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flying , : .JM 
Nightmares 

Exclusive Review 


ReadySoft 


300 and the 300 logos 
are the trodemorlcs of 
The 3D0 Company. 


Space Hulk, Space Pirates, 

The Daedalus Encounter, VR Stalker, 
Zhadnost The People’s Party & Hell. 

Foes OfAli, DeathKeep, 
Prowler, Captain Quazar, OnSide, 
Killing Time & BattleSport. 

M2 Update with Trip Hawkins, 
E3 Show report, Dr. David Kirk Interview, 
3D0 Online, new Joypads & more... 


Disc Manufactured By 
NIMBUS INFORMATION SYSTEMS 


Presented with 3DO Magazine *5 
DEMO: NOT FOR RESALE 


"Space Ace" is a registered trade¬ 
mark of Bluth Group, Ltd. - ©1994. 
Character Designs ©1983 Don Bluth; 
©1994 all audio, visual and concept 
- used under the exclusive license of 
Epicenter Interactive Inc. 
Programming ©1994 ReadySoft 
Incorporated. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. 
"BrainDead 13" is a trademark of 
ReadySoft Incorporated. ©1995 


ReadySoft Incorporated? 4BS RIGHTS 
RESERVED. "DrogonV jjytfcpreg- 
istered trademark of BlutWIrbup, j 
Ltd. - ©1993. Character Designs 
©1983 Don Bluth; ©1993 all audio, 
visual and concept - used under the 
exclusive license of Epicenter 
Interactive Inc. Programming ©1993 
ReadySoft Incorporated. ALL RIGHTS 
RESERVED. 







































T 


Update 
Credits 
Jobs on offer 
Sponsors 






Computing 

CD-ROM Games, 
CD-ROM User, 
Internet and Comms Today, 
Net User, 

PC Kids, PC Office, 

PC Power, PC Tactix 


Video Games 

3 DO Magazine, 
Amiga CD Gamer, 
Games World, 
SegaPro, 
Super Gamer, 
X*Gen 


Sport 

Football Heroes 



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Tune your World Wide Web browser to: 


http://www.paragon.<o.uk/paragon 

Paragon Publishing, the publishers of this magazine, have vast Internet experience. In October 1994 it launched the first and best-selling 
Internet magazine, Internet and Comms Today*. With the launch of Net User in April 1995, it became the only UK magazine publisher 
to have two independent Internet magazines. When it comes to the Internet, there is no more experienced publisher. With our ever- 
increasing range of Computing, Video Games and Sport titles. Paragon Online will develop into one of the busiest Web sites. 



♦source ABC 


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favourable introductory terms, email Pat Kelly at 























MANAGING EDITOR 

stuart Wynne 


ASSIST. EDITOR 
& DESIGNER 

mark clive Wynne 

SYSTEMS MANAGER 

alan russell 

PRE-PRESS 

suzzane ryan 
ted dearburg 

SENIOR AD SALES 

diana monteiro 
AD SALES 
alan walton 

AD PRODUCTION 

allegra gee 
francesca gianelli 
clare logey 

PRODUCTION 

MANAGER 

jane hawkins 

GROUP PUBLISHER 

pat kelly 

PRODUCTION 

DIRECTOR 

di tavener 

MD 

richard monteiro 

RECEPTIONIST 

paula wood 

SUBS 

karen sharrock 
<■ 01202 780578 

COVER ARTWORK 

© 1995 Domark 

PRINTED IN UK BY 
Duncan Webb Offset Ltd. 

DISTRIBUTOR 

seymour 
int. press, 

Windsor house, 1 270 
london road 
norbury, london 
swl 6 4dh 

e 0181 6791899 

ISSN: 1355 9621 

If you have access to the World Wide 
Web, please visit the following for 
details of other Paragon magazines and 
t services. 

http://www.atlas.co.uk/ paragon.html 

IMPORTANT NOTICES 

• "3DO" is a trademark of The 
3DO Company, Redwood City, 

California, 94063, U.S.A., and is 
used by Paragon Publishing Ltd 
under license from the owner 
"3DO' M Magazine" is an 
independent publication and is not 
affiliated with The 3DO Company. 
The 3DO Company is not respon 
sible in any way for the editorial 
policy or other contents of this 
publication. 

• The ReadySoft disc will run in 
letterbox format on PAL systems 




Magazine 



News . 04 

M2 musings, price wars and Mortal Kombat III. 

Joy pad Reviews 06 

Snazzy new peripherals tried and tested. 

Comedy at 30fps 07 

ReadySoft finally break free of Don Bluth. 

Dr. David Kirk 08 

Crystal Dynamic’s Chief Scientist causes chaos. 

3DO @ E3 10 

Tore Software’s Marcus Irwin finally gets back! 

Competition 13 

Panasonic give away an FZ-10. And why not? 

Previews 15 

Featuring EA’s Foes Of Ali, Cyclone’s Captain 
Quazar & BattleSport plus Killing Time, Onside, 
Prowler & DeathKeep! 

3DO Online 28 

The 3DO Company hit the Net. Full report. 

M2 Update . 30 

3DO CEO Trip Hawkins offers M2 insights. 

Reviews 34 

Space Hulk, Flying Nightmares, Zhadnost: 

The People’s Party, The Deadelus Encounter, 

Hell, Space Pirates and VR Stalker. 

Play Guides 48 

Brilliant Need For Speed cheats & more... 

3DO Interactive 56 

M2 and Gex get debated. Hotly. 

Software Directory 60 

Every UK release listed and rated. 

Coming Soon 64 

Jam packed release schedules revealed. 



3D0 Magazine 03 Sept 1995 


































news 


co 

d 

O 


8 


3 D O 




Phase One was to unveil the world's hottest 
videogaming technology. That 'minor' matter 
accomplished, press speculation has now shifted to 
information held back for Phase Two (hardware 
partners) and Three (shipping details) press briefin¬ 
gs. Prior to E3 rumours suggested a standalone 3DO 
II would retail at $400, the upgrade for existing units 
would cost $200, and the latter would definitely ship 
this year. In the event, 3DO would commit to none of 
this on or off the record at E3. 

Behind the scenes gossip indicates M2's perfor¬ 
mance is such that no-one now regards it as simply 
an upgrade for 3DO I. Its superiority over the com¬ 
petition has got people again talking of 3DO as a 
'VHS' for interactive hardware. The Wall Street 
Journal's report of Sega and Philips entering negoti¬ 


ations over the hardware is still reverberating 
around the 3DO community. Certainly M2's excep¬ 
tionally cost-effective, high-performance chipset 
seems the only answer to the question: what's going 
to stop Sony? 

As M2's profile rises, so does the cost of launch¬ 
ing it. It's estimated that launching the original 3DO 
system cost around half a billion dollars all told, 
including everything from development work to 
manufacturing to marketing. If M2 is to be regarded 
as an entirely new launch, with a sales target far 
beyond what's been achieved by any existing super¬ 
console, then someone needs to chip in, at the very 
least, another half a billion dollars. 

The size of this price tag has been thrown into 
sharp relief by 3DO's own, recently posted financial 
results. For the fiscal year 
ending March 31st, 1995, 
the company recorded a 
loss of $46.3 million. While 
the company made $18.6 
million from royalties and 
pressing fees (almost dou¬ 
bling the previous year's 
revenue), the cost of devel¬ 
oping M2, basic running 
costs, the expansion of 
Studio 3DO and $8.4 mil¬ 
lion in stock incentives to 
hardware producers all 
took their toll. 

One netsurfer went 
online to suggest these fig¬ 
ures suggested 3DO's 
imminent demise. It was an 
accusation 3DO were 



Spectrum Holobyte's Top Gun is the first big name movie license to be 
announced for M2. Initially due on PC CD-ROM this Summer, it will then 
be converted to PlayStation, Ultra64 and M2. The latter two versions 
should look considerably superior to these PC CD-ROM pictures. 


prompt to refute, claiming if the Company were to 
need further investment, there was no shortage of 
offers. No names were mentioned, but besides 
Philips and Sega the most obvious source of further 
funds is Matsushita. In the Eighties, Matsushita 
established the real VHS standard by buying up 
JVC, a move which many expect to see replicated 
with 3DO. If this happened, other hardware manu¬ 
facturers such as GoldStar and Sanyo are expected 
to welcome it. Although the take-over would end 
3DO's independence, Matsushita have proven with 
VHS they have the vision and commitment to foster 
standards which everyone makes money out of - not 
just a sole manufacturer like Sony with the 
PlayStation. 



The behind-the-scenes politiking is one reason 
why a 1996 release for M2 has fallen into doubt. 
3DO CEO Trip Hawkins certainly isn't in any hurry 
to license M2 for less than it's worth, let alone sell the 
company cheap. Besides his personal fortune of 
some $300 million, there's an excellent roster of new 
3DO titles due in late '95 (many from Studio 3DO 
itself) and M2 is, after all, the hottest technology 
around. The latest rumour is that the Sega deal 
involves M2 being used for next generation coin-ops 
such as Virtua Fighter 3. The 3DO Company cer¬ 
tainly seems to be riding high, but we, like most 
other 3DO system owners, will only truly feel secure 
when those M2 prices and release dates are finally 
announced. 



While American Laser Games has just released its 
most expensively produced game yet, the sci-fi 
blaster Space Pirates, it has still not got to 
grips with our PAL TV system. 

Contrary to initial reports, 
the ALG GameGun is com¬ 
patible with PAL TVs... 
but the software isn't. 

Unless titles are expen¬ 
sively reprogrammed 
to suit PAL, they won't 
work with the 
GameGun on our 
TVs. You can still 
play the games with 
a normal joypad, 
but obviously that 


doesn't really do them justice. ALG are aware of the 
problem but are currently uncertain whether UK 
demand justifies the expen¬ 
sive of reprogramming. If 
you think they should, 
write now to: Jonathan 
Leach, VP of Home 
Entertainment, American 
Laser Games, 4801 Lincoln Rd, 
N.E. Albuquerque, NM 87109, USA. 


GALLUP 


Chart 



1 Wing Commander III E.A. 

2 Need For Speed E.A. 

3 Syndicate E.A. 

4 Slam # n # Jam # 95 BMG 

5 Hell Gametek 

6 Theme Park E.A. 

7 Gex BMG 

8 Return Fire E.A. 

9 Fifa Soccer E.A. 

10 Road Rash E.A. 


Week ending: | 


' S N || 19th July 


r'J 

» * V 

L % 1 



3DO Magazine 04 Sept 1995 


































MORTAL KOMBAT IIIDO 


3DO SNIPPETS 




Williams Entertainment has finally agreed to a 
3DO version of its arcade smash-hit via a long¬ 
term agreement with 
the Panasonic Software 
Company. "The 3DO 
Interactive Multiplayer system 
is capable of reproducing 
Williams' games with full 
arcade realism/' said Justin 
Heber, vice-president of 
Williams Entertainment. 

"We are excited to be affil¬ 
iated with a publishing company that 
also has the marketing savvy and distri¬ 
bution channels of Panasonic." 

The agreement basically gives Panasonic 

the right to pub¬ 
lish 3DO ver¬ 
sions of many 
current and 
future Williams 
releases, possi¬ 
bly including 
NBA Jam, with 


the first releases expected before Xmas '95. "We 
look forward to a long and successful relationship 
with Williams 

Entertainment," comment¬ 
ed Pansonic Software's VP Bill 
Gardner. "With this agreement, 
[we are] acquiring the rights to 
some of the most popular video 
games of all time." 

Mortal Kombat III is 
due out this September 
in the arcades and the 
3DO version will appear early 
next year. Unlike previous MK con¬ 
versions for home systems, the game 
will be developed by Williams themselves 
rather than Acclaim and Probe. The world-leading 
coin-op manufacturer also expressed support for 
the 3DO Accelerator: "M2 promises to deliver 
exceptional performance in a home game system," 
said Justin Heber, VP of Business Development at 
Williams. "The technical challenges of bringing 
major arcade titles to home systems will be sub¬ 
stantially reduced with this new technology." 


— ---- — --- 

CD INSTRUCTIONS 


l 

i 




> 

l 


F 



Canadian-based publishers ReadySoft are respon¬ 
sible for this month's amazingly slick demo. Besides 
a playable demo of Space Ace, there are non-inter¬ 
active demos of Dragon's Lair, Braindead 13 and 
Space Ace. The instructions for 
Space Ace couldn't be simpler: D- 
pad controls movement, while any of 
the three main buttons trigger an action move. The 
type of move or action depends on your situation, as 


an FMV-based game you sometimes can only watch 
- a dull beep indicates the game's registered your 
command but a move isn't possible. A sharp beep 
indicates you've made a move, although it might be 
the wrong one! The objective is to 
make your escape from the short 
game section in a spaceship. 

Space Ace was the last of a trilogy of Don Bluth 
arcade games, following on from Dragon's Lair II: 
Escape From Singe's Castle. It improved over its pre¬ 
decessors with an improved structure offering more 
branching points and more varied gameplay. As 
you'd expect of Bluth Studios, the graphics are 
exceptional while gameplay is certainly a huge 
challenge. 


• If your demo disc fails to load, please return it to: 

3DO Disc 5 Returns, Paragon Publishing, Paragon 
House, St. Peter's Road, Bournemouth BH1 2JS. 

Remember to include your full address so we can send 
your replacement as swiftly as possible. 


Despite being about six months late, EA's Wing 
Commander III has made a phenomenal impact on the sales 
charts. According to Gallup, its first week sales are easily 
the best ever for a 3DO title - propelling it to number two 
in the CD-ROM charts and, with only a little help from PC 
version, number two in the all formats charts as well. 

While 3DO M2 led the way for the 64bit revolution at E3, 

Ultra64's launch was abruptly cancelled. Nintendo claim 
the setback isn't due to widely rumoured technical problems 
- apparently SGI have finally finished the chipset - but soft¬ 
ware. The machine now won't be launched until Spring '96. 
Nintendo had originally sought to ensure it had plenty of 
games by forming a 'Dream Team' of developers and mak¬ 
ing a widely publicised deal with Williams - where Ultra64 
compatible hardware was used for Cruisin' USA and Killer 
Instinct. However, while Killer Instinct is a nifty riff on the SFII 
theme, it offers little new and Cruisin' USA is a bland 
reworking of OutRun theme with sub -Ridge Racer graphics. 
While Sega has its coin-ops and Electronic Arts high-spec 
PC projects, Nintendo's traditional whimsy has long seemed 
most comfortable on 8bit and Gameboy formats. Getting to 
grips with 64bit is‘obviously proving harder than they 
expected. 

America's ABC TV network has announced a joint venture 
with Spectrum HoloByte. The new company is expected to 
produce five games in the next two years. Gilman Louie, 
CEO of Spectrum HoloByte, commented: "With the advent 
of next generation platforms from Sony, Sega, Nintendo 
and Panasonic this venture with ABC will allow us to com¬ 
bine their [TV] programming with our interactive experi¬ 
ence. We look forward to creating a dynamic next genera¬ 
tion sports brand." 

As reported last issue, the war over VideoCD's successor is 
hotting up. The Toshiba/Time-Warner system, dubbed SD- 
DVD (Super Disc-Digital Video Disc) has already begun 
talks with 'a major games hardware company.' No further 
details are forthcoming, although two candidates immedi¬ 
ately spring to mind. Sega has connections into the alliance 
via Hitachi (who manufacture the Saturn's CPUs), while Trip 
Hawkins recently went on record to say the next step for 
3DO was likely to be DVD rather than a quad-speed CD- 
ROM. SD-DVD discs can hold fifteen times the data of a 
conventional CD, however players can also read normal 
CDs, VideoCDs and CD-ROMs. 

The seminal cyberpunk movie Blade Runner is to finally 
spawn a videogame version. Virgin Interactive has signed 
up the hugely influential movie and plans a game for 1996, 
initially on PC and Mac. The Las Vegas-based Westwood 
Studios, widely respected for their work on Dune II and 
Command and Conquer, are the developers who'll actually 
produce the game. If it does the film justice, expect plenty of 
conversions. 

GoldStar's endlessly delayed ship-out of its 3DO system 
has finally happened and, at the last minute, the RRP was 
snipped £50 to £349, with a FIFA Soccer bundle. The move 
is the first sign that the aggessive US/Japanese price wars 
might eventually happen here. In the States, Matsushita 
finally bit the bullet and slashed a $100 off the price of the 
Panasonic FZ-10, bringing it down to $299. A similar cut 
in Japan took the FZ-10 down to Y29,800 (£225). Richard 
Marmoy, Panasonic's UK marketing manager, claimed the 
cuts represented "a powerful statement of commitment to 
the format." Even though the UK RRP remains £399, 
Marmoy is "gunning for a similar price, but we obviously 
have to consider things like the market size, higher sales tax 
and such like." Panasonic certainly isn't displeased that 
stores such as Virgin Our Price has followed the lead of 
independents with a £349 pricepoint. "We've done it to 
stimulate the market and increase the 3DO installed base," 
said Joe McNicholas, Virgin's console product manager. 
"We remain committed to 3DO, and sales have actually tre¬ 
bled since the price cut - but we've also done it in antici¬ 
pation of other 32bit formats being available this year." The 
first of these is, of course, the Sega Saturn which replicated 
its surprise American ship-out at E3 (four months ahead of 
schedule), with a July 8th UK ship. Despite its initial sniping 
at 3DO's pricepoint, the Saturn's RRP is £399 with margins 
so tight the company suggests retailers look to peripherals 
for their profits - a Saturn TV lead comes in at £25! 


Magazine] 


3DO Magazine 05 Sept 1995 


3DO 

























3DO 


feature 



After a slow start, 3DO is finally getting its regulation share of 
oddly shaped. Far Eastern accessories. We sort out the 
functional from the fashionable. 


3D Zero Infra-Red 
Controller Pack 
Fire International £49.99 

Half the world's peripheral industry is based 
squarely on the muscular shoulders of Street Fighter 
II and its six-button controls. The bizarrely titled 3D 
Zero Infra-Red appears to be a straightforward 
reworking of an old SNES SFII design. The basic 
shape recalls the 'stretched Nintendo' look of the 
numerous, Far Eastern pads although changes the 
colours to imitate Panasonic's original FZ-1JP. It's a 
smart move considering the fact Panasonic them¬ 
selves were heavily influenced by the SNES and the 
shoulder buttons work identically for both. On the 
face of the pad are the normal three buttons, with 
the L/R and Pause buttons duplicated above for 
six-button SFII play. In the centre of the pad are 
pause and stop, plus specific IR controls. An on/off 
button allows you to save battery power, while 
Player 1 /2 allows you to select which control signal 


your pad will emit (the opportunity for cheating is 
superb!). In the middle there's a small LED which 
flashes with each movement to show the batteries 
haven't died. 

The actual D-pad doesn't feel 
incredibly comfortable - it's a 
simple cross shape - but it 
comes with a socket so you 
can screw-in the supplied 
mini-stick. It's an old idea 
which some people might 
like, but we've yet to find a 
need for it. Many people would say 
the same about IR play as well, but contrary to 
expectations responsiveness is reasonable. The 
receiver unit plugs into the joypad port via a short 


cable (so be careful if you keep your 3DO out of 
sight), while the two supplied pads work off a pair 
AAA batteries each. 
Overall, the 
pad is a rea¬ 
sonable com¬ 
promise if you 
don't want to 
spend the earth. 
The feel is rather light¬ 
weight, but the finish is good and unlike 
Euromax's six-button F40, it retains the shoulder 
buttons so you can still play Need For Speed quite 
comfortably, an essential feature in this office. If 
you fancy cordless play, this is well worth investi¬ 
gating. 




3D Zero Controller 

Fire International £29.99 

3D Zero's manufacturers certainly 
know how to shave costs. After 
turning a SNES design into the 3D 
Zero IR, just a few more tweaks 
produced this conventionally 
cabled design. The plastic emitter 
section has been replaced by a cord 
holder at the front, the battery compartment 
is retained (without contacts) and the IR 


by 

autofire 
and 

slow-mo 
buttons. The 
latter apply two 

autofire speeds to the normal three buttons 
and the L/R and Pause buttons as used by SFIIX. 
All the autofire modes require you to hold the rele¬ 


vant button down to activate them. Slow-mo oper¬ 
ates off the pause button, rapidly flicking it on/off 
so you can play SFIIX as if drowned in treacle, for 
the truly abominable gameplayers out there. 

The feel of the pad is, of course, identical to the 
IR version - somewhat lightweight, especially 
compared to the FZ-lJP's brick outhouse design, 
yet overall fine. Like most cheap pads, it omits both 
a passthrough connector and stereo socket, but at 
the price is a reasonable enough purchase worth 
checking out. 


FZ-2JFX 

Panasonic @ £30 

We raved over Panasonic's baby pad in 3DO 
Magazine 3's FZ-10 review (news section), so it's 
great to find the pad is available separately. Made 
of the same high quality materials as the original, 
this is a considerably shrunk down version which is 
much more comfortable for younger players while 
still being absolutely fine for adults. Besides looking 



gorgeous, the fire buttons and D- 
pad seem more responsive 
than the original and 
whilst it's a shame 
there's no stereo 
socket, there is a 
passthrough connec¬ 
tor so you can con¬ 
nect up more joypads if 


you want to. 


If you can do without any 
special features such as 
autofire and six-but¬ 
tons, then the FZ-2JPX 
is undoubtedly the 
pad to go for and a 
great bargain at the 
price. 



3DO SpeedPad 

Logic 3 £19.99 

At last! A miracle! Yes, 3DO has finally 
got a pad which isn't about half the 
cost of a 16bit console. This practi¬ 
cally budget release is based on 
an old PC pad, subsequently 
reworked by Creative Labs to 
accompany their 3DOBlaster 
card. 3DO themselves released 


their own version as a 

standalone product 
for America - 
which was 
reviewed in 
Issue Two of 
3DO 

Magazine. 

As we said 

then, the styling is rather ugly and the top L/R 


'shift' buttons unusually small (small round circles 
rather than long elipses), while stereo headphone 
socket and passthrough connector are omitted to 
cut costs. Nevertheless it's perfectly comfortable to 
use over long periods of play and at a price sub¬ 
stantially less than the Panasonic standard, it would 
make a perfectly acceptable pad. At £20 less, this 
should find quite a few takers. □ ssw 

3DO Magazine 


3DO Magazine 06 Sept 1995 















3DO 


preview 




BrainDead 13 from ReadySoft 





t's something of a surprise to realise 
Dragon's Lair is now over twelve years 
old. It and the inevitable sequels. 
Escape From Singe's Castle and Space 
Ace, must be unique among Eighties coin-ops in 
that they're still selling today - unchanged and 
unenhanced. Produced with Hollywood production 
values by Don Bluth's renegade group of ex-Disney 
animators, the visuals remain as fresh and imagi¬ 
native as they were a decade ago. 

While ReadySoft remain committed to convert¬ 
ing the Bluth games to new formats, neither have 
they been blind to the advance of technology since 
that first, notoriously unreliable Laserdisc coin-op. 
BrainDead 7 3 was begun over eighteen months 
ago as an attempt to produce a Dragon's Lair for 
the Nineties. 

Rather than call on Bluth Studios for the visuals, 
ReadySoft decided to set-up their own animation 
studio with the game's 30 strong team largely 
made up of artists. While some of the new recruits 
are straight out of art college, most are experi¬ 
enced veterans who've worked on TV series or 
movies like An American Tail. 

As with Bluth's work, the animation work has 
been produced to the highest standards. The origi¬ 
nal imagery is 24bit colour, which will then be 
downgraded to suit the relevant platform. The 
game's design, however, makes far more efficient 
use of the animators efforts. 15-20 minutes of orig¬ 
inal animation is likely to fill at least two CDs and 
probably three, witf/certain elements cleverly 
reused to extend the experience. While the game's 
format is still based around FMV, the structure is 
far less linear than even Space Ace. A full-blown 
maze game is probably the most obvious illustra¬ 
tion of the multiple decision points and seamless 
joins between actions. 

As you can see from the demo, the quality of 
the FMV is excellent. Rather than use Cinepak, 
ReadySoft have their own compression techniques 
with BrainDead using the latest update - "part evo¬ 
lution, part revolution" according to 
Elton. The use of tweaked CD dri¬ 
vers and an intelligent memory 
buffer marks the main advance 

over previous games. The 3DO 
version will improve even fur¬ 
ther over the original, 

PC CD-ROM game with 
more colours (256 
each for both fore¬ 
ground and background) 
smoother transitions. M2, 


After achieving world wide fame with their Don Bluth arcade 
conversions, ReadySoft now plan to release their own, entirely 
original cartoon-styled epic. Stuart Wynne spoke to project 
manager David Elton about his Disneyesque ambitions. 


Project Manager David Elton, top right, has 
been working on BrainDead 13 for over a year 
and a half. Assembling the artists for the pro¬ 
ject required a major recruitment drive. 

with its built-in MPEG, would be even better of 
course and Elton admits to being very impressed 
by the E3 demos. 

Asked what he thinks BrainDead's main appeal 
is, Elton initially picks out the stun¬ 
ning graphics, but then changes his 
mind: "The best thing about 
BrainDead is that it makes me 
laugh. It's genuinely funny. The death sequences 
are probably the best, they're so good you really 
won't mind dying you'll be laughing so much! 

That's the main thing, the humour." □ ssw 
•BrainDead 13 is due out in September from 
Entertainment International. 

3DO Magazine 




Read y Soft 


3DO Magazine 07 Sept 1995 





























3DO 


interview 


I Magazine 






C 1 

1 S 1 i '1 



Chaos Master 


Eighteen months ago. Crystal Dynamics were just about the 
only thing 3DO had going for it. Crash 'N Burn launched the 
machine, while demos of Total Eclipse and Off-World 
Interceptor sold it to people as having an exciting future. Then 
came the MDF royalty rise and a very public falling out. 
Crystal's Chief Scientist, Dr David Kirk, ponders the future. 


Crystal's relationship with 3DO has appeared 
very rocky recently... 

"We were quite unhappy with the MDF, the royalty 
increase. But we're looking forward and trying to 
determine what's the best location to invest our time 
and effort. What I'd really like to emphasise is that 
when Crystal started, 3DO was the only advanced 
platform so it was the logical choice for us to do all 
of our development on 3DO. Now we're moving 
on to an era with many more choices - we're 
going to be sharing our time between all the viable 
platforms as planned from the beginning." 

You've got a substantial PlayStation and Saturn 
release schedule. Will any of those titles be con¬ 
verted to 3DO? 

"Possibly. One of the things that we're evaluating 
right now is M2, which we're very excited about... 
Crystal's long-term strategy is to be the 32bit mar¬ 
ket leader because we are focused on the new gen¬ 
eration of machines. Part of our culture is constant¬ 
ly reinventing and moving forward - we're always 
looking at the next machine coming out. As an 
aggressive early adopter it's a very important thing 
with us. Currently that's PlayStation and Saturn, but 
soon it'll be M2. Nothing's decided yet, but M2's 
certainly a very exciting platform." 

3DO claim M2 is five to ten times more powerful 
than the PlayStation... 

"Each platform has its respective strengths... One of 
the characteristics of technology is that it marches 
along - it leaps along - with time. Since M2 is a 
year later than the PlayStation, there's a lot of tech¬ 
nology they can take advantage of. It's a different 
generation in some sense." 

Did you find the M2 demo's at E3 believable? 
"They're certainly in the right ballpark. The M2 

Profile 

Dr David Kirk originally made a name for himself in 
the high end graphics workstation business where he 
made no less than seven patented inventions. After 
joining Crystal Dynamics at its inception, he was 
swiftly placed right at the heart of the company's 
whole business approach. Kirk's awesome technical 
department evaluates new machines and develops 
the programming tools with which Crystal games 
are produced for them. While other software houses 
are made nervous by the apparent chaos caused by 
all the new machines, Kirk welcomes it: "Chaos is 
good - it's exciting! We're not against chaos. We're 
willing to pay attention and be aggressive and take 
advantage of opportunities as they come up. And 
with that attitude chaos is good for us." 


technology with SDRAM and so on is very much at 
the leading edge of graphics capability. Certainly 
comparable to high-end graphics computers like 
the next generation of workstations... machines sell¬ 
ing for $50-100,000. A lot of those pieces of tech¬ 
nology and a lot of the ideas from those systems 
are being brought down the price curve in M2. 
[3DO] are very, very well acquainted with the big 
picture of graphics technology. So no, the demos 
aren't unbelievable - they're very much in the ball¬ 
park." 

With its new partners has 3DO tapped into a 
whole new realm of expertise? 

"Absolutely. They did a lot of things right with the 
first platform, it's a very powerful machine, it has 
some moments of brilliance sprinkled in, but also 
some problems. The M2 is a much more well 
rounded system. Their partnerships [with IBM and 
Motorola] really brings in the technical heavy hit¬ 
ters. Those people are really serious in the VLSI 
[Very Large Scale Integration chip] business and 
they do a great job. 3DO have really brought in 
the hired guns!" 

How impressive is M2 technically? 

"From a technical standpoint it looks absolutely 
fabulous... They've taken a very, very good high 
level look at what kind of graphics system is appro¬ 
priate for a really high level performance games 
system and they've made some really very clever 
changes from the approach made in the original 
system... As for details I don't want to violate my 
NDA. [The interviewer reels off published specs...] 
"Z-buffering is a very important feature because... 
it allows the developer to look more effectively at 
creating the game experience rather than having to 
worry about the details of display... Alpha buffer¬ 
ing will allow for a much higher quality display. 

The effective resolution is greatly increased by hav¬ 
ing anti-aliasing because the apparent pixel 
boundaries are much smaller when you can blend 
at the edges. In our games we have always focused 
on anti-aliasing - so this is a great thing for us. It 
moves in a direction we already attach a lot of 
importance to. 

"I also think the PowerPC is an excellent proces¬ 
sor choice - very powerful - while the choice of the 


MPEG standard for video playback is also very 
valuable for us. It means we can use off-the-shelf 
tools to produce our video content - any standard 
MPEG will play." 

Would you say M2 has an elegant design? 

"I would say that there a lot of characteristics of 
M2 that show evidence of a great deal of thought 
being put into the architecture. It's very cleverly put 
together. Technical people always use that word, 
'elegant'. I don't know if I'd ever describe a design 
as elegant but 'clever' is the word I'd use, certainly, 
the M2 design is very clever." 

How hard would it be to develop for M2? 

"Actually it's likely it will be easier than for the 
original platform because the additional features 
will not be burdensome, but in fact labour saving. 
For example, Z-buffering, it means you don't have 
to write sorting code... I'm also very optimistic that 
there will be a high degree of compatibility with 
the original platform titles on M2. Since we have a 
great amount of experience developing for 3DO, it 
would be very valuable to us if the development 
environment for M2 is heavily built around the 
same structure." 

Is there anything you'd criticise about M2? 

"I can't think of anything specific. Over our history 
with 3DO we've been fairly closely involved with 
them... And virtually everything that we felt was 
important to improve for M2, 3DO has made a 
good stride in improving those qualities. They real¬ 
ly listened to the developers, from our point of 
view, at least." 

Will there be a Crystal Dynamics game for M2's 
launch? 

"There's certainly that possibility. We're currently 
talking with 3DO about our respective plans for 
M2. Nothing is committed, though." 

