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interactive entertainment's new world standard 



not an official 3DO publication 


Issue 2 £4.99 
with Coverdisc 


Magazine 


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printed in the UK 



An Interactivn Sampler from Crystal Dynamics 


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It^s Mystical 

The best adventure of all 
time gets a face lift on 
the 3DO system 


Reviewed Inside: Return Fire, Demolition Man, StarBlade, 
Operation JumpGate, Family Feud, Rebel Assault, 
Shanghai Triple Threat, Virtuoso, Iron Angel Of The 
Apocalypse and more. 

Features include: Massive CES report; new GoldStar 
GPA10IM review; joystick round-up, plus interviews 
with EA’s Chris Thompson and Silent Software's 
Baron Von Wolfsheild. 

WIN THE UK^S VERY FIRST 
GOLDSTAR 3DO SYSTEM 














































Demolition Man^“ 

Virgin Interactive Entertainment 



Gridders^” 

studio 3DO/Tetragon 





Another World™ 

Interplay Productions 



Total Eclipse™ 

Crystal Dynamics 



Star Control ir 
Crystal Dynamics 





International Soccer' 

Electronic Arts 



Sherlock Holmes' 

Electronic Arts 



Sewer Shark™ "'t- • 


Virgin Interactive Entertainment/ 
Digital Pictures 



Shock Wave: 
Invasion Earth™ 

Electronic Arts 



Super Wing 
Commander™ 
Origin/Electronic Arts 


Z 

o 

^ 



Monster Manor™ 
Electronic Arts 



Virgin Interactive Entertainment/ 
Digital Pictures 



Powers Kingdom' 




Poad Pash™ 


Electronic Arts 




PaTaank™ 


Crystal Dynamics 







John Madden 

. 1 

Football™ 


Electronic Arts 



Panasonic Software 



Off-World 

Interceptor™ 

Crystal Dynamics 



Dragon’s Lair™ 

Elite 



The Horde™ 

Crystal Dynamics 





Mega Pace™ 
MIndscape International 



Soccer Kid™ 

Krisalis Software 



Golf Links® 

Panasonic Software 



Machine™ 

Sierra On-line 



Sesame Street® 
Numbers 


z 
o 


Electronic Arts 


Introducing the 3DO system 


3D0 and the 3D0 logos ore trademorks of The 3D0 Company. All other brond names and product names are trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective owners. © 1994 The 3D0 Company. All rights reserved. 


































o 
o 

Theme PqtW^ ^ ^ 

BuUfrog/Electronic Arts 



Super Street Fighter 
II Turbo^^ 

Panasonic Software 



O 

O 



Studio 3DO 



O 

o 

Samurai Showdown^**^ . ^ 

Crystal Dynamics 



Wing Commander lir*® 
Orlgin/Electronic Arts 


O 

O 



Flashback^** 

us Gold 




Virtuoso^" 

Elite Systems 



Need for Speed™ 

Electronic Arts 



Corpse Killer™ 

Acclaim/Digital Pictures 



World Cup Golf” 

us Gold 


No limits 





Twisted™ 

Electronic Arts 



Way of the Warrior” 


interplay Productions 



Kingdom™ 

Interplay Productions 




. T~ . 

*—f . •il’ . 


Shock Wave: 
Operation Jumpgate™ 

Electronic Arts 



Supreme Warrior™ 

Acclaim/DIgital Pictures 


Check it out at a store near you 

llvdjlobilitij is not Quoronteed ond is bosed on informotion ot the time of going to press. But don't believe us. check it out at ijour local 
Game Limited, selected HNV Stores. Virgin Negastores. and ail good independent dealers. Call 0800 444200 for your local dealer. 


♦ 

8 


3DO 




































EDITOR 

dave westley 

ART EDITOR 

jon ross 

ASSISTANT 
EDITOR 
mark vs^nne 

CONTRIBUTING 
j WRITER 

J Stuart Wynne 

PRE-PRESS 

MANAGER 

alan russell 
ASSISTANT 
MANAGER 
suzzane ryan 
ASSISTANT 
ted dearberg 

I GROUP AD 

MANAGER 

ian kenyon 
SENIOR 
AD SALES 
diana monteiro 
AD SALES 
alan walton 
AD DESIGN 
christa fairchild 
alex tilbury 

ASSISTANT 

PUBLISHER 

Stuart Wynne 

GROUP 

PUBLISHER 

pat kelly 

PRODUCTION 

DIRECTOR 

di tavener 

MD 

richard monteiro 

RECEPTIONIST 

paula wood 
SUBS 
karen sharrock 
® 0202 780578 

PRINTED IN UK BY 
Duncan Webb Offset Ltd. 

DISTRIBUTOR 
Seymour 
Windsor house, 
1 270 london road 
nbrbury, london 
swl 6 4dh 
0 081 6791899 

ISSN: 1355 9621 

IMPORTANT NOTICES 

r "3DO" is a trademark of 
The 3DO Company, 
Redwood City, California, 
94063, U.S.A., and is used 
by Paragon Publishing Ltd. 
under license from the 
owner. 

"3DO^'^ Magazine" is an 
independent 
publication and is not 
affiliated with The 3DO 
Company. The 3DO 
Company is not responsible 
in any way for the editorial 
policy or other contents of 
this publication. 



Magazine 


News . 

The Panasonic FZ-1 sells out at Xmas, 3DO gets VideoCD 

CES Report 

The Las Vegas CES brought to you courtesy of Stuart Wynne 

Interview Baron RK Von Wolfsheild 

The opinionated and forthright Baron of Silent Software 

Interview Chris Thompson 

The future as seen by Electronic Arts^ head of marketing 

GoldStar 3DO GPA 10IM Review 

GoldStar prepare to launch the 3DO GPA 10IM 

Joypad Shenanigans 

A comprehensive look at the joypads and sticks currently available 

Scanning 3DO Memory 

Create some space by spring cleaning your overworked 3DO machine 

Reviews . 

Every new UK 3DO release reviewed in full, including 
Demolition Man, Return Fire, Rebel Assault, StarBlade & more 

3DO Magazine Recommended 

The very best ofwhaPs out in the shops 

Goldstar Competition 

Win the new GoldStar 3DO System straight from the manufacturers 

UKA-Z . 

Every UK release reviewed and rated 

Previews . 

