newcastle to study at the University he has 
had to close down the board. It seems that 
he could not find accomodation which 
offered a telephone line. As far as we know 
this leaves the north of England bereft of 
any on-line club support. Is this true or is 
there anyone out there who can help? 

Pssst it's the Windsors 

The Windsor Bulletin Board User's Club 
has expanded, meaning that the group is 
now open to anyone. The club has access 
to a vast supply of good Public Domain 
Software as well as a 250MB CD ROM 
collection of their own: Contact Peter 
Cately at 11 Haslemere Road, Windsor, 
Berkshire, SL4 5ET. 







December 89 8000 PLUS 7 



NEWS PLUS 



Drive me wild 



The one thing which the PCW has 
never had has been a 3.5" drive. 
The 3.5" disc format is fast becom- 
ing the industry standard. Discs 
come in a hard plastic case, similar 
to those which the PCW owner will 
be used to. 

Compact Micro of Bradford who 
have been making 3.5" drives for the 
Amstrad CPC are now marketing the 
same for the PCW. Phil Craven from 
the company says that at £94.95, 
one of these devices would be the 
cheapest way of adding a B: drive to 
your machine. This price secures 
you a cased, cabled and ready to fit 
drive. At the moment the price differ- 
ence between 3 and 3.5" discs is 
minimal - if any. But with more and 
more machines such as the 
Macintosh and many PC clones 
making use of the format, the price 
is set to drop. 

If you wish to find out more 
about Compact Micro's offer you 
should call Phil Craven on: 0274 
636652. We haven't seen one of the 
drives as yet but as soon as we 
do. ...you'll know too. 



Clear as a bell 



Exemplar Design who specialise in 
desktop publishing add-ons for the 
PCW have brought out a new font 
collection. This one is for Micro 
Design 2 and is called MD Cleartext. 
John Evans who runs Exemplar 
Design says that MD Cleartext "..is 
the first Micro Design 2 font collec- 
tion to provide consistentt printing 
resolution for all users of the 256k 
page format.". He goes on to say 
that, "Unlike Micro Design's 
own fonts, ours are matched to the 
dot resolution available on the dedi- 
cated PCW dot matrix printer." This 
means, according to John, 
that you can produce clear text 
with the PCW. 



Along with the various fonts 
available are sets of accented char- 
acters for use in customised charac- 
ter sets. The cost of this addition to 
an already excellent desktop pub- 
lishing package is £13.50. If you 
would like to find 
out more about Exemplar Design 
you should call John Evans on 
0225 315131. 



More games 



Artronic who have just brought out 
the four game compilation PCW 
Challenge are launching a new 
adventure games package. Included 
in this are three games called Lost 
Legacy of Xim, A Simple Case of 
Espionage and Sir Lancelot. 

The compilation should be 
released by the time you read this 
and will cost £14.99. It seems like a 
fair price. 



Pommie winners 



Headline Communications, the cre- 
ators of Reeltime Audio training 
packages, have secured a strong 
deal which should establish them 
and the PCW in Australia. 

Free copies of a Reeltime 
audio cassette package will be 
included with every computer sold 
in Australia. 

Greg Wilkinson of Reckon 
Software who are the distributors 
down under says "We're confident 
that the Reeltime courses will revo- 
lutionise computer training 
in Australia". 




Hmdlim 

fBSJSSBMM 



Headline goes down under. 



CLEARTEXT 



Whole-pixel fonts 

Tor 
PCW MicroDesign 



What you see is what you get . . . 



Exemplar Design's new font collection 
produces exceptionally clear 256k pages 
on the dedicated PCW matrix printer. 

As indicated in Appendix II of the 
MicroDesign user manual, the dedicated 
printer cannot do full justice to Creative 
Technology's "half-pixel" fonts. 

MO CLEARTEXT is based on a whole-pixel 
design system which provides true "what you 
see is what you get* resolution on all printers, 
including the PCW model. 



These examples of CLEARTEXT output were 
produced on a standard PCW printer in the 256k 
"A4 upright" format. 



The main CLEARTEXT fonts can be adapted to 
include accented characters, chosen from supplied 
sets. 



RIGHT; A SET 
OF ACCENTED 
CHARACTERS 
FOR THE FONT 
ON THE LEFT. 



AAAAAA/taiaaa'aBCCcc 
ELtTeeeeHHHT finBWw 

UUub066o60UUUUuuuu 



PRICE £13.50 FROM: 

EXEMPLAR DESIGN 



P.O. Box 683 Bath BAI IXU 




Additonal fonts for the already well-endowed Micro Design 2 from Exemplar Software 



Joining up 



Verran Electronics are a new name 
in the PCW world and they look as 
if they've come up with a good idea. 
It is called the Verran AC datalink. 
The datalink allows computers to 
be linked to peripheral devices such 
as printers or modems without the 
bother, and expense of specialised 
cabling. The unit is heralded by the 
company as "the computer product 
of the 90s". It is basically an intelli- 
gent mains plug. One such unit is 
plugged into each computer or 
peripheral to be linked and then 
built-in microchips with their own 
smart software make it possible for 
coded data to be transmitted down 
the mains cables without interfer- 
ence. 

The AC datalink has been 
designed and tested in the UK to 
conform to the appropiate British 
Standard (BS415). This means 
that each unit is designed to cope 
with voltage spikes and fluctuations 
in current. 

Data is sent via the mains sup- 
ply in a stream of 'packets'. Each 
packet contains control information 
and bytes of data. 
To cope with potential interference, 
the unit checks conditons conti- 
nously and uses error-correction 
software. Several links can be 
achieved in one building 
by setting switches on the AC 
datalink to provide different 
addresses. You can even set secu- 
rity codes to make unauthorised 
'listening in' unlikely. 

The Verran AC datalink looks 
to be a cheap low-end way around 
the debatable LAN or Local Area 
Network systems beloved of 
small business who don't really 
need them. At the time of going to 
press we hadn't seen any of the 
devices in action, but we hope to 
remedy this state of affairs in the 
near future. 

Each unit will cost you £175 
and more detailed information can 
be obtained by writing to Verran 
Electronics Ltd, Cedarwood, 
Chineham Business Park, 
Basingstoke, Hants, RG24 OWD. 




Answer to Dingbyte: 
Artificial Intelligence 



SNIPPETS 



Sexist digs 

Oasis is a national organisation 
whose aim it is to combat sexism in 
software. There doesn't seem to be 
a great deal of that about in the 
PCW market (well, there is one 
strip poker game) but the idea is a 
sound one. It costs £3.00 to join 
and members receive six maga- 
zines a year into the bargain. If you 
would like to find out more about 
Oasis you should send an SAE to 
Sandra Vogel, 3 Alden Court, 
Stanely Road, Wimbledon, London, 
SW19 8RD. 




OASIS 



ORGANISATION AGAINST SEXISM 
IN SOFTWARE 



A pool in the desert of MCPisms? 



Music to your ears 

EMR have opened a Computer 
Music Learning Centre or CMLC in 
Southend. The centre should be 
well-equipped with state of the art 
hardware and software. For more 
information call 0702 335747. 

For the bod who has 
everything 

The strange device you see pic- 
tured below will only set you back 
£4,895 and is a Total Site Universal 
Programmer. It has nothing to do 
with PCWs but a press release was 
sent to us. So to mark the death of 
a few more trees, we thought we'd 
print the picture. 




Second opinion 

Would you like to air your views 
about certain products? We are 
aiming to produce some extended 
features on subjects close to the 
hearts of our readers. We are plan- 
ning a word processing feature and 
need to hear from users of the fol- 
lowing software. 

WordStar and Pocket WordStar, 
Newword, Tasword and any public 
domain word processing software. If 
you would like to be used as an 
expert source please write to the 
following address: 
Second Opinion (WP), 8000 Plus, 4 
Queen Street, Bath, BA1 1 EJ. We 
look forward to hearing from you. 



December 89 8000 PLUS 8 




See us at the 

SCOT" 

on STAND E4 



TYPESETTING = GRAPH1CS= FONT DES1GN~PAGE LAYOUT=TEXT EDITING— PRINTING^ 



» Runs on PCW8256. PCW8512 and PCW9512. 

♦ Fully compatible with Piles from 
Locoscript2, Protext, Wordstar, AMX Stop 
Press, The Desktop Publisher, Mini-Office 
Professional, Rombo Vidi Dlgitiser, Master 
Scan, and other PCW software packages. 



Gives very high quality printed output 
using the internal dot-matrix printer, or 
an external 9-pin, 24-pin op laser printer 
(HP Iaserjet+ compatible). 
Supports both the Kempston and AMX 
mouse systems (though not essential). 




EXTRA FONTS DISC £14 95 



tuport new disc full of foots from tar erostors of UicraOestgn 
Including lerger heedllne typofteos designed tt olios up to TSpt. 



irtcVATcndPtP 

FREE 

baehdad Caff/jrapHlcii CQLtlC CUWOV MI6LICK with MfcroDe«lgn2 when 
/V. tJi ordered directly from 

Outrigger Bd>WCl>ac|>« JBherwood ... 4 mamf mot* Creative Technology 

Tnis advert was designed, typeset and printed AT THIS SCALE using an Amstrad PCW85I2, UicroDesign 2 and a Star LOO 9-pin printer. 



(Recommended retail price £69.95) 

£59-95 55 

With FREE Extra Fonts disc 
only when ordered directly 
from 



10 Park Street 

Uttoxeter 

Staffs 

ST14 TAG 




TOP QUALITY PRODUCTS AND RELIABLE SERVICE 



[[guaranteed!! 



DATA TROLLEY 



STOCKISTS OF ORIGINAL AND 

COMPATIBLE (and coloured) AMSTRAD 

PRINTER RIBBONS, DUSTCOVER SETS, 

COMPUTER CLEANING PRODUCTS, 

PRINTER STANDS AND MUCH MORE — 

ALL JUST A PHONE CALL AWAY! 



CF2 3" DISKETTES 




Small 3" Storage Box (Cap 30) £9.95 
Large 3" Storage Box (Cap 50) lock £15.83 



(PUTER TO ORDER SIMPLY TOTAL 

III] YOUR PURCHASES, ADD 

m DELIVERY CHARGE AND 15% 

HI VAT. ALL PRICES EXCLUDE 

supplies VAT & DELIVERY E&OE 

SBS COMPUTER SUPPLIES LTD. FREEPOST (BR332) DEPT. 311, PORTSLADE, BRIGHTON BN41 1ZZ 







PHONE 

Our Express Hotline on (0273) 423523 
(10 lines, 24 hours) and order quoting 
credit card number, name, full postal 
address, daytime phone number and 
the dept. number below. 



POST 

Simply list your order, name and 
address, enclose a cheque or postal 
order (made payable to SBS 
Computer Supplies') or your credit 
card detais to the full address below. 



DELIVERY AND INSURANCE - UK MAINLAND 
ONLY 

1 . Supplies: 1 item ■ £ 150: 2 items = 2.00: 3 
items (& over) = £250. 

2 . Courier delivery only for computers, printers 
and furniture = £750 per unit. 

3. Overseas Orders Welcome — Please contact 

us tor delivery information 



FEATURE 



DATA-BASICS 

To rephrase an old saying for the new age: information is 

power. Databases can offer one of the most efficient means of 

extracting the power from information held on your PCW. 

Tim Smith takes a tour of the options and gets sorted out 



Put simply, a database is a computerised card index 
box. Like a card box, it stores information in an 
organised manner. But since when could a card index 
box print out selected details, search and find key 
words or put data into a typed page or spreadsheet? 'Never' 
is the simple answer. 

A database takes the hard work out of filing, sorting and, 
most importantly, retrieving information. One side of a blank 
A drive disc is capable of storing up to 1 43,000 characters. 
That's a lot of cards. 

One problem that manual storage and retrieval systems 
pose is the difficulty the user faces when it comes to cross- 
referencing information. You might, for example, have a 
paper file which contains details of your personal library. 
Say you wanted to locate all those books that include 
mentions of Czech lovers. If the card index was referenced 
by author's name, then you would have to search through 
the whole lot. With just a few entries in a card index system, 



even a small search can be time-consuming. With only a few 
more entries, the whole exercise can be transformed into a 
nightmare. A good database, on the other hand, can perform 
efficient cross-referencing in seconds with the help of a few 
wisely-selected words. 

Important and Exportant 

Finally, once you have been using a database for a few 
months, you will probably have amassed and stored a lot of 
important information. And you will want to do more than just 
look up information by calling it onto the screen. With 
LocoScript and Protext, Ascii files can be produced from 
database files and then data can be exported to other 
systems. This is invaluable when you use spreadsheets, 
desktop publishing or mail-merge packages - the concept of 
the paper-free electronic office revolves around readily 
portable information. Make sure you take a look at the 
import/export facilities offered by databases before buying. 



Roll me overlay, 
me down and do 
it again 

Both Cambase and Masterfile 
make good use of overlays. 
These files, recognisable by 
their .OVL filetypes, are 
separate but important parts of 
the main program. Program 
files run in an area of memory 
called the TPA or Transient 
Program Area. All PCWs have 
a TPA of 61k. If a program is 
too large to be run as a whole 
within the TPA, then it can be 
split into segments. The main 
section is the .COM file, while 
subsidiary parts are the .OVL 
overlays which can be called 
into the TPA when required. 
The only time you might notice 
this is when a message 
appears on screen saying 
something like 'Please 
wait.Joading program'. 



CAMBASE II 

£49.95 • Cambrian Software • 0766 831878 

Cambase II is a database packed with good ideas. It allows 
quite a free hand, for example, with the setting up of your 
records (the electronic cards). You are allowed up to 39 
fields per record each one of which can be defined as 
alpha or numeric. It also allows you to design where on the 
screen the information and prompts are to appear when the 
software is used, as well as on the printed version, or hard 
copy. If you are in the market for tidy printouts, Cambase 
could be worth looking at. 

This freedom can appear quite daunting to begin with. 
You have to go through an involved set of routines when 
defining record templates, or 'filspecs' as Cambase calls 
them. (With most databases, it's usually a good idea to sit 
down with a pen and paper to plan your record templates 
before touching the keyboard.) 

Cambase has three unique functions: Narratives, 
Processes and Loops. The explanations for these in the 
manual are confusing to say the least. The good news is, 
however, that Camsoft provide one year's full telephone 
support for registered users, which should help you get to 
grips with information-handling the Cambase way. 

The Cambase functions are, in effect, powerful 
formatting tools. The serious database user will certainly 
find them useful. A Process, for example, is much like a 
mini-program which takes its input directly from a file or 
from additional user input. Narratives, which are basically 
saved phrases, can also be used as input. Cambase 
Processes allow you to print labels, carry out short 
calculations and find averages using the data which you 
have stored. 

Cambase II has plenty to offer as a basic database. 



Series II Caabase 



Input tISI FILE M124851 I W 19 



AUTHOR'S WW: HUM BKKSS 

BOOK IIIU: The Cloaer and the Pior Peeps 



SUBJECT: 1 The Utholic Church in two;!. Plenty 

SUBJECT: 2 of nitty excorcisus and the like hut 

subject: 1 ueru little of ana literarj nerit save 

subject: I for sane extraordinarily long kotos 

subject: 3 



AUTHOR'S SIMM IIK3ESS 



EXIT to return to »enu 



jmrrum^irTgrEi 



Cambase II. More than a mere database, this program contains 
some very powerful features 



CAMBASE II 


PLUSES 

▲ Good templating facilities 
using Filspec 

▲ Powerful Loop and 
Process features 


MINUSES 

T Makes no use of memory 
so not for 8256 users 

T No in depth coverage of 
advanced features 


RANGE OF FEATURES 4/5 EASE OF USE 3/5 
PERFORMANCE 4/5 DOCUMENTATION 3/5 
8000 PLUS VALUE VERDICT 14/20 






10 8000 PLUS Decembers 



FEATURE 



CHIBASE 3.0 

£29.95 • Chiasma Software Systems • 

0633 60996 / 01 399 9758 

Chibase 3.0 represents a very healthy departure from the 
traditional card index view of databases. It labours under 
the name of 'free-format database'; this means that instead 
of entering selected data - like a name and address - into a 
templated 'card', you type ordinary passages of normal text 
- like a recipe - into an editor and mark out a series of 
keywords. These keys are then used by the PCW when it 
comes to retrieving selected data. 

Installing Chibase can be a bit of a nightmare, as the 
procedure is long and involved. A good idea is to make a 
straightforward copy using NSWP or DISCKIT and then 
follow the instructions in the manual. Don't worry - such 
copying only becomes piracy when you pass the discs 
on to a second party. Once installed, the program has 
immense potential. 

Text you have previously produced using your favourite 
word processor can be imported into the database in Ascii 
form. New text can be entered directly using the friendly 
built-in editor. Creating keywords could not be easier. You 
simply move the cursor over the word you require and press 
the [+] key. Repeating this over the same word will lose the 
highlight again. 

Chibase allows you to create a database as big as 500k 
in size but it is recommended that you do not exceed 150k. 
Beyond this size the search facility slows down and you are 
in danger of getting those annoying 'disc full' messages. 
Creating the database will require some preplanning. For 
example, you have to tell the system what size you wish 
your average record to be. If you are using Chibase to store 
magazine articles or academic reference material, it is a 
good idea to precis the text as you enter it. 






e near pyschotic Hadger Clan of the north appears 
of ?e Tribe?" , circa ffiB. 



{{This work is based entirely on received Myth and neglects to Mention the 
exquisite and intricate jjfflflj !STHEF tarried out by the tribe after the 
Monthly 3H3U slaughters. 



:fl More scholarly nark cones fro* 









Nadgers ind Norseum", circa 
century 
. Hore jttention 




Chibase 3.0, the free-form database which allows you to enter 
information like a word processor 



The freedom of use and range of utilities which Chibase 
offers set it up as a most powerful - and unusual - program. 
It will prove a boon to anyone who must process the kind of 
information that consists of passages of text rather than 
mere disjointed snippets. 



CHIBASE 3.0 



PLUSES 

\ Excellent text import/export 
i Good for book indexing and 
academic work 



MINUSES 

Won't run from the 
M drive 



RANGE OF FEATURES 4/5 EASE OF USE 4L 

PERFORMANCE 4/5 DOCUMENTATION 3/5 

8000 PLUS VALUE VERDICT 15/20 



MASTERFILE 8000 

£49.95 • Campbell Systems • 0377 77762 

Masterfile - as Miss Jean Brody would put it - must take its 
place among the creme de la creme. The installation 
process consists of making a back-up copy of the program 
disc. This is followed by clearing the M drive and putting 
the copied disc into drive A. Simply type MF8000 and 
you're away. 

Masterfile is what is known as a relational database. Up 
to eight files can be cross-referenced and linked so that 
information can be ported from file to file. In previous 
versions of Masterfile, this linking ability was only really 
useful in display and printouts. The latest version also offers 
the facility to calculate fields from different files. These two 
functions push Masterfile to the top of the list in terms of a 
business database. 

As an example of this relational power you might have 
one data file consisting of suppliers and prices and another 
containing customer records with details of items bought. 
Instead of having to calculate the invoicing for each 
customer record (each separate customer will have a single 
record) you merely get Masterfile to read the cost of each 
item from the first file into the second. You can add VAT 
rates, discounts and special offer prices to the calculation. 
Voila! Job done. With 1992 coming up, it should be no 
bother to include exchange rates as well. 

The only danger note concerns 8256 owners with 
unexpanded machines. Masterfile is restricted by the size of 
the M drive. The program itself makes use of overlay files 
from disc. 

Not only does Masterfile enable you to manipulate your 
data in calculations, its outputting and display abilities are 
also very versatile. Once you have input the data, you can 




wPaWCTHBwIBE 

Masterfile 8000: top of the range database software with 
impressive graphics features 



clarify or prettify the layout using up to nine pre-determined 
formats. Essentially these are templates for your data. Aside 
from the default format (0) you have a wide range of choice 
in your design. You can use boxes, large character 
headings, and grids. You can even improve the pixel 
definition for screen display. Most impressive. 



MASTERFILE 8000 



PLUSES 

'. Makes use of relational files 
, Great for flashy printouts 
and screen displays 



MINUSES 

■ Not suitable for 8256 
users; no use of M drive 



RANGE OF FEATURES 5/5 EASE OF USE 5/5 

PERFORMANCE 4/5 DOCUMENTATION 3/5 

8000 PLUS VALUE VERDICT 17/20 



Exits and 
entrances 

With Chibase it is imperative 
that you use the L command 
to quit. There is no point 
simply pulling the disc out of 
the drive and switching the 
PCW off. This is because of 
the way Chibase handles its 
files. All the index files it uses 
are lost unless you lock them 
by use of this command. 
Once an index file is lost the 
program has no idea where 
to start looking for 
information. Luckily there is a 
rebuild facility if powercuts or 
mistakes do occur. 



8000 PLUS Decembers!) 11 



FEATURE 



Make it easy on 
yourself 

To save you forking out for a 
database for your Christmas 
card list you can always use 
the FIND/EXCHANGE facility in 
Protext and LocoScript. 



MINI OFFICE PROFESSIONAL 
PLUS 

£39.95 • Database Software • 0625 878888 

One of the most successful of the Mini Office suite of five 
programs is the database module. It works on a fairly 
straightforward card index system. The screen represents 
one record (or card) per subject. 

You can, however, define a record layout to your taste 
using the quaintly-named Paint screen. This enables you to 
centre, underline and create text of different sizes. What 
makes the definition process even easier is the fact that it 
is carried out with the cursor keys. You move from field to 
field adjusting the length of each one with the left and right 
keys. 

Generally speaking, producing a reasonably good 
looking and effective database with Mini Office shouldn't 
be a problem. The only point to note is that leading spaces 
are retained. 

Where the Mini Office database really does score over 
its rivals, with the exception of LocoFile, is its ability to port 
data into and out of its own mailmerge facility. Calculations 
can be carried out using the Formula function. For the small 
business or club this can be invaluable. For example, the 
club secretary who has to mailshot members about a 
subscription rise can use a combination of mail merge and 
formula facilities to produce precise printouts. 

The Search and Sort facilities are useful, but do take 
a little getting used to. You find yourself leaping from 
screen to screen in order to view information. The 
most useful ability is the use of wild cards (asterisks) in 
the search fields. 

Most of the functions are carried out using the cursor 



Runbelou-Snith 
Holly 



Horld Books of Neu Vork 



Set in the windy city this is a 1 ' 
life fron one of the literary bra 
it lacks in depth it nakes up for in 






Mini Office offers a good basic card index system. The main advantage of this 
database is that the information can be used with the word processor's mailmerge 



keys which makes Mini Office one of the simplest databases 
to use. It is as far removed from the 'program your own' type 
of database (as illustrated by the dBase range) that you 
could possibly get. Once you have made up your mind to 
conquer the idiosyncrasies of the Mini Office package, you 
will discover an excellent database. 



MINI OFFICE PROFESSIONAL PLUS 



PLUSES MINUSES 

' Easy to design and use T Documentation not what 

, Has own mailmerge system it could be 

T Bad support 



RANGE OF FEATURES 4/5 EASE OF USE 4/5 

PERFORMANCE 4/5 DOCUMENTATION 2/5 

8000 PLUS VALUE VERDICT 14/20 



Indexterity 

Most databases make use of 
indexes or index files. At Last 
calls these IDX files. These 
work for the PCW in the same 
way as indexes in the back of 
books. For example, if you 
wanted to find references to 
Mad McMad clan in the 
Ratcatchers' Journal you would 
turn to the index and begin your 
search at the first page entry 
for Mad or McMad. The index 
files are also the first thing a 
PCW turns to in its search for 
specific records. 



AT LAST PLUS 

£39.95 • Rational Solutions 



056681 511 



At Last Plus has been a PCW stalwart since its first 
incarnation as Database Manager (At Last). The reason for 
its longevity is its quality. Rational Solutions call it a semi- 
relational database. A true relational database can cross- 
reference data between files. 

At Last Plus makes use of 'forms' which are different 
versions of the same file. Its cross-referencing occurs 
across these forms. This is still a useful function to have on 
board owing to the fact that different forms can contain 
more or less detailed data fields about the same 
information. 

The first thing to do if you decide to buy At Last is to 
find a quiet corner, sit down and read the manual carefully. 
After doing this, terms like 'SYS file', 'Constant field' and 
'Serial Field' will start becoming clear to you. 

The SYS file is the backbone of your database. It 
contains the raw format, record size, field names and types, 
which will be used to feed data into the other formats. The 
SYS file needs to be planned with some precision. 

Once the SYS file is set up, you move on to the first of 
ten possible files which can exist alongside it. Basically the 
SYS file is the parent while any subsidiary files you create 
become closely related children. Any other file created 
apart from the SYS file can make use of Serial and 
Constant field types. 

A Serial field is one which is assigned a reference 
number by At Last. This number then acts as a key for that 
particular record. As an example, this makes assigning club 
membership numbers much easier. 

A Constant field is one which takes its data from a field 
or element of a field held in the System file. This saves on 




At Last Plus at work - solid ar 
database wo 



> is the long-respected 
PCW 



future re-typing of the same information. 

At Last is a powerful database which is particularly good 
at handling name and address files. This facility will be 
enough to place it near the top of the pile for those people 
who need to keep club or society membership files up to 
date on a regular basis. 



AT LAST PLUS 



PLUSES 

A Good semi-relational 

record linking 
▲ Excellent formatting options 



MINUSES 

' Can't carry out calculations 
Manual is a little confusing 



RANGE OF FEATURES 4/5 EASE OF USE 4/' 

PERFORMANCE 4/5 DOCUMENTATION 3/5 

8000 PLUS VALUE VERDICT 15/20 



12 8000 PLUS Decembers 



FEATURE 



LOCOFILE 

£29.95 • Locomotive Software • 0306 
740606 

Probably the most familiar of all the PCW databases, 
LocoFile fits into the card index box format. The first thing 
to note about it is that it runs under LocoScript 2. If you 
have LocoScript 1 , you will need to upgrade before you can 
make use of LocoFile. 

As with all Locomotive products, LocoFile works on the 
pop-up menu system. It is also compatible with any of the 
other products from the range. This can either be a plus or 
a minus depending upon your view of the PCW. The 
manual which accompanies the disc is, as you would 
expect from Locomotive, straightforward and clear. Even 
the installation process, which causes so many other 
databases to appear clumsy, is quickly over with. 

To save you having to follow the manual blindly there 
are also several example databases which help familiarise 
you with the format. The only real change that LocoFile 
makes over other databases is the fact that it insists on 
calling fields 'items'; still, a rose by any other name... 

LocoFile has also been set up to make the most use of 
the PCW keyboard layout. For example, the [TAB] key 
moves you from item to item, the [PAGE] key moves from 
record card to record card. There is very little learning to be 
done before you get into your first database. 

LocoFile makes use of keyed items; there can be eight 
of these per record. The order in which record cards are 
viewed is dependent upon which one of the items you have 
chosen to be the key. Changing the indexing is easily done 
by use of the f2 ([SHIFT]+f1) key. This brings up another 
menu which lists the keyed items in the present file. 



1: wow WIJIIOC .MI LocoFile. 
Index: Authors Unique 

fl-Actlons f£ = Iiiiiex f3-lten f4=PriT 



Printer idle. Using B:H 
Item Keywords'! Col:Sl760 Line:13/lS 

fS-Goto F6=Find f7=E xtract i8=0ptions EXIT 



CONIEMS.DO 
LOCOCHbB.3 
LOCOCHhB.BH 
L0COFIEE.J0 
PBINIER .IS 



FiESTBNI .HI 
SIBFF .MI 
IIMEImBL ,MI 



laid Ml .SCB 
ULTIH2 .SCB 
UITIM3 .SCB 



LocoFile means never having to leave the Disc Management Screen. 
What more do you need? Ease of use and power in one go! 



Aside from its ease of use, the other outstanding feature 
of LocoFile is that records can be easily ported into 
LocoScript and LocoMail documents. You need never step 
outside LocoScript again. Given its user-friendly nature and 
the ease of start-up, LocoFile is quite probably the best 
database for avid LocoProduct users. 



LOCOFILE 



PLUSES 

' Runs from LocoScript 2 
Very easy to use 



MINUSES 

""■ Runs only from LocoScript 
Can be a little slow 



RANGE OF FEATURES 4/5 EASE OF USE 5/5 

PERFORMANCE 4/5 DOCUMENTATION 5/5 

8000 PLUS VALUE VERDICT 18/20 



Pah humbug! 

There are two courses of 
action to take if you hate 
paying vast sums for database 
software. Turn to your CP/M 
disc, boot up Mallard Basic and 
write your own. Mallard makes 
good use of Jetsam which is 
an excellent file handling 
system. If you can't be 
bothered then the Public 
Domain has plenty to offer in 
the way of databases. 



Off the record, John 



Most databases make use of terms that are easy to get 

mixed up. Here's the stripped-down 8000 Plus explanation: 

A FIELD: The smallest unit of information. 

A RECORD: The medium unit of information. It's made up 

from a group of FIELDS. 

A FILE: The largest unit of information. A group of related 



RECORDS. 

In the case of a manual card index, the plastic box 
itself is the file, the cards are the records and each 
separate entry on a card is a field. 

Database software acts as the referencing, sorting and 
retrieval system, doing the work of your brain and fingers. 



LOCOFILE 


MAX FILE SIZE 

Up to 81 9k 
(usually limited 
by disc capacity) 


MAX RECORDS TO FILE 

Limited by 
file size 


MAX FIELDS TO RECORD 

Up to 50 


MAX FIELD SIZE 

Up to 88 columns 

wide + 99 lines 

long 


MASTERFILE 


Limited by size 
of M drive 


Limited by 
file size 


Up to 84 


254 characters 


CHIBASE 


500K 


Limited by 
file size 


N/A 
(free-form) 


N/A 
(free-form) 


CAMBASE 


Limited by 
disc capacity 


Limited by 
file size 


Limited by 
file size 


Limited by 
file size 


AT LAST 


Up to 4 MB 
(usually limited 
to disc capacity) 


32,767 


20 

(also 99 elements 

per field) 


Dependant upon 
type: max 79 


MINI OFFICE 


Subject to 
disc capacity 


Limited by 
file size 


Limited by 
file size 


72 characters 



8000 PLUS DeCOTtK(89 13 



LINDEX 



RANK AND FILE 

When it comes to examining those LocoScript discs, Lindex will 
supply you - at the press of a button - with all the information you need 



Launches and 
appeals 

This year, the Bradford 
Diocesan Church Buildings 
Appeal launched its Festival of 
Talents scheme. Each parish 
was given a 'talent' of £100 and 
encouraged to find ways of 
multiplying it by the end of the 
year. Vicar David Johnson and 
volunteers from his parish have 
used the money to launch 
Festival Software Services and 
Lindex. The proceeds of the 
enterprise will help towards the 
repairs and extensions often 
beyond the means of inner city 
and rural parish churches. 



LINDEX 

£7 • Festival Software Services • 
0274 613300 • All PCWs 

One of LocoScript's least publicised features is the Edit 
Identity option that can be used to 'label' each freshly- 
created document. This optional label consists of a brief (up 
to 90 characters) description of the contents of the file to 
which it belongs. 

It is a facility which comes in handy when you're looking 
for a particular document. Instead of having to work your 
way laboriously through all the files on your LocoScript disc 
opening and closing each one to check its contents, you 
simply place the cursor on the file name at the disc 
management screen, press the [f5] Document menu and 
select Inspect document. 

The identity text that you keyed in earlier will tell you all 
that you need to know about the highlighted file: when you 
wrote it, for example, what it contains and for whom it was 
written. The drop-down menu allows you to insert a small 
piece of text like the following: 21st December 89. Letter to 
Colonel Huffington-Puffington requesting renewal of 
membership. Press [ENTER] and exit from the letter in the 
usual way. 



irt Jt=Ed i t document 

f3=File f4=GrouP (i 






: free 17 file 
group 4 
group 5 O 
group 6 O 
group 7 O 



16 files A:ADD 



•m Sf T^m—tt 



7 Ok 



A: ADDRESS 

O 1 inbo 



HEADERS .0< 



CHURCHDO.LTR 
CROAK .LTR 
SQUEALER. LTR 
TREAS .LTR 
HOBBLY .LTR 
HOBBLV2 .LTR 
8 hidden 



BLOOMER .LTR 

GROUPO 
A 



First page 
Last page 
Total pages 



To check a LocoScript Ifte's contents, choose Inspect document at the (f5] Document menu. 



===== LINDEX 
Catalogue of LocoScript Files with Identity 

[Copyright " 
* Festival Software Services, 



Bradford BD10 9AA * 



Select fn key to set program controls 
fl=Pisc change f3=File 



Press EXIT keg when ready to run Progran 
f5=Croup f7=Options STOP EXI 




Lintfex's [ft] Options menu: this is the drop-down menu you will need to access to print your index 



ICROAK .LTR LocoScript 2 



ocoScript 2 
ize= 2K * 5/8 



129th March 89. Letter to 
I Editor of Evening Chronicle 
Ire. Mad. Butterfly revir 



13rd Jan 89. Wrote to Mr Cr 
■requesting renewal of his 
Inenbership to operatic soc . 

13rd Jan 89. Wrote Miss 

I Squealer requesting nenbers 

(renewal fee 

list Mar 89. Letter to Socie 



Trie index will scroll gently down the screen showing you the contents of each file in the group or on the disc 



14 8000 PLUS Decembers 



Back to Lindex. What does it do? Well, Lindex is a computer 
program that has been written specifically to work within 
LocoScript - versions 1 or 2. It creates a list of all your 
LocoScript files on disc, group by group, with an indication - 
alongside the file's name and size - of its subject matter (the 
Edit Identity text we've just described). 

Lindex will also include non-LocoScript documents in its 
catalogue if required. This is a facility which will come in 
handy for those users who have made Ascii versions of their 
LocoScript files. 

Lindex is a program that is refreshingly easy to use - 
perhaps because it was written for those people who only 
ever use LocoScript. Installing it couldn't be easier. All you 
have to do is load CP/M to get the A> prompt, insert the 
program disc, type install, follow the on-screen prompts and 
away you go with a new disc that will load both CP/M and 
Lindex in one go. 

Cataloguing success 

The program's screens are clear and precise. You are 
presented with four options. The first [f1] option prompts you 
to place the appropriate LocoScript disc containing the files to 
be catalogued in the appropriate drive. The second [f3] File 
pattern menu should be used if you wish to restrict the 
catalogue that the program will create to files with names of a 
certain pattern. You might prefer, for example, just to 
catalogue all your letter files. You would, consequently, 
instruct the program to disregard those files that didn't have a 
.LTR suffix. 

The [f5] Group menu allows you the choice of 
cataloguing one specific LocoScript group of files or all of 
them. The [f7] Options menu affords a number of interesting 
selections. If you prefer to index non-LocoScript documents, 
the program will list the first 90 printable characters in the file 
to your screen. You can choose, at this stage, whether you 
want all your limbo files to be catalogued; in other words, 
those files that have been erased from a main group. 

The 'Output to printer' option is, again, rather self- 
explanatory. Once you set this option, (by pressing the [+] 
key in true LocoScript tradition), Lindex will print a single line 
for each file in the group or groups being catalogued. The 
program will print out the name of the file, which version of 
LocoScript is being used (1 or 2), the size of the file in both K 
and eighths and, finally, the identity text. 

You don't have to print out the catalogues that Lindex 
produces. Outputting the catalogue to the screen may be all 
that's needed to jog your memory. Once again, the screen 
presentation is professional-looking and easily controlled by 
use of various keys. Press [f1], for example, and the screen 
will stop scrolling so that you can examine the catalogue at 
leisure. Hit [STOP] and the screen will continue to scroll. You 
can exit from the program at any time. 

Lindex is a simple, well-crafted program that will probably 
be of unlimited use to any dedicated and organised 
LocoScript user who needs to know on a day to day basis 
just what each disc holds. Full marks must go to its writers. ■ 



EASE OF USE 5/5 

PERFORMANCE 5/5 DOCUMENTATION 5/5 

8000 PLUS VALUE VERDICT 15/15 



PAPER 



LOOK AT OUR RANGE! 

All prices per I OOO sheets incl. VAT 

11/9.5 60gsm Listing £6.45 + p&p 

11/9.5 70gsm Microperf £7.95 + p&p 

11/9.5 85gsm Letter Qual £9.95 + p&p 

A4 size 70gsm Microperf £9.70 + p&p 

A4size85gsm Letter Qual. £10.95 + p&p 

A5 size Letter Quality paper, 

Upright (Portrait) Orientation, 

Microperf all edges for letter-writing £13.90 + P&P 

□ Address Labels □ 

3.5/1.5, 1- or 2- across £3.75 per 1000 

+£2.50 P&P (any size order) 

□ ENVELOPES □ 

500 1000 

3.5/6 Manilla gummed £3.95 £6.95 

DL White self-seal £8.95 £16.95 

DL White Self-seal + window £10.95 £19.95 

Please add £2.50 P&P for paper/label/envelope 



"10-in-a-box" 



Smart, lockable disk bank 
with 10 CF-2 disks. . . 

£29.95 



inc. VAT & post 




(Box holds 20+ disks) 
*Box on its own £9.95 incl. 



DUST COVERS 



PROTECT YOUR EQUIPMENT! 

PCW 8256/851 2 set £1 1 .95 

PCW 9512 set £13.95 



orders 



SOFTWARE 



ALL SOFTWARE PRICES 



W/PROCESSING 

Product RRP Ours 

Locofile 2* 29.95 28.95 

Locomail 2 2995 28.95 

Locofont 24.95 22.95 

Locoscript 2 - 24.95 

Locospell2 - 19.95 

Locoscript 2 + L/Spell 34.90 32.95 

Protext 59.95 44.95 

Pocket Protext 39.95 28.95 

Supertype 2 24.95 19.95 

DESKTOP PUBLISHING 

Stop Press 49.99 39.95 

SPress + Mouse 89.99 79.95 

Desk Top Publisher 29.95 22.95 

DTP + Mouse 79.95 64.95 

Fleet Street Editor 49.95 39.95 

ACCOUNTS 

Digita Business Cont 99.95 79.95 

Digita Tax Planner .24.90 21 .95 

Cornix Simple Accounts 2 99.95 79.95 

MAP Integrated Accounts 143.75 109.95 

MAP Payroll 69.00 49.95 

MAP (Individual Ledgers) 49.95 each 

MAP Stock Control 69.00 49.95 

Money Manager + 39.95 29.95 

Sage Pop Accounts 99.99 74.95 

Sage Accounts Plus 1 49.50 1 09.95 

Sage Pop Payroll 70.15 54.95 

Sage Pop Invoice 70.15 54.95 




RIBBONS 



THE WIDEST RANGE 

-All include VAT & post free- 

PCW 8256/8512 

1 off 2 off 5 off 

Black High Quality fabric £3.95 £7.45 £16.95 

Black ExtraLife £4.95 £8.95 £19.95 

Colours* £4.95 £8.95 £19.95 

Multistrike Films £3.95 £7.45 £16.95 

PCW 9512 

1 off 2 off 5 off 

Multistrike films £3.95 £7.45 £16.95 

Fabric Black £3.95 £7.45 £16.95 

Fabric Black ExtraLife £4.95 £8.95 £19.95 

Fabric Colours* £4.95 £8.95 £19.95 

Lifetimes: M/Strike 100 000 Characters 
Fabrics 400 000 Characters 
ExtraLife 750 000 Characters 
Fabrics offer longer life and may be used with Refresh! 
Mix 'n' Match: any 5 @ £3.95 for £16.95 
any 5 @ £4.95 for £19.95 
*Colours available: Red, Blue, Green, Brown 



THE BEST OF THE PCW DATABASES 



9512DAISYWHEELS 



INCLUDE VAT * POST g TAy Q 

FOLLCWTHE Upwardly compatible with ATLAST PC 

M DATABASES »,, I JJf ATLAST PLUS 

*'Las< pi"« 39 95 29 ^ (2W<Y Special Promotion - 25% off 

First Base 29.95 27.95 ^7 "\V r *x,#*^ *« m- 

Cornlx Card Index* 34.95 29.95 -r>oo-flt ^•\0ll »^Q QS 

Masterfile 8000 49.95 36.95 ^£833^ Q\VlM fcfcW«»<»J 

Sage Retrieve 70.15 49.95 — ^ 

SPREADSHEETS 

First Calc 2995 27.95 

su^n : :::££*£ Courier 10 Prestige PicalO 

UTILITIES/GENERAL Gothic 10/12 Presti 9 e Eli1e 12 

ArnorMaxam2 49 95 39.95 Recta 10 Orator 10 

Arnorc 49.95 39.95 Script 12 Mini Gothic 15 

Comix Job Estimator 79.90 69.95 Th . pc . 

Cornix Product Costing 79.90 69.95 ' nesIS TO 

Knife + 19.95 18.95 

Plan It 1995 16.95 

Stockmarket 39.95 32.95 

Typerite 17.95 16.95 

LEISURE g, 

c r s r B 9 e is IS At last - a unique / Mfri/Tr 

M^ay?- ::::::£2 :s i^w ink spray that ii*£ W I 

Scrabble 1995 16.95 $,_, . ■-..-. • i_ |_ ■_ 

TimeandMagik 1495 1295 reStO^S NDDOnS 111 

•please state 8256/8512 or 9512 COfTtft H<i 



£6.95 ea 

inc VAT & post 



CAS PELL 

s 0202 666155 

- day or night - 






A NOTHING BUT THE BEST! A 

AMSOFT MAXELL 

£21 .95 for 10 
£11.50 for 5 

inc VAT & post 
*Disk supplies can be problematical - please enquire! 



SAVE 
£££s ON 
RIBBONS 



• Quick & Convenient. 

• Restores & Re-Inks faded ribbons 
In seconds! 

• Refreshed ribbon lubricates print 
head for smoother running & 
enhanced printer life. 

• Use on any. fabric ribbon... 
again and again) 

• Pays for Itself the first Ivjo. times 
you use tt 




HEAD CLEANERS 



Improve the performance ot your drive 

CASPELL COMPUTER. 43 Emerson Road, Poole, Dorset, BH15 1QS 




Hff uilffS'Sr 




Cheques/POs (no stamp needed) 

CASPELL COMPUTER SERVICES 

Dept 8k, FREEPOST, Poole Dorset BH15 1BR 
Tel: 0202 666155 or 0202 35650 (24-hr) 

TRADE ENQUIRES I LOCAL AUTHORITY ORDERS WELCOMED I 



a HH HBB Bw 



■■"■ mmM 



•■•. 7' ■■•/■' V-- :■•■■■ 



this Christmas 



h«s9 




Loo 



71 



if new Word Pi 



oScript 2 



An 



ad PCW 82 



or for 



nir 



56 8512 



Buy it 
LocoScript 2 



/ 



^^^MiSl^Sa4^£ : fct:*^#lf^ 




LocoScript 2 is faster and easier to use than the 
LocoScript word processor supplied with your 
PCW 8256/85 12. It offers you more characters and 
symbols and the ability to use over 300 different 
printers other than the PCW's built-in printer. With 
LocoSpell, the integrated spelling checker you can 
spot typing errors, use the word count facility and 
look up the spelling of difficult words. 

For only £34.90 you'll get more 
from your PCW than ever before 



Please send me the following: 



LocoScript 2 & LocoSpell £34.90 □ 
Please send me details of , — , 
the LocoScript 2 family I I 

Name 



Lj I enclose a cheque for total£ , 

| Please charge my Access/Visa card 



1 I I 



I l l 



I l l 



I I I 



□ 



Address. 



Signed 



Send to Katy Buchan at: 



Postcode . 




Note: All prices include VAT and UK postage TEL 0306 740606 



LOCOMOTIVE 
SOFTWARE 

Dorking, 
Surrey, RH4 1YL 



CASE IN POINT 






RABBINICAL EXCERPTS 

Rabbi Ian Goodhardt recounts his turbulent adventures with the PCW 




Reading rabbi Ian Goodhardt relaxes at home with a copy of the Jewish Chronicle 
not produced, we hasten to add, on his PCW! 



! 



i 



t can play noughts and crosses.' This was my first 
alluring introduction to computerdom. My father was 
then working at Thames Polytechnic in South 
London and, in my school holidays, he would take 
me down there to play around on the computer. The 
machine itself was a mainframe which hummed quietly 
away in a large building many miles away. My only contact 
with it was through the keyboard and printer in 
front of me which seemed to chunter away almost 
independently of anything else. It reminded me of the 
famous Grandstand teleprinter which came to immortalise 
those Saturday afternoons spent in front of the television as 
it punched the latest football results across the page. 

So I would sit there playing Star Trek, Mastermind, 
Lander and all those other old number games that a 
host of distant and anonymous undergraduates had 
written as exercises in Basic. A few months later, my 
father brought home a Z80 research machine (based on 
the same chip that the PCW has) and encourged me to 
have a go. 

He'd taught himself Basic; why shouldn't I, I thought? 
Well, I got as far as writing a program which told you 
how old you were if you entered the year you were 
born - but that was about it. When he kindly offered to 
buy me a BBC microcomputer for my 18th birthday, I had to 
tell him that I couldn't really see what I would use it for. I 
secretly suspected that he'd conceived the idea in much 
the same way as the car mechanic who decides to buy his 
wife a torque wrench. Or like the arrival of 'my' trainset 
years earlier. He looked more than a little crest-fallen. 



Screen gazing 

This early dabbling strengthened my interest in computers; it 
was further reinforced when I decided to undertake a short 
computing course some years later at university. The fruits 
of this learning included a short program which generated 
horoscope predictions. It has to be said, however, that the 
predictions were selected at random from a stored pool of 
consequences. One lady, obviously looking forward to a 
favourable outcome of some description, declared that the 
predictions must be true since a computer 'had ordained' 
that it was to be so. 

It wasn't until the PCW arrived on the scene that I 



decided I would go ahead and buy my own 
computer. It was a machine that could bring 
computing, for the very first time, within reach 
of those who had only a relatively modest 
three-figured sum of money at their disposal. 
I had also just started training for the 
rabbinate at this time and knew that I would 
be sent to study at either Gateshead or 
London. I promised myself that if the 
Gateshead option didn't materialise, I would 
buy myself a PCW. 

I secured a ticket to the confusingly titled 
PCW show at Olympia a couple of days after 
the launch of the PC1512. I asked the sales 
lady which of the two machines - the PC or 
the PCW - would be the best buy for me and 
she, in turn, asked me why I wanted a 
computer. What exactly did I want to use it 
for, she asked. I had to confess rather lamely 
that I didn't really know. I just felt that I had to 

have one. I was convinced that it would eventually come in 

handy for some - as yet - undesignated task. 



Observing the speed limits 

A couple of weeks later, therefore, I was seen tottering my 
way precariously around Brent Cross under the burden of a 
large square box which looked to be fairly bursting with 
potentiality. 

I found LocoScript quite easy to master. An hour a day 
had it cracked in just over a week. Protext's unequalled 
speed, on the other hand, seduced me into making what was 
to prove an invaluable purchase almost as soon as the 
program was launched. I can't enthuse about it enough. 
Protext is, by far, one of the best pieces of software I have 
ever had the pleasure to use. What can I say? It does 
everything I need and more. The Arnor team are clever, 
courteous and dedicated and have spent what probably 
amounts to a fair few hours getting to grips with various 
problems that I confidently tossed their way. 

Getting the PCW to print out the Hebrew characters so 
desperately needed during the course of my studies was a 
major stumbling block. Once I'd hit upon the magic formula, 
which consisted of redefining rarely-used Protext characters 
for both the screen and printer, I had to work out how to enter 
them into the computer on a right to left basis. Arnor's 
Douglas Thompson applied his mind to the teaser and 
quickly hit upon the perfect solution. A fuller article describing 
how we got to grips with the problem is included later on in 
the magazine. 

My PCW printer, unfortunately, would still only print the 
Hebrew characters out in draft mode. Amstrad steadfastly 
refused to think their way around the problem and repeatedly 
told me that an improvement on the existing situation would 
be 'virtually impossible.' 

The incredible shrinking program 

Perhaps a desktop publishing program would provide the 
answer? 

I had just become Youth Minister in Stanmore and had 
decided that I would produce, with the help of my PCW, a 
regular magazine called 'Tze'irut'. The necessity of finding a 
way to print out Near Letter Quality Hebrew characters was 
becoming urgent. 






What a star! 

The Star LC24-10 has 
changed my life. The fast, 
high-quality printout is 
definitely a sight for sore 
eyes. I also have a sheet- 
feeder - something of a 
luxury at the price - but it 
inserts page after page into 
the printer without any 
interference from me. 
For further information on 
the full range of printers 
Star offer, call 01 840 1800. 



17 8000 PLUS Decembers 



CASE IN POINT 



Tracts in the Know 

Ian Goodhardt is the Rabbi of the Reading Hebrew 
Congregation in Berkshire. He is married with two sons 
and has been interested in computers for as long as he 
can remember; the PCW is, however, the first one he has 
actually owned. 

He has a Philosophy degree from Birmingham 
University which he completed - with a subsidiary course 
in Computer Studies ■ in 1983. He then embarked on the 
five year training course at Jews' College in London to 
become a rabbi. When it came to computers, he found 
himself suddenly in the classic situation of the one-eyed 
man in the kingdom of the blind. He persuaded the 
college to buy a PCW for the receptionist and then to get 
Protext for all the PC users as well. 

The PCW has more than earned its keep within his 
own community. As well as the Hebrew calendar project 
which nets about £600 per year for the communities 
funds, the machine also comes in handy for keeping a 
database of synagogue members and sending out 
personalized mailings. 

The Reading Community comprises about 200 
families and is growing quite fast. "Being in Silicon 
Valley we have lots of members who work in the 
computer industry. I think my own knowledge of 
computers makes them take me a bit more seriously 
when I get on to more spiritual matters too. In that sense, 
I'm just one of the boys." 




Fleet Street Editor Plus was good - but not that good. 
Time after time I came up against the same problems: trying 
to insert text that had been either imported from a word 
processor or written in the program's text editor onto the 
finished page proved impossible. Pre-defined boxes would 
shrink impossibly as the last letters of text were being 
entered. The program would frequently crash without any 
warning thus losing several hours' work at a time. It was all 
rather irritating. 

I decided to try my luck with another heavily 
recommended DTP program, Stop Press. It has two 
problems: the first one is the lack of a legible small typeface, 
although defining one is not that difficult; the second, which 
such program designers should perhaps address, is its 
unsuitability to run a 24-pin printer driver. The Hebrew 
printout remained a problem. 

In January this year I succumbed to the temptation and 
bought a Star LC24-10 in a final bid to print out my beloved 
Protext-defined Hebrew characters in Near Letter Quality. It 
worked. The Star turned out to be one of the best purchases I 
I ever made. As well as getting on with 'Tze'irut,' I could turn 
my attention to another project I was beginning. 

You see, apart from the usual activities with which I must 
get involved as a rabbi, I also produce on my PCW upto 200 
Jewish Filofax-sized calendars which are distributed around 
the country in time for the start of the Jewish new year in 
September. Each calendar was taking up to 50 minutes for 
my PCW dot matrix to print out. When you multiply that by 
200, you know you're in for a long night. 

My primary considerations, therefore, in purchasing the 
Star were the speed and the quality with which it would print 
out these calendars. On both scores, it has proved a very 
efficient machine. 

Day by day 

Being a rabbi with what is often a rather hectic time 
schedule, I found that conventional calendars were of little 
or no use. I decided to design a calendar that would be 
specifically Jewish. It records, for example, exactly what 



time the Sabbath starts each week 
(did you know that there 
is a three-minute time difference 
between London and Reading?) It 
records all the major Jewish festivals 
as well as the English date (which is 
solar) and the Hebrew date (which is 
lunar). It also includes details of 
each week's reading which is 
the same throughout the world. 
And it's all written and designed in 
Protext. 

The only trouble is that the 
file which sends the definitions of 
the Hebrew characters to the 
Star printer is a massive 8K long 
and consists entirely of numbers. 
I managed to work it all out on a 
piece of old-fashioned squared 
paper during a particularly tedious 
holiday that I was forced to endure 
at the time. 

I could have used a Basic 
listing in the printer manual which 
enables you to define the characters 
graphically, but that was 630 lines 
long. After typing, debugging and so 
on, the listing would almost certainly 
have reached the kind of dimensions 
that even Tolstoy would have been 
proud of. 



Mind the gap 

The dawning of the Mini Office era looked like it would be a 
glorious one. Every marketing man's dream, I found myself 
powerless to resist the hype that its arrival occasioned. 
Accolades such as 'You'd be doing well to get one of these 
programs for the price, let alone one' and 'Mini Office does 
for software what the PCW did for hardware' were certainly 
not lost on me. 

I have to confess, however, that my Mini Office epoch 
was not, on the whole, a happy one. I found the limitations 
necessarily imposed on all five modules frustrating for my 
purposes and felt that pooling my resources to spend a little 
more money on a more robust, specialised program would 
have been better in the long run. 

Although I had no use for the spreadsheet, I didn't like 
the way the mailmerge facility left spaces in the letters or the 
way the database could only be manipulated by record 
number. The package did show me, however, that I could 
make constructive use of a database. I had discovered that a 
computer is good at handling monotonous repetitive tasks 
and a piece of software is only worthwhile if, like Protext, it 
can take the drudgery out of performing those tasks. To my 
way of thinking, a database should have a facility which 
enables you to input repeated data into corresponding fields 
across a number of different records. When I find one that 
can do these things, I will buy it. 

Protext has more than made up for the frustrations 
suffered at the hands of Mini Office. With its help, my PCW 
has proved invaluable in getting me through my exams, 
writing sermons, producing a youth magazine and keeping 
track of synagogue members' records and sending out 
personalised mailing lists. I was right after all: it did come in 
handy for something. ■ 



If you would like to know all the gory details of 

how Ian finally persuaded Protext to produce and 

print out Hebrew characters, turn to page 55. 









18 8000 PLUS i 



LocoFont 




MODERN : After disconnecting the 
mains power... 



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Good little runner... 



jgjCj gag£i§& ! 3t)e »li> Antique* 
Shop, 2T Gibe Square, West Street 



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to you - and iortgen tunce we met... 



DEC*; 

&vacade> IPear with prawns 



ROMAN : The minutes of the 
meeting were accepted... 



DEFINITE : We have been forced 
to adopt a tougher approach... 



SANS SERIF : Taking this as our 
hypothesis, we can... 



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SG£i££: We're ^tad to hear itvad, 
you/ enjoyed the surprise party... 



M IN I 1 S / 1 / : T h i s package is supplied 
on the terms shown below. . . 



STANDARD : Please find enclosed 
confirmation of your order... 



Mint Pb : A word processor provides a 
facility to create documents... 



1 Please send me the following for LocoScript 2: 

I LocoFont for the PCW8256/8512 Printer 

I Set 1 - Standard, Sans Serif, Roman, Script, 

I Copper Plate, Deco, Definite, Capitals, Finesse and Modern 

Set 2 - Standard, Sans Serif, Penman, Old English, 

Mini 15/17 and Mini PS 

Set 1 and Set 2 together 

LocoFont 24 for the 24 Pin Dot Matrix Printer 

Text Set - Roman, Definite. Capitals, Finesse and Mini PS 

Display Set - Penman, Old English, Deco, 
I Script and Copper Plate 

| To use LocoFont 24 you need the 
■ 24 Pin Printer Drivers Disc 



£19.95 □ 

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£24.95 □ 

£24.95 □ 



Name. 



Address. 



O I enclose a cheque for total£ 

I I Please charge my Access/Visa card exp Date 



i i i 



i i i 



i i i 



Signed 

Send to Katy Buchan at: 

LOCOMOTIVE 
SOFTWARE 




Postcode ! 3MEWJI Dorking, 

Note: All prices include VAT and UK postage TEL 0306 740606 Surrey, RH4 1 YL 




Tony Dennis shows you how your PCW can gather and process 
far-flung information using on-line databases 



« 1 ack in the bad old days when the mainframe ruled the 
I J roost, it was a costly undertaking to put information 



ra 

1 1 into digital form whereby it could easily be accessed. 
" <* Many companies decided.to offset this expense by 
making their data files available to other users - for a fee of 
course. In this way the on-line database was born. 

Firms who had spotted the advantage of publishing 
information in this manner appeared on the scene. They have 
subsequently produced on-line databases in their own right 
for commercial purposes. As far as the world of 
communications jargon is concerned, these firms are known 
as information providers. 



How much will it cost? 

This is one of the most difficult parts to gauge. Firstly, the user has the cost of the actual telephone 
call itself. If the user is located outside London or far enough away from the host computers that the 
call is not a local one, then it might well be worth considering using a dedicated data network such 
as BT's Packet SwitchStream (PSS) or Mercury's 5000 Service. 

For those intending frequent and lengthy consultations with on-line databases, these networks 
will prove cheaper. For the average user, however, dialling directly will be far less complicated and 
probably just as cheap. Databases might charge in a variety of manners. Connection charges for 
time spent actually on the system itself are very common. Additionally, the system might charge for 
the number of characters transmitted and received or for the number of records accessed. 

Some databases even charge for the speed at which they are accessed. Hence those calling at 
1200 bits per second (bps) or even 2400 bps (twice as fast) may be charged extra. One way of 
avoiding vast on-line access charges is to request a printout of a particular document. This will 
usually arrive the next day. 

Let's take as an example the Password database. The service is aimed at those in the process 
control industry and holds records on a wide range of sensors, transmitters, chemical analysers and 
self-tuning controllers. The details were supplied by companies like Honeywell, Foxboro and 
Rosemount. The information provider is a company called INDEX-i but the database can be accessed 
via a gateway on Telecom Gold. 

For those who aren't already subscribing to Telecom Gold, joining Password would cost £35 or 
£75. To search the Password database, it costs £1 per minute; users can, however, opt to pay 
£27.50 per month for unlimited access time. The cost doesn't stop here though, because the 
PCW user still has to pay the cost of the telephone call - between 2p and 6.5p 
per minute to be connected to Telecom Gold and between 1p and 4p to send or receive blocks 
of 512 characters. Thus calculating how much the service will cost is roughly akin to asking "How 
long is a piece of string?". 



20 8000 PLUS December 89 









m 










■■<■■'■■■■ '■; ' 





























The existence of such databases effectively means that 
there is a wealth of information already in digital form which 
can be downloaded to your PCW. On-line databases can also 
take the pain out of research. Searching with carefully chosen 
keywords or phrases saves hours wasted in wading through 
books and magazines looking for relevant articles. There is, 
however, something of a catch 22 situation with on-line 
databases: it is not always easy to discover exactly what 
information is held on-line and how applicable it might be to a 
specific requirement. 

Getting started 

There are two major routes to ascertain where the 
information might be held. The first is to enquire with the 
relevant professional associations or trade bodies. This is 
a good approach for some fairly narrow fields, such as law 
or medicine. 

Another solution - especially for those interested in a 
number of different fields - is to acquire a directory of on-line 
services such as Brit-Line from McGraw-Hill or The Source 
from Key Note Publications. Brit-Line concentrates on 
databases themselves whereas The Source is organised by 
industry; this naturally makes it much easier for users to 
locate databases specific to their own areas. Once the 
information has been obtained, the power of the PCW can 
then be brought to bear. 

Since the information is already in digital format, the 
downloaded data can be merged into other documents such 
as letters, tables, articles or a book chapter. Most users will, 
already be familiar with the PCWs text handling capabilities 
but the machine's processing power can also be utilised for 
increasing the efficiency of on-line searching. All it takes is a 
little forethought and some time spent learning how to use the 
comms program. 

There are certain important differences between the 
formats used by databases. At this stage we shall leave aside 
the fact that Prestel databases require different software from 
text-only services. Some databases carry the full text of 
articles or documents. Others are just summaries of the 
originals. The skilled database user will also learn how to use 
the headings which the information provider has given to 
particular documents/items. 

This can save greatly on on-line time. By looking only at 
headings, the host computer does not need to search the 
body of the text, so it arrives at an answer more quickly. Once 
a relevant database has been identified, there can be no 
substitute for training. Databases are complicated beasts 
often conforming to Boolean logic in the way they can be 



w ORD S 




awoau, 



T 'ON n =oq INFORM 

°«« WORDS iNFORMATION DATA WORDS 



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DATA' 



searched. All the major information providers, however, can 
provide either training materials or courses for subscribers. 

Thoroughly modem silly 

The cost of the actual hardware needed for connection to an 
on-line database has declined rapidly in recent years. A 
quality business modem like Dowty's Quattro used to cost 
£800. Nowadays, the same facilities are offered by modems 
like Amstrad's SM2400 for just £1 99. 

A serial RS232 interface is also required. It would be 
possible to access an on-line database by running a very 
simple terminal emulation program. A terminal emulator 
enables the PCW to pretend it is a simple asynchronous 
terminal such as DEC'S VT52 or VT1 00. 

This approach is not recommended because merely 
pretending to be a terminal removes the benefits of the 
PCW's own processing power. With good communications 
software, the PCW user can capture a whole on-line 
session back to disc and then edit it. Examples of PCW 
comms packages are PMS' Dial-Up Personal or Sagesoft's 
Chit-Chat. These packages also support Prestel emulation 
should the user need to access a database residing on 
that service. 

It is quite possible to automate a great deal of the on-line 
session. For example, not only can information be saved 
straight to disc, but certain keys can be assigned for specific 
functions. Typing out an involved search command on-line is 
risky because mistakes can be made or line noise might 
corrupt the character string. This problem is overcome by 
assigning a specific function key to send the string before 
going on-line. 

Knowing the exact form of the command to leave the 
system can also prove crucial in view of the costs involved. 
Failing to exit properly can mean the host continues to charge 
before it notices your absence. 

For reasons best known to themselves, on-line database 
suppliers use a multitude of different commands for the same 
thing. For example, the correct command for finishing a 
session might be QUIT, BYE, or OFF. Comms programs allow 
function keys to be assigned to send these commands. 
Moreover the keystroke combination can always stay the 
same, and although the actual string sent can differ, the effect 
will still be the same; [f2], for example, would always 
disconnect the user from the service. In fact, all the user is 
doing is making intelligent use of the same facility that allows 
log-ins to be automated. 

Signing on 

Let's run through a typical signing on procedure. In this case, 
the user would be accessing INSPEC, a database compiled 
by the Institution of Electrical Engineers. Basically the 
material it carries is literature of a scientific nature which 
might interest its members. 