When will you make a final decision about M2? 
"You could probably expect to see something fairly 
soon. We've been a very strong supporter of 3DO 
in the past and there's no reason to expect that to 
change if they're producing a really great hard¬ 
ware platform. We're producing great software so 
there's a clear match!" □ ssw 

3DO Magazine 


3DO Magazine 08 Sept 1995 

















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3DO 


feature 


| Magazine 


F 


EL E CT R ONIC 

ENTERTAINMENT 


EXPO 


3DO 



E 3 


Los Angeles E3 Show Report from from Marcus Irwin 



he E3 in Los Angles last month was The 
3DO Company's first chance to really 
show interested parties why they 
believe they are, and will be, the 
biggest selling platform this year and onwards. 
Nothing wrong with that you may think, but with 
Sony, Sega and (well, maybe) Nintendo vying for 
the same title it seems that 3DO really needed to 
pull out the stops at the E3 to keep this target with¬ 
in reach. As a 3DO owner, I came away thinking 
that 3DO had not done this view any harm at all. 
Sony showed 80 odd titles, but I got the impression 
it was all about quantity not quality. Sega showed 
that they're finding it hard to take 32bit gaming by 
the horns. Nintendo put back Ultra64 and tried 
very hard indeed to show us that 16bit gaming can 
be fun at £60 a game (yeah, right!). 

3DO, by contrast, showed that their understand¬ 
ing of 32bit gaming is growing day by day and so 
too the various affiliated software houses. This was 
proven at E3 with some superb looking and 
playable games on show. Expect around 50 differ¬ 
ent games for release this year (apart from Doom 
which couldn't be seen for love nor money), while 
some stunning M2 demos promised an amazing 
future. As much as a certain magazine likes to tell 
you that the future of video games begins with 
'play' and ends with 'station', if M2 gets the right 
software they're going to be eating their words. 
Anyway here's a list of some games never before 
seen, and some old faves which deserve yet more 
drooling over! 


ELECTRONIC ARTS 

Foes of AH 

This (if the title hasn't given it away) is a boxing 
simulator. Not a boxing game like Fighters' Road 
on the PlayStation but a boxing simulator. Believe 
me there's a big difference. The differences will 
become clear as I explain a bit about the game 
mechanics. Right, let's start with the graphics. First 
of all you see the fight from the eyes of your boxer 
(though the finished version will offer loads of dif¬ 
ferent angles). What you see is a texture mapped 
boxer standing in front of you with a photo realistic 
face. Believe me, it's quite frightening having two 
tons of crap knocked out of you by someone who 
looks like George Foreman on steroids. As you're 
fighting this gentleman you actually see his nose 
bleeding, his eyes getting blacker and blacker and 
his face generally getting uglier and bloodier as 
the rounds go on. But as you're giving the other 



Hi - i f i a 


Utytotwrti 

,pUtfcrn» , 


While deadlines prevented us attending E3 ourselves, Marcus 
Irwin, of Tore Software, did blag a trip over the pond. Below is 
his personal account of the world's biggest videogames Expo. 
For more E3 news see Coming Soon. 


M2 certainly 
brought the crowds, 
and even a cheer¬ 
leader or two, justi¬ 
fying the efforts of 
both the 3DO crew 
and Panasonic. 


boxer a good 1 -2-3 in the face he's doing the 
same to you. Now here is the really cool part. As 
your face gets slowly punched in, your eyes start to 
close up and the screen starts to blur on the side of 
the screen you're getting punched on. Get a real 
battering, and both sides blur so you can only see 
punches aimed at your nose. To top it all, if you get 
knocked out when you get back on your feet, you'll 
see everything in double vision and have to stay 
out of trouble until you get your senses back. This 
title should be on sale by October this year and 
will be another feather in 3DO's hat. 

NHL '96 

Yep that's right, NHL '96 from EA is coming our 
way. With five different views and all the players 
from the NHL included, plus a bonus of having six 
daisychained players a la FIFA, this has a good 


chance of being Sports Title Of The Year on any 
console. (Believe me this game is fast and easy on 
the eye). With games like FIFA, Madden and Slam 
'N Jam on the 3DO system, one thing it can't be 
knocked for is its sports sims. Maybe the quantity 



3DO Magazine 10 Sept 1995 

















isn't there but since every sim is pretty much the 
best in its category on any system, who cares? 

Psychic Detective 

Another interactive movie (what do you expect 
when you buy a console called the 3DO Interactive 
Multiplayer for God's sake?!).The story line goes 



that you're a private detective with a difference, the 
difference being that you have strange psychic 
powers and you have to use these strange powers 
to solve some grisly murders. Despite my usual 
detestation for these sort of games, I was actually 
quite impressed with this one. It's so weird and 
original it might actually be a hit. 

Shock Wave II 

I've never been a huge fan of the original, but the 
sequel looked very smart. The graphics are stun¬ 





ning, while the more open structure suggested a lot 
more depth. 

Shredfest 

After the astonishing Road Rash, whatever Monkey 

Doo produced 
next was guar¬ 
anteed to attract 
huge attention. 
While little was 
on show for this 
snowboarding 
arcade game, 


there's no doubt it will be huge. 

GOLDSTAR 

Firewall 

A texture-mapped shoot-'em-up which looks similar 
to Shock Wave, only instead of piloting a futuristic, 
hi-tech aircraft you're controlling a futuristic, hi- 
tech tank. Looks promising. 

INTERPLAY 

Blackhawk 

A side-scrolling platformer with more than a pass¬ 



ing resemblance to Prince Of Persia. 1,000 frames 
of rotoscoped animation, 20+ levels, shoguns, 
whips and plenty of logic puzzles are among the 
attractions on offer. 

Casper 

A sickly, Spielberg produced movie about the 



'friendly ghost' is turned into a videogame with 
20+ complex puzzles secreted within Whipstaff 
Manor. Casper can fly through walls (of course), 
travel through electrical outlets and morph into var¬ 
ious useful objects. 

Clay Fighter 



The classic SNES morphin'-comedy-beat-'em-up 
should be perfect for 3DO. 

Descent 

Raved over PC blast-'em-up, similar to Doom but 


3DO Magazine 11 Sept 1995 



with spaceships. 30 levels, light-sourcing, automap¬ 
ping, repair stations, power-ups, rock music and 
texture maps to the max. 

Rock N Roll Racing 

A superb isometric SNES racer gets uprated for 



3DO. No ingame shots or demos though, just these 
lovely pre-rendered grabs. 

Waterworld 

The polar caps have melted, drowning the land 
and wiping out most of humanity. Those that sur¬ 



vive war among themselves, while searching for a 
legendary island. The videogame makes extensive 
use of FMV, with eleven rendered 3D action 
sequences making up the gameplay. 

INTERPLAY/INFOGRAMES 

Alone in the Dark 2 

If you liked the first one but wanted more fighting 
and less puzzles this one's for you. And for those of 
you who wanted more puzzles and less fighting, 
tough! - wait for D. It's also worth bearing in mind 
that while Interplay's NTSC AITD2 is due soon, 
Infogrames' PAL version will be delayed so that it 
can be produced in glorious fullscreen mode. 

JVC 

Deadly Skies 

This arcade-style shoot-'em-up gives you a choice > 


3DO 

















3DO 


feature 



> of three aircraft: an FI 6, MiG-29 and F-l 17A 
Stealth Bomber (sic). The game adopts a behind- 
the-aircraft view in true Afterburner style for fast- 
action duels with an enemy aircraft piloted either 
by a friend or the computer. Missiles, lasers and 
cloaking devices are the weapons of choice, while 
graphics are a mix of polygon aircraft and pre¬ 
rendered backgrounds. 

Varuna's Forces 

Didn't see this one, but the blurb looked interesting 
with a Space Hulk scenario. Basically you control 
the eponymous forces in question, an elite group of 
soldiers, tasked with infiltrating alien bases. You get 
to guide the troops' dropship down to landing, 
then command the troops as they explore Doom- 
style corridors. 


PANASONIC 

Biosfear 

Returning from a deep space mission, your ship is 
forced to investigate the failure of your only stop¬ 



over point. On your arrival you find that the robots 
on the planet have gone loopy. The only way 
home, is to land and take back the installation with 
mega-violence. An interesting Doom/Descent 
clone. 

Carrier: Fortress At Sea 

Produced in conjunction with the Discovery 
Channel, this is based on a TV documentary of the 
same name. However, rather than simply rerunning 
it in FMV, this ambitious edutainment title uses a 
wealth of schematics, 3D models, stills and FMV to 
provide a comprehensive guide to the USS Carl 
Vinson, a nuclear powered aircraft carrier. There's 
even a Challenge Module which asks you to pilot 
an F-l 4 as it comes into land. A must for Top Gun 
fans, this should at least be better than Mindscape's 
dreadful Space Shuttle. [Autumn] 

Cyberdillo 

A unique 3D perspective for a very strange game 


which baffled most people at E3. To quote the flyer: 
"'My butt hurt... a lot," - Amanda Hugginkiss, after 
her first game of Cyberdillo.' 

D 

One thing D is not is an interactive movie. D evi¬ 
dently is known as an interactive horror movie and 
from what I've seen of this strange title at the E3, it 
is definitely the latter. Basically if you crossed Alone 
In The Dark with 7th Guest and gave it a chainsaw 
this would give you a pretty good idea of what to 
expect from this superb looking title. All in all, I'd 
heartily agree with last issue's acclaim for the 
Japanese version and there's no doubt the US ver¬ 
sion will do well. UK PAL letterboxing of an already 
letterboxed title could be a pain - but innovative 
puzzles and great style make it well worth a look. 
Isis 

Another interactive puzzle game. This one is a bit 
more like Mysfthan anything else using some 



amazingly colourful graphics with the extra bonus 
of having music by Earth Wind and Fire, plus live 
footage of their last concert and interviews with the 
band too.(For you kids too young to remember 
them they had big shoes, big flares, big affros and 
they danced a lot). 

Scramble Cobra 

This Genki/Pack-ln-Video collaboration is currently 
being promoted in Japan by Matsushita, but no 




word as yet on 
who'll handle the 
UK release. The 
game clearly tilts 
its rotorhead at 
Shock Wave, 
adopting a very 
similar graphic 
engine with similar limitations. As in Shock Wave 
you don't have much control over your height, but 
this is compensated for by some great texture 
maps. Everything from copters to aircraft carriers 


are very well drawn, while the HUD display is 
arguably the most involving and realistic this side 
of Flying Nightmares. Fast and fun, if this tweaks 
its awkward handling it could be a big hit with 
shoot-'em-up fans. 

Trip D 

For those of you out there who have played Tetris 
and Columns and are dying to play these on the 



3DO system you're in luck because this is a cross 
between both of these falling tile type games and is 
bound to sell very well. 


STUDIO 3DO 

Phoenix 3 



Developed by 
Gray Matter, this 
uses high quality 
FMV to gloss 
over the transi¬ 
tions between a 
space combat 
sim, like Wing III 
only more fun apparently, and a side-scrolling bit 
where your guy runs along with a gun - Green 
Beret- style. Looks promising. 

PO'ed 

This is definitely 
the sure fire hit of 
the year as 
PO'ed has it all. 
Basically a 
Doom- clone with 
a jet pack, lots of 
blood, lots of nice 
touches and lots of gameplay (oh yeah and a very 
silly sense of humour indeed). It just keeps getting 
faster, more gory and more deranged with every 
new version. Fabulous stuff! □ mi 

3DO Magazine 




3D0 Magazine 12 Sept 1995 
























3DO 


competition 




Panasonic 





ustifiably pleased with the arrival of 
their 4 CD mega-game, Panasonic 
have put together a splendid competi¬ 
tion to promote it. 

One lucky prize winner will not only grab a 
copy of The Daedalus Encounter , easily the best 
FMV spectacular yet, but also the stunningly sexy 
Panasonic FZ-10 3DO system. The FZ-10 boasts a 
fliptop CD-ROM Drive, a nifty new joypad design 


MECHADEUS 

and a built-in Memory Management program. Tia 
Carrere and the sleekest, curviest 3DO system yet 
are obviously a match made in heaven. To get your 
hands on this magical pair, answer these two easy 
questions. 

1: Which 'most excellent' movie was not 


worthy of Tia's talents? 

2: Who plays Tia's co-star in the game? 

Answers on a postvard or sealed envelope to: 

3DO Magazine, Panasonic Competition, 

Paragon Publishing, Paragon House, 

St. Peter's Road, Bournemouth BH1 2JS. 
Competition closing date: 30:8:95 □ 

3DO Magazine 


3DO Magazine 13 Sept 1995 
















3D0 




MAJOR STOCKIST 

of both new + used 3DO games import & official titles, 
all latest releases. 

SEND S.A.E. FOR A FULL LIST 
Neo Geo Cartridge Sales 
GAMES £20 - £50 Please Call! 

Part exchange welcome. 

EFFICIENT MAIL ORDER SERVICE 

Please add £1.50 P&P per game 

Payment must be made by cheque or Postal Order payable to Game 




JHH • 

riJiEHU 

raTTTTKTT 

nrrn 

rilyZJi 


MANNERINGS 

Sound & Vision 

0181-422-2070/2778 


3DO SOFTWARE 


Cannon Fodder 
Corpse Killer 
Flying Nightmares 
Gex 
Harrier 


£29.99 

£37.99 

£29.99 

£37.99 

£32.99 


♦ 

8 


Hell £37.99 

Quarantine £32.99 

Return Fire £37.99 

Rise of the Robots £39.99 

Wing Commander III £37.99 


This is just a small selection of our huge range of 3DO Software. 
Please call for other titles or our Free Catalogue 

Hardware 

Panasonic FZ10E 3DO Player inc. Joypad + Free Game £379.99 
VJ 3D0 Control Pad £29.99 


MAIL ORDER SAME DAY DESPATCH * EXPORT WELCOME 


Name and Address 

Tel No 

Payment Method □ Credit Card □ Cheque (payable to Mannerings Sound & Vision) 
Card No Expiry Date Signature 

Tide £ 

Title £ 

Title £ 

Hardware £5.00 Add Postage £ 


Postage £1.50 per parcel, 

Please send a free catalogue □ 


Total Order £ 


Total Order No Phone, Post or Fax orders to: 

Mannerings Sound & Vision. 21/22 Station Parade, Northolt Road, South Harrow, 
Middx. HA2 8HG Tel: 0181-422-2070/2778 Fax: 0181-423-8567 




Computer and Video Games 


y the time you read this we should all be 
piloting the victory in Wing Commander III, 
learning the intricacy of Harrier control in Flying 
Nightmares and maybe, blasting Genestealers in 
Space Hulk . If not, then why not? 

3DO has delivered some spectacular titles, but we feel of late 7 
release dates have become works of fiction. O.K, so Saturn & 
Playstation with over six months on the shelves, haven't got 
exactly a mind boggling choice of software titles between them 
and must be giving some of their new owners second thoughts. 
Not to mention both companies obsession with making each 
machine totally non-compatible to all others. I'm sure Sony 
haven't forgotten what happened to Betamax®! 

On a more positive note, M2 certainly looks to be the canines 
B*♦****$; but what's the point of all this distant techno hype 
when all we want is software now! Too much hard and not 
enough soft, a recipe for disaster in anyones language. Unless 



Call us for the best in second hand games 
inc. li.S imports. Plus used consoles 


CONSOLES ETC. 


GOLDSTAR 3D0 

NEW. £329.95 

PANASONIC 3DO FZ.£ CALL 

PANASONIC 3DO FZ10.£ CALL 

JOYPADS AND EXTENSION LEADS 
ALWAYS IN STOCK. 

GEX. £ 39.99 

FLASHBACK.. £ 39.99 

MYST. £ 39.99 

HELL. £39.99 

SLAM ‘N’ JAM. £ 39.99 


NEW TITLES - WE HOPE! 


WING COMMANDER III _£ CALL 

SYNDICATE.£ CALL 

FLYING NIGHTMARES.£ CALL 

SPACE HULK.£ CALL 

ALONE IN THE DARK 2.£ CALL 

PANZER GENERAL.£ CALL 

CANNON FODDER.£ CALL 

W.C.S/STRIKER.£ CALL 

BALDIES. .£ CALL 

DOOM.£ CALL 

BLADEFORCE.£ CALL 

PO'ed.£ CALL 


you're into porn movies I suppose. 


t one computer a video games 

f t=^g|=SE 9 WILTON PARADE, HIGH STREET, FELTHAM, MIDDLESEX TW13 4BU 

81 893 2100/844 2575 ^0181 844 1944 



































































3DO 


preview 



The Foes Of Ali from Electronic Arts 


After M2, one of E3's biggest hits was Foes Of Ali, a stunning 
polygon-based beat-'em-up - on 3DO I! Besides all the usual 
camera angles, it offers a stunning first person-perspective 
complete with double vision and swollen shut eyes. In the bat¬ 
tle of polygon bone-crunchers. Gray Matter are confident the 
science of boxing will easily outpoint its brawling competitors. 



Ithough E3 was the first public whisper 
about Ali, the project has been in 
development since October '93. 

Project Manager Roland Kippenhan no 
longer remembers whose idea it was - "it's so long 
ago now" - but developers Gray Matter are confi¬ 
dent it was theirs. The first 3DO unit was just about 
to ship then and "hopes were high for it being 
accepted as the de facto standard/' says 
Kippenhan. "We were starting up a lot of projects, 
sort of like the beginning of the Amiga... At the 
time 3DO was the only platform which could sup¬ 
port the game." 

4D Boxing by DSI (now EA Canada) was 
undoubtedly a big influence, but even so the game 
floundered in development hell for nearly a year. 
"There's been a lot design changes," admits 
Kippenhan. Initially the idea was you could create 
your own boxer, but it never really gelled. Then in 
June '94 , the Mohammed Ali licence was signed 
up, giving the game both a title and a clear direc¬ 
tion. "Since we signed him up it's just been fantas¬ 
tic... Like the September '94 issue of Sports 
Illustrated had Ali as the number one choice, of 40 
individuals, for the person who has most signifi¬ 
cantly elevated the world of sports in the last four 
decades." 

The licence also brought changes at the Toronto- 
based Gray Matter, home of Boulderdash and 
Infiltrator whizzkid, Chris Gray. One of the compa¬ 
ny's veteran teams was shifted onto the project, 
with Dave Bright as lead programmer, Bryce 
Cochrane heading up 3D graphics and veteran 
programmer Misho Katulic. The team had a long 
list of credits churning out 16bit 
licenses, most of which had to be 
written to incredibly tight deadlines 
- eg Wayne's Worldl However, 
with EA's innovative platformer 
BOB and, best of all, the surreal, highly playable 
Ren & Stimpy, they'd shown world class talent. 

FIRST STEPS 

The team certainly leapt at the chance to develop 
for 3DO. "The machine was a quantum leap from 
the SNES and Genesis," says Bright, "the develop¬ 
ment environment is very nice." Katulic agrees: 
"600K is pretty big for an OS but on the other 
hand it's fully featured. There's a lot of stuff in there 
which saves you having to write it yourself. Also, 
they're still working on it - the last major release 
cut it down by over 100K." 


Despite it being the team's first 3D game, both 
they and the 3DO system have coped rather well. 
"The original design was for two fighters with 325 
polygons each, running at 12 
frames per second. As time went 
on, the speed went up and up. I 
guess we realised we could do a lit¬ 
tle better. It just looks so much bet¬ 
ter now - the original boxers were quite blocky." 
Currently, the game boasts 450 texture-mapped 
polygons per fighter, plus another 100 polygons for 
the ring itself. "We've locked it down to 15 fps 
from pretty much every angle, from first person 
view to two players and showing much of the 
ring." 

Katulic is certainly very proud of the 3D engine. 
Rather than use 3DO's own 3D library, they spent 
months slaving over their own system. At its core 
are lots of "lovingly hand-crafted assembler" for 
the most speed critical routines. 'With this engine I 
think we really could do Virtua Fighter on 3DO." 


It's a knock-out! The finished game will have 
over a dozen KO'd falls. Rotoscoping various 
punchdrunk collapses was apparently good 
fun, for the programmers at least! 

LOOKING GOOD 

Unlike Virtua Fighter, Ali makes extensive use of 
texture-maps for more realistic-looking characters. 
Seamlessly blending all the textures together was a 
big challenge for artist Yi Zhao. 'We went through 
two to three revisions," admits Cochrane, "and 
some of the early ones were quite frightening, like 
pasted together Frankensteins!" The end result has 
certainly rewarded all that effort however, provid¬ 
ing a far more realistic effect than anything yet 
seen. 

Because the 3DO system handles texture map¬ 
ping in the hardware, with no hit on CPU speed, 

Ali has an individual texture map for every single 
one of each fighter's 450 polygons. "In the end we 
came up with a unique tool, Syze, that allows us 
to take a texture map and wrap it around a single > 




Electronic Arts* 


3DO Magazine 15 Sept 1995 























3DO 


preview 



polygon model. We're pretty proud of it." 

More innovative thinking is illustrated by the 
fighters' animation with a mere 150 frames for all 
the moves. "That doesn't sound so high/' admits 
Bright, "but we use key frames and have the 3DO 
interpolate between them on the fly. This means we 
don't actually have to store every single frame for a 
move. It looks a little hairy if you look at the code, 
but it does it without any division math so it's very 
fast." [3DO's ARM60 lacks built-in division func¬ 
tions, so any division calculations make a big hit 
on performance.] 

To make the animation as realistic as possible, 
the team originally planned to use motion capture. 
They bought in the widely used Flock Of Birds sys¬ 
tem, "But we better not go into that," says 
Cochrane, laughing, "the problems were with the 
software provided to capture data, not the hard¬ 
ware. Origin ended up writing their own capture 
software from scratch but we didn't have time. In 
the end we went to a local TV studio, brought in a 
former Canadian lightweight champion and 
hooked him up with optical sensors." 

It was more rotoscoping than motion capture, 
but it provided the solid foundation they wanted. 
This library of moves was then tweaked for each 
fighter. Kippenhan says he'd be "greatly disap¬ 
pointed" if you couldn't recognise a fighter just by 
the way he fights. "Individuals have distinctive 
moves and style. For example, Ali has this way of 
being able to duck back away, just bend his body 
back, something that nobody else has ever done. 
Also, if you watch a lot of his fights you'll see 
where he puts his left arm all the way out and just 
holds his fist in the opponent's face." Bright promis¬ 
es the other fighters will be equally well 
researched, "Henry Cooper tends to use his 
Henry's hammer quite a bit, while George Chuvalo 
just sort of sticks with straight jabs." 


WORLD CHAMP 

Due for an October release, everyone seems confi 
dent Ali will be as big a videogame champ as the 
man was in real life. "Boxing is a science. That's 
what we're really trying to work into the Al," says 
Bright. "We want to give people the sensation of 


THE CONTENDERS 

Foes Of Ali isn't just a game, it's a history lesson 
on the world's greatest boxer. "You can go 
through and fight his foes in the order he did," 
says project manager Roland Kippenhan. "Each 
time you do that you get a bit of historical infor¬ 
mation about what really happened, the style of 
the other person and how it came out." Of 
course, there's also an exhibition mode where you 
can have any two fighters against each other, a 
two player mode and a tournament mode where 
you can have all your mates round. 

So far Kippenhan has signed up seven boxers 
aside from Ali including Sonny Liston, Henry 
Cooper, George Chuvalo, Jimmy Ellis, Bob Foster, 
Ken Norton and Chuck Wepner but hopes to add 



The Ali team: clockwise from Ms Carolyn 
Cudmore (artist - user interface), we have 

Misho Katulic (programmer), Bryce Cochrane 
(artist - 3D animator), Yi Zhao (artist - texture 
maps & 3D models), Mark Kerr (audio) and 
Dave Bright (lead programmer). 

thinking in a ring instead of just going in and 
pounding your opponent. Also, while in other 
games fighters have the same amount of strength 
right through to the end, our characters can tire 
themselves out." 

The same realism applies to combination moves: 
"We're going to try and do it just as it would be 
done in boxing. Putting together a string of moves 
to attack your opponent, instead of just hitting a 
button and allowing it to build up energy." There 
will also be some special moves, "but no flaming 
fist punches" - except possibly as a cheat! 

There will, however, definitely be plenty of 

three more. "The plan is certainly to attempt to get 
Frazier and/or Foreman. Well see how it goes." 
Kippenhan reckons Alt 's legal work is equivalent 
to about eight other projects combined: "Every 
boxer's got his own lawyer and they all have to 
be dealt with as individuals. It's a complete night¬ 
mare, terrible, absolutely terrible!" 

However the uprating of Ali's foes wasn't due 
to lawyers. "It is a game after all," says lead pro¬ 
grammer Bright, "you didn't want to have Ali just 
clobber everyone because he's such a good fight¬ 
er. Also, because the way you go through it his¬ 
torically, we've made some of the fighters a bit 
better than they really were to make it into more 
of a game." Unsurprisingly, Bright won't divulge 
which ones! 


blood. "If you saw it at E3, we kind of forgot to 
turn that off," admits Cochrane. "People weren't 
into changing viewpoints so all you saw was a kind 
of red blot." This will be toned down somewhat, 
but there's no escaping boxing's basic violence and 
if that provokes controversy - "Good!" 

Play in first person perspective and you get 
blurred vision, red outs, even a white out effect. "If 
you get punched in your eye, it begins to swell 
shut," says Bright, "the screen will starts to go 
black in a semi-circle which advances across 
screen. If your right eye is swollen shut then you 
won't be able to see a left hook." These effects play 
to 3DO's strengths with transparency effects difficult 
to replicate on other systems. 

The team's obsession with realism reflects 
Cochrane and Katulic's passion for the sport, both 
of them boxing as kids. Bright laughs as he remem¬ 
bers how his mother pulled him out when she 
thought he was becoming a bully. 

Kippenhan's interest is more with the big fights, 
particularly Tyson. And as that troubled fighter hits 
the comeback trail with the biggest cash bonanzas 
in the history of sport, the combination of boxing 
and polygon graphics could make Ali very much 
the game of the moment. The sheer fist-in-face real¬ 
ism of Ali is unlike anything yet seen, providing a 
visceral impact that really will have you ducking 
and bobbing as the fists swing in. With the roar of 
the (sampled) crowd, plenty of blood and blurred 
vision Gray Matter are confident they'll do justice 
to the 'greatest' fighter ever with the most realistic 
beat-'em-up yet. □ ssw 
•Foes Of Ali will be released in October. 

3DO Magazine 


3 DO Magazine 16 Sept 1995 














Taking an incredibly realistic, texture mapped like¬ 
ness of a real fighter and turning it into badly 
swollen, cut-up mess would delight Jake La Motta. 
But only Ali-class fighters will be able to avoid get¬ 
ting damaged themselves, with blood flooding into 
your eyes, above. 


Magazine | 


3D0 Magazine 17 Sept 1995 


3DO 











3DO 


preview 


^Magazine 




Prowler from Electronic Arts 



ike all Origin games, Prowler is as 
noteable for its epic narrative as the 
actual game engine. The war into 
which you're plunged is no lowly 
superpower conflageration, but a galaxy-spanning 
war against a hi-tech alien race, the lllumen. You 
must defend numerous planets against their imperi¬ 
al ambitions, before launching your own attacks on 
the bases defending the route to their heartland. 

This epic quest will involve not only plenty of 
high-intensity combat, but also uncovering vital 


0 J4 




"S.jP' 



clues and solving intricate puzzles to keep human 
hopes alive. In the game you're the commander of 
a Terran Robotic Infantry unit equipped with huge, 
walking tanks that look like they've just stomped out 
of a manga film. Besides controlling your own unit 
in battle,, you're responsible for mis 
sion selection, weapon outfitting 
and hardware upgrades. 

The robots are undoubtedly the 
stars of the show. The clash of the 
titanium titans features an impressive range of fully 
texture-mapped 3D machines. These are construct¬ 
ed with properly modeled joints which have been 
programmed to react with 'real world' kinetics. If a 
Prowler leaps into the air, its legs will realistically 
recoil upon the impact of landing. 

The lumbering mechanoids fight it out within 
dramatic 3D worlds, fully texture mapped, with 


After providing the definitive space combat sim with Wing 
Commander III, Origin are getting down and dirty with 
humble battlefield combat. Only instead of trenches and 
bayonets, they've decided giant hulking robots are the killing 
machines of choice in the 21st century... 


AMDS IS 

ft NO. SO m 
DMG O % 

ATTIC 


* t\ 

v 


SgS»:Y 

j j,;. 

fw&m 1 " 





As with their definitive Wing Commander series. 
Prowler features plenty of interaction with your 
home base, right, to instill a sense of atmos¬ 
phere. The alien landscapes, above and bottom 
right, look quite stunning. 

some atmospheric skies as a backdrop and stun¬ 
ning Dolby Surround Sound. The early graphics on 
show lacked a little detail on Shock Wave If s 
impressive showing, but were still quite evocative. 
The various interlevel screens are great, of course, 
and beside the full campaign 
there's a Virtual Simulator for more 
immediate entertainment. Melee 
mode offers frantic free-for-all com¬ 
bat against massed lllumen 
mechanoids, while Obstacle and Roam offer more 
sim-style tests. 

If Prowler lives up to its early promise, this truly 
epic challenge could well rival the Wing 
Commander series for box office appeal. □ ssw 

•Prowler is due for release this Autumn. 

3DO Magazine 


v 



3D0 Magazine 18 Sept 1995 








































3DO 


preview 


I Magazine 


DeathKeep from SSI 



SI surprised everyone with the original 
Slayer, presenting 3DO's first AD&D 
game with the best Doom-style graphics 
the system had seen. Barely six months 
later, its sequel provided another shock at E3 with 
not just a new scenario, but a radically overhauled 
graphics system. 

Project manager Marion Clifford estimates 
DeathKeep' s graphic engine is "up to 250% 
faster." It also boasts "non-orthogonal walls" - 
which is to say the math is sophisticated enough 
to allow for more complex shapes than right 
angles. Floors slope, like in Doom II, while "true 
3D space" means there can be structures up to 
eight levels high in a room. 

As in the original, characters can look up and 
down, but now they can also fly! Slipping off 
ledges into freefall, flying down dank tunnels and 
using magic to leap to distant platforms are intrin¬ 
sic parts of the game. Add in a host of spectacu¬ 
lar spells to hurl about and DeathKeep is looking 
very hot indeed. 

DeathKeep also promises a more sophisticated 
game structure than its predecessor. Slaye/s 
choice of 25 characters and randomised dungeon 
generator has been replaced by a sharply 
focused storyline, with slick cinematics to reveal 
character details. While there are now just three 
characters on offer - a male fighter dwarf, a 
male half-elf fighter mage and a female elf mage 
- the DeathKeep is a much more believable bat¬ 
tleground. Each of the 25 levels has eight floors, 
while icy caverns, huge towers, the Necromancer's 
fortress and the Oracle's domain provide distinctive 
locations. 

Crowding the corridors are no less than 27 dif¬ 
ferent types of monsters, including AD&D regulars 
such as Tanari'ri, Mephits and Golems. As you can 
see, the Ray 
Ha rryhau sen-style 
skeletons look par¬ 
ticularly good. 
According to 
Marion, the game's 
artificial intelligence 
has been enhanced 
over PC equivalents 
with "more varied 
monsters with differ¬ 
ent abilities and 
attacks." At E3 the 
designers were quite 
open about the criti¬ 



Out in the wastelands a supremely powerful Necromancer has 
made his escape. The prison which held him has become a 
charnel house. The inmates are the warders, while their 
captors decompose in the cells. Only a fool would venture a 
quest into the DeathKeep... 



SSI promise an even more elaborate collection 
of monsters and ghouls for DeathKeep, with 
the weapon wielding skeletons, top, looking 
particularly spectacular... 


cism they'd received over the original, especially in 
comparison to Doom. But rather than claiming 
Slayer was AD&D and an entirely different sort of 
game, they've set about upping the speed, variety 
of monsters and especially the size of end-level 
monsters. The result is a game which really does 
give Doom a run for its money in the action stakes. 
A single-level demo at E3 was simply great fun to 
play. 