3DO experiences to come with Hell, Alone In The Dark 3, 

Dirt Racer, Wing Commander III & more... 



3D0 Magazine 04 February 1995- 






















3D0 Magazine 05 February 1995- 


3DO 
































3D0 


news 


news 


MAGIC CARPET - IT'S OFFICIAL 



The biggest game on the PC in 1994, Magic Carpet, is 
to be officially released on the 3DO system within the 
first half of this year, according to The 3DO Company. 

The primary reason that Magic Carpet has been so 
successful (it's sold well in excess of 100,000 units 
across Europe on the PC alone) is that it manages to 
combine Bullfrog gameplay with the most stunning 
polygonal graphics of all time. Within the PC's SVGA 
mode, buildings not only look real, but intricately real - 
baroque pieces of Prince Charles' approved architecture 
without a straying pixel in sight. The result is the 
Nirvana of a wholly believable landscape, designed for 
the optimal enjoyment of the gamesplayer - magical in 
itself. 

Magic Carpet is set in a fictional, alternate world 
where natural power ('Mono') lies in residues in the 
earth. The leaders of the land all share one thing in 
common - to ability to draw the natural power from the 
earth and use it for their own personal, magical ends. 


With Mana, not only can the player ride a magic car¬ 
pet, he or she can also build their own white castle, 
cause volcanoes, earthquakes, make it rain fireballs 
and even inspire lightning. With so many destructive 
spells available it should come as no surprise to find 
that the various barons spend their time fighting to the 
death - trying to kick all of the other magic users off 
their piece of land to create their very own principality. 

It's an incredibly involving game, one of those prod¬ 
ucts that's very difficult to leave once you've started to 
play, and so its arrival on the 3DO is very much to be 
looked forward to. EA's contribution to the 3DO cause 
cannot be understated. It is products like these that 
guarantee its success. The only slight disappointment is 
that the PC Magic Carpet was at its very best over a 
network. 3DO owners are unlikely to find themselves in 
such an environment, so we can only hope that Bullfrog 
include an option for modem-play. Then Magic Carpet 
really would fly. 


3DO LIKES 3DO 
MAGAZINE? 


As readers from Issue One know, although we're an 
independent publication we've enjoyed great support 
from The 3DO Company and the rest of the 3DO family, 
all of whom really wanted to see a magazine that would 
showcase their great work. Thankfully, the reactions to 
Issue One were pretty positive, none more so than that 
of John Edelson, 3DO Europe's Director of Sales and 
Marketing. An ex-employee of Silicon Graphics and a 
great gamesplayer, we really value John's opinion. 
However, exercising editorial discretion we've printed 
his praise in its entirety, and criticisms in brief! We'll 
open the Way Of The Worr/or debate in full next month, 
but for the moment the highlights: 

'Dear Editor, 

First of all, let me congratulate you on the fabulous inau¬ 
gural issue of The 3DO Magazine. No, I don't just want 
to congratulate you, I want to rave about the magazine. 

I read it cover to cover and loved it. Every customer that 
I spoke to also loved it. It's good reading, the reviews 
are substantive, and you're right in the heart of the lead¬ 
ing market for advanced game systems. A great system, 
great software, and now a great magazine. It should be 
a great year for 3DO customers in the UK. I look for¬ 
ward to reading the next issue. 

"With all that said, there were one or two reviews 
with which I disagreed. Fair enough. There was one in 
particular, however, which I felt did not do justice to a 
really interesting game, so I'd like to talk about it. It has 
been a major top-seller in the US and Japan: Way Of 
The Warrior. In the States, there were a number of 
divergent reviews on WOTW... People seem to love 
WOTW or hate it... Die Hard Game Fan wrote: 
"Naughty Dog has somehow captured the spirit of 
Mortal Kombat while adding a sense of comic relief and 
better, longer, and more balanced rounds... Graphics... 
better than MK. Music... Much better. Characters... The 
Coolest. Buy this game." Overall, WOTW has sold great 
in the US so when it becomes available here, I think it'll 
be a big hit.' 

After first praising John for his excellent taste in mag¬ 
azines, I think our only comment on Way Of The 
Warrior is to point out our main criticism was its lack of 
originality. Technically there is much to praise about the 
game, as we said in our review, and there the subject 
rests until Issue Three. If there are any readers who've 
got a strong opinion on WOTW please write in to our 
3DO Interactive section. We bow down to no-one in our 
expertise in games, but even we aren't perfect and we're 
alway ready to debate our reviews with people. Games 
are fun, and often as not arguing about them is a big 
part of the fun too. - Stuart Wynne, Asst Publisher. 



3D0 Magazine 06 February 1995- 

















GOLDSTAR'S 

MOVIEMANIA 


GoldStar has joined the VideoCD brigade with its just- 
announced GPA551M 3DO MPEG Digital Video 
Module. While the title is ungainly, the unit itself is 
exceptionally compact and, unlike Panasonic's external 
add-on, easily fits inside the GoldStar 3DO. The unit 
went on sale in America this January for $199, including 
a bundled copy of Total Recall, starring Arnold 
Schwarzenegger. 

Jim Ireton, of GoldStar's Multimedia Division, provid¬ 
ed a predictably upbeat soundbite: "The top-rated sys¬ 
tem in the video gaming universe now expands its repu¬ 
tation as a family entertainment centre by playing 
action-packed movies... This is truly the future of interac¬ 
tive entertainment." 

Despite some reports of VideoCD's imminent demise, 
the CES saw several new VideoCD players including a 
Technics SL-VM500 with a carousel for longer play. 
Over Christmas VideoCD releases exploded, principally 


due to the system's popularity as an add-on for PCs. 
Over the longer term MPEG2 is undoubtedly the future, 
but currently there are two competing systems in devel¬ 
opment - both offering around 140min playing time and 
broadcast quality visuals, but requiring new CD drives - 
and it could be years before a clear standard emerges. 



SUPER SSFIIX DEMO 



Without a doubt the most impressive version of Street 
Fighter on a console yet. This really is arcade perfect, and 
it's yours to try for free in the comfort of your own home. 