The host is the European Space Agency Information 
Retrieval Service (ESA-IRS) which has its computers in 
Italy. Fortunately it can be accessed via British Telecom's 
PSS service. Having already set the correct 
communications protocols for the system, the user would 
then instruct the modem to dial the appropriate number. 
The latter information could be held in the package's 
dialling directory. The user would typically see the following 
on-screen: 



NP )RMATION WORDS DATA ^F R MaTiqn 





Finding out more 



One of the most indispensable aids for the on-line researcher is a 
good directory of available databases. Two prime examples of 
such publications are: 

Brit-line • £85 (£110 with 6-monthly updates) • McGraw-Hill • 
062823432 

This book is essentially a directory of British databases and 
Volume 4 (1989) contains some 375 of them. 
Databases have been grouped according to the subject area they 
cover. One of the largest sections is company information which 
includes self-explanatory databases like Who Owns Whom Online. 
Each database entry provides essential information, such as the 
database's full name as well as its common abbreviation, who 
produced the information, which host systems carry ft, and what 

the printed equivalent (if any) is called. As far as possible, a sample record from each database is 

also shown. This wilt give you a useful taster as to what's in store. 

Brit-line contains an impressively comprehensive range of indexes; this means that the user 

can find a database on a minimum of information. The only drawback to this current edition is that 

information regarding the cost of access has been dropped. It's therefore hard to tell the affordable 

from the exceedingly expensive. 

The Source Book • £95 (p&p £4.95) • Key Note Publications •017830755 

There are 412 on-line databases available in the UK mentioned in this publication. Its approach is to 

break down 11,000 sources of information into recognisable areas; there are ten broad divisions 

which include the engineering, transport and primary industries. Then there fs a further grouping 

into 40 different sectors covering 300 different industries. 

Although both provider and host(s) are mentioned, the Book's list of addresses confines itself 

to covering host systems. 

No details of database costs are given, but this 800 page tome has a ring binder which bodes 

well for the future. It shouldn't be a difficult task to supply easily inserted pages when new on-line 

sources appear. 



ATDT6807999 - The command to dial 01 680 7999 

CONNECT 1200 - The modem indicating a connection at 

1200 bps 

LO4\A021 -16700401 14 - PSS acknowledging the user who 

has sent two carriage returns and the characters D] 

NUI? - PSS asking for the network user identity 

NESAIRS [ESA-IRS'NUI] ADD? - PSS asks for a network 

user address 

A21 9201 15604 [ESA-IRS' NUA] - The user would 

subsequently supply a password and be given access 

to the system. ■ 




°*T A , 



Nf =OR Mi 



Ar 'ON WORDS D 



\m 







A host of 
goodies 

Very many of the databases 
themselves are available to 
subscribers through more than 
one 'host'. A good example 
here might be the Official 
Airline Guide which is on a 
whole variety of hosts. It 
makes sense, therefore, to 
carefully research exactly 
which databases might prove 
useful before signing up with 
one particular supplier. This 
would avoid paying two hosts 
when one might carry all the 
desired databases. 



Gateway to the 
universe 

There is also an increasing 
trend for the suppliers of 
electronic mail facilities - such 
as Telecom Gold, Mercury Link 
and One to One - to provide 
■gateways'. This means that 
the user can check for 
electronic mail messages and 
then without any need to redial 
(or upload special passwords) 
gain access to a database 
without breaking the call. In 
such circumstances the user 
simply issues a command to 
go through the gateway. 



December89 8000 PLUS 21 



'?!7!?'? : P ! P ! ? ! 5 3 5 ; P'?'SH^^^^^'{';*;*;';'{';'{';';'r'r';'r';'{';':ftftW^'v^"V"V"V 






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RSC SPECIAL PRICE £14.95 



Fleet Street Editor. £29.00 

m&& Stop Press £29.00 

Stop Press + AMX Mouse £54.00 



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£38.00 

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Mini Office Professional PLUS £27.00 

(951 2 & Dual Drive 8000 Series) 

Sage Chit Chat £69.00 

Sage Chit Chat with Linnet Modem.... £205.00 

Easy Labeller £21.00 

Rotate £16.00 

AMX Mouse & Desktop Utilities £47.00 




At last, a quality sheet feeder for the Amstrad 9512. 

A voluble addition to your 9512 printer. 

Includes modified software. 

RSC SPECIAL INTRODUCTORY PRICE £69.00 



PCW ADD-ONS 



....£U5.( 



FD4 (1Mb Drive) 

(Second Disk Drive for the 8256/9512) 

Amstrad RS232 Centronics Interface 

PCW 8256/851 2 Memory Upgrade 

RSC PCW Printer/Power Extension 8256/8512 £1 1 J 

9512 Printer Extension £9 J 



£45.00 
..£P0.A 



ALL PRICES EXCLUDE VAT 



EDUCATIONAL, CORPORATE, OR VOLUME PURCHASERS PLEASE CALL FOR ASSISTANCE 



Telephone: (0923) 243301 

(24 hours) 



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RSCE21 A KEYBOARD 
STORAGE DRAW 



RSC L2 Desktop .1 TTrrr. £12.00 

RSC LI Desk Clomp £12.00 

A must tot every workstation, con be positioned ot almost ony angle. 



4 Woy moins distribution socket.Wim 
from mains borne spikes and surges ... 
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built-in orreste to give full protection 

£15.00 

£9.50 






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ANTI-STATIC MATS 



Min order 2's 

QT2 

QT5 



..£4.00 each 
. £3.50 each 



PCW Colour Ribbons (Blue/Brown/Red/Green) . 
Ribbons available for most other printers. 



PCW 9512 RIBBONS 



..£5.00 each 



..£3.35 eocb 
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RSC M-02 Anti-Static Mouse Mot 

280 x 21 x 4mm Fully Earthed when connected. 

RSC M-03 Anti-Static Keyboard Mat 

595 x 250 x 4mm Fully Earthed when connected. 
RSC M-04 Anti-Static PC Mat 



..£6.95 
..£8.95 



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RSC PRICE 



PRINTER PAPER 



80 Column listing paper per box 

11" x 9.5" 1 Part Plain 60gms 2,000 . 



..£13.50 



..£14.95 



11" X 9.5" 2 Part NCR 1,000 £21.50 

A4 1 Port Plain 70gms 2,000 £19.00 S&K&J& 

A4 1 Part Plain 90gms 1,500 £18.50 {££3&&&-$| 



■WWJW F° r Doisywheel Printers Only. 
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PCW DASIYWHEELS 



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Letter Gothic 10/12 Prestige Pica Mini Gothic oil at.. 
Some available in French & German ot 



AMSTRAD PCW PRINTER 
MAINTENANCE KIT 



...£5.25 eoch 
..£9.50 each 



'■? www 
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f# WWW KC PRICE £14.00 



For 8256/8512, removes dirt and ink deposits to maintain maximum 
print quality. 



RSC TOP 10 GAMES 




£10.00 




£12.00 




£12.00 




£13.00 


Match Day II 


£10.00 


Steve Davis Snooker 


£12.00 

£10.00 




£10.00 


Colusses Chess 


£12.00 




£12.00 




LABELS 


1,000 1 Across 

2 000 2 Across 


£6.00 

£8.65 




LASER LABELS 


3,000 3 Across 


£13.50 



1 32 Column listing paper per box 



1 l"x 14.5" 1 Part Plain 60gms 2,000 £17.00 tfWtftftftft 

11" x 14.5" 1 Part M/Rule60gms 2,000 £17.50 &J&&K&; 



BOOKS - VAT FREE 



Mallard Basic - Amstrad £9.95 

Program Your PCW - Sinclair £7.95 

Step by Step Guide to Locoscript £4.95 

All in One Mini Office Professional : £1 1 .95 

Desktop Publishing with the Amstrad PCW £9.50 

Locoscript 2 - Sinclair £9.95 

Locoscript 2 & Amstrad PCW - Hughs £1 1.95 

Locoscript/Moil/Spell ■ Brodshaw £7.95 

Looking into Locoscript 2 - Rogers £13.95 



3" DISK DRIVE HEAD CLEANER 



The Clear Head £6.50 



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STANDARD PRINTERS & THE PCW 

RS232 Centronics Interface-Connect the 8256/8512 to any standard printer,orasrhe9512 
already has this facility built-in, connect the 9512 to Communications peripherals. 

RSC Special Offer £45.00 

RSC CA4 Cable (Interface to Parallel Printer £8.00 



LX400 

FX850 

EX1000 ... 
LQ550 .... 
LQ1050 . 



LQ1060 (Colour) 



LC10 .. 



LC24-10 .. 

FRIO 

XB24-10 .. 



P2200. 
P7+ 



KX-P1180.... 
KX-P1540 ... 

DMP3250.. 
LQ3500 



EPSON 

£135.00 LX850 

.... £305.00 FX1050 

.... £565.00 LQ400 

.... £265.00 LQ850 

.... £565.00 LQ860 (Colour) 

.... £665.00 LQ2550 (Colour) 

STAR 

£155.00 LC10 (Colour) 

.... £260.00 NX15 

£310.00 FR15 

£410.00 XB24-15 

NEC 

.... £265.00 P6+ 

.... £545.00 

PANASONIC 

£165.00 KX-P1124 

.... £269.00 

AMSTRAD 

£110.00 DMP4000 £199.00 

£219.00 LQ5000DI £299.00 



.. £180.00 
. £399.00 
.. £189.00 
. £425.00 
. £529.00 
. £925.00 

. £189.00 

£265.00 

.. £410.00 

. £530.00 

. £429.00 



. £269.00 



JUKI 6300.. 



DAISY WHEEL PRINTERS 

£445.00 JUKI 6500 



. £699.00 




The Rolls Royce of PCW desk-top publishing. 

TYPESETTING • GRAPHICS • FONT DESIGN • PAGE LAYOUT • TEXT EDITING • PRINTING 

The fantastic new DTP package from Creative Technology. Micro Design II is 
fast and easy to use, running on the PCW8256, PCW8512 or PCW9512. 
Fully Compatible with files from Locoscript 2, Protext, Wordstar, AMX Stop 
Press and many other popular packages. Micro Design II supports hard-disk 
drives both on the Kempston and AMX mouse systems. Huge range of 
lettering styles and a comprehensive range of Graphic Art & Design 
functions. Includes 25 fonts, a whole disk of graphic 'cuts' and 'areas', 
and a clear & concise 140 page user manual. 

RSC Special Introductory Price £39.00 



EDUCATIONAL, CORPORATE, OR VOLUME PURCHASERS PLEASE CALL FOR ASSISTANCE 



RSC Limited, 75 Queens Rood, Watford, WD1 2QN. 

Fax: (0923) 37946 Telex: 265871 

Callers Welcome 



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A New Powerful Combination 
for your PCW8256/8512 



LocoFile 
with LocoMail 



V *a«. 



-g^jslS^sss 



,<v : 




LocoFile is a pop-up database that organises and 
maintains everything from names and addresses to 
books and sales orders. From data stored and 
sorted on your LocoFile cards, LocoMail lets you 
create reports, letters and labels. 

Together they make a powerful combination to 
use with LocoScript 2. 



All this for £49.90 - giving you a £10 saving on the 
individual price of LocoFile and LocoMail 



Please send me the following: 



LocoFile & LocoMail 



I 

* Please send me details of 
I the LocoScript 2 family 

I Name 

I 

I Address 

I 

I 
I 
I 



£49.90 □ 
□ 



I 1 1 enclose a cheque for TOTAl£ 

I I Please charge my Access/Visa card 



I I I 



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Postcode . 



Note: All prices include VAT and UK postage TEL 0306 740606 



Signed 

Send to Katy Buchan at: 

LOCOMOTIVE 
SOFTWARE 

Dorking, 
Surrey, RH4 1YL 





YOUR STARTER FOR TEN 

We take a look at a stocking-filler that will enable budding Bambers to 
fascinate the family during those long winter evenings... 



ULTIMATE QUIZ 
£14.95 «DGC Software 



0337 7444 



If the prospect of sitting down with replete, dozing members of your family 
to watch the umpteenth showing of The Wizard of Oz on Christmas 
afternoon doesn't hold any appeal, this latest version of Ultimate Quiz will 
give you the excuse you need to lock yourself away for an hour or two of 
fun with your PCW. 

A number of changes are immediately evident in this upgraded release 
from the DGC stable. Ten quizzes are now available on the disc, each one 
consisting of 100 multiple choice questions. There's something on here to 
please almost everybody - from foreign language (French, German and Italian) 
translation questions, to geography, history and sports puzzlers. There are also 
two pretty hefty trivia quiz files that are bound to satisfy the most hopeless 
general knowledge addict. 

The Highway Code quiz is still there to provide you with a fun and 
interesting way of brushing up on your road knowledge; it will also supply any 
would-be back-seat- drivers with all the hairsplitting ammunition they're likely to 
need to topple you over the brink of total insanity. 

Each of the ten quizzes can be played with one of a number of special 
effect extras. The Noughts and Crosses option is still there, which means that 
you choose the position you want to take on the empty grid before the question 
appears; answer correctly, and you secure one square against the computer. 
Get it wrong, and you lose it. It's all good fun - and rather addictive at that. 

I say, I say, I say... 

Younger players might prefer to answer questions with the jokes option turned 
on. When you answer the question correctly, an appalling joke will appear 
along the bottom of the screen. While this is a gimick that will definitely amuse 
the younger quizzer, we're not quite sure how well a 'Knock, knock' joke will go 
down with a more mature player who is capable of entering the right answer to 
a question like 'Which MP was first elected MP for Oldham in 1900?' 

For players preferring a somewhat livelier pace, the timer option is still 
available if you want it. Failure to answer the question correctly in the allotted 
time (5, 10, 15, 30, 45 or 60 seconds) will lose you the point. 

As with the last version of Ultimate Quiz, the program's trump card is its 
quiz editing facility. This means that not only can you make alterations to the 
existing quiz files (like adding and deleting questions), you can also make up 
your own quizzes and save them to the disc. Putting together your own 
subject-specific question files means that Ultimate Quiz can be used as a 
valuable (and amusing) learning tool. 



Run that by me again 

Ultimate Quiz is, on the whole, very well presented. The screens are clean, the 
program is easy to use and the questions in each of the ten quiz files will 
probably keep the majority of people happy most of the time. At times, though, 
the creators of the quiz files could have benefited more than once from using 
the editing facility just mentioned. Although the program is not exactly dogged 
by typos, they do tend to appear at alarmingly regular intervals and spoil the 
slick presentation of what is otherwise a very professional program. 

At one point in the Drive. Quz file, you're asked about the correct procedure 
when overtaking a horse on the road. Should you, for example, 'sound your 
hour' at the animal as you pass it? This, needless to say, conjures up the 
bizarre image of somebody winding down their window and screaming 'Two 
o'clock!' at some poor creature as they drive past it. There's another question in 
the French Language quiz where the program-approved answer was obviously 
completely wrong: 'Je peux rester ici combien de temps?' has never meant, as 
far as we're aware, 'Is there a short cut?' 

The good news is that the price is still the same: £14.95. When you 
consider that there are eight new quizzes on the disc as well as the optional 
extras, that's not bad going for a program that is sure to keep you so 
entertained you simply won't have time to give even a passing thought to the 
Yellow Brick Road. ■ 




The quiz editing facility is definitely the program's trump card. This can be used in two 

ways; you can either edit existing quiz files (alter the questions or add more of them) or 

make up your own question and answer files. 



ilTrvMMr' 



Tirter 80 Joke off 



Question lilt > trii 




One of the program's special effect extras is its noughts and crosses facility carried over from the first 
release of the Quiz. The PCW becomes your opponent. Answer a question correctly and your will be 

placed on the preselected position on the grid. 




rziz^z 



Sound Ho 15 BTeep I 



Uuestlon file > trivia. quz 




The jokes (here being used with the famous quotations trivia file) are rather cringing to say 
the least, but will doubtless appeal to younger users of the game. After a few hours' play, 
however, some of them may start to look oddly familiar. 



ULTIMATE QUIZ 



PLUSES 



Useful editing facility 
Addictive quiz play 
Professional program 
Can print out quiz sheets 



MINUSES 

Documentation is on the 
disc. 
~ After a few hours' play, 
some jokes look familiar. 



EASE OF USE 5/5 PERFORMANCE 4/5 

DOCUMENTATION 3/5 ADDICTIVENESS 5/5 

8000 PLUS VALUE VERDICT 17/20 



25 8000 PLUS Decembe 





PRELUDE TO A PCW 

Introducing a computer to a new business doesn't have to be a baptism 
of fire - provided you make sure you ask all the right questions first 



Until relatively recent times, the use of computers in small businesses 
was not a financially viable proposition. Their exorbitant price-tags 
restricted their use for many years to within large, affluent organisations. 
Since then, the steadily decreasing cost of hardware in particular has 
meant that more and more businesses - the nascent enterprise as well 
as the wealthy corporation - have been able to take advantage of many 
of the benefits computerisation brings. Improved communications in 
and out of the company, more efficient laundering of paperwork and 
speedier storage and retrieval of information are just some of the 
advantages to be gained. 

Take the arrival on the scene of the PCWs. Here, for the first time, 
was an easily affordable and readily available machine that came 
seductively bundled with its own keyboard and printer and which - most 
excitingly of all - boasted its own gateway onto the sea of business 
software already in existence: the CP/M operating system. 

Nowadays, though, a new kind of snobbery has attached itself to 



The Facts 



computers. They are invariably 'a Good Thing to Have Around' and 
nobody can possibly take any business seriously unless they've got at 
least two or three of them in sharp evidence. For those embarking on their 
own small business enterprise, the decision as to whether to 'go 
computerised' or not rears its head quite early on: a computer is bound to 
reduce the amount of paperwork, they think, and fondly imagine that it will 
transform the office overnight into one of those paper-free zones of data- 
based efficiency they've read about. 

Translating such heady aspirations into successful practice is, 
however, another matter. The paperless office remains a science fiction 
fantasy for many but the large organisation. 

Even in an environment where the user-friendliness of a software 
package is as important as the initial reason for its purchase, 
computerising your business will only reap the expected dividends if you 
first sit down and analyse your requirements. Faulty judgements in the 
initial stages can result in a lot of time and money being wasted. 



26 8000 PLUS December 8 



1 Here are some reasons why a small business might benefit 
from the use of a computer: 

for managing book-keeping functions 

for sending out invoices 

for keeping control of cash flow and monitoring 
outstanding accounts 

maintaining records of customers or clients and potential 
customers 

analysing business trends 

producing standard business letters 

producing designs 

stock control. 
As you've probably noticed, this list tends to have a strong 
sales orientation. As a general rule, if you have a lot of 
customers or a wide range of stock items, then there are 
many advantages to computing. If you deal with a few 
customers or clients and carry only a limitd range of stock or 
no stock at all, then a computer will have only a limited 
application. 

2 A computer is very good at handling large amounts of 
information fast. It is much less efficient at dealing with 
individual records. Let's take a customer database; if you 
want to look up a customer record, you have to switch the 
machine on, load the software, find the appropriate disc, load 
the record and find the data you want. By the time this has 
been done, you could have looked at several records in a 
paper filing system. 

Moreover, to input a record, you invariably have to write 
the information down on paper first so that you can remember 
what to key into the machine. If you have several hundred 
records of customers or clients with different requirements, 
most of which have alterations made to them regularly, then a 
computer will definitely be of help to you. On the other hand, 
a fairly static group of 30 or 40 client records might be better 
handled on a card index. 

3 Accounts are one of the classic administrative bottlenecks 
that a computer can help you negotiate your way around very 
successfully. You can use either a package that has been 
specifically designed for that purpose or a spreadsheet. Most 
of the accounts packages from leading suppliers are geared 
to the needs of certain types of firms. Packages that handle 
stock control, invoicing/sales and purchase/nominal ledgers 



can be bought either as separate items or as integrated 
suites. The secret here is to find out which of the available 
programs fits in the most comfortably with the current modus 
operandi of your business. 

Computerised accounts provide the best way of gaining 
accurate mastery of your budgets. I have my home budget on 
a spreadsheet and can predict with reasonable accuracy the 
size of my overdraft in three - or even six months' time. This 
means that when my wife asks for another Porsche, not only 
can I say 'No' with consummate conviction, I can also show 
her why not at the touch of a few keys. 

4 Many people buy PCWs for their word processing power. 
In business, this can have several uses: you can produce 
professional-looking letters free of spelling mistakes and 
obvious signs of Tipp-exing. You can even produce your own 
business stationery, though it might be better for your image 
to get this professionally-designed. 

However, the real benefits can be reaped when it 
comes to exercises requiring the turbo-charged boost 
of a professional mail-merge package. Even so, it is 
perhaps worth remembering that you've bought a 
computer - not a duplicator. A run of several hundred 
letters is probably going to tie up the machine for a 
considerable length of time. 

It has to be said that the novelty of getting 'personalised' 
letters has worn off somewhat; some people feel that the 
mailshot letter they have just received is so obviously 
computer-generated anyway that the de-personalisation of 
the correspondence is just as blatant. You have to weigh up 
the pros and cons. 

A well-managed micro-computer can be a boon to a small 
business. It's not, however, as will be seen, a simple matter 
of going out and buying the first one that you see. A 
generous gestation period should be planned during which 
you fully analyse your requirements. Once the original idea 
has been firmly implanted, do everything within your power 
to find out about the various installation procedures 
involved. Browse your way at length around library shelves, 
get advice from professional consultants and - above 
all - talk to those who have already - and hopefully, 
successfully - taken the plunge. 

Try asking yourself at least four salient questions before 
you go any further: why? when? what? and where? 




WHY? 

This is obviously the most important question to ask, yet 
possibly the least posed of them all. The speed with which 
data is processed is possibly one of the most seductive 
attractions as far as the small business is concerned. Not 
only that, but a PCW can handle one heck of a lot of 
information. One 3" disc can hold as much as 20,000 names 
and addresses, any one of which can be accessed within 
the space - at most - of a couple of minutes. The more data 
you have at your disposal, therefore, the more useful a 
computer will be to you. 

Another of the PCW's principal attractions is its number- 
crunching facilities. As well as storing the figures that you 
enter, it will perform complicated calculations on them. 
These calculations will all automatically be reworked if you 
make any changes to the original data. Provided you feed 
the correct figures into the machine in the first place, you 
can rest assured that the resulting calculations will be 
performed more quickly and accurately than you would 
probably be able to manage yourself. The beauty of an 
integrated accounts package of the kind we mentioned 
earlier is that you can record a transaction in the sales 
ledger and the PCW will automatically update the 
appropriate nominal ledger as well. 

I once heard of a medical practice the members of 
which glibly decided one day to computerise their patient 
records. They obtained a computer, read the manuals 
and set to work organising the office to facilitate the 
arrival of their new accessory. Having accomplished a 
major reorganisation of both the office and the systems, 
they made an astonishing discovery. They didn't 
actually need a computer. What they had needed was a 
reshuffled paper system. 



WHEN? 

This is likely to be one of the most difficult questions to 
answer. If you have a background of business experience, 
then that should make the decision easier to make. If you 
are new to running your own business, then judging the right 
moment to bring in a computer will not be easy. Ideally, 
computerisation should begin before your paperwork system 
looks bent on a state of total collapse through sheer volume. 
You will have no leeway for running the two systems side by 
side for a while to ensure compatibility. 

Ultimately, I suppose, there is no good time to introduce 
a computer. At whatever stage you take the momentous 
step, the introduction of a computer will undoubtedly but 
realistically complicate things for a time. If the thinking has 
been done in advance and done well, the transition should 
be short and reasonably painless. If you try 'making it up as 
you go along', prepare, as they say, to 'meet thy doom.' This 
is probably the most tried and tested method of them all; it is 
also the method with the greatest potential for disaster. 



CONTACTS 

Broadway Business Systems, Bank Buildings, Kennel 
Lane, Broadway, Worcester WR12 7DP (0386 852641). 

This company provides a concentrated interruption-free 

environment in which the potential buyer can view a variety 

of systems and software - including PCW applications - at 

work before making the decision to buy. The advice may be 

objective, but at £25 an hour it isn't cheap. 

Taming Your Company Computer by Colin Corder 

(£13.95 from McGraw-Hill). 

The A-Z of Business Computing by Adrian V Stokes 

(£14.95 from Heinemann). 



WHAT? 

Buy the best that your money can afford. For the small 
business in the early stages of development, this could 
mean a PCW. I work with several MS-DOS machines; as far 
as satisfying my personal set of requirements is concerned, 
the PCW is just as effective. The single advantage of larger 
machines at this stage is, of course, their increased speed. 
With many small businesses, though, this is insufficient 
justification to warrant the spending of two to three times 
more money. I would, however, make one proviso: you will 
almost certainly benefit from having two disc drives. 

Significant amounts of time can be saved through 
having a fast printer. Near Letter Quality printout is 
improving all the time and the ability to print acceptable 
invoice headings, business graphics and spreadsheets 
sideways on is an important consideration. Having said that, 
the high quality of daisy wheel reproduction cannot always 
be justified. Perhaps trading in your daisy wheel printer for a 
good quality 24-pin dot matrix or ink jet may provide the 
answer. If, however, very high quality reproduction is an 
essential part of your corporate image, having a cheap dot- 
matrix alongside the daisy-wheel could provide you with the 
best of both worlds. 



WHERE? 

Planning the precise location of the unit can be important. 
The machine should be positioned in such a way that all 
reflection from windows and lights is reduced to a bare 
minimum. Experience has shown that locating a computer 
so that the operator is facing into a window is better than 
having a window behind. The window should be fitted with a 
curtain or blind to cut out strong sunlight. In some 
circumstances, an anti-glare screen may be needed. These 
are usually clipped onto the screen of the PCW. Not only do 
they minimise irritating reflection, they also sharpen up the 
image that is on the screen. 

If at all possible, avoid placing the computer next to 
other regularly-used machinery. The same is true of busy 
aisles and doorways. A telephone next to the machine is 
nearly always useful, especially if it's required to reply to 
customers' data enquiries. Phones can also be fitted with 
headsets leaving both hands free to type. By this means, 
data can be entered directly into database records, for 
example, without going through the tedious and time- 
consuming drill of making out an input-slip. 



AND FINALLY .... HOW? 

If someone is going to spend large amounts of time 
operating the computer, then a well-designed chair and 
desk are important. It's not a bad idea to have the printer on 
a separate table since the noise and vibrations it produces - 
especially in the case of a daisy wheel printer - can upset 
the delicate components of even so robust a machine as 
the PCW, and drive you, of course, completely batty. It's not 
easy trying to work at a desk that feels like a Tiger Moth 
during its final stages of take-off. 

The desk should consist of a working surface some 28 
inches from the floor (2 inches lower than a standard table). 
This will, hopefully, allow the user to operate the keyboard 
comfortably, with forearms positioned roughly at right angles 
to the biceps (this is, incidentally, the ergonomic epitome of 
typing comfort). The chair should be adjustable for optimum 
back support. 

All this may seem like an expensive luxury; it isn't. 
Some people would argue that if you want a consistently 
high quality of data imput, it's absolutely essential. 



BUSINESS 



December 89 8000 PLUS 27 




When it comes to computerised number-crunching, 
David Wilson offers some cautionary tales of wisdom 




28 8000 PLUS Decembers 



little while ago, I was reading 
in the paper about some 
unlucky holidaymakers who 
were having to put up with a 
twenty-eight hour delay on their Florida 
flight from Heathrow. 

If anyone in a similar position 
goes to the nearest bookstall, picks up 
this edition of 8000 Plus, and stumbles 
across this column, they will almost 
certainly submit to the desire to rip the 
magazine up into little pieces and jump 
maniacally on the debris. That's because 
I'm going to ask you to imagine the 
upheaval involved in travelling to 
Florida two hundred years ago! The 
stagecoach to the harbour would have 
been bad enough .... 

It isn't surprising, I suppose, 
that this sort of philosophical reflection 
offers little or no comfort to someone 
glued interminably to a plastic chair in Terminal 1 3. Rapid 
though the development of civil transport has undoubtedly 
been, there's been an intervening decade or two - at least - 
between each new breakthrough. Let's face it, we've all had 
plenty of time to learn to take things for granted. 

My customers are a case in point. The computers that 
they use have only been around for what seems like ten 
minutes and already they take them for granted. Only 
yesterday they were keeping their accounts with a fountain 
pen in leather-bound foolscap volumes, and now - well, 
just look how the dreaded VAT calculations have 
been organised. 

I'm quite proud of the way my programs handle them. 
All the calculations are carried out to an accuracy of six 
decimal places, while the display is rounded to the nearest 
penny. It has to be said, however, that when a series of VAT 
amounts is added up, the unrounded numbers are used, and 
this can cause an apparent discrepancy. I wish I had a 
pound for every time I've had to explain this. Yet it isn't that 
long ago that the people I now help had to work everything 
out with a calculator. 

How's VAT! 

It's so easy to accidentally press the wrong key when you're 
trying to calculate 15% of six months' invoices with the VAT 
inspector hammering at your door. If they got it accurate to 
the nearest £50 they thought they were doing well. Now my 
programs do the whole job in a flash, and people will still 
complain, believe it or not, because the calculations are 
perhaps tuppence out! 

The big snag as far as labour-saving devices is 
concerned is that they only save you time and trouble if 
you did the job yourself previously. If you've always sent 
the family wash to the launderette, you probably won't be 
thrilled to death at the prospect of having to get used to a 
washing machine. 

A lot of people used to have a pretty cavalier attitude 



towards book-keeping. Some of them just preferred to hand 
over a great bundle of invoices and receipts to their long- 
suffering accountants every few months; at best, they would 
keep sales and purchase ledgers. Then they got a 
computer, and bought an accounts package to run on it .... 

Don't get me wrong; almost all the commercial accounts 
programs which you can buy for the PCW are excellent - if 
you need an accounts program. I don't know about you, but 
I suspect that most healthy people find accountancy jargon 
singularly mind-deadening. I made a vow years ago that I'd 
never let words like 'Journal Entry' and 'Trial Balance' cross 
my mind again - I'm breaking that vow for your sake. But let 
me tell you something: There Is No Law Which Compels 
You To Learn All That Nonsense! A wise Providence created 
people called accountants. They enjoy that kind of thing, so 
why not leave them to it. 

Perhaps you've already been through the struggle of 
learning to use an accounts package, or a spreadsheet, or a 
complicated database. Well done. I appreciate your hard 
work, even if no-one else does. But I'm sure you soon 
discovered the next pitfall. Since no-one else understands 
how on earth to work the program, YOU HAVE BECOME 
INDISPENSABLE. Try to take the afternoon off, and your 
mighty organisation grinds to a halt simply because 
everyone else is frightened to touch the computer. (Even 
worse - perhaps you're afraid to let anyone else touch it ....) 

'Open the pod-bay doors, Hal' 

Have you noticed how computers always play one of two 
roles in films. Sometimes they're evil monsters which 
come perilously close to taking over the whole world; it's 
funny how the hero always manages to blow them up at 
the last minute. 

Sometimes, of course, they are tireless servants of 
humanity: you ask them a question, they buzz for a second 
in a rather long-suffering fashion and then present you with 
a neat little answer. Somehow, these movie computers have 
absorbed all the data in the universe. They know everything. 
What I'd like to know is who types all this stuff into the 
machine in the machine in the first place. 

Film-makers seem conveniently able to gloss over this 
rather glaring oversight in the same way as those TV chefs 
who say "To save time, here's one I made earlier." In the 
real world, sadly, someone has to sit down and enter all 
those invoices, customer names and addresses and product 
descriptions. It's a pity that these movie-land computers 
aren't for sale in Dixons; mind you, if they were, you 
probably wouldn't be able to afford one anyway. 

I'm sorry I've been so down-beat this month. I make my 
living persuading people to computerize their businesses, 
but I'd far rather have one satisfied customer than a dozen 
aggrieved ones. I regard it as self-evident that you should 
try to find out the drawbacks as well as the benefits before 
you commit yourself to a major change in the way you run 
your affairs. 

Luckily for me, I don't have to sell umpteen computers a 
month to earn my wages. If I did, I'd be singing a different 
tune, I can tell you. ■ 




And now. a 



3 



FLIPPER 

that works 
with Isenstein 

memory 
boards t 



FLIPPER 2 was quite an 
unusual program. It could split 
your PCW's memory in two, let- 
ting you run LocoScript 2 in one 
half and a CP/M program in the 
other. Or it could let you load 
two CP/M programs atonce, 
one in each half. It could even 
tackle tricky programs like Mini 
Office and LocoFile. Best of all it 
could FLIP you from one half to 
the other in as little as two sec- 
onds, any time you wanted. And 
it wouldn't lose your place. 

Things have changed since we 
launched FLIPPER 2. Now 

you can buy an Isenstein 
Ramdrive Card and double your 
PCW's memory size. Soon there 
may be other memory boards 
on the market, giving you any- 
thing up to 2048K of memory. 



That's why we've brought out 
FLIPPER 2 PLUS. This still 
gives you all the memory-split- 
ting power of FLIPPER 2, 

but it can handle extra 
memory as well. (As much of 
it as you want to plug in, in 
fact.) This means that, with an 
Isenstein 51 2K expansion 
fitted, FLIPPER 2 PLUS 
can cram two (very nearly) 
full-size 851 2s or 951 2s into 
one machine. Not bad, eh? 
And we haven't even put the 
price up. 



Please send me FLIPPER 2 PLUS for my: 

n 851 2 n 951 2 U Expanded 8256 
□ I enclose a cheque/postal order for £29.95 
I ] I enclose my FLIPPER/FLIPPER 2 masterdisk and a 
cheque/postal order for £5.00 

(Price includes UK postage and packing, and VAT. Please make all cheques payable to Software 
Imperative. Sorry, FLIPPER does not run on an unexpanded 8256.) 



Name. 



Address.. 



Postcode . 



Mall this coupon to: Software Imperative, 11 Chapel Row, 
Queen Square, Bath, Avon, BA1 1HN 



FLIPPER 2 PLUS: still only £29.95, 



Software Imperative, 11 Chapel Row, Queen Square, Bath, Avon, BA1 1HN, proprietor A.J.Wilton, tel 
(0225) 425315. PCW is a trademark of Amstrad pic, CP/M is a trademark of Digital Research, f 

LocoScript and LocoFile arre trademarks of Locomotive Software, Mini Office is a trademark of 
Database Software, Isenstein is a trademark of Isenstein Computer Systems. 







<f ' ' K v- '3 < /> \ is 



ALL PRICES EXCLUDE VAT 

Export, Government & Education 
Orders Welcome. Callers Welcome by 

appointment. All prices subject to 

change without notice - all goods subject 

to availability. 



BRITAIN'S BEST SELLING WORDPROCESSOR RANGE 



AMSTRADPCW8512 




AMSTRADPCW9512 



\ 




THE AMSTRAD PCW8256 - A fully 
integrated word processing system with 
keyboard, screen, 256K of internal RAM, 
360K 3 1/2" disk drive, software and printer. 
Established over the last two years as the 
market leader, the PCW8256 continues to 
offer unbeatable value for money. 



VALUE: £321 .00 



8256 Site Service 1st year E36.00 



ACCESSORIES 8256/8512 



THE AMSTRAD PCW851 2 - offering double 
the internal memory of the PCW 8256 plus 
an additional 720K disk drive which both 
avoids the need for frequent disc-swapping 
and gives you greatly increased data 
storage capacity at only £100 + VAT more 



VALUE: £421.00 



8512 Site Service 1st year £45.00 



ACCESSORIES 8256/8512 



THE AMSTRAD PCW9512 - featuring a 
wide-carriage daisywheel printer, black and 
white screen, 51 2K RAM. 720K disk drive-, 
enhanced keyboard and Locoscript 2 word 
processing software with integrated 
Spellcheck and Mailmerge facilities, giving 
you top quality performance all round. 
Now with free ASF 9512 sheet feeder 



VALUE £449.00 



9512 On Site Service 1st year. 



£49.00 



ACCESSORIES PCW 9512 



FD2 Second Drive Drive 8256 £115.00 



PACE 5.25" 2nd Drive - with its own built in 
interface comes with free TDOS and 
external power supply. Very easy to fit. We 
use one for data transfer from 
PCW/PC/PCW £159.00 

Titmatic 20MB PCW hard disk £495.00 

CPS 8256 Micro Control P/S 

Interface £49.00 

CYC 256K to 51 2K Memory Upgrade Kit 
with fitting instruction £49.00 

MCS 8256 Micro Control P/S R3232 
Interface £49.00 

CYC PCW 8256/8512 Power and Printer 
Extension Lead £11.00 



MARGIN MAKER 




Single Sheet guide for the 8256/851 2 
E9.50 



PCW DUST COVERS 



3 Cover Set VDU, printer, Keyboard (please 
specify 8256 or 851 2 or 951 2) 
£9.50 

rnaxell 

m m. CF-2per10 £24.00 

CF-2per20 £42.00 




AMSOFT 

CF-2Per10 £24.00 

CF-2Per20 £45.00 

Disk Cleaner £6.50 



DISK STORAGE BOXES 8256/8512/9512 



3" Disk Storage Box holds 30 £11.50 

3" Tiered Stacker holds 10 £5.50 



DISK STORAGE BOXES 8256/8512/9512 



4 Way mains distribution socket 




With built in Arrester to give protection from 

mainsbome spikes £15.00 

Surge Protection Plug £9.50 



FD4 2ND DISK DRIVE 1MB FOR 

PCW 9512 £115.00 

CPS 8256 AMSTRAD RS232 

P/S Interface £49.00 



AUTOMATIC SHEET FEEDER 



The ASF9512 is an automatic sheet feeder 
for use with the PCW 951 2. It will hold up to 
30 sheets of paper enabling either multi- 
page documents or mail-merged letters to 
be printed unattended, thereby releasing the 
user for other tasks and improving 
productivity. The Sheet Feeder can be 
attached or removed in seconds, leaving the 
printer to accept individual sheets of paper 
or the standard tractor assembly. 




£75.00 



DOT MATRIX PRINTERS 



EPSON 

Epson LX850 150cps/80col £180.00 

Epson SQ2500 Ink Jet £875.00 

Epson LQ550 150cps/50nlq £265.00 

Epson LQ850 220 cps/73nlq £445.00 

Epson LQ1050 132 col 220cps/73nlq £565.00 

Epson LQ2550 New In £925.00 

Epson DFX5000 (high speed) £1295.00 

Epson FX850 £329.00 

Epson FX1050 £415.00 

Epson FX1050 £415.00 



PRINTER RIBBONS (min order 2's) 



COMPUTER PRINTERS 
Star LC10 Multifont Printer 


£155.00 


Star LC10 Colour Printer 

Star LC24-10 Latest 24 Pin Machine 


£189.00 
£260.00 


StarFR-10 


£310.00 


Star FR-15 


£410.00 


StarXB24-10 


£410.00 





AMSTRAD PRINTERS 

The new Amstrad LQ5000 24 Pin Printer 
Our Price £299.00 

DMP4000 136 col 200 cps F/T50n/q £199.00 

DMP3250di £110.00 

Amstrad LQ3500 24 Pin £219.00 



PANASONIC PRINTERS 

Panasonic KX-P1 124 

Draft - 160 cps, NLQ - 63 cps £269.00 

Panasonic KX-P1180 

Draft - 132 cps, NLQ - 38 cps £165.00 



DAISYWHEEL PRINTERS 



Juki 6300 E445J 

Juki 6500 £699.00 



PRINTER CABLES (parallel) 



25M to 36M 

2M Parallel cable £10.00 

3M Parallel cable £11.50 

5M Parallel cable £14.00 

2M 36 Way Centronics to 36 Way Centronics ..£12.50 



PRINTER LABELS 



1 Across (1000) £6.00 

2 Across (2000) £8.75 



DtfVTA fax 



By Kempston, Diary -Paperbook 

Notepad - Calendar 

£28.00 



AMSTRAD PCW MAINTENANCE KIT 



PCW PRINTER 8256/8512 




£14.00 



MAXAFITPCW9512 




£29.00 



PRINTER 

Amstrad PCW 

PCW 8256/8512 Nylon 
PCW 8256/8512 Carbon 
PCW 8256/8512 Colour 
PCW 9512 Nylon 
PCW 9512 Carbon 
PCW 951 2 Colour 
Colours: Red, Blue, Green, 



QTY 

2+ 
£4.30 
£4.95 
£5.00 
£3.50 
£4.75 
£5.20 



QTY QTY 
5+ 10+ 



£3.90 
£4.50 
£4.75 
£3.30 
£4.50 
£5.00 



£3.50 
£4.00 
£4.50 
£3.00 
£4.00 
£4.75 



Brown, Orange or Purple 



DAISYWHEELS FOR PCW 9512 



AVAILABLE TYPE STYLES 

PRODUCT CODE TYPEFACE 

Courier 10 Prestige Pica 10 

Recta 10 Oratorio 

Letter Gothic 1 0/1 2 Prestige Elite 1 2 

Script 12 Mini Gothic 15 

Thesis PS 

Each £5.25 
For other printer ribbons please call 



PRINTER PAPER 


80 COLUMN LISTING PAPER 

11x9.5 2000 1 part plain 60gsm (Fanfold) 

11x9.5 2000 1 part plain 80gsm 

11x9.5 1000 2 part NCR 

A4 -2000 1 part plain 70gsm 

A4 - 1500 1 part plain 90gsm 

132 COLUMN LISTING PAPER 

11x14.5 2000 1 part plain 60gsm 

11 x 14 5 2000 1 part M/Rule 60gsm 


Price 

per Box 
£13.50 
£19.00 
£21.50 
£19.00 
£18.50 

£17.00 
£17.50 


For Large quantity price please 


call 



Mouse Pad £5.00 



With Master Scan you can 
reproduce any picture on your 
PCW screen - and print it out as 
many times as you like 

£49.00 

Incorporates graphics into packages such as The 
Desktop Publisher, Fleet St Editor Plus and 
Newsdesk. Send scanned images via a Modem to 
other PCW's anywhere! 



tt\^W PADS 1 !! 

As well as creating drawing from scratch you can 
load in scanned images from Master Scan and 
manipulate them using Master Paint's versatile 
tools. Then you can remove superfluous detail, fine 
tune the drawing using the zoom feature, and add 
text £13.00 



M^w 



MASTERSCAN 

AND MASTERPAINT 

£55.00 



FLIPPER 2 



"Like having an extra PCW" 

New version - easier to install, more options 

£29.00 



MINI OFFICE 



PROFESSIONAL PLUS 



® 



Mini Office Professional Plus 

(including Spellchecker) £29.00 

Spellchecker /Thesaurus only £14.50 



WORD PROCESSING 



ArnorProtext £35.00 

Arnor Pocket Protext £27.00 

New Word II £43.00 

Tasman Tasword 8000 £10.00 

Tasman Tasprint 8000 £12.00 

Tasman Taspell 8000 £1200 

Tasman Tas Sign £20.00 



DATABASES 



Comsoft Cambase II £30.00 

Database Manager Plus £25.00 

dBase ll-Ashton Tate £66.00 

Datastore Digita V.2 £28.00 

Masterfile 8000 £29.00 

Supertype - Digita V2 £16.00 

Sage Retrieve £42.00 

Sage Magic Filer £43.00 



ACCOUNTS 



Compsoft Stock Control £36.00 

Map Integrated Accounts £90.00 

Map Payroll £36.00 

Map Stock Control £39.00 

Money Manager Plus £25.00 

Sage Popular Accounts £56.00 

Sage Popular Accounts Plus £88.00 

Sage Popular Invoicing £41 .00 

Sage Popular Payroll £41.00 



SPREADSHEETS 



Amsoft Supercalc 2 £40.00 

Cracker II £29.00 



LOCOMOTIVE SOFTWARE 



Locoscript2 £19.00 

Locoscript 2 with Locospell £33.00 

Locospell2 £17.00 

Locomail2 £25.00 

Locofont £16.00 

Locofont2 £12.00 

Locofile 8256/851 2 £15.00 

Locofile9512 £25.00 

Printers Drivers Disc £17.00 

24 Pin Printer Drivers Disc £20.00 



DESKTOP PUBLISHING 



AMX Mouse Only £40.00 

Database Desktop Publisher with 

AMX mouse £58.00 

Fleet Street Editor Plus £37.00 

Stop Press (software only) £30.00 

Stop Press with AMX Mouse £58.00 

Micro Design II The first desk top publisher to 
treat graphics and text as equals £40.00 



GENERAL UTILITIES 



Arnor C £38.00 

Arnor Maxam £38.00 

C-stam (File Transfer System, PC & PCW) ...£34.00 

Digital Pascal MT+ £34.00 

Digital C Basic Compiler £34.00 

Digia Personal Tax Planner £20.00 

Digita Business Controller £65.00 

Mass Easy Labeller (specify computer) £23.00 

Prospell £20.00 

Rotate £17.00 



TUTORIALS 



lankey Two Fingers Touch Typing £16.00 

lankey Crash Course Typing (beginners) £16.00 

Reeltime PCW9512 Locoscript 2 £29.00 

Reeltime PCW8256/851 2 Locoscript £29.00 

Reeltime PCW8256/8512 Locoscript 2 £29.00 

CP/M Learn to use your Computer £29.00 



EDUCATIONAL SOFTWARE 



Magic Maths (Age 4-8) £14.50 

Maths Mania (Age 8-12) £14.50 

Better Maths (Age 12-16) £14.50 

Better Spelling (Age 8-Adult) £14.50 

Biology 1 (Age 12-16) £15.50 

Chemistry 1 (Age 12-16) £15.50 

Physics 1 (Age 12-16) £15.50 



LEISURE SOFTWARE 



Batman £10.00 

Brian Clough's Football £10.00 

Colusses Bridge £12.00 

Colusses Chess £12.00 

Match Day II £10.00 

Scrabble £12.00 

Steve Davis Snooker £12.00 

Time & Magic £10.00 

Trivial Pursuits £12.00 

Tommahawk £13.00 



Telephone: 01-700-4004. Fax: 01-700-4677 



All prices exclude Carriage + VAT 



JO>BN THE 




If you're looking for the best prices, best games, best offers and best service, 
then join Special Reserve. Or join Official Secrets if you're looking for more.. 



Special Reserve 



£5.00 



Club Privileges 



All club members benefit from: 



• Special offers: at prices you might not believe! 

• Bi-monthly Buyer's Guide each with details of 40 games, building to a valued reference. 

• Membership card with privilege number, and folder for the Buyer's Guides. 

• 24-hour despatch of stock items. Most lines in stock. 

• Each product sent individually by 1st class post. Many will fit through your letter-box. 

• 7-day sales hotline, open until 8pm weekdays, 10 to 5.30 Saturdays, 11 to 5 Sundays. 

• Written notification of unexpected delays. Order query line manned weekdays. 

• New titles may he ordered in advance and will be despatched upon publication. 

• Instant refunds available on request for delayed titles. 

• No commitment, no obligation to buy anything and no "minimum purchase". 



P rices include VAT and carriage 

All the best software, carefully selected and available to members only at truly 
extraordinary prices. You can buy at the same time as joining - or join now and 
select from our catalogue. There is no obligation to buy anything. 



Games 



RRP SRP 



BOB WINNER (ACTION) 24.95 8.49 

BRIAN CLOUGH FOOTBALL14.99 8.99 

BRIDGE PLAYER 2000 1 9.95 1 3.49 

BRIDGE PLAYER 2150 29.95 19.99 

CLASSIC GAMES 4, Bridge, Chess, 

Backgammon and Draughts 19.95 13.99 

CLOCK CHESS '89 19.95 13.99 

COLOSSUS CHESS 4 17.99 10.49 

CYRUS CHESS 2 24.95 6.49 

DISTRACTIONS (Compilation 

for 8000 series only) 1 9.95 11.47 

G. GOOCH CRICKET (8000) 1 9.95 1 4.49 

SCRABBLE 19.95 13.49 

STEVE DAVIS SNOOKER ...17.99 11.49 

STRIKE FORCE HARRIER 24.99 7.99 

TETRIS (8000 series only) ...19.99 6.99 

TOMAHAWK (Helicopter) ...19.95 13.49 

TRIVIAL PURSUIT 19.95 8.49 

Utilities 



Adventures RRP 

Level 9 

GNOME RANGER 19.95 

INGRID'SBACK 19.95 

LANCELOT 14.95 

SCAPEGHOST 19.95 

TIME &MAGIK 14.95 

Magnetic Scrolls 

CORRUPTION 24.95 

FISH! 24.95 

JINXTER 24.95 

THE PAWN 24.95 

Infocom 

HITCHHIKERS 24.99 

LEATHER GODDESSES . . .24.99 
STATIONFALL 24.99 

Abstract Concepts 

MINDFIGHTER 24.99 



12.49 
12.49 
10.49 
12.49 
10.49 

15.49 
15.49 
15.49 
15.49 

12.49 
12.49 
12.49 



RRP 

69.95 
..79.95 



AMS "COMPLETE DESKTOP PUBLISHER" WITH AMS MOUSE 
AMS "STOP PRESS" DESKTOP PUBLISHING WITH AMS MOUSE 

AMS "STOP PRESS" DESKTOP PUBLISHING 44.95 

D. BASE 2 RELATIONAL DATABASE 69.95 

GRAPHICS PLUS (C.P Software) 24.99 

HISOFT DEVPAC 80 49.95 

LIGHTNING BASIC PLUS 24.95 

MASTERFILE 8000 DATABASE 49.95 

MINI-OFFICE PROFESSIONAL PLUS 49.95 

MONEY MANAGER PLUS HOME ACCOUNTS 39.95 

PROTEXT WORD PROCESSOR (Arnor) 59.95 

SAGE ACCOUNTS PLUS 149.99 

SAGE POPULAR ACCOUNTS 99.99 

SAGE INVOICING 69.99 

SAGEPAYROLE 69.99 

SAGE CHIT CHAT 99.99 

SAGE RETRIEVE RELATIONAL DATABASE 69.99 

STOCK MARKET ANALYSIS 39.95 

SUPERCALC 2 SPREADSHEET 69.99 



SRP 

48.99 
54.99 
28.49 
51.99 
16.99 
39.99 
16.99 
32.99 
29.99 
26.99 
37.99 
99.99 
65.99 
49.99 
49.99 
69.99 
49.99 
27.99 
49.99 



MAXELL 



1 89 

3" DISK EACH 



Official Secrets £22.00 



Confidential 



32-page A4 bi-monthly glossy magazine 



Confidential is written for people who take their tun seriously. If you are into Adventure, 
Strategy, FRPs, MUGs, PBMs, D&Ds. or if you would simply like to see more from 
behind the scenes then Confidential is essential reading. Regular features include 
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News. Competitions, and The Boss Upstairs. Club participation is welcomed. 

\ jnOtTl& HdnCJGrLe\/e\ 9's award-winning 3-part adventure 

Starring Ingrid Bottomlow. "Go out and buy Gnome Ranger pronto" said Atari ST User. 
If you already did please tick the box for a Surprise Alternative. 



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Myth 



A mini-adventure by Magnetic Scrolls 



Magnetic Scrolls, authors of The Pawn, The Guild of Thieves, Jinxter, Corruption 

and Fish! have now written Myth exclusively for members of Official Secrets. 
Amazingly enough, it is included in the price of membership. Set in Ancient Greece, 
you play the part of a young god striving to prove himself worthy of immortality. You'll 
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Myth Reviews 

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or 
Official Secrets membersh ip £2 2 UK, £25 EEC or £30 World 
with Gnome Ranger and Myth P 1 or with Surprise Alternative and Myth 

8000PLUS 
Item 



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SUPERCALC 



SUPERCALC SURGERY 

Tim Nott turns agony uncle in the absolutely, positively, definitely, 
adverbially redundant last instalment of our SuperCalc series 



Supercalc's manual has a well-earned reputation of 
being everything a manual should be. However, the 
program's performance can be considerably 
enhanced by using other CP/M utilities that are not 
covered in the manual. The following collection of tips, 
wheezes and glitchfixes have been gleaned variously from 
the manual, other sources, and bitter experience. They are 
loosely connected by the theme of exploiting SuperCalc 
without letting it exploit you. 

Q: Why does SuperCalc run so slowly, and with much 
flashing of the red drive light? 

A: You are running it from the disc drive. In order to leave a 
enough memory in which to create a spreadsheet, many of 
SuperCalc's functions are kept in an overlay file (SC2.0VL), 
rather than in the main program (SC2.COM). To access 
these functions, SuperCalc must read them from the overlay 
file, and this is what causes the delay. 

Your M drive, apart from being an excellent device for 
losing important LocoScript documents, can speed things up 
no end. Copy SC2.COM, SC2.0VL and SC2.HLP onto it, 
and run the program from there. This also avoids strenuous 
disc changing gymnastics when saving or loading .CAL files 
on a single drive PCW. 

Q: What's a .CAL file? 

A: A .CAL file is what you get when you save a spreadsheet. 

Q: Anyway, it's still slow. 

A: By default, SuperCalc automatically recalculates the 
entire spreadsheet after each new entry is made. This can 
be quite useful when "what-iffing" on a set of figures, but is a 
pain in the lowest part of memory at other times. Turn this off 
by typing /G(lobal)M(anual) and then SuperCalc will only 
recalculate when told to with an exclamation mark [SHIFT 1]. 

Q: Why don't the delete keys work? 

A: SuperCalc2 was published for the PCW as an official 
Amstrad package, and comes tailored for the PCW. 
Unfortunately, they seem to have used Alexei Sayle's tailor. 
What CP/M understands as a "rubout" or backward delete 
SuperCalc interprets as a forward delete. This may or may 
not be because the program was published by Sorcim, which 
is Micros spelt backwards. To fix it, include the following lines 
in your key definition file. 
16N"T'127'" 
72 N "T'#98"' 
E#98"TAT'127'" 

Q: In my what? 

A: A key definition file is what SETKEYS works on. 
SETKEYS.COM is to be found on side 2 of the Amstrad 
Master discs, and as its name suggests, lets you set up the 
keyboard the way that you want it. Copy it onto your 
SuperCalc start-of-day disc, and using BASIC RPED 
(or any other method you may have of making simple 
ASCII text files) create a key definition file, called, say 
KEYS.SC2. To paraphrase the much-loved words of the 
Amstrad manual, this utility is not covered any further in 
this article, as the said manual covers it fairly adequately on 
pages 1 08 onwards. 



Q: / always seem to be forgetting to put double quotes in 
front of my text, and get a "Formula ERROR" message. So, 
I take the cursor back to the start, type in the quotes, which 
then obliterates the first letter of my text, so I type that back 
in, which obliterates the second letter, and so on... Why? 

A: First, don't feel guilty about forgetting the quotes - it 
happens to all of us - and remember that the [TAB] key will 
send the cursor straight back to the start of the line. The 
input line editor works in "overstrike" mode, that is, any 
character typed in replaces that under the cursor. LocoScript 
users, accustomed to "insert" mode (where a character 
typed in is inserted in front of that under the cursor), take to 
this as naturally as a duck to cycling. There is no known 
cure, but there are ways of easing the pain. Either 
remember to hit the [T] key to create a space before trying to 
insert a character, or reconfigure, say, the [LINE/EOL] ^---^^ 
key, which is unimportant to SuperCalc, to jump back ^^ 




Just forget it 

ED.COM, which comes with 
the compliments of Amstrad on 
side 2 of your system discs, 
represents an interesting 
experimental development in 
word processing. The 
breakthrough, inspired by the 
writing of authors such as 
William Burroughs, was to do 
away with the convention that 
what is displayed on the 
screen has any relationship to 
the finished text. This literary 
genre is now considered out of 
fashion, except by the writers 
of some software manuals. 



As if by magic the spreadsheet is loaded. Well, it's less to do with magic and more to do with 
SUBMIT.COM and SuperCalc's own XQT or executable files. 



B>sid h: SC2.COM 

CP/M 3 SID - Version 3.0 

;■..'■: PC EM 
7©8< ' 086 910C BAIT 
•S5ASS 
SA2S 24 23 
SA26 7? . 



SID.COM will help you to get the £s in a stable condition. 
Follow this shot for the main SC2.COM file. 




Follow this screen in order to alter the £ signs in the 
overlay file SC2.0VL. Remember always to use backups. 



Sorcim File Conversion Utility 
Version : 1.12 

hese are the File Conversions Available : 
ft. SuperCalc file to Comma Separated value file 

B. Conna Separate,:, vi.^c :.' . c . .■ - ■ ' :. .. : .'...- 

C. SuperCalc file to SuperData Format file 
_'. . S^ier'-I-ita ..:„-..;.: .'i-i .: . S^ierCalc f»l« 

. _::.... ;;.':-:-;... 

Enter Sour choice (A, B, C, D, or X) ? A 

Enter Source File Name : PBOG.CAL 
Dpening file : PBOG.CAL 

Enter Destination File Name : PBOG 



This is SDI or Super Data Interchange in action. Simply one way of outputting files from SuperCalc to other software. 
Comma separated files are commonly found as output from databases and the like. Not one Star Wars joke... .yet. 



33 8000 PLUS Decembers 



3UPERCALC 



The really, really useful PROFILE.SUB file 

The semicolon and ensuing comments should not be typed in, they only serve to explain what is 
happening. 



PAPER 11 


;set up printer for continuous stationery 


LANGUAGE 3 


;support the £ 


SETKEYS KEYS.SC2 


xustomise the keyboard 


DATUM 


;tell Supercalc today's date 


PIP 


;copy to M drive... 


<M:=SC2.*[row] 


;the Supercalc programs 


<M:=*.CAL 


;your spreadsheet(s) 


<M:=*.XQT 


;and any execute files 


< 


;that's enough PIPping 


M: 


;log on to M drive 


SC2 START 


;let's go! 



Fast and free 

VDE.COM is a public domain 
program available free from 
CP/M user groups, or at very 
little cost from firms such as 
Advantage of Cheltenham. It 
takes up only 1 0k of disc 
space, has facilities similar to 
LocoScripf s cut and paste, and 
is very fast as it handles files 
entirely in memory. I wouldn't 
be without it. 



to the start of the line and insert a double quote. This is the 
line for the key definition file. 
E #8F "tl T_T"" 

Q: Nothing happens when I press [SHIFT 3]. Why won 't 
SuperCalc support the £? 

A: Good question. Nigel Lawson tried, and look what 
happened to him. Less learned journals have stated explicitly 
that there is no way to get SuperCalc to print a pound sign. 
However, these authors are clearly missing an address mark 
or two. The LANGUAGE command, which comes on side 2 of 
the Amstrad system discs, and a little more key definition can 
scotch this myth. Although the explanation of 
LANGUAGE.COM on page 104 of the Amstrad manual states 
that there is no difference between the US and UK character 
sets, this is not true. The command LANGUAGE 3 replaces 
the hash sign with a pound sign, and the following line in the 
key definition file will restore [SHIFT 3] to its sterling glory. 
57 S "£" 

Q: That's all very well, but it doesn't help with the "floating $" 
option in the user-defined formats. 

A: There's no pleasing some people, is there? To get round 
this you must hack the SuperCalc programs themselves. 
Copy SC2.COM and SC2.0VL onto the M drive. Insert side 2 
of the Amstrad system discs and type SET M:[RW,DIR]. This 
will let you alter the files. Insert side 3 of the system discs and 
type SID M:SC2.C0M. This will load the SuperCalc program 
into SID, which stands for Symbolic Instruction Debugger 
(Stop giggling- American computer programmers use 
language differently from the rest of us). 

At the hash prompt, type S5A25. This will show you the 
byte at the address 5A25 , which should be 24, the hex ASCII 
number for the dollar sign. Change this by typing 23 
[RETURN], Type a full stop [RETURN] to let SID know that 
you have finished debuggering about, then WM:SC2.C0M to 
write the altered file back to the M drive. Press [STOP] to exit 
SID, and repeat for M:SC2.0VL, this time changing the byte 
at 1 589, again from 24 to 23. Copy the SC2 files back to a 
start of day disc, and lo, you will have a floating pound, but 
don't tell Mrs Thatcher. 

Q: What can I do with the Arrange command? 

A: The arrange command, which is invoked with /A followed 
by the details of what and how you want to arrange, sorts a 
row or column into order. This can be numerical, alphabetical, 
ascending or descending. For instance, a spreadsheet 



The key definition file- call it KEYS.SC2 

16 N "T'127"' 




72 N "T'#98"' 
E#98"TAT'127"' 
E#8F"TlT_T"" 
57 S "#" 



showing which of your customers owed you money might 
have the invoice dates in column A, the customers' names 
in column B and the amounts owing in column C. 
Arranging column A would shuffle the list into age of debt, 
bringing your slowest payers to the top of the list. 
Arranging column B would sort the list alphabetically, and 
arranging C in descending order would bring the biggest 
debtors to the top of the list. 



doesn't SuperCalc care about 



Q: Money, money, money - 
anything else? 

A: Yes. Although primarily designed as a business 
program, it does contain more refined mathematical 
functions, such as log, sin, cos, pi (to 16 significant 
figures) and square roots. It can be used in fields as 
diverse as engineering, knitting and central heating. 

Q: WhatisSDI? 

A: Nothing to do with /G(lobal)W(arfare). The SDI 
program that comes on side 2 of the SuperCalc disc 
enables you to import and export files to and from other 
programs, such as dBase II, and Basic listings. You can 
also make a plain text file of a spreadsheet by 
/O(utputting) it to disc. 

Q: What is a black box and what's in it for me? 

A: Didn't you read November's article? SuperCalc's 
execute command takes instructions from a file, rather 
than the keyboard, taking the drudgery out of typing in the 
same commands every time you use a particular 
spreadsheet. It can be used either while SuperCalc is 
running, or before it is loaded. For instance a handy file, 
called, say, STARTXQT consists of just two lines. 
/lprog,a 
& 

When SC2 START is typed in at the CP/M prompt, or by a 
PROFILE.SUB file, SuperCalc will load itself, skip the 
introductory screen, load a spreadsheet called 
PROG.CAL and pass control back to the user. 

Q: / use continuous stationery. This causes me great 
embarrassment when printing out my spreadsheets as 
SuperCalc prints over the perforations between each of 
the sheets. 

A: There is nothing to be ashamed of in using continuous 
stationery. Thousands of otherwise normal men and 
women do this. The use of the PAPER.COM utility on side 
2 of the Amstrad system discs will solve your problem, 
and the command is PAPER 1 1 . 

Q: How can I achieve the ultimate start of day disc? 