However as you'd expect of an AD&D game, 
simply hacking away at enemies is only part of the 


fun. There's also plenty of sophisticated traps and 
mind-boggling puzzles to figure out. This depth is 
clearly the strong point of most of 3DO's upcoming 
titles. As developers struggle to get used to rival 
systems, 3DO developers are now experienced 
enough to concentrate on pure gameplay. On this 
count particularly, the depths of the DeathKeep look 
like an irresistible challenge. □ ssw 
•DeathKeep is due out in August. 

3DO Magazine 


3DO Magazine 19 Sept 1995 















3DO 


preview 



% 


V 



| Magazine 



Killing Time from Studio 3DO 




One of the most eagerly awaited titles of '95, Killing Time sets 
new standards for videogame visuals, combining an innova¬ 
tive arcade adventure with fabulous, first person graphics. As 
it rushes toward completion, we leapt at the chance to 
experience this metaphysical mystery thriller first-hand. 


tudio 3DO have come a long way since 
Escape From Monster Manor, graduat¬ 
ing from technical wizards to master 
software developers - and Killing Time 
neatly marks this transition. Unhampered by 
Monster Manor's incredible, four month deadline, 
Studio 3DO's Killing Time shows them revolutionis¬ 
ing the Doom-dominated genre they previously 
failed to conquer. This definitive new title promises 
enough action and depth to guarantee satisfaction 
from all gameplayers 

As detailed in 3DO Magazine 3, the plot has 
you trapped on an island, the only shelter an enor¬ 
mous mansion, its grandiose kitchens, ballrooms, 
bedrooms and labyrinthine gardens providing the 
play area for this mammoth adventure. Unlike 
videogame cliche, this huge battleground isn't split 
up into levels, but is a single play area. Using a 
new, continuous streaming technique the game is 
constantly loading in data so that when you move 
from the kitchens to the hallway, for example, there 
isn't the briefest pause - let alone an atmosphere 
breaking status screen. As you can imagine, this 
marks a huge break with previous games. You real¬ 
ly do feel like you're exploring an actual building 
and the various puzzles can spread across the 
entire house, not just a single level. Unsurprisingly, 
Studio 3DO's Larry Reed has already applied for a 
patent on this brilliant new technology. 

Another innovative touch is the use of Full 
Motion Video for enemy characters. For the first 
time in a 3D maze game, most of the sprites have 
been generated using digitised film footage. When 
a trio of Tommy gun wielding thugs loom into view, 
it's obvious these are real people rather than clever 
artwork. Which makes their blood-spurting death 
sequences all the more shocking! 

To ensure a wide range of ene¬ 
mies, Studio 3DO called on the tal¬ 
ents of Rick Carter, the make-up 
artist behind Nightmare On Elm 
Street 2-5, Texas Chainsaw 3 and Day Of The 
Dead. Carter created various bizarre make-up 
effects, such as the knife-impaled chef, to make for 
a stunning cast of characters - 24 in all, including 
seven often helpful ghosts and some computer-gen¬ 
erated monsters. The 3DO system's excellent trans¬ 
parency effects make for some particularly believ¬ 
able ghosts, infinitely more terrifying and fascinat¬ 
ing than any of Doom's grotesques. 

It all adds up to a stunningly atmospheric expe¬ 
rience. Wander through the smoothly scrolling, 
richly detailed corridors and a distraught hostess 


appears, begging you to lift the spell from her 
house that has her and an army of ghosts forever 
trapped in time. The mission to discover the cause 
of her death and the puppeteer behind this extraor¬ 
dinary, time capsule mansion provides as com¬ 
pelling a narrative as you could wish for as you 
roam through the atmosphere saturated rooms... 

The impact of the game is profound, 
mainly due to the authentic period 
detail, from the costumes worn by 
the ghostly inhabitants, to the stun¬ 
ning architecture to your own, 

1920's weaponry. The shock of seeing a dancing 
couple, oblivious to your presence, glide from 
nowhere to talk and confide, smoke and dance, 
before flickering into nothingness, is profoundly 
affecting. Observing these ethereal inhabitants is 
important too, as many relate clues to the tragedy 
that's befallen the house... 

Not all of the ghosts are so disinterested howev¬ 
er. Many, like the punch-throwing matron patrolling 
the kitchen, or the rifle toting hoods that prowl the 
gardens, are well aware of your mission and pro¬ 
vide full blooded opposition to your mortal well 


being. There's enough gun fights to make your 
exploration as fraught as possible, Studio 3DO 
injecting a level of graphic ultra-violence that 
makes this a supremely gory (and satisfying) expe¬ 
rience for bloodfest fans. Witness the exploding- 
head chefs or the blood-splattered mess left by 
shotgunning a hunter. With plenty of hidden rooms 
and secret passages to ensure you never take a 
seemingly deserted location for granted, adventure 
buffs will also be grateful for the save game facility, 
essential for this mammoth thriller. 


Mu Id 




3DO Magazine 20 Sept 1995 























The ability to pan up and down 
enables you to admire the stunning 
architecture, below, and blitzed bod¬ 
ies, right. Atmospheric details, such 
as the decorative»paintings, above, 
make Killing Time a unique experi¬ 
ence, albeit packed with enjoyably 
familiar blasting action. 


Preview discs of Killing Time have caused an 
excitable stir, its unique visual sumptuousness, 
superb, period authentic scores and engrossing 
narrative inviting much anticipation. The ambitious 
design is perhaps less surprising when you consid¬ 
er the man responsible, 3DO's John Hight, who 
has previously won a New Media INVISION 
Award, ITV A Golden Reel Award and CIDA Best 
Of Show (1982) for his interactive designs. 
Certainly, there's no other videogame like it for 
atmosphere, the only comparison coming to mind 
being Kubrick's The Shining. Imagine wandering 
the corridors of that spooky mansion, then add in 
the carnage of Doom together with a snake-like 
plot and you've got a mouth-watering prospect. If 
Studio 3DO deliver on the gameplay promised. 
Killing Time should make for one heckuva 
haunted house. □ mew 

•Killing Time , published by Studio 3DO will be 
available in August. 

3DO Magazine 



3DO Magazine 21 Sept 1995 


3DO 



















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Software P&P £1.50 per title 


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3DO 


in progress 





mong a fistful of fun innovations, prob¬ 
ably OnSide's most significant match¬ 
winning feature is the guv 7 nor - a com¬ 
prehensive management sim. If sitting 
on the touch line barking instructions, clouting fans 
and collecting bungs is your thing then this is the 
game for you. Drawn from the four European pre¬ 
miere leagues (80 teams), over 1000 players can 
be bought and sold to create the ultimate team, 
with physios, training games and specific practice 
modes available to assess players and thus inform 
your decisions. This high level of detail available to 
the budding managers means that if you wish, you 
can bypass controlling players on the field, enjoy¬ 
ing the game purely as a battle of wits and tactics. 

The majority of football fans however, will enjoy 
the management side only as an added extra to the 
on-pitch fun. Match day excitement is enhanced by 
OnSide's second, innovative touch; the commentary 
system which follows the current PC trend for men¬ 
tioning player names. A very exhausted actor is 
currently recording the 1000-plus names and vari¬ 
ous linking statements to put on CD, which Elite 
insist the game will intelligently cue and 
splice to fit play as it develops. This 
should add enormously to the 
atmosphere of the game and the 
skilful manager will get a big kick 
out of hearing his latest signing 
constantly getting possession of the 
ball. The complexities of designing 
such an elaborate database of sam¬ 
ples, that can be located and spliced 
immediately to provide a convincing commentary 
is immense, but Elite are confident they can pull it 
off, and if they do so, they might create one of 
the most atmospheric sports titles ever. 

Fortunately, these added extras haven't been 
developed at the expense of the gameplay itself. 

At this pre-alpha stage, OnSide looks as visually 
attractive as its peers, with brighter graphics than 
the sombre FIFA and as much arcade action as 
Striker. Gameplay runs at an impressive 25fps with 
eight different camera angles to 
choose from, plus all the usual 
weather conditions and pitch vari 
ations. Over 7000 frames of ani¬ 
mation make for very convincing 
onscreen movement, complete with ref and lines¬ 
men, which can be admired in the obligitary action 
replays. 

Overall, OnSide looks very promising indeed, 
with particular emphasis on the control system so 


Although there's currently only two 3DO football games, fans 
may feel a new title is superfluous with the exemplary FIFA 
and Striker to choose from. However, Elite are not simply 
muscling in to be seen as a contender. They're objective is clear 
- to produce the ultimate football simulation... 




The scaled sprites are already 
looking impressive in Onside, although Elite 
artists are currently refining them, frame by 
frame, to make them even more lifelike. 


feme- 


that the wide variety of shots and skills can be 
accessed as intuitively as possible. Indeed, Elite are 
so determined to make this the 
definitive footie sim, they're even 
going to give players full control 
over a variety of celebration rou¬ 
tines - for that all-important leap of 
victory or twenty foot slide on your knees after 
scoring! □ mew 

•OnSide will be published by Elite in Sep/Oct. 

3DO Magazine 


3D0 Magazine 23 Sept 1995 
























3DO 


preview 


I Magazine 


Of 

The 


Captain Quazar & BattleSport from Cyclone Studios 


It's a truism to say that if an already great videogame can 
support two players simultaneously, it becomes twice as great 
a game. Certain titles have transcended time and fashion with 
two-player brilliance - Super Mario Kart, networked Doom, 
StreetFighter II - and Captain Quazar and BattleSport are 
about to join this elite band with simply extraordinary 
gameplay you won't be able to resist. 



hilst next generation consoles have 
tended to seduce with alluring visu¬ 
als and more realistic (or bizarre) 
gaming environments, Cyclone 
Studios have focused on the real point of accelerat¬ 
ing hardware capabilities - to deliver a fuller, more 
exhilarating experience. In doing this they've also 
adhered to an unspoken philosophy that has 
underpinned the success of the 3DO - to take 
games not just from 16bit to 32 bit, but to a new 
level of gaming experience. By allowing videogame 
jockeys to share their remarkable new games with 
a friend, simultaneously exploring the mechanics. 
Cyclone Studios have reached a new pinnacle in 
interaction that will seduce all game addicts. 

This success shouldn't come as any surprise 
though, as their founder is Helmut Kobler, who, 
between October '92 and December '93 was a key 
player in the promotion of the 3DO launch. 
Developing the press kit and other launch materials 
for Trip was, according to Kobler "a real plea¬ 
sure... he's a pro". But whilst Kobler was helping to 
prepare the world for the 3DO revolution, he was 
also becoming increasingly fascinated by game 
development. The small band of innovative 3DO 
launch titles inspired his sense of potential not just 
for the machine, but for games themselves. Here 
was a machine that allowed the type of 
videogames Kobler had always dreamed of to 
actually be produced. 

The small band of innovators led by Trip had 
soon ballooned into a tightly organised, committee 
led company, intent on global domination, and 
Kobler began to nurture ideas of a small band of 
similarly inspired individuals with a 'vision thing' 
behind them. His pet project was forming in his 
mind, a glorious, isometric arcade game that 
would redefine the genre with 
extraordinary animation, sub¬ 
lime gameplay and a frankly 
obscene amount of carnage... 

After 3 DO was launched, 

Kobler and lead programmer 
(and co-founder) Ron Little spent 
four months setting up Cyclone 
Studios. Storyboards were pro¬ 
duced and test graphics mocked up. Finally, Studio 
3DO invited Kobler to make the game a reality as 
one of its first external developers. A team of 
videogame junkie programmers was swiftly hired 
and Captain Quazar began his journey to world¬ 
wide fame... 


Too Good To Be True 

The obvious influences for Captain Quazar- 
Smash TV and the Commando genre of upscreen 
blasters - fail to do it justice by way of introducing 
the game. Whilst Quazar faithfully shares the same 
maniac affection for gratuitous, non-stop violence 
as its predecessors, it cranks up 
the intensity by a factor of ten 
for arcade action better than 
any arcade game. Kobler cites 
Desert Strike's freedom of 
movement and the cartoon style 
of The Horde as key influences 
on Captain Quazar; but again, 
these are just starting points for 
Cyclone's unique title. 

Initially, it looks cute. Almost too cute. Quazar 
himself is a cartoon caricature of heroism, his blue 
jumpsuit, pumped up pecs and immaculately 
upstanding blonde quiff lending an air of whole¬ 
someness typical to a legion of tiresome arcade 


The Cyclone Studios team (top row, standing, 

L to R): Maarten Kraaijvanger, Subha Ghoshal, 
Helmut Kobler (President, Project Manager on 
Captain Quazar), Kerry Moffit, Tod Erickson, 
Greg Savoia, Tim Ryan, Heli Burgess and 
(bottom row, L to R) Ron Little and Evan 
Margolin (Project Manager BattleSport ). 

clones. But the gun he holds is... well, too big for a 
goodie, so big that he needs both hands just to 
carry the thing. When the baddies appear, scatter¬ 
ing fire with machine guns and lasers, you natural¬ 
ly let loose a few shots and are startled to see your 
sprite reel back on one foot, the recoil from the 
machine gun gradually propelling him backwards. 
These baddies do need a few rounds of machine 
gun fire to finish them off though, stumbling and 
spinning, they jack-knife away propelled by a tor¬ 
rent of bullets in the most satisfying fashion con¬ 
ceivable. But whilst the machine gun is ferocious, 
Quazar's top mounted missile launcher is just plain 
obscene. Let loose a shell and anything in its 
path is incinerated, bodies crumbling to ashes, > 




3D0 Magazine 24 Sept 1995 















,our stoogie chew in 9 boss sends us on. 


plus my good pal lieutenant Pulzar. 


THANKS, GOAZAR 


and making moolah ■ 


e *eniy 


protecting mother eartth 


freeing 


either 


finished being 


n’haps when 


But it's a smokin' hot war 

out here , my friend... 


or ghost. 


Welcome To C aptain Duazar... 


Magazine | 


starring myself , naturally... p % 


Vhere you ask? 

’ll tell ya where... 


rrr 


ah OVER THE 


You wanna 9 Join In dude? Y 9 all nee 
§ome quallfUcoBhlon*. Y 9 all need to 
have an ability to tvliiip on/ 


Well... maybe we do get outta r^Bl^^ere ain't noth’ »/ mwj 
control , /ust now and then... - ln /c ^ stanHiwu 


Cotta 


make 


them 


goons 


ft’f a hard hurtln 9 Job m guy got, but we 
keep our hmadB. Wall 9 we 9 re American , 
Bud, i¥C don't Jurt go In gum blazln 9 ! 


3DO Magazine 25 Sept 1995 


3DO 






































































3DO 


preview 





Left, the top player scatters shots over the 
fast moving enemy as they go for a speed 
ramp. Above, the devastating scorpion 
gets caught up in some architecture, vul¬ 
nerable to a few missiles at close range. 


One-player games of BattleSport 
offer brilliant opponents, each 
having different craft and tactics 
to flummox you, from sophisti¬ 
cated evasive moves to blatant 
barging and blasting. And we 
only played against the first four 
contestants! 


Above, two 
failed attempts 
to score. Top left 
and left, 
crippling face- 
offs, as tension 
explodes and 
MAD becomes 
inevitable. 
Getting nose to 
nose with a red 
scorpion, below, 
is unwise. It hits 
hard, and stings. 


3D0 Magazine 26 Sept 1995 




















> their eyeballs dropping to the floor for a last plain¬ 
tive look around, buildings combusting and setting 
off chain reaction explosions that can set the whole 
playing area alight with fire and smoke. Such a 
huge scale of excessive carnage hasn't been seen 
like this since Syndicate, although the feel here is 
much more surreal, as your cartoon hero stands 
alone in a battlefield decimated and blackened 
with ferocious action. Never before has dispatching 
baddies and demolishing property been such 
riotous fun, or so incredibly fast. And fast it is, in 
one or two-player mode, with no slowdown what¬ 
soever. Belying Cyclone's lack of experience, the 
program features a sophisticated mathematical 
trick which accelerates the game whenever a cer¬ 
tain amount of sprites are about to enter the 
screen, making Captain Quazar as fast as it could 
possibly be. 

Whilst it's the cartoon violence that pulls you 
into the action, it's the cartoon graphics, awash 
with innovative touches and genuine comic genius 
that keep you hooked. Vivid colours and striking 
lighting effects astonish as does the sophistication 
of character and level design, far ahead of any 
rival product (the programmers have referred to the 
classic Disney animation laws of squash and stretch 
to make everything in the game fun to watch). It's 
not surprising that the Captain Quazar licence is 
' already being touted for a TV cartoon show, his 
ironic posturing and environmental do-goodism 
recognised as great material. Even before comple¬ 
tion, it's a quite stunning title, with a level of polish 
seasoned developers would do well to inspect. The 
sight gags are relentless, with gravestones popping 
up, ghosts ascending to the sky and hostages run¬ 
ning screaming through the carnage. 

Every one of the eight massive levels is packed 
with a huge variety of landscape variations and 
monstrous mutations to make progress gratifying. 
The open ended structure is a key factor in 
Quazar's appeal with missions including rescuing 
hostages from slavery in war torn deserts, blowing 
up missiles packed with enemy spice before they're 
scattered across the solar system or simply locating 
and abducting political enemies. Whatever the mis¬ 
sion, you'll need passcodes (for warp gates), assis¬ 
tance from hostages (or war weary traitors) and 
honed arcade reactions for the quite insane arcade 
action. 

From the gloriously themed music accompany¬ 
ing each level, to the sumptuously designed menu 
system and opaque item bars on screen, to the fab¬ 
ulous visual effects conjured by Cyclone (flickering 
light bulbs in the mines that light your way, hypnot¬ 
ic, phosphorous glowing electric worms...), the 
game just demands attention, and of course, with 
the essential two-player option enabling Quazar to 
join up with Lieutenant Pulzar, Cyclone Studios 
have a premiere title that will push them to the 
forefront of 3DO developers. Plenty enough to be 
happy with, you might think, except that whilst half 
of Kobler's team were slaving over Quazar, the 
other half, led by producer Evan Margolin, were 
working on another smash hit of their own... 


Unsporting 

The Alpha version of BattleSport we had for 3DO 
Magazine *4 blew us away with its frenetic, head- 
to-head split screen action and laser fast graphics. 

It looked like it was destined for greatness, and our 
faith appears justified as the latest version of the 
game is even smoother, has plenty more features 
and generally looks like the best one-on-one 
videogame ever. The texture mapped graphics 
have been dramatically improved, most obviously 
on the eight tanks, which now bristle with armour 
and weaponry. Project manager Evan Margolin 
cites LucasArts' 8bit classic BallBlazer and Namco's 
CyberSled as inspirations for the game, but the 
barren stadium of BallBlazer has been replaced in 
BattleSport with action packed environments littered 
with huge ramps to accelerate off, tumbling con¬ 
structions to hide behind and cheering crowds 
enjoying the aggressive action, whilst the lethargic 
pace of CyberSled has been steamrollered by 
action five times faster and more thrilling. Driving a 
high speed, armoured tank has never felt such fun. 

It's this emphasis on feel that Cyclone have con¬ 
centrated most on, Margolin referring to the EA 
games, and in particular Road Rash, as titles offer¬ 
ing near limitless lifespans due to enjoyable, intu¬ 
itive control over your game alter ego as well as 
huge potential for increasingly sophisticated inter¬ 
action. At first BattleSport is a great blast - there's 
nothing faster to play, anywhere - but (inevitable) 
prolonged play reveals a multitude of intricacies to 
master if you're to win. Accentuating this sense of 
heightened realism is the variety between the tanks 
you can control. Apart from obvious weight and 
speed differences, dictated by whether you want to 
be fast and fragile or slow but apocalyptic, varying 
strengths of armour and weaponry give BattleSport 
a compulsive strategic thread. At the moment, 
Cyclone are building up an impressive arsenal of 
weapons, from weak lasers to armour piercing mis¬ 
siles, but a key new element to the game is the 
introduction of power-ups, which are scattered lib¬ 
erally around the stadium. Super speed, health, 
invisibility, extra weapons, double-damage weapon 
tuners... there's a real quandary players can get 
into, whereby scoring goals becomes secondary to 
blasting the silicon out of your opponent, and it's 
this dual excitement within the BattleSport experi¬ 
ence that makes play so exhilarating. 

That's not everything though. With the game 
engine playing like a dream, Cyclone are enjoying 
a few months breathing time to inject even more 
excitement. Margolin vividly describes the competi¬ 
tiveness in the office, as the designers indulge in 
marathon play sessions not just for the fun of nuk¬ 
ing each other, but to come up with even more 
elaborate touches to improve gameplay. Power-ups 
have been joined by power downs, crippling, self 
inflicted wounds that will make you scream, and 
another recent, killer feature devised by a particu¬ 
larly vindictive programmer is a power-up that lets 
you place decoy goals. The satisfaction of watching 
your grinning opponent shoot for fake goals should 
be unsurpassable... 


More is M2 

Whilst most of the glory for BattleSport can be 
attributed to Cyclone's inspired motivation and 
stunning game design, Margolin is happy to heap 
praise onto the 3DO system itself and, in particular, 
the 3DO Company for making BattleSport's devel¬ 
opment so enjoyable. The development tools for the 
3DO have plenty of built-in custom effects making 
programming faster and more intuitive. Also, 3DO 
are constantly updating the development system, 
ironing out problems and introducing new features, 
providing a level of support far superior to rival 
companies. This commitment from 3DO towards 
their developers is invaluable, and Margolin attrib¬ 
utes the explosive acceleration of third generation 
titles (such as Slam V Jam, Killing Time and 
BladeForce) to the sheer joy of working on the sys¬ 
tem. Margolin explains that Cyclone Studios is 
made up of "experienced gameplayers who are 
using the technology to make the games [we've] 
always wanted to play" pointing to the stunning 
diversity of original titles in development for 3DO, 
as opposed to the lame arcade conversions and 
quick hit licences clogging the launch catalogues of 
the Saturn and PlayStation. Margolin believes that 
quality game designers (rather than software pro¬ 
ducers) are increasingly being drawn to the cutting 
edge ambience created by 3DO and this excite¬ 
ment is extended, naturally, to the M2, with 



Who says success doesn't bring happiness? Not 
Cyclone Studio's founders, Helmut Kobler and 
Ron Little, practising BattleSport tactics... 

Cyclone already delirious at the prospect of devel¬ 
oping for the dream machine. Margolin is con¬ 
vinced that 3DO owners can remain smug in the 
knowledge that they will always be at the forefront 
of the games industry with such radical technology 
at their disposal, describing M2 as "a machine so 
powerful that high concept, visionary titles will be 
possible". With a top secret list of prospective M2 
titles currently bouncing around the office, headed 
by an unbelievably fast version of BattleSport, 3DO 
would appear to have found one of its most excit¬ 
ing and persuasive allies for world domination in 
Cyclone Studios, who seem committed to making 
each game they make twice as much fun as every¬ 
one else's... □ mew 

•Captain Quazar a nd BattleSport will be 
published by Studio 3DO in Sept/Nov. 

3DO Magazine 


Magazine 


3 DO Magazine 27 Sept 1995 


3DO 










3DO 


feature 


[Magazine 


Get Wired 


he pressure to get the 3DO World 
Wide Web site up and running in time 
for the E3 must have been enormous. 
Not only were there all the existing 
3DO products to promote, but oodles of new prod¬ 
ucts including the bicoastal launch of the M2 
upgrade. Steve Fowler, Vice President of Developer 
and Customer Services, only had two programmers 
to work with but in the event it was more than 
enough, the Web site proving not only exceptional¬ 
ly slick, but the perfect forum to relay all the E3 
news in a deliciously controlled explosion of hype. 

Signs of haste in the construction of the 3DO 
server are few and far between with top notch pre¬ 
sentation and plenty of categories to browse 
through. Dial up and flip onto Netscape, type in 
http://www.3do.com. and the Home page 
appears, with category icons and recent changes 
summary. Dive straight into The Hot Line for gener¬ 
al news, and pride of place is, naturally, coverage 
of the M2. Six screenshots are available to scruti¬ 
nise from the brilliant race game demo which are 
of superb quality and well worth the one or two 
minute wait for downloading. A full press release 
with lengthy tech specs and a list of M2 developers 
is also available. 

More M2 mania is available from the E3 
Highlights department. A huge selection of excel¬ 
lent photographs effectively communicate the 
excitement surrounding the 3DO stand, with 
appearances from Trip, various developers show¬ 
casing new titles, the X-O-TRON gyroscope from 
Altare Advanced Technologies (with a supernatural- 
ly unruffled Trip inside, acting as human joystick to 
Studio 3DO's BladeForce), as well as new 3DO 
fans Earth, Wind and Fire (you read it here first) 
and Steven Spielberg. The most impressive photos 
feature the huge M2 video display though, with 
that red car causing a storm, and for those unable 
to attend the event, this visual documentation is a 


3DO Magazine may be the most essential guide to the explo¬ 
sive world of 3DO, but as of May, another authoritative voice 
extolling the virtues of Trip and his toys has begun shouting for 
attention - the 3DO World Wide Web site. If you've a computer 
and a modem, this is the essential stop for all 3DO loving 
travellers on the information superhighway. 



real treat. Press 
releases and photos 
of hot developers 
such as Studio 3DO 
and Any Channel 
demonstrating their 
respective wares con¬ 
clude the E3 cover- 


<po 

<0 

& 



<4>© 

a 

ft 


Back 

Forward 

Horn* 

Reload 

Images 

Open 

Print 

Find 

Stop 


location : [http: / /Y W .3do .com. / ___ 

What's New? j What's Cool? 1 Handbook | Net Search | Net Directoryj Newsgroups | 


Welcome to The 3DO WWW Server! 


i o M sdo |J gii 

I Hard Line! 1 Pipelinel | Co. Line | jpirectLm 


age. 

The rest of The Hot 
Line concentrates on 
promoting up and 
coming titles, which is 
basically a loop into 
the preview depart¬ 
ment, The Pipe Line, 
plus promotional 
information for 3DO 
Interactive Sampler 
discs. 

The Hard Line 

deals with new hard¬ 
ware and peripherals. 

The Panasonic FZ-1, FZ-10, the GoldStar unit and 
Creative Labs 3DO Blaster all have a page cover¬ 
age with photo, specifications and availability 
details, that serve more as punchy flyers than in- 
depth assessments of individual merits, but this edi¬ 
torial even handedness is unsurprising. Similarly 
brief outlines of new peripherals including the 
Flightstick Pro, ALG GameGun, Panasonic and 
GoldStar controllers are also available. The Hard 


Line is, at present, the least developed section of 
the site. The American specs and prices are useful 
only as guide to what might be available in the UK 
eventually. Hopefully worldwide pricing and release 
dates, together with more in-depth information, will 
appear soon as the exciting peripheral and hard¬ 
ware development surrounding the 3DO system is 
one of the most fascinating and positive aspects of 
the machine. 


GETTING CONNECTED 

While a 3DO modem has long headed the list of likely peripherals, it now 
seems certain any plans have been shelved until M2. The 64bit upgrade has 
PCMCIA slots used by countless PC modems that could very easily be adapt¬ 
ed for M2. Until then getting online requires access to a computer, either your 
own, or a friends or even one at the much hyped 'cybercafes' opening in 
London and a few other big cities. 

PCs, Macs, Amigas and even Archimedes machines are all well catered 
for. Obviously you'll also need a modem to hook-up to your phone line and, 
basically, the faster ones make up for extra cost over the long term. You'll also 
need an Internet provider who'll charge a one-off set-up charge with a 
monthly or quarterly charge thereafter. The provider should provide all the 
software you need - remember to say if you want Web access - and proba¬ 
bly make a good offer on a modem too. An important consideration with 


providers is that they have a local point-of-presence (POP) for you to dial up 
to - this means your phone bills are limited to local calls. 

If you want to know more check out Paragon's own NetUser (a bimonthly 
magazine for beginners) or INTERNET & Comms Today (now edited by ex-3DO 
Magazine editor Dave Westley). The internet is certainly an exciting phe¬ 
nomena but it's worth pointing out there's still a huge gap between hype and 
reality. Media scares about pornography, for example, ignore the fact that 
the bulk of the net is text-only with downloading video footage a technical 
nightmare. The Web, with its user-friendly graphic interface is a relatively 
new innovation and the impressive 3DO site is the exception rather than the 
rule. By the time a 3DO modem arrives things should be more developed and 
access prices may have fallen lower. 


3D0 Magazine 28 Sept 1995 






































E3 photos from the Hot Line, 
featuring some shots of the M2 dis¬ 
play as well as a well known movie 
director admiring Trip's new toys. 


Pipe Line 

JladeForce 





& 



C$0 

vmi 

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• 

Back 

SV* art 

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Reload 


Open 

Print 

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Stop 




Location: jhttp://wv .5do .com. / docs / now /ntv .htrnl 


Vhat't Nov? | Vhat's Cool?| Handbook | Not Starch | Not Directory | Newsgroups | 



The latest breaking reira. Hot software titles on the vay Special promotions, offers and events 

On the Hot Line 

♦ M2 Unvei led! + E3HighjigIm ♦ Just Released ♦ Comin g Soon ♦ 3 DO Sam pler ♦ 

M2 Unveiled! 


The 3DO Company unveiled its highly anticipated, 
next-generation M2 technology 3DO's M2 64-bit architecture is 
designed to create a quantum leap in advanced CD entertainment 
technology Leveraging 3DO's high-end 3-D image and sound 
processors and IBM and Motorola’s PowerPC microprocessor, 
M2 technology rivals image quality and performance of 
workstations and the most popular arcade machines 


Screen Shots from M2 Demonstration 




VhatsNewVI Vhat sUoor'l Handbook | Not Search | Net Directory Newsgroups | ' 


Hard Line ca 

American Laser Games' GAMEGUN 


Nov you can add even more 
realism and excitement to your 3DO 
Interactive Multiplayer system. 

The GAMEGUN brings the 
authentic arcade experience right 
into your home, interfacing vith the 
nevest shooting adventure games. 
It's compatible vith all of the 
live-action arcade hits from 
American Laser Games, including 
Mad Dog McCree, Who Shot 
Johnny Rock’, Mad Dog II The 
Lost Gold, Space Pirates, Crime 
Patrol and Drug Wars 

TVin't iiwt qit thpna anri muh 



If it's game info you're on-lining for, you'll head 
straight for the Pipe Line. A 'hot' company heads 
the bill - at the time of writing Studio 3DO with 
BladeForce, Zhadnost and Killing Time - and click¬ 
ing on each game reveals a brief story synopsis, 
release date and a couple of screenshots. At pre¬ 
sent, video clips are unavailable although promised 
for the near future. The rest of the Pipe Line is split 
into genre categories - Sports, Simulation, 
Interactive, Family etc. - and whilst this angle may 
emphasise the wide diversity of 3DO software, 
such rigid categorisation can make locating specific 
titles difficult. 

Although the game synopsis's are interesting, 
especially backed up by high quality screen 
dumps, there's much room for improvement - 
longer, more thorough examination of titles, partic¬ 
ularly in the previews section would be welcome - 
but doubtless more resourses and more involvement 
from individual developers in promoting their titles 
will be forthcoming as the potential of the service is 
appreciated. 