The world's only arcade-perfect home conversion of 
the world's best beat-'em-up, the incomparable 3DO 
Super Street Fighter It Turbo, has been brought to you, 
via 3DO Magazine, by those great guys at Panasonic. 
Due to licensing problems we couldn't actually put the 
Crystal Dynamics disc on our cover, although you can 
get it free by using the card, so Panasonic kindly gave 
us permission to use SSFII Turbo instead. It's a 
Japanese-language demo, so the joypad instructions 
aren't in English, and the audio hasn't been perfectly 
tweaked for PAL like the finished game, but with no 
less than four characters to play around with - 
Cammy, Chun Li, Ryu and Ken - I don't think anyone 
should complain. 

The game uses the X/PLAY button to give a full six 
buttons for as near perfect, arcade-style control as pos¬ 
sible. However, to get the most out of the game you 
really need a six-button joypad like Panasonic's FZ- 
11JXP. Designed by Capcom, it feels absolutely bril- 


liant, is amazingly cheap at just £29.95 and is 
reviewed on page 22. 

The complete game features no less than sixteen 
characters, plus the super secret Akuma, and won a 
full five stars in the first issue of 3DO Magazine. In 
Championship Mode you travel around the world, tak¬ 
ing on every other character (and your double), each 
with their own beautifully drawn location, before a 
final confrontation with Akuma himself. There's also a 
comprehensive Versus Mode where two players can 
go head-to-head, challenging each other with any of 
the game's characters, changing them whenever they 
want while the game keeps track of the overall score. 
Our demo version doesn't have a Versus Mode, how¬ 
ever if you play in Championship Mode and the sec¬ 
ond player presses fire then he or she can join in for a 
one-off battle as any one of the four characters on 
offer. We'll have a full set of special tips on the game 
next month. 


SNIPPETS 


Creative Labs' 3DO Blaster finally went on sale 
over Xmas, unfortunately, despite all the early 
talk about ultra-competitive pricing, the system's 
RRP ended up at a hefty £350. Once again the 
problem seems to be supply and competition, the 
system is selling out in America, stocks are low 
and Europe isn't a very competitive market. 
Nevertheless, it's a slick system with the card 
coming with a joypad, Shockwave, Gridders, 
some utility PC software plus some neat, original 
gimmicks like speech control for joystick move¬ 
ments. To make it work, you'll also need a 
Sound Blaster Pro card and a 563 CD-ROM Drive. 
For more details, contact Creative on TEL: 0734 
344322. 

CORPORATE MOVES 1: Despite earlier denials. 
Electronic Arts has finally bought up Bullfrog, the 
enormously successful and innovative developer 
it has so long been closely associated with. 
Bullfrog made its name with Populous, a unique 
combination of god-style strategy play and 3D 
graphics. After a couple of data disks and 
sequels, it came up with Syndicate and, just last 
year, the mega-hits Theme Park and Magic 
Carpet - all three of which will be coming to 
3DO. EA is valued at about $400 million and has 
dug into its reserves to the tune of around $45 
million to buy up the Guildford-based operation. 
Bullfrog made profits of £1.7 million last year 
and only agreed to the take-over on the under¬ 
standing it would allow more, not less freedom 
to produce games with greater control on the 
publishing of its titles. 

EA's hot new announcement at the CES, 
Immercenary, was actually bought in from out¬ 
side developers. The game's presentation is 
apparently on a par with ShockWave, while the 
story has a futureworld turning to its past for a 
hero - you - who can fight the 'Perfect' computer 
which used to make their world an idyll, but is 
now devoted to their destruction. The game 
boasts a first person, 3D perspective through 
which you can explore its futuristic environment, 
interacting with various objects and fighting with 
the numerous agents of the silicon enemy. Expect 
a full review soon with the game due around 
March time. 

CORPORATE MOVES 2: Not content with owning 
Atari Games and Tengen, both now amalgamat¬ 
ed within Time-Warner's Interactive division, and 
buying Renegade just four months ago, the US 
entertainment giant has taken a 35% interest in 
veteran US games publisher Accolade for $12 
million. 

Trade newspaper, C7W, recently supported 
Panasonic's upbeat reports on FZ-1 sales with its 
counterpoint column: 'Without a doubt, 
Panasonic's 3DO raised the most smiles over this 
Christmas. Nearly all the retailers C7W spoke to 
claimed it was a hot-selling machine and many 
were also out of stock.' Even when the new, 
more easily manufactured FZ-10 appears 
Panasonic are unsure they'll be able to meet 
demand for the machine through most of '95 - a 
pan-European roll-out for the machine has also 
been delayed. 

The Future Zone retail chain of 10O-i- shops has 
seen its finances suffer to the tune of some £2 
million losses. Chairman Bev Ripley blamed a 
'dreadful' summer and tight margins on PC prod¬ 
ucts. Ironically, Future Zone doesn't support 3DO 
which was a lifeline for many independents over 
Xmas with machines selling out nationwide. 


-3D0 Magazine 07 February 1995- 


3DO 















3D0 


feature 

”300 World 

Whilst there's a wealth of 3DO software officially available at present, patrons of import software 
shops will have noticed there's an enormous array of games that aren't officially available, mainly 
Japanese software that for one reason or another, hasn't found its way into your local HMV. There are 
a few reasons why these titles are only available from import shops, the most common being that 
they're exceedingly poor, and thus haven't been picked up by a European distributor - the initial batch 
of software available for 3DO in Japan was huge, and of varying quality - so most will never be 
released. Many foreign titles are also too eccentric to be released here - there's loads of weird 
Japanese RPG and Manga beat-'em-ups that rely on cult, Japanese fads that are unlikely to find a 
wide audience, such as Ultraman Powered, reviewed below. Some import games are likely to reach 
these shores, but have simply been distributed abroad first but fans and collectors may be keen to 
snap such title up early. The chief difficulty with Jap imports is that most have little or no English 
language instructions - many of the games we've had in are simply too odd to work out - so it would 
be unwise to purchase any unofficial release without first asking to ploy the thing, especially as import 
games are inevitably more expensive than official releases. 

Over the next few pages is just a brief cross section of what's doing the import rounds at the 
moment. Next month, we'll have hopefully deciphered quite a few more, but the following are pretty 
good examples of what you're likely to find in the darker recesses of your friendly videogame import 
shop, a bizarre combination of flawed games, colt obscurities and soft porn, as scavenged by 
Dave Westley and Mark Wynne. 