A: This is partly a matter of your own personal needs and 

inclinations, but my own start-of-day-and-well-on-into-the- 

afternoon disc would contain the following files: 

SC2.COM 

SC2.0VL 

SC2.HLP (or any file by that name) 

DATTIM.COM 

All these are from the SuperCalc disc, to which add, from 

side 2 of the Amstrad system discs: 

J14CPM3.EMS 

PAPER.COM 

LANGUAGE.COM 

PIP.COM 

SETKEYS.COM 

SUBMIT.COM 

All the .CAL and .XQT files you need 

A PROFILE.SUB and a KEYS.SC2 file, which you create 

yourself using RPED, LocoScript (make an ASCII file), 

ED.COM (showoff), or any other text editor, such as the 

excellent public domain VDE. The listings for these are 

shown in the boxes. ■ 



Amor's 1989 PCW Software Sale 



PROTEXT ... The Word Processor 

Protext is now firmly established as the alternative to Locoscript. 

All the features you would expect from a good word processor - many text editing commands, print 
commands, spell checking and mail-merging. The refinement and thought that has been put Into the 
program - logical keystrokes and commands, clear layout, speed and power ... all go towards making 
Protext ideal for the novice or the experienced user. 

* On-screen help * Typewriter mode * Insert or overwrite typing mode * Word count * Undelete feature 

* Move/copy/delete/print blocks of text * Box manipulation * Configuration * Personal dictionaries * Exec 
files * Two file editing * Keyboard macros * File conversion * Comprehensive Find & Replace * Foreign 
languages and accents * Program editing mode * Proportional printing, right justified * Conditional 
printing and loop constructs * Print any number of copies * Works with any printer * Calculator * Print 
labels * Use the maths/string functions to produce personalised invoices etc * 

* Compatible with PCW 9512 * Enhanced spelling checker - larger dictionaries, dictionary on drive M or on 
program disc * Many improvements based on customer feedback * 

"Protext deserves to be the system by which all other word 
processors are judged... a superb product your computer 
" The great strength of this package is its ease of use" cwta 
" Protext is the solution to all Locoscript s drawbacks" pcw 
" Makes Locoscript took like a snait soooplus 

"Simply the best word processing program to date for the 
PCW ... Locoscript is effectively dead" putting your 

AMSTRAD TO WORK 



Special Offer - Save £20 

Buy Protext together with the book 
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Protext + Book £49.90 



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... The Book 

At long last an independently 
produced book about Protext, 
written by Rob Ainsley. 

The book features a large section 
of tips for easy reference and is 
well illustrated with screen shots 
and printouts. 

It also includes a section written to 
help the Locoscript user to 
'convert' quickly to Protext. 

It is an essential purchase for any 
current or potential Protext user 
whatever their word processing 
experience. 

Protext.A PCW User's guide 
192 pages, illustrated paperback 

Price £9.95 + £1 post/packing 
(Post/packing is free if buying a 
piece of software) 



New low prices for CP/M languages 



MAXAMII 

Complete CP/M machine code development system 

* Macro assembler * nested conditional assembly * file 
inclusion * textual substitution of macro parameters 

* repeat loops * Full expression evaluation * Error listing to 
screen/file/printer * 8080 mode * Linking facility * Create 
object files for use with C * 

Window based monitor, with: 

* line assembler * disassembler * memory editor * find 
string * relocate * move memory * compare memory * fill 
memory * bank switching * symbolic debugger * single 
stepping * set memory limits for stepping * stack checking 

* conditional breakpoints * trace mode * edit registers 

* Editor is program mode of Protext (as for C) * 

"Maxam II -now the best gets even belief cwtacpc 

"A really excellent piece of software which, given the speed 
with which debugging can be done, will pay its way very 
quick!/ acu 

"The thing that struck me ... was the amount of thought 
and effort that has gone into this product cwtacpc 

"Maxam II is stunning ... the most complete and competent 
programming package around. Simple, speedy and 
sophisticated' amstrad action 



RRP £49.95 



Sale price £24.00 



Complete C development system 

* Full implementation of K&R standard * 

* Optimising compiler * Floating point 
arithmetic * 32 and 16 bit integer arithmetic 

* I/O and maths libraries * Conditional 
compilation * File inclusion * Macros 
♦Linker accepts C and assembler (with 
Maxam II) * Stand alone generator 
produces COM files 

Protext compatible editor:- 

*fast and easy to use *on screen help 

* two file editing * keyboard macros * fully 
configurable* powerful find and replace 

* exec files * compile from inside editor 

" very good value for money* amstrad pcw 

"Streets ahead in terms of programming 
power" amstrad action 

"In typical Amor fashion, they've taken their 
tone and got it right amstrad computer user 

"All the facilities necessary to write 
complete applications programs' 

POPULAR COMPUTING WEEKLY 

RRP £49.95 Sale price £24.00 



BCPL 

Flexible, fast, general 
programming language. 



purpose 



Extensive set of I/O libraries 
including access to CP/M routines. 
Example source files supplied, 
including full screen editor and all 
the libraries. Comprehensive 
60 page manual covers the 
language and gives details of the 
libraries. 

"Easy to use, yet both flexible and 
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"Good library of procedures... very 

fast 8000 PLUS 

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have you programming 

confidently very rapidly 

AMSTRAD ACTION 



RRP £24.95 Sale £12.00 



All programs run on PCW8256/8512, 9512, CPC6128 



ffe/easmg your micro's potent/a/. 



tWI/^Z 



Amor Ltd f£PJ, 611 Lincoln Road, Peterborough, PE1 3HA. Tel: 0733 68909 

All prices include VAT, postage and packing. Access/Visa/Cheque/Postal Order. Fax: 0733 67299 





L0C0SCRIPT2 



BIG PAGES AND 
LITTLE PAGES 

We show you how to use different sizes of paper with LocoScript 2 



LocoScript 2 



Disc nanagenent. 



fl=Actions f2=Disc f3=File f4=Grouw> fS=Do 



Drive A: 
167k used 



6k free 21 files 



Drive B: 
Ok used 



JjUllliJMUiU 



group 2 Ok group 6 Ok 
group 3 Ok group 7 Ok 



A:CRGUP0 20 files A:ADDP,ESS 1 file 
2 limbo files limbo files 

DOCUMENT ioOO 2k 
INDEXING. 3k 
INDEXING. NDX Ik 
KENNELS .INU 2k 
KEVS .S2B Ik 
MULTIPLY. MAS Ik 
PHRASES .SID Ik 
SETTINGS. STD Ik 
SHAZ .001 4k 
USERS . 3k 

8 hidden 133k 



New Paper Type 



Neu Character Style 
Character Styles 
For Character Set 

Standard 
For printer 

MATRIX 



Standard printer 
Printer defaults 



Write SETTINGS. STD 

EXIT 



4k free 2 files 
k group 4 Ok 
k group 5 Ok 
k group 6 Ok 
k group ? Ok 




1 ) To find out what paper types LocoScript 2 already has in store, open the Settings menu ([f6] tram the Disc 

Management screen). Select Paper Types. ((This is the same menu which you must use to create a new paper 

type (select first option: New Paper Type). Once the new paper type has been created, select Write 

SETTINGS.STD further down to write it to the program's permanent Settings file.)) 



Ti 



l=t,reate neu document E=Ldit document 

fl=Act ions f2=Disc f 3=Fi le f4=Group f5=Document 



Drive A: , Drive B: 

167k used 6k free 21 files Ok used Ok f 

Hjlil group 4 Ok 

.33 iK group 5 Ok 

group 2 Ok group 6 Ok 

group 3 Ok group 7 Ok 



AiGROUPO 20 files h:ADDR£SS 1 files « 
2 linbo files linbo files ' . 



1=1 HI M=Herg( 
f 7=Disc change f 8=0pt ion: 



4k free 2 files 

k group 4 Ok 

k group S Ok 

'k group 6 Ok 

k group 7 Ok 



HEADERS ,000 3k 



2 hidden 2k 



DOCUMENT. 000 2k 

INDEXING. 3k 

INDEXING. NDX Ik 

KENNELS .INU 2k 

KEVS ,S2B Ik 

MULTIPLY. MAS Ik 

PHRASES .STD Ik 

SEIIINGS.STD Ik 

SHAZ .001 4k 

USERS . 3k 

8 hidden 139k 



2) Select Paper Types and you will be presented with this menu. It shows which paper types have been 

written to the Settings file.To inspect any one of them, highlight the appropriate paper type with the menu 

cursor and press (ENTER). 



Drive A: 
167k used 



(Drive B: 
Ok used 



group 2 Ok group 6 
group 3 Ok group 7 



A:GRQUPO 20 files A 
2 linbo files 



A: ADDRESS 
linbo 



1 filesIM 
files 



HEADERS .000 



T=Y i 11 M=Mergt 

1TB f7=Disc change f8=Option< 



Ignore paper sensor 



» Set neu details 

Create new Paper Type 
Renoye Paper Type 




DOCUMENT !000 2k 

INDEXING. 3k 

INDEXING. NDX Ik 

KENNELS .INU 2k 

KEVS .S2B Ik 

MULIIPLV.MAS Ik 

PHRASES .STD Ik 

SETTINGS. STD Ik 

SHAZ .001 4k 

USERS . 3k 

8 hidden 139k 



3) This menu shows the height and width of the stored paper type as well as the number of lines that have been 
delegated to the top and bottom gaps respectively. When using cut sheet stationery, the top gap will always be 

6 and the bottom 3. 



One of LocoScript 2's major advances over its 
predecessor is its ability to handle different sizes of 
paper during printout. Up until now, we've only 
concentrated on using that most popular of sizes, 
A4. And, of course, many LocoScript users will be perfectly 
happy to continue using A4-sized printout; others have more 
adventurous requirements necessitating the use of 
alternately sized paper: large sheets of A3, for example, or 
smaller ones of A5 (respectively double and half the size of 
standard A4). And then there's 11" continuous stationery. 

When using different types of paper, both the document 
that will be printed out on it and the software that control the 
printer have to be notified in advance as to its dimensions. 
The printer needs to know, for example, just how long or 
how wide the paper on which it will be printing will be. 
Similarly, LocoScript 2 - because it automatically splits your 
document into pages as you type in the text - must know the 
maximum number of lines that it can put on each page. 

LocoScript 2 already holds the Paper Type details of A4, 
A5 and 11" continuous stationery in its Settings. Std file on 
your start of day disc. That's not to say, however, that you 
can't design your own paper types. LocoScript 2 can handle 
the details of up to ten different ones. 

Get set, go 

So, how do we get into this famous Settings menu to have a 
look around it? Easy. Insert your LocoScript 2 start of day 
disc in the drive. When you get to the Disc Management 
Screen, press [f6] to open the program's Settings menu. 
Choose the second option entitled Paper Types. The 
resulting menu shows the names of the three different paper 
types which LocoScript already - by default - knows about. 
Highlight the first option on the menu to see what details the 
program holds on A4-sized paper - and so on. 

As we saw last month, the height, width, top and bottom 
gaps of the paper are all supplied as a designated number of 
lines. If you're a little confused as to why the width of the 
paper is also supplied in this form (ie, 50 lines) that's 
because LocoScript 2 allows you to turn the paper on its 
side and print on it that way too (a widthways Landscape 
format rather than the conventional lengthways Portrait one). 
Press [ENTER] to go back to the Paper Type menu we were 
at a moment ago. 

Going for a different paper type 

Once you've decided that you would like to print out your 
document on A5-sized paper, for example, you must get 
back to the document and prepare it for the new format. 

Setting a different paper type means altering the 
Document Setup, a menu with which we should all, by now, 
be heartily familiar. From within editing mode, open the [f1] 
Actions menu and choose the Document Setup option. 
Once you're faced with that well-known array of menus at 
the top of the screen, open the [f5] Page one. Not 
surprisingly, perhaps, we're going to need to get into the 
Paper Type menu. Move down to the A5 option and tick it 
using the [+] key to the left of the space bar. 



36 8000 PLUS December 



L0COSCRIPT2 






You will then be prompted to specify which way round 
you want to use the paper: portrait (tall) or landscape (wide). 
Let's stick with portrait for the time being. 

Just to make sure that everything is as it should be, 
choose the last Show Paper Type option. There, you 
will learn that A5-sized paper is 50 lines long, 35 lines 
wide allowing a top gap of 6 lines and a bottom gap of 3. 
Press [ENTER] to confirm all these details and go back 
to the menu we were at before; this time select the 
option which is second from the bottom of the menu: 
Use Paper Type. 

Think again! 

If the A5-size page is too short to accommodate the 
header and footer zones that you have set in your 
document's Page Layout, you will be presented with a 
LocoScript error screen which informs you that the page 
you have designed won't fit on the paper. When this 
happens you must do one of two things: either alter the 
Page Layout or choose a different paper type. Select 
the appropriate option. 

And so to the printer 

Once you have instructed the software to print out the 
document in question on A5 paper (through the Document 
Setup), you must also warn the printer. This couldn't be 
easier. All you have to do is start the printing process by 
placing the file cursor over the filename back at the Disc 
Management Screen and pressing [P]. 

LocoScript should present you with a screen that 
prompts you to change from the default paper type (usually 
A4) to the new or 'intended' one (the A5 paper type). 
Consequently, select the Change to Paper intended for 
Document option. LocoScript 2 then, with a minimum of 
intervention from you, has set up the printer for the same 
paper type as the document. You're ready to go! 

Setting up your own paper type 

This will involve making changes to the Settings. Std file, 
accessed from the Disc Management Screen by pressing 
[f6]. This time, however, you will want to access the New 
Paper Type option at the top of the menu. Alter the current 
paper type menu that is then displayed (it will probably be 
the A4 format details) to suit your new requirements. It is 
important that you enter these details - especially the line 
allocations - accurately. 

The height and width of your new paper type are 
especially important and are calculated as follows. 
Height = length (in inches) of paper x 6 (document base line 
pitch). This calculation will give you the length of the paper 
in line numbers. 

Width = width of the paper (in inches) x 6. 
To calculate the length of continuous stationery, measure the 
paper from perforated line to perforated line. It can only be 
printed on one way so its width is irrelevant. 
With continuous stationery, the top and bottom gaps you 
decide on are purely arbitrary: 2 and 2, 3 and 3 - and so on. 
As far as single sheet stationery is concerned, you must 
always make the top gap at least 6 and the bottom gap at 
least 3. These allowances are the minimum that the PCW 
printer can cope with. 

Extra sensory paper perception 

You can choose whether to Ignore [the] paper sensor or 

not. This will depend, however, on whether you are using 
continuous or cut sheet stationery. The paper sensor is 
something which has been built in to the printer and which 
detects the end of the paper on which it is printing. This is 
only useful, however, when using continuous stationery, 
as it will stop the printer from trying to print after the last 
sheet of the roll. 

When using cut sheet paper, the paper sensor will, 
irritatingly, signal the end of the paper before you've had a 
chance to print out the page's last few lines. When using 



single sheet stationery, therefore, tick this option. 

Naming and storing your new paper type 

Once you've set up the details for your new paper type, don't forget to save it to a 
new name. Go back up to the top of the menu, press the [-] key (to the right of 
the space bar) to clear the old paper type name and key in the new one. This can 
be up to 1 2 characters long. Finally press [ENTER]. This takes you straight down 
to the single command option Create new Paper Type at the bottom of the 
menu. You will be returned to the previous menu. 

All you have to do now is save your new paper type to the Settings. Std file to 
ensure that the next time you load LocoScript 2, it will be sitting there as a viable 
option ready to use. Check, therefore, that you have your LocoScript 2 start of 
day disc ready and waiting in the drive and select the Write SETTINGS.STD 
option in the Settings menu. ■ 



fl:GRDUF0 

Layout 



/DOCUMENT. 000 Document setup. 
Pil2 LSI CR+0 LP6 



i=Hcuons tc=Layoui 



|fS=PageBiSV3ffi 



Printer idle, Using A: M: 
Page line 



/54 



-end of header 1 : used for all pag 

-end of footer 1 : used for all pag 

end of header 2 : used for no page 

end of footer 2 : used for no page 



' Portrait (Tall) 
Landscape (Hide) 



U se Paper T ape 



4) To print out a document using a particular paper type (A5, say), open the document (using the (E]dit key). 

Open the [ft] Actions menu and select Document Setup. Open the [f5] Page menu and highlight Paper 

Type. This menu allows you to choose the paper type you want to use. 



A:GR0UP0 
Layout 



/DOCUMENT. 000 Document setup 
Pil2 LSI CR+0 LP6 



|fS=Page| 



Printer idle. Using A: M: 
Page line 



-end of header 1 : used for all pag 

end of footer 1 : used for all pag I 

end of header 2 : used for no page 

end of footer 2 : used for no page 




■J Single sheet 
Continuous stationery 



•I Ignore paper sensor 



5) Select the paper type you want to use - in this case, the A5 paper type - by ticking A5 and selecting 

Show Paper Type. Once youVe checked the relevant details, press [ENTER] and select the last option 

from the previous menu (Use Paper Type). 



Disc management, 



Pri nter idle, Using A: M: 

ii t HI iB til jjii WTSm 3ti tT< ■ B %\ II 'GIF 



Document and current printer do not match 
Paper types differ 



LETTERS 13k group 4 0k 

I SAMPLES 0k group S 0k 

'.k group 6 0k 

k group 7 0k 



limbo files 



,=ureate neu nocument t=tait document i^ 

:l=Actions f2=Disc f3=Eile f4=Group f5=Document f6=Settings f7=Disc change f8=0ptions 



irive A: . Drive S: empty Drive M: 

,67k used Sk free 21 files 0k used 0k free files 14k used 32k free 6 files 

MIS group 4 0k LETTERS 13k group 4 0k 

:SS iffi group 5 0k SAMPLES 0k group S 0k 
group 2 0k group 6 
group 3 0k group 7 



A:CR0UP0 20 files A: 
3 limbo files 

DATA .S2B Ik I 

DATAFILE.000 Sk 

DOCUMENT. 000 2k 

INDEXING. 3k 

INDEXING, NDX Ik 

KENNELS ,INU 2k 

KEVS ,S2B Ik 

MULIIPLV.MAS Ik 

PHRASES .STD Ik 

SETTINGS.STD Ik 

SHAZ .001 4 k 

8 hidden 139k 



6) Back at the Disc Management Screen, check that the file cursor is on the document to 

print out and press the [P]rint key. This menu prompts you to switch from the current paper 

type to the one you've just selected. 



U se the current pa per 
Cancel opera 1 1 on 



nanne to paper intended tor document 



38OOO PLUS 37 



■ 







t 22.2.29 

^ ^ ° ' Ul iAe\f | ueurlk'vUir ?><|Ure I L* 

}A \oaAcJL 'feoo UJuwiAa cUtkUes <w\JL a.treile across the (tol wee races ofti 
card c£4u nfA <JUu W YotU. "Itai |aci Wt i\ *prt(kckd WT>e Chvpre to 
lorn 4\t <Tv«LUrr€ InTen^ationAA Sales a* a eW value let in -we \act <% ine 
Woaju tettiAa on LAcoeTuies frompleA me To risk a (Wr on'i\. /ou oa mmmuk 
\\m 'plea^T lam »m 'i came in ad lt~\. tro ranter OjcIumU correctL 
nameX ftu \U\ ( Second an<l wird in itie actual |\nishina order and I L 
lotsK Id none $>r Ajl Tn'ca^t ! 

IV Wen usuv\ ™* H*^* sine*. Ine boodioooi 
meeting "in OuL and \ can Vionestk sou Inat I recooereJl is cost u>*Akft\4wa. 
first week. \ve uscJL it most $u<xe*<\u)L in \W Yuatar-clavs facts al^ouah'il 
'Per |t>crr\s well tn am* face ooWre wre. vs caouaVn ewosexd \ornn, incLluu Ine 
vecvx '(&*' HaiieAs ca ^ul V\«ct, In ^act, ft\e onUlimi. it realU aet* ^V\ina$ 
confused seems to loe in ita lou>-rdt«d handicaps. Overall, I W* founX 
jour Wftyun +o U an eycelUt aid to stitcL* mu Ukie and I am vera 
?W to Ue to urfc and WU* ^r ?» TUer. 1 Unt A. pridm 
midlg to tru to aet wjj |4er to WW U computer, ace Al even jc 
?ens»nef $. fis W W U a Wen ? unW all his life I tUK\ U a tft&r 
-p«* mU\A aive ten So*e_ en>meat h J* *Wa*, 4Uk \ nou> 
fad M \ cant ajk W auau ^rvN -fct WuUfA \ 

- just one of the many unsolicited letters we receive highlighting the potential success of 
this expert system. Over two years on the market, still winning and still the same price. 

TREAT YOUR DAD (AND YOURSELF) FOR CHRISTMAS! £57.50 

Available for IBM PC and compatibles. Amstrad PCW. Atari ST. BBC, Amstrad CPC6128 inc VAT p&p 
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Telephone 061-330 0184 



E3 




BASIC EDITING 

Steve Patient has a few words with RPED, the BASIC text editor that 

comes free with the PCW 



The PCW computer comes with so much on disc that 
many users simply don't get around to using most of 
it. Apart from LocoScript, of course, there isn't a 
great deal of documentation concerning it all. The 
consequence of such obvious largesse on the part of 
Amstrad is that many PCW owners never find out how to 
use a lot of the software when and if they glimpse its 
potential. RPED, the BASIC utility, is a case in point: many 
users simply don't realise that it's there. 

RPED is a text editor. When people talk about text 
editors generally, they are usually referring to simple, small 
programs which have been designed to write pure Ascii text 
files. RPED was written primarily to make the lives of BASIC 
programmers a little easier; it can be just as invaluable, 
however, for anyone who is in the business of regularly 
creating short text files - Submit files, for example. 

8000 series owners will find RPED (along with a Submit 
file called RPRD.SUB) on side 2 of the master discs 
supplied with the machine. 9512 owners, on the other hand, 
will find it on their CP/M discs. To get the most out of it, and 
to make familiarising yourself with it as easy as possible, it's 
worth making up a start-of-day disc that includes the 
following files: BASIC.COM, RPED.BAS and SUBMIT.COM. 
Don't forget that you must also have your operating system 
file on the disc. This is the one that ends in .EMS on your 
CP/M disc. 

It isn't worth including RPED. SUB for the following 
reason: every time you exit from RPED, you return to the 
system prompt (A:> or M:>). This is extremely irritating if 
you are using RPED to write BASIC programs, which is by 
far the most common use to which it is put. So the first thing 
you'll do with this new disc and your newfound text editor is 
to write a new ED. SUB file from which to run it. 

With your new disc in the A drive type: 
BASIC RPED 

This will start BASIC, load the text editor, and run it all in 
one go. You will find yourself at the opening screen where 
you get several alternatives, none of which will seem 
particularly obvious. 

Press for service 

Press [f3] and you will be asked for a filename. The default 
disc drive is A, which will probably be all right. If it isn't, then 
the right and left cursor keys will move the cursor onto and 
off the drive letter, allowing you to change it. Now type ED 
followed by a full stop (to move to the filetype area) and 
then SUB. When you press [RETURN], you will find 
yourself in the editing screen with the cursor at the top 
right hand corner. 

Type in the following lines just as you would in 
LocoScript: 

BASIC RPED [RETURN] 
BASIC [RETURN] 
ED.SUB [RETURN] 

Now press [EXIT] and you will be back at the opening 
screen. Pressing [EXIT] again will take you back to the 
prompt - not to BASIC. You've just finished your first editing 
session in RPED. The reason for creating a new submit file 
will be explained later. V~~~^ 

RPED was never intended to be a word processor; )^> 



I 



ind delete keys on both text and Filenames. Other features include: 

D toggles insert/overstrike node, aiUil aborts the edit, BSI1 ends the edit 



ttg To edit last screen 

Jfcj To ed i t neu screen 

ii! To edit existing Pile 

[3911 To quit 



Getting into RPED is a two part process. At the opening screen you must tell the program whether you're 

opening a new file ([f3]), editing a file already on disc ([11]) or simply renaming the file you already have in 

memory ([f5]) in order to write it to a new file. 



mi =DEL line U U 3 3 IU1E 3iU! 111113 IS1I 



10 open "0",l,"testlO" 

20 count=200 

30 uhi le(count>0) 

40 print til, "This is line number ", count 

SO count=count-l 



Once into the editing screen, it's extremely easy to create and edit files. In this example, a short program to test the 
editor is being written. Short files are best, as it can take a long time to scroll through hundreds of lines. 



iUl U =iii5 line SHI =DEL line [1 It 3 3 ISUE 331! Will 1101 liUUliUI 11911 aiUii 



RPED with a file containing the maximum number of lines (in reverse order to save scrolling through). Loading and 
saving a file of this length takes about four seconds. 



line Bill -DEL U 



u u a a iam ^"" tnaa uui wam 



Loading in a modified file with 220 lines resulted in the last 20 failing to appear. Aborting the edit leaves a file 
unchanged, but saving this one would lose the 20 lines for ever. 



39 8000 PLUS Decembers 







Technical writer 

The RPED text editor was written 
by Roland Perry, who is Technical 
Director of Amstrad. It is found on 
the Amstrad MS-DOS machines 
as well, the PC1512, 1640 and so 
on. It shows just how useful - and 
how portable - programs written 
in BASIC can be. 



Nutters only 

If you really must have RPED, 
return to BASIC. There are two 
approaches. The first is to 
unprotect the program. Create an 
empty unprotected file, load 
RPED and merge your empty file 
with it; save it under a new name 
and you should have an 
unprotected version. Now you 
can find line 19 and change the 
SYSTEM command to an END. 
Alternatively, if you have a 
version of BASIC that won't do 
this, use SID's S command to 
change the encrypted SYSTEM 
token at address 05A1 H from 
2EH to 1DH in the original 
protected file. 



40 8000 PLUS December! 



it affords as simple a way of writing a text file as possible. 
This means that you're now going to have to work very hard 
to forget all those clever things you learnt how to do in 
LocoScript. RPED will do almost none of them. 

Go back into RPED and create a new file using the [f3] 
function key. Now you can do a little experimenting and see 
just how RPED works. The first thing to try is writing a line 
longer than the screen will allow. You will discover that when 
you reach the end, the last word doesn't wrap onto the next 
line. In fact, if you keep typing, you simply replace the last 
character in the line endlessly. The maximum line length you 
can have is 88 characters. It would be helpful if all listings 
sent to us were written using RPED. 

Tops and bottoms 

Using the right and left cursor keys in conjunction with the 
backward and forward [DEL] keys allows you to edit any line. 
As soon as that line meets with your approval pressing 
[RETURN] (from anywhere on the line) takes you to the 
beginning of the next line. You can't split a line by using 
[RETURN] in the middle of it. 

Another thing you can't do is to join two lines together by 
pressing forward [DEL] at the end of one line or backward 
[DEL] at the beginning of another. Neither is there a Find, 
Replace or Page up and Page down facility of the kind you've 
been used to using inside word processors. 

Having said that, RPED is a full screen text editor. Unlike 
the BASIC line editor, RPED allows you to move freely 
around the screen using the cursor keys. The screen will 
scroll down if you try to cursor off the top (provided there is 
any more of the file) and similarly it will scroll up if you hit the 
bottom of the screen. It's also quite friendly - if it has a lot of 
work to do it will politely ask you to wait (top right hand 
corner) while it works behind the scenes. 

One of RPED's really useful features is that you can start 
writing from any point on the screen. The editor will fill in any 
preceeding gaps for you with space characters. This gives a 
very smooth feel when using the program. Against this, there 
is the fact that RPED doesn't accept the [TAB] character - 
nothing happens at all on pressing it. 

Because it has been written in BASIC, RPED has a few 
major limitations. The one that produces most complaints 
from regular users is the 200 line limit. Since RPED works 
entirely in available memory, it has to have some way of 
limiting file size. Roland Perry decided to limit the number of 
lines. For those using short lines, it can be irritating to know 
that there is probably a lot of room left. 

End of the line 

Once you reach line 200, RPED won't provide any more 
lines on which you can write. Now this needn't be all that 
bad news; what is serious is that it throws any extra lines 
in a long file away. If you load source code written in 
another program and then save it again to a file with the 
same name, you will find that everything after line 200 
has been lost. 

The reason the limit isn't serious is that if you're writing 
files that long, the time it takes to get from one end to the 
other is unacceptable anyway. The 200 line file used to test 
the program took 33 seconds to scroll from beginning to end 
and 42 seconds to scroll all the way back again. If you're 
working with long files, you really need a dedicated 
programmers' editor. 

If you're writing BASIC programs it really is much easier 
to edit them using a full screen editor, so it makes sense to 
use RPED, which is free. But to get the best from it you need 
to give it every chance. For example, all your working 
programs - BASIC and so on, should be loaded into drive M 
at the beginning of a session for speed. You can keep your 
program files on A for security but run BASIC from M. 

Even with the extra speed of the M drive, constantly 



Command 
structure 

Although all the commands that RPED obeys - and there aren't 
all that many to learn - are included In the program Itself, they 
aren't explained at all. Here's a complete list with brief details on 
each one. 

Opening screen 

[ft] Edit existing file - Choose this option to edit an existing file. 

You'll get an error message if RPED can't find it. 

[f 3] Edit new screen - This also refers to a file. If you want to 
create a new tile, choose this option. If you do choose this and the 
filename you give exists, then the file will be overwritten. 

[f5J Edit last screen - if you've been working on a file and pressed 
[EXIT], you can make RPED write to a new file. Useful for saving 
different versions of a file or creating backups. 

[EXIT] - Quits RPED and takes you back to the command line - 
but see the main text for one way around this. 

Editing keys 

[+] - Changes from normal Insert mode - where new characters 
can be inserted into text -to overwrite mode where new 
characters replace existing ones. 

[EXIT] - Quits editing screen and returns to opening screen. 

[STOP] - Abandons the current file you're working on and returns 
to the editing screen. If the file existed before, it is unchanged; if it 
didn't, then there will be an empty file on disc with the name of the 
abandoned tile. 

Up arrow - Moves cursor up a line; if there is one. 

Down arrow - Moves cursor down a line - as far as line 200, 

where it stops. 

Left arrow - Moves the cursor to the left margin, where it stops. 

Right arrow - Moves the cursor to the right margin, where it stops. 

[EOL] - Moves the cursor to the end of the current line. 

[SHIFTpOL] - Moves the cursor to the beginning of the line. 

[RETURN] - Moves the cursor to the beginning of the next line. 

[CUT] - Deletes the line the cursor is on. 

[ALT][down arrow] - Inserts a new line below the current line 






returning to the prompt is irritating. The little submit file you 
created right at the beginning can help. With all your 
programs on M, type 
SUBMIT ED 

and RPED will come up on the screen. When you quit 
RPED, BASIC will run automatically, called up by the 
Submit file. Of course next time you run RPED, you will 
again lose BASIC; this time, however, the Submit file calls 
itself which places you back into RPED. Quitting this puts 
you back into Basic and so on. 

Since Basic takes just a second or two to load from 
drive M with no typing involved, the irritation factor is 
greatly reduced. 

If you ever do want to get back to the prompt, just 
press [STOP] after pressing [EXIT] from RPED; it's all 
pretty simple really. ■ 




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ALL OUR PRICES INCLUDE VAT 



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Price List 

AMSTAT1 

AMSTAT2 

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AMSTAT4 

AMSTAT6 

AMSTAT7 



ANY 2- 15% DISCOUNT 
ANY 4 - 20% DISCOUNT 
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PC 

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m£i I AND PACKAGING IN THE 



CHEQUES AND P. O.s TO: 

5. C. COLEMAN LTD. 

33 LEICESTER ROAD, ASHBY-DE-LA-ZOUCH 

LEICESTERSHIRE, LE6 5DA 

TEL: 0530 415919 

24 Hour Answerphone. Technical enquiries after 6.00pm 



m 



FREE 3" CLEANING KIT WORTH 
OVER £5.00 WITH EVERY ORDER 



MAXELL 3" CF2 DISKS (uncased) 

10 x £20.90 

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a trademark of AMSTRAD PLC and is used under licence 




^K»©?©00 ^S©l 



• • * LocoScript Users • • • 
TempDiscs - Instant Templates 

professionally designed by a 
Member of the Institute of Word Processing 



FREE - 24 dual coloured Christmas 

bordered continuous labels with all 

orders over £5 before Dec. 10th. Same 

labels £1 .50 per 1 00 send SAE for 

FREE sample. 



COMPUTER SHOPPER 

SHOW ALEXANDRA 

PALACE. Brian Thurston 

is with Locomotive 

Software STAND Kl. 



a showcase for the features of LocoScript" cWithAPCW Sept 87 
extremely professional, a worthwhile purchase" Your Amstrad PCW Dec '87 
excellent, instructions are precise and well presented" APCW Mag Aug '87 
no LocoScripter should be without one" 8000 Plus June 89. 

TempDisc 8.2 £19.95 

A Double Density disc with 133 files (706k) for LocoScript 2. It includes LocoMail* and LocoChar features. 
All Discs ordered direct are personalised. 

♦ CHRISTMAS: Cards, New envelopes with Christmas designs, bordered greetings, Christmas header, 
and these Christmas LocoCharacters. 

as * i3». ;*? ss* •# m ^ \hi 5«& <?» s£ m 

♦ GENERAL: Lifetime diary'lto yr2100!), 2 yr calendar, agenda, minutes, 5 label choices', envelopes* 
(inc. New designedlst Class, AirMail, Private, Personal etc), disc labels, menu, order form, 
organisor/planner templates, compliments, choice of 13 instant letterheads. 

♦ FINANCE & FIGUREWORK: Invoices*, statement*, calculator*, spreadsheet layouts*, metric 
convenor file*, payment advice*, annual statement of account. 

♦ WRITERS: Authors, script layouts for film, TV and stage. 

♦ LISTS & FORMS: School marking chart, weekly diary, inventory, appointment diary, shipping doc, 
production schedule, personal file, c.v., will, template with 9 choices of vertical lined layouts (simply add 
your own headings). 

♦ SOCIAL & SPORTS: Star signs, family tree, automatic fixture lists* , K0 draw and chart* , first day 
cover', tickets*, party invitations, league tables, apology for abysmal behaviour at a party, screen-art and 
d.i.y., New LocoChar Artset. 

♦ LCOSCRIPT FILES: Template. Std with prepared Stock Layouts, Pitch guide, Settings. Std with 10 
preset choices, ingenious use of Phrases. Std files. 

Other versions (with file variations) of TempDisc: 

for LocoScriptl TempDiscl -double sided Drive A...., £17.95 

for LocoScript2 TempDisc2 - double sided Drive A £17.95 

PCW 9512 owners, TempDisc9 - double density Drive A £19.95 

TempDisc UpGrades £7.50 - UpDates £6.00 

5 V4 inch discs optional. 




TempMate (Design Copyright Sept 1986) 
MARGINS, TABULATION AND LINE POSITIONING 

Get them right first time! 

Suitable for all word processing. Versions for all character pitch sizes, for 'Landscape' printing 
and mini planner TempMates. PCW 8256/8512 users should ask for the Standard version. 
Place the grid over your form or letterhead and correct positions for Margins, Tabulation and 
Lines are clearly indicated. It's so simple it doesn't need further explanation! Reviewers 
have said; 

like many simple things extremely useful" BBC CEEFAX. 

"excellent" CompWAPCW Sept 1987. "wonderfully simple idea" Your APCW Jan 1987. 
''excellent, there are a umber of word processing aids of this kind on the market but this is 
the best I have seen' APCW Aug 1987. 
right olace first time think of all those trees you could save" 8000 Plus Dec 1986. 

WORD PROCESSING RULER 
The Page Boy word processing ruler is a clear PVC ruler which measures characters per inch 
at 17, 15, 12, 10, 5 (lOd), 6 & 7 V2 and, lines per inch at 5, 6, 7 V2 and 8. It also includes 
a centimetre line and the '10' line doubles as an inch measure. In total it has 13 options. 

TT PATIENCE - Solo Card Games 
Six games of playing card patience. YAPCW said "ingenious and highly addictive". 
Top marks from 8000 Plus for "addictiveness". Includes an emerency 'cover-up' in case the 
milkman interrupts you! 

LOCOFILE USERS - DISC OF SYNONYMS 
WordDisc. Approx 6,000 main words & 33,000 options, with space to expand. 

TempMate £4.95 TT Patience £14.95 

Page Boy £2.45 WordDisc £14.95 

TempMate & Page Boy £6.45 5 CF2 Discs in desktop pedal bin £13.00 

2 TempMates £7.00 10 CF2 Discs in desktop pedal bin .£23.00 

Quantity and trade prices on request. Retail, schools and local authority enquiries welcome 

All prices include VAT and UK Post and Packing. 48 hour despatch. 



IS •Dttnby Tmtue, 'D&unith 



■a Marines »oieb 






1 («»»> 17M»« 



Thurston Techniques 

FREEPOST 

Exmouth 

Devon EX8 2YZ 

0395 277496 

(Fax 0395 272693) 



GAMES 



SUSPENSION 
BRIDGE 



Cliche number 121 from a series of 
millions: bridge is for wealthy 
intellectuals. Think again with CP 
Software's Bridge Player Galactica 2150. 



Dealer East 
Uul . None 


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In a nutshell 

A worthy improvment 
on an old favourite. 
Quick play. Loads of 
options. Dull graphics 
and no atmosphere. 
The new manual and 
tutor make up for most 
faults. All in all, worthy 
of the Christmas 
stocking. 



The bidding is over and yoi 


, as South, have played a blinder Now are you ready to 
make that contract? 


Dea ler 
Uul . 

Contract 
Dec larer 


East 
None 
5+ 
North 






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This looks very much like a walkover but what do East and West have up their sleeves 
in order to foil your 5 diamond contract? 









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H 1 


Hand, no . 2 








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honours scored 




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Obviously they had something. You can look back and see what went wrong or try 
again with another game. 



Produce a 'game' package which includes a well written 
88 page manual and you are probably on the way to a 
hit. Make sure that the manual is written with the 
guidance of a twice world champion and teacher at the 
London Bridge School and you will definitely impress. 

CP Software's Bridge Player 2000 has been with us for a 
few years now. It has always played a good game. This new 
repackaged version looks very similar indeed when in play. 
Galactica 2150 retains the ALCOL system of play, and keeps 
its graphics to a utilitarian minimum; no playing cards or 
Omar Shariffs flying around the place. In the long run this is 
probably a boon rather than a bane to the serious player as 
it means that play is rapid. 

The program accepts the use of five conventions 
including Gerber, Unusual No Trump and Grand Slam Force 
(Josephine). These are additions to Stayman and Blackwood 
which its predecessor understood. It will not, however, 
initiate any of them except in Tutor mode. 

The Tutor mode is a slight misnomer for the complete 
novice to the game. You will still need to be aquainted with 
such arcane terms as 'singleton', 'ruffing' and honour points. 
For the slightly more advanced player - even the person 
who has just got to grips with the game - Galactica has a lot 
to offer. 

Grand Slam thankyou mam! 

You always play South except when your partner becomes 
the declarer; you then play both North and South. This 
avoids you having to take the position of Dummy and having 
to sit back and watch the play. You can choose to play a 
very basic game with the computer dealing random cards 
and all four players' hands showing. If this bores you, then 
you can deal with only your hand showing. 

These options alone should keep even the most avid fan 
exploring the program for a good few evenings. It must be 
said that Bridge is essentially a social game and the really 
serious player will probably miss some of the cut and thrust 
which goes on within bidding and play. Then again, the really 
serious player could be making large amounts of money 
playing the game. With this in mind, it is a good idea to take 
your time over the tutored hands which are detailed in the 
manual in a pleasantly concise manner. 

Lead by the hand 

You can choose to play hands in any order depending on 
your preference for Finesse, Squeeze, or the many other 
possible permutations. You are not nannied by Nicola 
Gardener (the co-writer and world champ) who comes 
up with lines such as this one from hand 96: 'North leads 
S9 (nine of spades) to your SA (ace of spades) - there is 
no point in holding up.' This particular hand introduces 
you to the 'entry destroying play known as the Merrimac 
coup'. As you can see, the play is not only detailed, it is 
given some verve. 

Play away-way 

During the bidding and play itself, pressing the space bar will 
allow the computer to make the best bid for you. This is a 
type of cheat mode which, if used properly, can be as useful 
as the tutor. Play is fluid enough to give a good player a run 
for their money. You can choose to have most points in every 
deal but this will probably begin to grate after a while. The 
best way for the advanced player to use Galactica 2150 is 
with randomly dealt hands. Once completed, the game can 
be saved to disc allowing you to relive your victories or 
defeats at leisure. 



BRIDGE PLAYER GALACTICA 2150 



GRAPHICS 2/5 FEATURES 4; 

DOCUMENTATION 5/5 CHALLENGE 4/ 

8000 PLUS VALUE VERDICT 15/20 



mm xi4 



42 8000 PLUS December 89 



GAMES 



The PCW is an ideal machine for the text adventure. 
Previous games such as Gnome Ranger, Launcelot 
and The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy have proved 
this to be true. Scapeghost looks set to join this roll 
call with a place of honour. 

The game is split into three sections. These can be- 
played in any order, but be warned: the chances of surviving 
part two without first gaining experience from part one are 
negligible. This goes double for part three! 

You play In-Spectre Alan Chance (as in 'ghost of a..') 
which should give you some idea as to the humour involved 
in the game. Your first realisation is that you are dead. It then 
transpires that you have been framed and that the real 
crooks include an officer in the drugs squad. This is more 
than one red blooded bobby can take, even if the blood is a 
trifle clotted by now. Your task, in the three nights left to you 
on earth, is to clear your name and nab the real crooks. 

As a new ghost, your powers are weak and you will need 
to gain some allies. Luckily you are presented with ghostly 
comrade-in-arms, Joe Danby, the local publican. He 
becomes your 'spirit' guide. Joe is a friendly soul who 
introduces you to the other inmates of the cemetery. 

Soul searching 

Some of the solutions require lateral thinking which is so 
lateral it is almost offside. Others are fairly straightforward 
once you've cracked the humour of the writers. This is 
essential by the way. None of the puzzles are too difficult for 
the beginner, nor would they insult the more experienced 
adventurer. The only hint we're prepared to drop about the 
first section is that you should be nice to animals. 

The atmosphere throughout part one is very effectively 
built up with the help of some very good characterisations. 
Your allies are all fairly eccentric characters and give a 
distinctly gothic feel to the plot. There are also very few Sam 
Spadeisms. 

Once you have made your way through the first night, 
foiling the villains along the way, you enter a very different 
atmosphere. The first thing to do is to save the game 
position to disc. This will keep your score and save you 
having to replay part one in future. The second night sees 
you accompanied only by Joe who appears to have 
developed a touching dog-like attachment to you. You're the 
one in control so don't worry if he drifts off occasionally; he'll 
be back. 

Shiver my timbers 

You are allowed out of the cemetery in order to investigate 
and collect evidence from the crooks' old hideout. This place 
holds some terminally bad memories for you. A nice touch 
from the writers makes this section extraordinarily effective: 
by concentrating very hard, you can call up past images. 
These are conveyed by a combination of some quite spine- 
shiveringly spooky writing and excellent graphics. 

But there is work to be done and a time limit to keep in 
mind. Still accompanied by Joe, you have not only to collect 
the evidence and make sure the authorities find it. You also 
confront the first real nasty of the game. 

Once you've done the business, it is time to confront the 
crooks in part three. One more warning: the third night is 
packed with danger and - rather disconcertingly - with brand 
new characters all of whom you 'knew' at some stage in the 
past. Watch out for light and remember that the time has 
come to get physical. The crooks are aware of you and the 
puzzles are real brainteasers. Once again the graphics add 
to the game. If you can finish Scapeghost in one attempt, 
you must be cheating. ■ 



SCAPE GHOST 



GRAPHICS 5/5 ATMOSPHERE 

CHALLENGE 4/5 ADDICTIVNESS 

8000 PLUS VALUE VERDICT 1720 



GHOST 
ENCOUNTER 



Put down thy spreadsheet and play. 
That's the order of the day as Tim Smith 
takes a look at Level Nine's new text and 
graphics adventure, Scapeghost. 



m^r^^^^00^S 



As the mourners prepared to file away, ignoring we, I was sti 

ms going to take a bit of getting used to. 

> load 

Really restore? y 

Please insert save disk and press a key. 

Filename ? b;close 

Please insert game disk, 

I was bg the headstone of Violet Conway, beside the hedge. Ex 

east, south and southeast. I could see Joe Danby, Bert Hillmo 

Edith Dean, Uiolet Conway and a dogwood bush. On it was a bel 

The bell jingled in the breeze, 



If you don't watch out, this could be your home for the rest of eternity. Although the 
inhabitants are friendly souls, this really does not bear thinking about. 



»oted to the spot. Ihi 



e. Exits led north, northeast, 
illnot, David Ridge, Alex Pym, 




jet inside the tank if I wanted to see what it was, 
Joe Danby floated downwards. 
> in 

" couldn't go that wag, An exit led downwards, 
oe Danby entered from below, 
get in tank 

eased myself into the tank and then realised to my 
erily in the discoloured water was the dead body of 
struggle before my death. 



ror that I was not alone, Sway 

:e, the crook I had shot in the 



tartled by the gruesoi 
in ny panic, 



sight, I scrambled to get out of the tank, pushing aside the 



This fellow took the early bath and might well be joining you in your ghostly wanderings 
before you know it. Play the game for too long and you could end up looking like him. 




No it isn't 'Rather annoyed of Pinnar' and frankly you really don't want to know who it 
is. The best thing to do in situations like this is run very fast or is it? 



In a nutshell 

Great atmosphere. 
Strong graphics. 
Should keep you 
playing for hours. If 
you want dwarves, 
damsels, sword 
fights and thumping, 
then it's not for you. If 
you want a good 
story, brain work and 
awful puns then get 
cracking! 



8000 PLUS December 89 43 



PUBLIC DOMAIN 



SELF-ASSEMBLY 

Build a complete assembly language package using 
public domain utilities - Steve Patient suggests the best 




Join the Library 

All the programs discussed 
can be obtained from the UK's 
largest public domain library, 
the CP/M and MSDOS User 
Group (UK). For a 
membership form, write to 
Diana Fordered, 72 Mill Lane, 
Hawley, Dartford, Kent, DA2 
7RZ. Membership is £11.50 
per year and includes access 
to the bulletin board. You can 
download the software (there 
are thousands of programs) 
and save on copying charges. 



44 8000 PLUS December a 




ft * mm hen CP/M first appeared, the existing assemblers 
1 f i fl - ASM.COM from Digital Research or the 
H A ■ alternative from Digital Research's competitors. 
BAA Microsoft M80 - were very expensive; you could 
have bought a good second-hand car at the time for the 
same price. When MAC and RMAC, first appeared, they 
were equally expensive. Now you get them for absolutely 
nothing with the PCW, yet people, it would seem, are still not 
completely satisfied. 

There are two good reasons for this: the first is that there 
is no documentation available (Digital Research never did 
supply it with the PCW and have now ceased supplying it 
altogether); the second is that these utilities do not 
understand Z80 opcodes (using the Zilog nmenonics), only 
the earlier codes of the discontinued 8080 chip (Intel 
nmenomics) - for which there are no useful books in print. 
(We're not counting Ian Sinclair's book on 8080 assembly, 
which fails to get beyond assembling simple routines using 
the Assemble command of SID, is mostly concerned with the 
CPC range of machines and rapidly deteriorates into Basic). 

Because of the high price of these utilities, many 
programmers wrote their own. Some of the resulting 
assemblers were very strange, most did the job, and nearly 
all were free. The CP/M and MSDOS User Group (UK) still 
have virtually all of the public domain assemblers in their 
libraries. Those that support the Zilog Z80 opcodes are well 
worth a close look. 

You must also remember that whether you buy a 
commercial assembler or practise on a public domain 
package you will still have to buy books on Z80 code, 
programming and the PCW. There is no way to learn low 
level programming without access to books on the PCW, 
assembler and CP/M. Fortunately the continuing popularity 
of the Z80 chip ensures a ready supply of literature on the 
Z80 and there are several excellent books on the PCW. 
Good source books are Michael Keys' PCW Machine Code 
and The Amstrad CP/M Plus by Andrew Clarke and David 
Powys-Lybbe. 

Where to look 

In the UK library, there is a straight replacement for the 
original ASM called Z80ASM; as you might guess, it 
recognises Z80 codes. It comes complete with the entire 
source code - in assembler - for those who like to know how 
these things are done. There isn't a great deal of 
documentation - though the 57K of source should give you 
some idea of the usage. Z80ASM produces COM files only 
and won't produce REL files; and it can't handle macros. It 
has no debugger with it and so can't take you very far into 
serious programming on its own, but it does work well. 

There is an improved version of this package called ZSM 
(written by Neil Colvin). This comes with better 
documentation, 84K of source code and some very 
interesting test files. It compiles source code to HEX files 
which then require the use of the HEXCOM.COM utility 
supplied with the PCW to produce a COM file. ZSM is 
probably the best stand-alone assembler in or out of the 
public domain. It's easy to use and has to be an ideal choice 



for anyone starting out on Z80 programming. 

For those who want REL files the best choice is the 
ZMAC, ZLINK combination. This is a much under-rated 
assembler that comes on SIG/M 224 (and you get a free C 
compiler with floating point math thrown in too). ZMAC has a 
couple of odd quirks (using '=' rather than 'EQU' is the best 
example) but it still remains a very fine assembler. 

Bolt-on goodies 

Getting an assembler is only half the battle. The debugging 
facilities of SID aren't much use to Z80 programmers - it 
can't disassemble Z80 codes. There is also the problem of 
learning how to use it. In the public domain there is a very 
fine debugger/monitor called Z8E, written by Rick Surwild. 
The only debugger that appears able to outperform this is 
the one that comes from Arnor with Maxam (which is the 
only one I know of that can show you what's happening in 
banked RAM). 

Z8E is on SIG/M 239; it comes complete with source 
code and a massive manual on disc. The manual runs to 
over 100K while still compressed, and expands to well over 
1 60K. Printed out, it is one of the best manuals you're likely 
to come across for any piece of software, and goes a long 
way to explaining many facets of programming and 
debugging practice. 

While Z8E can disassemble programs with ease, it is 
better to have a dedicated dis-assembler. One of the best is 
DISZ80, which you'll find in the UK library on volume 21 . 
This comes with the ZSM source code so is worth looking at 
anyway. As a bonus, you get the ECCE text editor on UK 
21 ; an editor that allows you to alter the way it works. You 
can have a lot of fun with ECCE (Edinburgh Compatible 
Context Editor.) There is another disassembler on UK 22 
which looks good, though we haven't tried it yet. 

Now see this 

As good as ECCE is, it still doesn't rate as a full screen 
editor. You can't just wander up and down as if there were 
an endless scroll of paper behind the PCW screen. For a 
complete assembler programming environment, you do 
need an editor; the best one in the public domain is 
undoubtedly VD025. This is a small (7K) editor that obeys a 
subset of the WordStar command set. It's extremely fast in 
use and can handle any file that will fit in memory - up to 
54K on the PCW. You can find this tucked away on SIG/M 
282 alongside a huge mailing database in Pascal. 

Unfortunately, the library file appears not to have the 
install program, which means you have to do it by hand. 
This is easy enough - all the information you need is in the 
documentation - and it will give you a chance to practise 
with Z8E. For those who want to enjoy an easy life (why on 
earth are you reading about assemblers?) VD025 and its 
cousins are available from a variety of other libraries already 
installed for the PCW. 

So there you have it; the combination of VD025, ZSM 
and Z8E, together with a few good books, will see you 
through every step of the way - from beginner to competent 
Z80 assembler programmer. ■ 



Brochures— Business Cards—Cartoons— Catalogues—Brochures— Business Cards— Cartoons- 

PUBLISH AND BE DAMNED ■ pleased 

There has never been a better time to invest in a Page Processor 




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IF ONE PICTURE IS WORTH A THOUSAND WORDS 
THINK WHAT YOU CAN SAY WITH 



Read what the Reviewers have to say 

"New lease of Life for the PCW" 

THE MANUAL "Is clear, concise and refrains from using terms which might 
confuse the first time user". "Comprehensive, immensely friendly and will 
lead you where you want ot go" " An excellent manual. ..which contains a 
clear and well set-out tutorial guide, as well as a full reference section". 

USE "It takes about an hour or so to get on speaking terms with 
MicroDesign". "The most un-artistic user should be able to produce basic 
illustrations." "MicroDesign has been created with the end user in mind." 
"The program is meant for grassroots users." 

FEATURES "It does everything you are likely to need in designing and 
laying-out your artwork". "With normal typing skills any document can be 
made to look attractive." "An important feature of the program is auto-flow 
around graphics... the text you enter will automatically flow around the 
picture." "The impressive way (it) copes with text." "There's speed like you 
wouldn't believe possible from the PCW." "Very fast - puts rivals to shame." 
"(They) have thought of everything." 

PRINTING "The print quality, even from the PCW printer, knocks spots off 
the competition." "Output is extraordinarily good" "...found it hard to believe. 
The quality was far in excess of my hopes." "...the high graphics resolution 
produces higher quality text even from the standard printer." "....extremely 
high resolution printouts which set the software apart from its competition". 



There has never been a better time to invest in a Dot Matrix Printer 



9 and 24 PIN DOT MATRIX PRINTERS 



We have researched budget printers for you and STAR is the outright 
winner with Panasonic the only close contender. We rejected Amstrad, 
Brother, Citizen, Epson (reliability) and NEC (jamming). The STAR LC-10 
was voted 'Best Dot Matrix Printer' by What Micro and 8000 Plus. The Star 
LC24-10 was chosen by the PC Independent Users Club and PC Plus. 

• STAR LC-10 Multifont 9 pin 144cps draft, 36cps NI_Q(£140+) = £161.00 

• STAR LC-10 II New, faster. 180cps draft, 45cps NLQ(£160+) = £184.00 

• STAR LC-10 Colour (7 colours, including black) 144cps/36cps 

Fully compatible with MicroDesign II (£175+) = £201.25 

• STAR LC24-10 Superb 24 pin 170cps/57cps LQ (£199 +) = £228.85 

• STAR LC24-15. A3 landscape, 200cps , 

67cps LQ (£330+) = £379.50 

NB printer cables required. 8256/8512 owners will require an interface and 
will usually require LocoScript 2. All PCW's will require Printer Drivers 
(Booklet on request). Please note that Panasonic's otherwise excellent 
KX-P1124 requires the extra 32K RAM Text Buffer for even part 
compatability with Locoscript 2. 



PERIPHERALS AND ACCESSORIES 



PRINTER CABLES. Top Quality PCW9512 to Star etc (Centronics) . £7.95 
PCW 8256/8512 (interface required) to Star etc Centronics Printer ...£9.95 
RIBBONS (including VAT, P&P) LC-10 £4.60; 5 + £4.30. LC-10 Colour 
£6.90; 5 + £6.20 (also takes black for economy): LC24-10/LC24-15 £5.75; 
5 + £5.25. 

AUTO Cut Sheet Feeder LC-10, LC-10C, LC24-10 (£60+)= £69.00 

BBD Dust Covers (incl) 8256/8512 (grey 3pc):£11.45: 9512 (ivory 3pc).... £13.45 

Star LC-10, LC-10, LC24-10, LC24-1 5 (state grey or ivory) £5.50 

INTERFACES Parallel /Serial for PCW8256/8512 printer etc connection 

SCA Professional. Highly regarded, full featured (£40.87+) =£47.00 

SCA Prof Plus. As above + real time clock/calendar (£50+) = £57.50 

MASTER SCAN Optical scanner attaches to 8256/8512 printer head. 
Digitises most pictures to save for Graphics 

and DTP programs (£46.04) =£52.95 

MASTER PAINT Graphics package £13.95 With AMX MOUSE ...£57.50 

MASTER PACK Master Scan + Paint £55.95.. .With AMX MOUSE ..£97.50 
AMX MOUSE (includes interface with through connector) £44.50 

CANON PHOTOCOPIERS Free one year UK on site mainenance 

Canon FC-5 small portable multiple A4 copier (£575+) = £661.25 

Canon PC-7. 8 copies/min. Reduction/Enlargement (£850+) = £977.50 



STOP PRESS "MicroDesign II takes over where Stop Press leaves off. 
There is no chance of Stop Press being upgraded to compete with 
MicroDesign II now and in fact there would be little point: there is just too 
much ground to make up.. .it would make little sense to choose Stop Press. 
MicroDesign II would win out for the printer support alone". 

THE ACCOLADES "They have introduced a desktop publishing program 
which surpasses anything else., the last word in the development of text and 
graphics manipulation for the ubiquitous PCW." "Does almost everything 
better." "This beats the lot." "The results are superb." "Brilliant and 
sophisticated." "Beats the opposition hands down." "The Rolls Royce of 
PCW desk-top publishing." 

QUOTATIONS FROM: The Guardian; 8000 Plus; Amstrad PCW; Micro 
Computer Mart; N.C.E. 

TYPESETTING • TEXT EDITING * PAGE LAYOUT 
• GRAPHICS • FONT DESIGN * PRINTING 

Runs on the PCW8256, PCW 851 2 and the PCW 951 2. Fully compatible 
with files from LocoScript 2. Protext, Wordstar, AMX Stop Press, The 
Desktop Publisher, Mini-Office Professional, Rombo Vidi Digitiser, Master 
Scan and other PCW software packages. 

Gives high quality printed output using the PCW 8256/8512 dot matrix 
printer. Speed and quality are improved with an external 9 pin printer. 
Highest quality and speed are achieved using 24 pin, or laser printer. 
MicroDesign II also supports the Star LC-10C Colour Printer. Supports both 
the AMX and Kempston mouse systems. 

Huge range of Fonts, Typestyles and Typesetting functions. Extensive range 
of Graphic Art and Design facilities. 

MICRODESIGN II (£36.52 + VAT) = 

With AMX Mouse and Interface (£71 30 + VAT) = £82.00 

We will beat any lower price providing the advertiser has 

stocks 



£42 



Your PCW 8256 will need a Memory Upgrade for high resolution 
printing 



MEMORY UPGRADES 



Upgrade your PCW 8256 memory to 51 2K with our best selling kit. 
Almost an essential for MicroDesign II and Locoscript 2 + disc copying. 

Our simple instructions assume no prior knowledge, experience, or skills. 
We supply TOP QUALITY chips jig preformed for ease of insertion. NO 
BENDING REQUIRED, plus a 'Practice' chip. Simply 'Plug in & Go' 
• PCW 8256 256K Memory Upgrade kit to 512K (£34.74 +) = £39.95 

SAVE £5 ON ABOVE WHEN PURCHASING A DRIVE 



PCW DRIVES 



3" Brand New AMSTRAD/PANASONIC internal fitting 1 mb (720K formatted) 
drives using CF2 discs, with simple DIY instructions. Just "Plug in & Go" 
The FD2 (black front panel) and FD4 (ivory panel) are otherwise identical. 

• FD4 second drive for PCW 8256 and PCW 9512 (£107.87 +) = £124 

• FD2 second drive for PCW 8256 (as available) (£112.17 +) = £129 

• NEW FD1 for PCW 8256/8512 drive A replacement (£86.09 +) = £99 

• NEW FD4 for PCW 9512 drive A replacement (£103.48 +) = £119 

5 "4" PACE external 40/80 track self powered drive for data transfer 

between PCs and all PCWs, using TDOS software supplied (£11 6.52 +) =£134 



SOFTWARE 



LOCOMOTIVE SOFTWARE. All new stock. Prices include VAT 
For the PCW 8256/8512 



Printer Drivers Disc 

(+CharKit) £17.95 

24 Pin Printer Drivers £20.95 

LocoFont Set 1 £16.95 

LocFont Set 2 £12.95 

For the PCW 9512 
Printer Drivers Disc 
(+Charkit) £17.95 



LocoScript 2 £21.50 

Locospell2 £17.45 

LocoScript 2 + LocoSpell £27.95 

LocoMail £24.50 

LocoFile £22.95 

24 Pin Printer Drivers £20.95 

LocoFile £22.95 



For all PCWs: Locofont 24 Text £23.50. Locofont 24 Display £23.50. 
CAVALIER SOFTWARE 

HOTELIERS! Hotel £89.95: With Hotel Plus £134.95: Diner £54.95: Intact £67.50 



Minimum order £10. Next day Courier Delivery £8. 

Bold prices include VAT and UK post, normally by return. 

Send cheques/Money orders; or Pic/LA/Govt orders to: 

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Access/Visa orders: Telephone 0209 891141 

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Locoscript 2 and 

CP/M do it better 

with an Isenstein 

Ramdrive 




Now that you can add an extra 
51 2K of memory to your PCW 
all you have to do is choose 
which way you want to fit it! 

Fitting the 512K Ramdrive 
Card inside your PCW adds 
the extra 512K memory 
permenently. (After all the 
existing memory does'nt hang 
on a box on the outside!) 

You can fit the Ramdrive card 
yourself to your PCW's CPU 
board or send us your CPU 
board (Advance instructions 
can be sent) for FREE fitting . 




But if you do want to hang 
the memory on the back of 
your PCW in a box. Then 
you will need the New 512K 
Ramdrive Pack . Extra 
peripherals can still be 
plugged into back of that 
too!. 

All Ramdrives work well with 
Locoscript 2 and CP/M. New 
programs like Microdesign 2, 
Flipper 2 and The Composer's 
Pen take full advantage of the 
extra memory . 

Included is our own disc that 
offers:- Change memory 
sizes, Full memory tests and 
a few graphic surprises. 
Once you have a Ramdrive 
You will wonder How you 
ever lived without one! 



Phone today on: 

0244 822768 




The internal 512k Ramdrive Card. 



My Amstrad PCW is a:- 

□ 8256 □ Expanded 8256 D8512 D9512 

I enclose cheque/postal order/card no for:- 

□ 512K Ramdrive pack £119.95 

□ 512K Ramdrive Card £98.95 

□ I enclose my CPU board for FREE fitting 

of 51 2K Ramdrive Card £98.95 

Please send me more details:- 

□ On your Ramdrive's . PCW spares , Repair services 
and other Isenstein Products . 

Card No 

Name 

Address 

Postcode 

Mail this coupon to:- 

Isenstein Ltd . , Glendale Business Centre , 
Deeside Industrial Estate . Welsh Road , 
Clwyd . CH5 2LR 

Please add VAT . to all prices . Post & Packing Free to mainland UK . 




DAISYWHEELS 



RINGING THE CHANGES 

In the last of the present series, Larry Whitlow shows you that no 
decisions are final when he changes his mind mid print-out 



Picture the scene: you're just about to print that document you've 
been slaving over for days. It could be the last chapter of your 
first novel, or perhaps something even more important: that 
feature you promised would be on the 8000 Plus editor's desk a 
week ago last Tuesday. 