Industry moles will be most impressed by The 
Company Line, which is basically a catalogue of 
press release Concerning new developers, hard¬ 
ware developments and prominent software releas¬ 
es. The May bulletins feature PO'ed bumph, '94 


Pipe Line previews are short and to the point, a 
side order to the impressive, high quality 
screenshots. A more thorough description of 
gameplay features, number of levels etc. would 
be better. Equally brief editorials in the hard¬ 
ware 'reviews' (right) which offer few 
specifications but plenty of retailers. 

fourth quarter financial results, software and hard¬ 
ware awards, plus lines back into M2 and E3 cov¬ 
erage. The retention of previous PR bumph and 
company statistics enables illuminating assimilation 
of the development of The 3DO Company, and a 
casual flip through this section soon turns into a 
marathon read, as a bigger picture of the company 
comes into focus. 

The 3DO Web site is an impressive launch then, 
with more than enough substance to justify hefty 
phone bills. Pipeline previews are a little limited 
currently, lagging considerably behind dead-tree 
press releases, but hopefully that'll change with 
more third-party support. As it stands it's is a great 
insight into the Company itself and, best of all, 
good fun. As we went to press, we found the site 
had suddenly been taken over by Bizarnia, with 
Stalin-style propaganda to promote Zhadnost: The 
People's Porty\ □ mew 

3DO Magazine 



ALSO ON LINE 

Committed netsurfers may be tempted to fork out 
for a subscription to the heavily subscribed (1.5 
million users at last count) America Online (AOL) 
service. The 3DO Forum within this site features 
not only all of the information contained in the 
Web site, but also the opportunity to 'online' with 
various members of the 3DO fraternity in regular 
discussions across the internet. This was most 
dramatically exploited during the E3 show, when 
Trip Hawkins held an online conference with 
users. 

AOL's 3DO Forum also offers a comprehen¬ 
sive mail order site (the 
Web's Direct Line for pur¬ 
chases is currently under 
construction) with plenty of 
3DO merchandise for true 
affectionados besides 
games. However, the sub¬ 
scription fee is relatively 
costly and dialing up direct 
means big international 
phone bills - unless your 
service provider offers 
access itself via local point-of-presence. 

The 3DO newsgroup (available through 
Usernet) is a cheap way to interact with... well, 
just normal people, really. A large selection of 
comments, views, completely provocative poseurs 
and pseudo-intellectual ramblings are available 
to read and, more enjoyably, respond to. At the 
time of writing, the M2 demo is creating the most 
controversy, as well as predictable anti- 
PlayStation/Saturn grumblings and Need For 
Speed high scores. Occasionally, an interesting 
feature or (slow) debate appears, but the lack of 
a 3DO modem rather hampers most users' 
access to the group. Still, it's well worth a visit if 
you get chance, as are... 

Chris Long's 3DO Page 

http://vwm.webcom.com/~dong/random/3do.html 
Ultra 3DO fan offesr reviews, screenshots, every¬ 
thing... 

Dan's 3DO Resource Index 

http://www.cris.com/~ginsburg/ 

Gives detailed information of all 3DO sites on the 
Net as well as reviews, new release information, 

M2 updates, 3DO Company info and gossip plus 
video game magazine indexes... 



3D0 Magazine 29 Sept 1995 


3DO 

























































3DO 




feature 


[Magazine 


Online with Trip Hawkins - M2 Update 




v . 1! -w , • § j 

'V* * * *. * 

%r * * *. 




The 


stunning new world of M2 technology 
brings to life Doom as you played it in your 
dreams. The fantastic hi-res detail, arcade 
frame rate and silky animation is stunning. 
This could well be the first M2 game. 


3D0 Magazine 30 Sept 1995 
















For Internet users, one of the real highlights of E3 was Trip 
Hawkins, 3DO CEO and President, going online to answer user 
questions. Below are edited highlights. 


ICS Sparky: Good evening. Trip Hawkins! 

"Hello, everyone. It's a pleasure to be here, live 
from the E3! We' re showing over 40 new 3DO 
titles here at the show and getting great reactions. 
We even have an Obitron, the device used in 
Lawnmower Man, to allow you to play our new 
Studio 3DO title BladeForce and you can spin 
around upside down! 

"We're also showing to the press and develop¬ 
ers our first working demos of M2 software. M2 is 
10 times faster than competitive products that 
haven't even been released yet, and you can see 
how good it is from our demos. People are blown 
away." 

AuricRoco: How would you compare M2 to the 
Ultra64 and Saturn? 

"We can do over one million polygons per second, 
sustained in a real application. We can draw over 
100 million pixels per second. We have tons of 
hardware features that improve image quality; like 
Gouraud shading, filtering, MIP mapping, Z-buffer, 
transparency, etc. 

"The competition isn't even close in either speed 
or quality. Just looking at the graphics, there are 


three stages to the pipeline for these machines. The 
first stage is the math determining the camera 
angle for the 3D models. This requires a lot of 
floating point capability. Sony and Saturn don't 
have floating point and have relatively low integer 
math performance (around 15 INT Specmark 
equivalents). We have 45 INT Specmark, but we 
also have 264 MFLOPS (million floating point oper¬ 
ations per second) of floating point. You really 
need floating point for 3D games. Ultra64 has 45 

COMPARISON CHART 


INT and about 15 MPLOPS, so it is well below M2. 

"The second stage of the pipeline is where you 
calculate your colours and images and map the 
textures. And there again we have much higher 
performance. Sony and Sega have to use their 
CPU, but we and Ultra64 have a separate proces¬ 
sor as a 'set-up' engine. Details are sketchy on 
Ultra's, but we have reason to believe we are high¬ 
er performance there also. 

"Then the third stage is getting the graphics ren¬ 
dered into the frame buffer for display and we are 
really fast at that, over 100MB/sec, way beyond 
the others. 

"So in total our graphics pipeline is faster in > 


MACHINE 

CPU 

DATABUS 

INTEGER MATH 

FPU/MFLOPS 

EXTRA FPU 

PLAYSTATION 

R3000 

32 

14 

- 

No 

SATURN 

SH-2 

32 

14 

- 

No 

ULTRA64 

R4300 

32 

45 

15 

No 

M2 

PPC602 

64 

45 

132 

Yes 


[The main point of this chart is sheer math. Throwing about thousands of polygons in a 3D world 
requires prodigous amounts of math. However, computers aren't necessarily all that good at math 
because of the limited memory they have to contain the sums involved. To get around this problem, 
computers move or 'float' the exponent for very large (or small) numbers. Most high performance 
computers have Floating Point Unit co-processors to speed-up this task, but M2 has two. One built into 
the PowerPC 602 CPU and another in the custom ASIC.] 



3DO Magazine 31 Sept 1995 


3DO 





















3DO 


feature 


| Magazine 



HIGH PERFORMANCE 
MEMORY ARCHITECTURE 

•PowerBus custom architecture 

•528MB/sec. peak 

•32 Megabit SDRAM [4MB] 

•Single memory space for all functions 

[Besides that incredible 528MB/sec data trans¬ 
fer, 3DO are very proud of its memory chip lay¬ 
out. On a conventional console, memory is seg¬ 
mented, so on the PlayStation there's 1 MB of fast 
memory for graphics, 2MB normal RAM for main 
memory and 0.5MB for audio. The drawback is 
that if you suddenly want to introduce new 
graphics or audio, you have to perform juggling 
tricks to route it through the system. M2 avoids 
this because it uses special memory, SDRAM, 
which is fast enough to be used for any task.] 


> each stage and has no bottlenecks. Same thing 
for the memory bandwidth. We can do 
528MB/sec. Sony and Saturn do 128. Ultra can 
do 500, but has only 2 megabytes of RAM, and 
the speed to the cart is only 30 MB/sec. 

"So in speed, we think we're seven to ten times 
faster than any of them. In quality, none of them 
has all the features we have. Ultra has at least 
some of them, but the others have none of them in 
hardware. 

"MIP mapping allows you to scale in and out of 
scenes without noticeable pixel blockiness or arti¬ 
facts. Z-buffer has the hardware automatically take 
care of figuring out which images to show and 
which to hide. There are a lot of other high perfor¬ 
mance features that you previously could only get 
on a high-end workstation. The demos we have 
show how dramatically better it is." 

Indigo 2 FX: Is there any truth to the 3DO/Sega 
deal in Wall Street Journal? 

"There have been rumors and speculation of vari¬ 
ous kinds for months. We don't comment on specu¬ 


lation. At the same time, we know we have a hot 
technology in M2. Matsushita (Panasonic), 

GoldStar, EA, MCA and others have already 
announced public support of M2. But we also think 
we have a real, legit shot at creating a winning, 
leading industry standard around M2. So we're 
willing to talk to anyone in the business to see if we 
can build an even stronger alliance than we 
already have." 

Demonhell: What arcade games are coming out 
for 3 DO or M2? 

"We're putting more focus on coin-op games and 
talking to many coin-op companies. Many of them 
want to use M2 hardware in the coin-op market. 
Also, GoldStar and Panasonic are starting to buy 


“The technology is outstanding and 
supercedes all the existing superconsoles. 
7-10 times better than the PlayStation is 
probably an exaggeration, but it is consid¬ 
erably better. For us, the main advantage 
is simply M2’s speed. The higher polygon 
count is really welcome and the 4MB of 
SDRAM would make it feasible to convert 
our latest PC fligh t sim, Eurofighter. If we 
see a good business opportunity with M2, 
there’s no doubt we’d love to develop for it.” 
Colin Bell . Development Director, DID. 



JT ~:= 


//;* v 

/// ' •• . V ; 

'/* V 


“The M2 technology blows away every¬ 
thing we’ve seen or are going to see 
from the competition. LG Electronics is 
already investing significant time and 
resources into making M2 the next 
standard in the advanced gaming 
market. We support the M2 technology 
100 percent. ” 


3DO Magazine 32 Sept 1995 




















GRAPHICS PIPELINE 


Graphics Transformation. PowerPC 602 

Polygon Set-Up. Set-Up Engine 

Rendering. GPU 


[While 3DO I and the PlayStation ease pres¬ 
sure on the CPU by passing graphic rendering 
to a graphics processor, that still leaves the 
time consuming polygon set-up routines. M2 is 
the first machine with a three-stage graphics 
pipeline, introducing a new Set-Up Engine to 
accelerate graphics handling.] 

coin-op game rights. Atari Games is developing 
Primal Rage for GoldStar to run on 3DO. Williams 
and Panasonic just announced a multi-game deal 
that will bring MK3 and other games to 3DO. 

I think this is just the beginning. The coin-op 
companies think M2 is really hot. The good ones 
tell us that it is hard to port to other systems 
because they don't have features like z-buffer, and 
they have to re-engineer a lot. But they've told us 


i!^ ; . 

• t4» mmm mm • 

mm mm .. . 

I t Mi wm 

* M 9 mmm mmm 

i 


r 

V 

. V 

1 

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they could probably port a good high-end 3D 
coin-op to M2 in six months!" 

Junkspill: Are there any plans to introduce a triple 
or quad-speed CD drive for the 3DO? 

"We started with high-cost 2X drives in 1993, and 
now we have low-cost 2X, and my view is we 
should get to really low cost 2X, and then go to 
DVD. I don't think a faster drive without a capacity 
increase is worth the incompatibility and cost." 
Robert Grunwald: "How does 3DO react to 
Saturn coming out today?" 

"We've been selling against Sony and Saturn for 
over six months in Japan. So E3 has brought no 
surprises. For this year, it is clearly a three horse 
race, nobody will be a big winner but everyone 
will finish "in the money". 

"Our advantage this year is our software cata¬ 
log. We have this week released our 200th world¬ 
wide title and we probably have at least 50 good 
games in the US. And we will have another 100 
titles before the end of the year. The competitors 
don't have anything close to that many good 


“They’ve leapfrogged over the Sony 
rather than try to match it. It’s very 
powerful , especially given that it seems 
to he doing everything properly. For 
example , things like the texture-map¬ 
ping , which is source texturing rather 
than target texturing. [On 
PlayStation] you have to break your 
polygons up into teeny weeny little ones 
to make the texturing look reasonably 
right... We’d be very keen to develop for 
M2 if we see a market. ” 



The car (below) and 'Doom ' demos really put 
M2 on the map at E3. The former boasted 
plenty of action, but 7 Doom ' was more believ¬ 
able as a game. It starts with the player in a 
cavern. A goblin attacks (opposite), and its 
head gets shot off. The player uses his gun to 
suck up power-ups before entering a room. 
Various objects are examined, the viewpoint 
smoothly panning up and down, before ene¬ 
mies suddenly attack. Creatures fly through 
the window, the carpet smoothly morphs into 
a monster and a demon springs out of the 
closet, holds up a table as a shield, then gets 
spectacularly blasted (above). 


games. 

In terms of price, we have the lowest manufac¬ 
turing cost. Now that GoldStar and Panasonic have 
seen the intro plans of the competitors, we expect 
them to make some countermoves. 

"E3 is like Fort Sumner. The first cannonballs just 
went over the wall, but this is just a skirmish in a 
long war that we think M2 is eventually going to 
win." □ ssw 

3DO Magazine 






/* - * 


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/ 

/V / 

S r i 


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3DO Magazine 33 Sept 1995 


3DO 

























3DO 


review 


| Magazine 


Space Hulk 

Publisher: Electronic Arts © 01753 549442 Developer: Key Game Save Game: Yes Price: £44.99 Available: August 


O 


ne of the most fun things about Space 
Hulk is showing it to fans of PC Doom. 
First their jaw drops at the graphics: 

_ the lush colours and fine detail, the 

way enemies explode under fire, body parts slop¬ 
ping onto the floor while blood permanently stains 
the walls. Genestealers scale into hi-res monsters to 
engage you in crunching hand-to-hand combat. 
Then there's the background hum, your thumping 
heartbeat, the crackling radio chatter and constant, 
hammering gunfire. The Doom fans watch and they 
drool. Then they snatch the joypad off you and 
promise to show you how the game should really 
be played. Then they die. And they die again. Then 
some more. Finally, they throw down the joypad 
and storm off. 

Play Space Hulk like a shotgun wielding Doom 
psycho and you'll have your lungs handed to you 
double-quick. The enemies are too smart, too 
numerous and too ferocious. Space Hulk is built 
around an intricate tactical combat engine, with the 
graphics grafted on later. Think of it like this. You're 
in an exceptionally claustrophobic environment 
being stalked by an apparently endless stream of 
Genestealers. They're no Einsteins, but they know 
enough to hang back if alone, pinning you down 
until reinforcements arrive for human-wave-style 
attacks. To survive against this merciless onslaught 
you need to deploy your squad intelligently, moving 
through the various maze-like levels with 
Terminators covering each other. 

Controlling your troopers is done by a beautiful¬ 
ly drawn, blue translucent display. Call it up and 
you can flick between soldiers, setting up to five 
waypoints for each. You can even tell them 
to open/shut doors, watch your back, 
observe certain areas and fire at them. The 
last Terminator you ordered about, is the 
one you control when you exit the map. 

Initially when you access the map, everything 
goes into Freeze Time - but this respite is strictly 
limited and soon runs out. You can still use the 
map, but the action resumes with Freeze Time slow¬ 
ly building up again. It's a brilliant device which 
allows for tactical thinking, without losing arcade- 
style pace - with so much to do, Freeze Time can 
be more frantic than in-game time. 

Mission objectives are exceptionally varied. 
Troops must be rescued, sacred relics recovered, 
some rooms must be flamed or bombed, others 
must be stormed and yet more held against relent¬ 
less attack. The most chilling missions simply ask 
thgt you survive for five minutes. As your precious 
defences are ripped to shreds - 'Pluvius is down! 


25 Millennia after the first cathedral-like starship carried forth 
the empire from its home planet, the art of technology has 
been lost. The Imperial Space Marines revere their weaponry 
as sacred artefacts, while the firepower of their enemies is 
indistinguishable from magic. The future is a grim, bloody 
place... 

Pluvius is down!' - 
seconds seem to 
last an eternity. 

Each mission is a 
unique tactical 
challenge: fast 
reactions are fine, 
but without brains 
you're dead... 

Unfortunately, 
the dramatic new 
visuals and atmos¬ 
pheric audio make 
cold calculation 
particularly difficult. 

As you hear the 
cries of fallen 
Terminators, while 
yet more 

Genestealers mass 

to attack, coolly worked out tactics tend to dissolve. 

Forget the plan, let's just move your instincts scream 
and that, of course, is invariably fatal. The enemy 
pour through the smallest opening, taking out half 
a dozen men in a second. 

H,- To avoid frustration at getting 

stuck on a single level, Space 
Hulk is split into two sections. 

IIII pfl The first allows you to play 

(b any of its missions in whatever 



Magazine o order |jke and indudes five 

A, ^ 


practice levels. Then there's the 
campaign option, putting you 
aboard that eponymous space hulk with some 30 
odd missions to fight through chronologically. There 
are over 60 missions in all and that's a big chal¬ 
lenge which, even if you complete it, still retains 
appeal with the objective of getting maximum 
points on individual missions. 

While the basic game is a superb in its own 
right, developers Key Game have embroidered it 
with other Warhammer imaginings. Besides the 
Genestealers, there are two types of magical crea¬ 
tures - Magi and Patriarchs - which fight with 
spells. Having a magi materialise before you and 
listen to his curses echo around the corridors, 


The boys are in town and they aim to have 
some fun... On tougher missions you often con¬ 
trol over a dozen Terminators. Watching them 
march about, automatically firing to protect 
themselves, is an awesome sight. 

before flames erupt all around you is quite unnerv¬ 
ing. Hybrids are Genestealers redux, smaller claws 
but faster, smarter and armed. Watching a Hybrid 
nip through a door, loose off a shot and then take 
cover is quite amusing... until you die, of course. 
Then there's rebel Terminators, heavily armoured 
with major firepower and smarts. None of these 
creatures have the Genestealer's close-up graphics, 
but as they naturally tend to attack from a distance 
it doesn't really matter. 

The game also boasts eight different landscapes, 
from iced up corridors to Star Trek hi-tech to weird, 
book-lined environments which look like something 
from Name Of The Rose. These medieval graphics 
perhaps best illustrate the strength of the game's 
scenario. While gameplay is as exciting as any¬ 
thing in Aliens, the storyline far outdoes most 
Hollywood offerings. The sheer depth of the 
Warhammer universe imbues the game with a 
weight and sense of depth which is quite stunning. 
When you've flung down the joypad for the 
umpteenth time, you can pick up the manual and 


3DO Magazine 34 Sept 1995 
















A 


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i t" 

1 « 1 » 1 ? T «a 


v -' 0 * V 

* - V 

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CONKftD 

C 

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Above, a Genestealer trades razor-clawed blows with your 
parrying defences. Above left, a Patriarch prepares a spell, 
whilst below, a Magi surrounds himself with fire. 


reread that scenario one more time. It's a game 
which crawls into your head even as it jangles 
your nerves. 

To sum up, this certainly isn't an easy game 
and, even more than Need For Speed, isn't instant¬ 
ly addictive. Some people will hate it. But for those 
who yearn for something more than arcade sim¬ 
plicity, this is a dream - or perhaps more properly, 
a fantastically dark nightmare come true. A truly 
majestic, magnificent and uniquely British product, 
Space Hulk is a truly epic product. As a standard- 
bearer for third generation 3DO software, its com¬ 
bination of superb presentation, utterly frantic 
action and, above all, in-depth gameplay shreds 
anything yet seen on competitor platforms. □ ssw 

3DO Magazine rating: ★★★★★ 


A robot defends you above, while 
below, a Hybrid attacks. 


While some troops carry heavy artillary, 
far left, others have only shields and axes 
to defend themselves with, above. 


The bloody 
remains of 
Genestealers 
give a useful 
guide to 
your route so 
far. You 7 !! 
also find bits 
of marine 
armour too, 
sadly... 




Magazine | 


3D0 Magazine 35 Sept 1995 


3DO 














3DO 


review 


I Magazine 


h—Jk ifjj If Jf A Cyberpunk 
Mm M t> 1^ Thriller 


Publisher: Gametek © 01753 553445 Developer: Take 2/Tetragon Save Game: 4 SRAM slots Price: £44.99 Available: Now 


Besides having ail the best tunes, Satan also has a great cast 
of characters for epic narratives. From Dante's Inferno to 
William Peter Blatty's Exorcist, the cause of evil has been the 
plot motor of numerous books and movies. Now, Gametek aim 
to make Old Nick's residence a hit videogame. 


there's introductory conversations where a charac¬ 
ter's lengthy opening remark brings a response 
from Gideon, then Rachel chips in - and if you've 
recruited additional characters, they can have a 
natter too. At times, Hell seems more like a radio 
play than a game. 

To perk the conversations up, the game does 
makes extensive use of close-ups which, for 3DO, 
have been expanded from the PC's tiny windows to 
fullscreen. The 3D Studio graphics are often highly 
impressive for demons, but humans tend to look 
like vacuformed plastic while lip-synching, even on 
an NTSC 3DO, is poor. 

If there's any redeeming Hell, it comes from 
three things: the neat scenario, some clever options 
and big stars. Besides a slick but memory hungry 
save system, Hell allows you to replay every con¬ 
versation so far (saving on note-taking), turn off the 
(lousy) music and activate onscreen text. Since it 
takes only a second to scan text, this can speed up 
the game considerably. When you meet Mr 
Beautiful, you won't want to however. It might be 
typecasting to have Dennis Hopper voice a 
drugdealing demon, but he still turns in a wonder¬ 
ful performance and the script gives him some 
great lines. Supermodel Stephanie Seymour also 
produces a good turn, especially as she's repre¬ 
sented by a digitised hologram. Watching her pose 
atop a bar, you wonder why Take 2 didn't digitise 
all the human characters. 

Where the 3D Studio graphics do score is in 
backgrounds and sporadic animated sequences. 

The scene where Gideon is disembowelled - and 
his entrails eaten by a superbly spooky hellhound - 
is one of the most gruesome sequences I've ever 
seen in a videogame. It's not actually that disturb¬ 
ing - after an hour of his soporific voice I was 
rather pleased by it, but there is a genuinely adult 
sensibility at work in this game. Besides the odd 
four letter word, there's some unusually macabre 
scenes. A kidnapped woman bound so her neck 
periodically breaks, then reforms because she's in 
hell, is made even more shocking by the Mafiosi 
demons which casually play poker beside her. 

Overall, Hell is very much a curate's egg of 
good and bad elements. The basic adventure is 
way behind the sophistication and sheer interactivi¬ 
ty of Lucasfilm's best. If your patience is short, this 
isn't the game for you. On the other hand the gen¬ 
uinely imaginative plot, often extraordinary graph¬ 
ics and adult orientation make it a truly provocative 
and intriguing experience. □ ssw 

3DO Magazine rating: ★★★ 



government agents arrive to assassinate them. In a 
firestorm of laser bolts and scantily clad bodies, 

Hell begins as it means to go on, with double cross 
after double cross. 

Exactly why the Hand has turned on its own is 
one of the mysteries which drive the narrative... in 
a manner of speaking. As turns out, Gametek are 
of the belief that the road to Hell is paved not with 
good intentions, but with endless reams of conver¬ 
sation. This is an adventure with all the pace and 
speed of Faust hurrying to that last appointment 
with Mephistopheles. In a normal adventure, a 
lengthy intro gives way to an environment packed 
with puzzles and mysterious objects with the occa¬ 
sional bit of speech. Hell turns this structure on its 
head, with a few scant puzzles virtually swamped 
by the CD-spooled dialogue. 

Much of the game is traditional, copstyle Q&A 
sessions with a list of questions to be ploughed 
through with each character. But more than this 

A digitised Stephanie Seymour is not only easy 
on the eye, but actually turns in a pretty good 
performance as the holographic Cynna. Grace 
Jones and Dennis Hopper provide the voices for 
Solene Solux and Mr Beautiful, but the central 
characters Rachel and Gideon (bottom), suffer 
with far duller vocal talents. 


ell's strongest lure is undoubtedly its 
scenario, combining traditionally sul¬ 
phurous, razor-clawed demonology 
with a dystopian cyberpunk future. In 
2095, hysteria over violence and immortality has 
swept to power the Hand Of God party, led by 
Jmperator Solene Solux. Her solution to America's 
problems is to invite demons onto Earth to punish 
sinners! - an inspired bit of doublethink, ranking 
with witchburning for its theological perversity. Also 
brought in on the coat-tails of this imaginative sys¬ 
tem is the banning of alcohol, free speech, cyber¬ 
space, Al and even comics. 

Two of the Hand's most trust-worthy agents are 
Gideon Eshanti and Rachel Braque. A team which 
works together and sleeps together, the game 
opening with them asleep in their apartment as 


3DO Magazine 36 Sept 1995 














A detailed 
cyberspace 
map, left, 
provides a 
quick way of 
getting to the 
speakeasy 
(above) and 
comics shop 
(far left). 


Warmongering generals and 
admirals suffer neverending 
torment in Hell, right, while 
demons take their places at 
the Pentagon (above, left). 




3 DO Magazine 37 Sept 1995 


3DO 










3DO 


review 



Encounter 


Publisher: Panasonic © 01344 853146 


Developer: Mechadeus Save Game: 4 SRAM Slots 


Price: £TBA Available: TBA 





hile Tia Carre's Wonderbra-equipped 
spacesuit compares oddly to Christian 
Bocher's functional body armour, 
Daedalus is on the whole a surprising¬ 
ly serious and grown-up adventure. Compared to 
the mind-numbing banality and ropey special 
effects of Stargate, Daedalus' imaginative, extrava¬ 
gant visuals are a revelation. The cliche opening 
shot of a sun's corona flaring over the curvature of 
a huge planet is beautifully done, bearing compari¬ 
son with anything in 2001. The ship itself is 
reminscent of Aliens' Sulaco, but if anything more 
impressive. Cutting edge computer graphics come 
complete with believable grime, while running 
lights brighten up the grey with washes of red and 
blue in true ILM style. 

Mechadeus' artists really come into their own 
with the alien landscapes. The immense potential of 
CGI is exploited to the full with sets which would 
cost millions on the Hollywood backlot. Then there's 
the slick animation of various aliens, the flawless 
composition of live-action actors and CGI back¬ 
grounds - all framed with slick camera pans, 
zooms and close-ups. 

The plot itself isn't quite so extraordinary, 
reusing that sci-fi favourite of stumbling on a 
deserted alien ship. The backhistory is that the first 
interstellar war of 2135AD ended with your ship 
being blown apart. Tia and Christian ejected suc¬ 
cessfully, but your pod got hit with debris - scratch 
one body. Now reduced to a 'brain-in-a-box', you 
got boosted like most of the parts of Tia and 
Christian's new ship, all for a quest to find fame 
and fortune salvaging wrecks. The opening 

Right, has Tia fallen into a swoon for Christian? 
Or is she just worried his thick skull was fatally 
bashed in a fall ? The soap opera dilemma of 
whether those sarcy comment conceal deeper 
feelings run through the game. 


Hollywood stars, awesome SGI sets and state-of-the-art special 
effects... There have been interactive movies before, but never 
anything quite like this. 


pyrotechnics of the 
space war are neat, 
but the real fun 
comes with Tia and 
Christian shuffling 
their feet as they 
explain your rather 
dire situation. The 
acting is a world 
away from the 
wooden perfor¬ 
mances in most of 
Digital Pictures out¬ 
put - there's a real 
humour about this 
game. 

The game's visu¬ 
al panache comes 
through with special 
force on 3DO 

thanks to an excellent conversion by Palmsoft. 
While the PC version offered a choice between 
small window FMV or jerky fullscreen, the 3DO 
version is entirely fullscreen on NTSC. The FMV 
isn't quite as pinsharp as Wing III, but the occa¬ 
sional glitch is minor and overall it's 
excellent. There's also an superb 
stereo soundtrack which, besides 
dialog which is both well acted 
and wittily written, boasts a 
wealth of exceptionally con¬ 
vincing sound effects and 
good background music. 

So after all this praise, we 
finally come to the 
gameplay. What of 
that, then? Well, it's not 
bad either. There are occa- 
sioanl arcade sections, such as join¬ 
ing in a lasergun fight, while various 
locations have to be explored with 
searchlight and claw, but the core of the 
game are logic puzzles. Life support sys¬ 
tems fail, doors refuse to open, strange 
alien artifacts need to be activated. For 
all of these problems, superbly drawn 
puzzles expand to fill the screen and get 
the old brain cells ticking over. 

Old Spectrum puzzlers like Deflector 
are stylishly resurrected in hi-res, 24bit 


One of the few arcade sequences has you 
blasting these bat-like creatures. Hit something 
and a cut sequence shows it dying. Predictably 
simplistic but entertaining. 

colour mode. Besides deflecting laser beams, you 
must arrange planets for a solar eclipse, superim¬ 
pose various shapes to obtain a coherent 
image and much, much more. These 
start off pretty tame, and three 
skill levels do make a big differ¬ 
ence, while the user-interface 
is the best I've ever seen - 
saving before every problem 
and allowing you to jump 
right back to a problem if you 
die on it. 

Arcade maniacs are never 
going to be reconciled to this 21st 
century Krypton Factor, but even non¬ 
puzzle fans should give it a look. After all, if 
you really were stuck on an alien spaceship, it's all 
too believable that most of your time would be 
spent puzzling over obscure iconographic prob¬ 
lems. Daedalus at least throws in some action - not 
to forget Tia as well, of course. 

Overall, The Daedalus Encounter is a pretty cool 
movie and reasonably interative with it. If you 
fancy the idea of it, there's no doubting this is an 
excellent implementation. □ ssw 

3DO Magazine rating: ★★★★ 


3 DO Magazine 38 Sept 1995 













CO 

o 

o 





While lid's an excellent distraction, this is the real 
game: a variety of beautifully presented and varied 
logic puzzles. Top: rotate the outer circles so their 
designs combine to produce the required image in the 
centre. Middle: rotate the various planets to cause an 
eclipse. Bottom: pressing a button causes some 
plungers to slide home, others to pull back. Work out 
the button sequence to get all the plungers home. 


Top, that's you, that 
is. The probe your 
disembodied brain 
controls is frequently 
shown whizzing 
about the spectacu¬ 
lar sets. On the left, 
the vertical strip of 
your virtual controls 
overlay a particular¬ 
ly ugly monster. 

From the top: 
yes/no, analyse, 
data, activate probe 
arm, searchlight, 
IR/UV light, probe 
on, probe diagnos¬ 
tics, probe launch 
and laser. The vari¬ 
ous analysis screens 
are particularly well 
done and often have 
useful clues hidden 
in the techno-jargon. 


Magazine] 


3D0 Magazine 39 Sept 1995 













3DO 


review 


I Magazine 


Space Pirates 

Publisher: Mirage © 01260 299909 Developer: ALG Save Game: No Price: £TBA Available: TBA 


W 


hilst Mad Dog II: The Lost Gold and 
Crime Patrol (reviewed in 3 DO 
Magazine 3) significantly enhanced 
the rather rusty format defined by 
Mad Dog McCree, disguising the linear nature with 
branches to different levels and much improved 
action, Space Pirates fails to take the genre any 
further, settling for a different scenario by way of 
compensation, and this makes ultimately play 
somewhat disappointing. However, this type of 
game is inevitably good fun to begin with, particu¬ 
larly with two players shooting hell out of the TV, 
and the pulp sci-fi trappings of the game are enter¬ 
taining, albeit in a 'bad' fashion (almost as bad as 
Tank Girl). 