Microcosm 


Developer: Psygnosis 

Microcosm can be seen as the granddaddy of all Silicon 
Graphic pre-regenerated games. First released on the 
FM Towns (a PC/console hybrid relatively unknown out¬ 
side of Japan) it has so far followed wherever a CD- 
ROM drive has existed in quantifiable numbers - com¬ 
ing to the PC at the beginning of 1994, and making its 
way onto Amiga's underpowered CD32 console mid¬ 


way through last year. 

That it has yet to be released officially on the 3DO in 
the UK comes as no surprise, however. Though its super¬ 
slick FMV intro caused jaws to drop at the 16-bit time - 
and even now looks fairly impressive - it was largely the 
novelty value that sold the 'game'. In a world where the 
Super Nintendo's Mode 7 reigned supreme, to see 
Silicon Graphic generated 
pinkie-red v( 


Your miniaturised vehicle, right, enters a pink domain. In-gome graphics, 
below, are tedious with a constantly scrolling vein as your backdrop. 


/alls 


scrolling by was awesome. To then get previously unpar¬ 
alleled FMV mini-movies spliced into the game made it a 
'must see' - a piece of iconoclastic history that had to be 
played by everyone. 

Sanity, fortunately, was soon regained. As FMV and 
Silicon Graphics began to be used more frequently so 
the magic of Microcosm faded. People saw past the 
abundance of visual candy and started to look for the 


3D0 Magazine 08 February 1995 














Microcosm takes its influence from The Fantastic 
Voyage, the intro showing the President of mega-corp, 
Axiom, being injected with a miniaturised craft contain¬ 
ing the hero of the show (you). With said craft the player 
has to journey through the President's body, destroying 
enemy craft as he goes. 

Play for a short while and you soon realise that the 
first of the SG games failed to bother itself with such 
notions as interactivity or indeed gameplay. Later games 
such as Novasform (see below) or MegoRace put an 
invisible mask around the pre-generated areas so that 
the computer could be informed when the player 
'touched' the sides, went over a 'power-up', etc. In 
Microcosm it's immediately apparent that you're totally 
uninvolved to the backdrop - it might as well not exist 
as far as the game is concerned. Indeed, it actually looks 
as though you're disconnected - the 'rough' foreground 
sprites just don't seem as though they're part of the same 
game as the super-smooth background. 

Gameplay itself is a simple shoot-'em-up. Enemy 
sprites come from both behind and winding along the 
vein from the front. Because your sprite is located 
towards the back of the screen it's almost impossible to 
avoid enemies that come from behind, and the controls 
are such that you need to be super-dextrous to get 
enough control to be able to shoot even those enemies 
coming straight at you. The result is that you die fre¬ 
quently. The game does give a generous number of con¬ 
tinues, but nevertheless they're soon used up and, 
because there's no password save, you'll have to start 
right from the beginning again. Naturally, incredibly 
frustrating. 

It is, undoubtedly, a good thing that Microcosm has 
failed to be released officially. It sits uncomfortably 
between the 16 and 32-bit worlds and, for all of the sur¬ 
face gloss, fails to deliver the gameplay that's necessary 
if a game hopes to do well in this wiser, game-smart 
age. dw 

Novastorm 

Developer: Psygnosis 

Effectively the follow up to Microcosm, Novasform 
attempts to address all of the misgivings and inadequa¬ 
cies of the original game whilst retaining all of the visu¬ 
ally impressive elements that contributed to its success. 
And it succeeds - in part. The smooth scrolling back¬ 
ground is now fully interactive (hit it and you'll 
know about it!), the sprites zoom towards you 
more realistically and the game comes with some 
stunning imagery in Guardians that are just as 
interactive and intelligent as non-pre-regenerated 
sprites. 


In fact Psygnosis felt that such an improvement had 
been made over Microcosm that they didn't want the 
game to be considered a sequel when they released the 
game on the PC over Christmas. However, on the PC, 
Psygnosis had done more than revamp the graphic 
engine. They'd also totally re-designed the structure of 
the game from the original FM Towns version, re-work¬ 
ing it for a European audience. As a result many PC 
magazines claimed it to be the best shoot-'em-up the PC 
had yet been given - a slick and absorbing product that 


kept you interested long after the initial dazzle of the 
graphics had faded. 

Yet 3DO Novasform is the original working of the 
Japanese FM Towns version - and it's poorer for that 
fact. The graphics are undoubtedly better - the 3DO 
Cinepak allowing for much smoother scrolling land¬ 
scapes, and infinitely more stunning Guardians. But the 
idiosyncratic way it's been put together means it's more 
frustrating and less of a pleasure to play for long peri¬ 
ods of time - mainly because when you die it's right 
back to the beginning again. 

Unlike Microcosm , Novasform provides a fairly 
conventional setting and storyline (no poking about 
in someone's vein here). The game takes its inspira¬ 
tion, in part, from the Luddite Terminator movies. 
The year is 2129 and the human-occupied > 




3D0 Magazine 09 February 1995 


3DO 




















UHELP 


Profile 


Profile 


Profile 


ProflleliProflle 


3D0 Magazine JQ February 1995 


feature 


> BaVor system is slip-sliding into anarchy, its once 
mighty federation free-falling into destruction. The cause 
of the disaster is the enemy within - the human race and 
its so called 'intelligence'. Its creation, Scarab X, an inte¬ 
grated artificial intelligence at the centre of a state-of- 
the-art computer network, saw one weak link in its logi¬ 
cal chain - humanity, and with customary binary-cold¬ 
ness saw the only possible remedy in the complete anni¬ 
hilation of humanity. The military, in a last ditch to save 
themselves, launched a proto-space fighter. Scavenger 
IV (the original title of the UK version) to track down and 
destroy its progeny. 

And that's the game really. You fly along in your 
craft shooting the enemies coming towards you, getting 
ever more powerful weapons in the process, until you 
reach the final confrontation and face Scarab X. It's infi¬ 
nitely more entertaining than Microcosm, mainly 
because the backdrops change constantly, and you 
always want to get that next weapon, but it really only 
deserves to be a minor success. If Psygnosis were to 
release the PC version, along with its brilliantly atmos¬ 
pheric pumping techno-beat, then it would be a different 
story. Somehow 1 doubt they will, however, primarily 
because Sony own Psygnosis who also happen to be the 
manufacturers of rival-console, the Playstation... dw 

Ultra man Powered 

Developer: Bandai 

With stupid stories, ultra low budgets and lots of men 
dressed in ludicrous rubber suits pretending to be 60 
foot monsters, the cult Japanese TV series Ultraman is 
the obvious inspiration for the more tepid 
PowerRangers, and with hundreds of hours of the TV 
series to draw on, plus easily recognised heroes and vil¬ 
lains, this is an obvious choice for a big 3DO licence. 
That Uitraman probably won't see the light of day over 
here can be attributed to two significant reasons. Firstly 
the TV series has never been transmitted over here, so its 
brand recognition is nil, and secondly, it's crap. Well, 
maybe that's a little harsh, because a good deal of fun 
can be had with this game, but most is at the expense of 
the TV clips themselves, which are ludicrous, and the 
frighteningly annoying speech samples, with Ultraman 
shouting "Shak!" every three seconds, the irritation soon 
reaching a point of giddy hysteria. 