There's just one little technical gremlin worrying you: during the 
printout of the document, you know that you are going to want to 
change your printwheel. You're not sure but you suspect that there will 
probably be some nasty traps lurking in store for you. You might be 
right, of course. Allow us to guide you through the tangled maze. 

It's a fact of life that, when printing documents, printwheels often 
need to be changed. This may be because you want to use another 
character style of the same or different pitch, or it may be because you 
would like to try another language character set. 

With the PCW 9512, the only facility in LocoScript 2 which allows 
you to perform this task is the end of page marker which appears across 
the screen at the end of one document page and the beginning of 
another. This only allows printwheels of the same character style to be 
changed; there is no provision for changing the language character set. 
It is possible to intervene during printing and stop the printout mid- 
flow by pressing the [PTR] (printer) key. The printout will grind to a halt 
at the end of the line being printed. As we've just said, however, this 
only allows printing with a new printwheel; it doesn't allow you to 
change the language character set. 

Right petal? 

LocoScript 2 does not offer any natural or easy provision to the multi- 



linguist for changing to a different language-set printwheel in the middle 
of a printout. To understand why this is so, it's necessary to know 
something of what happens when a character is typed into a document 
and when it is printed out. When a key is pressed during the creation or 
editing of a document, the program refers to what is, in effect, a table to 
see which character that key represents in the particular keyboard 
program being used. 

It enters the Ascii code for this character in the document. During 
printout, the program looks to yet another table to find out which petal on 
the printwheel this character corresponds "to; it needs to do this before it 
can position the printwheel to print the character. This table is different 
for every language character set and so it is important that the 
printwheel corresponds to the language character set loaded in the 
printer, since some of the characters on the printwheels are different for 
each set. If the printwheel and the language character set in the printer 
do not correspond, then some wrong characters will be printed out! 

To fix the language character set used during the editing or creation 
of a document, press [f1], select 'Document Set up' and press [ENTER]. 
To access the printing mode, press [f6]. This selects any language 
character set installed in Locoscript 2 (only the English and the Swiss 
/French character sets are installed in the software supplied with the 
PCW 9512). 

The character style can also be selected at the same time.This is 
something that is easily changed in the course of typing out a document; 
that way, it can vary throughout. However, the language character set is 
always determined for the whole document; you can't change it within 
the document - at least not without a little ingenuity. 



Changing the language character set in the 
printer mid printout 

This can be done in two ways: the first is carried out from the Disc 
Management screen. Select any document which has the same 
language character set as the one required, press [P] then 
[ENTER] for a printout. When the display appears, select Change 
to Set/Style intended for documnt and press [ENTER]. A new 
display should appear - select the option Cancel operation and 
press [ENTER]. The program now returns to the Disc Management 
screen; this time, the printer is set for the desired language 
character set, which remains unchanged even though the print 
mode has been cancelled. 

The second method creates an 'insert-document' containing 
the text to be printed out with the different printwheel; this is set up 
for the new character set. This insert-document should have the 
same layout as the original document but with no header or footer. 
During the Document set up the Printing setting should select the 
new language character set, and the 'Page layout' should be set to 
Header and Footer zones of zero. 

The text in the current page to be printed with the new 
printwheel is pasted into the insert-document. If it goes beyond the 
current page, this will have to be printed as part of the main 
document after the insert-document has been printed. This is 
because the next full page to be printed after the insert-document, 
must have the same page layout and numbering as the main 
document. 

If the last line of the text to be printed out with the old 
printwheel is not terminated with a Return character, then the first 
character of the insert document must be a Return. This is 
because when the printing is stopped by pressing [PTR], it will 
stop on the same line, unless there is a Return character at 
the end of it. 



Changing the printwheel at a page boundary 

A few cautionary words before you start: in all the following instructions, it is 
assumed that if a printwheel with a different pitch is to be used, then the 
relevant pitch setting has already been set in the document at the 
appropriate point. 

(1) When printing stops at the end of the page immediately before the one to 
be printed with a new printwheel, you should insert the new printwheel. 

(2). If the new printwheel only differs in style or pitch, then load a new sheet 
of paper and press [EXIT] to resume printing with the new printwheel. 

(3) If the new printwheel has a new language character set, then change to 
the Disc Management screen. This will have been done automatically if the 
original Print instruction had been selected only for the page just printed. 
If, however, it has not been done as a matter of course, press [PTR], then 
[f1]. Select Abandon printing, and press [ENTER] followed by [EXIT]. 

(4) Set the new character set in the printer using the first method described 
above. 

(5) Select the original document and press [P], but do not press [ENTER] 
yet. 

(6) When the display appears, select the option Print part of document and 

press [ENTER]. 

(7) When the next display appears, set menu to start printing at the next 
page and to stop at the appropriate page, and press [ENTER]. 

(8) When the display appears saying Character set and/or style differ, 
select Use the current Set/Style, press [ENTER].The usual printing 
instructions should now be followed. Press [EXIT] to start printing. 



8000 PLUS December8947 



DAISYWHEELS 



'Daisy, daisy...' 

Daisywheel printers take all their 
characters from a print wheel, 
which looks rather like a daisy and 
which is hit with a small hammer 
every time you want to print a 
character. Different printwheels 
have a different set of characters 
on the ends of their petals and 
even where they do have the 
same characters, the characters 
won't take up the same space on 
printout. Before you can do any 
printing, LocoScript needs to know 
which characters the printer can 
produce, the order of the 
characters on the printwheel - the 
character set and, finally, their 
character pitch. 



Style council 

Two printwheels having the 
same character set are 
differentiated by their character 
styles. This means that they 
have been designed for use at 
different pitches. Courier 10 and 
Courier 12, for example, will 
contain the same set of 
characters, but one will be for 
use in 10-pitch documents, the 
other for use in 12-pitch text. 
These details are stored in 
special printer files on your 
LocoScript start of day disc. 



48 8000 PLUS December 89 



Selecting where to 
change the printwheel 



All the printwheels currently available, with the exception of 
Greek and Latin, have about 80 common characters. They 
are (A to Z, a to z, to 9, | !$%&()* + ,-./:; = J. 
Greek Latin has the same except for the lower case letters. 
Thus most of any document can be printed out with any 
printwheel, provided that the same character style is used 
for the various language character sets. 

When it becomes necessary to change a language 
character set for some other characters, it may not be 
necessary to change back to the original set. Even better, it 
is often unnecessary to change printwheels immediately 
before the new character is needed - it may be possible to 
change over at the start of the page in which this character 
is to be found. Careful consideration of the document will 
show that the difficulty of changing the printwheel in the 
middle of a line is seldom necessary. 



Changing the printwheel at the 
end of a line 

If this only concerns a change of style or pitch, the procedure 
is simple: 

(1 ) When the line before the point where the new language 
character style is to be used is being printed, press [PTR]. 

(2) When the printing stops, insert the new printwheel 
and press [EXIT]; the printing will resume with the new 
character style. 



an 'insert-document' containing the text to be printed with the 
new printwheel on the current page. 

The text pasted into the insert-document should not be 
cut from the original document, otherwise the pagination and 
numbering of the document will be altered. The changeover 
procedure is as follows: 

(1) When the line before the point where the new language 
character set is to be used is being printed, press [PTR]. 

(2) When the printing stops, press [f1]; select Abandon 
printing, press [ENTER] then [EXIT] to return to the Disc 
Management screen. Do not touch the paper in the printer! 

(3) Select Insert Document with the cursor, press [P] then 
print as usual. 

(4) When the message Paper please appears at the top of 
the screen, press [PTR] then [f1], 

(5) When the menu appears, select Resume printing. Press 
[ENTER] then [EXIT]. The insert document will 

now print. 

If this insert-document is to be followed by another insert on 
the same page, then the printing should be stopped at the 
appropriate place by pressing [PTR]. If you don't do this, the 
paper will eject after the first document has printed out. If the 
text with the new character-set extends to the next page, 
when the system returns to the Disc Management screen, the 
original document is selected and printout is initiated to start 
at the next page. When the Character set and style differ 
display appears, select the option Use the current Set/Style 
and print as normal. 



Changing the printwheel in the middle 
of a line 

Before creating the insert-document, some preparation 
of the text which is to be printed out is necessary since 
all changeovers must take place at the end of a line or 
at the end of a page. The procedure you follow will 
depend on whether there is to be a change of pitch, or 
language character-set, and if justified text is to be used 
or not. 

If the new printwheel involves a change of character 
pitch, then the new pitch must be inserted in the line 
immediately before the changeover point; press 



(1) Press [f8] and set options to show Blanks and 
Spaces. 

(2) If justification is not being used, go straight to step 
(3). Otherwise, replace all Blanks with Spaces in the 
line where the changeover is, so that the line is fully 
justified without any Blanks being used. 

(3) Insert Line Spacing and [RETURN] immediately 
before the first character to be printed under the new 
character style. 

(4) Insert sufficient leading spaces so that the first word 
in the 'new' line that has just been created starts at the 
same position that it occupied in the original line. 

(5) Set Line Spacing at the beginning of this line to its 
previous setting. 

(6) If the new printwheel has the same character-set but 
a different pitch, insert the pitch change in the text 
immediately before the first character - not space - of 
the new line. If it has a different character-set, copy the 
text from the start of the new line to the end of the page 
(or new changeover point) into a block ready for pasting 
into the insert-document. 

To print out the insert-document, just follow the 
procedure described in the section 'Changing the 
printwheel at the end of a line'. 



KRJIN 



for all your 



TEL: 01-567 7313 



COMPUTER SUPPLIES 



SAME DAY 
^DESPATCH! 



13% OFF ALL PRICES FOR OVERSEAS BUYERS. I Callers welcome 9.30am - late 



MAIL ORDER + EXPORT HOTLINE 01-567 7313 



Official orders welcome from 

PLC, Government & Educational 

establishments. 

ALL PRODUCTS CARRY 

KCS GUARANTEE 



ALL PRICES 
INCLUDE VAT 

(Overseas orders deduct 13%) (PRICES SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE) 



Post & Packing (UK Only): 
Ribbons 25p each 
Computer Paper £3 per Box 
All other items 50p each 
Computer/Printers £7.50 (by courier) 



Kavin Computer Supplies Ltd 

106 South Ealing Road 

Ealing London W5 4QL 

Tel: 01-567 7313 

Fax:01-578 2352 

Telex: 947838 GEEWS Dept KCS 

Callers Welcome 9.30-5.30 




YOU ORDER BY 3PM 
WE DESPATCH BY 4PM 

(subject to availability) 



AMSTRAD HARDWARE 

Popular Wordprocessors 

PCW 8256 Single Drive/256k Memory/VDU/ 

Keyboard/Dot Matrix Printer £368.00 

PCW 8512 Double Drive/51 2k Memory/VDU/ 
Keyboard/Dot Matrix Printer £483.00 

PCW 9512 Single Drive/51 2k 
Memory/VDU/Keyboard/Daisywheel Printer £499.00 



PLUS FREE AUTOMATIC SHEET FEEDER WORTH - £90.95 



AUTOMATIC SHEET FEEDER 




For PCW 951 2 printer holds up to 30 sheets of 
paper £90.95 



ANS 20L 

DISK STORAGE 

Box Clever - protect your disks 
with high quality perspex, lockable 
storage boxes. Holds 18 3" disks & cases. 
ONLY £7.50 



DISK STORAGE 



LOCKABLE DISK BOXES 

Model Size Capacity Price 

DD40L 373.5" 40 £7.50 

CS100L 3.5" 100 £13.90 

DD150L 5.25" 50 £7.90 

DD100L 5.25" 100 £11.70 

1 Box 2 or more 

3M 5.25" DS/DD £11.50 £10.75 

Kodak 5.25" DS/DD £12.50 £12.00 

3M Sony 3.5" DS/DD £1 6.50 £1 5.75 

All discs are guaranteed. 
We do not stock cheap disks 



FLOPPY DISKS 



PCW 9512 DAISYWHEELS 



Courier 10 
Letter Gothic 10/12 
Thesis PS 
Orator 1 
Mini Gothic 15 

£5.80 each 



Recta 1 
Script 12 
Prestige Pica 10 
Prestige Elite 12 



PCW BOOKS 

Advanced Amstrad Basic (Locom) £12.95 

Amstrad 8256/8512 More 

Wordprocessing £9.95 

Amstrad CP/M Plus £12.95 

Amstrad Comms (CPC/PCW) £8.95 

Amstrad Companion (Mallard) £7.95 

Amstrad Wordprocessing (8256) £8.95 

Introduction to CP/M Plus on Amstrads ....£7.95 

Get Started 8256/85 12 £7.95 

Mastering Amstrad Guide/WP 

Amstrad 8256 £5.95 

Practical Amstrad Wordprocessing £7.95 

All in One Mini Office Prof £11 .50 

DTP with the Amstrad PCW £9.50 

Step By Step Guide to Locoscript £4.95 



ACCESSORIES 



Additional Disk Drive for 8256/951 2 £132.00 

Modem V21/V23 £99.95 

RS232 Interface £51.75 

8256 Memory Upgrade POA 

Trade in your old PCW 

Part Exchange your 8256/851 2 

for PC1 51 2/1 640 

CALL FOR LATEST PRICES! 



3" DISK DRIVE 
CLEANING KIT 



ONLY 
E7.50 



GAMES SOFTWARE 

Starglider 

Pawn 

Cyruss Chess II 

Time & Magic 

Clock Chess CP 

Bridge Player 

Leather Goddesses 

Head Over Heels 

Draughts/Checkers 

Matchday II 

Ballyhoo 

Scrabble Deluxe 

Tomahawk 

Backgammon CP 

Knight Ore ~ 

Steve Davis Snooker 

Strike Force Harrier 

Fish 



..£19.95 
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RIBBONS 

LOW LOW PRICES 

Ask for quantity discount 

2 

PCW 8256/851 2/LQ3500 £3.90 

8256/8512 Red or Blue £4.90 

8256/8512 Carbon £4.90 

DMP 2000/3000 £2.80 

PCW9512 £3.85 

PCW9512 Red or Blue £4.85 

Minimum of 2 



4+ 

£3.70 
£4.65 
£4.65 
£2.60 
£3.75 
£4.75 



PAPER & LABELS 

2000 sheets 11" x 14.5" 1pt 60gsm £16.27 

1000 sheets 11" x 9.5" 2pt OTC £19.82 

2000 sheets 11" x 9.5" 1pt60gsm £14.16 

1000 sheets 11" x 9.5" 2pt NCR £23.26 

2000 sheets A4 1pt 70gsm Microperf £17.19 

1000 sheets A4 1pt85gsm Microperf £11.49 

Labels 1 Across 2 Across 

2000 3i/2"x 17/ib" £8.65* £9.20 

20003i/2"x 115/16" £11.74 £11.84 

2000 4" x 17/16" £9.53* £9.65 

2000 4" x 115/16" £13.00 £12.72 

•Available in Blue, Yellow, Pink, Green (£1 extra) 
OTHER SIZES AVAILABLE 



ACOUSTIC HOOD FOR PCW 9512 



Silence that 
noisy printer with 
our high quality 
printer muffler. 
Up to 80% noise 
reduction. 



Our Price £79.95 
Base for the hood £24.50 




AMSTRAD PCW 

PRINTER 

MAINTENANCE KIT 




For 8256/851 2 

removes ink deposits maintains 

print quality 

Our Price £16.50 



PCW DESKTOP PUBLISHING 



Fleet St. Editor Plus £43.00 

The Database Publisher (software) £23.00 

Database Desktop Publisher (with AMX Mouse).£60.00 
AMX Mouse Only £44.85 



STOP PRESS 



DESKTOP PUBLISHING 

13 Fonts, Clip Art, Typesetting, 
Cut & Paste Up, Graphic Design. 

Stop Press (Software only) £34.00 

Stop Press & AMX Mouse £66.70 



3" AMSTRAD DISKS 



3" DISKS AMSOFT/MAXELL 

5 10 20 

CF2 £12.45 £23.45 £49.50 

CF2-DD £23.00 £48.95 £89.00 




DUST COVERS 



PCW 9512 (3 piece) £12.45 

PCW 8256/8512 (3 piece) £11.45 

PC1640 (2 piece) £9.50 

PC1512 (2 piece) £8.50 

DMP 2000/3000/3160 £4.50 

DMP 4000 £5.50 

LQ3500 £4.50 

Eliminates dust and static with these attractive- 
ly designed dust covers 



■jTAW i 



DAATAFAX By Kempston 
Diary/Phonebook/Calendar/Notepad 

Filofax on your PCW £33.50 

Stationery £6.95 

GIFT PACK (with Stationery/Binder) ..£42.00 



Mini Office 

PROFESSIONAL PLUS 

Very successful - many new features 
5 separate programs - Wordprocessor 

• Database • Spreadsheet • Graphics 

• Communications Interactive 

OUR PRICE ONLY £33.35 



COPYHOLDERS 




With 

adjustable arm 

80 column 

£14.50 

132 Column 

£19.50 

Desk Top 

£14.50 



TIDY UP/PROTECT 




-WITH 

MAINS 

FOUR GANG 

SURGE PROTECTOR 



SOFTWARE 



ACCOUNTS 



Sage Popular Accounts £64.40 

Sage Payroll £47.15 

Sage Invoice/Stock Control £47.15 

Sage Accounts Plus £101.20 

Camsoft Invoice/Stock/Sales Ledger £79.95 

Camsoft Payroll £39.95 

MAP Integrated £105.00 

Money Manager Plus £28.75 

Tasman Tasword 8000 £18.40 

Tasman Tasprint 8000 £11.50 

Tasman Taspell 8000 £13.80 

Tasman Tas Sign £23.00 

Arnor Protext £40.25 

Newword II £49.45 

Locomail 2 £28.75 

Locospell for Loco II £19.50 

Locospell + Locoscript II £32.50 

Locoscript II £21 .85 

Locofont.. £18.00 

Locofile £28.00 

Locofont 2 £13.80 

Amsoft Supercalc II £48.50 

Newstar Cracker Turbo £38.50 

At Last Plus £28.75 

Datastorell £32.50 

Sage Retrieve £48.30 

Camsoft Cambase II £34.50 

Masterfile 8000 £33.95 

dBase II £75.90 



COMMUNICATION 



Linnet V21/V23 Modem (needs RS232 inter- 
face). Autodialing & Answering. Hayes 
Compatible. 32 Names store. 

3 Help Menus £148.35 

Sage Chit-Chat Software £84.99 

Sage Chit-Chat + Linnet Modem £209.50 



LANGUAGE 



French Mistress Kosmos £16.95 

German Master Kosmos £16.95 

Spanish Tutor Kosmos £16.95 

Italian Tutor Kosmos £16.95 

SPECIAL OFFER ON TYPING 
TUTORS 

lansyst Crash Typing £19.50 

lansyst Two Fingers Touchtype Course. .£19.50 



GENERAL UTILITIES 



Mass Easy Labeller 

Rotate 

Digital Pascal MT+ 

Digital C Basic 

Prospell 

Arnor C 

Arnor Maxam 

Digita Personal Tax Planner . 



..£26.45 
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.£43.70 
..£23.00 



VOLUME PURCHASERS CALL FOR ASSIS- 
TANCE - GOVERNMENT, EDUCATIONAL & 
OVERSEAS ORDERS WELCOME. 

KAVIN COMPUTER 
SUPPLIES LTD 

106 South Ealing Road, 

Ealing, London W5 4QL 

Telex: 947838 

Fax: 01 578 2352 

VAT INCLUDED IN PRICE 

TEL: 01 567 7313 



INTERFACES 



JOINED-UP WIRING 

Steve Patient nips round the back and expands his PCW's horizons 



You can't get 
there from here 

Under CP/M, the PCW (all three 
models) can redirect input and 
output to go via the 
RS232/Centronics ports using 
DEVICE. Under LocoScript, 
matters aren't quite so clear-cut. 
Under LocoScript 2, printer 
output can be sent via the 
interface to a parallel printer. 
Under LocoScript 1 , if you want 
to use another printer you'll 
need an upgrade as well as an 
interface. 



The CPS 8256 Interface 
£59.95 • Amstrad • 
0279 454555 




The Amstrad interface is sturdily built, extremely well-presented and 
comes with an excellent manual. 



There's no doubt that Amstrad have marketed this one well; it 
looks good and feels solid. The high point of this package, 
though, is undoubtedly the manual. Too often PCW owners are 
left confused as to how to perform in detail various functions 
via an interface. This manual devotes at least a page (with 
pictures) to virtually every alliance it's possible to make using 
an RS232/Centronics interface. It starts with a picture showing 
exactly how the interface is fitted, and begins with those 
memorable words 'Switch off the computer...'. 

The manual continues with instructions on how to connect 
serial printers with much good advice on how to get one 
running properly - an irritating process since it involves 
altering baud rates, framing bits, and other remotely esoteric 
drill practices. 

It offers advice on connecting computers to each other 
via cables or modems, redirecting the standard internal 
printer output to the interface (and back again) as well as 
instructions on how to use the supplied comms program 
MAIL232. Since MAIL232 doesn't support Xmodem protocols 
(for example), the advice on transmitting program files as 
HEX files isn't quite right so you can ignore it; you can 
transmit COM files but you will need a better comms program 
than MAIL232 to do it. 

The last few pages of the manual incorporate cabling 
details for computer to computer (null modem), computer to 
modem and computer to serial printer connections. Full 
marks to Amstrad for including it. The booklet concludes 
with technical information on the RS232 and the Centronics 
ports. This includes the pin outs and the various signals 
that the different pins carry. Almost everything you could 
ever want to know is here - plus a lot you probably won't 
ever need to know. 



PCW Interface 

£49 plus VAT • Micro Control Systems 

• 0602 391204 



The least professional-looking of the interfaces we looked at. It 
has a tacky feel and leaves the green circuit board completely 
exposed on the underside. Once it's screwed into position, you 
can't get at it anyway; it just looks half-finished. It is, however, 
a perfectly sound piece of kit and does what it's supposed to. 

One feature it can boast is its industrial strength RS232 
connector with screw fittings. Amstrad have tended to supply 
serial connectors of an especially cheap construction that just 
push in. Most of the computer world boasts serial connectors 
with tiny fitted screw sockets to secure the connection against 
accidental dislodgement. Cables with matching screws are 
often fitted with milled grips so that they can be easily attached 
and removed just using your fingers. For anyone who has to 
do a lot of data transfer or works where wires can be pulled 
about, these connectors are essential. This interface was the 
only one that had such a connector fitted. 

The manual looks like a photocopy which has been put 
together by someone intent on getting the job done as fast as 
possible. The details on making up cables don't include a null 
modem cable for computer to computer work. However, it does 
cover the use of MAIL232 for simple comms. The person who 
wrote it clearly understands his (or her) subject but does little 
to explain it to the novice interface user. The overly-concise 
'Send STX, listen for ACK' in the MAIL232 section, for 
example, is a little obscure. 

Unless you can get this interface more cheaply than its 
Amstrad neighbour (which doesn't after all appear to be the 
case), there seems no good reason for choosing it in 
preference to that better-made device. That said, if you want it, 
it will do the job just as well. 



CPS 8256 INTERFACE 



PLUSES 

▲ Excellent documentation 



MINUSES 

T Expensive 



PCW INTERFACE 



PLUSES 

▲ Has an industrial strength 
calibre RS232 connector 
with screw fitings 



MINUSES 



Poor presentation 
Not recommended for 
the novice 



EASE OF USE 5/5 PERFORMANCE 5/5 

DOCUMENTATION 5/5 

8000 PLUS VALUE VERDICT 15/15 



EASE OF USE 2/5 PERFORMANCE 5/5 

DOCUMENTATION 3/5 

8000 PLUS VALUE VERDICT 10/15 



50 8000 PLUS Decembers 



INTERFACES 



When Amstrad laid out their original list of requirements for the PCW 8256, 
they specified a high level of user-friendliness. It was LocoScript which 
ensured that the Amstrad PCW would be easy to get on with from day one. 
Cynical computer journalists, however, were quick to point out that the 
PCW had no serial or parallel ports and claimed, with some justification, 
that this shortcoming was crippling its use as a serious machine. The 
introduction of the CPS8256 provided Amstrad's timely retort. This 
provided both a serial port (useful for all kinds of communications) and an 
industry standard Centronics parallel port (used only for third party 



printers). It seems unlikely that it was a mere afterthought for a casual 
glance at the rear of even the earliest 8256 revealed the protruding board 
edge carefully protected by a wide, deep slot in the casing. Since the 
board edge gives access to the PCW bus, the PCW isn't restricted to the 
standard Serial/Centronics interface and can easily support various other 
kinds of interfaces, a fact which is exploited by hard disc manufacturers 
and games houses alike. While the Centronics port allows you to use a 
third party printer, the serial port can connect a wider variety of devices - 
from printers to modems to other computers. Let's take a look. 



SCA Systems Professional 
E49.95/E59.95 • SCA Systems 
0903 700288 




The SCA Interface offers a lot more than bare functionality; the software extras 
•Incl " 



This one's got to be the ultimate in designer interfaces for those 
who simply have to have the latest thing in bolt-on goodies. 
It's the only RS232/Centronics interface that comes with a disc; 
it needs this for various programs, including the one that allows 
you to access the built-in battery-backed clock (on the £59.95 
version only). This really is a very nice feature; it allows you to 
include a command in your PROFILE. SUB file (TIME.COM) 
which sets your PCW system clock to the correct time 
automatically whenever you switch your computer on. 
This comes in very handy if you're in the habit of date-stamping 
files. If you've already got an SCA interface, you can buy the 
clock separately. 

Another program on the disc allows the PCW to use 
another terminal (a special kind of serially-linked screen that's 
usually attached to a mini- or mainframe computer used in 
business). This could be one way of getting hold of an 
improved screen display. 

On the disc there is also a basic listing which will allow you 
to take advantage of your PCW's new found ability to keep 
perfect time in your own programs. There is an interface test 
program and finally there is a terminal emulation program of 
interest only to the seriously technical buyer. 

The manual is the shortest and smallest of the lot even 
though it tries to cover more ground (including a comms 
program in Basic). It doesn't go as deeply into the technicalities 
as either of the other two offerings. This is understandable in a 
way - anyone thinking of attaching dumb terminals to his or her 
PCW, probably already knows exactly what they're doing. As 
for the TIME program - and the rather attractive clock that you 
can make appear on your PCW using CLOCK.COM - these 
are so easy to use that they need little documentation. 



SCA SYSTEMS PROFESSIONAL 



PLUSES 

A The clock optional area is 

an important and useful one 
A Lots of extra software supplied 



MINUSES 



Poor shallow 
documentation 



EASE OF USE 4/5 

DOCUMENTATION 3/5 

8000 PLUS VALUE VERDICT 



PERFORMANCE 



Parallel I/O Interface 

£55.95 plus VAT • SM Engineering 

0323 766262 




The Parallel I/O interface is designed to aid the teaching of control 
ications i 



This is perhaps one of the most innovative interfaces you can 
buy for your PCW. This product is for the serious hobbyist or 
for schools and colleges seeking an inexpensive way to teach 
computer control applications. The Parallel Input/Output 
Interface comes with a complete set of fact sheets for users 
as well as a disc full of sample programs in both Basic and 
Assembler. These show you how to use, not just the interface, 
but the various boards SM Engineering build to allow it to be 
used as a teaching and development tool. Some knowledge of 
low-level communications will be required to put it to use. 

SM Engineering supply a variety of devices that can be 
attached to their interface. These include a speech 
synthesiser, an LED board that allows you to check that the 
signals you want are appearing on the correct lines, as well as 
stepper motors and control boards for robotic applications. 

The interface also allows the PCW to be used as a 
developments platform for Z80-based controller applications. 
Programs can be written and debugged on the PCW and then 
put on ROM. SM Engineering supply a ROM controller board 
that pretends to be a PCW, right down to the edge connector 
itself. Any application that can be run from the PCW using the 
interface can then be run from the much cheaper controller 
board once it is operating properly. 

The Parallel I/O Interface allows the PCW to send or 
receive on up to eight lines simultaneously via two separate 
26 way IDC connectors. In fact, the way things are set up, you 
can actually address four separate ports via the two 
connectors. This interface may look expensive but it will allow 
your PCW to do industrial strength computing. As an 
engineering and software design company, SM Engineering 
will also make up boards to your requirements. 



PARALLEL I/O INTERFACE 


PLUSES 


MINUSES 


A Fully supported by range 


T Not ideal for the 


of SM products 


absolute beginner 


A Wide range of features 


T Expensive 



EASE OF USE 2/5 

DOCUMENTATION 2/5 

8000 PLUS VALUE VERDICT 



PERFORMANCE 



Keep it clean 

The connectors on the board- 
edge protruding from the PCW 
are tin- plated rather than gold- 
plated and corrode over a 
period of time. If your new 
interface fails to work (or isn't 
even shown on the sign on 
screen) try cleaning the edge 
connectors with a hard rubber. 
This often does the trick. 



Dece™r89 8000 PLUS 51 



NTERFACES 



Through here 

If you want to piggy-back one 
kind of interface onto another 
-for instance, a mouse for 
DTP work - then you have a 
problem. None of the available 
interfaces have the necessary 
through bus. 

The answer is to contact 
SM Engineering who can 
modify your interface so that it 
does have one. Contact them 
on 0323 766262 for details. 



Battery backup 

One of the more interesting 
things to stick on the back of 
the PCW is a battery pack. 
This clever box from Isenstein 
(0244 312986) allows your 
PCW's memory to survive 
power cuts for several hours. 
Unlike most extras, it does 
have a through connector so 
you can use it with an 
interlace. 



Joycestick (and) Interface 

£19.95 • Cascade Games Ltd 

• 0423 504526 • 8000's only 

Mouse and Interface 

£69.95 • Kempston • 

0234 841224 

Since the expansion port gives direct access to 
the PCW hardware, it's possible to attach other 
kinds of kit to it - including things Amstrad 
probably never originally intended. 

These oddities usually support one 
particular gadget and include the Kempston 
mouse and the Cascade Joycestick pictured 
right. The trouble with these two product 
interfaces is that they monopolise the 
expansion port. 

The Kempston mouse interface does not 
allow the piggy-backing of other add-ons. 
Included with the mouse, however, is a device 
driver that will let you control the cursor within 
many CP/M programs using mouse movements 
This is a useful way of extending its use. 

The AMX mouse, on the other hand, is quite different to its 
Kempston counterpart in that its interface comes with a through 
connector. This means that your expansion port is not 
monopolised by the mouse alone so that other add-ons can be 
enjoyed - like an external printer. 

The Joycestick is another good example of dedicated 
gadgetry. Unless you are an enthusiastic games player, it's 
unlikely that you will want to tie up indefinitely the expansion 
port on your PCW just so that you can play games. That is, 
however, the only use to which you can put a joystick. 
Nothing is better guaranteed to damage the edge 




connectors on the expansion bus more thoroughly than 
constantly fixing and removing connectors. 

The Joycestick has its limitations. For a start it's expensive 
and doesn't work with all games. The price includes a flight 
simulator game (so you get a disc) as well as a Spectravideo 
joystick which can be used on other computers. It has the 
standard 9-pin D-type connector found on a variety of joystick 
ports and will also work on an Amstrad CPC464 machine. 

The Joycestick is a good buy for those who have a 
games machine as well, but otherwise is of limited interest to 
PCW owners. 



Technical Talk 



The strip of motherboard that sticks out of the back certainly 
can't hurt you but you can hurt it very easily. All those little 
metal strips constitute a bus, a vehicle for the transference 
of information between the machine and compatible devices. 

These strips are connected directly to the Z80 chip in the 
PCW and provide direct access to it. The main problem with 
this is that the Z80 chip is delicate (electrically that is, 
bouncing it off the floor won't hurt it) and shorting those little 
tags can kill it. For this reason, you must never attach or 
remove interfaces unless the PCW is turned off. 

On the plus side, the availability of signals makes adding 
peripherals via the bus relatively simple. The important thing 
is to buffer the signals. This means beefing up the weak bus 
signals and protecting the Z80 from anything the outside 
world might do. 

The chip normally used to do this is a Z80 DART (which 
stands for Dual Asynchronous Receive/Transmit). This chip 
takes the signals from the Z80 bus and provides the 
required translation of the Z80 signals. The 'asynchronous' 
bit means that it doesn't have to run at the same speed as 
the PCW bus but takes signals as they come. This allows 
the PCW to communicate with other devices running at 
different speeds. 

The 'dual' part of the name means that it can output to 
both serial and parallel ports, so you only need one major 
chip to do the work inside an RS232/Centronics interface. 
You still need various support chips though (up to eight of 
them), to provide decoding and buffering services before the 
interface can do its job. 

The Centronics parallel port is a specification decided on 



by the Centronics printer company because, at the time, it 
was easy to implement. Around 20 of the 36 lines in the 
specification carry useful signals. The PCW gets by with just 
11 of them, though many printers support 20 or more. 

These 11 are a strobe signal, which indicate when valid 
data is on the lines; eight parallel data lines carry the data, a 
busy line which tells the computer when not to send data to 
the printer and a logical ground line so that the two devices 
can agree signal levels. 

The PCW doesn't support Paper Out (line 12), though the 
SCA Centronics port has it connected. A parallel port like this 
one is only really good for about six feet of cable. Beyond 
that it becomes increasingly unreliable. 

The RS232 port is a serial connection defined by CCITT 
V24 (yes, the same people who brought you all those strange 
comms standards) and is a definition laid down for the 
exchange of signals between data terminal equipment and 
data circuit terminating equipment (really). RS232 is the 
American name for it. The full specification calls for 25 lines, 
all of which have names. Few computers use more than nine 
of them and the PCW uses just eight. Some computers have 
been known to use only three, but that isn't really enough. 

Since serial ports send only one bit at a time, they have 
to send extra bits to enable the receiving device to decide 
what constitutes a byte. Up to 12 bits can be required to 
send a single eight bit byte. However, the problems involved 
in setting up serial links are offset by the much greater 
flexibility they offer and the distances at which they will work. 
You can have your serial device at the other end of the 
building with no trouble. 



52 8000 PLUS 




S K MARKETING 



► ► ► 



COMPUTER SUPPLIES 



< < < 



LONDON'S LARGEST 

REGISTERED 
AMSTRAD DEALER 



I 

I 



10 Fulham Broadway, London SW6 1 AA. Telephone 01 381 6618/9 (24hours) FAX: 01 -381 0528 



Personal callers welcome 
Opposite Fulham Broadway 
Tube Station - District Line 



COMPARE OUR PRICES BEFORE ORDERING FOR 
UNBEATABLE OFFERS!! 

Export, Government and Educational orders welcome 



All prices Excl. VAT 

Carriage Free/Mail Order 

(UK Mainland) 



BRITAINS BEST SELLING WORDPROCESSING RANGE 



AMSTRAD PCW 8256 




• Fully integrated word processor system 

• 82 key Keyboard 

• 256K RAM 

• High res. screen 

• 180K 3" disc drive 

• 9 pin dot matrix printer 

• 90 CPS in draft 20 CPS NLQ 

• Locoscript software 

• CP/M Plus with GSX & Dr.Logo 

• Mallard Basic with Jetsam 

£315 

On-site maintenance please add £30.00 



AMSTRAD PCW 8512 




• Fully integrated word processor system 

• 82 key Keyboard 

• 512KRAM 

• High res. screen 

• 1x 180K + 720K3"drives 

• 9 pin dot matrix printer 

• 90 CPS in draft 20 CPS NLQ 

• Locoscript software 

• CP/M Plus with GSX & Dr.Logo 

• Mallard Basic with Jetsam 

£399 

On-site maintenance please add £30.00 



AMSTRAD PCW 9512 



ACCESSORIES PCW 951 2 I ■ 3 " CF2 DISCS FOR AMSTRAD 



Vortex 40MB Hard Drive £499.00 

CPS 9512 AMSTRAD RS232 

P/S Interlace £49.00 

SKM 256K to 51 2K Memory Upgrade Kit 
with fitting instruction P.O. A. 

FD4 Second Disk Drive 8256 £115.00 

PCW Dust Covers (3 piece inc) £9.00 

3" Drive Cleaning Kit £9.50 

Margin Maker £10.50 



SKM SCOOP 




• Z80A processor 

• 512KRAM 

• 3" 720K drive 

• 82 Key Keyboard 

• High res.paperwhite monitor 

• Wide carriage bi-directional daisy wheel printer 

• 20CPS single & tractor feed 

• Locoscript 2 software inlcudes Locospell 
& Locomail 

• CP/M Plus with GSX & Dr.Logo 

• Mallard Basic 

FREE SHEET FEEDER WITH PCW 9512 

£425 

On-site maintenance please add £30.00 



maxell 

. CF -2 per 10 £22.00 

CF-2per20 £42.00 

CF-2per30 £63.00 



AMSOFT 

., | CF-2per 10 £24.00 

S-l CF-2per20 £45.00 

Disk Cleaner £6.50 



DOT MATRIX PRINTERS 



Star LC10 Multifont Printer £150.00 

Star LC10 Colour Printer £185.00 

PANASONIC PRINTERS 
Panasonic KX-P1124 

Draft- 160 cps. NLQ - 63 cps £265.00 

Panasonic KX-P1180 

Draft - 1 32 cps. NLQ - 38 cps £1 65.00 



PCW RIBBONS 



SKM's CHRISTMAS 
SOFTWARE BONANZA!!! 



PRINTER OTY 

AMSTRAD 2+ 

PCW 8256/8512 NYLON £4.30.. 

PCW 8256/8512 CARBON £4 75 
PCW 8256/8512 COLOUR £5.00 

PCW 9512 NYLON 

PCW 9512 CARBON 



£3.50 
£4.75 





OTY 


OTY 


5+ 


10+ 


£400 


£3.50 


£4.50. 


£4.00 


£4.75 


£4.50 


£3.30 


£3.00 


£4.50... 


£4.00 



WORDPROCESSING 



DESKTOP PUBLISHING 



AMSTRAD PCW MAINTENANCE KIT 



PCW PRINTER 8256/8512 




DAISYWHEELS FOR PCW 9512 



AVAILABLE TYPE STYLES 
PRODUCT CODE TYPEFACE 

CourieMO Prestige Pica 10 

Recta 10 Oratorio 

Letter Gothic 10/12 Prestige Elite 12 

Script 12 Mini Gothic 15 

Each £6.00 
For other printer ribbons please call 



BOOKS (no VAT payable) 



Mallard Basic By Amstrad £9.95 

Programming PCW By Ian Sinclair £7.95 

Step by Step Guide to Locoscript £4.95 

All in One Mini Office Professional. ...£11.50 
Desktop Publishing with the Amstrad PCW . £9.50 

Locoscript 2 by Ian Sinclair £9.95 

Locoscript 2 Amstrad PCW £11.95 

Locoscript - Mail - Spell £7.95 

Looking into Locoscript 2 £13.95 



Protext £35.00 

Locoscript 2 £22.00 

Locoscript 2 with Locospell 2 £27.00 

Locospell 2 £18.00 

Locomail 1 & 2 £25.00 

Locofont 1 £17.00 

Locofont2 £13.00 

Locofile £25.00 

New-Word II £42.00 

Sage Accounts £58.00 

Sage Accountant Plus £86.00 

Sage Invoicing £40.00 

Sage Payroll £40.00 

Stockmarket £25.00 

Money Manager £24.00 

DG Payroll £26.00 

Map Integrated Accounts £90.00 

Better Maths (Age 12-16) £14.00 

Physics (Age 12-16) £17.00 

Chemistry (Age 12-16) £17.00 

Biology (Age 12-16) £17.00 

Better Spelling (8-Adult) £14.00 

Magic Maths (Age 4-8) £14.00 

Maths Mania (Age 8-12) £14.00 

Sage Chit Chat £69.00 

Easy Labeller £21.00 

Rotate £16.00 

AMX Mouse & Desktop Utilities £47.00 

Crash Course Typing £17.00 

Two Fingers Typing £17.00 

Daata Fax £32.00 

Sharemaster £69.00 

E-Type £18.00 

Personal Tax Planner £20.00 



Fleet Street Editor Plus £39.00 

Stop Press £29.00 

Stop Press + AMX Mouse £54.00 

Micro Design II £40.00 

Database Software £20.00 

Database DTP + AMX Mouse £57.00 



SPREADSHEETS 



Supercalc2 £38.00 

Cracker II (Turbo) £35.00 



GRAPHICS 



EDUCATIONAL 



Master Scan £49.00 

Master Paint £13.00 

MasterScan and 

Master Paint 

£53.00 



WKW 



GENERAL & UTILITIES 



DATABASES 






...£40.00 




..£35.00 


Dbase II 


...£60.00 




...£29.00 




£19 00 




£32.00 





Mini Office 
PROFESSIONAL PLUS 

Very successful - many new features 
5 separate programs - Wordprocessor 

• Database • Spreadsheet • Graphics 

• Communications Interactive 

OUR PRICE ONLY £27.00 




ALL PRICES EXCLUDE VAT 
CARRIAGE FREE!! 



Export, Government and Educational orders welcome 

SALES HOTLINE 
01 - 381 - 6618 



AUTOMATIC SHEET FEEDER 



The ASF951 2 is an automatic sheet feeder 
for use with the PCW 9512 . It will hold up to 30 
sheets of paper enabling either multi-page 
documents or mail-merged letters to be printed 
unattended, thereby releasing the user for other 
tasks and improving productivity. The Sheet Feeder 
can be attached or removed in seconds, leaving the 
printer to accept individual sheets of paper or the 
standard tractor assembly. 




ACCOUSTIC HOOD FOR YOUR 9512 




SKM'S most economic solution to 
noisy printers 

• Up 10 90% noise reduction 

• See through lid keeps noise in and dust out 

Hood and Stand £89.00 only 

Now available to accommodate 

9512 with Sheetfeeder 

OUR PRICE 

£120 



LEISURE SOFTWARE 



Cyrus Chess £12.00 

Colossus 4 Chess £14.00 

Batman £11.00 

Tomahawk £13.00 

The Pawn £17.00 

Trivial Pursuits £14.00 

Head Over Heels £11.00 

Ace £14.00 

Match Day II £12.00 

Tetris £14.00 

Clock Chess £14.00 

Steve Davis Snooker £11.00 

Classic Games 4 £14.00 

Time & Magic £10.00 

Brian Cloughs Football £10.00 

Colossus Bridge £12.00 

Mindfighter £15.00 

Living Daylights £14.00 

PCW Challenge £12.00 

Times Jubilee Crossword £16.00 

Sun Crossword 2 £14.50 



MODEMS 



AMSTRAD V21/V23 



Features 1200/75. 75/1200, 300/300 
Baud rates £99.00 




24 HOURS 
ANSWERPHONE 

FOR CREDIT 
CARD ORDERS 



All prices subject to change without notice. PFR^ONAI CM I FR^ WFI POMF Q If) - *> ^O 10 Fulham Broadway, London SW6 1AA 
All goods subject to availability rcnOUHHL V/HLLLnO VV CLVslSIVIC V.OV O.OVJ TEL: 01-381-6618/9 FAX: 01-381-0528 



1 



Desktop Publishing Accessory Discs 



HD1 CLIPS & FONTS E1 2.50 (NB*") 

12 Versatile fonts plus 60 clip art illustrations 

HD2 DESKTOP MAGIC £12.50 (NB*) 

100's of clip art graphics including, Dogs. Cats, Cars, 
Build'ngs, Advertising Aids and many more, plus .the 
amazing border maker, 90 graphics for trims and bor- 
ders. 
(NB* HD 1&2 are available for all DTP except the 

Desktop Publisher) 
HD3 "IMAGE KIT E12.50 

(Available for all DTP)44 Selected larger graphics, 
from Spitfires to Butterflies, from Cannons to Steam 
Trains. 

HD4 "POSTER KIT £12.50 

(Available for all DTP)Larger cm and paste lettering in 
four styles inc. Olde English outline. 
HD5 "PAGE MAGIC" £12.50 

(Available for all DTP)This disk contains figures, por- 
traits, a selection of digitized pictures and 14 ready 
made decorative founts, 
CLIP PACK. ( NB** )A selection of 280 
graphics from HD 1 & 2 and formatted for 
The Desktop Publisher **£12.50 




ALL DISCS ARE COMPATIBLE WITH 

MICRODESIGN II 

Please specify which DTP software when placing an order 

Merry Christmas to all our Customers! 

(WRITE OR PHONE FOR OUR FREE INFO SHEETS) 

HD DESIGN VISA 

3 ROUNDTHORN WAY, GOLDSWORTH PARK, 
WOKING, SURREY. GU21 39N. 
TELEPHONE: 04867 81394 



MAKE YOUR AMSTRAD EARN! 



Yes making money with your Amstrad becomes incidental when you know how. 
Your micro is, it only you knew it, a gold mine. The size and make is irrelevant. 
Make the initial effort NOW by starting your own 

HOME BASED BUSINESS 

This may be the most important move you will ever make! 
REMEMBER: You'll never get rich by digging someone else's "ditch". Anyone in the 
country, including YOU, can become very rich in a relatively short period of time just 
by doing a few basic things! It's more rewarding than playing games. The benefits 
are many and varied. Full or part time. For FREE details send S.A.E. to: 



HOME BASED 
BUSINESS 

31, PILTON PLACE (8+11) 

KING AND QUEEN STREET, 

WALWORTH, LONDON SE17 1DR 




nfLRunEDlR 

Computer Supplies Ltd. 0533 856622 



AMSOFT/*"|\|Cf*C SPECIAL /*E9 * 10 20 
MAXELL 4 UI9W9 OFFER VrZ 1150 21 so 41 .1 

Printer Ribbons Computer Paper 



S 10 20 50 

11.50 21.80 41.80 99.50 



Price per each Ribbon 2 6 

AimJrod 95 12 Carbon 2.99 2.75 2.! 

9512 carbon 3.20 2.95 2. 

8512/825cAQ3500carbon 4.95 4.65 4! 

•8512 LQ3500 carbon 3.99 380 3j 

DMP 2000/3 160/3000 2.80 2,60 2.: 

LO5000 9.95 9.30 8. 

•COIIO0 1080/1 156 2.99 2.85 2.< 

tp»onM.F&RX80,F&LX800 2.99 2.75 2.1 

■LX80/86GX80 2.80 2.65 2.. 

NICP2200 4.95 4.60 4.: 

•PanotonlcKXP's 3.99 3.80 3,< 

llafLCIO 350 3.10 2.1 
* - Colour Ribbons available 

Dust Covers 

For Printers For Computers 

DMP 2000 £5.75 PCW 8256 £6.60 
8256 £5.75 PCW8512 £6.60 

9512 £5.75 PCW9512 £6.60 

MOUSE PAD £4 .90 3 HIAD CLEANER £5 .90 
DAISYWHEELS FOR 9512 £6 50 
ANTIGLARE SCREEN FILTERS^ 
12" Mono £11.85 
14" Colour £13.85 



MD12 3"x 12 
DISC BOX 

1 1 1 .90 " 
3+ 11.30 
6+ 10.50 



• spring forward action • 3" file in existing case 

• Modular stacking-clip together 

• supplied with 1 2 cases 8i index cards 




Plain fanfold. micro pert edges 

Size Weight 1000's Price per box 

gsm perbx 1 box 3bxs 5bxs 

llx9'/5 60 2000 14.95 14.45 13.65 

llx9'/> 70 2000 18.45 16.05 15.15 

llx9'/t 80 2000 20.25 18.55 16.45 

A411%x9'/i70 2000 20.95 19.70 18.45 

A411%x9'/.80 2000 24.55 23.05 20.15 

A411%x9'/.90 1000 14.25 13.15 14.15 

Computer Labels 

Continuous fanfold. sprocket fed 
Price per 1000 1000 3000 5000 

70x362%xl 7 /i6th 4.85 3.85 3.55 

89x363'/zxl'/i»th 5.35 450 410 

Please state no of labels across sheet (1 , 2 or 3) 

HOW TO ORDER 
LEICESTER 0533 856622 

OUT OF OFFICE HOURS 0533 850654 

MICRO MEDIA DEPT 80+ 

FBEEPOST 

LEICESTER LE3 6ZO 

LEICESTER - 

SORRY NO PERSONAL CALLERS 
POTTERS BAR - PERSONAL CALLERS WELCOME - 
MICRO MEDIA Rydol Mount. Baker St. Potters Bat. Herts 

Mon to Eri 10 00am - 3 30pm 

l']3JW<I[*ll|:H Leicester - Mon to Fn 8 30am - 6 30prr 
EB3HJ3J WITHIN 24 HRS 
EJiniEni PLEASE ALLOW 5 DAYS 



MINIMUM ORDER VALUE 



FOR PAYMENT WITH ORDER 
Min. Value £8.90 or £1.50 Handling charge 

FOR ACCOUNT CUSTOMERS 
Min. Value £15.00 or £300 Handling charge 

SPRING CATALOGUE OUT NOW 

PlfAJi PINO OH vntro FOR YOUR FREE COPY 



ADVANTAGE 





• The BEST Public Domain Software 

• Specially Adapted for the PCW 

• Easy Start-Up - Full Instructions 

• Fast Despatch - First Class 



HOW XO BUY 

Order with confidence, by phone using your Access 
or Visa car d or send cheque, PO or Eurocheque to: 
Advantage, 56 Bath Road, 
Cheltenham, GL53 7HJ 

0242 224340 Fax 0242 226755 



WORD-SPREAD-BASES 



WORD PROCESSOR £5.95 Powerful WordStar-like editor with full 
block operations, windowing, automatic horizontal scroll, macro 
functions, word-wrap, formatting, pagination, find/replace, 
pagination, undelete and many user options. 

SPREADSHEET £5.95 For home accounts, mortgage repayments, 
business transactions. 60 rows by 26 columns, menu-driven, enter 
text, numeric value or calculation. Print facility. 
DATABASE £5.95 Relational database with reports generator. Uses 
free format query language with macros and commands plus on-line 
help. A good introduction to the concept of databases. Comes with a 
useful Inventory Database. 

KEYBASE II £5.95 A commercial menu-driven database released as 
Shareware - register with the author for the full version. 15 fields and 
128 records out of 32000 - more than enough to set up a simple 
database. Ideal for cataloguing collections. "Well designed, simple to 
use and it works" - 8000 Plus 



HOME & BUSINESS 



THE DESKMASTER £5.95 A suite of programs comprising a Desk- 
Top Appointments Calendar, Calculator. Memo-writer, Card-file 
Database, Label Printer, Home Accounts, Mortgage Calculator, 
Weather Forecaster and UNERASE for the M drive. 
HOME VTOEO £5.95 Keep track of your video collection with this 
purpose built program. Offers four Sort Options and Forms 
Management System for printing out the data in order of title 
number, video number, global alphabetic or unique. 
HOME INVENTORY/HOME INSURANCE £5.95 Record your assets 
and their value eg. for contents insurance, monitoring your spending, 
valuing your stamp collection, simple stock taking. 
LETAFONT £5.95 Fed up with the characters on your PCW screen? 
With Letafont you can see a wide variety of new ones, change the look 
of programs, print out text in different styles and alter any of the 16 
fonts provided using the LETA-EDIT program - design your own 
character set! 

KERMIT & FRIENDS £5.95 for data transfer between computers 
(local and remote), access to databases, bulletin boards. Viewdata, 
Prestel. Kermit, UkModem7, MEX & Comms utilities. 
STD CODEBOOK £5.95 Text files containing lists of all the UK 
STD codes and corresponding exchange names. Listed in 
numeric order of STD codes and alphabetical exchanges. 
NUMBER CRUNCHER £5.95 does for calculations what a word 
processor does for text. The mathematian's toolbox has 15 sig.fig. 
accuracy, complex formulae, %, log. trig functions, fixed or 
floating point. Plenty of menus and on-screen help. 



PROGRAMMING 



THE Z80 PROGRAMMER £5.95 Convert your own Assembler file into a 

fully executable machine code .COM program. Includes Z80 Disassembler. 

Z80 Debugger, Z80 Library, 8080 Disassembler. Z80 to 8080 Translator 

and associated utilities. 

THE C PROGRAMMER £5.95 C for Yourself what C programming is like. 

A practical and useable version of C which produces .COM programs. 

Includes source code and documentation. 

THE PASCAL PROGRAMMER £10.95 A completely operational Pascal 

compiler which compiles to executable .COM programs. With sample 

programs and extensive documentation. (2 DISC SET). 

PROLOG 80 £5.95 This powerful interpreter offers a good introduction to the 

world of Artificial Intelligence. Printed documentation supplied with the disc. 

THE LISP PROGRAMMER £5.95 Why not find out more about this 

fascinating Artificial Intelligence interpreter. Plenty of on-disc 

documentation. 

GOING FORTH £5.95 A comprehensive FORTH compiler which produces 

executable programs with documentation and utilities. 

C TOOLBOX £5.95 See some practical examples of C at work with this 

disc full of C source code examples. Each program is accompanied by the 

corresponding executable .COM programs. 



MIX C COMPILER £33.95 

Thousands of satisfied users agree that this is the best 
floating point C compiler for the PCW. MLX C is supplied with 
an extensive manual and tutorial plus examples. 
ADVANTAGE MIX £44.95 

This amazing value for money package offers all the items 
you need to write your own programs in C - MIX C compiler. 
Text Editor, Source code for the Tutorial, Graphics Library 
and the MIX Assembler Utility. (Items also available 
separately) 

NEVADA COBOL COMPILER £33.95 

Very popular with colleges, Nevada Cobol offers one step 
compile and run, fast programming for commercial and home 
applications. Printed manual supplied. 

NEVADA PASCAL COMPILER £33.95 

A good low-cost one-step compile and run language which 
offers sequential or indexed file I/O and trace-style 
debugging. Printed manual supplied. 

NEVADA FORTRAN COMPILER REDUCED TO JUST £13.95 
Adheres closely to the ANSI X3.9 standard with some 1977 
extensions Two pass assembler, random I/O file, function 
library and runtime error reports. With printed manual. 
* ADVANTAGE ALSO STOCK 
THE HISOFT RANGE OF QUALITY PRODUCTS 



GAMES AND EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS 



PIT YOUR WITS £5.95 Pit your wits against the computer with 
Chess. Othello, MasterMind. Rubik's Cube. Spellit. Stone (Awari). 
TicTacTo and Word Search puzzles generator. 
FUN & GAMES £5.95 A selection of popular classics: Pacman, 
Space Invaders, Maze Game, Hungry Snake. Pressup. Ping-Pong, 
Return to Arg, Game of Life, Bugs and Golf. 
AMUSEMENTS AND DIVERSIONS £5.95 Packed with over 30 games 
including Startrek, Lunar Lander, Pilot, Merchant, Baseball, Football, 
Horses, Civil War, Craps, Baccarat, Chase, Spies. 
COLOSSAL CAVE ADVENTURE £5.95 The one that started it all! 
An extensive and challenging adventure game. Features game 
save and re-load. Also "BESTIARY" specially written for the PCW. 
PCW CHALLENGE £5.95 Four entertaining cult games from 
Nemesis - The Trial of Arnold Blackwood. Arnold Goes To Somewhere 
Else, The Wise And Fool Of Arnold Blackwood. Brawn Free. 
TRIVIA QUIZ £5.95 Multi-choice game with graphics and sound, 
competitive scoring and plenty of questions. Suitable for all ages. 
"Guaranteed completely trivial" - 8000 Plus. 

LOGO LOGIC £5.95 Six educational programs specially written 
for DR-LOGO (supplied with all PCWs) :- AIRLINER, ANAGRAM, 
HANGMAN. UFO HUNTER, LOGO-DRAW and MUSIC PRINTER. 
FUN WITH GRAPHICS £5.95 DRAWING program plots lines, 
points, boxes, four fill patterns. BIO-MORPH - fascinating graphic 
demonstration of natural selection. README - program to display 
any text file in double width, 45 character format. 



DO IT YOURSELF 



COMPLEAT UTILITIES £5.95 NEWSWEEP gives you one-key CP/M 
functions, makes disc and file housekeeping much easier. SUPERZAP 
Sector editor for modifying files and discs, unerasing etc. DISCKITA 
disc formatter- 178k data format and 5 1/4" second drive formatting. 
MAKE. CLEANUP. LOOKAT. UNERASE. DIRECTORY CHECK. FILE 
SPLITTER. PASSWORD PROTECTION. SCRAMBLER. 
TEXT PROCESSING £5.95 Print file (eg Spreadsheet) SIDEWAYS, 
ALPHABETIC SORT, WORD COUNT for text AND Locoscript. WSCLEAN, 
CALENDAR GENERATOR. SPELLING CHECKER, SCORING CARD 
Generator, BANNER Printers. TYPEWRITER EMULATOR. 
DISC ORGANISATION £5.95 CATALOGUE your discs, LU 
LIBRARY UTILITIES for archiving. FILE DATING system * 
SQUEEZE and UNSQUEEZE for space saving. 
INSTA-MENU Now you have menu presentation similar to 
Locoscript for your CP/M programs. Simple program selection, 
copy, view, print out. Easy access to all user areas. The ideal 
front end" for all your discs. 



PROTEXT 



BIBLICAL LEARNING 

Ian Goodhardt makes some character-building modifications to Protext 



Have you ever had one of those problems that takes 
years to sort out with each hopeful-looking solution 
coming thoughtfully packaged with its own genre of 
pitfall? This just about sums up the relationship struck 
up between myself and my PCW during a long-standing, 
dare-devil project of mine which consisted of coaxing the 
machine to print out Hebrew phrases under Protext. 

The problem was a specific one. Had I wanted to 
produce complete Hebrew documents, the obvious solution 
would have been to buy a Hebrew word processor (at least 
two of them are available in Israel). They work, however, 
by substituting the Hebrew characters for the lower case 
English ones; only being able to print out English as a 
series of capital letters wasn't going to be much use to me 
as I needed to write predominantly in English while being 
able to insert the odd verse from the Bible or the 
occasional Talmudic phrase. 



LocoScript proved hopeless. Phone calls and letters to 
Howard Fisher yielded a stock reply: there wasn't - and it 
didn't look like there ever would be - sufficient demand to 
make the creation of a Hebrew LocoScript worthwhile. After 
many months I took the hint and gave up. I turned my 
attentions to Protext. 

Quite by chance, one day, I discovered that the program 
contains a little-known command which enables the user to 
redefine characters on the screen. Could this unassuming 
SYMBOL (or SYM) command provide me with the solution to 
my problem? 

Yes, as it turned out. My first attempts were rather wobbly, 
but I shall never forget the sheer sense of elation I felt when I 
saw that little wizzened aleph (the first letter in the Hebrew 
alphabet) making its debut appearance on the screen of my 
PCW. And all I had done to achieve the breakthrough was to 
redefine some of Pretext's rarely-used symbols. 



Onto the screen ... 

I decided that I would use the upside question mark as my 
starting point. I would redefine it to create my aleph. The 
command which redefines the screen appearance of the 
new characters is actually quite simple to use. You need to 
use the SYMBOL command followed by the Ascii code of 
the character you need to redefine - in this case the upside 
down question mark. This code is in turn followed by a 
series of numbers (to be calculated shortly) which describe 
the shape of the new character. 

The Ascii code for the upside down question mark is 
74. Following on from what we've just said, then, the 
command to redefine it begins SYMBOL (or SYM) 174. 

I'm afraid that there aren't any shortcuts for the next 
bit. To work out the numbers needed to describe the shape 
of the new character, you will have to draw the character 
on a grid. Sketch out on a piece of paper a grid which is 
eight squares wide by eight squares deep. Number each of 
the vertical columns from left to right as follows: 128, 64, 
32, 1 6, 8, 4, 2, 1 . Draw the new character on the grid by 
filling in the appropriate squares. 

Now begins the tricky bit. For each horizontal row of 
the grid (working from left to right and starting at the top), 
add up the numbers for each square that has been filled in. 
For instance, if one line has its second and seventh 
squares filled in, the value for that line will be 64 + 2 which 
is 66. In the case of the aleph, the top row gives 0, the 
second row gives 32 + 1 6 + 2 + 1 (= 51 ) and so on. Work 
your way, row by row, down the grid until you can enter the 
whole series of eight numbers required to define the aleph. 
It should look like this; 
SYM 174, 0, 51, 27, 63, 54, 51, 51, 0. 
Once you've redefined all the characters that you want 
following the same procedure, save yourself the bother of 
typing all the numbers in each time by creating an EXEC 
file to do it for you. If you want them available whenever 
you use Protext, call it EXFILE and it will happen all by 
itself whenever you enter Protext. 

So all the new characters are happily sitting there deep 





128 


64 


32 


16 


8 


4 


2 


1 


1 

— 1 

5 

•< 































































































The screen aleph. For each horizontal row of the grid (working from left to right 
and starting at the top) add up the numbers for each shaded square. 



within the computer's memory. The next problem is how to 
access them so that you can call the one you want onto the 
screen. This is done by assigning the characters to various 
keys as phrases. The command to assign our newly- 
created letter to key A, for example, is KEY A T174T. (The 
up-arrow is obtained by pressing [EXTRA]/[;]). 

Whenever I press [EXTRA]/[A], for example, my 
Hebrew letter will appear on the screen. This is when you 
will find out if you've redefined any of those special 
characters that Protext needs. 

Hebrew has one slight additional problem: it is written 
from right to left. Overcoming this, showed the real genius 
of the Amor support staff; simply add character 242 to each 
letter in your phrase file. 242 is the Protext code for a 
backspace, so as you type in the Hebrew letters, the cursor 
stays where it is and the text shoots off to the right, 
achieving the desired result. 

You can type any Hebrew phrase you want onto the 
screen; getting it to the printer, however, is another matter. 



> 



55 8000 PLUS December 89 



PROTEXT 



Prints-ly 
characters 

Star's range of 9- and 24-pin 
dot matrix printers have long 
been a favourite buy with PCW 
users by virtue of the high- 
resolution print-out they offer. 
The Star LC24-10 that Ian uses 
now costs £299 plus VAT. 
Phone Star on 0494 471 111 for 
further details. 





.... and fit to print! 

Getting this far only made me realise that I couldn't rest on 
my laurels just yet. You see, the job was still only half done. 
When you use Protext to define new characters, you must 
do it in two stages: once you've designed the screen 
appearance of the character, you must then start work 
designing its appearance in a way that the printer can 
understand. 