The plot is appropriately preposterous, with you 
playing the part of an heroic Star Ranger, charged 
with taking down Captain Talon and his huge 
horde of planet-hopping Space Pirates, who are 
kidnapping colonists and making everyone's life 
hell. Talon is a classic videogame nasty, because 
he's not just nasty in a logical, constructive sense, 
he also possesses those exhibitionist, malicious 
streaks essential for a truly nasty baddy. Colonists 
aren't just killed, they're held hostage, to provide 
human barriers for Talon's pirates and, if they're 
women, they tend to get tied up, possibly to distract 
you from the job at hand. Your only hope of 
destroying the near indestructible Talon (who pops 
up now and again to remind you that he's nearly 
indestructible) is by collecting enough energy crys¬ 
tals to power-up the star splitter cannon (it's big), 
and blast Talon into a sequel. 

There's no doubt that the camp visuals of Space 
Pirates are entirely appropriate for light gun genre 
- blasting lasers is a whole lot more fun than old 
west horseplay - and ALG have certainly spent a 
modest sum on sets, costumes and location shoots 
to create a fairly impressive environment. Sure, the 
style is more Flash Gorden than Blade Runner, with 
ridiculous costumes, fabulously silly alien make-up 
and ludicrously leathered baddies, but it looks bet¬ 
ter than your average episode of Scavengers or 
Blake's 7. And whilst the odd bit of tacky sexploita¬ 
tion could cause offence (particularly the large 
amount of bewitchingly dressed female pirates to 
be dispatched) there's nothing as overtly tacky as 
Crime Patrol's strip joint. 

At times Space Pirates gets positively surreal, 
certain scenes exposing an intriguing 'artiness' that 
suggest bursts of inspiration from the 'creative 
team'. One section, with a dominatrix and dwarf 
standing on top of a sand dune, throwing goblets 
in the air for you to shoot, truly baffles but is still 


With the violent Wild West and contemporary streets of crime 
infested America amply exploited for the maniac scenarios ALG 
thrive on, only the imaginary future of 2023 seems left to offer 
enough violence for GameGun addicts. Thus we have Space 
Pirates, a future so frightfully tacky, you'd probably turn the 
gun on yourself... 



Evil Talon, right, is a bad as can be, tand 
the princess in distress, above, though not 
as gusty as the female side-kick in Crime 
Patrol, does add a welcome touch of 
glamour to the proceedings. 



impressive for its dream like direction and (shaky) 
symbolism. The occasional 'trip' like this is weirder 
and more affecting than anything ALG have pulled 
off before, but too infrequent to significantly 
enhance the experience. For the most part Space 
Pirates is typical laser gun stuff, fast and furious, 
playing it for quick, straight thrills. The FMV quality 
is consistently good, with each short scene featur¬ 
ing a pre-set number of baddies popping up from 
behind boxes, dropping from ropes or leaping in 
front of you, all spliced in random order so that 
whilst you may know where they'll appear from, 
you won't know when. This stays off terminal 
monotony, as does the familiar technique of throw¬ 
ing hostages onto screen at random intervals, lur¬ 
ing the nervous and trigger happy into an uninten¬ 
tional assassination. Take out a friend, and you're 
bearded spiritual guide will rap your knuckles and 
take away a life, and those continues are soon 
used up... Most striking is the use of hand held 
cameras, cheap but effective camera tricks and a 
few optical effects (for lasers and disintegrations) 
which certainly make this the best looking of the 
GameGun bunch. The slightly more tactical 
approach required - memorising colour sequences 
for freeing hostages and codes for crystal imple¬ 
mentation - makes play almost adventure like, but 


don't be fooled into thinking this is a thinking man's 
game. As with its predecssors, Space Pirates' play 
revolves around repetition, learning the mechanics 
of each section, making slow progress. However, 
the wide variety of planets to hop across and aliens 
to encounter makes it all feel pretty big, with 
enough branch points to postpone irritation when a 
seemingly impossible section gets just too much to 
cope with. 

Play wise, one-player joypad control is fiddly 
(the A/C slow/fast buttons on the joypad are most 
unsatisfactory), two-players with two joypads is 
better, but using the GameGun itself is the only real 
way to play, bolstering the atmosphere and 
enabling much faster reaction times. If you're a fan 
of the genre, there's no doubt that Space Pirates is 
as good as its limited but fun predecessors, and 
novices seduced by the format will be entertained- 
for a while. But with the follow up, Drug Wars, 
offering more of the same, ALG really should con¬ 
sider investing some thought on this format, as it 
needs some serious re-invention if it's to acquire 
anything larger than a cult following. □ mew 

3DO Magazine rating: ★★★ 

•NOTE: Potential purchasers who will wish to use the ALG GameGun, should 
be sure to purchase an official (UK) copy of Space Pirates, as import copies 
will not be compatible with a British TV or GameGun. 


3 DO Magazine 40 Sept 1995 














Exteriors, above and 
top left, provide a 
welcome breaths of 
fresh air, with both 
arty and tacky scenes. 
Get shot by a sharp 
shooting enemy, left, 
and there's the obliga¬ 
tory cackle of laughter 
to inspire grating 
teeth. Below, another 
elaborate bondage set 
from kinky Talon... 


The easiest way to lose lives (and your patience) is to 
accidentally clip hostages, who are randomly dragged 
on screen to trick the trigger happy. The amount of 
female baddies to be blasted (inset) is surprisingly high. 


wT 

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1111 

1*K: V; ' i l 

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lijlliji 

■ a! 


Magazine | 


3D0 Magazine 41 Sept 1995 


3DO 

















3DO 


review 


| Magazine 



Publisher: BMG © 0171 9730011 Developer: Morpheus Intercative Save Game: Passcodes 


Price: £39.99 Available: Now 


Originally released last year by American Laser Games, it's 
taken BMG for the game to make its official transatlantic 
crossing to PAL. It certainly boasts some neat presentation, but 
does gameplay match up? 



rogrammed by a brand-new start-up 
company, VR Stalker is an intriguing 
hotch-potch of ideas and graphic trick¬ 
ery. The opening sequence is a bravu¬ 
ra display of intro cinematics with lots of profes¬ 
sional looking pans and fast cuts as various air¬ 
craft scramble. The Terminator 2-style voice-over 
is an unintentional parody while the storyline is 
purest hokum, but the visuals still get the pulse 
going. It's all the more impressive because rather 
than Silicon Graphics hardware, Morpheus used 
high spec Amigas with Video Toasters and 
Lightwave 3D. You can certainly see why Silent 
Software asked them to do produce the intro for 
Return Fire. 

The game's main idea is, unlike the intro, 
both realistic and intriguing. The eponymous VR 
Stalker technology puts the player not into a 
fighter's cockpit, but a virtual reality outfit with 
radiolink to real aircraft. It's not original, but with 
3DO's graphics chipset the visual possibilities are 
fantastic. Rather than a boring old realistic cock¬ 
pit, why not a cyberspace version with the usual 
Head-up-Display info being expanded to provide 
a complete 3D environment? Unfortunately, the 
operative word is 'could' and in-game VR 
Stalker clearly aims to be as realistic looking as 
possible - right down to your knees making an 
appearance in the F-14 cockpit! 

The graphic engine is an effective mix of sprites 
(for enemy aircraft) and polygons (for ground 
objects such as bunkers, skyscrapers and hills). The 
technique allows for plenty of speed - slowdown 
only rears its ugly head when the programmers 
lurch entertainingly over-the-top with ridiculous 
amounts of aircraft swirling about on the 
toughest missions. In fact sometimes it's 
too fast with the lack of ground detail 
making judging your height tricky, 
and you can lose height easily. 

For the UK version, Morpheus 
betray their enthusiast origins by 
taking time to rework the game. It 
still runs in letterbox on PAL, but all of 
the aircraft cockpits have been redrawn 
- they're still no works of art, but they're 
much improved, as are exterior views of the air¬ 
craft which now boast shading to make them far 
more realistic. 

Unsurprisingly, VR Stalker's resemblance to any 
kind of serious sim is entirely coincidental. Look up 
the family tree for this game and you'll find Sega's 
Afterburner rather than Microsoft's Flight Simulator. 
Missions begin with you in the combat zone and 


end as soon as the last target is destroyed. You 
have complete freedom within the combat zone 
and the game is compatible with the Flightstick Pro, 
but your controls are simplistic to say the least: 
increase/decrease speed and fire weapons - either 
cannon or missiles. 

Some minimal tactics come in with your choice 
of aircraft, initially on offer are a Grumman F-14 
Tomcat (good all-rounder), A-10 
Thunderbolt (best for ground 
attack) and General Dynamics 
F-l 6 (best for air combat). The 
aircraft all handle differently, 
the Thunderbolt being partic¬ 
ularly cumbersome, but the 
main difference is more sim¬ 
plistic with the F-l 6 having fast 
reloading air-to-air missiles, but 
its ground variants taking ages. With 
the Thunderbolt, it's the reverse. 

As you progress through the levels, more air¬ 
craft become available. The Northrop F-l 17 
Stealth Fighter and FI 19 Stealth Bomber offer 
harder to detect versions of the above, while the X- 
2 experimental has 'turbo thrust' and 'guided plas¬ 
ma blasts'. Besides adding a bit of variety, they 
also give extra lives - when all your planes are lost 


Top, a lengthy opening sequence and intros for 
each aircraft help set the scene for the action 
to come. Above, an F-14 hammers an aircraft 
carrier with a salvo of missiles. In the distance 
a pair of islands play host to more enemies. 

it's game over. 

Besides the extra aircraft, the game also 
improves with more dramatic locations. Level one's 
mostly flat, boring desert landscape gives way to a 
reasonably effective city and far more tricky, hilly 
terrain. Enemy tactics are rarely that advanced, 
gunship helicopters seem little more than floating 
targets, but their numbers provide a decent chal¬ 
lenge and the graphics have some nice details. The 
way enemy flak zips past is nicely done and explo¬ 
sions are effective, if hardly spectacular. 

For flight sim fans this is, at best, only a stop¬ 
gap before Domark's Flying Nightmares. For 
arcade fans, this comes a very poor second to the 
Shock Wave series which has far better presenta¬ 
tion, in-game graphics and gameplay. To quote 
Sleeper, this is very much an 'Inbetweener', a rea¬ 
sonably diverting filler between major releases. 
While probably more comfortable at a budget 
price, it's fast enough and playable enough to be 
worth a look and is a promising debut. □ ssw 

3DO Magazine rating: ★★ 



3DO Magazine 42 Sept 1995 

















Choosing a rear¬ 
view of an F-14 
makes Stalker's 
arcade approach 
all the more obvi¬ 
ous. Just like 
Afterburner , all 
the aircraft are 
sprites. Right and 
below; a Hind-D 
gunship copter is 
shown from 
different angles 
to show how the 
sprites simulate 
genuine 3D. 


The night-time, urban environments are probably VR Stalker's most 
impressive graphical flourish. It's good fun weaving in-between skyscrapers 
- if an enemy missile doesn't get you first. Without chaff, dodging missiles 
requires some dramatic acrobatics. Below, gorgeous instruments of death... 


The bizarre X-l, above right, is the most powerful 
aircraft you can get with plasma missiles making 
short work of most enemies. Below, a low-level 
ship strike goes badly wrong! 




Magazine | 


3D0 Magazine 43 Sept 1995 


3DO 
















3DO 


review 


| Magazine 


The People’s 
Party 


Publisher: Studio 3DO © TBA Developer: Studio 3DO Save Game: No 


Price: £34.99 Available: Now 




wisted established Studio 3DO as gen¬ 
uinely innovative developers, but its 
panache, irreverent attitude and sheer 
originality marginalised it in a market 
dominated by more easily categorised titles. Over 
a year later, it still rates as one of the most creative¬ 
ly designed and professionally produced games 
around. It's only possible rival is Station Invasion , 
the Studio 3DO follow up which uses the same, 
cutting edge approach with dazzling FMV pasted 
into a surreal computer gameboard. A benchmark 
edutainment title, it lampoons soaps as effectively 
as Twisted mocks gameshows. A third title in the 
series promised much to get excited about for fans 
of the eclectic. 

It's disappointing then that whilst tremendous 
fun, Zhadnost fails to develop the genre as effec¬ 
tively as its predecessors. The format is almost 
identical to Twisted, with two to four players exer¬ 
cising their wits on FMV jigsaw puzzles, general 
knowledge quizzes, audio-visual memory tests and 
concentration games to win time on the main 
'interactive' board game. It's here that money is 
won, the player with the most cash winning free¬ 
dom to emigrate from Bizarnia and, even, to have 
their fondest dream come true. From running for 
President to becoming a rock star or soap king, the 
secret fantasies of the communist contenders are 
laid bare. These egocentric fantasies are depicted 
in an outstanding opening sequence, with petty 
crook Zygi Nada's blackmailing election campaign 
rating as most hilarious. However, these amusing 
characterisations are fairly limited in the game 
itself, being mainly confined to the winner of a 
round earning an FMV update on their favourite, 
outrageous fantasy. 

In truth, the game never comes close to match¬ 
ing the bravura opening sequence for gags. Whilst 
gameshows ( Twisted] and soaps ( Station Invasion ) 
are easily satirised, the East/West twist of Zhadnost 
is more limited. The characters pose and gesticulate 
wildly, but don't really develop and never 
approach the out-and-out weirdness of Uncle Fez. 
The more sombre tone is also reflected in the visu¬ 
als. Although the sets and constructions are beauti¬ 
ful, the fabulous, day glo tackiness of Twisted is 
sorely missed, replaced by muted greens and shad¬ 
owy recesses that impress rather than seduce. And 
this minimalist beauty encroaches on the direction 
as well. Whereas Twisted had a huge variety of 
angles and cutaways to create an illusion of a 
seamless, fast edited TV show, Zhadnost relies on 
just three or four camera positions, cutting mechan¬ 
ically between them and seldom providing close 


Imagine a gameshow where you don't play for points and 
prizes, but for your very freedom. Set in the People's Republic 
of Bizarnia, Zhadnost is a dizzying parody of 1950s 
Communism and gameshow capitalism, garnished with state- 
of-the-art 3DO multimedia. Question is, which is more insane? 



Mad hosts, above, and 
even madder contestants. 
Clockwise from left, Ivana 
Borchnik, cellist, wants to 
be a rock star, chief of 
secret police Ivan Kropotkin 
dreams of being a sitcom 
star, scientist Grushenka 
Ruble fancies her chances 
as a top fashion designer 
and transsexual Ludmilla 
Pectoralvich pictures herself 
as Miss America... 


ups of the players. 

Bizarnia doesn't provide much inspiration for 
gameplay either. None of the puzzles have a dis¬ 
tinctly Bizarnian theme and are, in fact, mostly 
mildly reworked versions of the subgames in 
Twisted and Station Invasion. Even more surprising 
is the relative mundaneness of the format itself. 
Twisteds spiral staircase not only provided a great 
visual hook for the game, but allowed for some 
neat snakes and ladders reversals. Zhadnost, by 
contrast, simply has the characters four abreast 
behind consoles which clock up money earned. 

In part, these criticisms highlight the stunning 
originality of Studio 3DO's previous efforts more 
than the failure of Zhadnost itself, and will have lit¬ 
tle impact on novices to the genre, unaccustomed to 


Twisted's compulsive brilliance. Viewed in its own 
right, there's no doubt that Zhadnost is entertaining 
enough, with brilliant graphics, great sound and 
top-notch acting, and there's few other games you 
can get three friends around to join in. Also, it 
offers the significant innovation of a simultaneous 
two-player mode on almost all the subgames. Some 
people will find this element alone makes it signifi¬ 
cantly superior to Twisted. For myself, however, I 
found the atmosphere much less entertaining and 
enjoyable. If Studio 3DO are to extend their innov¬ 
ative trilogy further, they need to return to the origi¬ 
nality and humour which made the prequels so 
engagingly fresh. □ mew 

3DO Magazine rating: ★★★ 


3DO Magazine 44 Sept 1995 





















Above, the contestants groove. 
Left, potential wannabe 
President Vladmir Zygi Nada 
slicks back his hair and 
threatens to do some damage. 
"It would be a shame if 
somethin' was to happen..." 
Right, the technically impressive 
money round. Below right, one 
of many Pythonesque, match the 
sound/picture rounds, made 
more enjoyable by simultaneous 
two to four player action. 


Magazine | 


3D0 Magazine 45 Sept 1995 


3DO 


































3DO 


review 


I Magazine 


Flying 


ightmares 

cw 

Publisher: Studio 3DO © TBA Developer: Domark Save Game: 8 SRAM Slots Price: £44.99 Available: August 




or console fans too long deprived of 
home computer delights, the first take¬ 
off and long, sweeping climb away 
from the carrier is a revelation. This 
game literally soars with an utterly convincing sen¬ 
sation of flight. There have, inevitably, been some 
compromises in cramming the original PC game - 
Domark's AV-8B - into 3MB of RAM. The option to 
plan your own campaign has been stripped out, as 
has the option to transfer between allied aircraft. 
The controls are somewhat simplified... but if you 
think these cuts turn a full-blown flight sim into 
Afterburner, think again. 

The highly realistic cockpit is a world away from 
Shock Wave's simplicities. The Head-Up-Display 
and various Multi-Function Displays are crammed 
with cryptic information. As you switch between 
weapons, the HUD flicks up new targeting systems. 
While Hydras are relatively straightforward point- 
and-shoot missiles, gravity bombs are much trickier. 
There are, of course. Mavericks and laser-guided 
bombs, but unlike those in 16bit flight sims these 
are far from miracle weapons. Without friendly 
forces support, you have to 'paint' the target with 
your own onboard laser - fixing the aiming cur¬ 
sor from a rapidly manoeuvring jumpjet 
with AA exploding all around is far 
from easy. Even if friendly forces 
do provide support, Domark kind¬ 
ly ensure the weapons' (inaccu¬ 
racy is realistically modelled. 

Real flight sim buffs will also 
enjoy the ability to VIFF - 
Vectoring In Forward Flight - which 
uses the Harrier's famous ability to 
hover for some radical acrobatic moves. 

This makes carrier landings a bit easier, but most 
will be relieved that the computer will bring you in 
automatically unless you decide otherwise. There's 
certainly a substantial array of controls to learn, 
everything from wheel brakes on/off to eject is 
available with the right key combination. This can 
be annoying at times: while Wing III uses the shift 
buttons purely to alter the effect of the other but¬ 
tons, Nightmares gives them minor functions of 
their own. Accessing shifted controls means you 
have to press both buttons simultaneously, which 
can be tricky. 

On joypad the shift moves aren't too difficult 
and the feel of the aircraft comes through well, 
although the aircraft's realistic handling means it's 
far from a picnic. The Flightstick Pro's analogue 
controls bring over the sensation of flight even 
more impressively, but it's still not easy and the 


Flying Nightmares has come on a long way since its first pre¬ 
view in 3DO/1. Photorealistic menu screens now include FMV, 
a digitised cockpit flickers with warning lights, while the 
Spartan 3D of the Mac is glossed with slick texture maps. The 
first, and only, superconsole flight sim is here and at last you 
really can fly on your 3DO! 





shift-key combos are more 
difficult. As with learning the 
HUD icons, practice makes 
perfect! 

To make up for the lack 
of a PC's keyboard controls, 
the 3DO version impresses 
with some flash audio-visu¬ 
als. The lengthy intro 
sequence is both very dra¬ 
matic and an accurate 
depiction of most of the 
weapons in action. It's also 
accompanied by a driving 
rock guitar soundtrack by 
Mike Ash and Mike 
Edwards of Jesus Jones. 

There are also an additional eight tracks, 
evenly divided between rock and 
ambient - most of which are pretty 
good. All nine can be swapped 
between ingame, mixed up or 
down at your discretion with the 
excellent sound effects. 

The graphics are similarly 
impressive with the Harrier itself 
being something of a masterpiece in the 
art of texture mapping. While lacking the 
resolution to show every last rivet, the graphics 
evocatively suggest all kinds of fine detail and are 
extremely effective - especially with full lightsourc¬ 
ing. As with any modern flight sim, panning about 
in an exterior viewpoint is great fun. The aircraft 
carrier is also impressive, while the 3DO's palette is 
nicely illustrated by the smooth blending of the sky. 

Other graphics aren't quite as impressive with 
limited texture maps. The coastal transition zones 
are slick and the mountains impressively rocky, but 
otherwise the landscapes are a bit plain. This hard¬ 
ly makes for impressive screenshots, but ingame 
you're actually glad of it. Unlike in an arcade 
blaster like Shock Wave, enemy targets rarely get 
that big. When you're travelling at 700 knots, the 
approach of a supersonic F-16 isn't going to fill 
your screen unless you're on a collision course. 
Mostly, jets are fast-moving dots while ground tar- 



Although you can see other Harriers take off 
from the Tarawra, you can't really fly with 
them on missions. There are no big co-ordinat¬ 
ed attacks to take part in either. 

gets such as hangers, tanks and anti-aircraft instal¬ 
lations rarely grow beyond small boxes. Elaborate 
texture maps would swamp the targets and you're 
glad of all the clarity you can get. There are some 
nice, realistically scaled explosions, but they and 
spitting tracing fire aim for realism rather than ll_M- 
style special effects. 

The sense of actually being there is particularly 
strong in Combat mode. While some sims scatter 
their missions across the globe for superficial glam¬ 
our, Nightmares focuses down to a single cam¬ 
paign. Taken over by a military junta, the tiny 
island of Barcala has made world headlines and 
the UN has despatched Operation Saber to restore 
democracy - in just three days! The small time- 
frame emphasises the intensity of modern combat, 
your gruelling roster of missions includes everything 
from combat air patrols to bombing ammo dumps 
to cratering runways. Barcalan air defences aren't 
awesome, but then neither is your task force. The 
number of Harriers and lives at your disposal are 
limited, while the Harrier's thin-skinned fuselage 
provides scant protection against even small arms fire. 

Overall, realism is undoubtedly the game's 
strongest card. Piloting the complex beast which is 
a Harrier through a complete mission brings a real 


3DO Magazine 46 Sept 1995 




















•<£" V 


Above, your AV- 
8B Harrier II 
swoops low 
over your US 
Marine carrier - 
the Tarawra. 
Enemy aircraft 
include heli¬ 
copters (UH-T 
Heuys), jet fight¬ 
ers (F-16s, F-4s 
and F-5 Tiger lls) 
and transports 
(the C-130 
Hercules). 


The slate grey finish 
of the Harrier is 
identical to that in 
True L/es, which also 
used planes from US 
Marine squadron 
VMA-513, AKA the 
Flying Nightmares. 




COMMAND & CONTROL 
1: Mission background info. 

2: Load/save game options. 

3: Choose three preset weapon 
loads, or customise your own fit. 
There are 15 types of stores, 
including Sidewinders, rockets, 
ECM pods, chaff and flares. 

4: Mission Briefing. The cam¬ 
paign stretches over three days 
with 36 missions in all. Most 
missions include secondary as 
well as primary objectives - 
towards the end, you'll often 
need to fly several sorties to 
finish a mission. Arcade mode 
allows you to play any of the 36 
missions in whatever order 
you like. 


sense of accomplishment. On the Flightstick 
particularly, you get an excellent sense of 
being in control of a huge chunk of metal 
in sometimes uncertain balance between 
speed, airflow and gravity. The frame rate 
is fast and smooth - lending particularly 
heart-stopping impact to low altitude stalls. 

This, in turn, makes low level bombing runs 
especially challenging. While in Shock 
Wave targets often seem to roll up as if on a con¬ 
veyor belt, in Nightmares you must carefully plan a 
long swooping attack in full 3D. 

While arcade-fiends might find the intricate 
controls frustrating, the ability to simply zoom off 
into the wide-blue yonder is a big temptation... 
and combat isn't too dull either. Screaming in at 
low level, with tracers arcing overhead and AA 
exploding all around, certainly gets the adrenaline 
pumping - especially with tricky weapons to aim, 
lots of very solid terra firma streaking by and a 
complete lack of Wing III -style shields! □ ssw 


3DO Magazine rating: ★★★★ 


Magazine | 


3DO Magazine 47 Sept 1995 


3DO 





























3DO 


play guide 


| Magazine 




3DO software made easy, from the magazine that cares 


PATAANK 

This demented pinball extravaganza 
has a full set of appropriately insane 
cheats. The cheats can only be 
entered on the Options Screen, 
brought up from the Main Menu by 
pressing B. 



FAME THE EASY WAY 

To access the High Score or Hall of 
Frame entry screens don't bother with 
any of that gameplay nonsense, just 
input this cheat. 

While holding down L, press A, P, 

A, P, B, B. Release L and press Start. 
Press R and C twice to get to the High 
Score Entry Screen. For the Hall of 
Frame Entry Screen press L and C 
twice. There, that was satisfying was¬ 
n't it? Or maybe not... 

TESTING, TESTING 

If you actually want to play this fun 
game, but the reactions aren't what 
they used to be, this game tester's 
cheat will see you through to the end. 
While holding down R, press A, B, 

B, Up,C, C, B and A. Now when 
you're playing the game, if you 
pause the game pressing B will warp 
you to the Nexus. The best path to the 
Metagame goes like this: enter the 
Carnival of Luv. Press P and then 
Right to finish the level. Enter the 
Tunnel of Luv to set the heart on fire. 
Next, repeat the process (P and the 
Right) with the Surf level. Ride the 
wave to become the Big Kahuna. At 
Disaster Central, P and Right one 
more time. Hit three of the green pan¬ 
els and then the Panic button. Now 
go in and beat the core! 

PERSPECTIVE MATTERS 

To access the Free Camera and High 


A bumper selection of hints and cheats this issue, with a large amount 
of space devoted to the cult Pataank and criminally difficult ShockWave 
games, plus a two-player Akuma cheat to enjoy for SFII Turbo... 


Zoom perspectives use this nifty 
cheat. While holding L, press C, B, A, 
A, C, B, A and A. Now when you're 
playing the game, holding down the 
X button while on magneto gives you 
some stunning new views. 

Alternatively, while holding down L 
press B, C, C, Left, A, C, B and A. 

This should give you a bird's eye 
view. 

FLIPPED OUT 

For a bizarre upside-down view, try 
this: while holding down R press A, 

C, B, Right, B, C, B and A. 

AIRBORNE ANTICS 

Cut free from gravity with this nifty 
cheat. While holding down R, press 

A, C, A, Right, B, B, C and B. 

FANCY FREE 

This allows you to move anywhere on 
the playfield with the control pad. 
While holding down L, press B, B, C, 
Up, C, C, B and A. 

NO LIMITS 

For unlimited fuel and no tilts, hold 
down R while pressing C, B, C, Up, B, 

B, C and A. 



VR STALKER 

Morpheus International's arcade-style 
blast-'em-up packs plenty of chal¬ 
lenge, but these codes not only get 
you deep into the game but give you 
the full set of hi-tech aircraft. 
Fortunately, these codes not only work 
for the American original but also the 


graphically enhanced UK version. 

To use the codes below, simply go 
to the passcode screen and enter the 
code for the relevant mission followed 
by 'LQG-77K'. So for Texas, you'd 
input 'M37-LQG-77K'. 


Utah/M79 
Arizona/5KK 
Texas/M37 
Gulf of Mex./IAD 
Colorado/150 
Nevada/5U1 
Tennessee/ 1QO 


Arkansas/CCT 
Virginia/CC7 
lndiana/EW3 
California/ESO 
Pac. Ocean/EAT 
Wash D.C./SAH 
Flor. Keys/CUD 



SSFII TURBO 

While we've printed the one-player 
Akuma cheat before, thanks to 
Wayne we've now got some back¬ 
ground detail on this elusive character 
and a two-player version! It turns out 


Ryu's pic is replaced by Akuma's evil 
silhouette. It's tricky to pull off, but 
definitely does work! 

AKUMA'S MOVES: 

Dragon Punch: F, D, DF, F 
Fireball: D, DF, F 
Red Fireball: B, DB, D, DF, F 
Air Fireball: Jump + D, DF, F 
Hurricane Kick: D, DB, B 
Teleport: F, D, DF, F + 3 punch or 3 
kick 

DEMOLITION MAN 

Virgin's stunning movie tie-in mixes 
Op Wolf, beat-'em-up and racing 
action along with extensive movie 
clips to truly stunning effect. 

LEVEL CHEAT 

Pause the game at any time and enter 
L, A, Up, Down, R and Up. The pass- 
code should change to #PWR to show 
the cheat is activated. Press and hold 
B to get the level select appearing in 
the passcode box. Keep holding B 
and use Up/Down to cycle through 
the levels. When you find the one you 
want, release B. 


Akuma is the brother of Sheng Long 
and they both share the same 
teacher. It's said Akuma killed Sheng, 
who was Ken and Ryu's master, to 
gain total power. 

To get control of Akuma in two- 
player mode is easy, just hold down 
all six buttons on the character selec¬ 
tion screen - usually it's the second 
player to select who gets him. And in 
case you missed issue 3, for one 
player mode you have to follow this 
intricate code on the select screen: 
start with Ryu, wait 2 seconds, then 
go to go to T-Hawk, wait 2 seconds, 
then go to Guile, wait 2 seconds, then 
go to Cammy (passing Dhalsim), wait 
2 seconds. Then go back to Ryu and 
wait 2 seconds before pressing the 3 
punches buttons and the X button. 


SECRET MISSIONS 

Go to VRGN1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 to 

check out some of the best bonus lev¬ 
els ever. Sly is transported to the 
Virgin offices where you can blow 
away the game's designers, program¬ 
mers and even marketing people. 



VARIOUS 

GMOVER - shows the game over 
screen. 

GMWNNR - shows winner screen. > 


3D0 Magazine 48 Sept 1995 



















SHOCKWAVE & 
OPERATION JUMPGATE 

While some are put off by 
ShockWave's huge levels and quirky 
save system (quit the game during a 
level and you may lose your save 
position), there's no doubt it's an 
exceptionally impressive package. 

The FMV sequences are just about the 
best around, providing a highly 
involving narrative, while the Dolby 
Surround Sound is simply fantastic 
and in-game 3D superb. Night-time 
Las Vegas, superbly animated winged 
transport ships over England and 
much, much more make the first 
game well worth another look. The 
JumpGate mission disk boasts even 
more impressive graphics, but it's also 
a lot tougher. With the awesome- 


looking Shock Wave II on the way, 
now's the time to revisit these intense 
blast-'em-ups with the aid of some 
brilliant codes from Wayne Drury 

(Wayne@wdrury.demon.co.uk) and 
Laurent Benes (lbenes@ea.com). 

SHOCKWAVE ONLY 

Press pause while playing, then enter 
code. Each code must be preceded 
by BACCAAX before using any other 
code. 

BACCAAX: Allows loops and spins 
with Shift-Up and Shift-Down 
controller keys. 

CAABAX: Very good missiles (1000 
points each, fast moving, rapid fire). 
Once per mission. 

CAABACAX: Very good lasers. 
ACABAACAAAX: Smart bomb, once 



per mission. 

ABACAABAX: Player becomes invin¬ 
cible, infinite everything. Once per 
player only. 



BABX: Displays the name of the 
player. 

BACACAX: Displays programmer 
message. 

SHOCKWAVE AND 
OPERATION JUMPGATE 

Start a mission, press pause while 
using the laser (I insist on this point, 
the laser must be used when you hit 
pause). You are now with the pause 
screen (and some laser is visible on 
the screen). You now carefully press 
the following sequence of key: 

BABAAABABAC. 

Press stop to quit the game. THE 
GAME SHOULD NOT QUIT! If it does 
quit, then you failed in something 
above. 

Remember that the GOD mode 
stops when you quit a mission, so you 
must redo the sequence above when 
starting (or restarting) a mission. 