As a beat-'em-up, this has a few modern touches 
which should have endeared it to a 3DO audience not 
weaned on the genre. The backgrounds are well digi¬ 
tised landscapes, with irrelevant space craft whizzing 
about to liven things up, and the digitised sprites of Ultra 
and his rubber, wobbly friends is pretty good, as they 
stomp and bash their way through the miniaturised sky¬ 


This monster bears an uncanny resemblance to Dave, 
you know. The stunningly poor Ultraman, 


scrapers below them (they're giants, you 
see). Also impressive is the zooming func¬ 
tion, as used to good effect in Way Of The 
Warrior, which lets you examine the sprites 
more closely when the battle moves in for 
hand-to-hand combat. Sadly, Ultraman 
Powered plays very poorly though, with 
slow responses to your commands and 
rather lethargic leaps and bounds across 
screen. As well as this, there's relatively few 
moves, and the enemies are all barely ani¬ 
mated, shuffling lumps, that simply cannot 
whip about screen at the rate required for a 
truly exciting beat-'em-up. Compensation 
for this inadequacy is offered in the form of 
special powers with each monster (and 
Ultraman) capable of firing bolts of energy 
or blowing gusts of freezing breath, but 
these damage rather than enhance play, 
since computer controlled opponents 
inevitably resort to these moves in crisis, 
which are quite unavoidable. If a human 
opponent finds out how to implement these 
annoying cheat tactics, God help your sani¬ 
ty. They're better banned. 

One welcome twist in Uitraman 
Powered is the inclusion of a 3D shoot-'em- 
up, in which your jump-suited hero fly's 
down a street in a spacecraft blasting at a 
tentacle waving monster. No, it's not any 
fun to play, sorry, but it looks brilliant, and 
actually makes you duck when you swerve 
around the ugly brute's face. 

All in all then, this is a package that 
does seek to utilise the many powerful abili¬ 
ties of the 3DO, with well coded camp FMV 
sequences, and nice looking fighting and 
3D sequences, all rendered useless by com¬ 
pletely appalling gameplay. As a novelty 
gift to someone you don't like much, it 
comes highly recommended, and as a fas¬ 
cinating slice of Japanese culture, it's well 
worth studying, but for anyone wanting a 
decent game, this has nothing to offer, rncw 

To Be Titled 

(Japanese girlie filth) 

Developer: Intarus 

This is a classic example of the silly, soft- 
porn novelty titles that the Japanese are flogging by the 
truck load. We can't deduct what this is actually called, 
but it's basically a scissors, paper, stone game, with 
bints. There's five, nubile and (very) young 
Japanese girls to play against, and it's simply a 
question of picking A, B or C to pick your weapon 
and then watching her pick hers (you know, paper 
wraps stone, stone blunts scissors, scissors cut 
paper). All the pouting girlies are pretty useless at 
this game, it must be said, and when you wrap her 
stone (for example) , you're given the choice of 
either removing an upper or lower garment. If this 
was an American Strip Poker game, you can bet 
she'd have more clothes on than an Arctic explor¬ 
er, dragging out the stripathon for ever, but 
Japanese girls seem to wear next to nothing any¬ 
way, so it only takes about five wins to have here 
rolling around in the nude, discreetly covering her 
private parts and looking shame faced (In a mock 
coy fashion). This, you might think, would be 


Single play say's it all really. This delightful young 
thing is pretty close to complete bareness, so soon 
it'll be MTV style nudeo mucheo galore. You can't 
fault the elegant simplicity of this stunning title. 

ample reward in itself, but generously, that's not the 
end. Stripping the young babe gives you access to a two 
minute video of the defeated femme flaunting around jn 
the altogether and striking altogether un-ladylike poses. 

And there you have it. Whilst playing this title, I felt 
exploited, cheap and lecherous, but it was still damned 
good fun, all the more pleasurable for being bloody 
easy. Of course, you'd a be a complete fool to fork out 
for this on import for anything more than a tenner, 
because it has far too short a shelf life, but if you've a 
fetish for Japanese beauties, this must be the most excit 
ing release you'll have ever seen, and I can reliably 
inform you that there's no shortage of similar stuff 
around, so check out your import dealers. □ mew 

3DO Magazine 












































Thomas * 
Jefferson 


Abraham 

Lincoln 


roAD 


Choose « 
verb 


Introducing the first truly interactive kids tv show that 
enriches and entertains You ve never seen anything like 
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Kids have taken over a local TV station and you have 
been hired as the producer You will come face to face with 


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the television stars real life video characters an unusual bunch who need your help. 

But beware, the better you get, the harder the game becomes Even when you have o smash hit on your hands, you may find 
your friends have been hired to see if they can do a better job. 

The content is designed by teachers to enhance the understanding of the arts and sciences, and the game even 
adjusts to match your ability. 

Station Invasion develops thinking and memory, as weU as problem solving capabilities. 

Station Invasion Kids TV will never be the same again 

The 3DQ system dnd 3D0 softuiare are available from Game Limited selected HNV stores Virpin Hepastores 
and all pood independent dealers. Gall 0800 444220 for pour local dealer 


3D0 and the 3D0 logos and Station Invosion are trademarks of The 3DP 
Company. © 1994 The 300 Company. All rights reserved. 


3DO 


♦flOl 










































3D0 


interview 


Barom R K V&nt Wolf^heild 


Making Porsches in a VW World 


Silent Software's Reichart Von Wolfsheild is one of 
videogaming's most colourful and controversial charac¬ 
ters. After earning a fortune as an MTV producer and TV 
ad maker, he set up a software company he estimates is 
a thousand times more efficient than its competition. 
Stuart Wynne asked about his story and why he thought 
3DO was winner. 