As things stand at the moment, for example, the aleph 
on the screen will still produce the normal upside down 
question mark at the printer. You now have to alter the 
printer driver to place the two in accordance. This means 
further calculations on a new grid. Draw yourself another 8 
by 8 grid and sketch in the aleph. 

This time number each horizontal row of the grid 
(starting with 1 28 at the top and finishing with 1 at the 
bottom) and calculate the required series of eight numbers 
on the basis of one total for each vertical column starting 
on the left of the grid and moving to the right. 

Create a new file which has one line for each 
character, with each line consisting of the following four 
elements: the stored command >RC (redefine character), 
the Ascii code of that character, the numbers 27, 75, 8, 






1 CALCULATE 
▼ ▼ ▼ 




















128 

64 

32 

16 

8 

4 

2 

1 










































































94 126 48 24 126 118 




The printer aleph. Calculate the required series of eight numbers on the basis of 
one total per vertical grid column moving from left to right. 


(to tell the printer the character is eight dots wide) and 
finally the eight numbers required to define it. 

The redefine character command should look 
something like this; >RC 174, 27, 75, 8, 0, 0, 0, 94, 126, 
48,24,126,118. 

The numbers 27, 75, 8, tell the printer to expect a 
series of numbers defining a normal density graphic image. 
The eight numbers which follow define the actual shape of 
that image. To get this file to the printer, simply tell Protext 
to PRINT it. 

Nothing will appear to happen, but deep in the bowels 
of your machine the printer driver is being amended to 
send the newly-defined characters. Be warned though: if 
you save the new version as PCW.PTR, then it will be 
there to stay forever as this is the file that Protext always 
looks to. You can save it under another name, however: 
HEBREW.PTR, for example. Now when you print out, the 
symbol of your design should go to the printer as well as 
appearing on the screen. 

The characters you should concentrate on redefining 
are the ones you rarely, if ever, use: the Yen sign, for 
example, the upside down question mark, the paragraph 
sign, and so on (apologies to Japanese and Spanish 
readers, by the way.) Some characters are used by Protext 
for special functions, so redefining these may cause 
problems. This is something you can only really find out by 
trial and error, but I can tell you that you should avoid 


;haracter 154 which Protext uses as an end-of-file marker. 

Shady characters 

The bad news is that the PCW printer will only print such 
characters as draft characters. Even when printing English 
n NLQ, the Hebrew characters still appear in draft. 

I was satisfied with this for a while, but then got fed up 
with the printer as a whole, and the draft Hebrew in 
aarticular. I decided to go up-market and invested in a Star 
LC24-10 24-pin printer (needless to say, daisy wheel 
printers are no use at all for redefining characters.) 

The printer itself is superb; not only does it combine 
quality and speed, it will also accept definitions for NLQ 
Hebrew. The only disadvantage is that whereas the PCW 
printer needs six numbers to define each letter, the Star 
needs 105. This is because each letter is 35 columns 
across and each column is defined with three separate 
numbers. So your letter-definition box is 35 columns across 
and 24 lines high. Number it 1 - 35 across the top (in 
Dractice, the last few columns will be empty so that the 
etters do not all run together) and from the bottom, number 
1,2,4,8,16, 32, 64, 1 28 three times. 

Apart from that, the principle is exactly the same. The 
file which results from defining the 27 Hebrew letters in this 
way is no less than 8K and consists entirely of numbers 
and commas apart from the >RC which 
begins each line. 



PROTEXT Document examples. heb 
Page 1 Line 21 Col 1 



TIT 



Right-Justify 
No markers set 



Word-Wrap 



.y liana loves Fruit and Nut chocolate, (yes, I remember the old days 
d? 8W0+) 

(80001- 56 K***WI f,vovj Kgm v = « jC;i .) ,±i>i3«m VA » "'/"IE: oU-""« v o9* 



Mr. Fortesqiie, these Brussels sprouts are covered in insects. 
p,v|Ag^ ftv^irt/o ja«j Fv. v= t ; "f^Ii'. ,*" v Sf*A A * . A 3 



It is also quite possible to type 6 VA H*-f .in Hebrew H»e° <i«t°«f, in the 
middle of a sentence. 



The final result. This is what Hebrew phrases look like on Protext' s screen - complete with translations of penetrating insight 



56 8000 PLUS Decembers 



Make way, 
make way 

The only major problem which remains after this 21/2 year saga is 
that the 8K file makes the printer driver so big that it interferes with 
other bits of Protext's workings. Protext only allows a maximum of 
5K for the printer driver, and no-one is quite sure where the 
overflow goes. All I do know is that it makes it impossible to leave 
Protext for any reason - even to use the spell-checker. 

The answer is to dump all the code directly into the printer's 
own buffer using the >OC command - but for some reason 
this just won't work. Both Star and Arnor are working on this 
for me at the moment and all three of us are confident that 
before long we shall be able to pronounce the entire venture 
an unqualified success. 



DISCOUNT SOFTWARE 

FOR THE PCW 8256, 8512 & 9512 



HARDWARE 



5.25" DISC DRIVES 
We now stock 5.25" fully compatible 
disc drives for the PCW range. They 
are directly addressed by CPM and 
require no extra software. 
PCW 8256 & 9512 5.25" drive....£139.95 
PCW 8512 Switchable drive £159.95 



WORD PROCESSING 



Protext (Full Version) 39.95 

Protext Office 29.95 

Locoscript2 21.95 

Locospell (for Loco 2) 38.95 

Locoscript 2 & Locospell 31.95 

LocoMail (for Loco 2) 28.95 

LocoFile (state if 9512) 28.95 

Supertype II font program 12.95 

Tasword 8000 17.95 

TasSpell 11.95 

TasPrint (extra fonts) 10.95 



MJC SPECIAL: 

PROTEXT CPM 

Full Version including Spellchecking 

& powerful Mail-Merge routines. 

RRP £59.95 

OUR PRICE JUST £39.95 



DATABASES 



Masterfile 8000 34.95 

Locofile (8256/85 12) 28.95 

Locofile(9512) 28.95 

At Last Plus 29.95 

Comix Card Index (8256/8512) 25.95 

Comix Card Index (9512) 25.95 

Minerva First Base 25.95 



TUTORIAL 



French Mistress 15.95 

German Master 15.95 

Spanish Tutor 15.95 

Italian Tutor 15.95 

Iansyst Crash Course Typing 19.95 

Iansyst Two Finger Typing 19.95 



BUSINESS/FINANCIAL 



Cornix Invoicing 45.95 

Cornix Simple Accounts II 55.95 

Cornix Job Estimator 59.95 

Cornix Product Costing 59.95 

Digita's DG Payroll 29.95 

Money Manager Plus 32.95 

Money Manager PCW 39.95 

Personal Tax Planner 19.95 

Plan-It (Home Accounts) 15.95 

Stockmarket (share analysis) 32.95 

Supercalc2 55.95 

Minerva First calc 25.95 

Mini Office Professional 25.95 



DESKTOP / GRAPHICS 



Desktop Publisher 19.95 

as above with AMX Mouse 59.95 

Stop Press 34.95 

as above with AMX Mouse 69.95 

Micro Design 2 54.95 

as above with AMX Mouse 95.95 

Masterpaint (graphics) 15.95 

as above with AMX Mouse 59.95 

Masterscan (optical scanner) 54.95 

N.B. Masterscan is for 8256/8512 only 

Masterpack (Scan & Paint) 59.95 

as above with AMX Mouse 99.95 

AMX Desktop (WIMP Environment) 

with AMX Mouse 64.95 

AMX Mouse and Interface only ..47.50 



IT'S BACK 

The Original 
MINI oFFICE PROFESSIONAL 

Since the release of Mini Office 

Professional Plus, customers have been 

asking for the original program. No spell 

checker, no thesaurus, just the original five 

modules, comprising Word Processor, 

excellent Spreadsheet, Database, 

Presentation Graphics and 

Communications. They would also prefer a 

new manual and/or a copy of the John 

Hughes "All In One..." book. 

Now you can have both!! 

MINI OFFICE PROFESSIONAL 
RRP £39.95 OUR PRICE £25.95 

If you still require the spell checker and 

thesaurus and you have an 8512 or 9512, the 

'new' Mini Office Professional Plus 

is still available. 

MINI OFFICE PROFESSIONAL PLUS 

RRP £49.95 OUR PRICE £32.95 



DOT MATRIX PRINTERS 



Suitable for 95 1 2 and supplied with 
necessary cable. 

Citizen 120-D 139.95 

Panasonic KXP-1081 159.95 

Star LC-10 Mark 1 179.95 

Star LC-10 Mark 2 (quicker) 199.95 

Prices include normal 1 2 month 'return 
to dealer' guarantee. For 1 2 month on- 
site Service Contract iust add £5.00 



PROGRAMMING 



Amor C Compiler 39.95 

Hisoft C Compiler 39.95 

Nevada Cobol 39.95 

Hisoft Pascal 80 39.95 

Hisoft Devpac 80 V2 39.95 

Maxamll 39.95 

Nevada Fortran 39.95 

Hisoft Forth 18.95 



GAMES 



Bridge Player 2150 24.95 

Classic Collection 1 (not 95 12). 11. 95 
Classic Collection 2 (not 9512) .11.95 

Classic Games 4 15.95 

Clock Chess '89 15.95 

Colossus Chess 4 11.95 

Corruption 19.95 

Guild of Thieves 19.95 

Jinxter 19.95 

Lancelot 15.95 

PCW Challenge 11.95 

Scapeghost 15.95 

Tomahawk 15.95 

Trivial Pursuit 15.95 

All In One Mini Office 11.95 

Mallard Basic 9.95 

Program Your PCW 7.95 

Programming the Z80 19.95 

PCW Machine Code 13.95 

CP/M Bible 16.95 



CONSUMABLES 



Amsoft or Maxell CF2's (as available) 

10 off 25.95 

5 off 14.00 

PCW 8256/8512 RIBBONS 

Standard 14m Fabric Each 3.95 

two 7.00 

Higher quality/density fabric 4.95 

PCW 9512 RIBBONS 

Amstrad brand Film Multistrike..3.95 

Box of 12 42.00 

Unbranded continuous fabric 2.95 

N.B. Fabric ribbons do not give as good a print 

quality as film/carbon ribbons even when new. 

but as they are continuous will last a lot longer. 

Recommended for draft copies 

or in-house memos. 



MISCELLANEOUS 



PCW 8256/85 12 Dust Cover Set .9.95 

PCW 9512 Dust Cover Set 10.95 

PCW 8xxx Printer extension lead 1 1.95 
PCW 9512 Printer extension lead 12.95 

1000 Fan-fold address labels 6.95 

3" Disc Head Cleaner 6.95 

PCW 9512 Daisy wheels: All at .£5.95 
choose from: 

Courier (10) Orator (10) 

Script (12) Prestige Elite (12) 

Recta (10) Thesis (Prop) 

Letter Gothic (10/12) Mini Gothic (15) 



3ARCLAYCAR 



All prices INCLUDE VAT, postage and packaging 
Overseas orders welcome - please write for prices 

MJC SUPPLIES pls 

40a QUEEN STREET, HITCHIN, HERTS, SG4 9TS. 

Tel: (0462) 432897 / 420847 / 421 41 5 for Enquiries/Credit orders •""• 
CALLERS WELCOME Mon to Fri 9.30 - 5.00. Sat 10.00 - 4.00 ^v ^ 



Locomotive Software 



LocoScript2 (MRP 24.95) 21.95 

LocoSpell 2 (MRP 19.95) 17.95 

LocoScript 2 with LocoSpell 

(MRP 34.90) 29.95 

LocoMail2 (MRP 29.95) 24.95 

LocoFile (8256/8512) . (MRP 29.95) 24.95 
LocoFile (PCW9512) . (MRP 29.95) 24.95 
LocoFont Set 1 ... .(MRP 19.95) 17.95 
LocoFontSet2 . . . .(MRP 14.95) 13.95 



Creative Technology 



Micro Design II . . . .(MRP 69.95) 49.95 

"The Rolls Royce of PCW desk-top publishing" 

Extra Fonts Disc . . .(MRP 14.95) 12.95 

Disc full of Fonts up to 75pt 



Cornix Software 



Simple Accounts II . .(MRP 99.95) 69.95 

Genuinely easy to use book-keeping system 

Cornix Invoicing . . .(MRP 59.95) 49.95 

The efficient solution to the problems of 

producing and recording invoices 

Job Estimating . . . .(MRP 79.90) 69.95 

An essential tool for the small contractor 

Product Costing . . .(MRP 79.90) 69.95 

Invaluable for use by manufacturers 

Card Index (MRP 34.95) 29.95 

Useful and simple filing system 



HiSoft 



Devpac 80 version 2 . (MRP 39.95) 29.95 

HisoftC (MRP 39.95) 29.95 

HiSoft Pascal 80 . . .(MRP 39.95) 29.95 
FTLModuIa2 ... .(MRP 54.95) 49.95 
Please enquire for other languages, utilities etc. 



SPA Associates 



PCW MACHINE CODE 13.95 

NO VAT 
A practical guide to controlling PCW's by 
MACHINE CODE PROGRAMMING 

Direct access to: 
DISCS - MEMORY - SCREEN - PRINTER 

170 PAGES - PAPERBACK - ILLUSTRATED 
FULL INDEX & PROGRAM EXAMPLES 

"A detailed guide; very informative and helpful. 
Good value." APCW Magazine 



COULD YOU FILL THIS SPACE? 
Have you written a program or book for 
the PCW? 

If so we would like to speak to you with 
regard to our unique co-operative 
method of producing and marketing 
YOUR title. Please telephone - it could 
help you to achieve the sales you deserve 
without the costs you fear. 
If you are already marketing a product 
yourself we can probably help with 
supplies or services at very competitive 
prices because of our bulk buying. 



CF2 DISCS 



MAXELL CF2 . (Individual Card Sleeves) 

19.95 for 10 (10.95 for 5) 
MAXELL CF2 . (Individual Plastic Cases) 

22.95 for 10 (11.95 for 5) 
MAXELL CF2-D (Individual Card Sleeves) 

24.95 for 10 (12.95 for 5) 
AMSOFT CF2 . (Individual Plastic Wallets) 

22.95 for 10 (n.95 for 5) 



DISC STORAGE 



AMS30L deluxe storage box . . .11.95 



DUST COVERS 



PCW9512 2-piece set 9.95 

PCW9512 3-piece set 9.95 

PCW8256/8512 2-piece set .... 9.95 

PCW8256/8512 3-piece set .... 9.95 

Monitor and keyboard covers are combined in 

2-piece sets, seperate in 3-piece sets. 

All have seperate printer covers. 



PRINTWHEELS 



PCW9512 PRINTWHEELS 
UK STYLES ONLY 

Mini Gothic 15 5.95 

Prestige Elite 12 5.95 

Thesis PS 5.95 

Script 12 5.95 

Prestige Pica 10 5.95 

Oratorio 5.95 

Letter Gothic 10/12 5.95 

Courier 10 5.95 

Recta 10 5.95 

Style sheets available on request. 



RIBBONS 



TOP QUALITY - FULL LENGTH 
ALL RIBBONS GUARANTEED 

PCW 8256/ 8512 
Multistrike FABRIC Ribbons 

Black 4.95 

Red, Blue, Brown or Green .... 5.95 
Multistrike FILM Ribbons 

Black only 6.95 

PCW 9512 
Multistrike FILM Ribbons 

Black 3.95 

Red, Blue, Brown or Green .... 4.95 

Multistrike FABRIC Ribbons 
Black only . 4.95 



ACCESSORIES 



Margin Maker MM3 9.95 

The essential accessory for your 8256/8512 printer 



PRINTING SERVICE 



We can now offer a Laser Printing 

service from most software packages 

and disc formats. If multiple copies are 

required we can photocopy or Iitho print 



D G C Software 



ULTIMATE SUMS 14.95 

The fun way for children aged 5 to mid-teens to 
learn and practice sums. 

• EIGHT TYPES OF SUM * 

* EIGHT LEVELS OF DIFICULTY * 
* UP TO EIGHT PLAYERS • 

* COMPREHENSIVE SCORE SHEET * 

ULTIMATE WORD 14.95 

Test your knowledge of English words. 

• LARGE SUPPLIED DICTIONARY * 

* CREATE YOUR OWN DICTIONARY * 

* ADD WORDS DURING THE GAME * 

ULTIMATE QUIZ 14.95 

Learning can be fun! 

• ONE TO EIGHT PLAYERS • 

*10 QUIZZES (1000 QUESTIONS) SUPPLIED* 

* OPTIONAL JOKES - TIMER - OXO GAME * 

* COMPREHENSIVE SCORE SHEET • 
SUITABLE FOR SCHOOLS - CLUBS - HOME 

* MENU DRIVEN - VERY EASY TO USE * 

• * * NOW INCLUDES * * * 

ULTIMATE TEST 

One player against the clock 

Can you take the ULTIMATE TEST? 

"•PLUS*** 

ULTIMATE QUIZ QUESTION PRINTER 

•"PLUS*** 
ULTIMATE QUIZ QUESTION EDITOR 

THE USEFUL DISC 14.95 

A collection of 20 useful and entertaining 

programs to help you use the computer to the full 

BAR CHARTS * CALENDARS * COLUMNS 

CONVERSIONS * DIARY * DISC LABELS 

FILE MERGE * PRINTER SET-UP 
ASCII PRINTER * ENCRYPTION * TIMER 

WORD COUNTER * ASCII SORTER 

DRAWING - FRUIT - SHOOT - SQUASH 

(For the children) 

REVERSI-learning the rules is easy! Winning isn't 

SUITABLE FOR PCW8256/8512 OR PCW9512 



Bourne Software 



WORLD WISE 14.95 

Constructive geography programs 
covering the United Kingdom and the 

World 
ANIMAL VEGETABLE MINERAL 

14.95 

Can the computer guess the object 

you've thought of? 

Suitable for 7 year old upwards. 



DATA TRANSFER 



We are pleased to announce that we can 
now offer this new service to the public. 
We can transfer data between different 

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TELEPHONE: 033 77 444 

(Monday to Friday, 9 to 5 - Human Beings. Other Times - Infernal Machine) 
FAX : 033 77 445 (Anytime!) 

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MAINTENANCE 




Hour PCW probably spends much of its life tucked 
away in a corner of your study or office soundlessly 
smoothing out the creases in your administrative 
nightmare. Few would dispute, however, that just 
how effectively a machine - any machine - tackles its 
allotted tasks can be an indication of its physical condition. 

The PCW is a very trustworthy machine; most of the 
hardware problems that do crop up can usually be put down 
to the accumulated effects of general wear and tear. Lavish a 
little care on it from time to time, however, and it will probably 
make it worth your while. 

Gaining headway 

The disc drives are perhaps the most worked and potentially 
fragile moving parts of the machine, and, as such, will tend 
to go first. There's not a lot you can do to prevent this most 
expensive and serious of death-knells from sounding. Try to 
make sure the drives are empty whenever you switch your 
PCW on or off, and insert and release the discs gently. And 
here's one more tip: if you smoke, try and keep the cigarette 
well away from the drive. Nicotine build-up on the heads is a 
very common problem that will always eventually require 
corrective surgery. 

Amstrad firmly recommend that you don't try and clean 
your drives with any of the cleaning kits now available from 
many suppliers. You will almost certainly do more harm than 
good. Neville Smith from our very own Software Plus here in 
Bath offers this advice: 'If the drive in question is in need of 
attention, it should be stripped down and cleaned with a 
cotton bud. The board should be washed with isopropyl 
alcohol, the heads cleaned, and when the parts have been 
lightly oiled, the drive should be reassembled - expertly.' He 
stresses that this is not a task for the DIY enthusiast. 'The 3" 
drive is a very small compact device,' he warns. 'It can't 
tolerate any clumsy handling. If you're not sure what to do, 
get professional, specialist help.' 



Buying a plastic transparent keyboard cover will both protect 
the lettering and prevent anything sinister from finding its 
way under the keys. 

Prints of darkness 

Frequently advertised printer maintenance kits are also to 
be avoided like the plague, counsels Neville. 'They are a 
complete rip-off. Paper dust is the biggest single problem for 
printers and by far the best way to get rid of that is to dust 
round the printer's nooks and crannies with a large soft- 
bristled brush.' 

Ribbon Refresh (£8.95) from Caspell Computer 
Services (0202 6661555) is an aerosol spray which does 
exactly what its name suggests. Rather than going out and 
buying a new printer ribbon when your current one starts to 
fade, just lift the ribbon cartridge out of the printer and prize 
off the top. Put the cartridge on a piece of newspaper and 
spray the ink sparingly over the exposed ribbon inside; don't 
forget to wind the ribbon on periodically so that you can 
spray all of it. Leave it for a good 24 hours to dry out 
thoroughly and pop the cartridge back into the printer. So 
complete tends to be the nature of PCW damage when it is 
specifically owner-induced, that many repair houses have a 
hard job believing that the act was perpetrated accidentally. 
Wendy and Neville Smith spend a lot of their time nurturing 
back to health those PCWs which have suffered at the 
hands of their usually well-meaning users. 'One thing is 
clear,' says Wendy. 'Nobody should try and repair their 
machine if they suspect something has gone wrong unless 
they're sure they know what they're doing.' 

What more can we say? Provided you treat your 
machine with respect, it is certain to reward you with years 
of faithful - and hopefully faultless - service. ■ 

Our thanks to Bath's Software Plus, Unit 5, Greenpark Station (0225 
448855) for supplying us with the diagnostic board to photograph. 



All keyed up 

The keyboard provides the point of 
interaction between you and your PCW; it's 
little wonder, therefore, that this peripheral 
takes the heaviest pounding. Save it the 
hassle wherever possible by using 
keyboard replacement devices - especially 
if you're a keen games player. Invest in a 
joystick rather than hammering away 
relentlessly at the keys. 

The keyboard's biggest enemy, though, 
is errant coffee, tea, lager - and any other 
liquid refreshments you care to mention. As 
Neville points out, 'The keyboard isn't a 
dumb device. Not only does it have its own 
power supply, it also contains an interface 
chip and circuit board. Because it also has 
two membranes inside it, any spilt liquid 
that finds its way into the keyboard will sit 
there for a while unless you tip it upside 
down and leave it to dry.' 

On the whole, though, keyboards tend 
to be very hard-wearing and reliable. The 
legends will tend to wear off with time, but, 
again, there is a way round this problem. 




Many PCW repair houses make 
frequent use of what are known as 
diagnostics testers. This is a board 
which fits onto the expansion port 
at the back of the PCW. This 
causes a large menu to appear on 
the screen, By selecting the 
appropriate option with the cursor 
keys, you can perform independent 
tests on either the VDU, the 
keyboard or the printer, 

The diagnostic board is 
guaranteed to bring the most 
stubborn of lurking gremlins to 
justice. It enables you to test the 
drives and make sure that the 
display and alignment on your VDU 
is everything it should be. You can 
also test each key on the keyboard, 
verify that all the links and LEDs 
are operating normally and run 
through any number 
of printer tests - in both draft 
and near letter quality modes 
If necessary. 



Interface the 
music 

Another extremely big no no 
is plugging an interface onto 
the expansion port at the 
back of the monitor while 
your machine Is still switched 
on. While you will see the 
occasional blase user doing 
just this from time to time, it 
is not to be advised. There is 
no guarantee that the next 
time he or she does it, they 
won't blast the main 
processor chip inside the 
machine (the Z80 In the case 
of the PCW). 



Keep the 
memory alive 

Memory failure can be 
caused by sudden surges 
of electricity 

entering the machine. Since 
memory faults can be very 
costly to repair, you might 
prefer to invest in a spike 
protector plug (£10.25 from 
various suppliers). These 
wire up like a normal plug 
and simply stop the spike 
from entering the machine 
The spike protector also 
works without being wired 
up: just plug it into the 
adjacent socket. 






59 8000 PLUS December 89 



WORLDWIDE 



SOFTWARE 



1 Bridge Street 
Galashiels 
TD1 1SW 



Tel 

0896 

57004 

(24 hrs) 



Tel 


106 A Chilwell Road 


0602 


Beeston 


252113 


Nottingham 


(24 hrs) 


NG9 1ES 



All Prices Include VAT. 
1st Class Postage and Packing is FREE in the U.K. 



AMX Mouse/Stop Press £69.95 

Stop Press Software Only E31.95 

AMX Mouse/Desktop Publisher £58.95 

Masterpack (Masterpaint + Masterscan)..£58.95 

Desktop Publisher £19.50 

Mini Office Professional Plus (8512/9512) £33.00 
Mini Office Professional Enhanced (8256) ...£33.00 

Hi Soft C £38.95 

Hi Soft Knife Plus £14.95 

Hi Soft Pascal £38.95 

Locoscript II + Locospell £32.95 

Locofile £28.95 

Masterfile 8000 £32.95 

Money Manager Plus £28.95 

Money Manager PCW £38.95 

Plan It £16.95 

Pocket Pretext £26.95 

Prospell £21.95 

Sage Payslips (1000) £38.95 

Sage Invoices (500) £44.95 

Sage Statements (1000) £38.95 

Sage Popular Accounts Plus (Accts + Inv)... £102.95 

Sage Popular Accounts £71 .95 

Sage Popular Invoicing £51 .95 

Sage Popular Payroll £51 .95 

Sage Popular Retrieve £49.95 

Programmable Joystick Interface £24.95 



Cheetah Joystick £6.95 

10 x CF2 Amsoft/Maxell Disk £23.95 

Bridge Player 2000 £11.95 

Bridge Player 21 50 £21.95 

Classic Games 4 £14.95 

Clock Chess 88 £11.95 

Clock Chess 89 £13.95 

Colossus Bridge 4 £13.50 

Colossus Chess 4 £13.50 

Scapeghost £14.95 

Scrabble £14.95 

Steve Davis Snooker £13.50 

Tomahawk (Helicopter Simulator) £14.95 

Trivial Pursuit £14.95 

PCW Challenge (Compilation) £12.99 

(Air Combat Emulator, Sky War, Formula 1 , 
Strip Poker) 

Educational 

Animal Vegetable Mineral £12.99 

Better Maths (12-16 Yrs) £12.99 

Better Spelling (9-14 Yrs) £12.99 

Maths Mania (8-12 Yrs) £12.99 

World Wise £12.99 

Wordprocessors Computers 

PCW 8256 £373.95 

PCW 851 2 £488.95 

PCW 951 2 £505.95 




VISA 



Please make Cheques and Postal Orders 
Payable to 

Worldwide Software 

Credit Card Orders accepted by Phone or Mail. 




PROGRAMMERS 



CDS Software Ltd, one of the country's leading Leisure 

Software Publishers is looking for PCW Programmers. Work 

would be on a contractual basis and would involve the 

conversion of existing programs to PCW format and 

programming to specification of new projects. 

Applicants must be able to program in Assembler Language, 

have an intimate knowledge of the PCW family of machines 

and be able to work to strict deadlines. 

In the first instance please write to:- 

Chris Allen • Software Manager 
CDS Software Ltd • Nimrod House 
Beckett Road - Doncaster DN2 4AD 



Laser Typesetting 



Our new improved service brings low cost laser 
printing and typesetting to the PCW and PC user 
from £1 per sheet. Ideal for books, reports, etc. 

Wide range of ty»e styCes and Sizes. 
Phone or write for full details. 

LASER IMAGES 

39 Belle Vue Terrace • Sandbach • Cheshire • CW1 1 0NR 
TELEPHONE (0270)760531 



also Disc Conversions from £5 



APPLICATIONS 

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Savings Processor 



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SOUND AND LIGHT 

In the last of our programming series, Geoffrey Childs adds the 
final trimmings to your finished output 



Have you ever thought how exciting it would be to 
have the colour graphics of an Atari ST or the sound 
effects of an Amiga? Such effects can produce one 
of two possible outcomes: they can either enhance 
the program or be a cause of much irritation to the 
program's user. 

I once used a colour monitor with a default of white text 
on a blue screen. By far the most comfortable colour 
scheme for intensive work was - you've guessed it - 
green on black. As a programmer, you should be thankful 
for the PCW. I've had many comments on my PCW 
programs, but nobody has written to me complaining that 
they didn't like my blue trees against a brown sky with a 
green sun shining! 

This makes output on a PCW a relatively simple matter. 
It does not mean to say that it is something to be done 
without care. It is still possible to produce interesting 
graphics. The use of the full screen resolution of 720 by 256 
pixels - an impressive figure for a computer in this price 
range - is not practical in Basic without the use of machine 
code or additional programs. It is possible, however, to 
design neat pages using the low resolution characters that 
appear in the character set. 

The general rules about output are those of common 
sense. Make the output absolutely clear, and as 
grammatically correct as possible. 'You will need 1 farmers 
30 horse and 0.0000001 kows', for example, suggests a 
certain degree of incompetency on the part of the 
programmer. Try to design an output page so that is 
pleasing to the eye, but don't make the design so complex 
that the user has to endure an irritating delay. 

Use of OUT 248,8 (screen blank) and subsequently 
OUT 248,7 can be used to produce an instantaneously 
complete screen, but use this trick with discretion. 

Outputting screens that scroll are generally the result of 
sloppy programming. Be careful not to give output that could 
be ambiguous. The user wants a clear result, not a 
demonstration of your artistic and programming talents. On 
the whole, screens should be like Victorian children - seen 
and not heard! 

Even if you do intend to do some design work on your 
output, it is wisest to leave that stage to the frills section. 
Make sure your program works, is understandable and is 
fully debugged first. 

North-South divide 

In the map option of BRITMAP, output is the main 
consideration. We shall only attempt a crude low resolution 
positioning. It would be attractive to superimpose our 
towns on to an outline map of Britain, but such an outline 
would probably need a light pen to design it, a special file to 
load it and high resolution graphics to operate it. None of 
this is impossible on the PCW, but it is beyond the scope of 
this series. 

We shall use the left hand window of the screen to 
mark each town with a * in the correct position. The number 
of the town will be written to the right, and we shall just have 
to hope than no two towns will be so close that they 



overwrite each other. In low resolution, we can safely use 
rows 0-29 and columns 0-50. 

The North/South (vertical) position is fixed in this way. 
We think of the bottom of the map as row 29, the top as row 
0. The lowest latitude in Britain is just over 49, and the 
highest under 60. This means we have a range of 11 
degrees. 

Suppose we want to plot a town which is 51 degrees 
North; this is two elevenths of the way up the map. Two 
elevenths of 29 rows is about 5 rows. Thus we want to plot 
on the 24th row. The first formula in line 4030 does this 
calculation. The horizontal displacement is calculated in the 
same way. 

When I was testing and debugging this section, I noticed 
that the map had drawn Edinburgh to the west of 
Manchester. Back to the drawing board! Before I did that, 
though, I decided to take a look at a 'real' map. Edinburgh is 
situated further west than Manchester. I'd be willing to bet 
that half of you wouldn't have been right on this one. PCWs 
can certainly teach you a thing or two. 

Frills 

The most important frill, if one calls it that, is the 
documentation of your program. Some programmers would 
say that the documentation should be done before the 
program, but I prefer to do it afterwards when I know exactly 
what the program does, and what particular difficulties might 
occur in use. This can be anything from a few REMs to a full 
blown 500 page manual. 

For BRITMAP, a HELP screen may be the most 
appropriate way. If so, you can write one for yourself. I've 
just put a few lines into the program where it could go, and I 
make no claims that this is the most helpful screen that I 
have ever written. 

10000 PRINT c$;FNa$(16,20); 

10010 PRINT'Who do you think I am - your blinking 

psychiatrist?" 
10020 FOR n=1 TO 10000:NEXT:RETURN 

Most of the other frills are an individual matter. 

Programmers see particular effects in other programs, 
and those they like are incorporated into their own 
programs. There are plenty of effects that one could add to 
BRITMAP, but I felt the most important one was to write a 
routine that produced a reverse video effect on the right 
hand side of the screen so that the town listing would 
appear distinct from the rest of the program. There may be 
ways to do this with Basic, but a code routine seemed more 
appropriate and much quicker. 

Well, that's it for BRITMAP. If any of you are saying that 
you could write a better program yourself, that's good news! 
Don't just say it, write it. 

If any readers have queries about anything in this 
series, I will be happy to try to reply if you write to my home 
address: 
14 Gretton Road, Winchcombe, Gloucestershire. V^^ 



61 8000 PLUS December 6 




Character set 

1 OPTION NOT TAB:FOR n=0 TO 255 

2 PRINT USING*'###";n;:PRINT" "; 

3 IF n<32 THEN PRINT CHR$(27); 

4 PRINT CHR$(n)SPACE$(3); 

5 IF n MOD 10=9 THEN PRINT 

6 NEXT-OPTION TAB 



This little program will give you all the characters 
available on a tidy screen. OPTION NOT TAB is 
needed to give you the down arrow character. For 
beginners, the use of PRINT USING and MOD may 
be worth a careful look. 



Sounds 



You really need machine code to produce any sounds 
other than the usual beep. Even then, the value is 
dubious! You may, however, like to experiment with 
this - rather you than me! 

10 OUT 248,11 :FOR n=1 TO 600:NEXT:OUT 248,12 
20 FOR m=1 TO 300:OUT 248,11 :OUT 248,12:NEXT 
30 FOR m=1 TO 300:OUT 248,11 :x=9.1 :OUT 
248,12:NEXT 

The OUTs turn the beeper on and off. Lirte 10 
gives the norma! note for the beeper, the other 
two lines use shorter delays and, on my machine, 
give slightly different notes. (x=9.1 is just a delaying 
tactic). A physicist friend tells me the thingies that 
produce the sound vary from machine to machine, 
t might be abit to write a tune that sounds reasonably 
like the national anthem, but when you come to run 
the same program on your machine it could very well 
sound like a very drunk football crowd trying to sing 
'You'l! never walk atone'. * . 



Frills 



Some readers might like to experiment with this 'frill', 
the creation of a dark green screen background. This 
effect is quite easy to reproduce: just light alternate 
pixels. 

1 PRINT CHR$(27)+"0":RANDOMIZE 

PEEK(64504!):GOSUB 6000 

2 CALL k:a$=" 8000PLUS" 

3 FOR n=1 TO 30:r=RND*30:c=RND*70 

4 PRINT CHR$(27)"Y"CHR$(32+r)CHR$(32+c) 

a$:NEXT:END6000h=HIMEM:j=INT(h/256)- 

1:k=j*256:MEMORYk-1 
6010 DATA 1,9,0,205,90,252,233,0,201,33,48,89 
6020 DATA 62,170,1,0,90,119,35,13,32, 

251,16,249,201 
6030 RESTORE 6010:FOR n=k TO k+24:READ a 
6040 POKE n,a:NEXT:POKE k+2,j:RETURN 

Once the subroutine at 6000 has been called, 
the code is installed, and any subsequent CALL 
k clears the screen to this background. 

The first few lines give a demonstration effect, but 
the coding could easily be adapted - for your menu 
page, for example. 



Map routine 

4000 GOSUB 5800 

List of towns on the right. 

4010 FOR n=1 TO me 
4020 IF e(n)=0 THEN 4050 

Check that the entry exists. 

4030 u=29-(la(n)-49)/1 1 *29:v=(6-lo(n))/9*50 

u calculates row position, v column position. 

4040 l$=STR$(n):l=LEN(l$):PRINT FNa$(u,v);"*"RIGHT$(l$,l-1) 
Print * and number of town without the leading space. 

4050 NEXT 

4060 PRINT FNa$(31,0) "Press any key to return to menu."; 

4070 GOSUB 5000:RETURN 



62 8000 PLUS December 



Reverse video 
window 

5820 NEXT:PRINT wl$:CALL inv:RETURN 

To include our reverse window routine, we only need to add the 
CALL command to line 5820 (given previously) - providing we 
have installed the code below. The call to 5900 was made in our 
initialisation of BRITMAP - 1 apologise to readers who may 
have been mystified by this. 

5900 DATA 

1,83,246,205,90,252,233,0,201,33,48,91,17,0,2,6,32 
5910 DATA 

1 97,6,208,1 26,47,11 9,35,1 6,250,25,1 93,1 6,243,201 
5920 RESTORE 5900.FOR n=63050! TO 63080!:READ 

a: POKE n,a:NEXT 
5930 lnv=63050l:RETURN 

A short machine code routine (up to about 50 bytes) can be 
conveniently installed at 63050. It only overwrites the CP/M 
Copyright message. You could, of course, use HIMEM to do this 
conventionally. Most of you should take the coding for granted, 
but for those who are trying to understand machine code, a 
disassembly is given below (Z80 mnemonics). 
LD BC 63059 {start of operative code for SCRRUN) 
CALL 64602 (with the address below the call brings the screen 
data into memory), 

DW 233 (the two byte address of SCRRUN) 
RET 

LD HL 23344 (screen address of Row 0, Column 64) 
LD DE 512 (this is the number of bytes NOT reversed in each 
row) 

LD B 32 (32 rows in loop) 
PUSH BC (save it, start of outer loop) 
LD B 208 (number of bytes to reverse) 
LD A (HL) (get screen byte data, start of inner loop) 
CPL (reverse it) 
LD (HL) A (put it back) 
INC HL (next byte) 
DJNZ 250 (loop inner) 
ADD HL DE (jump past left window bytes) 
POP BC (retrieve row count) 
DJNZ 243 (loop outer) 
RET 

We have taken no account of roller ram, assuming it to be 
In the original setting. If it has been changed, it won't matter; 
the reversing will start half way down, go down, then start 
again at the top. 



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Whether your application is control of a model railway or 
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your project. Hobby or industry, one off or batch work, 
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Just some of our stock items for the PCW include: 

PCW Parallel I/O Interface - 32 I/O Lines £55.95 

PCW 8 ch. AtoD (needs above interface) £39.95 

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Dual Stepper Motor Driver Board £19.95 

Speech synthesiser (use with CENTRONICS port) £35.00 

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Prices include P&P - Please add VAT at 15% 
OEM, trade and overseas enquiries welcome 



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Telephone 0323-766262 



'St Georges' Lion Hill Stone Cross 
Pevensey East Sussex BN24 5ED 




DESKING Three 

A COMPACT & ERGONOMIC WORKSTATION FOR YOUR PCW. 

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* * * * CHRISTMAS SPECIALS ' ' ' ' 

Microdesign II £43.95 

Stop Press 8 Mouse £66.95 

AMS Disc Box + 10 Amsoll Discs £33.00 

Offers end 19/12/89 

Databases 

At Last Plus £31 .95 

Cambase2 £54.95 

Datastorell £33.95 

DBase II (A/Tate) £72.95 

Locofile £24.95 

Mastertile 8000 £34.95 

DTP/Graphics 

Desk Top Publisher £21.95 

Desk Top Publisher & Mouse £59.95 

Stop Press £39.95 

Masterpack £61.95 

AMX Mouse & I/Face £46.95 

Word Processing 

Locofont (10 fonts) £16.95 

Locomail £26.95 

Locoscript2 £21.95 

Locoscript 2 + Locospell £31.95 

Full Pretext £41.95 

Supertype I & II £12.95 

Educational 

Maths Mania (8-12) £13.95 

Better Spelling (9-14) £13.95 

Biology 1/2 (12-16) £18.50 

Chemistry 1/2 (12-16) £18.50 

Physics 1/2 (12-16) £18.50 

LCL Micro English £21 .95 

LCL Micro Maths £21.95 

Akadimias Software GCSE 16+ £24.00 

Kosmos Language Tutors £15.95 

Training 

Two Fingers To Touch Typing £19.95 

Crash Course In Typing £19.95 

Touch W Go £19.95 

Reeltime - Locoscript 2 £29.95 

Reeltime - Dbase II £29.95 

Reeltime - Supercalc 2 £29.95 

Reeltime - CP/M Computing £29.95 



Leisure 

Brian Cloughs Football £11.95 

Clock Chess 89 £15.95 

Classics Collection II £11.95 

Classic Games 4 £15.95 

Classic Invaders £11.95 

Corruption £19.95 

Fish £19.95 

Guild of Thieves (8000 only) £19.95 

Graham Gooch Cricket £15 95 

Head Coach £15.95 

Hitch Hikers Guide T/T Galaxy £21.95 

IngndsBack £15.95 

Jinxter £19.95 

Lancelot £14.95 

Leather Goddesses of Phobos £21.95 

Living Daylights ... £11.95 

Mindfighter (8000 only) £19.95 

PCW Challenge (8000 only) £11.95 

Scapeghost Phone 

Starglider £19.95 

Time & Magik £11.95 

Tomahawk £15.95 

World Of Soccer £15.95 

Spreadsheets 

Cracker II Turbo £39.95 

Supercalc 2 £46.95 

Accounts 

Money Manager PCW £36.95 

Small Business Aces £58.95 

Sage Pop Accounts £79.95 

Meridian Stock Market £32.95 

Ribbons (Min 2) 

8256/851 2/LQ3500 Fabric £3.50 

9512Amstrad M/Strike £3.65 

Star LC10 £3.65 

Star LC24/10 £4 95 

StarNL10/NB24-10 £3.65 

3M DSDD5.25" Discs 10 x... £9.95 

Amsofl/Maxell 3" Discs 10 x £23.95 

AMS 30L Disc Box £11.95 

Amstrad 9512 Cut Sheet Feeder £89.95 

NewAmstrad FD4 2nd Drives £123.95 

Mouse Mats - Soft. Non Slip £4.95 



Send 28p stamp ( refundable ) for our lastest catalogue ( please state machine ) 

Cheques/P.O's payable to:- 

DATALINE COMPUTING SERVICES 

14 DUKE STREET WISBECH CAMBS PE13 2AS 

ACCESS/ENQUIRES 

TEL: 0945 61736 
ALL OUR PRICES INCLUDE 
POSTAGE AND PACKING 



pr0dn-~- 



BBD 

. DUST. 
COVERS 



GET SMART ! 



. DUST . 
COVERS 



Protect Your Computing Equipment With 
BBD PROFESSIONAL DUST COVERS 

• In todays economic climate were equipment failure costs time 
and money protecting your hardware from wear and tear is 
the smart thing to do and the smart way to do it is with dust 
covers from BBD Professional Range. 

• Manufactured from top quality washable nylon and 
attractively finished with contrasting piping BBD covers are 
simply the smartest protective covers available. 

• BBD covers can be washed and ironed without fear of fading 
or shrinking and will never crack or lose their shape. 

• With all these superlative features you might expect BBD 
covers to be a little expensive. Nothing could be further from 
the truth. 

AMSTRAD PCW 8256/851 2: £1 1 .95 

In light grey with green piping. 3 piece set 
AMSTRAD PCW 9512: £13.95 

In ivory with green piping. 3 piece set 

• BBD also offer a wide range of matching covers for the 
printers from only £5.50. These include Amstrad DMP 2000, 
3000, 4000 and LQ3500, and a wide selection from Brother, 
Canon, Citizen, Epson, Star etc., etc. 

Generally covers for 80 column printers are £5.50 and for 132 
column £6.50 

GET SMART! GET BBD! 

BBD DUST COVERS 

The Standish Centre 

Cross Street, Standish, Wigan WN6 0HQ 

Telephone: 0257 425839 Ext 32 Fax: 0257 423909 

DEALER ENQUIRIES WELCOME 



PUTTHAT MANUAL 
DOWN- 

AND LISTEN! 

/fyou want to master a new computer or 
program, but don't have time to waste or 
money to burn, a Reeltime Audio-disc training 
course will teach you in a fraction of the time. 
Just switch on your computer and play the tapes - 
your tutor will talk you through the course in a 
series of easy-to-follow exercises. 
Learn at your own speed on your own computer - 
and take as much time as you need! 




AMSTRAD COW 


1SES 


Amstrad PPC Portable £29.95 


Amstrad CPC 6128 


£29.95 


SuperCak3(&4) 


£29.95 


PCW9S12-Loco2 


£29.95 


WordStar Express 


£29.95 


F>CW8256-Loco 1 


£29.95 


GENERAL COURSES 


KW82S6-LOC02 


£29.95 


IBMXT 


£29.95 


CPiM Computing 


£29.95 


IBM PC/AT Extended 


£49.95 


AmstradPC1640 


£29.95 


Desktop Publishing 


£49.95 


Amstrad K Extended £49.95 


WordStar Prof 3.3 


£29.95 


AmstradPC2086 


£29.95 


dBase II 


£29.95 


PC2086 Extended 


£49.95 


Timeworks Publisher 


£29.95 



&eUlW& 



All courses available by return. All prices include 

P+P but exclude VAT. Send your cheque to: 

Headline Communication Ltd., 

POBox2Z Hereford MM 8UW 

or phone 0602 603623 quoting your 
Access or Visa number. 

437 Westdale Lane, Mapperley. Nottingham, NG3 6DH. 



The Professional Serial/Parallel Interface 
For The Amstrad PCW 8256 8512 & 9512 



AVAILABLE NOW 
A Choice of Interfaces From 

SCA 

SYSTEMS 

SCA Professional £49.95 
SCA Professional Plus £59.95 

Both prices include VAT please add £1.55 for postage 

*100% Compatible* *Money Back Guarantee* 
Both Models Feature 



"Full Duplex RS232 Serial Port* *Full 8 Bit Parallel Port* 

♦Secondary 2 Wire Serial Port* *75 to 19200 Baud* 

•Printed User Manual* *New Stylish Black Case* 



Professional Plus Has All The Above + 

*Real Time Clock* *Calendar* *DemoDisk* 

•Rechargeable Battery Back-Up of Time And Date* 

♦Automatic CP/M Time & Date Stamping* 

DEALER ENQUIRIES WELCOME 



SCA Systems Ltd ^^^^ 

61 Ferrlngham Lane I ^T"^ 
Ferring West Sussex m * ■ 



DIRECT ORDER 

HOTLINE 

0903-TOOaSE 



CONTRACTOR* 



LANGFORD 




Some people think becoming 
a professional author 
involves a terrible initiation 
rite leaving lifelong scars: 
the brand of a red-hot keyboard, 
perhaps, or the outlines of 3"discs 
tattooed on each buttock. Actually 
the true and appalling rite of 
passage comes when, delirious at 
hearing that Pemmican Publishing 
Ltd likes your masterwork, you're 
abruptly brought to earth by a 
horrible document called the 
contract. 

This intimidating 
'Memorandum of Agreement' 
tends to be printed on legal paper, 
hardly more flexible than tablets of 
stone and (maddeningly) too long 
for an A4 photocopier. With 
experience, one can suspect a 
psychological gambit: most literary 
agents keep standard contracts as 
word-processor documents 
because they're infinitely 
negotiable, while publishers prefer 
the printed look, to give the 
impression that they aren't. 

The impulse is to sign at once 
for fear of losing your first big sale. 
Such action is invariably unwise. 
There's always the chance of a 
better deal. 

You can pass the buck to your 
literary agent; if you have none, a 
book offer from a reputable 
publisher is excellent leverage 
when persuading one to take 
you on. Or... grit your teeth and 
do your own negotiating. Don't 
trust my omniscience! A good 
starting point is the Society of 
Authors booklet Publishing 
Contracts, £1 .50 from them (84 
Drayton Gardens, SW10 9SB) or 
free to members. 

Whichever your decision, you 
should read the contract yourself: 
though intimidatingly formal at first 
sight, each clause ought on 
examination to make some sort of 
sense. If not, ask your agent or 
publisher to translate. 

The money arrangements tend 
to be straightforward (though 
beware of "vanity" publishers who 
expect you to pay them). In 
exchange for various publishing 
and licensing rights, Pemmican 
Books undertake to pay you so 
much (perhaps negotiable) as an 
advance against royalties on 
sales, calculated as a percentage 
(not so negotiable) of the book's 



cover price. Certain subsidiary 
rights will also be covered, such 
as book club sales' translation, 
newspaper serialization - all 
potentially yielding loot for division 
between you and Pemmican 
(proportions highly negotiable). 

Pemmican will undertake to do 
its sums regularly after publication, 
usually twice yearly, but will claim 
inability to write a cheque for 
royalties due until months after the 
accounting date. (Sometimes 
negotiable, to little effect.) 

What about traps? Pemmican 
Publishing are not crooks (opinion 
negotiable after polling their 
authors) but want the best 
possible deal - and protection - 
for themselves. Here are some 
points to watch. 

1) Will the copyright be in 
your name or your pseudonym's? 
Any other arrangement is a Bad 
Sign, except in special cases of 
"work for hire": for example, 
software instruction manuals are 
normally copyrighted by the 
software company, hundred- 
contributor encyclopaedias by the 
editor or publisher. 

2) How long before 
publication? The Pemmican 
agreement probably says "within a 
reasonable time" from the contract 
or delivery date. "Within eighteen 
months", say, is preferable. 
There's nothing more 
disheartening than indeterminate 
delays, especially if the book is at 
all topical. 

3) Will you see the final, copy- 
edited version of your typescript? 
Often it vanishes into the system 
and you know nothing until printed 
proofs arrive - a bad time to find 
that excessive tinkering has 
mucked up your book. The 
contract should specify that you 
get two sets of proofs for 
correction, and can keep one for 
reference. 

4) Does your book need 
illustrations or an index? Are photo 
copyrights owned by third parties? 
Pemmican will want you to pay 
reproduction/illustration fees; you 
want them to pay; you might end 
up splitting it 50%. Likewise for the 
services of an indexer if you can't 
face the job yourself. 

5) Is there a reversion clause 
(very important)? This ensures 
that rights return to you should 




L 
A 




o 



A page in 
the company 

of author and 
PCW pundit 

David Langford 



Q 

F 
O 





Pemmican go bust, allow your 
book to drop out of print for more 
than (say) a year without 
scheduling a requested reissue, or 
remainder it. 

6) Is there an option clause 
giving Pemmican first refusal of 
your next book? This can be a 
pain: when Gastric Editions ask 
you urgently to do a lucrative book 
for them, you may not want a long, 
delaying ritual of first offering it to 
Pemmican. If Pemmican insist, 
there should be a time limit for 
their decision: six weeks, say. 
Having rarely written two 

similar books running, I've 
sometimes defused such clauses 
by allowing an option on my next 
"of a similar nature". 

7) What sweeping guarantees 
do you give by signing this 
contract? It's usual to declare that 
the book doesn't infringe copyright 
(e.g. by being plagiarized outright 
from John Fowles) and isn't 
libellous. Picky publishers may 
request disturbing extras, whereby 
you warrant that the book doesn't 
contravene the Official Secrets 
Act, and even, just recently, that it 
isn't blasphemous. The last in 



particular should be resisted at all 
costs. How can you predict what 
some maniac in Whitehall or Iran 
will retrospectively decide 
shouldn't have been published? 

8) What happens when they 
remainder your book? (When. Not 
if.) In the contract, Pemmican 
should promise to give advance 
notice that they intend to 
administer this humiliating kick in 
the groin, and to allow you first 
option of buying stocks for resale 
or Christmas presents... at the low 
price offered to the trade. (My first 
remaindered hardback suddenly 
dropped to 50p when I queried the 
£3 asked.) Pemmican will happily 
agree to such provisions, and as a 
rule will then ignore them, knowing 
there's little you can do. (The 
marketing division remaindered it 
without telling us,' you hear from 
editors. 'Copies weren't moving 
fast enough out of the 
warehouses,' marketeers tell you.) 

One last tip: distrust the 
common clause which goes, "The 
AUTHOR shall forfeit his/her 
immortal soul for a period of not 
less than ONE ETERNITY from 
the date of this Agreement".. ..■ 

December 89 8000 PLUS 65 



PCW OWNERS IN THE NORTH EAST 



WE STOCK THE LARGEST RANGE OF PCW 

SOFTWARE IN THE AREA 

PCW UPGRADES AND REPAIRS 

DECEMBER SPECIAL OFFERS 

Microdesign 2 (New Version) £59.95 

5.25" External Disk Drive £159.00 

Amcase (holds 10CF2's) £3.99 

Clean Print Ribbon £6.50 

3" Drive Head Cleaner £3.99 

8256 Upgrade to 8512 £180.00 

PCW8256 Memory Upgrade Kit £55.00 

PCW Dust Covers £9.99 

Mini Office Pro Plus (8512. 9512) £34.95 



MICROTYNE 

Leazes Arcade, Leazes Park Road, 

Newcastle on Tyne 

TEL: (091) 261 4088 

All prices include VAT and carriage 



LETTA-HEAD PLUS 



Design letterheads, receipts, posters, labels, tickets for home or small business. 
Create your design by placing text in any combination of fonts in any mixture 

of 8 1 different sizes anywhere on screen Add graphics in the form of lines, 

arcs, circles, elipses, shading and icons. When you're happy, print headings in a 

choice of 18 different sizes, use your design in labels up to 4" x 2" in size or 

print groups of designs as a poster. Easy to use program includes full 

instruction manual, 15 fonts and a font and icon designer. 

Price £18.50 inclusive. 

ALSO WordFinder - THE program for word game enthusiasts. 

Price £13.50 

For further details and orders phone (0433) 30799 or write to: 

BRADWAY SOFTWARE (8P), 

HILLSETT ", UPPER PADLEY, 

GRINDLEFORD, SHEFFIELD, S30 1JA. 



mM\*m version (3) mihu* 

VERSION (2) OWNERS RETURN ORIGINAL DISC, SEND £8.00 
[ DEMONS TRATION DISCS FOR PCW8512 & PCW9512, SEND £8.00 | 

: Cards can be shuffled or specific cards can be selected. 
: Cards selected are positioned in the Celtic cross spread. 
i Each card and position of the Celtic cross interpreted. 

■ Provision for entering clients full name and date. 
i Option for full justification. (Left & right edges straight) 
i Facility to edit the interpretation and create your own files. 

• The Tarot Editor now includes a word warp feature. 

■ Output to screen or printer. Over 5 pages of interpretation. 

■ Single sheet or continuous stationery. (8000 series only) 

• Landscape output for Celtic cross spread. (8000 series only) 

| FOR USE WITH PCW8256, PCW8512 OR PCW9512 (PLEASE SPECIFY) I 



£24.99 



Includes 
P&P 



Overseas please add £2.50 



Cheques or P.O. 's made payable to:- 
K.F. Heywood, 10 St. Johns Road, 
Yeovil, Somerset, BA21 5NG, UK 



Enquiries 
(0935) 



W: 



AMSTRAD 



COMPUTER 
REPAIRS 



We repair Amstrad models 464, 664, 6128, 8256, 8512, 
9512, PC1512 and Amstrad Monitors. 
All repairs carry a 3 month warranty. 

* Maintenance now available in West London * 
PHONE US NOW FOR DETAILS 



SUREDATA 



TELEPHONE: 01-902 5218 



DEPT+, UNIT 6 
STANLEY HOUSE 
STANLEY AVENUE 
WEMBLEY, MIDDX HA0 4JB 



fir^ 



^^1 




The DeskTop Environment for the PCW 



PCW SuperDOS totally replaces the unhelpful A> prompt with a friendly DeskTop environment 
featuring windows and pull down menus. 




ALSO NEW!! PTR. COM 



For 8256/8512 users only. Displays a second menu bar at the 

bottom of the screen giving the up-to-date settings of paper, 

Length. Spacing, Gap, Pitch, Margins, Tabs, Bold, Double, Italic 

and Underline. Any item can be changed at will and text can be 

sent direct to the printer. Instructions on disk. 

Only £7.95 or together with PCW 
SuperDOS for £34.95. SAVE £2.95! 



With SuperDOS you can 

* run all your programs and batch files, 

* do all your disk housekeeping, including copying 
Ar^D moving files. 

• carry out actions with the minimum of keystrokes 

• organise your programs into separate directories 
just like the PC. 

After running your programs you return automatically to SuperDOS. You need never see the A> prompt again! 
SuperDOS also includes a notepad' for reminders, to-do lists and the easy writing of batch (SUBMIT) files. SuperDOS 
adds four new built-in' commands, including COPY, IFNOT and a pause command for inclusion in your batch files. For 
8256/8512 users there is improved control of the printer from the DeskTop. SuperDOS is fast, is packed with features, 
and has been designed to feel like Locoscript so will appeal to reluctant CP/M users and power users alike. SuperDOS 
includes some or all the features of DIR, PIP, ERASE, RENAME, TYPE, SHOW, SET, RPED, DISCKIT, SUBMIT and DATE 

SuperDOS requires a minimum 512K RAM, and will work 

with the new memory expansion boards. It is programmed in 

machine code using only documented CP/M techniques. 

Unfortunately it is NOT designed for use with a hard disk. 

Publication date is December 1 1th 1989, so would make a 

lovely Christmas present! 

PCW SuperDOS costs £29.95, including a ring bound manual. 

Four great PCW programs from 

Encyclasoft 

Hay fields Grove, 

Audlem, Crewe, 

CW3 OLB. 

0270 811890 



Script2Base and Text2Base 
Free Text Databases 

These programs turn your Locoscript 2 or Protext 
documents into a database. No need to make ASCII 
copies. You mark key phrases in a way that does not 
affect the documents. The program then creates up to 
five alphabetical subject indexes that you can later 
browse through to find your pearls of wisdom. Manual 
on disk as a sample free text database. 

Both programs cost £29.95 - 
please specify clearly which you require. 



E 



n 



f 



t 



/ 




LISTINGS PLUS 




FIREWORX 

by Richard Cox 



This is one of the programs which was 
screaming, "Run me!" when it came out 
of the envelope. It also came with a 
note to "switch all the lights off and turn 
the PCW's brightness up full." So we did. It's 
only by dint of the fact that we got hungry that 
we're not still watching the display now. It 
really is very impressive indeed. 

The less fun loving of our readers 
should skip this listing as all it does is to 
produce a quite spectacular fireworks display 
on the screen of the PCW. The display can 
either be controlled from the keyboard using 
the numeric keypad or you can sit back and 
watch the built-in demonstration. 

To add some zing for the hard core 
programmers amongst you, there is also the 
possibility of adding your own data lines. This 
will enable you to create even bigger and 
better displays. The data statements within 
lines 50-130 are the demonstration and can 
be customised. They consist of an encoded 
series of keypresses with delays in between. 
Each keypress is represented by a shift state 



(n,N, for normal or S,s for shifted) followed by 
the key number in decimal form. N01 is 
unshifted [EOL]. A delay time, consisting of a 
decimal integer must follow each keypress. 
Missing out this time assumes a gap of 
65,536 (about 90 minutes).This confuses the 
display. Two codes do not fit the pattern; Q 
which terminates the current CALL FIREWORX! 
(the exclamation mark is mandatory) and K 
which stops the display and enters keyboard 
mode. Lines 150-170 demonstrate these. 
Neither Q nor K require a delay time. 

The core of the program lies in lines 
200-570 which hold the machine code sub- 
routine Fireworx!. They also hold the routine 
to load Fireworx! 

To control your own display you will 
need to use the numeric keypad as follows: 



When [SHIFT] is pressed, a large firework is 
set off. The space bar has a special function: 
each firework is a collection of moving dots of 
which there is a finite number. After about 
eight normal sized fireworks you run out of 
dots. Pressing the space bar reclaims some of 
them for recycling. Pressing the space bar 
and [SHIFT] instantly reclaims all of the dots. 
Due to lack of space, we can't go into 
the program in greater detail. Suffice it to say 
that it should provide hours of enjoyment both 
from a programming and a sensory level. 
Thanks to Richard Cox for the excellent idea, 
execution and documentation. 



Key 

Position on screen 

[RELAY] 

bottom left 

[ENTER] 

bottom right 

[2] 

middle 

[EOL] 

top left 

[5] 

top middle 

[WORD/CHAR] 

top right 



Key no: 

01 

78 

07 

13 

14 

05 




10 










20 


GOSUB 200: PRINT cls$;"**«* Demonstration of FIREWORX program ****" 


30 


PRINT "It's ESSENTIAL to switch OFF lights & turn UP screen brightness" 


40 


PRINT "Then press any key to start display: ";FNcls$ 


50 


RESTORE 60: CALL fireworx! 


60 


DATA 


n47,50,n07, 75, n07,75,n07, 75, n07, 75, n07 , 75, n07, 150 


70 


DATA 


sl3, 30,s05, 30,sl4, 150 


30 


DATA 


nOl, l,n78, 1, nl3, 1, n05, 100, s47, l,s07,5, s07, 150 


90 


DATA 


s01,60,s47, I,s78,60,s47, 1 , sl3, 60 , s47 , 1 , s05 , 60 , s47 , 1, s07,5,sl3, 1 ,s05, 200 


100 


DATA 


nOl, 60, n78, 60, nO 1,60, n78, 60, nOl, 60, n78, 60, s07, 100, s47, 1 


110 


DATA 


nl3, 10, nl8, 1, nl8, l,nl8, l,nl8, l,nl8, l,nl8, l,nl8,75, n47, 1 , n47 , 1 , n47 , 1 


120 


DATA 


n47 , 1 , n47 , 1 , n47 , 1 , n47 , 1 , n47 , 1 , sl.3 , 1 , n47 , 1 , n47 , 1 , n47 , 1 , n47 , 1 , s05 , 50 


130 


DATA 


s47, 1, sOl, 1, s78, 1, s07, 20, s47, 1, s07, 1, sl3, 1, s05, 1, si 4, 200, Q 


140 







Oooooooo! Ahhhhhh! Wow! and erm bang! Light 

up the sky with Basic fireworx! 



13 IP 
22B1 
28D6 
1 DSC 
0E55 
11C6 
095C 
130A 
1C1C 
14BB 
1902 
198C 
1737 
0120 




8000PLUSDecemebr89 67 





Inch Thesaurus 

PCW 8512/9512 with LocoFile 



If you are lost for a word when typing a LocoScript 

document, the 3 Inch Thesaurus is the answer. 

Being a LocoFile datafile means that you can call up the Thesaurus any 

time you are working with LocoScript - just press a few keys, type in the 

word you want to change, and you jump straight to a list of related words 

Using a special disc format has allowed us to record a Thesaurus datafile 
of over 780K on the disc. 

The 3 Inch Thesaurus is available by mail order for £14.95. If you need a 
copy of LocoFile (for LocoScript 2) at the same time, we can supply that for 
£28.95 (please specify whether for an 8512 or 9512). 



Three Inch Software, 2nd Floor, 
73 Surbiton Road, Kingston upon Thames, KT1 2HG 
Access/MasterCard orders telephone 01-546-2754 



SIGNWRITEP/ 



Quality lettering 
from your PCW 



Many extra fonts (£5.75 each plus disk), e.g.: 

hUm DEC© Choi Corn Crll 



£29.95 

n 



Also: 

PAPERBASE De Luxe for bibliographies 
LABELWRITER for product labels 
OXSTAT for statistics 
COLOURED RIBBONS 



WIGHT SCIENTIFIC 

Dept. 8P 

kk Roan Street 

London SElo 9JT 

Tel. (Ol) 858 2699 



Pri nt your own te mplates with PJtGHSIj A4 and Personal Organiser planning grids 

A4 in all Pitches - incl. doubles • • • Pers. Org. in P15 & 17 




Every dot on 

Its spot. 