Once you're god, you can use all 
the following passwords without 


restriction or limitation. 

To use one of these passwords, just 
press pause during the mission, press 
the following sequence of A, B and C 
keys, and then press quit.THE GAME 
SHOULD NOT QUIT. If it does, then 
you failed in the password input or 
you forgot to become GOD first. 
BACCAAA: Quit the mission success¬ 
fully. 

CAAAACA: Increase the current mis¬ 
sion number. (For example, use this 
password 9 times while playing 
mission 1 and then quit, the next 
mission you will play will be mission 
10 . 

CAABA: Very good missiles (power¬ 
ful, fast, rapid reload). 

CAABACA: Very good lasers. 
ACABAACAAA: Smart Bomb. 


Magazine | 



ABACAABA: Player becomes invinci¬ 
ble (infinite everything). 

BAB: Display the name of the player. 
BACACA: Display the programmer's 
message. 

BAAAABA: Refill of all your energy 
levels and missiles (Only Operation 
JumpGate). 

Now save the world! 


> CRDTS - shows the development team 
credits. 

SCORS - shows the high scores. 
LSTNG#BTH - accesses the sound test 
menu. 

POWERS KINGDOM 

This odd little RPG, reviewed back in 
3DO Magazine •!, may get a bit 
repetitive, but the visuals are genuine¬ 
ly weird and the combat quite 
engrossing. Known as Guardian 
Wars in the US, it was recently 
offered as the pack-in game with the 
FZ-1 so quite a few of you should 
enjoy this cheat! 



CHEAT MENU 

Either start a new game or reload an 
old one, then when the menu screen 
appears with the game locations and 
flags, press L, R and C in turn. The 
flags should freeze. Next press Up, 
Down, Left and Right. Another menu 
now appears in Japanese. From top 
to the bottom, the options translate 
as: Load Game, Equip, Shop (enter a 
shop where every item in the game 
can be bought or sold), Gems 
+10,000 (get a little extra cash), No 
Battles (prevents enemies attacking 
you, or vice versa*, Co-ordinates 
(shows x/y position*), Free Movement 
(can enter almost any location, 
regardless of whether previous ones 
have been cleared*), All Attacks (all 
the weapons and magic are available 
in combat*), God Mode (during bat¬ 
tles neither your HP or MP can be 
harmed), Map Detail (loads more 
detail), ?? (Unknown), ?? (Unknown), 
Basic +1 (increase level of currently 


selected Golem by one), Class +1 
(increase level of currently selected 
body or sub-body by one). 

*Turn on/off 

MAD DOG MCREE 

The original lightgun shoot-'em-up 
has been dwarfed by its much 
improved sequels, but if you're still 
having problems try this cheat to help 
get all the way through he Wild 
West: if you get killed, quickly press P 
and then click on Continue. If you 
were fast enough, you should return 
to the action at the same point as 
when you were shot. 



SUPER WING 
COMMANDER 

DEBUG MENU 

On the lounge screen press and hold 
the X button. Now press B, B, C, C, 

A, A and if you've done it correctly, 
you'll hear a bleep. Let go of the X 
button, and press and hold the L and 
R buttons, before pressing P. A 
Debug menu will appear. On system 
flags, setting Killable to false means 
you can't be killed. Set Bangable to 
false and you won't crash into other 
spaceships. Put Finger of Death on 
true and pressing L, B and R simulta¬ 
neously will destroy your target. If 
you haven't acquired a target, every 
ship in range is destroyed. Change 
Picker to True, then go to the lounge 
and cycle through options until you 
hear 'Choose Campaign' or 'Choose 
Mission.' You can now choose any 
mission. □ ssw 

3DO Magazine 


3 DO Magazine 49 Sept 1995 


3DO 



















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J£L es Prices correct at time ot going to press E & OE 

Expiry Date 


NO MEMBERSHIP FEE All Prices include VAT. 























































































































3DO 


play guide 


| Magazine 


Essential tips for this extraordinary war game 






Superbly presented and great fun - especially in two-player mode - 
this has been a real bestseller for Studio 3DO Europe, so these cheats 
should prove especially popular! 


EASY ACCESS 

If you've been having any trouble 
with getting through the levels, enter 
'WOLF' as your password to unlock 
all the levels. Too easy now? Push the 
cursor up the levels until it flicks off 
screen, bringing back the password 
screen. Enter 'ZZZZ' and all the levels 
are locked. You can also call up a 
debug mode by holding down L & R 
& P while in-game. This gives various 
techie details, besides allowing you to 
cheat by setting the game so the first 
building you destroy has the objective 
flag in it. There's also an FPS option 
which activates a small digital 
display on the status bar 
showing how many 
frames per second 
the game is run¬ 
ning at. On status 
screens the FPS is 
around 50fps, 
dropping to 18fps 
at maximum zoom- 
out ingame, but usually 
averaging mid 20s. 

We've also got some internet 
advice from swikh@delphi.com 
beginning with the observation that 
the level codes backwards spell 
DONT PLAY WITH GUNS JUST THIS 
GAME. 

NO STATUS BUG 

This amusing bugette actually has 
some gameplay value - without your 
control window not only don't you 
know your ammo/damage/gas sta¬ 
tus, but there's no map! It certainly 
toughens things up and can even be 
used in two-player mode as a handi¬ 
cap, although we've only got it on 
player one so far. 

To activate the cheat, select your 
vehicle and when it moves onto the 
ramp, hit the P button. If you're quick 
enough, the control window will be 
'jammed' at the bottom of the screen. 

Return Fire 

Published By: Studio 3DO 
© TBA 
Price: £39.99 


Press A, B or C to exit the pause 
screen and you'll be back in the 
game but without the control window. 
Timing is all with this cheat and we've 
found it easiest on the APC. 

GENERIC TIPS 

A. Bring your vehicles back to your 
bunker before they are completely 
destroyed. The Bunker will repair all 
damage. 

B. You can self-destruct by 

pressing A+B+C. You will 
sacrifice the vehicle, 
but it's a quick way 
to get back to your 
bunker. 

C. Never cross 
bridges with 
Drones on your tail. 
Drones will continue 
to fire at you as you 
move and will destroy the 
bridge behind you. 

D. Keep moving to avoid enemy 
Drones - they're launched when you 
stop moving. 


E. The submarine is deadly and can¬ 
not be destroyed. Once it fires a heat 
seeking missile at you, you're dust.... 
unless something else is closer to the 
missile. The missile really is heat-seek¬ 
ing and if something else - say a 
drone or even your enemy - is closer 
to the missile, it will be taken out and 
not you (even if you're the one that 
caused the sub to surface!)! With a 
bit of practice, the heat-seeking mis¬ 
sile can be used quite creatively. 

F. Always check the map when you're 


in the bunker. It is constantly 
updated and will show you how 
the terrain has changed. It will 
also show your enemy's posi¬ 
tion on the map as he moves 
around. 

2-PLAYER SPECIFICS 

A. Learn to play very well. 

B. If your enemy finds your 
flag, take your Jeep and go retrieve 
your own flag. You now have quite a 
few options: 

(i) Hide it behind a building near 
turrets. 

(ii) Move it to the farthest location on 
the map. 

(iii) Bring it back to your own Bunker. 
(It will be randomly placed in a new 
Flag Tower.) 

(iv) You can take it out to sea, and it 
will slowly float back to shore. (Let 
your enemy have fun trying to find a 
moving flag!) 

C. Lay mines on: 

(i) The enemy's useful bridges instead 
of destroying the bridge. When your 
enemy hits the mine you will have 
taken out an enemy's vehicle and 
destroyed a useful bridge. 

(ii) On or near your flag. 


(iii) On or near your enemy's Bunker. 

(iv) The Helicopter can remove mines 
by firing rockets (and only rockets) 
directly at the mines. 

D. Use radar screens to: 

(i) Keep track of where you are 
located. 

(ii) See your enemy. 

(iii) Prepare to fight an approaching 
Drone. 

(iv) See mines (You can't see them on 
the map). 

E. Use the Jeep Beacon light: 

(i) The beacon lights green and 
chimes when you are headed towards 
your enemy's exposed flag. 

(ii) The beacon lights bright red when 
you are facing your bunker. 

F. Learn to play very well. □ ssw 

3DO Magazine 


3 DO Magazine 51 Sept 1995 




















































3DO 


play guide 


The 


[Magazine 


i 

/ 

W 



Fantastic cheats for the greatest racing game ever 


SCOOTER OPPONENT 

If even the Mazda RX-7 is giving you 
tough competition, why not put your 
smarmy opponent on a scooter! 

That'll teach him... Well, maybe not. 
The scooter is actually pretty nippy 
and can easily weave through heavy 
traffic. Fortunately, once input the 
scooter stays active so you can race it 
across all the different tracks. Despite 
being a cheat, the scooter graphic is 
superb. 


EA Canada are not only trailblazing the way for 3DO gaming, they're 
also way out in front with hidden game features. After the wonderfully 
wacky FIFA cheats, they've now revealed equally weird fun in the 
incomparable Need For Speed. Thanks to Marcus (Tore Software), 
Wayne Drury (Wayne@wdrury.demon.co.uk) and Doug Dyer 
(dyer@alx.sticomet.com) for their help with these. 




To get the cheat working, start a 
level and play it for ten seconds. Then 
call up instant replay and rewind to 
the beginning. Now press R, Down 
and B simultaneously on joypad two. 
Quit the race and when you restart it 
you'll find a scooter beside you! The 
scooter is apparently a self-portrait by 
track designer Sheila Allen, with 3D 
programming by Mark Tessman. 

TURBO TURBO 

Scooter giving you hassle? How 
about supercharging your car by 
boosting engine torque and power by 

The Need For Speed 
Published By: Electronic Arts 
© 01753 549442 
Price: £39.99 


a whopping 20-30%? 

To activate this, start a level and 
then immediately press L, R and Up 
on pad two, plus L, R, A and C on 
pad three. If the 
cheat's been activat¬ 
ed, the game will 
flash up a 'car 
crashed' warning. 
From now until 
when you turn off, 
the cheat will be 
enabled. The fastest 
cars are boosted by 
20% and the slowest 
by 30%! While you 
can't exceed the 
maximum published figures of the 
cars, the radically increased engine 
torque makes for breathtaking accel¬ 
eration! 

NO DASH 

If you're tired of your car's dash¬ 
board, why not get rid of it? The dif¬ 
ference isn't merely cosmetic as sim¬ 
plifying the screen display brings 
extra speed which, when combined 
with Turbo Turbo, can make for an 
absolutely breathtaking performance. 

To get the cheat working, press 
Up,L and A on joypad two at any 
time while playing. Every time you 
press it, the dash will cycle through 
four variants: full dashboard, no dash 
but exterior rev counter and rear-view 
mirror, no dash but rev counter, and 
no dash with no instruments. 

BLOW'EM AWAY 

Even for veteran players this is an 
absolutely unmissable cheat. With the 
press of a single button, every car on 
screen is sent spinning into the air! It's 
the stressed out commuter's dream 


seeing a logjam of traffic, your race 
opponent and even the cop car go 
whizzing into the sky, before tumbling 
back to earth. Be careful though, 
occasionally it takes your car out too! 
To activate the cheat (1) start a level 




and during load¬ 
ing press L & R & 

Left on pad one, 
then quit. 

2: Restart level 
and during load¬ 
ing press L & R & 

Up on pad one, 
then quit. 

3: Restart level and during loading 
press L & R & Right on pad one, then 
quit. 

4: Restart level and during loading 
press L & R & Down on pad one, 
then quit. 

5: Start the level again and every 
time you press 'X', everything on 
screen will fly into the air! 

SOLO SPECIAL 

If you're tired of all that traffic and 
those annoying cops, why not get rid 
of them? In control central go to the 
options menu and highlight skill level. 

On pad one, press X + R + A + L 
in rapid succession holding each one 


down as you get to it. Then lift them 
all up and start again - this is tricky 
to do and so far we haven't got it 
right, but we're assured it is correct! 

If you do it right and enough times 
the text will turn from yellow to pur¬ 
ple. No records or 
times can be saved in 
this mode! 

BLACK TO 
BASICS 

If you really think 
you've mastered the 
entire game - won 
bonus cars on every 
stage of every level, 
beat the 512TR with 
a Viper on Alpine... 

- well, there's one 
more challenge to 
face. Start a level 
and play for ten sec¬ 
onds, then rewind to 
the start. On pad one 
hold down B and on 
pad two press X, P 
and C. A 'car crashed' warning 
should appear. Now play against the 
clock on the Alpine level - for just 
that added little frission of excitement, 
all the road on the final stage has 
been covered with ice. The graphics 
are the same, but the feel is murder! 

WHO'S RESPONSIBLE? 

To see the geniuses responsible for 
this software masterpiece, sit back 
and wait after a race has finished. 
When the credits start to roll, press R 
and L to flip between the normal 
backdrop and a pic of the program¬ 
ming crew. □ ssw 

3DO Magazine 


3D0 Magazine 52 Sept 1995 

























CO 

d 

O 


| Magazine | 







Magazine - 



3DO Magazine is the only British publication dedicated to the machine of 
tomorrow. It is packed with exclusive reviews, exciting features, in-depth 
playing tips and a comprehensive A-Z guide to every UK 3DO release. Demand 
for the first three issues of the magazine has been unprecedented, with acclaim 
from both the public and industry insiders. To make sure you catch the next 
action-packed issue, we recommend you fill in this subscription form and send it 
back to us. Everyone wants a slice of the future, and only 3DO Magazine 
from Paragon Publishing delivers the goods... 



- VV wity 


9 *771355 '962022 


Space Hulk, Space Pirate k. 
The Daedalun Encounter. VK Stalker. 
Zhadnosl The People'll Party & Hell. 

Foes Of Ali, OeathKevp, 
Prowler, Captain Quuzur, OnSide, 
Killing lime & BattleSport. 

MS Update with IYip Hawkii 
E:i Show report, Dr. David Kirk Intern 
3DO Online, new -Jaypuds & mure... 


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T ightmares 


Exclusive Review 


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3DO Magazine is for the elite gamesplayer and copies sell out fast. If you 
want to be sure of getting your own copy, with free delivery to your door 
and a saving of over 25% on newsstand prices, then subscribe 
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3DO 


letters 


I Magazine 




Correspondence from around the world concerning the wonderful world of 3DO 


Please address all mail to. 3DO Interactive, 
Paragon Publishing, Paragon House, St. Peter's Road 
Bournemouth BH1 2JS or Fax us on 01202 299955 

If you have access to the World Wide Web, please visit the following for 
details of other Paragon magazines and services: 

iiliis.co.uk/paragon.lihnl 


A 


t last!! A 3DO specific magazine and 
even better a mature magazine for a 
mature audience and an excellent read 
to boot. No more scouring shelves in 
newsagents for a mention of 3IX) reviews from 
magazines claiming to cater for all formats - who's 
kidding who here? Three quid for three pages of 
3DO specific material and that's if you're 
lucky. Then there's all the hype about how 
great future systems are, despite all the 
talk of how a machine's only as good as 
its software when PlayStation and Saturn 
have only about four decent titles between 
them. 

3DO will succeed - but only if they get 
to grips with advertising. Whilst reading 
your interview with Mr Robert Lindsey, 

"Marketing Magus", I couldn't help but 
think to myself that you failed to ask the 
question most, if not all 3DO owners 
would have asked - WHAT MARKET¬ 
ING?! I have yet to see an advert on TV or in the 
national press for 3DO. I own a 3DO and I am 
delighted with it, but I feel that unless this product is 
given more prominence where it matters - which is 
TV and national press - I fear the consequences. 

What really gets me is that it is such a good 
product that anyone could sell it. This very week- 

3DO's US ads take Sega’s ‘in-your-face’ style 
further. On the reverse of this four page fold-out 
are 40 of the 200+ ‘woody-inducing’ titles. 


end I'm going to a friend's house with my machine 
and six fellow bus drivers for a 3DO day. You 
might have interviewed me as I seem to be doing 
more "marketing" than Mr Lindsey. To cap it off I 
went to the 3DO club meeting in Glasgow to see 
"new titles" and ended up playing a tournament of 
FIFA all night. In fact I ended up organising it! 

I do hope you print this letter, although it may 
be controversial, it is what 3DO owners are think¬ 
ing and you at 3DO Magazine are our unelected 
spokespeople. This is my second letter to you and I 
hope I have many more reasons to write as it 
proves the mag is doing something, and making 



people like myself take the time to read this. I hope 
you will print it even so that the people at the 3DO 
Company will take note of our views. 

Anyhow, enough moaning, I did enough of that 
in Issue 19 of Edge and they didn't like it one bit. 

In fact they edited a lot of it out and mocked my 
letter with a sarcastic reply. I won't have to put up 
with that any more as I am now the proud owner 
of a 3DO Magazine subscription. It was my 



Above, Panasonic’s TV and press campaign 
modestly places 3DO along with the A-Bomb and 
the theory of Relativity in importance! 

Below, Sanyo’s TRY 3DO may be limited to 
Japan so far, but the ads are neat and the case 
design absolutely superb. 




WE'VE GOT THE 
HARDWARE- 


BEST GAME SYSTEM OF 1994 


BEST OVERALL GAME SYSTEM BEST AUDIO 


EDITOR'S CHOICE AWARD 
-1994 BEST GAME MACHINE 


THE ULTIMATE SYSTEM OF CHOICE 


BEST SYSTEM OF 1994 f 


n BEST PRODUCT OF THE YEAR 






BEST OF WHAT'S NEW 


While you're wading 
through all the crap 
concerning who's got 
the "next" ultimate 
game box, 3DO 
would like you 
to consider two 

important 

facts: 


We've got the mast 
advanced gaming system on 
the planet. 

We’ve got over 200 
woody-inducing titles to 
play on it. 

We've got industry awards 
coming out our wazoo. 

And you knew what ? 

It's ail here. Right now. 

Wot next month. Not "coming 
this fall." 


3DO Magazine 54 Sept 1995 

















































Valentine's present from my wife - it beats a box of 
chocs any day! 

One thing about the mag, what about giving 
tips not just cheats ? Ask readers to send them in 
and since our mag is a mature one, ask them for 
best times and scores for certain games as hopeful¬ 
ly they wouldn't cheat. 

We are a family of four, two kids aged five and 
three, and we all regard the 3DO as an excellent 
form of family entertainment. My five year old son 
is competent at most of the games, which are gen¬ 
erally as hard or easy as you make them. 

Ian McKenzie, Glenburn, Paisley. 

Thanks for your letters, Ian, just as we hope to be 
regarded as a mature magazine so we're grateful 
for mature-minded let- 


to bed with me, but should I wait for Cyber Clash 
or Dragon ? I was thinking of Way Of The Warrior, 
but decided against due to the controversy. 

2) What happened to Highly Recommended? 

3) Are any of the ALG GameGun games any 
good? I'm looking for the same satisfaction that 
Terminator 2: The Arcade Game gave me. Virtua 
Cop sucks. 

4) Congrats on a cover disc every month, but could 
you please try to fit more on? It doesn't have to be 
of the greatest quality, but I already have Theme 
Park and surely the demo didn't take up 500Mb. 

How about giving away a free game to the best 
letter of the month (hint, hint), I hear Return Fire is 
pretty good! 

Aurian & Denzil Lyne, Fairford, Gloucester. 



ters such as yours - 
the above being a 
composite of both. On 
your principal subject, 
marketing, I think your 
points are accurate 
and very well made, 
although blaming Bob 
Lindsey is a little unfair. In America, 3DO is cur¬ 
rently running a very hard-hitting marketing cam¬ 
paign. On TV, the SNES and Mega Drive are 
shown being locked away in a box marked 'Toys' 
before a showreel of 3DO software. In magazines 
a superb array of screenshots is wrapped up with 
a memorable hard sell (see picture). 

3DO Europe are planning their own campaign 
for later in the year, which could well include TV 
ads. Until now European activity has been mini¬ 
mal because the small numbers of 3DO systems 
Panasonic/Matsushita have brought in quickly sell 
out. Matsushita are generally regarded as per¬ 
forming best in competition, which is when their 
formidable marketing operation acquires proper 
targets - they didn't get to be twice the size of 
Sony by accident! GoldStar, by contrast, has been 
aggressive right from the start - in the US it's 
already offering a $50 rebate on its $399 system 
and claims to be outselling Matsushita currently. 

On the subject of playing tips, whenever we 
have space we will be printing a lot more of these 
and would certainly welcome any from readers. 
High scores are a bit more problematic, but we're 
experimenting with them in this issue so maybe 
other readers can give their opinions. 

ongratulations on a brilliant magazine! 
(How many people write that, eh?) The 
moment I saw the first issue I sub¬ 
scribed, and have enjoyed all three 
issues received so far. The reviews are lengthy and 
have depth, but rather too many seem to have a 
full five stars. Are they really this good or do you 
need a more accurate measuring system? 

I actually have a few niggling questions (who 
hasn't) that I'm sure you'll answer: 

1) I'm looking for a really meaty beat-'em-up. I got 
the Super Street Fighter demo and seriously took it 


“...rather too many 
reviews seem to have a 
full five stars. Are they 
really this good or do 
you need a more accu¬ 
rate measuring system?” 


Yes, 3DO games are 
that good and no we 
don't need percentages 
- see below! 

1) The current world 
champion for 3DO 
beat-'em-ups is Super 
Street Fighter II. If any¬ 
thing, it's better than the coin-op which is proba¬ 
bly the most sophisticated combat game around. 
Nevertheless, Samurai Shodown runs it close with 
many of SFII's programmers having moved to 
SNK for its development. Gameplay isn't quite as 
complex or involving yet, but it's still top-notch 
while graphics are even flashier than SFII. 

Dragon was well received on SNES and Mega 
Drive - three characters on screen is fun - but it 
isn't really in the same league as its arcade-bred 
competitors. Hopefully the 3DO version will be 
enhanced, but we haven't seen anything on it yet. 
As for Cyber Clash , Crystal Dynamics apparently 
became unhappy with 


its external developers 
and have now can¬ 
celled it. 

Way Of The Warrior 
is pretty good, we 
think our star system 
accurately rated that! - 
but it lacks the respon¬ 
siveness of the game 
which inspired it; Mortal Kombat III (which is now 
due on 3DO in '96). Somewhat nearer are Ballz, 
Primal Rage and Electronic Arts' awesome Foes 
Of Ali. Is that enough choice for you? 

2) We decided the A-Z section pretty much cov¬ 
ered this topic. 

3) The ALG-compatible Demolition Man is proba¬ 
bly closest to Terminator 2, in its early and fairly 
extensive blast-em-up sections anyway. However, 
for a real challenge ALG's games keep getting 
bigger and better. Crime Patrol and Mad Dog 
McCree II are both well worth a look, but see 
News for PAL details. 

4) Of course we'd prefer more demos and newer 
ones, but as you probably know a last minute 
glitch over Syndicate delayed 3DO/4 by almost a 


Super Street Fighter II, still top of the heap of 
beat-’em-ups, despite strong competition. See 
letter from Aurian and Denzil Lyne 

month. We're always trying for the best demos, 
but programmers rarely have time to do them 
until a game's finished and there's also lengthy 
approval process to go through with 3DO. 

bought an import 3DO as soon as the 
machine was released in America. It 
cost £600 and I thought for that I was 
getting something which would last a 
long time. After endless hassle trying to get it to run 
on a TV, I had some fun with Crash 'N' Burn but 
then had to wait ages for another good game. 
Anyone remember how awful Stellar 7 was? Then 
all magazines started going on about how 3DO 
was doomed and the PlayStation was the only con¬ 
sole worth buying! 

I guess 3DO had to make a response and M2 
certainly looks impressive, but how much can we 
really believe? And even if the hardware does live 
up to the hype, will software houses support it? 

More importantly, since M2 is so much more 
sophisticated than the old machine, surely there'll 
be an even bigger gap between its release and 
good games arriving than with the first 3DO? 

But probably the 
worst mistake with M2 
is announcing it now. 
Think about someone 
who's considering buy¬ 
ing a 3DO now. It'll 
cost them £400 and 
will be out of date in 
about six months. 
Wouldn't it be better 
for them to simply wait for 3DO II which has to be 
cheaper than a 3DO I and upgrade? 

Aggrieved 3DO owner, Stoke-On-Trent. 

Yes, we definitely do remember how dire Stellar 7 
was. However, things are a lot different now and 
however painful 3DO's launch was, it has paved 
the way for a whole new way of doing business. 

Firstly, the games you buy now will always be 
compatible with whichever new upgrade comes 
along. This doesn't just preserve your investment, 
it means when M2 arrives there'll be plenty of 
excellent new 3DO I titles coming along to plug 
any gaps in the M2 release schedule. 

Secondly, the core of a 3DO system, its operaF- 
ing system, is designed to evolve with the hard- > 


“Since M2 is so much 
more sophisticated than 
the old machine, surely 
there’ll be an even 
bigger gap between 
it’s release and good 
games arriving.” 


co 

d 

O 


Magazine 


3 DO Magazine 55 Sept 1995 





















3DO 


letters 


> ware. Once developers learn how to write a 3DO 
game, those basics will apply to any new models 
- cutting down development time and cost. 

Thirdly, the upgrade path is designed to be as 
cost-effective as possible. M2 marks a massive 
leap forward in technology, but since the upgrade 
operates off 3DO I's power supply and CD-ROM 
drive (by far the most expensive component), it'll 
cost considerably less than a new 3DO. Sure, if 
you wait until 1996 to buy you could probably 
save some money - but as you know, there's 
some great 3DO I games to play today. 

It's also worth pointing out that while M2 is 
probably an even bigger technological leap than 
the original system, most of its capabilities come 
from easily accessible built-in functions. When 
Namco converted Ridge Racer to PlayStation, a 
large proportion of development time was spent 
emulating in software what the coin-op did in 
hardware. With M2, tasks such as z-buffering 
and Gouraud shading are handled by custom 
chips. 

3DO hasn't had the easiest of starts, perhaps, 
but I don't think anyone should doubt that it's 
coming together pretty well now. 


H 


aving rushed out and bought Gex, 
largely on the basis of 3DO 
Magazine's review, I feel your maga¬ 
zine must bear some of the responsibili¬ 
ty for my subsequent disappointment. 

Firstly, I completed the game going through a 
mere 18 levels including all the bosses: now I may 
have missed a secret level or two, but that's still sig¬ 
nificantly below the '30 to 40' levels claimed in 
your review. Surely, the 'definitive' platform game 
for what is a superb next generation machine could 
manage better than that. Compare it to the 96 lev¬ 
els of Super Mario World on the humble SNES. 

Did your reviewer find an extra 22 levels that I had 
missed or did he take the publishers' word without 
fully bothering to play the game through? 

Secondly, Necropolis' 'on the move' stage suf¬ 
fers noticeably from slow-down as you try to nego¬ 
tiate the conveyor belts - something not seen on 
Sonic, despite that quicker moving game being run 
on a far less powerful machine. 

Now don't get me wrong, Gex is an excellent 
game. Its graphics (when not in slow motion) are 
superb and it does have some innovative features. 

Does some minor slowdown on the Necropolis 
level really make Gex inferior to Sonic? 






“...to describe Gex as a 
‘startlingly good game’ is 
pure hyperbole... in 
many ways (Gex) doesn’t 
measure up to the 16bit 
platformers that 
went before.” 


But to describe it as 'a startlingly good game that 
matches, nay betters any that's gone before it' is 
pure hyperbole - as the many 3DO owners who 
have graduated from the SNES and Mega Drive 
will find out to their cost (£46.95 precisely). Gex in 
many respects doesn't measure up to the 16bit 
platformers that went before. 

As an afterthought perhaps you might give 
thought to expanding the star based scores for 
reviews. With an ever 
increasing number of 
excellent software titles 
coming out for the 3DO 
it won't be long before 
shoot' -em-ups, sports 
sims and driving games 
all have a collection of 
five star games with lit¬ 
tle for the purchasing 
public to differentiate between them. I think a per¬ 
centage system with one overall score and number 
of separate scores for graphics, sound effects, 
gameplay and longevity etc would help people like 
myself decide better what to spend out £50 on. 


After all, on a percentage based system a five star 
game could be any where between 81-100% and 
anyone who bought magazines for another games 
system knows that difference between a 81% and 
91% game can be very large indeed. 

Mark Colquhoun, Woking, Surrey. 

First, an apology for the mistake over the number 
of levels. Dave's math went a bit awry, you get 
around 30 levels only 
including the bonus 
games and final, 
secret world. 

On the main sub¬ 
stance of the review, 
however, we stand by 
it. If we'd been unsure 
about reviewing Gex 
accurately we would 
have waited until the next issue - as we did with 
Immercenary. Our principal argument for Gex 
was that various innovations (such as being able 
to climb on almost anything), meant 'it genuinely 
makes the game feel different 7 and that 'it sends 
itself up' with smart, superbly drawn graphics, 
and a brilliantly witty soundtrack which make it 
appealing to an older audience. 

Of course, it would be better if it had more 
levels, but the amount of work involved in its 
'superb', highly detailed graphics is prodigious. 
Super Mario World , by contrast, basically 
reworked Mario Bros' 3 8bit graphics at a slightly 
higher resolution. Which is why Sega happily ran 
the game on their stands besides Sonic, a game 
that did look 16bit and partly explains why 
Nintendo lost the 16bit war. And Sonic, while a 
great game, was small enough to be completed 
without a save game. 

Gex is clearly a lot larger than Sonic and if, 
like SMW, the save game inevitably reduces the 
challenge it still has some nice twists. Finding the 
various phones forces you to thoroughly explore 


3DO Magazine 56 Sept 1995 



























what are, after all, generally very big, complex 
levels. Moreover, if you do finish the game then 
there's the additional challenge of finding the five, 
hidden bonus game levels and completing them 
to get to sci-fi world. Now that's tough and, like 
much of Gex, a significant improvement on Sonic 
or SMW. In our opinion, anyway. 

Your argument over the star system is fine 
apart from the fact it presumes percentages 
would somehow make our opinions closer to 
yours. If we had used percentages, Gex would 
have got at least 91 %! While we think most peo¬ 
ple agree over an 'excellent' game, as we seem 
to here, beyond that things are too subjective for 
the pseudo-accuracy of percentages. Is there real¬ 
ly any point in debating whether Need For Speed 
has 2% better graphics than The Daedalus 
Encounter ? What matters is that they both look 
great in very different ways - something best 
expressed in a well written review. 

Sure, there are going to be more five star 
games but if you're choosing between Road Rash 
and Need For Speed, the decision should come 
down to whether you prefer arcade racing action 
or sim-type depth. For us to somehow rate one 
above the other would simply cloud this issue. 


Flightstick 
from CH Products. 


producing the 3DO's first platform title, CD have 
made an extremely playable game. Despite the 
platform genre being pretty much exhausted these 
days, Gex features enough novel ideas to keep the 
player hooked. From the brilliant intro to the amaz¬ 
ing dexterity of the main character, this game is a 
must-buy. Another element which really adds to the 
game's atmosphere is that it's funny. Gex's constant 
one-liners and quotes really do give the character 
a personality of his own. 

Now to my questions... 

1) Will the M2 sequels to Road Rash and Need For 
Speed include simultaneous two-player modes? 

2) Why do so many people hate the Panasonic 
joypad? I think they're well 
designed, sturdy and com¬ 
fortable - though a little 
expensive when bought sep¬ 
arately. 

3) Will your magazine ever 
go monthly? 

4) Do you know how 
long/soon until any of the 
following games are released 
on 3DO? Flying Nightmares, 

Magic Carpet, Doom and 
Star Trek: The Next 
Generation. 