>1. ^ I 


When did you first get involved in the business? 

"I started in 1974 with the Altair and then went onto the 
Apple I, II, the Timex-Sinclair computers, the ZX81 I 
think you called it over there. When the IBM PC came 
out I actually wasn't very interested in it - it was too 
primitive, it didn't even have a video output... In the 
Eighties the Macintosh came out and I was a real fan, it 
was so much simpler to use than even the [Apple] Lisa. It 
affected totally what I thought you could do with comput¬ 
ers. But in 1984 a friend of mine introduced me to the 
Black Box Amiga. I realised then that there was a plat¬ 
form on which games and utilities could be created 
much easier, much faster than even on a Macintosh. 
With colour, and sound! 

In 1984 I didn't like most computer games, but I liked 
a game on the Atari by Jay Minor called Tank. It was 
simple and given away with the Atari and in it you 
drove a tank through a maze on a search for your 
enemy. I like the idea of tanks because it doesn't get any 
simpler. Computer games are particularly enjoyable 
when they take the form of some sort of destruction or 
violence and what epitomizes destruction more, a per¬ 
son running around with a gun?... or a Tank - a big, 
heavy vehicle with a big, powerful cannon?" 

Are you essentially a programmer? 

"No, my background is as a traditional artist. But my 
history is odd. In essence while most people would love 
to come to Hollywood and get in the film business, this 
was always my worst nightmare! Friends kept coming to 
me with film and TV jobs, but I didn't want them. 

"In the early Eighties a friend of mine, a director who 
worked with Michael Jackson, came to me and said he 
wanted to create short videos for popular music - like 
the Monkees used to do. And I knew it was the Mike 
Nesbitt thing, MTV. So I was the art director and special 
effects guy working with a whole bunch of friend. We 

Profile 

Baron Riechart Kurt Von Wolfshield is a man who 
turned his back on the hype and mega-riches of MTV 
and advertising to found Silent Software. Primarily a 
computer consultancy and utility producer. Silent also 
produces games like the awesome Return Fire (see 
pages 51-53). Years ago the company produced its 
16-bit prequel and a string of other hit games, a hit 
Disney animation package, and even helped develop 
Commodore's CDTV. Its return to videogames was 
mainly prompted by the 3DO system itself. 


produced something like the first 10% 
of videos that aired on MTV. I was 
working with all these pop stars like J. 

Giles, Rick Springfield, Donna 

"It was a lot of fun, but what real- 
ly wanted to do was work in com put- 
ers. Of course, eventually the two 
worlds collided with computer special 
effects. I did TV ads for Pepsi, Pizza 
Hut, God Father's Pizza, and 7-11. 

The money was great; I made more 

money in a month that most people 

earn in a year. But I just hated it, the 

whole scene: the drugs, the self-importance, alcohol, 

cigarettes. I guess I was a nerd but I didn't look like it! I 

was really craving intellectual stimulation. There's only 

so many times I can discuss where to put a camera, 

what colour to use. 

"It was also about the time two acts took off. Boy 
George and Wham, and I just thought 'this is over, this 
is so frivolous and crappy.' George Michael has gone 
on to do some great stuff but Wham was so child-like 
and techno-boppy. I was hoping to get into the epic 
grunge, even back then, I wanted music videos to do 
something serious and artistic. Wham was eye-candy. 
So I said 'I can't do this anymore.' I stopped working for 
a year and began doing research on computer to see 
what the market wanted. 

"I decided what I wanted to do was, well, a game I 
wanted to play and on a PC with a serial port, this 
meant it could include modem play. And this Amiga was 
awesome, so basically what I did was write a fast asyn¬ 
chronous transfer routine for it. The other thing I did was 
write a game with two independent windows with two 
tanks, each in one window. From there I developed 
Firepower [a 16bit prequel to Return Fire] which was a 
top ten hit. Then I created Galactic Invasion, Turbo and 
M/nc/ro//- which was a reinterpretation of C64 Quedex, 
by Stavros Fasoulas. I don't usually convert other peo¬ 
ple's work, but I so liked Quedex I wanted to see it on 
other machines. 

"Anyway, then we did Who Framed Roger Rabbit for 
Amiga, PC, C64 and Apple II... the real magic there 
was we did all the formats in just ninety days! One of 
my key animators was Eric Daniels, who we hired away 
from Disney. It was on Roger that we developed soft¬ 
ware called Onion [after the animation paper used in 
conventional animation], because animators are expen¬ 



sive and it was wasting time for him to draw on paper, 
and then scan each drawing in. Onion allowed us to 
create about 16 times more animation. 

"Onion was later developed into Disney Presents... 
The Animation Studio. It also won an award from the 
SPA [Software Publishers Association], and is still used 
in movie houses all over the world to create videos, time 
animation, and create shorts. After that we worked with 
Commodore designing CDTV - we developed special 
video compression techniques which had to fit into the 
machine's ROM, and we created and designed the 
whole CD audio virtual control panel." 

After that you seemed to take a break... 

"Yeah, I took about a three year break. I can't really talk 
about the work we did then, it was for the government, 
education and private companies. It was nice. Vs^e 
worked fast, compared to other companies we seem to 
work a thousand times faster. We estimated one hour of 
our time was equal to about one year of another per¬ 
son's. We made a lot of money solving other people's 
problems - and I've got such a large network of friends 
there's always these calls - where people have been 
working for three to four years on a piece of software, 
and we've solved their problems in a day, literally a 
day. We look at the code and we fix it. A very simple 
analogy: we build Porsche race cars in a world where 
most people are Volkswagen designers. And once in a 
while someone comes to us and says, 'oh, my VW is 
broken.' So we walk over and say 'oh, this is it right 
here.' Because we're used to working on these incredi¬ 
bly complex, high performance engines it's so simple... 

"I'll take a small diversion here because recently I 
booted up my old C64 for reference. I like to believe you 
should use the worst example of a machine a game 
could run on. If you can make the game fun on a primi- 


-3D0 Magazine 12 February 1995- 












five piece of technology, then you should be able to 
make that game fun on a more sophisticated piece of 
technology. I have a friend who recently bought an Atari 
800 because he really enjoyed the games back then and 
he wanted to understand why. He owns the entire library 
of 3DO games (he's fanatical) and he thought so many 
are just eye-candy, which I agree with. On Return Fire 
the last thing we put In were the special effects..." 