Every space In 

its place 





Ideal for 
designing 
document lay- 
outs, leaflets, 
letter headings 



Ideal for colour 
separation 



Prmt^ourowiicalenQars - 
A4 and Pers. Org sizes - until 2000 



LocoScript 2 base for 8000 series PCWs 

With CaleNDisC and PitCHarT Calculator 

ALL ON ONE 3" DISC £10 POST FREE 
Send cheque/PO to: John Fisher, 10 Broadwater Close, Woking, Surrey, GU21 5TW 




Simple converter to calculate 
all pitch measurements 




23 Hampstead House, Town Centre, Basingstoke RG21 1LG (8000) 
ALL OUR PRICES INCLUDE CARRIAGE & VAT 



Personal 
Organiser 
Stationery 

85gsm 
£7.95 

for 250 sheets 



Stationery 


■ ■ ■ 


Stationery . . 


, . Stationery . . 


■ 


Micro-Perf all Edges 




500 


1,000 


2,000 


4,000 


9.5" x 11"60gsm 






- 


£9.50 


£15.95 


£29.95 


True A4 70gsm 






£8.50 


£12.95 


£23.95 


£45.95 


True A4 80gsm 






£8.95 


£13.95 


£25.95 


£49.95 


True A4 90gsm 






£9.75 


£14.95 


£27.95 


£53.95 


True A4 100gsm 






£16.95 


£31.95 


- 


- 


(coloured - Cream, 


Blue 


Grey 


or White) 









Cleaning Products 

3" Disk Cleaning Kit £4.95 

PCW8 Printhead Cleaning Ribbon ...£6.95 
PCW9 Printhead Cleaning Ribbon. ..£6.95 



Labels 


1,000 


2,000 


4,000 


3.5" x 1.5" (1 across) 


£5.25 


£9.50 


£17.95 


3.5" x 1 .5" (2 across) 


£5.75 


£10.50 


£19.95 


4.0" x 1.5" (1 across) 


£5.75 


£10.50 


£19.95 


4.0" x 1 .5" (2 across) 


£6.75 


£11.95 


£22.95 


2.75" x 1 .5" (3 across) 


£4.75 


£8.50 


£15.95 



Disk Box 

AMS 30 Lockable disk 
box holds 30 uncased 
3" disks or 15 cased 3" 
disks £12.95 



Amsoft 3" disks (uncased): One £2.60; Five £12.50 Ten £23.95 

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LISTINGS PLUS 



200 '- load machine code and general- initialisation 

210 ON ERROR GOTO 270: DEFINT b-z: vl . 39=PEEK <&H151 ) =&H33 
220 IF UNT<PEEK<6)+PEEK<7)*256X&HFO0O THEN ERROR 7 

230 cls$=CHR$<27>+"E" : DEF FNcls$= INPUTS < 1 ) +cls$ 

231 PRINT cls$; "Please wait..." 

240 a=57344! : fireworx!=a: MEMORY a-li RESTORE 300: GOSUB 260 
250 IF vl.39 THEN RESTORE 570 ELSE RESTORE 560 
260 READ x$: WHILE x$<>"*" 



1C77 
18A4 
165B 
12FF 
0E75 
1BF3 
16E3 
0A19 



270 
280 
290 
300 
310 
320 
330 
340 
350 
360 
370 
380 
390 
400 
410 
420 
430 
440 
450 
460 
470 
480 
490 
500 
510 
520 
530 
540 
550 
560 
570 



IF ERRO200 THEN 
PRINT " Invalid/mi 



DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 



CD.4F 

18, 03 
E9, 0E 

19, E9 
B5,C0 
4B, 28 
CD, Al 
E2,CD 
C3, 5B 
OF, 20 
23 , 23 
CB.39 
10, EF 
B7.28 
30, 0E 
El, CD 
E0.36 
23,30 
23, 1A 
C6, 34 
3D, D3 
E6, 07 
77, 3E 
0E.23 
IB, E2 
17, 74 

A4, 74 



, E2.3E, 
,CD,DF, 
,65,C5, 
,CD,42, 
, CD , B3 , 
, IF, OE, 
, EO.ED, 
, 6 1 , E2 , 
, E2, OD, 
, 78, 00, 
, 18, F3, 
, CB,39, 
,C9,CD, 
,05,36, 
,CD,61, 
, 84, El, 
, 01, C9, 
,05,35, 
, 77,23, 
, 4F, 06, 
, F1,5E, 
, 47, 3E, 
, 86 , D3 , 
,86,CB, 
,E1,C9, 
,FD,21, 
,FD,21, 



error sub 

ON ERROR GOTO 0: ERROR ERR 

ssing letter code in DATA statment " : END 

machine code data 

D8, 32, 57, EO, 21, 01, 00, 22, 4D.E2, OE, 66, CD, 33, E0,CB, 
EO.CD, 44, E2, C5 , CD, 44, El, CI, 10, F9, CD, 4A, EO, 79, 30, 
OE, IB, CD, 3D, EO, CI, C3, 3D, EO, 11, 09, 00, 18, 03, 11,57, 
EO.DA, 00,30, 06, 79, FE, 15 , 28, F4, 37 , C9 , 2A, 4D,E2, 2B, 
E0,23,CD,5E,E2, 06, 00, CB, AF,FE,4E, 28, 18, 06, FF, FE, 
42, FE,51,37,C8,CD,31, EO , 3E, C8, C3 , 64 , E2 , C5 , CD, A4 , 
53 , 4D, E2 , CI , 37 , C9 , 3E, C9 , 32 , 57 , EO , B7 , C9 , CD, B3 , EO , 
FD, 75, 00, FD, 74, 01, C9, FD,5E, 00, FD,56, 01, DD.6E, 00, 
OF, 30,38, 05, OF, 30, B8, 01, OF, 88, 58, 4E, OF, 88,98, 07, 
7F.20, 40, FE,2F,CA, 2A,E1,21, C3,E0, 7E.23, B7,28, 08, 
4E, 23, 11, 4B, E2.CD, 23, El, 23, 13, CD, 23 , El , CB, 68 , F5 , 
Fl,2O,02,CB,39,7E,B7,20,08,CD,A2,Bl,0D,28, 07,18, 
20, E2, Al, 86, 12.C9, 11, 06, 00, 4B,CB,68, 28, 02, OE, FF, 
00, 0D.28, 03, 19, 10, F4.C9, E5, AF,32, 4A,E2,CD,BF, El, 
El, 30, 09, EB, 3E, FF, 32, 4A, E2 , CD, BA, El, C9, 1A, B7 , C8, 
CD, 84, El, 37, C9, 7E, B7 , FA, 7D, El, C6 , 02, 77, EO , 36, 7F, 
7E, 23, 37, 8F, 38, OA, 86, 77, 23, 30, 11, 34, 20, OE, 18, OA, 

20, 02, AF, 12, 23, C9 , 11, 4B, E2 , CD, A9 , El, 13, CD, 20, E2 , 
C9, 11, 06, 00, 19, C9, 7E, B7, CA, B5, El, 23, 23, 5E, 16, 00, 
00, CB, 10, CB, 21, CB, 10 , 23 , E5 , EB, 29, 11, 00, B6, 19, F3, 
23,56, EB, 7D, E6 , 07,5F,29, 7D, E6, FO , B3 , 6F, 59 , 79, E6 , 
CO, 28, 03, OF, 10, FD, 47, 3A, 4A, E2, B7, 78,20, 05, 2F, A6, 
F2, 3D, D3, Fl, FB, El, C9, 00, 89, CB,C7, 2D, E5, 21, IB, E2, 
OE.CB, OE.CB, OE, 30, OC, 23,86, CB, 06, CB, 06, CB, 06,23, 

21, 67, E2, 06, B4, C9, 00, 00, 00, 00, 00, DD, 21, » 
AA, 73, C9.C3, CD, 59, C3, 97, 45 , C3 , 27 , 47 , C3, E7 , 62 , C3, 
37 , 74 , C9 , C3 , 78 , 5A , C3 , DE , 45 , C3 , 57 , 47 , C3 , 92 , 63 , C3 , 











0ED9 










1647 










2188 










1123 


E8 


CD 


2A 


El 


1AFE 


FO 


FE 


42 


20 


1B0B 


00 


2A 


01 


00 


189B 


22 


4D 


E2 


7C 


1AF2 


53 


28 


12 


FE 


1C30 


EO 


CI 


4B 


C5 


1B4D 


06 


OA, 


CD 


58 


1BE4 


DD, 


66, 


01, 


19 


1B21 


OF 


58 


78 


OE 


1A01 


B9 


28, 


05 


23 


199C 


CD 


44, 


E2 


48 


19DB 


03, 


CD, 


B5, 


El 


1A11 


CD 


44 


E2 


7E 


1A7C 


Dl 


CD 


61 


El 


1ADE 


62 


6B, 


CD 


71 


1BB7 


C9 


D6, 


02 


77 


1BAA 


4F 


7E 


91 


77 


18C9 


77 


23 


36 


00 


1954 


23 


23, 


23 


7E 


190D 


3E 


82, 


D3 


F2 


1939 


F8 


4F 


09 


7B 


1BD7 


77 


18 


02 


B6 


18E7 


7E 


23 


86 


CB 


1BCE 


86 


CB 


06 


32 


1B04 
12DF 


B3 


, OE 


i * 




1949 


B2 


OE 


* 




1899 




How to type in a listing 



First you will need to get Mallard Basic up and running. Insert a copy of your 
CP/M disc. At the A> prompt type BASIC and press [ENTER]. 

You will see that BASIC is loaded when the A> disappears and is replaced 
by ok. You're now ready to type in the listings. Do this as they appear on the 
page, line by line. 

Don't bother to type the four figure hexidecimal numbers which appear at 
the end of each line as these relate to the Checksum program published in the 
November 1988 issue. 

Typing errors are common, so check each line carefully. You can use various 
short cuts; for example, typing ? into a line is Mallard Basic's shorthand for 
PRINT. You can also press the left arrow on the numeric keyboard to 
automatically rewrite the last line you typed in. If you find a mistake before 
pressing [RETURN] , simply cursor back to the error and make the required 
correction using the [DEL] keys. If you realise that you've made a mistake after 
pressing [RETURN], all is not lost; you will need to type EDIT and the number of 
the offending line. You can then edit any errors in the same way as above. Once 
you're sure that all is just as it should be, press [RETURN]. The corrected line will 



then be accepted into the program. 

When you've typed in all the lines and made any corrections, you will 
probably want to give your eyes a rest from the screen. You will also need to 
check over the listing yet again. To get a copy of your work sent to the printer, 
you will need to type LLIST. If you can still stand to look at the green on black, 
you should type LIST to print the entire program on the screen. 

The next thing to do is save all your hard work. You can save the program to 
disc by typing SAVE "FILENAME (where FILENAME can be any name you like up 
to eight letters long). If you get a directory (type DIR) you will see that Basic 
programs are given the .BAS suffix. You don't need to bother typing that in 
because Basic assumes this and will do it for you. 

Finally, the acid test itself; type RUN and see what happens. The chances 
are that the dreaded warning 'Syntax error in line XXXX', or some other error 
message, will appear. The line number to which it refers might not be the exact 
place in which the error occured but it will narrow down the search. Correct any 
errors using the EDIT command and try again. It is very rare indeed for any 
program over five lines to run first time. If all else fails try the manual. 



8000 PLUS December 89 69 



POOLSWINNER n 



12? 



POOLS PRF.DIC 



• MASSIVE DATABASE Poolswinner is a sophisticated Pools 
prediction aid. It comes complete with the largest database available 
22000 matches over 10 years. 55"** 

• PREDICTS Not just SCOREDRAWS, but NO-SCORES, AWAYS ISi 
and HOMES too. Predictions are based on many factors ... recent form, 
the massive database, current league standing, goal scoring rates, and 
draw averages (each factor is independently switchable by the user). 

• SUCCESSFUL Selec g uarantee that Poolswirmer performs signifi- 
cantly better than chance. 

• LEAGUE AND NON-LEAGUE matches are covered. 

• FULL LEAGUE TABLES are automatically generated as results are entered. 

• AUTOMATIC FIXTURE GENERATION : Fixtures for English and Scottish 
League matches are generated automatically by Poolswinner's sister program FIXGEN... 

• FIXGEN : No need to struggle for 
hours to get the fixture list into the tZo. jU 

computer - just type in the date, Fixgen contains the complete Poolswinner 
fixture list for the whole year's league soccer. (Published under w jth Fixgen. 
licence from the Football League, and the Scottish Football League). 



POOLS PERM PLUS 

SOPHISTICATED FOOTBALL, POOLS PERM ANALYSER 



FIXGKN 89/90 



• Whether you use a scientific bet, or family birthdays, PPP will check the performance 
of any bet over the years, revealing which weeks it won prizes. Test your theories, or 
compare perms' performance. Complete with 5 years coupon results. 

• Also you can use Pools Perm Plus to check your perm for winning £26.00 
lines each week: the program comes complete with 20 top perms. 



COURSEWINNER vs 

THE PUNTERS COMPUTER PROGRAM 



• The ORIGINAL, and still the BEST computer punter's aid. 

• Coursewinner V3 uses all the most important form pointers (past form, 
speed ratings, prize money, course statistics, jockey form ,trainer form etc) 
to give a detailed assessment of ever y runner's chances, not just a tip. 

• Vital statistics of all British courses (Draw advantage, Top 

Trainers and Jockeys etc) are included in the database. £26.00 

• Includes both FLAT and NATIONAL HUNT versions. 



All available for IBM (5 25 , 3 5) AMIGA, ATARI ST, Amst PCW 



Send cheque I PO 
for return of post servu 



Selec Software 

62 Altrincham Rd, Galley, Cheadle, Cheshire SK8 4DP Tel 061-428-7425 



lend lor full list ol our software) 



THE BARD WOULD 
HAVE TURNED IN HIS 



AVON is a light-hearted but 
challenging look at Shakespeare's 
world through the keyboard of 
modern man. As a tourist in 
Stratford-upon-Avon, you find 
yourself mysteriously transported 
into the Bard's world... How will 
you return to the present day? 
An exhaustive knowledge of the 
Shakespearean Canon is NOT 
necessary! PC £19.95, PCW 
£14.95, CPC £14.95. Includes 
MURDAC free! Used in schools all 
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popular maths adventure for ages 
9 to 14. PC £17.50, PCW £14.95, CPC £14.95. Prices inc VAT&P&P. 





TOPOLOCilKA, 1 ROMAN WAY, S III TO V 
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PCWDRAW 



A full function drafting program - produces clear drawings on your PCW printer. 

Prints across or down page - small drawings can be positioned anywhere on page. 

Menu-driven, pixel accuracy. Draws lines, rectangles, arcs, circles, ellipses 

from simple key strokes. Also freehand sketches with zoom facility. 20 fill 

patterns, 3 line thicknesses, 4 line styles. 

Undo and Restore commands, allows backtracking up to 40 steps. 

Four methods for saving all or parts of drawing for re-use. 

Price £39.95 ( inc. VAT p&p ) cash with order 

NOW INCLUDES DETAIL EDITOR. 



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(Red. Blue, Green. Brown. Purple) £4.95 £4.50 £3.95 

PCW 8256/8512 Carbon Multistrike ....£3.75 £3.50 £3.25 

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(Red, Blue, Green. Brown, Purple) £4.95 £4.50 £3.95 

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(Age 12-16) 

Physics 

Chemistry 

Biology 



Magic Maths (4-8) 

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Better Maths (12-16)... 
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£11.95 



LOCOFILE 



8256/8512 

Locofile9512., 
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Locoscript II + Locospell.. 

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24 pin Printer Driver 8/9.. 



4 



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e y. £17.95 

& £12.95 



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£9.95 



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PC15512/1640(2pcs) £11.95 PC2086 (2pcs).. £12.95 

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MISCELLANEOUS 



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£14.50 

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PCW8256/8512..E57.95 
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Q25-CEN36 £7.95 

Printer Cable 

CEN36-CEN38 £9.95 

Margin Marker MM3 £12.50 

9512 Daisy Wheels. .£6.50 
2 Way CEN36 



Switchbox £19.95 

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Switchbox £19.95 

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Switchbox £29.95 

4 Way Serial 025 

Switchbox £29.95 

Mouse Pad (Soft). .£5.45 
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(Thick Rubber) £5.85 

Mouse Pad (Strong 

Thick Rubber) £6.95 

9512 Printer Extension 
Lead (1.8m) £14.95 



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LISTINGS PLUS 



^ 



TREASURE 
IT 




by Steve Mayer 
(and Clare and Nicole) 

At heart this is a simple game. What 
you have to do is search around a 
grid for a small nugget ot treasure. 
You use [Q] for up, [A] for down, [K] 
to move left and [L] to move right. Steve tells 
us that he chose this key combination 
because they are easier to keep four fingers 
on while playing. 

You are given clues to tell you whether 
you are W(arm), C(old) or H(ot). The idea is to 



find the booty in the fewest possible steps. 

These steps can be increased or 
decreased in distance from 1 to 9 grid units. 
You achieve this by pressing the number keys 
at the top of the keyboard. It's not as easy as 
it appears as the warmth is decided by circles 
of various radii around the treasure. Since the 
grid works in rectangles, this complicates 
matters somewhat. Once you have succeded 
in finding the loot, you are given a rating and 
are asked if you would like to try again. 

Steve Mayer tells us that this game was 
written strictly with his children in mind, but 
then again Tetris was looked upon as too 
simple in its early days. Frankly, Treasure 
Hunt can become complusive. Because we do 
require certain criteria to be filled before 
publishing listings (ie, we don't like more than 
60 lines with preferably less than 80 
characters per line) there are a number of 
improvements which could be made. For 
example, the treasure graphic could be 
improved, the grid could be expanded and 



there could be more than one piece of 
treasure. Still it is a fine game and it certainly 
kept the 8000 Plus office amused. 

By the way, there is also a cheat mode 
which will show the treasure. But beware, it 
will also inform you that you cheated on move 
so and so. Good luck me hearties! 




The search is on. Remember this game is for the kids.. .so give 
them a go at some point. 



rof f S=eS+" 



10 clS=CHR$<27)+"E"+CHRS<27)+"H" : eS=CHR$<27): ron$ = e$+" p" 

20 coffS=eS+"f" : con$=e$+"e": PRINT cl$+e$+" 0" +cof f S : j=l 

30 DEF FNatS<r,c)=e$+"Y"+CHR$<32+r)+CHRS<32+c) 

40 REM Draw grid 

50 s2S=CHRS<149)+SPACES<9) : s3$=CHRS <149> +STRINGS <9, 45) 

60 linel$=" 15" +CHRS <150) +STRINGS <59 , 154) +CHRS <156) 

70 line2$=s2$+s2$+s2S+s2S+s2S+s2$+CHR$<149> 

80 line3$=s3S+s3S+s3S+s3$+s3S+s3S+CHRS<149) 

90 line4S="0"+CHR$<:i47)+STRINGS<59, 154 ) +CHRS <153 ) 

100 PRINT FNatS<14, 12) ; linelS 



The clear screen routine, user defined function FNat$ and grid are set up here. 



110 FOR n=l TO 2: FOR m=l TO 4: PRINT FNatS <9+5«n+m, 14 ) ; 1 lne2$ ; NEXT 

120 PRINT FNatS <14+5*n, 12) ; DECS <15-5*n, "##"); line3$: NEXT 

130 FOR m=l TO 4: PRINT FNatS <9+5*n+m, 14) ; line2S : NEXT 

140 PRINT FNatS <29, 13) ; llne4$ 

150 FOR k=0 TO 6: PRINT FNatS <30 , 10*k+13) ; 10*k: NEXT 

160 PRINT FNatS <0, 35) ;ronS ;" TREASURE HUNT " ; rof f S 

170 PRINT FNatS <2, 16) ; "Find the hidden treasure ";CHRS(188); 

180 PRINT " in as few steps as possible" 



190 PRINT FNatS <5, 3) 
200 PRINT FNatS<7,3) 
210 PRINT FNatS<9,3) 



"Up 

"Down 

"Show 



Left 

Right 

Footstep 



K" 
L" 
1-9" 



'Footstep is 



220 
230 
240 
250 
260 
270 
280 
290 
300 
310 
320 
330 
340 
350 
360 
370 
380 
390 



THEN GOSUB 
48); j 
ELSE a=0 
ELSE b=0 



410 



REM Play 

RANDOMIZE (PEEK <64504! )) : x=INT <14*RND) +15 : y= INT <59*RND)+15 

u=INT<14*RND)+15: v= INT <59*RND) +15: IF u=x AND v=y THEN 240 

p=v-14: q=29-u: GOTO 300 

m$=INKEYS: IF mS="" THEN 260 ELSE IF mS="x" 

IF VAL<mS)<>0 THEN j=VAL<m$): PRINT FNatS <5 

IF mS="l" THEN a=J ELSE IF mS="k" THEN a=-J 

IF mS="q" THEN b=j ELSE IF m$="a" THEN b=-j 

IF a<>0 OR b<>0 THEN st=st+l 

PRINT FNatS <5, 61) ;DECS<st, "####") ; 

IF st=l THEN PRINT " Step " ELSE PRINT " Steps" 

p=p+a: q=q+b: p=MIN<p,59): p=MAX(p,l): q=MIN<q,14) 

d=SQR< <x-29+q) "2+ <y-14-p) "2) 

IF d<=5 THEN tS="hot" ELSE IF d<=20 THEN tS="warm" 

PRINT FNatS <rr , cc) ; LEFTS <ttS, 1) 

IF 29-q=x AND 14+p=y THEN PRINT CHRS <7) j FNatS <x, y) 

PRINT FNatS <9, 40); ron$ ; " ";tS;: 

PRINT roffS:" "; r=29-q : c=14+p: 



q=MAX<q, 1) 



ELSE tS="cold" 



CHRS < 188) : GOTO 480 
IF t$<>"h" THEN PRINT " " ; 
PRINT FNatSCr.c); ronS; LEFTS <t$ , 1 ); rof f$ 



16FC 
14D9 
0F79 
0884 
14A8 
1254 
0F25 
0F4.3 
1219 
OBFD 



1D19 
16D7 
1804 
0C32 
14C3 
168B 
1C46 
1428 
0E30 
0FA7 
207D 




057C 
1A9D 
1A88 
0BF7 
17F6 
1713 
17DA 
17E3 
0E1C 
0DC3 
1743 
1D49 
0CB5 
1EA9 
OEBF 
2147 
16FC 
21B3 



8000 PLUS December 89 71 




LISTINGS PLUS 



400 
410 
420 
430 
440 
450 
460 
470 
480 
490 
500 
510 
520 
530 
540 



rr=r: cc=c: tt$=t$: GOTO 260 

REM Cheat 

PRINT FNat$<x, y) ; CHR$<188) ; FNat$<8,62) ; ronS 

IF o=0 THEN PRINT ron$; st ; rof f S: o=50 

FOR delay=l TO 1000: NEXT 

h$=CHR$<45) ELSE h$=" 

h$=CHR$<149> 

RETURN 



Cheated at Step"; rof f$; 



IF x=24 OR x=19 THEN 

IF <y MOD 10)=4 THEN 

PRINT FNat$<x,y) ; h$: 

REM Found It 

PRINT FNat$<8, 35) ; ron$; " Treasure found! " ; rof f $ ; FNatS <9, 35) ; SPC < 11 ) 

IF st<=20 THEN re$=" BRILLIANT" ELSE IF st<=40 THEN re$="GOOD" 

IF st>40 THEN IF st<=60 THEN re$="FAIR" ELSE re$="AVFUL" 

PRINT FNat$<ll, 63) ;re$;FNat$<ll, 35) ; "Another go <y/n) ?" 

n$=INKEY$: IF n$<>"y" AND n$<>"n" THEN 530 ELSE IF n$="y" THEN RUN 

PRINT cl$+con$+e$+"l" : END 



0D16 
0618 
1F20 
1526 
0BED 
13BA 
0CD6 
1038 
08B4 
1EAE 
1EA1 
1C3F 
18A9 
1B19 
0C17 




Let's list again 



All of the listings you see within these pages have been sent In by readers. We 
are always on the lookout for new and Interesting applications for Mallard Basic 
(or DR LOGO) listings. 

Over the last year or so, we have built up quite a backlog of material which 
we will be going through as soon as the 8000 Plus team is back up to full 
strength. So, if you have sent in any listings (with stamped addressed envelopes) 
which we have not returned, do not fear. We're also pleased to receive reminders. 

If you have any new programs you would like to see published, please try to 
keep to the following guidelines; the program should be no more than 60 lines 



long. No line should exceed 80 characters, including spaces. 

Each listing should be saved in Ascii form and be accompanied by full 
documentation. If you would like your disc to be returned, you should also 
include sufficient postage. 

Although these pages deal with Mallard Basic which comes with your 
system discs, we are also pleased to see short programs written in other 
languages. 

Finally, as per usual, the address you need to send your work to is: Listings 
Plus, 8000 Plus, 4 Queen Street, Bath, BA1 1EJ. 



DATA AND READ 

This month we will be taking our first look at 
READ and DATA. These two functions always 
appear together in a program. If you give the 
Fireworx listing a brief glance, you will see 
what wonders can be achieved using these 
two. Don't worry, DATA lines (or statements) 
can hold plenty of other information besides 
reams of numbers. Have a look at the 
following short program: 

10 FOR count%=1 TO 5 

20 READ nameS 

30 PRINT name$ 

40 NEXT count% 

50 DATA simon, jon, muriel, toby, sam 

We will now go through the program line by 
line: 

10: This sets up the loop counter. Because 
there are five names in line 50 the loop needs 
to be set to five. Try setting the counter to six 
and you see the message 'data exhausted in 
line 50'. 

20: This line takes the information stored in 
line 50 and READs it into the program. DATA 
is read in a specific way. An invisible program 
pointer is aimed at the first piece of 
information in a statement, this is read and 
the pointer then moves on to the next and 
so on until all of the data has been read. 
30/40: PRINT to screen and end the loop. 



THE LEARNING 



Do you think that starting to learn Basic would be too much like hard 
manual labour? Does a program look like ancient Egyptian graffiti? Then 
try sliding down the Learning Curve. This section of the Listings pages is 
devoted to those of our readers who think they might like to begin 
exploring Basic. The aim of the Learning Curve is to give a brief 
introduction to some Basic commands and functions. This is done in such 
a way as to make the learning process as simple as possible. 



<""> 



M 



50: The DATA itself. Each individual piece of 
information must be separated from its 
neighbour with a comma. 

All the program does is read each piece 
of information from the data statement in order. 
It then prints it to screen. Very straightforward. 
But once it has read through the five names 
the program ends. As long as you alter the 
loop counter it is quite possible to add as many 
lines of DATA as you like. Try making these 
changes to the program: 

10 FOR count%=1 to 10 

60 DATA BILL,JIM,BERT,JENNY,LOUISE 
You should be able to see that the program 
now reads all ten names. 

DATA is a tidy way of keeping information 
which a program will use regularly. Becauase 



READ only looks at lines with the word DATA 
at the beginning, DATA statements can appear 
anywhere in a program. You will normally find 
them grouped together towards the end. 

So far we have only been reading one 
piece of information from a DATA statement at 
a time. DATA and READ are far more 
versatile than that. Try this example: 
10 READ number%, word$ 
20 PRINT "The number is "number% 
30 PRINT "The word is "word$ 
30 DATA 100, WORD 
Now try experimenting with DATA and READ 
by building up a few statements and reading 
them. Next month we will continue with our 
examination of these two Basic functions and 
introduce a third one called RESTORE. 



72 8000 PLUS Decembers 



A SMALL SELECTION FROM OUR 
WAREHOUSE 



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Amstrad PCW951 2 Computer/Word Proc. with Sheet Feeder 573.85 516.47 anc 

Amstrad Automatic Sheet Feeder - PCW9512 113.85 91.08 C 

FD-4 2nd 3" Disc Drive - PCW9512 (Genuine Amstrad Drive) 171.35 115.66 C 

Amstrad CPS8256 Serial/Parallel Interface- PCW 68.94 44.81 D 

MCL391 Lead, CPS8256 to Parallel Printer (Round Cable) 14.95 8.97 E 

PL2 Lead, PCW9512to Parallel Printer (Round Cable) 19.95 6.98 E 

Panasonic 1081 Parallel F&T NLQ Printer 281.75 166.23 A 

Vortex System 2000 40MB Hard Disc inc. PSU, Fan, Util. - PCW 573.85 516.47 A 

Electric Studio Light Pen with Art Software - PCW8256/8512 79.95 23.99 C 

2746MS Ribbon Multistrike - PCW9512 Pkt 2 7.70 4.62 F 

2741 FM Ribbon Fabric- PCW8256/8512 Pkt 2. ..11. 98 5.00 F 



DO YOU WANT TO SAVE MONEY, 
THEN SEND FOR OUR TRADE PRICE LIST 



(State for which products and enclose 
Blank Discs & Software 

CP Software Bridge Player 2150 'Galactica' - PCW 

Database Mini-Office Professional Plus - PCW 

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Database, Plan-It - PCW 

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Connect Systems, Money Manager Plus - PCW 

Caxton, Condor 1 Database - PCW 

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Eng. Mainland post a ins.: (A) £5.75 (B) £4.60 (C) £3.45 (D) £2.30 (E) £1.15 (F) 58p 

(ANC) 3 Day £10.35 Next Day £13.80. COD+ £2.30. Max UK post chg. £6.90 per 20kg/£500. 

All Prices Include VAT. Ail saies subject to our Trade Terms of Trading. 

W.A.V.E. (Trade Dept. 80001289) 

Walney Audio Visual & Electrical Distribution 

1 Buccleuch Street, Barrow-in-Furness, Cumbria, LA14 1SR 

Tel: 0229-870000 (6 lines) Hours: Mon - Fri 10.00-5.00 




NEW- Version 2 now available! 

It is designed to allow anyone to examine, copy and recover 
information from damaged or corrupted discs. Although ToolKlt 
is a full-function disc editor, you don't need to be an expert to 
use it! The manual too is comprehensive but straightforward. 
and includes features such as a "First Aid" section for quick 
answers in an emergency. ToolKit runs on all PCWs. 

PCW-Toolkit Version 2 still costs just £24.95 
How much is YOUR data worth? 



MFU for PCW8256 and PCW8512 £49.95 

Universal Multi-Format Utility. Allows the PCW to emulate other CP/M 
formats, analyse discs, transfer files from other systems and much more. 

2inl for PCW8256 and PCW8512 £49.95 

Transfer files to and from IBM-PCs on disc, format PC discs on the PCW. 

5.25" Disc Drives for PCW8256 and PCW9512 £139.95 

5.25" Disc Drives for PCW85 12 £169.95 

3.5" Disc Drives for PCW8256 and PCW9512 £139.95 

All prices INCLUDE V.A.T. and postage to U.K. and BFPO addresses. 
Please write or phone for our catalogue; overseas enquiries welcome. 

moonston e seek.""""" cen,re 

n , , + : „ „ CLYDEBANK G81 1PF 

computing 41 -941-3120 



Com-Stax 

THE ULTIMATE SPACE SAVER 

"Interesting solution thoughtfully designed" says 8000 Plus 



The new Com-Stax 8 Series 
a unique stand that will 
stack your PCW 8256 or 8512 
plus your keyboard and printer in 
under a quarter of a square 
metre of floor space. Its 
reclining monitor position 
and langled keyboard make 
the PCW even more user 
friendly. The Com-Stax is 
98 cm high, 41 cm wide 
and beautifully finished in 
durable red, white or black 
lacquer, the unit comes to 
you as a flat pack kit which is 
easily assembled in minutes 
with the alien key provided 



THE PRICE: £35.00 

Pf US VAT £5.25 and P&P £4.70 
TOT At £44.95 

TO ORDER: 

Post your cheque for £44.95 
together with your name and address 
and choice ot, colour: red white or black to 



COM-STAX LTD, FREEPOST, LONDON, SW5 OBR 
Tel: 01.244 8292 

Please allow 28 days lor delivery The Com-Stax is a Copyright design Patent applied for 




please quote 8 




/ 



Successful projects, reports, courses, 

meetings and presentations can be 

yours with Brainstorm 

• It's an ideas organiser 

• It enhances and encourages your thinking and creativity 

• It lets you build and rearrange maps of your thoughts 

• It's so fast, it never impedes your creative flow 

• It's quick to learn and is genuinely easy to use 

• It's a tried and tested product with thousands of users 

• It comes with a full tutorial and reference manual 

• It's sold and supported by the experts - its authors 



Please send me: 

□Amstrad PCW disk-only 
BrainStorm-l enclose £29.99. 
The manual is on disk in both 
LocoScript and ASCII text formats. 
I Further information. 



□ F 



My name is_ 



My address is_ 




_Tel. 



Please make your cheque out to Brainstorm Software Ltd. Our address is 
18 Courtlands Close, Ruislip, Middlesex HA4 8AX. Tel: 0895 677845. 



v. COMPUTER 

Je&n4t#n& SERVICES 



(0202) 431762 



All prices INCLUDE VAT & CARRIAGE 

Cheque/PCs with order please or 

phone using Access or Visa 

BA11 orders 
despatched 
same day subject to availability 



DEPT 8000, 32 Granville Road, Bournemouth, Dorset BH5 2AH 



MAXELL DISKS 



3" CF2 Per 5 £1 1.75 

Per 10 £22.45 

Head Cleaner £3.95 



STORAGE BOX 



Top Quality. Lockable Holds 30 ....£9.75 



PRINTER STAND 



CONTINUOUS STATIONERY 



DUST COVERS 



PROTECT YOUR EQUIPMENT! 

Smart. Washable, & Antistatic 

8256/8512 £11.95 

9512 £13.95 

Fully Adjustable to Fit 

All Printers £9.95 

Full range available Forms Price 

Per Box Per Box 

11x9.5 

1 Part60GSM(M) PI or MRuled....2000 17.94 

1 Part70GSM(M) Plain 2000 19.33 

1 Parl80GSM(M) " 2000 21.14 

1 Parl90GSM(Ml " 1000 14.43 

2 Part NCR " 1000 24.30 

3 Pari NCR " 700 26.59 

2PartNCR TINT (White/Pink) ..1000 28.01 

3 Part NCR TINT IWhite/Yellow/Pink] 750 30.95 

11.66X9.25 (A4SIZE) 

1 ParteOGSMIM) Plain 2000 21.60 

1 Part70GSM(M) " 2000 21.67 

1 Part80GSM(M) " 2000 25.61 

1 Part90GSM(M| " 1000 16.84 

2 Part NCR80/57 " 1000 35.54 

11x14.5 

1 Part 60GMS Plain or MRuled2000 22.00 

2 Part NCR " "..1000 29.14 

3 Part NCR " " .700 35.52 

(M) = Micro perfs on all edges 



RIBBONS 



1off 2off 
8256/8512 Norm life 3.95... ..'..7.45.. 



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8256/8512 Extra life 4.95 8.95 19.95 

8256/8512 M/strike 3.95 7.45 16.95 

8256/8512 For Colours*. ...4.95 8.95 19.95 

9512 Norm Life 3.95 7.45 16.95 

9512 Extra Life 4.95 8.95 16.95 

9512 Multistrike 3.95 7.45 16.95 

9512 Fabric Colours* 4.95 8.95 19.95 

* Colours - Blue. Red. Green. Brown 
We have ribbons for 100s of printers 



RIBBON REFRESH ! 



Unique spray allows you to re-ink faded 
fabric ribbons in seconds 160ml can. ..£8.95 



COMPUTER LABELS 



Top quality Avery Labels 2000 10000 

1 ACROSS £ £ 

2 \ x t«/ 16 8.00 29.35 

2 % X 1 ?/ 16 9.75 36.95 

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3 <; 2 X 1 15 - 16 14.90 59.45 

4 X '5, 16 8.95 33.95 

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FREE TAPE DISPENSER/CUTTER 
( Worth £5.75) with every lOOOO labels 




I Desi g ns — 



MEW fftoir M® 

Three new discs are available 

for use with MicroDesign 2, 

Stop Press and Newsdesk: 

Aircraft 

(Contains more line drawings by Michael Kay) 

Digipic 2 
Digipic 3 

(More digitized photographs) 



All Discs ordered before January 1st 1990 are priced at £11.50 

All previous material is still available, SAEfor lists. All discs are 3W2.5"ft 

§§, Tin® SMblwds, HOISFOIHD, NflwrMk, NMffi 3EL„ 
Or telephone Tim on 0603 890195 (24hr Answerphone.) 



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CLASSIC SOFTWARE 




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External Disc Drives 

100 Discs and a 5.25" disc drive for less than you may pay for 100 3" discs for a PCW8256. 8512 or 

9512. 

An external 5.25" disc drive in a high quality sleel case with leads which plug easily into your PCW by 
removing Ihe back and connecting to the cables already in the PCW lor a second drive. 

It will work just like a 3" DS/DD drive and cost jusi £135.00 

or without (he 100 discs tor just £105.00 

Add a third drive lo your PCW and get into cheaper discs. A complete 3.5" or 5.25". steel cased drive 
with connecting leads and complete a switch to change from internal to external drive giving you a 
choice of the drive. Easy back up of 3" DD discs by just switching from internal to cMernalt 145.00 

Power supplies in separate cases (not essential unless your PCW is already running a lol of 
peripherals). Just £15.00 if ordered at ihe same liinc as a drive. 

Discs 5.25" 96 ipi £4.95 for 10, 

3.5" 135 tpi £12.95 for 10, 

1 year guarantee - 7 day money back guarantee if not satisfied - prices are inclusive of VAT. packaging 
and parcel post. 

PINBOARD COMPUTERS 
Unit? 

O Bond or Business Centre 

London Road 
Baldock SG76HP 
Tel: 0462 894410 



CHIBASE TEXT RETRIEVAL 



Use CHIBASE to keep track of your notes and abstracts. 



Free Text 
"Very fast" 
Easy to use 
Full Screen-Editor 
Sort /Browse 
Multi-keyword 
Simple Forms 
Manual - 



records of up to 1860 characters 

said Amstrad PCW May 1989 

said 8000+ Jan 1989 (Ease of Use: 4/5) 

to create/amend records 

to view recalled records 

sophisticated searches 

speed record entry 

"...well planned and easy to follow": 

said Amstrad PCW May 1989. 



NEW A free utility which can convert an entire Chibase database into an 

ASCII file. It also helps to optimise database performance. Please send a 

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Price £39.95 inc. 

ONLY FROM CWMBRAN COMPUTER CENTRE 

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TIPOFFS 



Questions 




Information at your fingertips. 
Or tips at your information 
fingers or fingers at 

This month we bring you tips on Micro Design 2, PCW 
transportation, space cadet cheat modes and a host of 
other useful information. Last month's Make a Date 
competition is going to be held over for another month to 
give more people a chance. The winners of this month's 
Tip Offs' cash prizes are: David J Miller for his box 
character key definitions and David Solomon for his 
Micro Design II hints. Send your questions or tips to: Tip 
Offs, 8000 Plus, 4 Queen St, Bath, BA1 1EJ. 



Boxing clever 



n 



I find the use of box 
characters to outline 
menus or displays adds 
a professional touch to 
the programs I write. However 
they are tedious to produce under 
Mallard Basic as you have to 
define string variables for all the 
corners and intersections. Using 
CP/M it's virtually impossible 
because there are no key 
combinations to obtain the 
required characters. 

The solution I have found is 
to use SETKEYS.COM. There are 
two problems with this. The first is 
to find eleven convenient keys or 
key combinations to represent the 
four corners, five intersections 
and the horizontal and vertical 
lines. I chose a combination of the 
[ALT] key and characters from the 
numeric keypad to the right of the 
PCW keyboard. The next problem 
is that the ASCII values of the box 
characters are used as 
'expansion tokens' (#80-#9F). 
Only four of them are unassigned 
(#9B-#9E). This means that you 
have to choose seven already 
assigned expansion tokens to be 
re-assigned to box characters. I 



solved these two problems and 
came up with the following file 
which can be written using any 
word processor which can 
produce ASCII files: 



E#82" A '150' 
20 A " A '#82"' 
E#84" A '158' 
12A" A '#84'" 
E#86" A '156 

04 A " A '#86" 
E#88" A '151 
13A" A '#88" 
E#97" A '159' 
14 A "A' # g 7 "' 

E#99" A '157' 

05 A " A '#99"' 
E#9A" A '147' 
15A" A '#9A'" 
E#9B" A '155' 
07 A " A '#9B"' 
E#9C" A '153' 

06 A " A '#9C" 
E#9D" A '154' 
11 A " A '#9D" 
E#9E" A '149' 
79 A " A '#9E"' 



' Top Left 
[ALT]-7 
' Top Centre 
[ALT]-8 
" Top Right 
[ALTJ-9 
" Middle-Left 
[ALT]-4 

" Middle-Centre 
[ALT]-5 
' Middle-Right 
[ALT]-6 
" Bottom-Left 
[ALTJ-1 

" Bottom-Centre 
[ALT]-2 

" Bottom-Right 
[ALT]-3 
" Horizontal 
[ALTHCOPY] 
" Vertical 
[ALTJ-Pl 



Save this file as BOX.KEY. You 
can now use these characters 
with ease by typing SETKEYS 
BOX.KEY in CP/M before you 
start programming. 
David J Miller 
Berks 



An empty ET.AL file, 
which lets LocoScript2 
auto-load from more 
than one start-of-day 
disc only takes up 1 k of space 
but even this might be a nuisance 
for some. 

Space obsessives may find it 
useful to have an ET.AL file which 
takes up no space at all! You can 
create this from the disc 
management screen in the 
following manner: 

1 ) Use f4 to rename a group as 
ET This can be on the M: drive. 

2) With the cursor anywhere in 
that group use f3 and select 



'Erase file'. Type in ET.GRP as 
the file name. Press [ENTER]. 
You will see that ET disappears 
as a group name. 

3) Use f8 and select 'Show Limbo 
Files'. Put the cursor over the 
limbo file ET.GRP. 

4) Use f3 and select 'Recover 
from Limbo'. Give the new 
filename as ET.AL. Press 
[ENTER] and lo and behold you 
have an ET.AL file of OK. 

5) Use f3 to copy this to your start 
of day disc. 

You will find that 
LocoScrip2's auto-load procedure 
recognises it as a prompt to 
insert a further start of day disc. 
R Howard 
London 




When is a file not a file? When it's OK. But this ET.AL file will enable you to boot LocoScript 2 
using more than one start-of-day disc. 






Disc management. Printer idle. Using NT 

»« new document I=Edit document P-Print document D=Direct printing F-FiU M=.._. 
1-flctions fa=Disc f3=FiIe f4=Crom> fS=»ocument f6=Settin<)s f7=Disc change f8=Optu 




lill i | Ml ||i 

AHPIXS Ox 



MATRIX .PR I 

PHRASES .STB 

SCRCHAD .JO 1 ;' 

SCRIPI ,JQV 

SHARON .BOC 




LocoScript 2 waits for you to Insert the next disc. This might contain anything from a system 
dictionary to LocoFile. This system can also be used as access protection. 






Re-group captain! 

■«*■ Using LocoScript 2, after 
|{h| naming groups with what 
LJKJ I think are appropriate 
i^^ titles I feel I'd like to 
change my mind and return to the 
original 'group 0' etc. 

LocoScript 2 won't allow you 
to use lower case characters 
when renaming a group, so how 
do you do it? Here's how: 

In the disc manager, 
highlight any file in the group 
you want to rename. Press f3 and 
choose the ' Erase File' option. In 
the panel which appears in the 
middle of the screen will be the 
filename. Change this to the 
group name and for the suffix (the 
three letter filetype which follows 



the fullstop) type GRP. Then 
press [ENTER] and the group 
name will be erased to be 
replaced by the original group 
number in lower case. 

The old name will drop into 
Limbo. It can be brought back to 
life using the f3 key should you 
have a change of heart. 

A bit of a lightweight tip 
perhaps but one which is 
satisfying to execute. 
H Ainscough 
Sheffield 

( WPLUS 

Indeed a simple tip but why not? Knowing 
these seemingly trivial pieces of 
information about your software and 
machine may well lead to greater 
confidence and then who knows what? 



t> 



8000 PLUS December 89 75 



Connect 






What users say about Money Manager - 2 



I have the worst brain for money matters 
around but in the years I have had your 
Manager I have never yet had VAT or cash 
flow upsets, it's great!. 
(J.D.W. - Berks) 

I cannot let this opportunity pass without 
repeating my satisfaction with Money 
Manager. I am using it for the book-keeping 
of several small businesses. Before I retired 
recently after 40 years in banking, 24 of 
which were as branch manager, I would have 
been delighted if my small (and some not so 
small) business customers had presented me 
with figures and statistics of their businesses 
as produced by Money Manager. It really is a 
program which, being easy to use, could save 
many businesses from the chaos and disaster 
which can, and so often does, result from 
poor or non-existent book-keeping. 
(R.A.L. - Cheshire) 

Of the improvements, I find the calculator 
and macros the most used, and greatly 
appreciate the increased number of Accounts 
and the facility for defining Marks, not to 
mention the pie chart and improved bar chart. 
What further improvements could one 
possibly expect? 
(R.R. - Southampton) 



Thank you for the prompt delivery of Money 
Manager, and what a delight to use, it is not 
very often that computer software adverts 
fully live up to the written word but in this 
case having used it for only a few hours I feel 
absolutely confident about the use of it. 
(J.S.K. - Essex) 

The program is perfect, just what I needed. If 
it were edible I would have a second portion. 
(NT. - Wilts) 

I have been using Money Manager since then 
for my personal accounts and am writing to 
let you know that, as an accountant working 
in industry, I am very pleased with the 
program. I regard the program as having 
been well designed and user friendly with lots 
of useful options. I have had no hesitation in 
recommending the program to a friend of 
mine who is self-employed and needs to 
prepare accounts for his own business. 
(A.DS.G. - Northants) 

Several of my clients are struggling with 
Sage and the like. I am now doing my best to 
wean them onto your Money Manager, which 
is far more suitable for them. 
(A.R.L. - Kent) 



I would like to take this opportunity of 
congratulating you on an excellent program. 
I am treasurer of a local cycling club and the 
help that the program gives me in that job is 
tremendous, and impresses the auditors too! 
It is also very helpful to be able to keep track 
of my personal accounts, and know to the 
penny how much I owe to the various credit 
card companies. Keep up the good work! 
(J.F.N. -Wilts) 

We would like to thank you for providing 

such a marvellous and easy to use program at 

such a reasonable price. No longer do we 

guess how much is where and no decisions 

are made without first consulting Money 

Manager. 

(K.D. - Milton Keynes) 

I have bought the new Money Manager - and 
I think it is magnificent. The manual is so 
rare in the mass market: a well printed, clear, 
concise, friendly instruction booklet written 
for us amateurs who really aren't computer 
experts, and don't particularly want to be. I 
really do congratulate whoever wrote this 
instruction book. Well done indeed! 
(C.P.G. -Hove) 



Only 

£49 M 



including VAT and p&p. 



Suitable for the Amstrad PCW 8256, 8512 and 9512 

MONEY MANAGER PCW 



New, 



Now even 

more powerful, more 
friendly, and more useful II! 

Be your own accountant! Control your finances the easy way! 

Money Manager PCW provides individuals, businesses and professional people with a simple yet powerful way of managing their financial 
activities. All transactions can be entered easily and then presented in a wide variety of reports, ranging from a detailed listing of expend- 
iture for tax purposes to summaries showing, for example, how much money has been spent on petrol or phone bills in a chosen period. 
Reports can be printed as text, sent to a datafile for further processing or presented in graphical form. 

The program includes many helpful features, such as pop-up claculator, context-sensitive help windows and macro comands. The Money 
Manager package has over 25,000 users in the UK alone. It is the ideal program for people who find that traditional accountancy programs 
are too complicated, unwieldy and time-consuming for their requirements. 



■ Any number of data files: Personal, Business, Accounts etc. 

• Budget and cash-flow forcasts - which may be updated 

• 12 months per file, up to 500 entries (transactions) per month 

• Move a file forward a month at a time when required 

■ All options selected from the main menu 

■ Up to 20 user-defined accounts: Bank, Cash, Visa, Savings etc. 

■ Up to 50 user-defined classes of income and expenditure 

- A reference of up to 6 characters for each entry 

- Your own descriptive text of 18 characters for each entry 

■ All the codes are displayed on-screen whilst entering data 

■ Add, modify and delete existing entries at any time 

■ Quick insertion of standard entries and standing orders 

■ Entries can be sorted into date order at the touch of a key 

■ Single character 'mark' for extra reporting selectivity 

■ Statements showing each entry in detail with running balance 

- Reports may show classes merged into logical groups 

- Spreadsheet type table showing class totals In each month 

- Report showing class totals for each account 

■ Bar chart for up to 4 selected categories 

■ Pie charts of up to 20 selected 'slices' 

^Detailed bank statement reconciliation with running balance 



• Totals for each class of transaction for any period 

- Report of monthly income, expenditure and cash-flow etc. 

- Report of account and class totals (eg profit & loss) 

• Account statistics - monthly max, min, average, balance etc. 

• Automatic calculation of VAT, with multiple rates if required 

- Detailed VAT reports showing taxable, VAT and gross amounts 

- Summary VAT statements in the same format as a VAT return 

- Simply ignore VAT features if they are not required 

• Print any report to built-in (or separate) printer 

• Print any report to a file for word-processing (eg in Locoscript) 

- Data search facility to find 'lost' items 

- Built-in text line editor for data entry 

• Horizontal and vertical scrolling of screen reports 

- Pop-up five function multi-line calculator with memory 

- Macros to record and replay user-defined reports 

• Context-sensitive help windows appear at the touch of a key 

■ Automatic creation of back-ups for data files 

- You can choose which disc drive to use for data on a PCW8512 

- Comprehensive 64 page indexed manual 

- Two sets of sample data for practice and familiarisation 

■ Free and indefinite telephone support 



Connect 



To receive your copy of Money Manager PCW by return post phone us now with your credit 
card number, or write to us at the address below enclosing your cheque for £49.95 

01743 9792 8amtol0pm,7daysaweek 
Connect Software Ltd., 3 Flanchford Rd., London W12 9ND 




TIPOFFS 



Pack up your troubles 



jj 



When transporting my 
PCW, the yoyoing to and 
from the car boot has 
driven me mad. Not 
really requiring specialised PCW 
luggage I have taken to using one 
of the large shopping trolley bags 
now widely available in 
supermarkets. 

Line the bag with a bath . 
towel. The monitor fits snugly in 
one end, the keyboard rests on 
the monitor pedestal and the 
printer goes at the other end. With 
a towel on top there is room for 
paper and disc boxes. Cover it all 
with a bin liner and hey presto! (or 
Tesco) only one trip at either end. 
Ian Baird 
North Yorkshire. 



The PCW travels. Complete with manuals 
and discs and at cut price too. 




Why pay out your Christmas Club money 
for expensive luggage ? 



Beam me up 



n 



Re Steve Chapman's 
query about Starglider 
in the October issue, 
here are some tips. 
When the game is over and 
you are asked to enter your 
name in the high-score table, 
enter it as Boris the Bean (case 
is important). Once this is done 
and you have started a new 
game every time you press 
[STOP] you will presented with 
the cheat mode menu. Pressing 
[A] will still abort the game but 
pressing numbers between 1 



and 5 will have the following 
effects: 

1 will take you to the next 
level. 

2 will give you unlimited fuel, 
energy and lasers. 

3 will restore you back to 
limited fuel etc. 

4 will give you two missiles 

5 lets you choose a mission 
from a sub-menu of six. 

Press C after making your choice 
to continue the game. 
John Eggeling 
Lanes 




It's not cheating; it's saving the galaxy 



Tie a yellow ribbon 



H 



If you rarely use 
Superscript and Double 
Width you will notice that 
your 8000 series printer 
ribbons have a strip 2/1 Oths of an 
inch wide where the printer head 
has struck the ribbon. There is 
another strip of 3/1 Oths of an inch 
wide unused. You can double the 
life of the ribbon by removing it 
from the case and reversing it. 

1 ) Gently ease off the cover in 
stages with a small screwdriver. 
Danger areas are the two lugs on 
the protruding arms. 

2) Note how the ribbon is 
threaded at both ends of the box. 
The jumble in the middle can be 
ignored. 

3) Remove the ribbon. The 
ratchet on the spring pushes 
back. 

4) Take about 1 2 inches of the 
ribbon and rethread it through the 
box. The aim is to finish up with 
the ribbon which will eventually 
show between the protruding 
arms with its shiny side towards 
the printer head, dull side towards 
the paper. 

5) Snap back the cover. 

6) Hold the box in a vertical 
position with the winding ratchet 
at the top and loose the ribbon on 
the floor. Using the ratchet, rewind 
the ribbon into the box taking care 
not to wind in any snags. This 
should take about 5 minutes! 

J L Bartlett 
Wickham. 



Now is the winter... 

@l should be most grateful 
if you or any of your 
readers could help us 
with a problem which we 
have encountered using Caxton's 
Cardbox package which we run 
on an 8512. As you will be aware 
Cardbox is no longer supported 
by Caxton. 

The problem is that we have 
reached the capacity of the duel 
density disc which contains our 
customer database. It is not 
possible for us to delete any files 
from the disc - there being only 
one customer file. Although we 
are able to delete a number of 
redundant records this does not 
seem to make equivalent space 
available for new ones. We can of 
course update redundant records 
but this is long winded and only a 
stop gap. 

The documentation implies 
that is is necessary to reorganise 
the file by dumping it and then 
recreating it. But this is frustrated 
by the lack of space on the disc. 



Presumably there is a solution to 

the problem, but with the absence 

of Caxton we must look 

elsewhere for help. 

R Palmer 

Kent Repertory Company Ltd. 

8000 PLUS 

The problem with databases gowing 
larger than disc capacity will crop up from 
time to time. One way round this problem 
is to create a number of customer files on 
separate discs. Customers with names 
from A-C use one file and so on. 

Your present file should then be used 
as an archived back-up. First you will 
need to write the information from this file 
into their respective new homes. This 
should not take you too long using 
Cardbox's WRite command, the Internal 
format and selected records. There is no 
great problem with using different discs 
for a database, you must of course back 
each one up. The other alternative might 
be to get yourself a hard disc. 

As you say, Caxton no longer 
support the product so if there are any 
readers who use Cardbox and have a 
better solution please get in contact with 
8000 Plus at the address given at the top 
of Tip Offs. 



PRNs of darkness 

@l have been reading your 
magazine since I 
purchased my PCW9512 
last December. I find that 
many books are either aimed at 
the expert or the pure beginner 
with nothing in between. Can you 
therefore help me out with a 
problem I have not been able to 
solve for ten months. 

I have a Public Domain 
Mandelbrot routine, which at least 
saved me the bother of having to 
type in the 8000 Plus listing. But 
when a plot is completed, it is 
saved by the program as a PRN 
file. I cannot find out how to run 
this file! TYPE does not do it and 
in Basic, RUN brings up the 
message 'Direct command found'. 
Neither of these tell me how to 
recapture my lost file. Can you 
please help? 
James J Haxted 
South Glam 

8000 PLUS 

Tricky devil the PRN file. What seems to 



have happened is that your Mandelbrot 
plots have been saved as printer listings, 
hence the suffix PRN. 

The image which you created 
has been saved in a form which can be 
turned into hard copy. Not having seen the 
particular piece of software to which you 
allude we can 't really go much further than 
this. It most certainly won't run under 
Basic as it is not a piece of program code. 
TYPE will only print the numeric codes 
which are communicated to the printer in 
order to produce the picture. Without 
seeing the software we can only assume 
that there is a print out option. 




Is this the way you're going to feel on boxing 
day? No, it's a plot by Mandlebrot. 



> 



8000 PLUS December 89 77 



TIPOFFS 



Design council (parti) 



n 



Here are a few tips to 
make Micro Design 2 a 
bit easier to use: 
1 ) The manual tells you 
to 'cycle' through the disc drives 
and User groups using [ALT)+d 
and [ALTJ+u. The simpler way is 
to press [ALT]+ a,b or c for the 
appropriate drive. Also [ALT]+ the 
user group number. 

2) MD2 directories will only hold 
50 entries at one time. If you 
want to view, say, 200 CUT files 
on a B disc you have to scroll 
through 50 at a time. The trick 
here is to load the files, 50 at a 
time, into different user groups. 
This is easily done with NSWP 
for example. 

3) MD2 will not accept Stop 
Press pages at full-size in high 
resolution (254k) mode. It insists 
on reducing them to half size. To 
get round this; go into New, 
select A4 low resolution (64k) 
mode and the Stop Press page 
will load at full size. Save with an 
MDA file-type. Re-load the new 
file into a high resolution page at 
twice full size to fill the page. 

4) Keep all your page dummy 
files (also known as page 
templates or style sheets) in 
group 1 . Save all current work 
files in group 0. This way it is 
more difficult to rub out essential 
files! 

5) When adjusting the supplied 
typefaces for size, calculate the 
ratio between the height and 
width of characters in pixels, at 
their original point size. Increase 



' . J 



)tfrfit~ 



Put these tips to the test, see the back page 



the height of the character to the 
required point size, note the 
height in pixels and then multiply 
by the ratio to give the required 
width in pixels. This keeps the 
proportions of the characters 
correct. The ratio differs from font 
to font. 

6) When making an A4 page 
which is to be reduced to AS on a 
photocopier, do not forget to 
increase the size of typefaces 
and graphics by 41 % to give the 
correct size when reduced. A4 to 
A5 is a 71% reduction. For 
example, use 16 point characters 
in A4 to give 12 point in A5. 

8) To centre a page of print 
lengthways on continuous A4; 
wind on the paper by hand until 
the perforations are level with the 
horizontal guide lines which are 
cut into the printer head. Press 
[PTR] to call up the printer 
command line and execute three 
linefeeds. 

9) As a matter of interest on MD2 
a vertical pixel measures 0.009 
inches while a horizontal pixel 
measures 0.008 inches. 

David Solomon 
Southampton. 



The opening menu of our very own version of PMS' Dialup. 



jj 



Design council (part 2) 

Some tips for users of 

the excellent Micro 

Design 2. 

1) Imported Stop Press 
fonts can be made to look less 
ragged by writing them in Outline 
mode and then flooding the 
hollow letters with black ink. It 
takes time but the results are 
worthwhile. 
2) Don't forget when typesetting 



text you don't have to go into 
Editor mode to write it. For 
short pieces of work it's just as 
easy to go into the temporary 
text editor by pressing T 
followed by [f1] and then writing 
the required text. Style and 
emphasis codes can be added 
in the usual way. This saves 
continually jumping between 
Editor and Layout. 
Rev M Komor 
South Glamorgan 



SERVICE DIRECTORY 








XMODEM to Mac 
cpn user group 
Leeds PCW 
Telecon Gold Direct 










Miiinum amend create utilities exit 



Maccie's back in town 

HI purchased a PCW 
8256 when they first 
came out in 1985. Since 
then it has given me 
excellent service and has proved 
a very good value buy. In 1988 I 
bought a Macintosh SE in order 
to carry out detailed CAD 
(computer aided design) work as 
well as other graphics. 

It would be most convenient 
to be able to read our PCW 
records on the Mac. I am told that 
I must first make Ascii files from 
the PCW data. This is relatively 
simple with regard to LocoScript 
files. However our old accounts 
were done using SuperCalc2 
which of course operates under 
CP/M. My old (1985) manuals 
give no guidance on converting 
SuperCalc files to Ascii form. 

Most of the data, from both 
LocoScript and SuperCalc is on B: 
drive discs as I upgraded my 
8256. One major problem appears 
to be that there is no RS232 
interface on the back of the 
machine. Could you please help? 
J S Peacock 
Cambridge 

8000 PLUS 

There seem to be a number of questions 
here; SuperCalc will save files in Ascii 
form using the /0(utput),D(isplay) function 
from the command line. You can also the 
SDI or Super Data Interchange facility 
which comes with SuperCalc2. This will 
produce a straight forward comma 
deliminated file of the data you require. To 



be quite frank, to fully describe both 
comma deliminated files and their uses 
would take an entire feature. Suffice it to 
say that what you end up with is raw data 
without the frills. This can be exported to 
Macintosh. 

The second part of your letter deals 
with the fact that you have no interface 
attached to your PCW. You have to buy 
interfaces. They are the optional extras of 
the PCW world. What you do have is an 
edge connector (or board edge or even 
expansion port). In layperson's terms this 
is the long slot on the back left of the 
PCW just below your printer port. The 
slice of plastic which you can see poking 
out is actually an extention of the mother 
board itself. You will need to get an 
RS232 interface which fits onto this 
board. There is an indepth review of the 
interfaces available for the PCW on 
pages 50, 51 and 52 of this issue. The 
Mac comes with ports readily built in. 

We will be dealing with the matter 
of file transfer in far greater depth in a 
later issue as this seems to be a popular 
question at the moment. Briefly, once you 
have your interface you will also need to 
lay hands on a fairly simple cable which 
will connect your RS232 interface to the 
Mac's RS422 port. At 8000 Plus we use a 
piece of comms (communications) 
software called PMS Dialup and the 
comms module from Microsoft Works on 
the Mat. We then send at a 9600 baud. 

Once the file has been sent, it is up 
to you which word processing software 
you use on the Macintosh. We use a 
combination ofMakewrite, Macwrite and 
Quark Express to turn out these pages. 
The major hurdle however is actually 
getting the data from one machine to the 
other and it really isn 't as difficult as it 
might at first appear. 




MAC 


PCW 


RS422 


RS232 


1 


_ 


2 


15 


3 


k— 


4 __ 


_ 3 


5 — — 


— . „ 7 


6 — 


__ 2 


7 








Ready to send these pages which were written in Protext and then saved in Ascii form. 



For those of you brave enough to try it, this is the cable which will join your PCW to a Macintosh. 