5) Are there any plans for a 3DO conversion of 
Sim City 2000? 

6) How does a data disk work? Surely when you 
eject the original game disc, the machine will reset 
itself before you put in the data disk? 

David Steele, Plumstead, London. 


Soccer Kid is actually 3DO's first platformer, but 
other than that I think we agree over Gex! 

1) We certainly hope so. The two-player modes of 
C64 Pitstop II and SNES Super Mario Kart rank 
among our all-time favourites. 


A joystick is available for 3DO. It's by CH 
Products who produce high quality sticks for the 
PC and is very good - like them it's analogue 

rather than digital, so the faster 
you move the stick the faster 
your aircraft reacts. The RRP is 
£89.95 and you can get more 
details from ISM (tel: 0121 
3274499. You might also try 
examining our small ads for 
special offers. 

Since the Flightstick Pro is 
analogue, it requires games to 
be specially programmed - but 
this is becoming increasingly 
common: PO'ed, Flying 
Nightmares, Rebel Assault, 
Shock Wave, Operation Jumpgate, Super Wing 
Commander, Wing Commander III, VR Stalker, 
Return Fire, Mega Race and Need For Speed are 
all compatible. 

Alternatively you could consider getting an 
adapter which makes the 3DO compatible with 
SNES joypads and joysticks. This costs around 
£25 and should be released soon, although some 
importers might have it already. Cheap, digital 
SNES joysticks can be had for around £15. □ ssw 


3DO Magazine 


WR in)) IT OUR WAY 

And still the debate rages over our controversial 
Way Of The Warrior review... 

As a specialist in 3DO retail, an owner of an 
American 3DO and NTSC version of Way Of The 
Warrior, I'd like to express my opinions on this 
game. When we originally had the game back in 

the summer of '94 we thought r—- ^ 

'Yeah, ace graphics, naff 
gameplay, what a shame!' 

But we were using the 
3DO pad (cringe), which 
while brilliant for games like 
Road Rash, Need and Return jXSzS 
Fire is very dodgy for beat- 
'em-ups like SSFIIX, Samurai ■ i ...... 

Shodown and Way Of The 
/v". . • ^ E \ Warrior. I am now the owner 
/ i , Wj \ of an adaptor allowing the 
l / I / use SNES pads and Way 

\lj »/ ) J Of The Warrior is much more 

x Z responsive and less frustrating 


to play. 

Another mistake that doesn't help the game 
any is the almost total lack of any moves shown 
in the instructions which lifted the frustration even 
higher. My advise to anyone thinking of buying 
the game is yes, but if you haven't got a good 
fighting pad don't expect to be pulling off any 
. ^ g—w'-' :v seven or eight hit combo's 

V*'. 1 ' because you won't be able 

*' to with the standard pad. 

V V i f> Geoff Wiltshire, TCW, 

Clwyd, Wales. 


"| have bought Way Of The 
Y? U Warrior and I would like to 

B ^‘- «- support it by saying that is 

seriously kickin'! (Although it is letterboxed!)" 

Robert I Donald, Edinburgh. 

"A game that's nearly great in every department, 
but let down by dodgy sprite collision and less 
than fluid animation." 


e've just bought a Panasonic 3DO 
which we're really enjoying. My Dad 
loves it and he's been playing games 
that he doesn't usually like. There is 
just one problem: my dad is having a lot of trouble 
using the small pads that come with the 3DO on 
the game Need For Speed. I would like to know if 
you can help me find a joystick or steering wheel, 
as it will make it easier for my Dad to use. We 
have looked everywhere for a joystick. 

Amanda Smith, Plymouth. 


2) We agree. 

3) Yes, as soon as there are sufficient releases to 
justify it. 

4) Flying Nightmares is imminent, while Doom 
and Magic Carpet will probably arrive at year's 
end. Sadly, Star Trek appears lost in a time warp! 

5) No, the huge amount of save game data has 
so far restricted console versions. M2's PCMCIA 
system could get around that and, if it sells as 
well as 3DO expect. Maxis could well do an M2 
version. However, after playing the game on 
Macintosh I personally felt the incredible addictivi- 
ty of the original had been buried with all that 
new fangled complexity. 

6) 3DO systems are designed to automatically 
reset when a disc is ejected. For this reason 
Operation Jumpgate isn't so much a datadisk as 
a complete game, with all the relevant code, but 
it only loads into your 3DO if it detects a save 
game from Shock Wave. A similar system works 
with the additional game disks of D and Wing 
Commander III. 



efore I give you my questions, let me 
start by congratulating several groups 
of people, beginning with yourselves 
for producing such a good magazine. 
Now to congratulate the people behind the games. 
Firstly, Electronic Arts (who else?), for producing 
some utterly fantastic 3DO games. Games like 
Need For Speed, FIFA, Road Rash and Madden 
perfectly combine next generation graphics (and 
sound) with stunning gameplay. 

Secondly, well done to Crystal Dynamics for 
Gex. The game's release was continually delayed - 
but the wait was well worth it. Not content with 


Magazine | 


3DO Magazine 57 Sept 1995 


3DO 
















BLADEFORCE. The year-2110 AD. The city—Meggagrid. A gritty metropolis reeking 
with the stench of organized crime. You enter this cesspool wearing only a helicopter 
flight suit and a big grin that says "Hello Mr. Criminal. My gun is bigger than yours" 
You fly in real time. You fire in real time. They die in real time. Have a reai good 
time. Features: 360° 3D flying. 3D worlds. 3D everything. You spin. You soar. You 
shoot. You spew. Pack the barf bag. 16,000 true 3D objects. 28 missions and 7 crime 
infested levels. Buy the game, get the motion sickness free. 


Who's responsible for these 
two favouriles? The warped 
minds at Studio 3DO, of 
course. These innovative 
renegades have turned the 
most advanced gaming tech¬ 
nology on the planet into 
their own sensory amusement 
park-and every ride's an 
"E" ticket. See your favorite 
retailer or look us up on the 
Web: www.3do.com 

300 the 3DO logos. BladeForce and Killing Time are trademarks 
and/or registered trademarks of The 3DO Company © 1995 The 
3DO Company All nghts reserved 









ist. Skip This Ad. 



3 DO 


3DO 


KILLING TIME. What a politically correct title, eh? You're trapped in a horrifying 3D 
world of the undead. But lucky you. You've brought along some serious firepower. 
You've got to shoot first and catch your breath later. To solve the mystery, listen to 
the ghosts for clues. You'll have to call on your wits, call on your weapons or call for 
an organ donor if things go sour. Features: 16 horrific enemies (only 3D0 could get 
7 genuine ghosts on videotape). 45 supernatural areas to discover and over 200 
rooms to explore. Requires use of the head, if it hasn't been blown off already. 


WE 


GOT 




THEY 


DON’T 












3DO 


directory 


[Magazine 



The essential update to every review from 3DO Magazine issues one to four. 


3D ATLAS 

Electronic Arts, TBA 

A huge geographical, political and envi¬ 
ronmental guide to planet earth, this uses 
excellent stock footage, good 3D graph¬ 
ics routines and brilliantly edited news 
sequences to entice and seduce almost 
anyone into enjoying a traditionally dull 
subject. Even the inevitable quiz show 
game is good fun, circumnavigation of 
the world through multiple choice ques¬ 
tions providing a useful indication of just 
how much information you've retained. 
Overall, an absolutely excellent edutain¬ 
ment package, 
issue 2, Rating: ★★★★ 

ALONE IN THE DARK 
Infogrames, £39.99 

The game that made Infogrames' name, 
Alone In The Dark shattered preconcep¬ 
tions about what PC gaming was about 
when it was released in late 1993. 
Multiple camera angles, haunting poly¬ 
gon graphics and a Voodoo inspired sto¬ 
ryline made it the most intimate and 
atmospheric adventure of the time. It still 
looks amazing even now, and is well 
worth a look - especially if you're a fan 
of Lovecraft inspired chillers, 
issue 1, Rating: ★★★★ 

ANOTHER WORLD 
Interplay, £39.99 

Originally an Amiga game, Another 
World was a welcome twist on the plat¬ 
form genre. Rotoscoped sprites and styl¬ 
ish cut sequences achieved a uniquely 
cinematic feel. The 3DO version doesn't 
tamper with the game's puzzling funda¬ 
mentals, but adds 256 colours to freshen 
it up a bit. 

issue 1, Rating: ★★★ 

BATTUE CHESS 
Krisalis, £39.99 

All 3D chessboards, bar none, are fun¬ 
damentally flawed in that a piece closest 
to the screen will obscure those pieces 
behind it. Battle Chess doesn't prove to be 
an exception to the rule, and the visual 
candy isn't sweet enough to make the 


extra squinting worthwhile. To its credit 
the 32-bit RISC chip of the 3DO system 
powerhouses a V8 chess engine and the 
game incorporates a clear and simple 2D 
board for the more serious player, 
issue 1, Rating: ★★ 

BURNING SOLDIER 
Panasonic, £39.99 

A distinctly Japanese game, Burning 
Soldier follows where Microcosm and 
Novastorm trailblazed with interactive 
sprites overlaid on an uninteractive, pre¬ 
rendered backdrop. Naturally that makes 
for fairly linear gameplay, but manga- 
esque graphics and a simultaneous two- 
player mode provide limited compensa¬ 
tion. 

issue 1, Rating: ★★ 

CANNON FODDER 
Virgin, £44.99 

Sensible Software's classic in miniature 
gets the 3DO treatment and comes out 
with vibrant new colouring and crystal 



clear sound effects. The sprites may be 
tiny, but there's a huge number of levels 
and gameplay is incredibly addictive 
with masses of enemies, buildings and 
vehicles to destroy. Somewhat similar to 
Return Fire, it has a superior structure 
(more challenge) but sadly there's no 
two-player mode, 
issue 3, Rating: ★★★★★ 

DEMOLITION MAN 
Virgin, £49.99 

This is a glorious showcase both for the 
technical capabilities of the 3DO (great 
FMV, glorious presentation) and the 
growing clout of videogames (the movie 
crew actually shot extra scenes for it). 


Actual gameplay is a clever mix of gen¬ 
res with beat-'em-up. Doom, car racing 
and even Op Wo/f-style blasting all mak¬ 
ing an appearance. None are that 
impressive individually but melded 
together they form a playable package 
with a tough challenge. Passwords side¬ 
step tedium, and the whole thing 
improves vastly with a lightgun. 
Unmissable for fans of the movie, 
issue 2, Rating: ★★★★ 

DRAGON'S LAIR 
Elite, £39.99 

More of a cartoon than a game, Sullivan 
Bluth's arcade classic wows those who 
watch the game, but frustrates those who 
are actually playing it. Gameplay is 
restricted to pressing the correct button at 
exactly the right time. This gets very 
tedious. The quality graphics - drawn at 
the Don Bluth studios - are amazing 
though. 

issue 1, Rating: ★★ 

ESCAPE FROM MONSTER MANOR 
Electronic Arts, £39.99 

Developed in an amazing four months, 
this early Doom clone has some neat 
tricks with translucent sprites, gorgeous 
texture maps and spooky sonics. The 
atmospherics of a haunted house are 
there, but gameplay is rather ghostly, 
issue 1, Rating: ★★★ 

FAMILY FEUD 
Gametek, £39.99 

The American inspiration for Family 
Fortunes, this suffers from culturally spe¬ 
cific questions you're unlikely to know the 
answers to, a lousy control interface and 
poor, minimally animated graphics. In the 
shadow of such multimedia game show 
extravaganzas as Twisted, Station 
Invasion and Zhadnost this is a very small 
thing indeed. One for students of the 
great, dysfunctional nation only, 
issue 2, Rating: it 

FIFA INTERNATIONAL SOCCER 
Electronic Arts, £44.99 

The most stylish and visually impressive 


soccer game there has ever been, 
Electronic Arts met the huge pre-release 
hype with a product unusually more than 
worthy of the attention. From the superb 



FMV intro, spliced with in-game action 
scenes hardly distinguishable from real- 
life, to the multitude of camera angles, 
slow motion controls and sound FX, FIFA 
International is a game that looks good 
enough to eat. Purists may argue that 
gameplay isn't a match for the no frills 
Sensible Soccer, but a six-player game 
compensates rather well, 
issue 1, Rating: ★★★★★ 

FLASHBACK 
US Gold, £44.99 

As with its Another World prequel, 
Flashback's highly stylised, rotoscoped 
Amiga graphics and elegant gameplay 
have adapted easily to numerous for¬ 
mats. The 3DO version adds no new lev¬ 
els or radically reworked graphics, 
although some 32bit gloss is provided 
with 256 colours, better sound and 
enhanced, 3D Studio cut sequences. The 
excellent puzzles are as absorbing as 
they ever were, and overall it's an enjoy¬ 
able teaser for Virgin's forthcoming 
blockbuster, Heart Of Darkness - which is 
from the same programmers, 
issue 4, Rating: ★★★ 

GEX 

BMG, £46.95 

The 3DO's Sonic or Mario with bells on, 
Gex redefines the platform genre in 
32bit, postmodern guise. The central 
Gecko sprite (rendered with over 450 
frames of Silicon Graphic animation) 
can cling to just about anything; use his 
tail as a whip and collect power-ups with 


3DO Magazine 60 Sept 1995 




























a long gelatinous tongue. Five big and 
varied worlds provide a reasonable 
challenge, while non-stop quips voiced 
by Dana Gould make this fun even for 
those who thought they'd outgrown this 
tired genre. 

issue 3, Rating: ★★★★★ 

GRIDDERS 

The 3DO Company, £39.99 

This challenging puzzler was designed 
around the 3DO chipset with its intricate 
puzzles rendered in full 3D. 36 torturous 
levels provide a big challenge which has 
won many admirers. The idiosyncratic 
rules can be confusing for non-puzzle 
freaks however, 
issue 1, rating: ★★★ 

HORDE, THE 

Crystal Dynamics, £39.99 

A brilliantly original game designed for 
the 3DO system, this seamlessly merges 
hilarious FMV, intense arcade action and 
thoughtful strategy into an irresistible 



package. In the game you play 
Chauncey, a young knight charged with 
protecting various villages against the 
superbly greedy Hordlings. You must 
speedily organise village defenses - and 
finances - before quarterly attacks by the 
loony toon-style Hordlings. Chasing after 
them with a huge sword is brilliant fun, 
while interlevel FMV is exceptionally witty 
with a great pay-off right at the end. It's 
what your 3DO was made for! 
issue 1, Rating: ★★★★★ 

IMMERCENARY 
Electronic Arts, £44.99 

Despite a genuinely innovative visual 
style, this pretentious Doom variant fails 
to live up its promise. The control inter¬ 
face suffers with a laborious pick¬ 
up/implement menu, while weapons are 
unexciting and 3D surroundings repeti¬ 
tive. Persevere and the game can become 
addictive but, perversely, the more 
progress you make, the easier it 
becomes. The shortness of the challenge 
raises the suspicion that the look of 


Immercenary has had far more thought 
applied than the game. With some 
restructuring this could have been some¬ 
thing special - instead of a cult oddity. 

issue 4, Rating: ★★★ 

INCREDIBLE MACHINE, THE 
Sierra, £39.99 

A big hit on the PC over a year ago, this 
is a compelling collection of puzzle 
games, which although criminally unen¬ 
hanced for the 3DO, remains as much 
fun as it ever was. Building the epony¬ 
mous machines requires manipulating a 
wide range of bizarre objects to won¬ 
drous effect. A superb learning curve 
makes play utterly addictive, and the 
ability to design and build your own puz¬ 
zles to fox a friend makes this a highly 
rewarding package, 
issue 2, Rating: ★★★★ 

IRON ANGEL OF THE APOCALYPSE 
Panasonic, £39.99 

A bizarre, Japanese Doom variant, this 
really titillates with its fantastic FMV intro 
sequence, only to implode, sadly, with a 
poorly programmed, dingy exploration 
game. There are few aliens to blast, the 
scenery is monotonous, with identical 
retro-fitted rooms conspiring to confuse 
your navigation, and, most seriously, the 
frame rate is slow and jerky. Dire, 
issue 2, Rating: ★★ 

JAMMIT 
BMG, £39.99 

A lazy conversion by GTE of an ancient 
MegaDrive one-on-one (or two) basket¬ 
ball game, this is uniquely set in a ghet¬ 
to, with vandalised walls providing the 
backdrop to the simplistic action. Despite 
the general ineptitude of the coding and 
lame animation, this still has some merits 
in two-player mode, with the simplistic 
format providing furiously competitive 
play, and the selection of basketball vari¬ 
ants adds some longevity to the action. 
Hardly essential, but pretty good fun in 
short bursts, 
issue 2, Rating: ★★★ 

JOHN MADDEN FOOTBALL 
Electronic Arts, £39.99 

Inarguably the best American Football 
game on any format ever. EA's master¬ 
piece merges together incredibly 
detailed, beautifully animated sprites, 
stereo sound, slick FMV and sublime 
gameplay. It also comes with a plethora 
of options allowing the complete begin¬ 



ner and football pro alike the perfect level 
of competition. Brilliant in one player 
mode, absolutely unmissable in two, this 
is an unbelievably impressive product. 

issue 1, Rating: ★★★★★ 

LOST FILES OF SHERLOCK 
HOLMES, THE 
Electronic Arts, £39.99 

One of the first 'multimedia' releases to 
appear on the PC, this now seems well 
past its retirement date. Tiny FMV win¬ 
dows interrupt rather than complement 
the adventuring, while the plot is distinct¬ 
ly linear. It'll take time to solve it all, but 
overall most people will wish the files had 
remained 'lost' on 3DO. 
issue 1, Rating: ★★ 

MEGARACE 
Mindscape, £39.99 

Originally a heavily hyped PC CD-ROM 
title, this has been cleverly reworked for 
3DO. Both in-game and TV-style FMV 
presentation is far more colourful and 
impressive, which is particularly welcome 
due to the Gallic flair of Cryo's superbly 
stylish graphics - far more evocative than 
most American efforts. Sadly, actual 
gameplay is a lot less flashy and ulti¬ 
mately rather repetitive, 
issue 1, Rating: ★★★ 

MYST 
TBA, £TBA 


NIGHT TRAP 
Virgin, £39.99 

Oh dear. Originally developed for the 
MegaCD, Nightrap is a sad little 
exploitation title that goes for the adoles¬ 
cent audience by offering the player the 
chance to view semi-clad girlies running 
about a besieged house. The FMV is of a 
high standard - much better than the act¬ 
ing - and presentation is very slick, but it 
matters little when gameplay is so dire, 
issue 1, Rating: ★ 


Magazine] 


OFF-WORLD INTERCEPTOR 
Crystal Dynamics, £39.99 

A virtuoso display of the 3DO's chipset in 
action with stunning 3D, texture-mapped 
landscapes, masses of explosions, nippy 
rival cars and enemy gunfire. An excep¬ 
tionally, fast, frantic shoot-'em-up cum 
race game it's okay in one-player mode 
(lack of a save game is frustrating), great 
in two. 

issue 1, rating: ★★★★ 


OPERATION JUMPGATE 
Electronic Arts, £29.99 

A five mission expansion disc to Shock 
Wave, this offers more tactics, more 
exciting (hillier) terrain and new, tougher 
enemies. Presentation is, again, marvel¬ 
lous and the Dolby surround sound is 
excellent. 

issue 2, Rating: ★★★ 


A huge hit on the PC, the near photore¬ 
alistic imagery generated an alarmingly 
convincing alternate world of IQ-strain- 
ing puzzles and an intricate storyline. 
The 3DO version retains all the game¬ 
play and much of the atmosphere, but 
joypad control and TV-style resolution do 
blur some of its appeal. Still, if you're the 
quiet, patient type there's little to touch 
this brainy masterpiece, 
issue 3, Rating: ★★★★ 

NEED FOR SPEED, THE 
Electronic Arts, £44.99 

Superb graphics, fantastic Dolby audio, 
eight of the world's most exciting super¬ 
cars, three absolutely huge routes to race 
on, an unbelievably comprehensive 
replay mode, jaw-droppingly spectacular 



crashes, a smarmy opponent, lots of 
speed cops and, of course, the most real¬ 
istic car handling ever in a videogame. 
Take the time to get into it, and you'll be 
rewarded with one of the best games 
ever. 

issue 1, Rating: ★★★★★ 


PATAANK 

Crystal Dynamics, £39.99 

Instead of the conventional top down 
view of a pinball table, P.F. Magic actual¬ 
ly place the camera behind the pinball. 
Stick with it and the game begins to make 
some sort of (weird) sense. Instead of 
having flippers your 'craft' has a supply 
of velocity which you must use to guide it 
around, hitting power-ups and bonuses 
as you go. Odd, but strangely enjoyable, 
it's certainly an acquired taste, and 
remains the best pinball game available 
on 3DO. 

issue 1, Rating: ★★★ 

PEBBLE BEACH GOLF 
Panasonic, £39.99 

Although there's only one course and the 
controls aren't as sophisticated as US 
Gold's World Cup release, the slickly 
digitised graphics and user-friendly con¬ 
trols make this a very enjoyable experi¬ 
ence. In Japan and America, the same 
game engine has been reused for 
Waialae Country Club Golf and Wicked 
18 - which really does live up to its 
name! 

Rating: ★★★★ 

POWERS KINGDOM 
Panasonic, £39.99 

A very Japanese RPG which boasts some 
impressively cinematic effects. There's a 
large variety of bizarre creatures, imagi¬ 
native weapons and odd landscapes with 


3DO Magazine 61 Sept 1995 


3DO 











3DO 


I Magazine 


directory 


plenty of good, tactical combat. Over the 
longer term it does become distinctly 
repetitive, but it's still worth a look for 
genre fans. 

issue 1, Rating: ★★★ 

QUARANTINE 
Gametek £44.99 

'Doom in a car' is a superb concept, the 
FMV intro is great and even the game- 
play is initially absorbing. Whizzing 
around crime-infested cities, picking up 
dodgy passengers and blasting pursuit 
vehicles is certainly fun. Unfortunately, 
Imagexcel ultimately fail to deliver on the 
potential. As with the PC version, driving 
a hover car has a distinctly uninvolving 
feel - the way it slides around seems sim¬ 
ply cheap. An indistinct soundtrack and 
dire graphics further dull the promise, 
firmly relegating Quarantine to the 
'missed opportunity' category, 
issue 4, Rating: ★★ 

REAL PINBALL 
Panasonic, £39.99 

More conventional than Pataank, Real 
Pinball adopts a top-down, slightly titled 
perspective. Sadly, indistinct graphics 
and a ball which moves as if it's encased 
in treacle rather ruin playability, 
issue 1, Rating: ★ 

REBEL ASSAULT 
Electronic Arts, £44.99 

This made a big impact on PC CD-ROM 
with its innovative variety of FMV blasting 
action skillfully mixed in with Star Wars 
film clips. The underlying gameplay was 
somewhat better than average for this 
type of game, but still ultimately rather 
repetitive. The 3DO version looks and 
plays exactly the same which, when you 
consider the system's far superior FMV 
capabilities, is something of a disaster. 
After the razor-sharp FMV of Demolition 
Man or Star Blade, the limited colours 
and frequent blockiness'of the imagery 
just isn't on. 
issue 2, Rating: ★★★ 

RETURN FIRE 

The 3DO Company, £49.99 

A sequel to the Amiga hit Fire Power, this 
retains the basic structure but adds in 
superb Dolby sound, beautifully detailed 



tanks, helicopters, jeeps and APVs, all 
unique handling, weapons and abilities. 
One player mode is great fun - although 
the challenge isn't huge - but two-player 
mode is magnificent. A superb technical 
achievement married with timeless game 
design, Return Fire is one of the best 3DO 
games around, 
issue 2, Rating: ★★★★★ 

RISE OF THE ROBOTS 
Art Data Interactive, £44.99 

Rise Of The Robots was in development 
for so long that many began to doubt that 
it would ever arrive. Arrive it did/howev¬ 
er, and immediately confounded the 
sceptics with its glorious graphics and 
okay-ish gameplay. Rise Of The Robots 
may be no match for Super Street Fighter 
2 in respect of its combat engine (you 
can't even jump over your opponent!), 
but its visuals are truly next generation 
stuff - if you're shallow enough to care 
about such things, 
issue 1, Rating : ★★★ 

ROAD RASH 
Electronic Arts, £44.99 

Quite simply one of the best games ever, 
this unbelievable 3DO spectacular 
rebuilds the classic Mega Drive game 
from the ground up. FMV reward, intro 
and game over clips are superb with 



music from bands such as Therapy? and 
Swervedriver, but the game itself is the 
real star. The racing action starts fast and 
frantic - and then keeps accelerating. 
Speeding through a city centre with 
pedestrians, oncoming traffic, pursuing 
cops and five other bikes swarming 
about, their riders trying to punch your 
face in, is really rather exciting. If you've 
got a 3DO system, then you must have 
this stunning title, 
issue 1, Rating: ★★★★★ 

SAMURAI SHODOWN 
Crystal Dynamics, £39.99 

Samurai Showdown is widely regarded 
as the best beat-'em-up available on the 
saturated Neo Geo market. Huge, 


3D graphics with intelligent panning and 
zooming, more levels, more everything 
basically. Your objective is to capture 
your enemy's flag from heavily fortified 
defenses. To do this you have a stock of 



‘ colourful, brilliantly animated sprites, 
richly detailed backdrops and twelve 
very different characters to choose from 
make the game an immensely rewarding 
experience, It may not be quite as fast as 
SSFIIX, nor quite so sophisticated, but its 
bold characters, superbly varied back¬ 
drops and imaginative use of weapons 
put it neck and neck with its better known 
peer and a sure-fire hit for beat-'em-up 
addicts everywhere, 
issue 1, Rating: ★★★★★ 

SEWER SHARK 
Virgin, £39.99 

With Blade Runner's FX whiz John 
Dykstra responsible for directing it, this is 
perhaps Digital Pictures' slickest FMV 
effort yet. Gameplay is obviously quite 
limited, but the shoot-'em-up action is at 
least fast and quite demanding. Fun for a 
while, but success rests on memorising 
ultimately repetitive enemy attacks and 
route junctions, 
issue 1, Rating: ★★ 

SHANGHAI TRIPLE THREAT ' 

Activision, £39.99 

Activision have enjoyed considerable 
success with their previous console 
Shanghai titles, due both to the inge¬ 
nious, simplicity of play itself (match tiles 
as quickly as possible to clear the table) 
and the delightful bonus of simultaneous 
two-player games to up the ante. The lack 
of enhancements on 3DO is forgivable, 
given the difficulty of tampering with clas¬ 
sic game formats, and the game varia¬ 
tions make this a good package. • 
issue 2, Rating: ★★★ 

SHOCKWAVE 
Electronic Arts, £39.99 

This features some of the most impressive 
presentation around with a superbly 
realised War of the Worlds scenario. As 
you progress through the game's ten mis¬ 
sions, the FMV footage carries the plot on 
with truly cinematic panche. In-game 3D 
graphics are impressive too, with plenty 
of speed, variety and slick texture maps 
while sound is in Dolby. The only draw¬ 
back is that the sheer size of the levels 
can make dying a very frustrating expe¬ 
rience. Still, if you've the determination 
this has plenty to reward you. And when 
you complete it, the Operation JumpGate 
mission disk is even tougher while a full¬ 
blown sequel is due later, 
issue 1, Rating: ★★★ 

SLAM 'N JAM '95 
Electronic Arts £49.99 

Edging past even the heady standards set 
by EA presentation, Slam 'n Jam '95 is 
the best looking sports sim yet. Watch 
open-mouthed as distinctly individual 
players leap, shoot and slam dunk before 
you in a bravura display of program¬ 
ming muscle and graphic artistry. 
Fortunately, gameplay is equally impres¬ 



sive to make this a supremely addictive 
experience - in one or two player mode. 
Realistic beyond belief - with a non-stop 
narration from CNN's Van Earl Wright - 
this joins Striker and John Madden in the 
elite of sports simulations. In short, the 
sort of mega-game that offers undeniable 
cross over appeal to even non-fans of the 
sport. 

issue 4, Rating: ★★★★★ 

SLAYER 

SSI/Lion Entertainment, £39.99 

Well known on the PC for their Ravenloft 
series, SSl looks set to make a respectable 
name for themselves on the 3DO system 
too. Slayer uses a slick Doom-style first 
person perspective for a more arcade feel 
than most RPGs, but there's still plenty of 
potions, puzzles and so forth to keep the 
tactically minded occupied, 
issue 1, Rating: ★★★★ 

SOCCER KID 
Krisalis, £39.99 

Although only marginally improved over 
its Amiga parent, this is still worth a look 
since the original was so good. The 
eponymous hero not only runs and jumps 
with the best of his peers, but can also 
use his ball as a springboard to reach 
otherwise inaccessible places, collect 
power-ups and even cannon opponents. 
It takes times to master all these skills,' but 
it's well worth it. Great fun. 
issue 1, Rating: ★★★ 

STARBLADE 
Panasonic, £49.99 

The enormous impact StarBlade had at 
the arcades upon release has, to 
Namco's credit, been replicated on a 
smaller scale for its 3DO release. 
Stunning FMV backdrops are cleverly 
integrated with realtime generated poly¬ 
gons to superb effect. The 3DO version 
even offers an enhanced mode which 
features stunning texture maps. Great 
audio and a tough challenge make this a 
spectacular experience, especially on a 
huge TV. 

issue 2, Rating: ★★★★ 

STAR CONTROL II 
Crystal Dynamics, £39.99 

Star Control was originally released in 
the ascetic days of 8-bit games and its 
conversion to the 3DO does little to 
enhance the geriatric look. Sprites are 
blobby and backdrops unremarkable, 
with only new alien graphics and long 


3DO Magazine 62 Sept 1995 





















sampled speeches hinting at 32bit poten¬ 
tial. Still, the underlying structure of a 
huge, open-ended strategy cum explo¬ 
ration cum arcade game is as intriguing, 
as ever. The two-player blast-'em-up 
mode is good fun too. 
issue 1, Rating: ★★★★ 

STATION INVASION 
The 3DO Company, TBA 

Expanding on the successful style devel¬ 
oped in the brilliant Twisted, Studio-3DO 
have created a completely wacky FMV 
extravaganza, with a TV station over run 
by kids providing’ the infrastructure on 
which several enjoyable puzzle and quiz 
games are hung. An edutainment prod¬ 
uct for younger players, this is brilliantly 
executed, with amusing spoof soaps and 
TV shows offered as reward for winning 
points. Excellent fun. 
issue 2, Rating: ★★★ 

STRIKER 
TBA, £TBA 

When EA's FIFA International Soccer was 
released in late '94 few thought it would 
be surpassed until M2 arrived. Yet while 
Striker's FMV presentation isn't up to EA 



standards, in-game the tables are 
reversed with more controllable sprites, 
faster action and some of the most daz¬ 
zling animation ever seen. If you can do 
without the six-player option and all 
those camera angles, this offers an 
exceptionally competitive game, 
issue 3, Rating: ★★★★★ 

SUPER STREET FIGHTER II X 
Panasonic, £60 

Capcom's Street Fighter 2 sold more 16- 
bit Super Nintendos than any other 
game. A sophisticated combat engine 
allowed for moves, countermoves and 



even counter-counter moves than had 
previously been imagined. Its depth is 
unrivalled in this genre - we've been 
playing various versions in the office for 
years and the arcade perfect 3DO ver¬ 
sion is by far the best yet. 
issue 1, Rating: ★★★★★ 