How would you compare Return Fire to old C64 
gomes? 

"We've become so sophisticated nowadays with the PC 
and Macintoshes we work on. With Return Fire, for 
example, we recently figured out printing its source code 
would use something like eight reams of paper with 
about 66 lines of code per page. We're talking about a 
stack of paper a foot and a half tall on your desk. For a 
computer game! And I can remember when games were 
just 8K. I wrote a 2K game once for an Altairl So the 
way to look at it is we've become like brain surgeons. 
Expert technicians for this sophisticated technology. C64 
games were better thought out than most games of 
today. It is so easy to throw fancy sound and full motion 
video into games machines today. I call them 'Animated 
Slide Shows.' Return Fire was built with the care and 
consideration of the old days. You might say that it's an 
old fashioned game... destroy, destroy, destroy. 

"Return Fire does not have an intelligent, computer 
generated opponent because it was primarily designed 
for two players. I want people to play against each 
other. I don't design computer games to play against a 
computer, I design computer games so that people can 
play against each other using the computer as the 
"board" on which to play the game. I would like to use 
more computer intelligence in the future, but not neces¬ 
sarily using the computer as an opponent - because 
there is no challenge. In a war game what's happen¬ 
ing? You're targeting and firing. What's going to do 
that better, a human or a computer? A computer can- 
win constantly. It's not a challenge, it's not fun. I think 
many more games will be like this in the future. " 

What are you working on now? 

"Currently we're developing 15 products. Including 
Return Fire. You're not going to hear about all of the 
products. Some are utilities which will be reviewed in PC 
magazines, who won't know about our games, so it's 
like two separate worlds we operate in, but I guarantee 
you'll eventually use one of our utilities even though you 
probably won't know it was by us. And all these projects 
were financed out of our own pocket, which is pretty 
unusual for a developer. That's one of the reasons we're 
getting Into publishing our own software." 

Who worked on Return Fire? 

"Some of the people working on Return are Van Arno, 
who's the graphic artist, then there's Will Ware who's 
the programmer who did all of the programming. Alex 
Kasperavicius was the producer. And we're an odd 
group, all Lithuanian or German, all over six foot - a 
pretty ominous group, but we're all incredibly non-vio¬ 
lent. Yet we're for the freedom of expression in enter¬ 
tainment, although we don't think we'll ever step outside 
the boundaries of what is acceptable. The tanks in 
Return Fire may squash people, but we hope we've done 
that in the most delightful way possible! !t makes people 
laugh. Yet we're constantly appalled by TV. I can't even 
watch the news. It might seem like a contradiction, but 
that's the question; if you can separate real violence and 
what the game symbolises - which is just the game. I tell 
you when I first saw Street Fighter II, and to this day, I 
think this is an excessively violent game with imagery I 
don't think is acceptable. This sounds like a contradiction 


with Return Fire. But permit me, take 100 women, bring 
them in a room, mothers alike, let them play both games 
and let them tell me what they say. I don't see any 
redeeming qualities, or intelligence, or even spatial com¬ 
prehension in SFII. In Return Fire you have to compre¬ 
hend in your mind, not merely on the screen, what your 
enemy is doing. Unless you do that, you cannot win." 
How long did Return Fire take to program? 

"That's a difficult question because everyone here works 
on what they want, pretty much whenever they want. 
Return Fire was a backburner project, just something we 
did in our spare time, because we had to wait for there 
to be a big enough installed base out there [for 3CXD]. I 
mean I loved the machine from day one. It was ahead of 
its time when it came out and it's still ahead of its time. 

"Anyway, Return took about two years in all; we 
played around with it a lot. It took us about three months 
just to develop the 'look.' It uses a lot of very tiny poly¬ 
gons, every vehicle, tree and so on is made up of poly¬ 
gons - everything. I estimate the 3DO is handling about 
200,000 polygons per second, and we could go up to 
230,000. If you look at Return Fire you see it rendering 
animated men and translucent shadows. Then if you 
look at the helicopter it's got a transparent cockpit and 
you can see the men in there. People keep on saying 
that 3DO can't do polygons. Right." 

How would you soy 3DO is still ahead of its time? 
"Probably with an American accent. Okay, a couple of 
ways. 3DO is really a computer with a videogame 
machine output, whereas other machines are simply 
games machines. You see 3DO is really a philosophy, 
not just hardware. The inherent philosophy is: when you 
upgrade, it works... At the CES I went in the 3DO booth 
with all these machines and our game's running, then I 
walk down to this huge Panasonic stand and there are 
more machines with this huge projection TV display, and 
then I walk to the GoldStar booth. And it all works, all 
these different 3DOs, just like a VCR. This is awesome... 
oh, and there's the Creative Labs 3DOBlaster too! 

"Then there's the development environment. I can't 
really comment on the other systems, except to say I've 
got a Sega development system and doesn't seem to 
even run all of its own demos. For 3DO there's a solid 
compiler tool, audio tool and video tool. Also we use 
IBMs, Mac and Amigas all linked together with no prob¬ 
lem (amazing, eh?). The hardware's really cheap, I got 
the development system for around $10K... I've even got 
a CD mastering machine so I can put my game on disc 
for proof of concept. 3DO is just such a cool concept. 

"They [3DO] also have great technical support. I 
have a problem and I get on the line and there's a real 
person there to answer a real question. I know some 
people think 3DO is a bit stand-offish, but that's not my 
experience and I know other guys, like Morpheus who're 
just a couple of guys with their first game {VR Stalker 
which is great for a first game), and they think the same. 
So it's not just because I personally know lots of people 
at 3DO. Besides which, it's such a kick ass incredible 
piece of hardware." 

Do you think the base machine is powerful enough to 
establish the format? 

"Definitely. Look at Sony's PlayStation. It's their first 
attempt. They're not a games company and the technol¬ 
ogy is based on what was available about a year-and- 
a-half ago. The Sega Neptune, basically the Genesis 
and the 32X mated, that's basically just a frame buffer. 
It is pod, I am impressed with it technologically, but the 
sound is never going to be good enough if it's not fulll 
CD quality - you can get a CD player but then it costs 
more than a 3DO. And they've been working on that for 


about a year-and-a-half too. So we all know what their 
technology can do. So let me put the question back to 
you: what do you think 3DO's team of top engineers 
and seasoned software designers have been doing since 
they released 3DO over a year and a half ago? 