78 8000 PLUS Decembers 



> 



AMSOFT 3" DISCS ■ £24.50 FOR 10 

DISC BOXES - TO HOLD 40 X 3" DISCS 

ONLY £9.95 

8256/851 2 FABRIC RIBBONS - £2.99 EACH 

9512 RIBBONS - £2.75 EACH 

AMSTRAD PCW 9512 - £510 inc VAT 

AMSTRAD PCW 851 2 - £499 inc VAT 

AMSTRAD PCW 8256 - £389 inc VAT 

PCW 9512 SHEETFEEDERS - £99 inc VAT 

LIGHT PEN and ART SOFTWARE - £24.49 inc VAT 



PCW Catalogue now available - contact us for details 

All our prices include VAT & 1st class post (UK only) 

Postage overseas - please apply for rates 

The price you see is the price you pay 

Order now from:- 



K&M COMPUTERS, 8P 

140 SANDY LANE CENTRE 

SKELMERSDALE, LANCS, WN8 8LH. 

24 hours phone 0695 29046 



Ribbon Re-cycling Services 



INTRODUCTORY OFFERS - exclusive to 8000+ readers 

PCW9512 CARBON-FILM refurbishment: £2 each + 99p per order 

(eg: two for £4.99, five for £10.99) 

All Amstrad FABRICS re-inked: £1 each plus 50p per order 

PCW FABRIC REPLACEMENT (15 yds new ribbon in your old cassette) 

£3 each plus 50p per order 

All the above for BLACK only. Details for COLOUR FABRICS on request. 

Phone for prices for re-inking all other FABRIC ribbon cassettes. 

Post used cassettes with order and payment to: 

ALADDINK (Dept 80), Eyemouth, Berwickshire, TD14 5AP 

Tel: 08907 50965 up to 8pm Mon - Sat 

Super GIFT STAMPS with every order. VAT receipt supplied on request. 
These offers expire at end of 1989. 



Introducing 

CASHMASTER 

This is how to make accountants redundant - Master your own finances. There isl 
now no need to be frightened by accountancy programs. CASHMASTER providesl 
you with the easiest method yet invented to keep track of all your finances. Be you a I 
business or professional individual, you are sure to need to know where your moneyl 
is going. CASHMASTER will allow you to input all the necessary information perl 
transaction in one simple operation, whilst allowing you to extract the absolute| 
maximum from it all again with an array of statements and reports. 



"I Features Full VAT analysis 

3 Easy, natural data entry - Just like a 

hand written ledger 
^ Any amount of ledger files 
D Ledgers can span any time period, there 

is no one year limit 
Reports can be produced over any time 

span 1 day to 100 years 
90/99 Class Codes (User definable) per 

ledger file 
n 30/99 Accounts per ledger file 
n Detailed statements showing balances 

(Selected Accounts & Classes) 
~J Profit & Loss Statements (Selected 

Accounts & Class totals) 
~\ Tagging of entries for extra report selectivity 
"1 Items can be Inclusive/Exclusive of VAT 
"I VAT can also be just ignored 
"I VAT element automatically calculated 

and displayed 
"I Pop-up running total calculator 
"I Entries can be repeated with one key 

press (Standing Orders etc) weekly. 

fortnight, monthly, quarter, half year or 

yearly. 



"I Entries can be edited or deleted at any time 
~\ Insert Entries anywhere'. CASHMASTER 

puts them in the right place 
"1 Reports directable io Screen, Printer or 

Disk File 
"1 Detailed selectivity of data for reports 
~\ Reference field for each entry (Invoice No. 

Desp Note No etc) 
a 10.000 Entries PC Version. 2200 PCWs 
~\ Entries automatically inserted in 

chronological order - no need for sorts 
1 Search function, to find forgotten entries 
1 All functions and operations available 

from main program screen 
n Most functions operate from a single 

key press 
"I Scan through the ledger a line, or page at a 

lime if required 
~I Split and merge files if required 
"I Class and account codes and 

descriptions visible at all limes, scroll 

through pages of codes with one key press 
"1 FREE - Separate running total calculator 

for adding up those cheques. Useful for 

quick sums. 



All previous so called 'Simple to use' accounts programs will 
now seem like nuclear physics next to CASHMASTER. 

CASHMASTER is currently available for: IBM PCs and Compatibles. 
All Amstrad PCWs and Amstrad CPC6128s. For an unbelievable 
£29.95 Inclusive of VAT and P&P. Its not only far superior to the 

competition, its far cheaper too. To receive your copy of 

CASHMASTER soonest, send a cheque/PO for £29.95 payable to 

Intraset Ltd. Don't forget to state your machine and disk size. 



INTRASET LTD, Dept 8000. FREEPOST, 10 Woodside 

Avenue, Clayton-Le -Woods, Chorley, Lancashire. PR6 7BR. 

Tel: (02572) 76800 





STOCKMARKET 

THE COMPREHENSIVE INVESTMENT PROGRAM! 

STOCKMARKET is a program designed to help you plan your investments and keep a close and careful watch on their progress. It enables you to 
record full details of your purchases and sales of stocks, shares, unit trusts and other securities. Dividends can be recorded as they are received. If 
required, cash balances in savings accounts can also be monitored as stocks are bought and sold. It also lets you record and plot prices of shares, unit 
trusts, exchange rates, indexes etc. 

STOCKMARKET does not have to be used only with your real investments. We all see shares recommended in a newspaper or magazine that we 
think will do well. Six months later if the price has gone up we wish that we had trusted our judgement. If the price has fallen we quietly forget it. 
With STOCKMARKET you can record details of as many shares folios as you want. These can include hypothetical folios of 'hot stocks', recovery 
shares, penny shares or whatever you choose. You can practise buying and selling shares and see how well you do! 

The program is easy to use and comes complete with a comprehensive manual and demonstration files including real price information going back 
several years for several shares (inc FT 30 index, British Telecom, Amstrad, Marks & Spencers) so that you can plot graphs straight away. 



PORTFOLIO MANAGEMENT 

* Record full details of your portfolios of stocks, shares, unit trusts etc. 

* Practise buying and selling and accurately record your progress. 

* Up to fifty shares per folio. As many folios as you like. 

* Buy and sell shares with automatic calculation of dealing costs. 

* Ten sets of dealing costs which you can alter as necessary. 

* Record dividend yields and price earnings ratios. 

* Update prices and automatically recalculate share and folio values. 

* Record tax credits (not CPC) and dividend payments. 

* List one year's information for the tax man (not CPC). 

* Keep records of your cash as you buy and sell. 

* List your present folio, past transactions, dividends and cash accounts. 



PRICE ANALYSIS 

* Record values of share prices, unit trusts, indexes, exchange rates etc. 

* Store up to 260 prices per share (equivalent to weekly prices for 5 years). 

* List all the prices for each share. 

* Plot prices and moving averages on a logarithmic or linear scale. 

* Choose any period for moving averages. Plot them separetely or 
superimpose them on the price. 

* Automatic scaling of graphs so they always fill whole screen. 

* Easy to read scales for prices and dates (not just week numbers). 

* Complete with real weekly prices for several shares for the last few years 
(inc FT 30, British Telecom) as a demonstration. 

* Use curves as a guide to the best buying and selling opportunities. 



Comprehensive fifty page manual. Complete with demonstration account and prices. 

AMSTRAD PC, PPC, IBM PC and compatibles £39-95 
AMSTRAD PCW £39-95 

1% /Tl? T> TT\T A TVT (AMSTRAD CPC (disc) j £29-95; 

[ \i Jh/ XV. J MJ JL J\. 1% Prices are all inclusive worldwide. Send cheque or phone any day (including 



*®§viw©ip@ 



weekends) from 8am to 9pm and quote credit card number for immediate 
delivery by first class post. 

38 Balcaskie Road, London, SE9 1HQ. Tel: 01-850 7057 




TIPOFFS 



Liberate Liberace 



I play the electronic 



{■J keyboard and although I 



MFJ find many of the pre- 
^^^ programmed rythmns 
impressive, I find a greater need 
for just a simple 'ticking' 
metronome. Being a total failure 
when it comes to writing 
programs in Mallard Basic, I 
wondered if perhaps an 8000 
Plus reader could write a 
metronome program? The user 
should be able to set a ticking 
rate in crotchet beats per minute. 
Could the PCW's bleep cope I 
ask myself? 



N Perrin 
Fordingbridge 

8000 PLUS 

A nice idea. Although you can build 
metronomes from squeegy bottles, 
sticky back plastic, knitting needles 
and chewing gum, the idea of a PC W 
version is mighty appealing. Can 
anyone come up with such a 
program? If you think that you can 
doit you should send your effort to 
the normal Tip Offs address and mark 
the envelope 'Click track'. Because of 
the nature of the season we have 
decided to send the usual crisp 
five pound note to the charity of 
your choice. 




The PCW can do many things but can you make it keep time like Sir George Solti or Simon Rattle? 



Degrees of excellence 

HMy new PCW951 2 cut 
sheet feeder works very 
well, but.... I tried to 
type 1 6° as an 
abbreviation using [EXTRAJ+H to 
give me the degrees sign. I got a 
symbol which shows up on the 
screen but does not print out. 

I checked the WHEEL.TXT 
document in Group 1 of the 
Sheet Feeder Start of Day Disc 



and this shows that [EXTRA]+H 
will give the degrees symbol, 
although as I found out - it 
doesn't. I thought it might be 
useful to users to know that 
[ALT]+7 will produce the 
required symbol. 
Sylvia Martland 
Merseyside. 

8000 PLUS 

Has anyone else any specific 9512 cut 
sheet feeder tips? 



Nice header 



EMy trouble seems so 
minor that I am loathe to 
approach you but I trust 
that you will come to my 
rescue. I am using LocoScript2 
on an 8256 and I want to know 
how to put a header on the first 
page only and number ail pages 
in the footers. It appears to me 
that I am only offered a choice of 
putting the header on all pages if 
I wish to number all pages. 

The problem has arisen 
because I have been trying to get 
the first page of a long document 
on one side and I can only do 
this by using all the spaces 
available to me on the header. I 
do not want the heading to 
appear on any other page but I 
do need to number all pages as 
it is a legal document and I wish 



to demonstrate that all pages are 
present. 

Geoffrey Catlow 
Huntingdon 

8000 PLUS: Pen and paper at the 
ready? This is how you do it: 

1) Create a document as usual. Then 
press 11 for Document Setup. 

2) Once in Document Setup, press t[5] tor 
Header/footer options. 

3) Set the header and footer options as 
follows: Header and footer 1 should be 
set for the first page only. Your text will 
go in here. Leave Header 2 blank as this 
will go at the top of all other pages. 
Remember to page number, using [tjPN, 
both footer 1 and footer 2. Don't forget to 
use the page numbering symbols (details 
of which are found in the manual) 

4) Finally enable all headers and footers. 

5) Return to your document and save all 
this as a template before going ahead 
with the writing for real. 



fiLLTTLH ii /UUCUHLN ' l ' .BW 



Script 1: 
fl=Actions| 



L SI C B+O 




EB it identity 
Insert text 
Disc manager 



ITEB5 /DOC UMEN T . WO Bocunent setup. 
' . P ile LSI CRtg LP6 



id of header 1 



id of footer 2 



used for only the 
used for only the 
used for all pages 
used for all pages 



Printer idle 

■IMjBBjglBMMgjH 



Paper type 
Page layout 



P age layout 

JUn&QXf CPU iHJ 'AWTlTMBI 
Page break control 



Page numbers 



H:L ETTE B5 /DUCUH E N T ,066 
Script 1: Pi 12 



...... I *,, f I * ,f + 

(CEntre) Messrs 

mi of header 1 : used for only th( 

page: (PageNo)<<< 

end of footer I : used for only tht 

end of header 2 : used for all pagt 

page: (PageNo)<<< 
end of footer 2 : used for all pagt 



■f5=Page| 



Printer idle 

yjB^amifirHauB-H 



Header/footer 1 used for : 

■s first page only 
all hut last page 
odd pages 



V First page header enabled 
•S First page footer enabled 
■S Last page header enabled 
■/Last page footer enabled 



For one page document 

Use footer for first page 
v Use footer for last page 



Three steps to Header. Remember to include the page numbr symbols otherwise.. .no numbers. 



Stitched up 



H 



have decided to have 
a go at using The 
Desktop Publisher for 
counted cross stitch 
designing. The grid was 
surprisingly easy to reproduce. I 
chose the size carefully - 8 pixels 
high by 16 wide. This means that 
each press of the cursor key will 
move the cursor one square. 

That keeps everything nicely 
in sync and makes filling in the 
pattern very easy and quick. I 
saved a copy of the empty grid 
before I did any designing, ready 
for future use. 

Then I needed symbols to 
represent colours. Once I had 
done one for each symbol which 
I made using the MAGNIFY 



option - 1 used COPY to put them 
where I wanted them in the grid. 
Finally I labelled the colour key. To 
correct mistakes, I simply copied 
an empty square over the error. 

Thickening every tenth grid 
line - quite a fiddly job using LINE - 
makes counting squares a lot 
easier when embroidering. I did that 
when everything else was finished. 
It was then back to the Page Editor 
and time to test the results with a 
printout, needle and thread. 

The main drawback with this 
system is the size of the grid. You 
can only see 34 by 24 stitches at 
any one time on the screen. A full 
page window would not be more 
than 50 stitches wide. However 
trying to make the grid smaller 
would leave little room in the 
squares for the colour symbols. 



The grid does not print out as a 
true square either; it is roughly 29 
1/2 squares to 10cm in width but 
26 squares to 1 0cm in depth. 

One last comment; turning 
the subject of cross stitching and 
computers on its head, I have 
found alphabets, borders and 
other designs taken from samplers 
very handy for computer graphics. 
Sue Jones 
Shrewsbury 




Thru' the arch window 



a 



After opening a window 

in Basic using 

CHR$(27)+x+top row + 

left column + height + 
width, I find editing a program 
line inside that window can 
sometimes cause the delete keys 
to duplicate part of the program 
line you are trying to edit. 

A way to prevent this is to 
use the CP/M command 
SETKEYS. Create a small Ascii 
file with a four letter name 
something like clos. This file 
should contain the following line: 
E#8D "PRINT CHR$(27)+CHR$(96) »M" 
The [PASTE] key will now close 
any open windows. 
Brian Smith 
Plymouth 



80 8000 PLUS December 89 




A Complete 

Service in 

Computers & 

Software. 



Miles Better Software 

219/221 Cannock Road, 

Chadsmoor, Cannock 

Staffordshire, WS11 2DD 

Telephone: 

(0543) 466577/8/9 



Word Processing 



Locoscript 2 £24.00 

Locoscript 2 + Locospell 2 £33.00 

Locospell2 £18.70 

Locomail 2 £27.00 

Locofont £17.50 

Locofonl 2 £13.00 

24 Fin Drivers 8256/8512 £21.00 

24 Pin Drivers 9512 £21.00 

Tasword 8000 £17.95 

Tasspell8000 £11.95 

Tasprint £17.95 

New Word 11 £74.95 



Desktop Publishing / Graphics 



AMX Stop Press £36.40 

AMX Slop Press + Mouse £70.00 

AMX Desktop + Mouse £62.00 

Desktop Publisher + Mouse £62.00 

Master Sean £63.00 

Master Scan + Paint £67.00 

Master Paint £15.00 

Digital Research Draw £29.00 

Digital Research Graph £29.00 

Micro Design II £47.95 



Integrated Packages 



Mini Office Professional + £34.95 

Spell Checker + Thesaurus £18.95 

Plan It £15.00 



Databases 



Maslerfile 8000 £30.00 

Datastore II £27.00 

Locofile 8256/8512 £27.00 

Uicofile9512 £27.00 

Al Last Plus £24.95 



Utilities & Program Development 



Turbo Pascal £69.00 

C-Basic Compiler £29.00 

Pascal MT+ £29.00 

Rotate £29.00 

Datafax £32.95 

Easy Labeiicr 8256/8512 £29.00 

Easy Labeller 9512 £29.00 

Hisoft Pascal 80 £32.95 

Hisoft Devpac 80 £32.95 

Hisoft Knifes Plus £16.95 

Super Type £19.95 



Spreadsheets 



Supercalc 2 . 
Cracker II.... 



..£52.00 
..£39.00 



Accounting 



Accounts Plus £102.00 

Popular Accounts £69.00 

Invoicing £48.00 

Payroll £48.00 

Money Manager Plus £27.95 

Personal Tax Planner £18.95 

Stockmarket £29.95 

SBACash £45.00 

Map Integrated Accounts £1 10.00 



Just a selection from our vast range of computer software 
All goods sent within 24 hours. 
All Prices include VAT and Delivery 

Please make cheques, postal orders payable to: 
"Miles Better Software" 

Access/Visa orders please phone for immediate 

dispatch. 

Visitors Welcome. 



DATA - ACCESS 



Printer Ribbon Re-Inking Service 

Have your FABRIC printer ribbon fully re-inked by the experts and save 

£££'s. 

Our guarantee - send your used FABRIC printer ribbon plus payment 

and we will have it in the post and on its way back to you within 48 

hours of arrival on our premises 

Black - Brown - Orange - Blue - Green - Red - Purple 
ribbons all re-inked in original colour 

Trial Offer only £1 .80 per ribbon (send as many as you wish, we will 

even pay postage both ways!) 

Send ribbon(s) plus payment to:- Data - Access (Dept 8+) FREEPOST, 

LLANELLI, DYFED. SA15 1ZZ (no stamp required) 

» Ribbon re-inkers to Educational & Local Authorities« 
(Special prices 1" Industrial - Commercial ribbons) 

(77 Penyfan Road - LLanelli - Dyfed SA15 1JG) 



CP/M DISC SERVICES 



We offer a variety of services for users of the 
PCW, 6128, CPC and most other CP/M machines. 

The Best of the Public Domain 

A range of excellent and tested P.D. software for every purpose. 

Languages, utilities, games, databases, text editors, 

and many, many more. Fully documented. 

Format Translation 

We will copy your files from one CP/M disc format to 
another, or from IBM-PC or BBC formats to CP/M, and back. 

Disc Salvage 

If your valuable data gets lost because of disc problems - 
don't panic. We can probably get all or much of it back. 

For FREE catalogue please send a S.A.E to 

PCW Software Library, 
11, Older Way, Angmering, Sussex BN16 4HQ 




I 



Easy to 
understand! 
Easy to use! 



^▼▼▼1 



DOWN TO EARTH SOLUTIONS FOR YOUR PC BOOK-KEEPING PROBLEMS 

All systems offer full, versatile, high volume, complete book-keeping with Nominal Sales and Purchase Ledgers, statements, payment advices, aged 

balances, up to 500 Nominal ledger analysis codes, multiple coding of prime entries, easy view access, random or sequential, to any ledger account. 

twin bank accounts, all necessary VAT information. Optional formats, with or without narrative 



BOOK-KEEPING AND ACCOUNTS 

• 3 ledger Module system 

• Facility to use up to 3 data discs 

• Unusual postings eg Bank Payment to Sales Ledger as single posting 

• Up to 999 each Sales and Bought Ledger accounts 

• Optional historic mode 

• Trial balance split between capital and revenue permits profit or loss 
assessment at trial balance level 

Version 1 - Book-keeping only £69.00 inc P&P 

Version 2 - with integrated invoicing £80.50 inc P&P 

Version 3 - with invoicing and stocks £92.00 inc P&P 

" The best system for the 9512" Chartered Accountant 
" Easy to understand and operate" Book -keeper 



CLUB ACCOUNTS 

I Similar to Book-keeping and Accounts 



£69.00 

inc P&P 



i Members ledger and journal 

1 Deals quickly and effectively with annual subscriptions 

> Includes Bar Takings control 

" A gem of a system. Three alternative quotes for a system to 

do the job were each over £5000" Financial Advisor 

"Ideal for the job" Golf Club Secretary 



INDEPENDENT INVOICING £29.00 

A very versatile system offering three means of producing inc P&P 

invoices, catalogue based and two freestyle types. Invoice 

summaries and analyses including VAT information. 
Based on A4 paper and 80 columns 



STOCKS/INVOICING £34.50 

The same invoicing system plus stock records for sale goods. inc P&P 
at three levels: simple, simple plus dues in, simple plus dues 
in and out. Employs a register of entries and creates a Stock Ledger plus 
summary and evaluation of stocks on hand. 



GOLF HANDICAP RECORDS AND REVISIONS £29.00 

A complete implementation of the Standard Scratch Score and inc P&P 
Handicapping Scheme (1983) as amended (Male only) Created 

in response to popular demand. Quick, simple and effective. 



DDE ACCOUNTS (DIRECT DOUBLE ENTRY} £69.00 

• Single module system means freedom to post to j nc p&p 
any account from any source 

• Allows narrative in nominal ledger 

• Speeds up and simplifies operation 

"I'd recommend it to anyone" Chartered Accountant 



INDEPENDENT STOCK RECORDS £29.00 

An all-purpose comprehensive system offering an j nc p&p 

immediate view FIFO based Stock Ledger, showing, 
base and selling prices, balances on hand at cost prices. Dues In, 
Dues Out. Re-order level. Re-order signal and calculation, plus 
priced analysis of issues and a complete stock list with valuation at 
cost prices. A sure winner. 



BAR TAKINGS CONTROL 

A Simple means of exercising 

control over takings from a bar or kiosk 



£23.00 

inc P&P 




TELEPHONE HELPLINE DIRECT TO AUTHOR - JUST ASK FOR GEORGE CLOUGH. 

GENUINE AFTER SALES ADVICE LINE AND SERVICE 

MANX TAPES, GAREY VEG, GLEN AULDYN, RAMSEY, ISLE OF MAN. 

TELEPHONE (0624) 813071 






I 



0$ 

GET A DETAILED TIME S*T 
MATERIALS BREAKDOWN FOR 
EVERY JOB ■ AUTOMATICALLY 



A FAST, WELL PROVEN 

PROFESSIONAL SYSTEM 

DESIGNED SPECIALLY 

FOR BUILDERS 

RUNS ON ANY PC 

OR PCW COMPUTER 

SUPER EASY TO USE 

CALL NOW 





0387-88612 



for your FREE 
INFORMATION 
PACK 



ASTROLOGY for beginners 

Teach yourself astrology using your Amstrad 



Buy a Starter Pack comprising a simple program to calculate a 

horoscope, an introductory booklet and 2 self-teaching programs 

(how to interpret the horoscope). 

ONLY £12.50 No previous knowledge required 

For ALL Amstrads (CPC, PCW, PC, PPC) 

Payment by Access /Visa, Cheque, P.O. Please state make of 

computer or send s.a.e. (about 9"x7") for free catalogue giving 

details of our wide range of programs for PROFESSIONAL 

ASTROLOGERS including complete natal interpretations and 

forecasting. 

Also I CHING, GRAPHOLOGY, BIORHYTHMS, etc. 



ASTROCALC 

(Dept 8000) 67 Peascroft Road, Hemel Hempstead, 
Herts HP3 8ER England. Tel: 0442 51809 



3" CF2 DISCS 
FROM £1.70 EACH DELIVERED 

(nothing more to pay)' 



Quantity 


5 


10 


20 


50 


100 


Bulk CF2 3" 


£9.95 


£18.95 


£35.95 


£87.50 


£170.00 


Maxell CF2 3" 


£11.95 


£19.95 


£39.00 


£95.00 


£185.00 


Rigid Plastic Library Cases 


£2.50 


£4.95 


£8.95 


£19.95 


£35.90 



All Discs Guaranteed 

Store and Protect your 3" Discs in Individual Rigid Plastic Cases 

3" Disc Drive Head Cleaning Kit £4.95 



r\ f\ fc I it throw away your used fabric printer ribbons 
l^wIN I - re-ink them for only 95p each/ £1.75 per 2* 



S.A.E. for 
FREE 

Catalogue 



FREE 



Only £3.95 per Disc 
- Price includes a 
New 3" CF2 Disc* 



PUBLIC DOMAIN SOFTWARE, 70 Discs in Library 



G/101 Printmaster: Design & Print greetings 
cards, calendars, signs, letterheads, diary 
pages & stationery. 
B/104 Keith Simons Collection: Over 25 

useful programs, educational, business & 

entertainment. 

GA 102 Games Collection: Well over a 

dozen entertaining games, Battleships, 

Hangman, Flyrace, Mastermind, Solitaire and 

many more. 

L 102 JRT Pascal: Once a commercial 

product but now in the Public Domain. 2 Discs. 



U 110 Disk Edit: Fuliy featured disc sector 
editor & more! 

U/107 PCW - Desktop: Calculator, Memopad, 
Appointment Calendar, Database, Home 
Accounts & Label Printer, all menu driven. 
G/104 Digi-Pics: An excellent selection of 
'Ready Made' pictures for importing into your DTP 
software. State what DTP program you use. 
PLUS: Programming languages, 10 discs of 
utilities, databases, assemblers, graphics, 
basic programs, games, communications & 
tutorials. SAE for catalogue. 



DISC FORMAT TRANSLATION SERVICE 

3" ■ 3 1 /2" - 5 1 /4" CP/M ■ MS-DOS. Only £3.95 per Disc* 



Laser Printing from 25p per page. Complete Desktop Publishing Service 

PCW-World 

Cotswold House, Cradley Heath, Warley, West Midlands B64 7NF 

OCall 0384 66269 anytime 
* For orders under £25 please add £ I . Post & Packing 



*76e @0mfi640& 'Pen 



"The ability of the program to handle even the most complex musical layouts is staggering... 
Unreservedly recommended." (New Computer Express) 

"It's been very well designed. ..an invaluable tool for producing orchestral parts or 
arrangements.. .powerful...very easy to use." (The Guardian) 

(mi 



fegE 



Charlie is ity Darling 

Beethoven arranq**#nl 



i=^£ 




Composit Software (Dept. 11) 

FREEPOST 

10 Leasowe Green, 

Lightmoor 

Telford, Shropshire 

TF4 3BR 



Write for 

details - no 

stamp needed. 



Telephone our 
order hotline: 

0952 595436 



Features include: 

• Up to 99 staves • 

• Up to 20 note chords • 

• 9 octave pitch range • 

• Any number-tup\ets • 

• Seven clefs • 

• Transposition • 



Comprehensive beaming and flagging 
Full control of note and stave spacing. 
Text and standard music symbols 
'Cut and paste' music 
Print the score and the parts 
Clear manual written by a musician 



The Composer's Pen ZLuID 

(Please specify PCW8256/8512 or PCW9512 when ordering) 

Now available! 

The Composer's Pen System 

(PCW8512 incl. Locol plus The Composer's Pen program) 



only £489 

(also available for PCW8256 & PCW9512) 
Prices exclude VAT 

Write or ring for details of our special Christmas offer! 
Cheques payable to Composit Software 



PH 



SOFTWARE 




There are broadly two different types of 
database, and which suits you best depends, 
of course, on what you want it for. 

Firstly there's the simple card index substi- 
tute. For many home users, this will be the kind 
of thing you want - all it does is store your 
address book or stock items so that you can 
easily look them up. 

A more sophisticated option is the pro- 
grammable database. With these, in addition to 
allowing simple card index retrieval there is a 
command language which allows you to anal- 
yse the data on the cards. For example, you 
could automatically add up the money owed to 
you by all your customers from Yorkshire. To 
make best use of this kind of facility, you will 
need to be able to understand a little program- 
ming, although it's not too hard really. 

A bit of jargon now. A database is said to 
consist of records - this is just like a card in a 
conventional card file, with all someone's 
details on it. Each record is composed of fields 
- a field is a single entry on a card, like some- 
one's name, or age, or postcode. 

The thing that makes a database special is 
an index. You might be able to hold your 
address book as a simple list in a word proces- 
sor document, but if it gets large then this 
becomes unwieldy. An index means that the 
database has worked out which order records 
should be in, so it can go straight to the one 
you want without looking at lots of others first. 

The field that you use as your index (e.g. 
someone's surname) is said to be a key field, 
and can be looked up very fast compared to 
"non-key" fields. A good database will allow 
multiple keys, meaning that it can look up data 
just as fast for a variety of types of information. 

Masterfile 8000 

£49.95 • Campbell Systems • 0378 77762/3 

A specially written PCW version of the successful database 
sold on other Amstrad computers. It is fully menu controlled, 
and makes good use of the PCWs special screen and keys. It 
can deal with up to 8 separate data files at once, so can cope 
with relational databases. Screen (but not printed output) can 
be elaborately laid out with boxes, lines etc. 
PLUSES ■ MINUSES 



These pages provide a comprehensive guide to the Amstrad 
PCW software. Published in three monthly parts, this time it's 
the turn of Databases, Educational Software, Communications and 
Programming Languages. We've set out to cover every important 
piece of software we could lay our hands on, 
and to give you enough information to decide whether they are 
suitable for you. 

All software will run on both the 9512 and the 8000 series 
machines, though the former's daisywheel printer cannot print 
graphical output. 

The selection isn't comprehensive, but the software listed here 
represents what we think is the best of that currently available. 

As well as a brief summary of what they do, the main Plus and 
Minus points for each program are listed - 
Pluses have a ▲ by them, Minuses a T . Those we think are 
particularly noteworthy have a corner flash. 
Have fun window shopping! 



Works fast 

Wide range of Layout options 

Handles 'relational' files 

Plenty of good example files 

Can do arithmetic calculations within its records 

Capacity limited by size of M drive - best on an 8512 

Takes a while to learn all the features 



At Last Plus 



£39.95 • Rational Solutions • 0566 81511 

At Last Plus is a full-featured database that Is excellent value 
for money. It does what Cardbox did, with much better report- 
ing facilities, and can sort too. You can do simple totalling of 
columns, but not general arithmetic on fields in a record. A 
good general purpose database. 
PLUSES • MINUSES 

▲ Good screen editing facilities 

A Constants enable insertion of repetitive data 

▲ Good on storage space - ideal for 8256 owners 
A Handles names and addresses well 

▼ No arithmetic calculation in fiels 

▼ Setting up the database is at first confusing 

▼ Good, but not that good 



Cambase II 



£49.95 • Cambrian Software • 0766 831878 

New version of the old favourite PCW database. Most 
important change is the Copy Filespec facility You can set 
up a new database with potentially more entries than 
you've made provision for using the information from the 
original database. You can also change the fields to suit 
another set-up. 
PLUSES • MINUSES 

▲ Quick and efficient to use 

▲ You can set up a database blueprint (Filespec) which you 
can test thoroughly before entering data 

A Includes powerful features like conditionals, loops, field 
validation, and specified layouts 

▲ Simple parts of the program are well 
covered in the manual 

▼ Can't use the memory bad news for 8256 users 

▼ You have to guess how to use the more advanced features 
T Not much room for prompts 

▼ Tendency to crash occasionally in Filespec 



LocoFile 

£29.95 Locomotive 0306 740606 



The indexed pop-up database that runs from within LocoScript 
2 and that goes even further toward turning LocoScript 2 into 
a completely integrated software package. Unlike most 
databases empty records take up almost no space on disc. 
This allows large record cards to be defined even if they won't 
always be used. Records pop up very quickly without having 
to exit from your document. Works best when used in conjunc- 
tion with LocoMail. 
PLUSES • MINUSES 

▲ Very easy to use 

▲ Unusually efficient use of disc space 

▲ Can alter existing index - a very powerful feature indeed 

▲ Automatically upgrades your LocoScript, LocoMail and 
LocoSpell to version 2.2 

▲ Sample databases help you get a better feel for 



the program 

▲ Very flexible when designed the record format 

▲ Carries out searches on partial strings - ideal for when 
dealing with incomplete information 

Chibase 3.0 

£29.95 Chiasma 06333 60996 

The updated version of the 'free format' database. You type 
in the text, mark the words to be indexed and treat the file 
as a database. The updated version allows you to import 
and export ASCII data files and a chain delete option 
enables you to work your way methodically through the 
database deleting the records you don't want while keeping 
those that you do. 
PLUSES • MINUSES 

▲ Good amend, sort and recall features 

▲ You can edit without a word processor 

▲ Searches quickly through data 

▲ Great for storing large amounts of data where the 
subject matter is variable 

▲ Useful record template 

▼ Can't run from M drive 

Delta 

£99.99 • Compsoft • 04868 25925 

Delta is another of the heavyweights, like dBase II and 
Condor, but unlike them is fully menu driven. Although the 
screen layouts are fully flexible, there is a default "quick" 
layout so you don 1 have to sweat at defining your own. It 
could use better record indexing facilities. Particularly good 
for writing applications, once you have ploughed through 
the large manual. 
PLUSES • MINUSES 
A Records can contain up to 90 fields, plus groups of 

fields that may be repeated 
A Screen layout can be user defined, or "quick" mode used 
A Single page letter writer provides detailed mail merge 
A Processes can be defined, and run from user defined 

menus, for ease of use by others 
A Very full, and quite readable, manual 

▼ Only one field may be used for indexing 

▼ Very big program - a PCW8256 would be hard pushed 

▼ Some of the menu operations are unforgiving to errors 



Mini Office Professional 



£39.95 • Database Software • 0625 878888 

The Mini Office database retains its original format. It's a 

pretty standard card index type, similar to First 

Base. Good range of selection operations and arithmetic on 

fields. Can sort over a combination of fields and print out a 

variety of smart layouts, and you can have up to 255 fields. 

No import or export of data. 

PLUSES - MINUSES 

A Easy to use and intuitive 

A Can use the data in the word processor 

A Powerful selection and sort facilities 

A Arithmetic on fields 

A Test print facility lets you check your labels will print okay 

A One command makes global changes 

▼ Can't import or export data 



83 8000 PLUS Decembers 




SOFTWARE 

Pocket InfoStar 

£69.50 • MicroPro DRA • 0386 841181 

Consists of two large programs, DataStar and ReportStar 
(both available independently). DataStar is a conventional 
database, with screen card layout and indexing. ReportStar 
then generates the printed output, either from DataStar or 
CalcStar files. Powerful if you can use them, but the suite is 
horrifically overcomplicated, and the documentation just 
incomprehensible. 
PLUSES < MINUSES 

▲ DataStar is a quite good database with indexing and 
calculated fields. 

▲ "Transaction processing" feature allows cross referencing 
of data files. 

▲ Can be integrated with other Pocket products, 
eg WordStar. 

▲ Can take up to 255 fields per record 

T Two volume manual set is very badly organised. 

▼ There are separate programs to run for form design, data 
entry and reporting. 

▼ Operation is all by obscure command keys, a la WordStar. 

dBase II 

£99.00 • Ashton Tate/First Software • 07357 5244 

The WordStar of database packages. Recently licensed 
"cheaply" for Amstrad machines, dBase II is a market leader 
in business computing. As you would expect, this means It 
is very powerful but very complex. It has a procedure 
language to allow you to write programs to manipulate the 
data, and you can construct index files for really fast access 
to large databases. If you can make the effort to learn it, it'll 
serve you well. 
PLUSES • MINUSES 

A Powerful command language for customised programs 
A Indexing facility makes large databases fast to handle 
A Can handle very big databases 
A The data can be fairly easily altered after its entry 

▼ Manual is daunting (but there are plenty of independent 
books on the market) 

▼ Can't easily alter the screen record layout 

▼ For an expensive package, you still only get 32 fields 
per record 

▼ Generally unfriendly unless you have some 
programming skills 

First Base 

£29.95 • Minerva • 0392 437756 

Billed as a simple database for the first time user, First Base 
is quite a competent cheap card index. The manual is 
computer printed, and weak on diagrams which doesn't help 
things. One weakness is getting printed results out of First 
Base - either you settle for crude lists, or you have to create 
a template in LocoScript which is awkward to do. But overall, 
it's pretty good value for money. 
PLUSES • MINUSES 
A Can alter the index field at any time 
A Simple to use screen editing make data entry easy 
A Good value as a simple card index lookup system 
A Can easily browse through the database picking out a 
set by hand 

▼ Manual is badly laid out and generally difficult 

▼ Producing printed output is awkward 

Sagesoft Retrieve 

£70 •Sagesoft • 091 2131555 

A high-power package that is relatively easy to use with pass- 
word security if desired, calculations, automatic counting or 
deletion of sets of records satisfying given conditions. It also 
has sophisticated sort and select commands, and can change 
the structure of an existing database. All this is done by a set 
of commands rather like a programming language. Printed 
formats are rather limited though and the program insists on 
using both drives, making use on an 8256 impractical. 
PLUSES • MINUSES 
A Easy to use for a powerful package 
A Advanced sorting and selection commands 
A Subsets can be written to files 
A Can count or delete subsets with one command 
A Labelling/mailmerging routines included 
A Can change structure of existing database 
T Impossibly big program for 8256 
T Printed output limited - must use mailmerge 

Script2Base/Text2Base 

£29.95 each Encyclasoft 0270811890 

Two free-form databases to be used with LocoScript and 
Protext respectively. Complete rewrites of FT=DB, the beauty 
of these databases is that you first create all your text on the 
word processor and import it as an ordinary (non-ASCII) text 



file into the database. You then mark all the words you want to 

see indexed as keywords so that you can go on to compile 

indexes and carry out searches. 

PLUSES • MINUSES 

A Very easy to use 

A Allows you to organise your collection of discs like an 

encyclopaedia 
A Can construct new files made up of selected parts of 

existing ones 
A Can send any part of a document to the printer on a 

line-by-line basis 
▼ No text-editing facilities within the databases themselves 
T Dreadful documentation 



Smartcard 

£59.95 • Focus Computers • 0272 420109 

A conventional card index database which is now the nearest 
thing available to Cardbox . Small and fast, you can sort 
the records, index up to three fields and do simple arithmetic 
in fields. Can't put background text (eg. titles) on records 
or printouts. 
PLUSES • MINUSES 
A Good clear screens 
A Plenty of on screen help 
A Fast and high capacity 
A Easy to use 

▼ Can't put background text on printed reports 

▼ No way of exporting data for mailmerge 



Magic Filer 

£69.95 -Sagesoft -091 2131555 



Magic Filer is not a true database, but is a structured filing sys- 
tem. Information is split into a hierarchy of categories, and 
tagged with a keyword which is not stored as part of the data. 
You can browse through the data, but it will get tedious if you 
find it needs updating regularly. Many applications will find 
Magic Filer restrictive. 
PLUSES • MINUSES 
A Good for browsing through data when you don't really know 

what's there 
A Data can be declared "read only" to protect it from alteration 

by other browsers 

▼ The basic filing system is weird but not wonderful 

▼ Editing data once in Magic Filer is awkward 
T The documentation is far too brief 

▼ You can only have one database per disc 

Microfile (Sold in The Micro Collection) 
£49.95 • Saxon Computing • 0401 50697 

Microfile is a well implemented simple database, driven by 
plenty of menus and on-screen prompts. It's fast and has good 
screen control, although it has some size restrictions. Microfile 
comes as part of a software suite, "The Micro Collection", 
which is good value (Microfile, Microwrite, MicroSpread, 
Flexilabel and Lock-It) 
PLUSES • MINUSES 
A The price includes competent word processing, spread 

sheet, labelling and encryption programs 
A Plenty of menus and on screen prompting 
A Very flexible formatting for screen layout and printing 
A Numeric fields can be expressions to be calculated 
A Indexing is fast and can be on several fields 

▼ Maximum number of fields per record is only 20 

T Limited facilities for totalling up fields in a database 



Educational 



Educational Software is designed as an aid to 
traditional teaching, not an alternative. Its main 
use is in re-inforcing traditional learning done 
elsewhere and providing the stimulus of a dif- 
ferent approach. It can also be especially useful 
in rote learning and improving the speed at 
which problems can be solved. 

Iankey Crash Course 

£24.95 • lansyst • 01-607 0187 

A fairly traditional typing tutor, taking you through basic 
keyboard exercises. There's a lot of explanatory text, which 
gets in the way second time around. Definitely competent, 



but a bit boring. 
PLUSES • MINUSES 

A Mostly avoids boring letter drills 

A Very full on-screen information guides you along 

A "Fast" option cuts out some text if it gets repetitive 

▼ Not particularly imaginative use of graphics 

▼ It doesn't always ensure that the cursor is properly aligned 
with the exercise text 

2 Fingers Touch Typing 

£24.95- lansyst- 01-607 0187 

Despite its provocative name, a useful typing tutor in that it 
specifically caters for people who can already get by on key- 
boards with two fingers. You are gradually introduced to touch 
typing, so your speed doesn't drop while you learn. Fills a 
necessary slot in the Typing Tutor market. 
PLUSES • MINUSES 
A Suitable for improving two finger typists without much 

drop in speed 
A Full on screen instructions 
A Exercise material is interesting text, not letter drills 

▼ Explanation text is annoyingly verbose in some lessons 

▼ It doesn't always ensure that the cursor is properly aligned 
with the exercise text 

Giantkiller 

£14.95 • Topologika • 0733 244682 

A mathematics adventure game loosely based on Jack 

and the Beanstalk. Lots of intriguing puzzles which should 

stimulate any student up to GCSE standard. Not the best 

adventure game ever written but great for making 

mathematics fun! 

PLUSES • MINUSES 

A Puzzles plausibly integrated into scenario 

A Progression of game is simple and well defined 

A Puzzles introduce a lot of valid mathematics 

▼ Program understands only very simple commands 

▼ Saving a position takes a move - can be fatal 

▼ Won't be of particular help in exams 

Animal Vegetable Mineral 

World Wise 

£14.95 each • Bourne Educational • 0794 523301 

Aimed at the younger market, 7-15 year olds. Both these pro- 
grams work by learning as the child uses them. Think of an 
object and the computer tries to guess it. If it is wrong, the 
child is asked for a question which would allow the PCWto be 
right next time, and it learns. 
PLUSES • MINUSES 
A Can be used as many times as the child's imagination 

holds out 
A Performance can be analysed by a teacher after a session 
A As you build up a base of objects and questions, they can 

be saved for reuse 
T It needs a lot of typing, hence a lot of supervision 
T The PCW starts with only two objects known , so it takes 

time to get going 

▼ Documentation has hardly been altered from cassette 
based versions 

T Since it is for young children, more imaginative use of the 
screen would be nice 

Better Spelling 

£16.95 • School Software Ltd • 010 353 61 45399 

This is a spelling course aimed at the 8 to adult age group. 

It consists of a series of well organised, short lessons 

each dealing with one topic, like plurals or which version 

of there/their/they're to use in a sentence. The use of 

the PCW screen is rather unimaginative, and doesn't hold 

your attention. 

PLUSES • MINUSES 

A Well thought out lessons to emphasise particular points 

A Teaches words in a sentence context as well as in isolation 

A Lessons can be picked in any order from a menu 

A Seems to be proof against mischievous key pressing 

▼ Boring use of the screen doesn't grab interest 

▼ No instructions come as to how to use the program. 

Chemistry • Biology 

£22.95 each • School Software • 0T0 353 61 45399 

These two are fairly traditional question-and-answer tests. 
You are faced with a choice of 10 topics, and then asked 
10 or so questions each, where you have to fill in the blank 
in a statement. There are preamble notes beforehand, and 
if you get it wrong you are given a clue. Aimed at 12-16 
year olds. 
PLUSES • MINUSES 



84 8000 PLUS December 89 




FACTOTUM 



The Servant who runs his Master's affairs 



TURN YOUR PCW 8512 INTO 
YOUR MAN FRIDAY 



■ ELECTRONIC DIARY - including appointments, birthday and anniversary 
reminders. Plus Filofax printout. 

■ ELECTRONIC ADDRESS LIST - Automatically addressed letters, labels. Christmas 
cards, circulars, and telephone directory. 

■ ELECTRONIC BUDGET CONTROL - Monthly expenditure, income tax forecasts, 
capital goods lists. 

If you own LocoScript 2. LocoFile and LocoMail, FACTOTUM , the tried and tested 
collection of specially written programmes, will enable you to get the best from your 
PCW8512. 

Why spend frustrating hours trying to write programmes like this? Avoid all those 
Error messages, the bafflement and the frustration. 

Please make your cheque payable to Tudor Systems. £14.95 includes VAT, packaging 
and first class postage. Delivery within 28 days. 

TUDOR SYSTEMS, TUDOR COTTAGE, STONEACRE LANE, OTHAM, 
KENT. ME15 8RT. Tel: 0622 861775 



GOOD DTP STARTS HERE 



MD CLEARTEXT - sixteen "256k" MICRODESIGN fonts, 
fully compatible with the dedicated PCW matrix printer. "An 
excellent supplement to those supplied with MicroDesign" 
(Creative Technology). £1 3.50 in CF2 or CF2DD format. 

LATE EXTRA - software to transform the quality of STOP 
PRESS text output. "There is now no excuse for not presenting 
your publications in a much more attractive and readable way" 
(8000 PLUS). £19.50 in CF2 or CF2DD format. 

DESIGNER STUBBLE - the key to high-quality publishing 
with the DESKTOP PUBLISHER program. "Highly recommended" 
(Amstrad PCW Magazine). Two issues available - please send 
SAE for details. 



EXEMPLAR DESIGN, P.O. BOX 683, BATH BA1 1XU 

Proprietor: J. B. Evans. 20 Grosvenor Place. Bath BA1 6AX 




'MM3' cut-sheet tOCATOR & ALIGNER for PCW 8000 Printers 

Architect designed. British made. Quality throughout! 

Load cut-sheets spot-on, fast! Save time, paper, money! No guesswork 

or skewing. Use letterheads, forms etc. < 100gms. Multi-pass print! Fix 

arms anywhere. Four pitch scales. Easy to fit, adjust, use. 



"MM3 is so simple. ..so effective. Beautifully 
designed and well worth the money." 
'Micronet' August 88 

"MM3 revolutionised teaching word processing, 
improved GCSE results in keyboard applica- 
tions." 

Mrs. M.R. (Tewkesbury) September '88 
"I would like to order MM3 as I'm sick of friends 
who've got one and gloat at my wasted paper!" 
Mr. P.F. (Birmingham) August '88 



SIMPLY - THE BEST! 



o 

£12.50 



incl. VAT&p+p 



MARGIN MAKER" 



Or send addressed sticky LABEL + REMITTANCE made out to:- 

"MARGIN MAKER" 

Dept.8 Box 121 Gresham Rd., Staines, Mx.TW18 2AJ. UK. a (0784)452677 

Reg. Design. No. 1043347 



NEW IMPROVED DESIGN WITH NEW CONFIGURATION OPTIONS, AVAILABLE FOR THE 
PCW 8256, PCW8512 & PCW 9512. FULLY COMPATIBLE WITH LOCOSCRIPT 1 & 2 



Supplied with :- NEW HARD DISK CP/M & LOCOSCRIPT, BACKUP SOFTWARE (TO FLOPPY DISK A: or B:), PARK UTILITY 
TO ALLOW EXTRA PROTECTION WHEN WEB IS IN TRANSIT, USER MANUAL, FORMAT & PARTITION SOFTWARE 



The software for the 1.2 series WEB has been 
completely rewritten in consultation with Lo- 
comotive Software and therefore has no re- 
strictions with regard to CP/M and 
LocoScript. The software provided allows 
you to partition the WEB in any of the follow- 
ing ways. 

1) 1 drive of 20 megabytes as drive C: 

2) 2 drives of 10 megabytes as drives C: & D: 

3) 1 drive of 15 & 1 drive of 5 as drive C: & D: 

4) 1 drive of 10 & 2 drives of 5 as C:, D:, & E: 

5) 4 drives of 5 megabytes each as C:,D:,E:, & F: 

LIFE AFTER THE PCW 

As we use industry Standard parts you will 
still be able to use your WEB if you chan 
computer in the future to a PC or compatib 



PCW9512 





Track-to-track: 
Average: 
Maximum: 
Start up time: 



60 West Street, Fareham, 

Hampshire, P016 OJN 

Tel: 0329 239953 / 236727 

Fax: 0329 237 051 



Drive Capacity 20.05 Megabytes 
Access time including Settling time 



16msec 

75 msec 

120 msec 

8 sec typ; 15 max 




SOFTWARE 



▲ Questions would challenge a GCSE pupil well 

▲ Preamble notes introduce topics 

▼ The fill in the blank questioning style has little flexibility for 
different answers 

▼ No option to add questions for a specialised syllabus 

▼ Some careless errors, like incorrect facts and hard to 
decipher chemical formulae 

Micro Maths 

£24.95 • LCL • 0491 579345 

Supposedly covering 8 to adult ages, this seems an O-ievei 
type program, covering topics from calculus to tables. A good 
implementation on the PCW with proper use of the screen. 
Questions are picked at random from a pool, so may repeat 
but never run out. Replies to questions are typed in mathemat- 
ical notation, like XT2+3 
PLUSES • MINUSES 

A You can pause to use BASIC as a calculator while 
you think 

▲ 'Unlimited' question set 

▲ Comes with a 'free' book of AEB O level questions 

▲ Good hints and explanations 

▼ Questions in a topic repeat occasionally 

▼ Some frills, like the clock and beeper, are annoying 

▼ No flexibility to add questions for a particular syllabus 

Amstat 1,2,3,4,6 and 7 

£28 ■ £40 « SC Coleman Ltd • 0530 415919 

A suite of six statistical routines including a business 

analysis program, forecasting and resource management. 

Individual prices range from £27.95 to £39.95. Very 

sophisticated, and perhaps because of that, a little awkward 

for beginners. 

PLUSES - MINUSES 

A Good range of statistical functions 

A Good manual 

A Can produce good quality graphical results 

▼ Some editing procedures very long winded 

▼ Needs some expertise to use properly 

▼ Weak on checking that input data is reasonable. 

Yes Chancellor! 

£14.95 • Topologika * 0733 244682 

Wait! Don't skip over Yes Chancellor! because it calls itself 

an 'economic simulation' program. Instructive and fun to 

use, you type in your annual budgets (tax rates, public 

spending etc.) and see your popularity plunge and the 

economy crash. Great for economics classes, also an 

amusing game in itself. 

PLUSES • MINUSES 

A Simple but effective model of the economy 

A Comes with booklet explaining economic principles 

A Great for teaching economic and political pragmatism! 

▼ Can get boring as a game 

▼ You can't adjust the model of the economy, so it can be 
too simple 



t ti • r\ ' 

Ultimate Quiz 

£14.95 David Greenhough Computing 0274 640764 

An educational aid for school age children. Two quizzes on a 

multiple choice format are available on the one disc. The first 

one is a general knowledge quiz, the second is based on the 

Highway Code. You can play against a timer and can set the 

level of difficulty. 

PLUSES • MINUSES 

A Optional noughts and crosses game included with 

either quizz 
A Incorporates an editing file for easy updating of questions 
A It's very versatile up to 8 people can play 
A Provides hours of general knowledge fun 
A None of the questions are repeated 
▼ Some of the questions are a little esoteric 

Supermaths 

£16.95 Abacus Software 0689 36293 

Specifically designed for the PCW, this program exercises 
basic numeracy skills in children. Questions are asked in quick 
fire volleys of ten and cover all four operations (addition, sub- 
traction, multiplication and so on). Scores are automatically 
recorded. 

PLUSES - MINUSES 
A Special original Test and Worksheet modes included the 

latter is ideal for teachers 
A Very efficient scoring method 
A Numeracy level is very basic 
A New version has enhanced screen displays 
T Some of the questions may start to look familiar after a while 



Language Tutors 

£19.95 each Kosmos Software 052553942/5406 

Four programs with identical formats to help you learn French, 
Italian, Spanish and German. They can be used just as effec- 
tively by students of those languages learning English too. 
Very versatile series of programs and useful adjuncts to con- 
ventional language learning. 
PLUSES • MINUSES 

A Can edit the lessons yourself to include new words 
A Useful self test option 
A Completely bi lingual packages 
▼ Purely for vocabulary learning no grammar lessons 
T Would have been more useful if they had also included 
audio cassettes 



Maths Mania 



£16.95 School Software Ltd 010 353 61 45399 

For children between the ages of 8 and 12, this program offers 

5 levels of difficulty in multiplication and 2 in division. A very 

good program for exercising basic numeracy skills and for 

practising some mental arithmetic. 

PLUSES • MINUSES 

A Program provides a chirpy feedback on the score of the user 

A Large attractive numbers appear on the screen 

▼ Surprisingly enough, no addition or subtraction exercises 
are provided 

▼ Screens could be made more visually exciting for the 
younger users 



Better Maths 



£16.95 School Software Ltd 010 353 61 45399 

A continuation of Maths Mania for the next age group 12 to 16 
year olds. Topics are very varied and cover among others, 
statistics, simple interest and algebra. Each topic consists of a 
series of ten multiple choice questions. At the end of each set, 
the percentage scored is shown. 
PLUSES • MINUSES 
A Realistic level of difficulty practised 
▲ Program makes a first class revision aid 




Communications is one of the glittering areas 
of computing, gurus would have you believe. 
It can provide a fascinating hobby for 
'hackers', but more importantly it is a 
valuable business tool. 

'Electronic mail' is just what it says: you 
use your PCW to send messages, which can 
be documents thousands of words long, to oth- 
ers on the electronic mail system. The best 
known system of this kind is Telecom Gold, 
which also allows you to send telexes. Another 
major system is Prestel, which is more of an 
information provider - you can read share 
prices, weather information and other news 
direct from your phone line. 

For any professional service, you pay a reg- 
istration fee, plus a connection charge - typi- 
cally around 10p per minute you use the sys- 
tem. Of course, your phone bills are extra. For 
• hobbyists there are also 'Bulletin boards', 
which are effectively a kind of private electronic 
mail system run by a system operator (a 
'sysop' to those in the know). 

To use any service, you will need to buy a 
modem and an interface. A modem allows 
you to send computer signals down a phone 
line, and the interface gets the signals from 
your PCW to your modem. The pair will set 
you back £200 or more. Once done, you 
need some software to allow you to send 
and receive data, and it is this software 
reviewed below. 

Electronic mail services just send strings of 
characters to and fro, whereas Prestel is a 
'Viewdata' system, meaning it sends pictures 



and graphics too. Software needs to do 
more to receive Viewdata graphics, so if 
you want to use Prestel make sure your 
software is up to it. 

8256UKM7.COM 

Public domain (ie. free!) 

P.D. software documentation is often poor but this program 
has an above average document file. UKM7 was written 
to support ASCII file transfers using error correction and 
as a dumb terminal either for use over the phone or 
between two Amstrads. Between two PCW's file transfer 
is possible at a staggering 31,250 baud which is even faster 
than PIP! Easy to use for beginners and better than 
KERMIT, UKM7 provides a cheap and excellent way to 
communications after you've got fed up with the PCW's 
MAIL232. 8256UKM7 is available from the Public Domain 
Special Interest Group, or most bulletin boards supporting 
the PCW machines. 
PLUSES • MINUSES 
A Cheap! {the price of a phone call) 
A Easy to use, and helpful menus 

▼ Modem7 version of Xmodem error checking supported 

▼ Single file and Batch Mode transfers 

▼ "Quiet" mode for slightly faster transfers (on-line transfer 
progress report disabled) 

▼ Only ASCII, no Viewdata 

T You need to find a PD software source (eg. use a modem 
and MAIL232 software) 

Mini Office Professional 
Plus 

£39.95 • Database Software • 0625 878888 

Thecomms package is as comprehensive as anything 

else on the market. It can display both ordinary 

text screens and the 'Viewdata' block graphics used by 

Prestel. You are offered baud rates from 75 to 9600, 

separately set for transmit and receive, straight terminal 

emulation for use with Telecom Gold, and XMODEM and 

KERMIT file transfer protocols for error-proof transfer of I 

ong files. Would be well worth the money just by itself - 

and of course you're getting four other very good 

programs as well. 

PLUSES • MINUSES 

A Very comprehensive - a genuinely useful comms package 

A Ordinary text and 'Viewdata' block graphics 

A Can save setups under names and recall them, so you 

only need work out your baud rates/parities once 
A You can set keys to return strings, such as Telecom Gold 

passwords 
A Comes preconfigured to use Prestel and Telecom Gold 

Chitchat E-Mail/ 
Viewdata/Combo 

Sagesoft • £69.99/£69.99/£99.99 • 091 284 7077 

Two communications programs for the 8000 series machines 
that have been around for a good time now. Most of the fea- 
tures you will need are here: message text editor, prepro- 
gramming unattended tasks( if you use a suitable "intelligent" 
modem), directory of stored numbers, copy to printer, and a 
very useful connect time clock so you can watch your phone 
bill climb! E-mail is used for simple text phone links like 
Telecom Gold, whereas you'll need Viewdata if you want to 
use Prestel. The Combo pack contains both Email and 
Viewdata. 

PLUSES • MINUSES 
A Good, clear documentation 
A Easy for first timers to use 

A Built in text editor for pre-sending message preparation 
A Pre-definable tasks executable at any preset time if 

unattended. 
T No error corrected file transfer (i.e. Xmodem or CRC) 

Dialup 

£89.99 • PBS Communications • 021-643 7688 

Offers both E-mail and Viewdata operations. Very easy to 
use, and offers an XMODEM transfer protocol unlike Sage 
Chitchat. If you are buying a modem too there are some 
cut-price bundled deals to be had, eg. the Miracle Technology 
WS4000 modem. 
PLUSES • MINUSES 

▲ Simple to use 

▲ Comprehensive file transfer commands, including 
XMODEM and the increasingly popular KERMIT 

▲ Runs from the M drive 

T Manual is not PCW specific, and the references to 
5.25" discs are tedious 



86 8000 PLUS December 89 



SOFTWARE 



COMM+ 



£86.25 • NewStar • 0277 220573 

This single package combines both ASCII and full Viewdata 
block graphics and Telesoftware downloading. A very power- 
ful command language allows you to look for particular mes- 
sages coming in and take actions, even while doing other 
things. Its use is only limited by your programming ability. 
PLUSES ■ MINUSES 

▲ Very comprehensive and well indexed ringbound manual 

▲ High quality Viewdata graphics 

A Well presented on-line help menus for use by beginners 

A Autodialler program works with most modems 

A Telesoftware downloading facility, with CRC/Xmodem 

checking 
A Very powerful command language, doesn't need much 

programming skill to learn 
▼ Not recommended for absolute beginners to 

communications 



Programming 

Programming languages come as either 
'compilers' or 'interpreters' - compilers pre 
process the program into machine code, so 
are much faster. The PCW's standard Mallard 
BASIC and LOGO are both interpreters. 
Compilers are generally more cumbersome 
to use than interpreters, but have various 
benefits for serious programmers. 

With language compilers in particular it is 
difficult to discover whether they are reliable 
and efficient without spending many weeks 
working with them, impossible for a brief 
review. If you use a specialised programming 
language and have any comments that would 
help us compile a good software file entry for it, 
we would be pleased to hear from you. 



HiSoft C 

£39,95 • HiSoft • 0525 718181 

A very good C compiler, fast, produces good compact code. It 

comes complete with the HiSoft integrated text editor ED80. 

PLUSES ■ MINUSES 

A Compiles program into ordinary CPM .COM file 

A Produces compact code 

A Fast and inexpensive 

A Comes with integrated text editor 

▼ No floating point arithmetic 

ArnorC 

£49,95 • Arnor • 0733 68909 

Good compiler with floating point arithmetic, but not as fast or 

as cheap as HiSoft C. 

PLUSES • MINUSES 

A Excellent integrated text editor 

A Floating point arithmetic 

▼ Cumbersome to produce .COM files, needs special run 
time support program 

▼ HiSoft C is faster and cheaper 

MIXC 

£29.95 'Advantage >0242 224340 

American C compiler. You can buy a full screen editor with it 
for £19.95 extra. Also machine code assembler & examples 
for £8.95 each. 
PLUSES -MINUSES 

A Features an excellent C tutorial 

A Comprehensive implementation and massive manual 

T Not for the newcomer to programming 

Pascal 80 

£39.95 •Hisoft- 0525 718181 

A standard full Pascal compiler that produces compact code, 
Comes with the ED80 text editor and a stand alone program- 
mers editor. 



PLUSES • MINUSES 

A Well integrated text editor - when you hit a compilation 

error you are returned to the correct point to edit it 
A Short compilation time, economical on memory 
T Manual makes no attempt to teach you Pascal 

Hisoft Forth 

£19.95 • Hisoft • 0525 718181 

Forth is an unusual language, somewhere between 
assembler and C. This is one of the few compilers 
available for the PCW. 
PLUSES • MINUSES 

A Comes with a Forth editor 

A Quick and efficient implementation 

▼ Manual doesn't teach you Forth 

The Vicar 

£49 « lansyst • 01-607 5844 

A programming tool for serious programmers. If you have a 

several-hundred line program held in several files on a disc, 

you can lose track of which variables are used where. The 

VICAR produces a concordance listing and other diagnostics, 

to help you find bugs and maintain the program. 

PLUSES • MINUSES 

A Easy to use but still flexible through use of options 

A Amstrad versions all at a special low price 

A Good manual 

▼ Only of value on large programs 

▼ Limited value to most PCW users {except BASIC buffs) 

Modula 2 

£45.00 -Hisoft '0525 718181 

A compiler. Modula-2 is the successor to Pascal, good for 
large programs requiring separate compilation, complete with 
text editor. 
PLUSES • MINUSES 

A Full implementation with extensions. 

A Includes libraries of predefined modules 

A WordStar type screen editor included 

T Compilation process is longwinded and not for beginners 

CBASIC 

£45.00 • Digital Research -0635 35304 

The original Basic compiler from Digital Research, and still 
one of the best for anyone wanting to produce COM files with- 
out abandoning their investment in Basic. 
PLUSES ■ MINUSES 

A Easier programming tool than conventional interpreter 
A Very similar to Mallard Basic, so easy to learn 

▼ No text editor - you need to buy a programmers editor 
such as ED80, or the public domain VD025 

▼ Programs don't necessarily work faster than they would in 
conventional Basic, sometimes slower 



All You Ever 



£24.95 CP Software 0993823463 

Program is ridiculously entitled All You Ever Wanted To Know 



About Graphics, the Universe and Everything on the PCW 
8256/8512 but were Afraid to Ask. It's for the experienced 
programmer who needs fast, smoothly flowing and profession- 
al looking graphics output. It has a library of machine code 
routines which you can use in any language from Mallard 
Basic to machine code. 
PLUSES • MINUSES 

A You can produce professional standard graphics 
A Demo programs included on the disc 
A Routines are very wide ranging 
A Excellent value for money 

A New routines of latest version concerned with printer 
control 

▼ Not recommended for beginners 
T Cumbersome to use from Basic 

Pascal/MT 

£45 Digital Research 063553499 

A full implementation of ISO standard DPS/7185 Pascal with a 

number of extremely powerful additions. Is very good for 

large complex applications both data processing and 

system control. 