SUPER WING COMMANDER 
Electronic Arts, £39.99 

Origin totally rewrote the PC original for 
this stunning' 3DO debut. Besides 
superbly drawn static screens and great 
FMV, in-game graphics have been mar¬ 
vellously spruced up. With a strong over¬ 
all narrative, changing according to mis¬ 
sion performance, this is an exceptional¬ 
ly engrossing experience. The only draw¬ 
back is that the sophisticated 3D combat r 
system and intense missions make few 
concessions for beginners, 
issue 1, Rating: ★★★★ 

SUPREME WARRIOR 
Acclaim £44.99 

Determined to build on the limited suc¬ 
cess of their FMV dominated titles Sewer 
Shark and Night Trap, Digital Pictures 
here take on the beat-'em-up genre. 
Using an ambitious first-person person 
perspective, it asks you to thwack a host 
of well-acted fighters into submission 
across * numerous, lavishly dressed . 
Chinese sets. The production values are 
excellent and the skillful editing of short 
sequences into seamless, lengthy fights is 
tremendously impressive, but it all goes 
wrong due to ineffectual moves and slug¬ 
gish controls. There's no doubt that this 
bold reworking of the genre could work, 
but it certainly hasn't been pulled off 
here. 

issue* 4, Rating: ★★ 

SYNDICATE 

Electronic Arts, £49.99 

A seductive blend of ultra violence, 
brooding visuals and genuinely absorb¬ 
ing game design, this Amiga classic has 
been a hit on almost every format. An 



utterly engrossing strategy/arcade 
game, it has you raising taxes and fund¬ 
ing weapons R&D between arcade com¬ 
bat missions set in isometric 3D cities. 
Superbly varied missions involve assassi¬ 
nating crime lords, abducting political 
prisoners and much more as you pursue 
world domination. While most console 
versions had the violence toned down, 
the 3DO version fully retains the dark 
glory-of the original, with blood spilling 
copiously. This also means no new mis¬ 
sions or significantly improved graphics, 
but mission disks are promised. Great 
action, fiendish missions'and Blade 
Runner- inspired surroundings make this 
a genuine classic of software history well 
worth investigating, 
issue 4, Rating: ★★★★★ 


THEME PARK 
Electronic Arts, £34.99 * 

Bullfrog's brilliantly addictive sim is set 
within the crazy world of Disney and 
Alton Towers. The player has complete 
control over a mass of variables, all intri¬ 
cately and intelligently linked - put an ice 
cream vendor too close to a ride, for 



example, and you'll have kids throwing 
up everywhere. A compulsive game, this 
will appeal to 3DO system players who 
want a little more than just fast, photon 
spitting sprites from their games. A 
genuinely original title that demands 
attention, but be warned, it requires plen¬ 
ty of save memory! 
issue 1, Rating: ★★★★★ 

TOTAL ECLIPSE 
Crystal Dynamics, £39.99 

One of the first games to really show off 
the 3DO chipset, this demanding 3D 
blast-'em-up features a great rock sound¬ 
track, masses of action and absolutely 
gorgeous texture mapped landscapes. It's 
an incredibly intense experience, but the 
lack of a save game on a huge, 20 level 
blaster can be irksome. (Fortunately, 
issue two of 3DO Magazine was packed 
with cheats and tips to make this mam¬ 
moth blaster more approachable!) Still a 
premiere blaster for the machine, with a 
definitive FMV mini-movie intro, 
issue 1, Rating: ★★★★ 

TWISTED 

Electronic Arts, £39.99 

One of the most innovative and intriguing 
3DO games yet, Twisted uses the system's 
FMV capabilities to produce the world's 
first true multimedia gameshow. The 
basic objective is for you, and up to five 
friends, to get to the top of a spiralling 
stair case, tackling mental puzzles and 
general knowledge tests put in your way. 
EA have included various difficulty set¬ 
tings so that both the adult and the child 
can be catered for simultaneously. It's a 
thoroughly polished product that demon¬ 
strates the potential of the 3DO for truly 
ground breaking titles. Bizarre, innova¬ 
tive and good fun. t 
issue 1, Rating: ★★★★ 

VIRTUOSO 
Elite, £44.99 

Originally designed as a vehicle for a 
digitised rock star, Elite ultimately failed 
to land a celebrity - or even any decent 
gameplay, come to that. The various lev¬ 
els have some neat ideas - snowmen 


being particularly cute villains - but it's all 
far too slow and desperately unexciting. 
The inability to move and shoot at the 
same time is particularly infuriating, 
killing the game stone dead, 
issue 2, Rating: ★ 

WAY OF THE WARRIOR 
Interplay, £39.99 

Whilst the extravagant, boldly digitised 
characters of Warrior immediately 
inspire excitement, play reveals a rela¬ 
tively weak Mortal Kombat clone. A hard 
rock soundtrack blasts along with the 
action, and some of the backdrop 
designs are extraordinary, but play is 
awkward, controls lack an intuitive feel 
and close quarter combat is difficult to 
master. Flawed fun, this has provoked 
heated debate amongst the 3DO fraterni¬ 
ty. We stand by our review, but many 
have enjoyed this noisy beat-'em-up. 
issue 1, Rating: ★★★ 

WING COMMANDER III 
Electronic Arts £49.99 

The Wing Commander series has long 
been a flag-bearer for the power of PC 
CD-ROM gaming and its arrival on 3DO 
is a major event. Unlike lesser compa¬ 
nies, Origin have totally reworked the 
game with excellent texture maps (16bit 



colour as opposed to 8bit) and CD Dolby 
Surround Sound rather than mono 
Soundblaster audio - not to mention ultra 
fast-loading, superb FMV and an impres¬ 
sively faster fps rate. Taking up no less 
than four CDs, this is a truly epic game 
with plenty of sophisticated 3D combat to 
master alongside the star-studded story¬ 
line featuring Mark Hamill and Malcolm 
MacDowell. 

issue 4, Rating: ★★★★★ 

WORLD CUP GOLF 
US Gold, £39.99 

This doesn't quite succeed in being the 
portentous sim to end all golfing sims it 
wants to be. The digitised graphics are 
drab, the controls are sluggish and the 
much vaunted FMV clips of your tee-offs 
don't really work. That there's just one 
course doesn't help matters either, but the 
degree of control available over the ball 
is impressive, as are the enormous array 
of play options and tournament styles. 
Unlikely to seduce novices, but offering a 
level of realism attractive to pros, 
issue 1, Rating: ★★★★ 

3DO Magazine 


Magazine 


3DO Magazine 63 Sept 1995 


3DO 



















3DO 


previews 




The tidal wave approaches. A legion of fabulous games is imminent, 
so many in fact, we've barely managed to fit them all in, but it's a 
thrilling time to own a 3DO with so much to look forward... 


ACCLAIM 

Corpse Killer 

A Caribbean-set, FMV heavy shoot- 
'em-up which requires a lightgun for 
best results. [Soon] 

Slam City With Scottie Pippin 
Another interactive movie produced 
in conjunction with Digital Pictures, 
this one has a basketball theme. 
[Soon] 

AMERICAN LASER 
GAMES 

Drug Wars 

Blast those drug dealers in this neat 
conversion of the hit arcade game. 
[July] 

Fast Draw Showdown 

None of this silly scenario stuff, just 
straightforward fast draw action with 
speed and accuracy being essential. 
[November] 

Last Bounty Hunter, The 

Apparently ALG's biggest production 
yet this you as the eponymous hero 
pursuing Nasty Dan, Handsome 
Harry and The Cactus Kid. For the 
first time, the difficulty and order of 
gameplay will vary according to your 
shooting skills. [June] 

Madison High 

ALG's first title to be released for their 
new "Games For Her" division. [TBA] 

McKenzie & Co 

Yet more rapid-fire action. [October] 
Shootout At Old Tucson 
Speaks for itself really! [October] 

ART DATA INTERACTIVE 

Alien Seed 

A revolutionary new polygon inten¬ 
sive extravaganza being developed 
especially for M2. [1996] 

Chess Wars 

A Battle Chess for the 32-bit genera¬ 
tion, this grafts live-action footage 
onto an advanced chess engine. 
Scripted by Paul Cooper, the winner 
of three Emmys, and costing so far 
half a million dollars to produce, this 
should be fun. [TBA] 

Doom I 

The phenomenally successful first-per¬ 
son perspective blaster is upgraded 
for the 3DO system complete with a 


brand new episode containing nine 
levels of new monsters and weapon¬ 
ry. Despite its no-show at E3, ADI are 
still confident it will appear this year. 
[September] 

Doom II: Hell On Earth 
The current PC mega-hit is bound to 
be huge on 3DO with all new FMV, 
higher resolution graphics plus new 
creatures to interact with... [Winter] 

BMG 

Ballz 

Outrageously fun MegaDrive beat- 
'em-up gets uprated for the 3DO sys¬ 
tem. Should be a big hit. [July] 

ELECTRONIC ARTS 

Foes Of Ali 

Stunning 3D, texture-mapped graph¬ 
ics allow you to recreate Ali's amaz¬ 
ing career in the best boxing sim 
ever. [November] 

NHL '96 

The hugely popular 16bit ice hockey 
sim is spectacularly converted to the 
3DO system. Using the same Virtual 
Stadium technology as FIFA , it's likely 
to be completely awesome. [October] 
Psychic Detective 
An innovative and very promising 
comedy-thriller with the player taking 
the part of psychic PI, Eric Fox. It's an 
interactive movie, but with some 500 
different variations promises plenty of 
lastability. [September] 

PGA Tour Golf 

The 16bit version is just about the 
best around, so hopes are high for 
the 3DO version. [November] 

Prowler 

100 years in the future the Terran 
Robotic Infantry is locked in combat 
with hi-tech invaders. Huge fighting 
vehicles, stunning texture-mapped 3D 
and complex missions make this 
another prospective mega-game from 
WCIII developers, Origin. 

[November] 

Shock Wave 2 


400% bigger levels, complete free¬ 
dom of movement for proper mis¬ 
sions, enhanced 3D, 60 minutes of 
FMV, 25 new enemy vehicles and a 
choice of three fighters with a big 
range of selectable weaponry. Should 
be a huge hit. [Early "96] 

Shredfest 

Developed by Road Rash's Monkey 
Doo team, this will be awesome. 
Besides three types of speed races, 
there are three trick events and two 
bonus games. [Early '96] 

ELITE 

OnSide 

A comprehensive footie sim including 
a running commentary and manage¬ 
ment sim. [October] 

Power Slide 

A 3D rallying game with the empha¬ 
sis on realism. [Xmas] 

Space Ace 

Dragon Lair's more varied, slightly 
more playable arcade sequel comes 
to 3DO. [Soon] 

ENTERTAINMENT INT. 

Braindead 13 

Developed by Readysoft, the people 
behind Space Ace, this features more 
extraordinary FMV cartoon graphics. 
[Summer] 

GOLDSTAR 

BC Racers 

A conversion of Core Design's well 
received Mario Kart clone. Featuring 
Chuck Rock with a host of other pre¬ 
historic themed characters, it mixes in 
plenty of comedy and combat with 
the one or two-player racing action. 
[Soon] 

Defcon 5 

A stunning looking space adventure 
strategy game with a very fast, very 
smooth Doom-style graphics engine. 
[Summer] 

Fire & Ice 

We know the title, but that's it! [TBA] 


Firewall 

A cyberpunk, cyberspace arcade 
game which pits you against an Al 
core. Action sequences include a 3D 
flight-combat sequence over China. 
[TBA] 

Fire Wolves 

Yet another mystery project. What is 
it about GoldStar and fire? [TBA] 

Primal Rage 

Time-Warner's hit arcade beat-'em-up 
features some impressively OTT char¬ 
acters. [November] 

INFOGRAMES 

Alone In The Dark 2 

More of the same superb stuff, only 
bigger and even better, with lots more 
combat. The NTSC version is immi¬ 
nent, but for the UK a special, 
fullscreen PAL version is planned. 
[Xmas] 

Alone In The Dark 3 

The final installment. This time set in 
the Wild West (in a ghost town no 
less). [1996] 

INTERPLAY 

Caesar's World Of Gambling 

The casino not the emperor plays host 
to various games of chance. 
[November] 

Cyberia 

A Silicon Graphic pre-rendered 
shoot'em up in the StarBlade mould. 
Looks stunning. [October] 

Clay Fighters 

A brilliantly quirky fighting game 
using the highly distinctive graphic 
technique, Claymation. An awesome¬ 
ly big release. [October] 

Casper 

An action-strategy game based upon 
the Spielberg produced film of the 
classic cartoon. [October] 

Descent 

A big hit on PC with a spaceship 
blasting its way through a Doom-style 
3D landscape. [November] 

Kingdoms 


3DO Magazine 64 Sept 1995 















400Mb of FMV is brilliantly integrat¬ 
ed into a classic adventure. Sequels 
are already being planned, as is a 
coin-op version. [Soon] 

Lost Vikings 2 

The original was probably the best 
arcade-puzzler since Lemmings, so 
hopes are high for the sequel. 
[November] 

Rock 'N Roll Racing 
Merging classic rock tracks, extrava¬ 
gant firepower and an isometric 3D 
viewpoint, this was a huge hit on 
SNES. The two-player mode was par¬ 
ticularly excellent and hopes are high 
for the 3DO version. [Xmas] 
Waterworld 

The world's most expensive movie, 
starring Kevin Costner and Dennis 
Hopper, is turned into a videogame. 
[October] 

JVC 

Deadly Skies 

An Afterburner-style shoot-'em-up. 
[Winter] 

Varuna's Forces 

Sci-fi action game which has you 
piloting a dropship through turbulent 
planetary atmospheres, then leading 
a squad of soldiers in tactical Doom- 
style action. [Winter] 

KIRIN ENTERTAINMENT 

The Grandest Fleet 

Another PC classic gets upgraded for 
the 3DO. [August] 

The Perfect General 
The popular PC strategy game 
reworked for the 3DO with the addi¬ 
tion of 3D rendered sequences and 
stereo sound. [Summer] 

MECC 

DynoPark Tycoon 

A variation on the Theme Pork con¬ 
cept with dinosaurs instead of roller¬ 
coasters to manage. [Soon] 

MINDSCAPE 

Dragon Lore 

A mythological adventure with stun¬ 
ning, pre-rendered graphics from 
Cryo. [August] 

Panzer General 

Superb, in-depth gameplay from 
strategy masters SSI. Raved about on 
the PC, if you like strategy games, 
you'll love this. [Soon] 

Slayer 2: DeathKeep 
This AD&D RPG could well give 
Doom a run for its money in the 
action stakes with a similar perspec¬ 
tive, lots of speed, spells and ghoulish 


enemies. [October] 

PANASONIC 

BIOS Fear 

An ecologically minded strategy 
game with the player in charge of 
preserving Earth's last resources. 
[Summer] 

Fun V Games 

An odd-ball compilation of classics, 
allegedly. [Spring] 

Ice Breaker 

Developed by Magnet Interactive 
Studios, this boasts a cool cyberpunk 
scenario but is essentially a shoot- 
'em-up with wave after wave of 3D 
pyramids rushing the player. Success 
depends on smart tactics as much as 
fast reactions. [July] 

Mortal Kombat III 
MKirs hugely popular mix of gore, 
digitised graphics and sophisticated 
combat moves is uprated with a total 
of 14 characters, animal transforma¬ 
tions and even more moves Should be 
huge. [Early '96] 

Seal of the Pharaoh 
Mediocre Japanese, first-person per¬ 
spective RPG recently re-dubbed for 
the American market. [TBA] 

Trip'd 

A cute puzzler in the style of Tetris 
derivative Columns. The falling 
objects in this version are alien eggs 
which must be arranged into groups 
of four to self-destruct. A simultane¬ 
ous two-player mode looks best fun. It 
was developed by Warp - the people 
behind D. [June] 

Strahl 

An interactive movie which has Alex 
Hawkfield attempting to recover seven 
crystals, battling golems and even a 
dragon. [July] 

PONY CANYON 

F1GP 

An officially endorsed, Japanese FI 
racing sim with some intriguing tex¬ 
ture-mapped 3D. Looks promising. 
[TBA] 

RUNANDGUN!, INC 

Duellin' Fireman 

A spectacular looking 50:50 mix of 
arcade action and interactive movie, 
it's described as an action adventure 
comedy with plenty of energy and set 
in weird, mutated environment. 

Should be good fun. [Summer] 

SPECTRUM HOLOBYTE 

Star Trek: The Next Generation 

A truly epic project which has been in 


development for years. [TBA] 

Top Gun 

A flight-sim for the 64bit generation. 
After lead development on PC, this is 
due for conversion to Ultra64 and 
M2. [1996] 

STUDIO 3DO 

Absolute Zero 

Set in an Arctic mining colony with 
plenty of advanced vehicles to play 
around with in full 3D, this is "a sci¬ 
ence-fiction simulation along the lines 
of X-Wing, only ours will be much 
more detailed in the variety of mis¬ 
sions, the ships and the strategic 
planning." Like Flying Nightmares, 
Domark are handling development. 
[Xmas] 

BattieSport 

The game that should bring the 
arcade crown to the 3DO. A two- 
player shoot'em-up in the style of 
Cyber Sled it's super-fast, stunning to 
look at, brilliant to play and still 
months off release. Expect massive 
things. [October] 

BladeForce 

Heli-Pak wearing vigilante roams the 
streets in 2110 - or should that be 
flies through the streets. Absolutely 
awesome 3D and lots of action. 
[September] 

Captain Quazar 

This has a wonderful comic feel with 
our hero out to bust intergalactic 
criminals. The isometric graphics are 
great. [October] 

Killing Time 

An abandoned island is the site for 
some frantic, Doom-style action with 
stunning graphics. Early sightings 
look very impressive with monstrous 
amounts of gore - blood and guts 
spurting out of bullet ridden bodies. 
This really does look unbelievably 
impressive. [September] 

Phoenix 3 

An intriguing sci-fi action/adventure 
set on the planet Galearth. The game 
mixes side-scrolling Commando 
action with a flight sim style shoot- 
'em-up. You must repel enemy 
invaders by finding pilots, hidden 
ships and lots of blasting. [Late '95] 
P.O'd 

One of the most exciting games in 
development with cool 3D graphics 
and an aggressive, adult approach. 
Gameplay is Doom-style, a huge 
range of weapons even includes a 
powerdrill, but more sophisticated 
with the ability to fly via a JetPack. 
[October] 


StarFighter 3000 

Based upon the hit Archimedes game, 
this hugely promising title promises to 
be a Defender for the Nineties. 
Graphics are 3D, texture mapped 
and very fast, while missions range 
from sinking enemy fleets to protect¬ 
ing allied squadrons. [October] 


Magazine I 


TAITO 

Pyramid Control 

Originally a Laserdisc title Pyramid 
Control spools most of its graphics off 
disc with shoot-'em-up arcade action 
overlaid on top. [Soon] 

VIRGIN 

Creature Shock 

An imaginatively varied FMV blast- 
'em-up. [Summer] 

Dragon 

A hyper-violent Street Fighter 2 clone 
with the difference that there can be 
up to three mean mother fighters 
upon the screen simultaneously. 
Originally released to rave reviews 
on the Super Nintendo. [Summer] 

Lost Eden 

An epic adventure, featuring 
dinosaurs and mankind unrealistically 
co-operating in mystical prehistoric 
times. A Cryo production, Lost Eden 
should be a gorgeous-looking pro¬ 
duction with masses of FMV. 

[Summer] 

Heart Of Darkness 

Another World for the 32-bit, 3DO 
dominated next generation, first 
impressions suggest an absolutely 
stunning looking - and playing 
game. Definitely one to look out for. 
[Winter] 

11th Hour 

The sequel to the million selling CD- 
ROM extravaganza, 7th Guest. 
Release (on PC) has been put back 
several times now which suggests that 
Virgin want it to be something special 
when it's released later this year. 
Fantastic, CD-streamed adventure 
with a horrific bent, 1 1th Hour will 
have either a 15 or 18 certificate 
upon release and will scare the pants 
off you. [TBA] 

VIRIDIS CORPORATION 

Dreamer 

A super-secret 3D game. What else 
can we say? [TBA] 

'Project X' 

Another super-secret 3D game with 
no details disclosed. [TBA] □ 

3DO Magazine 


3DO Magazine 65 Sept 1995 


3DO 










next issue 


CO 

0 

O 


Magazine 




3DO software goes third 
generation with 
Studio 3DO mega-hits, 

Killing Time and 
BladeForce. 

And that's just a starter for 

3DO Magazine *6, on 
sale September 28th. 
















SCOTLAND CORNWALL SCOTLAND 


KENT 


GAMES 


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(Import & Official) 

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Glasgow 


DeCourcey's Arcade 
Cresswell Lane 


0141-334 3901 


LINCS 


CONSOLE CONNECTIONS 
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Goldstar 3DO £329.99 

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O 8 Button Pad £19.99 

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Mill] Best Software Prices £Call 

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PC-CD ROM SOFTWARE Discount Prices 
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Tel: 01872 261065 Fax: 01872 261067 


LEICS 


3DO GAMES 
WANTED 



Console Exchange 
25 Greig Street 
Inverness 
“ IV3 5PX 


01463-221173 

out of hours 

03744 95958 (no calls after 11pm) 


W.MIDS 



18/20, NEW RENTS 
ASHFORD, 

KENT TN23 1JJ 
TEL. 01233-663996 


ALL THE LATEST HARDWARE, 
SOFTWARE & ACCESSORIES 
+ 

USED TITLES 

PART EXCHANGE WELCOME 

PC 

PLAYSTATION 

AMIGA SBGA^ATURN 

naan ( intoodcQ 

ALL MAIL ORDERS ARE DESPATCHED WITHIN 24 HOURS 

VISA 


LANCS 



P/EX WELCOME 
NEW /USED BOUGHT/SOLD 


FANTASIA CONSOLES 
440, HIGH ST, LINCOLN 
LN5 8HZ 


01522-514553 



We carry a large selection of 
new and secondhand 
software for:- Super Nintendo, 
CDi, 3D0, Megadrive, IBM PC, 
Jaguar, Saturn and Playstation. 

We buy and sell your old titles, 
call for more details. 

Visit our shop at: 

7 Fennel Street, Loughborough 


(01509)217260 


♦ 

GAMEP&0 

71 

o 

GREAT SPECIAL OFFERS 


<T1TT 

ON SELECTED ITEMS! 

mrrl 


DON T MISS OUT ORDER NOW 



TITLE 

RRP 

OUR PRICE 

DEMOUTON MAN 

£39.99 

£28.99 

DIGITAL DREAMWARE 

£19.99 

£13.99 

IMMERCENARY 

£44.99 

£33.99 

IRON ANGEL APOCALYPSE 

£39.99 

£18.99 

REBEL ASSAULT 

£44.99 

£33.99 

SAMURAI SH0D0WN 

£44.99 

£31.00 

SHOCKWAVE D 

£29.99 

£23.99 

STARBLADE 

£44.99 

£23.99 


^PANASONIC3DOSYSTEM\ /GOLDSTA^W?SYSTEM 

£349.00 £5 P&P ( £349.99 + *p 4P ) 

V INC. STARBLADE J Xj NCLUDES FIFA SOCCER^ / 

T0F TEH TITLES 

WING COMMANDER III* £28.99 GEX £31.99 

SPACE HULK* £28.99 FIFA SOCCER* £32.99 

RETURN FIRE £38.99 ROAD RASH £36.99 

THE NEED FOR SPEED £38.99 SUPER STREETFIGHTER II£53.99 

THEME PARK* £33.99 ALONE IN THE DARK £38.99 

•LIMITED STOCKS 

_ADD £1 POSTAGE A PACKING PER TITLE. PLEASE MAKE CHEQUES PAYABLE TO 

inrj MBS, 219/221 CANNOCK ROAD, CHADSM00R, CANNOCK, STAFFS, WS112DC y A M 
_ TEL (01543) 466577 FAX (01543) 466579 Pv " 


STEWART 


85 Penny Meadow, Ashton-U-Lyne, Lancs 

Tel: 0161 339 0504 

PANASONIC & GOLDSTAR 

3DO’s 

with one game 

from £379 

New and Used UK titles 
Wing Commander Slam ‘n Jam 
flying Nightmares Road Rash 
Syndicate Gex 

Hell Need for Speed 

S ONY PLAYST ATION Phone for Latest Release! 

£5 minimum OFF all Games! 
Part Exchange Welcome 

INSTANT CREDIT AVAILABLE 

Ask for written details 




TELEPHONE ORDERS OR CALL IN AT SHOP 


OXON W. MIDS BEDFORDSHIRE WALES 



3DO FZI0 WITH 3 GAMES 2 CON 
TROL PADS £384.25 

3DO FZIO WITH I GAME£364.25 
6 BUTTON PAD £19.50 

CONTROL PAD £19.50 

2 INFRA RED PADS £36.00 

WING COMMANDER 3 £37.00 

CANNON FODDER £34.00 

FLYING NIGHTMARES £36.00 
If you would like a full list of games 
and haredware phone or write to - 

3 HILLSIDE CLOSE, UPPER ARN- 
COTT, BICESTER, OXON 0X6 
OPF. 

Add 1.60 games and pads 9.00 FZIO 



336 Londonderry Road, Warley B69 9MP 

We specialise in 
Mega Drive, SHES, 300, 

Nee Geo CD, Sega Saturn, 
Sony Playstation 

Very cheap prices on all 
formats 



Also Specialise in 
Japanese Animation, 
Martial Arts films, 
Mong Kong films 


with this ad 


& Ex-rental films 


! Tel: 0121 511 1436 | 
L Fax: _0|21544 7041 j 


YOUR NUMBER 1 

3DO & CDi CENTRE 


• LATEST SOFTWARE & 

HARDWARE IN STOCK 

• WORLDWIDE MAIL ORDER SERVICE 

• SAME DAY DISPATCH 

• ALL GOODS SENT FIRST CLASS 

• SEND SAE FOR FULL LIST 

PHONE NOW FOR 

SPECIAL OFFERS 


TAVISTOCK SOUND & VISION 

21 l lll BROADWAY. BEDFORD. Mk-10 

^ 01234 356323 > ■ 



The 3DO System Specialists 


Tel/Fax 01492 580622 Mobile 0374 702128 


BRAND NEW GAMES 1 

FLASHBACK 

£35.00 

GEX 

£35.00 

HELL 

£36.00 

REBEL ASSAULT 

£30.00 

RETURN FIRE 

£36.00 

SYNDICATE 

£40.00 

SLAM N JAM 

£34.00 

WING COMMANDER III 

£40.00 

CALL FOR USED PRICES AND PART EXCHANGE OR 
SEE OUR MAIN AD ELSEWHERE IN THE MAGAZINE 


T.C.W. 33 Tal Y Fan, Gian Conwy. 
Colwyn Bay, Clwyd. LL28 5NG. 


CHESHIRE LONDON MERSEYSIDE LEEDS 


Software Express 

MAIL ORDER 
01925 828455 epm* 
44 fax 01925 418 784 O 

Panasonic 3DO player with game... £379.99 

Goldstar player now available.£349.99 

SOFTWARE 


Cannon Fodder .. £29.99 
Creature Shock .. £32.99 

Doom.T.B.A. 

Dragon.£34.99 

Eleventh Hour_T.B.A. 

Flying Nightmares £34.99 

Gex.£34.99 

Hell.£34.99 

Immercenary .... £38.99 

Lost Eden.£32.99 

Need for Speed .. £38.99 


Quarantine.£34.99 

Panzer General .. £34.99 

Powerslide.£34.99 

Return Fire.£38.99 

Road Rash.£38.99 

Scottish Open Golf£34.99 

Shutdown.£38.99 

Slam n Jam.£36.99 

Space Hulk.£34.99 

Syndicate.£34.99 

Wing Commander 3E39.99 


LARGE SELECTION OF 
USED GAMES AVAILABLE 

Send cheques/PO's to: 

UNIT 1C, CAUSEWAY PARK, OFF WILDERSPOOL CAUSEWAY 
WARRINGTON, CHESHIRE. WA4 6RF 
P&P add £1.50 games / £6.00 consoles 

SELECTION OF NEW & USED 
GAMES AVAILABLE 
AT BRUCHE VIDEO, OFF GREEN LANE, 
v _ PADGATE WARRINGTON _ 


ss 


EW AGE 


COMPUTER GAMES & CONSOLES 

12 TOOTING HIGH STREET LONDON SW17 0RG 
The latest official & import 
games for yo ur console. 


MEGA DRIVE mtendd) 

JAGUAR 


\ 


MASTER SYSTEM 


i ma 

AMIGA CD 32 

PC CD-ROM ““ IGAMEBOYl 

WE BUY & SELL 

SECOND HAND GAMES!! 
OPEN MON-SAT 10:00am-6 :OOpm 


0181 767 2575 


THE 


CHIP 


SHOP 


SBGAyaiJRN 

We buy, we eel, we part exchange 


•CARTRIDGES* 

•SOFTWARE* 

•HARDWARE* 

SEGA, NINTENDO, 3D0 ,NEO GEO 
CM, JAGUAR, QAMEBOY, GAME GEAR, AND NEXT 


GEO CD SONY PLAYSTATION, SATURN, 
ULTRA 64 

66 WOOD ST LI 4DQ 
0151 - 708 0022 

LEADING INDEPENDENT 

Repair Service on most 
Consoles/Machines. 

Conversions to 60Hz Full Screen Plays 
Everything! 

Only £20 + £5 P&P 




143 TONG 
LEEDS 


FOR 
PLAYSTATION 
NEO GEO CD 
NINTENDO 
SATURN 
3DO 


OP AT 

, ARMLEY, 


0374 84539 


CALL FOR BEST DEALS ON ALL HARDWARE &’SOFTWARE 

MAIL ORDER - ORDER WELCOME ENQUIRES. QUERIES AND HELP 
ALSO AVAILABLE. 

WE.BUY, SELL AND PART EXCHANGE ON ALL NEW AN&»fcT0CK 

STOCK CHANGING DAILY • 

CALL FOR DETAILS 

























































































































































3 D O 


TAKEYOUR3D0 
TO THE MAX! 

T his state-of-the-art flight and combat 
simulator will have your heart 
pounding and palms sweating. Hold on 
tight because the flight sim engineers at 
Domark have pushed the limits of 3DO 
technology! This rockin' romp through 
unfriendly skies delivers the very best in 
gaming graphics, speed and smoothness. 

KEY FEATURES 

■ Super-fast 3D graphics make full use 
of 3DO hardware capabilities 
■ Full-motion video sequences 

■ Over 100 objects, vehicles, enemy 
aircraft and mission objectives, 
rendered in superb texture- 
mapped 3D. 

■ Includes accurate representation of 
the Harrier's weapons systems. 

■ Fly simultaneous missions with up 
to 3 wingmen. 

■ Multiple cockpit views, plus external 
and missile camera angles. 

■ Incredible rock music soundtrack 
featuring Mike Edwards of 
Jesus Jones. 


31)0 


Radar Installations 

□ 


□ □ 

1200 1300 1400 1900 


Superiority 


Published by Domark Software, Inc. and Studio 3D0. 
Programmed by Colin Boswell, Simis and Lifelike 
Productions. Flying Nightmares: ©1995 Domark 
Software, Ltd. All rights reserved. 3D0 and the 3D0 
logos are trademarks and/or registered trademarks ot 
The 3D0 Company. The trademarks ot The 3D0 
Company are used by Domark Software, Inc. under 
license from The 3D0 Company. 


► Available: JULY '95 ► No. of Players: 1 

[D -MARK