PLUSES • MINUSES 

A A very powerful tool for the serious software writer 

A Unlimited program size with modular development and use 

of overlays 
A Built in assembler 

A Improved string handling (over standard Pascal) 
A Choice of BCD real numbers for commercial/financial use 

▼ No built in text editor 

T Compiler in general and the manual in particular are not for 
beginners 

▼ No graphics 

DevPac 80 MKII 

£49.95 Hisoft 0525718181 

Version 2 of the PCW hacker's first choice of development 
system. Substantially upgraded from the original with a new 
quite powerful debugger, and a Mini Officetstyle main 
menu from which to run the individual utilities or your own 
finished programs. 
PLUSES • MINUSES 

A Powerful assembler producing REL or COM files 
A Good hex facility for Basic programmers 

▼ Text editor antiquated and clumsy 
T Weak monitor 



Maxam II 

£49.95 (£69.95 incl. C) Arnor 0733 68909 

CP/M machine code development system incorporating an 
editor, assembler and monitor. It will allow you to disassemble 
any of the memory banks including extra memory on M drive. 
PLUSES • MINUSES 
A Very versatile assembly language programming 

environment 
A Flexible monitor capable of bank switchng, conditional 

breakpoints and symbolic debugging 
A Tailored to meet all CP/M Plus programming requirements 
A Program can't cope with some undocumented Z80 

instructions 
A Program assumes basic familiarity with the Z80 assembly 

language 



NEXT MONTH 



The guide continues with the categories of SPEADSHEETS, GRAPHICS and 
GAMES. The month after that will cover WORD PROCESSORS, ACCOUNTS/ 
PAYROLL, UTILITY and DTP software, and the month after that it's back to 
this months topics. 

Our intention is to keep publishing the three parts of the guide in rotation, 
updating it each month to include all new products. If you would like to see other 
sections of the guide, back issues of 8000 Plus are available at #1.75 each. 
Meanwhile, if you are aware of any significant omissions or errors in the File as 
published, please let us know. We intend to maintain it as THE authoritative 
guide to PCW software. 



87 8000 PLUS Decembers 



8000 PLUS SMALL ADS! 



I 



VENTURES, QUIZ & HILO. 

Over 200K of Interactive Entertainment 

Software for the PCW 8256/8512. Only 

£12.50. Please write for Demo Disk 



MIDDLESEX GROUP (near M25!) 

meets first Tuesday (machine handling), 



8512 FOR SALE 

] Excellent condition complete with covers ] 



] and third Monday (program using), month- j ] and original packing, RS232 Interface and ■ 



i Entertainment Software, 2 Councillors Walk 
Elgin, Moray, Scotland. IV30 3JL. 



ly meetings £1 . Membership £2! All Ages; 



i i 
i i 

i Fun Atmosphere! S.A.E Enquiries:- K. Ritchie, i 

5 Rib Vale, Hertford SG 1 4 3LE. ! 



.j i— 



DISKS DAMAGED? DATA LOST? 

Simply call Dave Smith of DAVE'S DISK 
DOCTOR SERVICE Ltd on 089283 5974. 

No fix, no fee. 
All profits go to charity. 



WORDPROCESSING SERVICE 

Margaret Nickolls, 

8 Fisherton Island, Salisbury, 

Wilts SP2 7TG 

Tel: 0722 25802 



-J L. 



Lightpen, Lots of discs and software. 
Upgrade to 1512 explains sale. 
Tel 0793 783320 Evenings. £450. 



HI-TEC EC2400 

plus Modem, Quad Speed, Hayes, Battery 

Backup, MNP5, £299.00 Inc. 
Hi-Tec Modems Limited Tel: 0733 897333. 



DATA TRANSFERS:- PCW-BBC-IBM. 

Details (sae): MAPEJ (8), 

32 Carew Road, 

Mitcham CR4 2JH 

(01-640 7676). 



COTSWOLD WORD PROCESSING 

Training and Consultancy 

PCWs: Locoscript Locomail Locofile PCs: 

Word Perfect, Wordstar 5 etc. 

On your machines or ours 

(0453) 750096 



, : 

I I 

DATADIARY: A4/Filofax versions/ Pocket 
i Datadate: Birthday gazette (Locoscript 2). i 



i i 

i 
i 
i 
i 
i 
i 
i 



TELECOST 

Displays changing telephone call cost 

whilst phoning. Many other features. S.A.E. 

for details. £6.95 for disc with TELECOST 

BASIC 8256/8512 program. 

J.C. Brown, 

20 Hillside Drive Macclesfield SK10 2PL. 



Also Locoscript tuition available (SAE for j i 



i 

i 

] details): A4 Ideas, The Old Forge, 66 Curzon | 
Street, CALNE, Wilts, SN1 1 0DL 



DATA RECOVERY / DISK 
REPAIRS. 

Sameday Service, 
99% Success. 
0274-492381 



i i 



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ASD 10MEG WEB £200 
OMNI Reader £100 Locofont. £10 LISP £20 
Retrieve £25 Cambase £25 Mass £15 Knife 
£20 lankey £10 Rotate £10 Supertype £10 

Loco 2. £20 Originals. 
0206 768970 



EARN MONEY 

with your DTP. SAE for details 

DDTP. 47 Northill Close, Brixham 

South Devon. 



EASY DISK DATA RECOVERY 

For the Novice 8256 user using "Sector 

Saviour". Only £14.95 

from Alba Ancestral Research, 

21 Lansdowne Crescent, 

Edinburgh, EH12 5EH. 

DISC ERRORS! 

Lost Data? For recovery send corrupted 
disc, blank disc and £17.50 to:- D.Garvin 
23 Fieldway Liverpool L15 7LU 
051 - 722-8653 



SMALL ADS RATES 

Private ads cost £7.50 for up to 30 words. (This 
rate only applies to readers wishing to sell their 
own hardware or original software or to pass on 
a message to other 8000 Plus readers) 
All other ads are now classified as Trade 



Advertisements and are charged at £1 per word. 
(Max 30 words). 

8000 Plus reserves the right to refuse any ad 
which is deemed to be a Trade Advertisement 
but which has been paid for as a Private Ad. 

To place an ad just fill in this application 
form and send it to us with the correct payment. 



We will then place the ad in the next available 
issue (published 2-7 weeks after we receive your 
order). 

If you wish your address or telephone number 
to be featured in your advert it must be includ- 
ed in the grid below (one word per space). 



Order form Send to: 8000 Plus Small Ads, Future Publishing, 4 Queen Street, Bath BA1 1EJ 



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Please place the following advertisement in the next available issue of 8000 Plus 

My advertisement is a Private/Trade* Advertisement and 

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Please make cheques and POs payable to Future Publishing Ltd 



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1.8000 Plus disc labels 

Spare labels for your 3" discs in four different 
colours - yellow, green, red, blue. 

2. Copi-Reader 

This neat and easy copy holder features a unique 
new clip. It can be positioned on either side of the 
monitor, and may be swivelled into position for best 
viewing angle, and then to the side when not in use. 

3. Highlighter Pens 

For £1 .50 you get green, red and yellow 8000 
Plus-stamped pens in a clear plastic wallet. 

4. 8000 plus dust covers 

Protect your PCW with these specially- 
commissioned three-piece 8000 Plus covers. 

5. 8000 Plus T-Shirt 

The Truly Terrific American Royal Blue T-shirt with the honour 

of carrying our 8000 Plus logo on the left breast. Wear yours 

with pride and set yourself above the rest! 

6. Magazine Binders 

A superb gold-embossed green binder. Buy one 
and watch your collection grow into the definitive 
library of PCW information. 

7. PCW Luggage 

An essential addition for any PCW owners 
who want to ensure against accidental knocks when 
transporting their computer. Ideal for writers on 
assignment, businessmen when taking the micro to 
the office, or salesmen for demonstrations. 
High density foam padding and a water resistant nylon 
exterior make this a strong and safe piece of luggage, along 
with its adjustable shoulder strap and 
sturdy carry handles. 

8256/8512 

Two separated pouches for the printer and 
keyboard, that then fit neatly into the large case 
but leave room for manuals, etc. 

9512 

Two large cases for the monitor and printer, with a 
separated pouch for the keyboard that fits in neatly with the 
printer but leaves room for manuals, etc. 



Order code Price 













1 




\arfLB 
111 vMMwV^HtHl 


>* 




















4 


^ 





Disc labels (pack of 20) 

Copi-Reader 

Highlighter pens (x3) 

Dust covers - 

3 pieceset for 8256/851 2 

3 piece set for 951 2 

T-Shirt - 

Medium 

Large 

Magazine Binder 

Two Magazine Binders 

PCW Luggage - 

8256/8512 

9512 



• PRICES INC CARRIAGE & VAT t HOTLINE 0458 74011 • 



t MAIL ORDER • MAIL ORDER t MAIL ORDER t 



A Future book 




The Ultimate Tips B(x>k for the Amstrad PCW 




ROB AINSLEY 

The Most Comprehensive Compilation of Amstrad PCW 
Hints, Tips. Shortcuts and Useful Programs Ever Published 



The book is based on the collected tipoffs in 8000 Plus 
from issue 1 to the present day and covers every 
possible facet of PCW use. But it's not just a reprint — 
every item has been rewritten, re-illustrated and updated 
where necessary. Plus a whole host of new tips have 
been added to make this book the essential guide to 
PCW use. 

Each tip has been written to stand alone — easily 
followed by even the absolute beginner without having 
to read other sections first. No 'refer to the manual' or 
'see the tip on page 1 92' here — we tell you exactly what 
to do, which keys to press, and what happens on screen. 

We feel sure that you will quickly come to rely on this 
unique reference source as the new PCW owners' bible. 
The information it contains is truly invaluable. 



Tips Book 
Book only 
Book and disc 



Order code Price 



8602 £11.40 

8603 £14.40 



HACKERS HANDBOOK 



from Century Hutchinson 

Everything about challenging 
mega-computers and networks. 
This brilliant book by Hugo 
Cornwall has been updated by 
the infamous Steve Gold 
(Prince Philip/Prestel hack). 
This new edition covers viruses, 
hacking, electronic mail and 
looks at the new and extensive 
tools available. 
A must for every computer buff. 




Order code 



Hackers Handbook 



DAATAFAX 



from Kempston Data Products (All PCWs') 

Use your PCW to organise your life with this complete personal 
organiser package. 

# Diary Print your diary with four days to a page for anything from one 
week to a year. Then cut and paste to other parts of the diary. 

• PhonGbOOk The phonebook allows you to store names, 
addresses and telephone numbers either as full entries or in 
abbreviated format. Complete with fast search facility. 

• Notepad Use this indispensable facility to print notes for 
timetables, expense sheets, bank balances, etc. 

# Calendar Featuring a perpetual calendar, this option prints three 
months per page for any selected year. 




Order code Price 



Daatafax - 

Giftpack (inc. binder, tabs and stationary) 

Software only 



BRIDGE PLAYER GALACTICA 2150 



from CP Software 

A must for every PCW owner's Christmas stocking. 
A brilliant game requiring skill and 
concentration, written by a world champion 
bridge player the programme includes:- 

• post mortem facility 

• cheat "options" to peep at your 
opponents hands. 

• fully integrated tutor. 



Order code Price 



mm 



Bridge Player 8606 




SCAPEGHOSTfo 

from Level 9 ^£^5] 



It's not easy being a ghost; betrayed to a 
criminal gang and falsely blamed for your 
own death when they escape. 
Reincarnated in your old haunts, you have 
just three nights to clear your 
name. A unique adventure game. 



Order code Price 



Scapeghost 8607 




• PRICES INC CARRIAGE & VAT t HOTLINE 0458 74011 (• 



t MAIL ORDER t MAIL ORDER t MAIL ORDER t 



MICRO DESIGN 2 from Creative Technology (All PCWs') 
The latest and best DTP package. 

The print quality is unbelievably good for the PCW 

printer. Get into desktop publishing and buy the best 

mouse around at the same time. 

• Four times higher graphics resolution than Stop Press 

t Three possible page formats 

Full review issue 36 



Micro Design - 
Software only 
Sofware and AMX Mouse 



Order code Price 



8508 £44.95 

8509 £89.00 




TOUCH N GO 

from Paperback Software 
(All PCWS) 

Teach yourself touch typing. 
The course develops your skills 
and aims to produce 95% 
accuracy at 45 words per minute. 



HISOF I C from HiSoft (All PCWs') 

The fastest C compiler for the PCW. Produces fast, good, compact code. 

Carefully designed to make it easy for a newcomer to learn as well as 
providing the power and flexibility that professional programmers need 

• Full screen editor automatically started on compilation errors. 

• Friendly English error messages and hints on how to find bugs. 



Order code 




HiSoft C 

— — — 

Fast. Standard 



r 




WBb 



TOUCH N GO 
TOUCH N GO 



n 




Order code Price 



Touch n go 8605 



MASTER PACK 

from Database Software (8256/8512) 
Consisting of Master Paint and Master Scan 

Master Scan: attach the 
optical scanner to your PCW 
printer to enable images to be 
captured for use in art 
packages and DTP. Capture 
logos, diagrams, sketches, 
photos, maps, signatures, 
cartoon characters and much 
more. Your letters, reports 
and bulletins can now be 
illustrated to create a much 
more interesting and 
professional image. 
Master Paint: with this 
package you have everything 
you need to produce quality, 
artistic, professional artwork. 
Create various shapes that 
can be filled with a choice of 
16 different patterns, choose 
from a range of styles and 
fonts, use the airbrush for a 
more subtle shading facility. 




aster 



i 




Order code 



Master pack 



ORDER FORM N0.39 



HOW TO ORDER 

Just list the items you require in 
the order form below or ring our 
24 - hour hotline on (0458) 
74011 and ask for Credit Card 
Orders. All goods are sent by 
first class post, normally within 
five days of order. But please 
allow 28 days in case of 
temporary shortage. 

New subscribers please note: 
The first issue of a new 
subscription will be one or two 
issues away from the one 
current when you place your 
subscription order. 

Please send me the following 
items from the 8000 Plus 
Special Offers pages 

Name 



Payment is by (please circle) 

Cheque • PO • Access • Visa 
Make payable to FUTURE PUBLISHING LTD. 
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Fxpirv Hato 


For 
pie 


prices and delivery 
jse call Kelly Porter 

Title 


times for expori 
on 0458 74011 

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orders 
Price 


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Send this form plus payment to: SPECIAL OFFERS • 8000 Plus • 
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SUBSCRIBE NOW . . . 



... to the best 
selling 
magazine for 
Amstrad PCWs 
at only 
£20.95... and 
receive £20 
worth of 
vouchers* for 
the mail order 
pages 
absolutely 
FREE! 




12 Issues of the magazine 
delivered to your door, why 
queue only to find out that your 
local newsagent has already 
sold out? 

Guarantee 

If at any time during the 
subscription period you are not 
completely happy with our 
service, we will refund the cost 
of unmailed copies. 

Receive your quarterly update 
of extra special offers we 
either didn't manage to 
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that have been replaced by 
new ones. 



Overseas Subscriptions (12 issues only) 

Air Mail Europe £35.95 Order code 81 01 A Surface Europe and Rest of World £26.95 
Order code 8101S (For other variations call Christine Stacey on 0458 74011) 



BACK ISSUES 




We have limited quantities of the back issues listed below. The 
prices include a nominal 25p postage. All issues contain excellent 
TipOff sections and a selection of BASIC listings, plus the other 
regulars. Don't miss the chance to expand your collection! 

Issue 17 £1 .75 Specialist Software.,Stop Press Review, SETKEYS 
command explained, History of computers.Order code 8032 

Issue 20 £1 .75 Computer filofaxes, Mini Office tutorial, add your own 
2nd drive, Cracker Turbospreadsheet Order Code 80020 

Issue 21 £1.75 New Locoscript fonts reviewed, Guide to add-ons, 
PC/PCW link. Order Code 80021 

Issue 24 £1.75 9512 Special report, Four-page features, back issues 
index, astrology, cricket, database reviews, DIY Graphics, 
Mini Office book Order Code 80024 

Issue 25 £1.75 Spreadsheet special, Flipper review, DIY share 
analysis, Home banking, Jeffrey Archer & his PCWs' GSX graphics, 
2nd hand PCW Guide Order Code 80025 



Issue 26 £1.75 LocoFile exclusive preview, BASIC wallchart , 
PCW portable preview, Disc doctor, LocoScript books, Devpac 80 2 
Order Code 80026 

Issue 30 £1 .75 Speech synthesiser, teach your PCW to talk back, 
transferring files from a PCW to a PC, Lightening Basic review. 
Order code 80030 

Issue 31 £1 .75. Writing a thesis, the 'do's' and 'dont's, your database 
with Protext, Amstrad SM2400 Modem, What is C/PM 
Order Code 80031 

Issue 32 £1 .75. Astrology on your PCW. Learning C/PM, PCW User 
Groups, The Amstrad-Sugar story. Publishing books. 
Order Code 80032 

Issue 33 £2.00. Four spreadsheets compared, C/PM for beginners, Five 
budget printers reviewed 
Order Code 80033 

Issue 34 £2.00. Accounting packages reviewed, the full report, write a 
bestseller, the series on spreadsheets. 
Order Code 80034 

Issue 35 £2.00. Take a look at communications, we analyse budget 
modems. Play sweet music on your PCW. The PCW out on Safari in Africa 
Order Code 80035 

Issue 36 £2.00. Micro Design II, is this the best DTP package so far? 
Money Manager, the new one, fully reviewed. The full story of the 
Locomotive team from Dorking. The new ASF9512 from Amstrad. 
Order Code 80036 

Issue 37 £2.00. Take a look at the jumbo ram drive for your PCW. 
Choose between three hard discs. Mini Office Plus, is it worth the wait? 
Order Code 80037 

Issue 38 £2.00.Need a third disk drive? The Composers Pen for the 
PCW Musician. Women in computing. 
Order Code 80038 




Simple Recounts II 

Genuinely easy to use book-keeping 
system - featuring: 

* Full Audit trail 

* Monthly and year to date totals 

* Full bank/cash reconcilliation 

* Part payments catered for 

* In depth analysis facilities 

* Creditors and debtors report 

* Full vat accounting 

* 1 00 page ringbound manual 

* Indefinite FREE user support. 

Amstrad PCW format 



SPECIAL 

CHRISTMAS OFFER 

SIMPLE ACCOUNTS II 

£69.95 

SAVE £30!!! 




Job 'Estimating 

An essential tool for the small contractor: 



* Holds a library of component parts 
Performs all calculations 
Full control over quoted prices 
Comprehensive analysis 
Prints full estimates or quotations 
Reports your profit 
Maintains latest cost prices. 

Amstrad PCW format £79.90 



Product Costing 

Invaluable for use by manufacturers in 
costing products: 

Reflects changes in component costs 

* Automatic update of production costs 

* Comprehensive analysis of costs 

* Reports your profit 



Amstrad PCW format £79.90 



9^EfW - Cornbt Invoicing 

Our latest product for the small business market. Cornix Invoicing offers an efficient 
solution to the problems of producing and recording invoices: 



Stores up to 200 regular customers 
Automatic numbering - in sequence 
Shows Invoice and delivery address 
Holds up to 1500 'stock items' 



* Will operate on five vat rates 

* Handles blanket & settlement discount 

* Comprehensive invoice analysis 

* Prints on headed or plain paper 



Amstrad PCW format £59.95 



Full specification manuals are available FREE upon request on any of the products mentioned. 

We are so confident that our programs are easy to use - we offer INDEFINITE FREE USER SUPPORT 



Cornix Software (sales) Ltd. 

40b Queen Street, Hitchin, Herts. SG4 9TS 

Telephone: (0462) 422232 

DEALER ENQUIRIES WELCOME 



POSTSCRIPT 



J ' J l^ J 




Rapturous reports, rueful 
resignation or raucous retorts? 
Responsive readers write in 



The Postscript letters continue to arrive In their droves 
every morning here at the 8000 Plus office. Providing 
you've got something constructive to say, we'll publish 
them. And that goes for criticism and questions as well 
as praise and suggestions. These pages are yours: 
please continue to fill them. Keep on sending your letters 
to Post Script, 8000 Plus, 4 Queen Street, Bath 8A1 1EJ. 




"SC^L. 



Speedy recovery 



I today received a disc and manual 
for PCW Toolkit from Moonstone 
Computing, this being purchased 
by post the Friday before, 1 3th 
October. 

Now this was the day all 
computing machines were 
supposed to throw of their bits and 
pieces due to the dreaded virus 
programs being put about by some 
really wonderful people. 

Was my old faithful the only one 
to suffer a day early? In the middle 
of saving a rather large document 
my PCW decided to throw a 
wobbly. The much hated "Missing 
Address Mark" appeared and then 
the machine locked up and the disc 
would not re-load. This document 
was not saved to another disc as I 
had just typed it in. 

After much hair pulling and 
thoughts like "How am I going to 
get through the remaining years of 
my life" I took out my October copy 
of the best mag since Dan Dare 

94 8000 PLUS December 89 



pet.. 

and ponder through it to find help. 

I found the advertisement for 
Moonstone Computing and gave 
them a phone call. A nice 
reassuring voice told me that even 
the complete computer thicko can 
usually get some of the work back 
using ToolKit. I immediately sent 
off my hard-earned work and 
waited for Postman Pat. (Actually 
ours is called Alec.) 

Even though there are lots of 
bits and pieces throughout the 
ToolKit manual I very quickly found 
page 63. This told me what to do 
when you get a world shattering 
problem like the above. 

Within 20 minutes I had 
recovered my data, copying it to a 
fresh formatted disc. Sigh of 
relief and most grateful thanks to 
Moonstone for supplying a 
program that not only works, 
but is easy to use, even to a 
word processor user who doesn't 
delve into much of the inner 
workings of CP/M and BASIC. 
Word of warning though, make 



sure you have a correctly 
formatted disc which should be 
either a CF2 if A Drive 851 2 or 
CF2DD if a B drive disc (or 
951 2 A Drive) 

I can now make use of the 
document I was in the middle of 
and I have of course backed 
up the disc. 

Michael Castro 
Oxhey, Herts 

8000 PLUS: It's happened to all of us 
some time or another. We hate to be the 
ones to say this, but you've probably learnt 
a very valuable - but not too painful - 
lesson - thanks to Moonstone Computing. 
Always, always keep back-up copies of 
important discs. Next month, we II be 
looking at the whole range of 3" disc 
recovery programs and showing you how 
to navigate your way round some 
potentially dangerous, uncharted territory. 



Academic question 



Please could you tell me where I 
can find the game 'Academy' as I 
cannot find anyone who sells it in 
your magazine. 

Steve Chapman 
Bodmin, Cornwall 

8000 PLUS: Your best bet would be to talk 
to CRL , who produce the game, directly 
on 01 533 2918. They told us that they 
have it in stock and that it costs £19.95. 



Hard act to follow (part 2) 



Concerning the article Hard Act to 
Follow' by Sharon Bradley it seems 
to me that pirate copying would 
cease if the software houses 
charged a reasonable and realistic 
price for their programs. 

Some of these programs are 
not very clever and the 
accompanying manuals also leave 
a lot to be desired. In some cases, 
a number of the instructions in the 
manual are wrong and one has to 
decipher, then alter, them 
accordingly. 

Before you can do this, you 
have to read the instruction manual 
in accordance with the leaflet 
accompanying it as the relevant 
software house has, by some good 
fortune, noticed several 
discrepancies. 

I feel Sharon has gone more 
than a little overboard with her 
remarks regarding putting a disc 
into a registered envelope, 
addressing it to oneself, then 
keeping it deep inside one's bank 
vault until required in a court of law. 

We could possibly find the 
following happening, should the 
prospective programmer be an 
undesirable type of individual. 

'A' decides to write a program, 
but realising that this will take a 



year to complete due to a multitude 
of different reasons, he sends 
himself a registered envelope 
containing a blank disc. He 
finishes the program some twelve 
months later and swaps the discs, 
either at home or at his bank. 

It seems to me that one of the 
surest procedures would be to 
contact one's solicitor, inform him 
of the work in hand, and when the 
program is completed, take the 
disc to him for safe-keeping. 
Obtain a receipt for the disc. Then 
he could produce this in evidence - 
should it be required - stating that 
this is the disc in question. 

Has Sharon any idea as to why 
this copying takes place? Did she 
consider this before writing the 
article or is she simply convinced 
that to copy is wrong? When I say 
wrong, that is precisely what I 
mean. Not illegal. Many bad laws 
have been passed. 

The real crux of the matter lies 
with supply and demand. As the 
demand increases, so does the 
price. This prevents the less well 
off' in our society from enjoying 
computer programs. 

But, Sharon, I am sure that you 
are not labouring under the 
misapprehension that all micro 
computer owners are affluent 
members of our society? 

John Bell 
Warley, W. Midlands 

8000 PLUS: / 'd be the first person to 
agree when you say that many bad laws 
have been passed. No matter how unfair 
they may seem, however it doesn't alter 
the fact that ordinary people like you and 
me have to live within their parameters. 
Copying software is illegal. We have to 
remember that. 

I'm also well aware of the fact that 
software - even for the PCW - can be 
expensive. So are lots of things. I'd like to 
drive a Ferrari; that doesn't give me the 
right to go out and steal someones else's - 
no matter how much I can justify the theft. 
Living within the law means not buying a 
computer if you can't afford to run one. 

I appreciate what you're saying about 
the self-addressed parcel routine. Yes, it is 
an unwitnessed act. But if the envelope 
with the disc is well-sealed and registered, 
there shouldn't be any problem. A court of 
law will be able to tell if a sealed envelope 
has been tampered with. Your solution - 
ie, informing your solicitor - is equally valid. 



Free transfer 



I am writing to you to see if you 
can explain to me in detail how we 
can transpose text generated on 
our PCWs over on to an Apple 
Macintosh Plus. 

The equipment we have consists 
of a PCW 851 2, PCW 951 2 using a 
LocoScript version 2.11. Our Apple 



-POSTSCRIPT- 



Mac has a system version 6.0.2. 
and a finder version of 6.1 

I look forward to hearing from 
you in due course. 

Max Cruickshank 

Development Officer 

STR Athclyde 

8000 PLUS: It sounds like you've got a 
similar system installed to the one we use 
here in the 8000 Plus office. You will need, 
first of all, to make Ascii versions of all your 
LocoScript-produced files and then transfer 
them onto the Macintosh using a 
combination of Dialup from PMS 
Communications (021 643 7688) on the 
PCWand the comms module from 
Microsoft Works on the Mac. The two 
machines need to be connected via the 
PCWsRS232 and the Mac's RS422. For 
all the gory details (cable connections and 
protocols), have a look at this month's tipoff 
entitled 'Maccies back in town'. 
Quite a few of you have been asking us 
recently about PCWto Macintosh 
transfers. If any more of you are 
interested, then please write to let us know. 
It might be worth a more detailed look. 



The knowledge 



I am writing to you for help in trying 
to locate a book on CP/M Plus. I 
have seen advertised a book titled 
Introduction to CP/M on Amstrads, 
but cannot find anyone who has a 
copy of it left. Any other books I 
have tried to obtain also seem out 
of print. 

I have been a user of the 8256 
now for six months, I have begun 
to take an interest in the computer 
side of the PCW. The instruction 
manual that comes with the PCW 
is okay for LocoScript but less than 
useless for CP/M. 

It starts as you know, to explain 
the different functions and then 
cuts off with the THIS UTILITY IS 
NOT COVERED ANY FURTHER'. 
Can you recommend any book that 
would be of help, something fairly 
basic please (I'm thick). 

Ernest Clifft 

Walsall, 

W Midlands 

8000 PLUS: 7/y The CP/M Plus Handbook 
from Heinemann, Michelin House, 81, 
Fulham Road, London SW3 6RB. They're 
on 01 581 9393 and the book costs 
£14.95. Alternatively, try and get a copy of 
Sigma's 'CP/M The Software Bus ... a 
programmer's companion ', by Clarke, 
Eaton and Powys-Lybbe. Hang around 
long enough in a raincoat and dark glasses 
on the Tottenham Court Road and you 
might be able to pick up a remaindered 
copy of it in one of the bookshops for 
something like £1 . 

It isn't as PCW-specific as the 
handbook and is a little out-dated, but it will 
give you a reliable overview of the 
operating system and its different utilities. 



Not a hope 



'Help', there I can't put it any 
simpler than that! 

I expect that you have had 
endless letters concerning the 
subject of Mini Office Professional 
Plus. Well, here is another one, 
not concerning the program itself, I 
wish that I had a copy! 

I ordered a copy some months 
ago (April) from a company called 
Cut Price Software, based in 
Lewes, Sussex, after reading an 
advertisment that they had placed 
in your magazine. To cut a long 
story short, I never even saw my 
copy, phone calls were hung up on 
me, letters went unanswered and 
generally I was avoided like the 
proverbial plague. 

After a lot of detective work I 
managed to get in touch with their 
accountants, only to be told that 
they had gone into liquidation, and 
that it was highly unlikely that I 
would recover any of the money 
that I had paid out (they had 
cashed my cheque as soon as they 
got it) as people like me were so 
low on the list of creditors to be 
paid out of any capital gleaned 
from the remnants of the company, 
that I might just as well forget 
about it. How many other of your 
readers lost out to this company in 
this way? 

G Lewis 

Proprietor - Clockwise 

Enterprises 

8000 PLUS: We fear that you may be 
confusing us with another magazine. 
Having anticipated the collapse of the 
company our Adverisement Manager tells 
us that 8000 Plus has not run any Cut 
Price Software advertising at all over the 
past year. Nevertheless, if you're still 
interested, Database Software are now 
marketing a new version of the program, 
Mini Office Professional (without the 'Plus'). 
This doesn't have the spell-checker or the 
thesaurus. See News for further details. 



Moonlit drives 



Roy Smiles found that his drive B: 
would not work out of doors. 
Although you did not give it, I 
suggest there is a simple 
explanation. 

Recently, a PCW B: drive of an 
acquaintance started to give errors. 
The heads were cleaned with no 
improvement. Use of the Verify 
option in Disckit showed that all the 
errors were on one side of the disc. 

A disc newly formatted in the 
drive was verified correctly showing 
that the fault was in the head 
alignment. Rather than pay 
someone to service the drive, I 
decided to try first to realign the 



head. To do this properly would 
require a special disc and an 
oscilloscope. However, using a disc 
formatted in a good drive, it is 
possible to obtain an adequate 
result by lengthy trial and error; the 
head is moved, and the disc tested 
using Verify. 

A disc drive seeks any required 
track by moving in steps from a 
mechanical reference point called 
the 'track zero adjustment'. This 
point is provided by the interruption 
of a light beam by a mechanical 
arm on the head carriage. 

I found it necessary to replace 
the disk drive cover after every 
minor head adjustment in order to 
prevent light falling on the track 
zero detector and so allow the 
drive to work. 

I would suggest that Mr Smile's 
problem on his hot, and 
presumably sunny, afternoon was 
stray light getting through the 
ventilation holes and onto the disc 
drive electronics. This explains why 
the drive stopped working as he 
carried it outdoors. You may 
therefore be surprised to learn that 
your recommendations of a) 
rotating the PCW, and b) of using 
moonlight are both likely to be 
effective. Restricting use of the 
PCW to a Thursday seems a bit 
excessive. 

Mark Buckley-Sharp 
Middlesex 

8000 PLUS: There. And you thought we 
were just trying to be funny. 



Tolerance level 



I understand that you have only 
just taken over as Editor. However, 
you should be aware that if 
answers to letters continue to be as 
offensive as that to Brian Perry 
(Uneasy of South Harrow ) in the 
November issue it will not only be 
your gay readers (and subscribers) 
that you will lose. 

I won't insult the intelligence of 
yourself or your readers by 
detailing the ways in which the 
comments made are quite 
unacceptable to any reasonable 
person, but look forward to an 
apology on behalf of the magazine. 
Dr P A Sleigh 
Exteter 

8000 PLUS: Bv their very nature, 
apologies are nearly always meaningless 
unless delivered by the originator of the 
alleged offence. Personally, I have no 
quibble whatsoever with 'queer quips'. 
Have you ever tried carrying out sustained 
alliteration on the 'que' sound? As well as 
meaning homosexual, 'queer' can also be 
defined thus: odd, singular, quaint, slightly 
mad, having a sensation of coming 
sickness - and so on. The use of the word 



'pansy' was, I admit, unfortunate. I will take 
steps to ensure that it never darkens the 
pages of the magazine again unless used 
in a strictly horticultural context. 



Sense and sensibilities 



I feel I must write in support of your 
comments to 'Uneasy of South 
Harrow'. (Issue 38 November 
page 87). Why do homosexuals 
think that words that have been 
around for many years when now 
used is with reference to their 
sexuality? 

Maybe Brian Perry should 
refrain from using the term 'booting 
up' as this could be termed 
offensive to amputees. 

At least I can say that I haven't 
put my foot in it as I am a bilateral 
amputee. I can hardly call myself 
legless as I've got spare one in the 
cupboard. 

Keep up the good work, 
especially the humour it helps to 
make it the best magazine on the 
market. 

Ron Stacey 
Bristol 

8000 PLUS Thanks for your letter, Ron. 
The subject is now declared - officially, 
positively and any other way you care to 
name it - closed. 



Royal flush 



Does anybody know how to find 
the Emperor's Throne Room in 
Head over Heels. My wife and I 
have been trying to find it for nearly 
two years. Ocean Software didn't 
reply to our letter so you are our 
only chance. 

Richard & Suzie Cox 
London 




"H/we^'T <xo<A r?ia|nIp t^at 

TMpOfJe (2COM ieT,P&AB?" 



December 89 8000 PLUS 95 



POSTSCRIPT- 



8000 PLUS: In that case, you're only 
chance consists of an 8000 Plus awaiting 
with bated breath their copy of probably 
what is the finest graphics games around 
for the PCW. Are you listening, Ocean? 
Its arrival, promises our Marketing 
Manager, is imminent. Just as soon as we 
can, we II get back to you. 



Loco in motion 



Does anybody out there know how 
to transfer files from LocoScript 
2.26 on PCW 8512 - normal Disc 
Drives - into 'Wordstar V5 
professional' on IBM compatible 
machine - 3.5 and 5.25 disc drives. 

This is not my fault I hasten to 
add. An accident of fate. I need it 
for my work. 

A simple 'can't be done would 
suffice'. I just need to be sure. 
Perhaps there are special places 
where this can be done? 

Andrew Holbrook 
China 

8000 PLUS: The good news is that it can 
be done since Wordstar has an Ascii 
(American Standard Code for Information 
Interchange) import facility. All you have to 
do is convert your PCW LocoScript files 
into Ascii format and send them jia a null 
modem cable to the PC. 

If you haven 1 got a lot of data to 
transfer, you can easily get by using PIP at 
the PCW end and COPY on the PC. For 
weightier transfers you will need to run, 
say, PMS" Dialup on the PCW and a 
suitable comms package on the PC. 
If you don't fancy tackling this yourself, 
there a number of companies over here in 
the UK that will do it for you. Talk to Phillip 
Turner at Greymatter, 4 Prigg Meadow, 
Ashburton, Devon TQ13 7DF (on 0364 
5349) or Jenny Dell at Word Print Ltd (01 
9988877). The cheaper of the two is 
Greymatter who will charge you £10 per 3" 
disc to transfer, £8 each for two to three 
discs, and so on. 



What's it all about, Alfle? 



I have recently bought a second 
hand Amstrad PCW 8512. There 
was no manual of program with it - 
do you know of anywhere I can 
obtain some? 

Eric Coggins 
Cheshire 

8000 PLUS: Phone a mailorder company 
called CPC in Lancashire on 0772 555034. 
At the moment they've got plenty of them 
in stock and they cost £13.95 each 
(including posting and packaging.) 



Staying 'au courant? 



What are the advantages in 
keeping computers 'switched on' 
days on end? Could you please 
explain the reasoning behind this 



96 8000 PLUS December 



practice? Would you recommend 
this procedure to home users? 

R Furlonger 
Dorset 

8000 PLUS: Bit of a tricky one, this. 
Every time you switch your PCW on, you 
get a surge of electricity which can, in time, 
damage the components. Every time you 
switch it off. the components cool down 
which, needless to say, doesn't do the 
machine any good either. Leaving the 
PCW switched on permanently will cause 
anything that has been left on the screen to 
bum it. The answer is to leave the 
machine on permanently and change the 
screen display from time to time. 



Private property 



I would be grateful it you could 
clear up a copyright matter for me. 
I have recently created a disc of 
'chaos' programs developed using 
Lawrence Simons' plot and screen 
save routines and enhanced and 
rewritten versions of the disc 
catalogue and Mandlebrot 
programs published in 8000 Plus in 
recent(ish) issues. I would like to 
release this to Public Domain and 
therefore need to clear up the 
status of programs published in 
magazines. 

Should they be considered as 
already released to Public Domain 
by definition, having been 
published, or are they under your 
jurisdiction, or still that of their 
original authors? In other words, 
whose permission do I ask? 

Full acknowledgements would, 
of course be included on the 
disc if it was released, as I hope it 
might be. 

Barry Etheridge 
Oxford 

8000 PLUS: 8000 Plus doesn't buy the 
copyright of any of the articles or listings 
that we publish, just the first serial rights. 
Since the original authors haven't 
relinquished their copyright, you'll need to 
ask their permission - not ours - if you're 
going to reproduce their work in any shape 
or form. Unfortunately, we can't put readers 
into direct contact with each other, but if 
you write to us, we'll pass your letter on. 



Ascii and it will be granted 



I recently purchased "Stop Press ", 
largely on the strength of what 
appears to be an endorsement of 
this software, which appeared on 
page 76 of your May 1989 edition. 
I enclose for your information a 
letter to Stop Press, expressing my 
concern that their product does not 
appear to have any significant 
advantage in working with 
LocoScript. Indeed it would seem 
necessary to convert LocoScript 
documents to ASCII files, to be 



sure of avoiding the insertion of 
garbage into pages being made up 
from previously prepared materials. 

I should be grateful for your 
comments on the matter. 

John W Smith 
London 

8000 PLUS: The truth of the matter is, Mr 
Smith, you 'd be very hard pushed to find a 
DTP package that allows you to import text 
straight into the program from a word 
processor without first making an Ascii file 
of it. This is the norm rather than the 
exception. When the offending page in the 
May issue states that you can enter text 
'directly' into Stop Press, it means straight 
into the program's text editor (in which 
case, Ascii files aren't required) rather than 
directly from a word processor. 



The reel thing 



As a newcomer to the art of 
personal computing/word 
processing, may I congratulate you 
on an extremely informative 
magazine. I've learnt more from 
perusing 8000 Plus until I came 
across 'Dataline Computing 
Services' Wisbech. 

A phone call brought me into 
contact with David Kemp who 
turned out to be a mine of helpful 
and useful information. His 
patience with ignorance of 
computing technology is 
praiseworthy indeed. 

Taking his advice I ordered, and 
received within forty-eight hours, 
two 'Reeltime' tuition courses. 
One for LocoScript 2, the other 
for CP/M. 

May I advise any newcomer to 
PCW to get the above course as 
they are first class. 

A E Jones 
Harrogate, N Yorks 

8000 PLUS: For those of you who are 
interested, Reel-Time courses are 
delivered to you recorded and stored on 
audio-cassette and disc. The obvious 
advantage of this is that you can do the 
training when and where you like at your 
own pace. The company offers training on 
using the 9512, the 8256/8512, LocoScript, 
SuperCalc 2, dBase II to name but a few. 
Each package costs around £30. Phone 
0602 603623 for further details. 



Original prints 



hollowing last month's letters, I 
would like to set the record straight 
concerning the support LocoScript 
2 offers the Star LC-10 printer. 

The first one asked whether 
any of the special features of the 
LC-1 could be used from 
Locoscript 2. The full anwer to this 
is that LocoScript does not include 
as standard the ability to embed a 
printer specific control code into a 



document. That said, you can use 
the CHARKIT program on our 
Printer Drivers disc set to assign 
control codes to otherwise unused 
characters, and so output these to 
the printer. This will destroy the 
WYSIWYGness! 

The letter goes on to ask about 
the IBM character set. Simply 
select the appropriate printer driver 
(either the FX80NLQ driver with 
the IBM character set [file FX80. 
#IB] or the IBMPRO driver) and 
use the DIP switches to set the 
printer to the correct emulation. 

The second letter goes on to 
refer to the problem that, when 
printing justified PS text on the LC- 
10, the print head occasionally 
pauses part way through a line. 
This is Locoscript trying to get an 
even spacing on the printer so that 
the justification looks right, even 
though the printer doesn't include a 
micro-spacing facility. What we do 
is print the correct-sized gap 
between words by the use of a 
sequence of pitch changes and 
spaces. 

Unfortunately on the LC-10 the 
existence of a pitch change within 
a line causes the printer to panic 
and dump out the line so far to the 
paper before considering the rest 
of the line. 

The reason this 'soft shoe 
shuffle' doesn't occur with the 
LX800 driver is that this printer 
cannot change pitch within a line at 
all. So it prints the line in one go, 
but the justification is by complete 
spaces between the words. 

Mr Drohan asks if we support 
down-loaded characters on 9 pin 
printers. Here, I'm sorry to say, the 
answer is no. While some 9-pin 
printers permit the use of down 
loaded characters, there is by no 
means as wide or as consistent 
support of the facility as there is 
with 24-pin printers. Although we 
support ancient Greek (with 
breathings) on a 24 pin printer, it 
isn't really commercially viable to 
extend this to those 9 pins that do 
support down loading. 

And finally Mr Poland of 
Portugal asks about the large 
characters provided by the LC-10. 
This too is a case for CHARKIT! 
Set up some unused characters to 
produce the required control codes 
(say Extra 0) and then where you 
include that character in a 
document, the control code will be 
produced. I can't say we 
recomment it though! 

Sorry to have gone on for so 
long, but the truth has to be told. 
Howard Fisher 
Commerical Director - 
Locomotive Software 

8000 PLUS: Sack cloth and ashes time 
again. 






POOLS AND HORSES 

WIN WITH 

COURSEMASTER AND 
POOLSMASTER 

(formerly 'Pools Predictor' by Corwen Computer Systems) 

The Computer Horseracing Programme 

r RATES ANY RACE IN SECONDS - ANY DAILY NEWSPAPER IS ALL YOU NEED 

r NEVER out of date - Both N. Hunt and Flat - Fast data entry 

f AMAZING ACCURACY!! - Now you CAN BEAT THE BOOKIE! 

I Works on the simple principle that FAST HORSES BEAT SLOW ONES!!! 

r Clearly identifies best selection in every race plus these AMAZING Features:- 

r First, Second and Third choice shown for Forecasts and Tricasts, etc. Recommends most suitable type of bet. 

i Actually works out your WINNINGS on most popular bets including SINGLES and DOUBLES, win and each 

way. PATENTS, YANKEES, CANADIANS, HEINZ etc. Good EACH WAY and LONG ODDS bets clearly 

shown. 

■ Will PRINT out your BETTING SLIP for you. 

r Maintains a BANK ACCOUNT - BET like PROFESSIONALS do! Records all your bets in any number of 
accounts. Keep a complete record of your betting or compare Coursemaster against your favourite tipster 

■ PLUS!!! ■ THE AMAZING COURSEMASTER SYSTEM. This superb betting system is included in the 
programme. A system which regularly produces huge wins from small stakes. Try it! Can pay for itself many 
times over on the first day! 

Supplied with 20 page BETTING GUIDE and MANUAL. 

FREE HOT TIP OF THE MONTH TO EVERY PURCHASER 



Supplied on TAPE at £16.95 tori- 
All Spectrums, Commodore 64/128. Amstrad 
CPC's, BBC & Electron. Also available for 
Sinclair QL on Microdrive at £16.95. 



Supplied on DISC at £18.95 for; 

All Spectrums, Commodore 64/128 Amstrad 

CPC's, Amstrad PCW's, BBC & Electron, 

IBM/PC compatibles. All Amstrad PC's etc. 



Please state machine and disc size 
The Computer Football Pools Predictor 

The amazing POOLSMASTER programme is by far the best Pools predictor that we have ever seen. 

In just 1 weeks of trying this programme ourselves we won 1 2 dividends the largest being nearly £300. 

POOLSMASTER is simple to use and requires only that you keep the league tables up to date using your usual 

newspaper. 

The result of many years research into the Football Pools by the programmer Martin Evans of CCS. the 

programme is a masterpiece of expertise and is simplicity itself to use. 

* Predicts Homes, Aways and Draws. 

* No fiddly typing in of teams etc. and no redundant databases, 

* Instant read out or Hardcopy if you have a Printer. 

* Uses scientific formula based on recent form home and away, league position, goals scored etc. It has long 
been realised that certain combinations of these factors return a much higher average of draws than the laws of 
average would expect. POOLSMASTER looks for these factors and analyses their significance to give you the 
best possible chance of a win. 

* Also has a 'Sequence Predictor' option Many people believe that certain numbers on the coupon come up 
more often than others and over a season patterns do seem to develop. The programme analyses these 
patterns and predicts the numbers most likely to come up next. Certainly more scientific than sticking a pin in or 
family birthdays etc! 

If you do the POOLS then this is the programme for you. 



SUPPLIED ON TAPE AT £16.95 

FOR ALL SPECTRUMS, AMSTRAD CPC'S 

COMMODORE 64/128. 



SUPPLIED ON DISK AT £18,95 FOR ALL 
PCWS, SPECTRUMS, COMMODORE 
64/128, AMSTRAD CPC'S, AMSTRAD/IBM 
COMPATIBLE PCS. 



British and Australian version available please state which. Please state disc size. 



* SPECIAL COMPENDIUM DISK OR TAPE CONTAINING ! 
BOTH COURSEMASTER & POOLSMASTER - TAPE E31.95 - DISK E34.9 



INTRASET LTD, (DEPT 8000) FREEPOST NO. 10 Woodside Ave, 
Clayton-Le-Woods, Chorley, Lanes, PR6 7QF 



'ADffRfi'SERS 1 
INiB X 

^mc+rnH lleo, Huh /lT ICt*A ™ ™ i^"*^^ 



Amstrad User Club 4 

Ansible Information 97 

Arnor 35 

AV Marketing 63 

A-Z Computer Services 70 

Advantage 54 

Aladdink 79 

Astrocalc 82 

BBD Dust Covers 64 

Bradway Software 66 

Brainstorm Software 73 

Caspell Computer Services 15 

CDS Software 60 

Classic Software 74 

Composit Software 82 

Compumart IBC 

Computer Accoustics 97 

Computing Plus 63 

Compact Micros 74 

Comstax 73 

Connect Software 76 

Copycomm 58 

Cornix Software 93 

Creative Technology 9 

Cwmbran Computer Centre 74 

Cyca 30.31 

Data Access 81 

Dataline 64 

DGA 38 

Dragonfly Design 74 

Dunning Computer Services 74 

Encyclasoft 66 

Exemplar Design 85 

Groundwork 97 

HD Design 54 

HSV 68 

H.T.B Computers 70 

Headline Communications 64 

Home Based Business 54 

Intermediates 32 

Intraset 79,97 

Isenstein 46 

■ ■-• ■— mi ^m ^m m— hb >m ^m ^m mmJ 



JEM ...IFC 

John Fisher 68 

Kavin Computer Supplies 49 

K + M Computers 79 

Kevin Heywood 66 

Laser Images 60 

Little Office 41 

Locomotive Software 16, 19,24 

Manx Tapes 81 

Margin Maker 85 

Mc Gregor Software 82 

Meridian Software 79 

Micro Media 54 

Micro-Tyne 66 

Miles Better Software 81 

M. J. C Supplies 57 

Moonstone Computing 73 

Newstar Software OBC 

Noms de Plume 74 

PCW Software Library 81 

PCW World 82 

Pinboard Computers 74 

RSC 22,23 

SBS 9 

SCA Systems 64 

S.C.Coleman 41 

Selec Software 70 

Silicon City 45 

SK Marketing 53 

SM Engineering 63 

Software Imperative 29 

Suredata 66 

Three Inch Software 68 

Thurston Techniques 41 

Timatic Systems 85 

Topologika 70 

Tudor Systems 85 

Vital Software 60- 

WAVE...: 73 

West Of Britain 6 

Wight Scientific 68 

Worldwide '. 60 




ENHANCED, GREATLY 

Ansiblelndex PLUS! 

The fully-featured LocoScript 
indexer, now UPGRADED. 
Easier to use, more powerful, 
same price . 

Ansiblelndex PLUS will index 
from your LocoScript 
documents: 

* Words and phrases 

* Inverted phrases 

* Headings and sub-headings 

* Themes and sub-themes 

* Choice of automatic alphabet sorting 
We include an improved version of Check . . . fast LocoScript 
word counter. Counts a whole document, several in one go . . . 
or just a small section of text. (Also available separately.) 

And the dreaded Grease is more fiendish than ever . . . 

Pfjcg' £29 95 
We also supply A.I.Q. . . the Amstrad PCW ra'ndom'text 
generator, with uncannily lifelike (always) and funny 
(sometimes) results. No other PCW program is like A.I.Q 

Prices £25*95 

Request our info sheet for more details. If you are an 
existing user of the old Ansiblelndex, please write to us 
at once for details of how to get your low-price upgrade. 
All Ansible software comes with a manual written in plain 
English. The prices shown include VAT, postage and full 
after-sales support. No extras! 

ANSIBLE INFORMATION 

94 London Road 
Reading 

Berkshire, RG1 5AU 
England 



Tel: 0672 62576 



FAXLINK 



The Dialatron Faxlink allows both a telephone and a facsimile machine or 
modem to be used on a single telephone line. It is a sophisticated piece of 
electronics that incorporates a voice synthesiser and can distinguish between 
a normal telephone call (voice) and a fax call (data). It automatically switches 
incoming calls to the correct piece of equipment. 



FEATURES 

Low Cost 

Voice Synthesiser 

Rapid answering (1.5 seconds) 

Compact design (4" x 2") 

Supplied with adhesive pads 

12 months guarantee 

Comes complete with power 

transformer 



BENEFITS 

Simply plugs in 

Saves time and cost of installing 

an extra telephone line 

One time purchase. No extra 

rental costs. 

No embarrasing silences. Voice 

synthesiser informs user of call 

status 

Modem to modem facility 



Tel: 



FULL B.A.B.T. APPROVED. 

COMPUTER ACOUSTICS 

17 East Place, West Norwood, 
London, SE27 9JW 
01-7616117 Fax: 01-7615889 



A unique publishing support service for writers, 
voluntary groups, small businesses and anyone else 
who needs to get words into print. 

S LASER PRINTING • DESKTOP PUBLISHING 

• EDITING • GRAPHICS & ILLUSTRATION 

• TRAINING & CONSULTANCY WORK 

/ DATA TRANSFER FROM LOCOSCRIPT & CP/M 

Expert help from experienced writers and 
self -publishers. Realistic fees. Discounts for 
educational groups and charities. 

Contact John Hunt or Penny Hitchin at 
Groundwork, Old Gatehouse, Station Square, 
Grange-over-Sands, LA11 6EH. Tel 05395 33600 



BACKPAGE 




COMPETITION 

Sharpen up your image with the latest in 
PCW desktop publishing software 



Our Christmas competition gives you 
the chance to take your place 
alongside the Murdochs and 
Maxwells of this world. As you are 
probably aware, many existing desktop 
publishing packages show a distinct bias: 
either the text or the graphics receive the 
star treatment. It's rare that both 
components get the chance to look 
equally good on the finished page. Well, 
Creative Technology broke the mould 
when they wrote Micro Design, this 
month's bonza prize for our three eagle- 
eyed competition winners. 

Hailed as the first 'fully-integrated 
page processor' for the PCW, this means 
that both text and graphics components on 
the page are perfectly combined to 
produce what is hopefully an easily-legible 
and professionally-illustrated page. 
Micro Design has the feel of both a 



dedicated word processor and image-maker 
in one package. And here's another big plus: 
it will accommodate not only the standard 
8000 printer, but external 9- and 24-pin 
printers too. You can even combine it with a 
laser printer to produce optimum high- 
resolution printout. 

So bring your hawk-eyed powers of 
observation to bear on this month's issue 
and a copy of Micro Design can be yours. 
Julie, our Art Editor has cunningly scattered 
a number of cleverly-crafted seasonal icons 
throughout the magazine. 4& 

All you have to do is keep your eyes 
open and count them up as you move 
through the magazine. Write the final 
number, as usual, on the back of a sealed 
envelope or postcard and send it to the 
Seasonal Search Competition, 8000 Plus, 4 
Queen Street, Bath BA1 1 EJ. Closing date is 
the 20th December. 




Next month 



• Desktop Publishing Special 

Following on from last month's Second Opinion rally, we are currently 
planning an in-depth comparative study of the most popular DTP 
packages - and accessories - around for the PCW. We will be taking a 
look at the programs you use, why you use them and what you like about 
them. So keep writing in. 

• Disc editors 

Under scrutiny next month are those programs we turn to when all else 
fails. We take a look at the disc editors which hold the promise of new life 
for moribund data. 

• Disc doctor 

We talk to Dave Smith of Paddock Wood in Kent who devotes his time to 
rescuing the discs that the rest of us don't (or daren't) tackle. 

• Biorhythmns 

Never mind the discs; pep up your own performance with the help of a 
brand new program that's got more highs and lows than a weather chart. 

• Exploding Myths 

We review yet another new game for the PCW which plunges you - the 
gods willing - into another world of half-forgotten myths and legends. 

• Book Look 

More new books are arriving on the scene to help you get the most out of 
your machine. 



98 8000 PLUS November 






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will KNOCK YOU FOR SIX' 

• MASTERFILE 8000 (Campbell Systems) £29.90 

• MINI OFFICE (Database Software) 
PROFESSIONAL PLUS £29 90 

• MONEV MANAGER PCW (Connect Software) £29.90 
(New improved version!) 

• DESKTOP PURLISHER (Database Software) £19.90 

• LOCOSCRIPT 2 (Locomotive Software) £19.90 

• LOCOFILE (Locomotive Software) £24.90 
(Please specify PCW 8 or 9 Series) 



'SUPERSAVERS' BlAMS 30L STORAGE BOX 



CLEAN N' TIDY KITS 



TAKE UP A 

GREAT OFFER 

WITH OUR 

SPECIAL 

KIT PRICES 



PCW 8 SERIES 

1 - Clearhead 
1 - Cleanpnnt 
1 - AMS 3QL Deluxe 



£20.76 

(Normal RRP £29 43) 



PCW 9 SERIES 

1 - Clearhead 
1 - Cleanpnnt 
1 - AMS 301 Deluxe 



£20.12 

[Normal RRP £29 09) 



AMSTRAD ASF9512 AUTOMATIC SHEET FEEDER 



-Ot^/Designed for youi PCW 951 2 system to save you 
J*"^ time and frustration! 

• Holds up to 30 sheets of paper # Colour co-ord mated 

• Complete with new versions of Locosmpt and CP'M+ 

• Fits on yout PCW 9512 in seconds 



NEW PRODUCT ONLY 



£99 



IDEAL FOR 

MAIL SHOTS 

OR MULTIPAGE 

DOCUMENTS 



AT LAST. ITS HERE! 

Just what you've been waiting for! 

Successor to the ever popular AMS 20L is the at new 
AMS 30L Deluxe Following in the footsteps of the 
201, the UK's best seing 3" disk storage box, the 
AMS 30L is of the highest quality. 

• High impact resistant anti-static plastic 
construction with inset smoked id panels 

• Hinged id with key operated security lock a 

• Stepped base for easy disk selection with M 
a capacity for fifteen 3" disks either 
cased or uncased y 

• Can accommodate up to thirty 0<* „ 
3" uncased disks 

• Redesigned throughout and now 
attractively finished in grey 




MISCELLANEOUS 



PRINTER RIBBONSIPRINTWHEELS 



Genuine Amstrad or quality compatible ribbons at 
SUPER LOW PRICES! 



AMSTRAD, 



// 



£2.95 



£395 



£2.40 



£2.40 



Minimum Order - 2 ribbons unless ordered with other items. 
Prices are per ribbon and ex. VAT. 




AMSTRAD PCW 9512 
PRINTWHEELS 



LETTER GOTHIC 

MINI GOTHIC 15 

THESIS PS 

RECTA 10 

ORATOR 10 

SCRIPT 12 

COURIER 10 

PRESTIGE 12 

PRESTIGE PICA 10 

« 90 EA 

EX. VAT 



CLEANING KITSI MISCELLANEOUS 



CLEARHEAD (3" Drives) 

► Safer data storage 
K Easy to use 

► Prolongs disk and drive lite 

£5.90 

CLEAN PR I NT (PCW Printers) 

► Removes ink deposits 
I Maintains print quality 

► Protects and lubncates print head 




£5 90 



SERIES 



£5 



20 



LISTING PAPER 11 "x9ft"60gsm, 
1000 sheets, £7.50 

2000 sheets, £13.00 

DUST COVERS 

High quality transparent PVC 
PCW 8 Series- 2 Piece £7.80 
- 3 Piece £8.60 
PCW 9 Series- 2 Piece £7.80 

AMSCASE 

3" Disk Storage Case £5.90 
(Holds 10 disks) 




ORDER HOTlinE (0509) 



w? 



Service 



^ 



p* Usually same day despatch on most items 

\P> Free fast delivery on all items. 
Please allow 2-5 days 

Q> Large stocks for immediate despatch 

p* FAST, efficient service 



Guarantees 



\^> If any item proves to have a manufacturing 
fault within 30 days we will replace free of 
charge or refund in full 

]^> After 30 days and within the warranty period, 
we will repair at our expense 



All ortces exclusive of VAT 




Any problems quickly resolved to your 
complete satisfaction 

p> Special offers to existing customers 
We aim to please . . and usually do! 



Prices/delivery subject to availability and only applicable to UK mainland, N. Ireland and BFPO's. 
Compumart are licensed credit brokers. Simply ask for written details. 



E&OE 



COMPUMART LTD 
FREEPOST (8 0+) 
LOUGHBOROUGH 
LEICS LE11 OBR 
TEL: 0509 610444 
FAX: 0509 610235 



News From The Software Specialist 



NEW STAR SOFTWARE 

The Old Rectory, London Road, Widford, Chelmsford CM2 8TE, Essex. 
Telephone 0245 265017, Fax 0245 263969, Tlx 995143 



New Star Software's Autumn 89 catalogue 

is now out! 



NewStar Catalogue 

[Autumn 1989 




The complole guide to buying 5I/\R 



n<f Amnrxid softtvare 



more products 

prices shown inc & ex VAT 

extensive buyers's guide 

information 

network and multiuser 

pricing 

feature cross ref charts 

Expanded PCW section 

Business software 

Entertainment software 

FREE 
•just ask! 



NewStar Software: Original and best 



Over 3 years of supplying 
software for the PCW user 
makes NewStar probably the 
most experienced company in 
the marketplace. 

We were there from the launch 
of the PCW with any CPM 



Celebratory 
Offers! 



software transferred to 3" disk 
on request; and our classic 
CPM applications, Touch 
'n'Go, NewWord and Cracker 
are still the best in their 
respective fiel ds. 

Several feature data and skill 
portability to MSDOS (IBM 
PC) systems, so skills learned 
on the PCW can be carried 
forward with no wasted effort. 
□ 




To mark the appearance of our 
first major new catalogue for 
over a year, we are giving away 
a free copy of the Trivial 
Pursuit game, or for the more 
serious minded user, a copy of 
the outstanding keyboard 
trainer, Touch 'n' Go - with 
each order for £50 worth of PC 
software, accompanied by a 
copy of this advert. Offer 
applies until September 30th 
1989. □ 



From PCW to PC, 
and back again 

Included in an expanded PCW 
catalogue section, is the latest 
edition of Software 
Technology's versatile 
CSTAM: the simple to use 
serial file transfer utility: 
available with 3" PCW disk, 
3.5" and 5.25" PC disks. 

Move files between any 
combination of these systems 
using the serial connector 
lead supplied. 

□ CSTAM £49.95 

□ PCW Serial interface 
£59.95 

□ CSTAM and interface is 
purchased together £99 



More for the PCW 
owner than ever 

By popular demand the PCW 
section has been expanded, 
andincludes thecomplete Loco 
selection from File to Font. 

Displaying it's usual commit- 
ment to be much more than 
just another software vendor's 
flog sheet, the all-new New 
Star Software Buyers' Guide 
and Catalogue is available free 
of charge - just call/write for 
your copy. 

There are 64 pages describing 
a complete range of IBM PC 
(and compatible) software, 
plus an expanded section 
covering the best of the PCW 
software. 

Accounts, wordprocessing, 
database and graphics are all 
covered. 

Check and see if your local 
software stockist has the New 
Star catalogue available - and 
if not, ask them to get some in, 
but don't delay before getting 
your free copy! □ 

Cracker 2 Turbo 

still the only high res 
graphic spreadsheet 
for PCW users 

The range of features and 
functions in Cracker remains 



NewWord2: 

the classic 
alternative WP for the 
PCW 

Lost in LocoScript? You may 
be surprised to learn that the 
most refined WordStar worka- 
like of them all has been avail- 
able to run on the PCW since 
long before LocoScript was 
dreamed of! 

NewWord2 operates under the 
CPM operating system, and 
uses the universally recog- 
nised codes that allow trans- 
portability of the skill to virtu- 
ally any micro computer - in- 
cluding systems operating 
under CDOS and Unix! What's 
more, the files are directly 
transferrable! 

□ NewWord2 PCW £60 

Q NewWord2 with Polyprint 
typeface sets, if purchased 
together £99.95 

□ Upgrade NewWord2 PCW 
to IBM PC edition £39.95 

□ Upgrade NewWord2 PCW 
to IBM PC edition with 
STAMfile transfer utility 
suite £60 

(Return of original master 
disk required with all 
upgrade purchases) 



OPINION POLLS 




Example plot from a PCW printer 



Prices here are EXCLUDING VAT 

All registered trademarks acknowledged. 



unsurpassed for the serious 
spreadsheet user. And don't 
forget, like newWord, Cracker 
users can upgrade to MSDOS 
and CDOS systems, taking all 
data and experience as you go! 
QCracker2 £60.00 



PaperBackUp 
Support 

Don't forget that our 
affiliate publishing 

company, PaperBack 
Software UK, operates a 
comprehensive hotline and 
support service on all it's 
published products. 

Extensive support, close 
integration of the facilities 
of UK published 
applications and the easy 
transfer of skill and data to 
other types of computer 
software like Cracker and 
NewWord,. makes 

PaperBack Software the 
logical solution for all UK 
users.