M2. 

"Right. I saw the PSX. I saw the Saturn. I saw the 
Ultra64, and then I saw the M2 and literally my jaw fell 
open. I'm not making a joke. One of the people with me 
pointed it out and we joked about it. M2 is 'very impres¬ 
sive.' Especially because of some of the stuff inside that I 
know about. Which ! can't talk about. And especially 
because of the price, which I also can't talk about. I defi¬ 
nitely will support 3DO. There's no doubt about it. 

"The designers of 3DO are old friends of mine (even 
graying). R.J. was looking forward to seeing what I 
could do with his hardware as much I was. He and Dave 
Needle design hardware from the perspective of soft¬ 
ware designers. It's just great hardware." 

Will you do another game for 3DO? And will you redo 
games for M2? 

"Oh absolutely, we'll do more games. We're doing 
some now but I can't describe them. As for re-doing 
them for M2, I don't know. All our 3DO games will run 
with M2, we've done tests, but M2 is so powerful that I 
think anything we do for it will be done from scratch. 
Return Fire is actually more a philosophy than a game 
though, it's like chess, so there might be another game 
in the same style for M2. 

What other 3DO games do you like? 

"There's a lot of eye-candy out there, but I like Gex, 
Road Rash, Need For Speed for 3DO. Although I have 
problem with Need For Speed, which is when you have 
the crashes everything goes into the slow-motion. I race, 

I average lOOmphon surface streets, and I've seen real 
flips and everything happens extremely fast." 

You think the standard 3DO could run Need faster? 
"Sure, I think it could run a lot faster, definitely. I don't 
know the program well, I don't want to criticise the 
developers but I'd say there were at least three calcula¬ 
tions they're doing that they don't need to do. One thing 
about 3DO is that divide calculations are very danger¬ 
ous. Because it's a RISC chip and there's no divide func¬ 
tion built-in you have to be very careful and do shifts 
instead of divisions." 

How do you regard the software scene generally? 

"There's a lot of these titles which I call 'GBG': Games 
Between Glass. Games like Ecco The Dolphin and Mario 
Bros games. It's like they're squished between panes of 
glass. I don't like those sort of 'games'. I like games with 
real depth, with substance. With 3DO the hardware can 
do real-time 3D. So why don't people do it? I'd like to 
see developers push themselves more. A lot give up far 
too easily, on all formats." 

3DO Magazine 



Magazine | 


-3D0 Magazine 13 February 1995- 


3DO 











3D0 


( 


interview 


[Magazine 



Artistic Intentions 



After a string of huge 3DO sucesses, EA's confidence has 
past bursting point - the company even have stickers on 
their walls saying 3DO is EA - EA is 3DO. Sitting happily 
upon the crest of this emotional tidal wave is Chris 
Thompson, the European Marketing Manager at 3DO 
Europe, and we sent Derek Dela Fuente to chat to this 
justifiably happy man. 



Do you think it was a mistake not to launch the 3DO 
world-wide simultaneously or, maybe with a larger 
catalogue of games? 

3CXD announced in January '93 that they would be at 
the CES with the system for general release - and they 
hit their target. From a confidence point of view that 
made the software developers very happy - Philips has 
promised their machine for a long time and it didn't 
appear, undermining their credability in the process. In 
terms of scheduling then, the 3DO company did very 
well. An ideal situation for them would have been to 
have released the 3DO world-wide, on the same day, 
with a good catalogue of titles. A problem a lot of the 
developers got into was the difficulty with the operating 
system not being finalised until the last minute. This 
meant a lot of developers were working to old specs and 
didn't use it properly, while others that got the latest 
specs near the release of the machine had to rush their 
titles... Not an ideal situation but, even so, compared to 
other launches, still relatively brilliant. After all, by the 
end of 1994 every major territory had the machine - 
pretty good going. 

Many UK developers were initially very enthusiastic 
about the machine but that waned slightly with reser¬ 
vations about the operating system. What do you 
think? 

To understand 3DO you have to go back to 1983. Trip 
Hawkins has always had a vision of 'real life' in a box. 
He's an incredible visionary. Because he's such a 
respected figure he amassed a lot of support from the 
top guys in the US. There are now 400 developers work¬ 
ing on 3DO. It's a highly critical industry we are within 
and that's good. Anything that shocks the developing 
community will make them nervous - and two things are 
making them so, Sony's PSX and Sega's Saturn. We, as 
a software publisher, will back the system we feel will be 
at the cutting edge of technology, and the 3DO is the 
machine we shall do it with. If we thought it wasn't the 
machine we would change. It's both a financial and 

Profile 

Chris Thompson, an American, works for EA in their 
UK office, and is in charge of marketing games upon 
their release in Europe. Entering the EA fold in its 
early days Chris has now worked for the company 
for seven years in total - three in the United States 
and the last four in the United Kingdom. 


technical decision. We've never held 
onto old technology. 

Regarding peoples reservations... I 
find that hard to believe - everyone's 
been impressed with some easy tricks 
you can do with the machine. I suppose 
any new system needs time to master. 

Do you ever single out specific coun¬ 
tries? 

If we were to aim for a sole market then 
it would be the US or Germany - simply 
because they have a large enough mar¬ 
ket support. Both are also identical in 
the type of games they want. The UK 
and USA are the same when it comes to 
consoles. France falls between the two. 

The best approach is to have develop¬ 
ment teams in all the major countries 
like US, France, Germany and UK - 
which we do. The main criteria when 
producing a title is to do a projection on 
how a certain title will do in all the lead¬ 
ing territories. But then I strongly believe 
that if a title is good enough it will sell 
anywhere. Look at John Madden on 
3DO. Who would have thought it would be such a huge 
success in Europe? 

John Madden is the program that really highlights the 
machine's potential. Where can you go from there? 

John Madden is simply a great game. The ployabilty is 
excellent - even to people who don't like American 
Football. The video footage and interaction is just amaz¬ 
ing. FIFA is as good. We've improved on an already 
perfect game with the camera following the player and 
varying angles to adjust play. Technically both of these 
programs offer such a realistic environment that you feel 
you are there. Many companies go for lots of video 
footage, fancy graphics, etc. The first thing we look at is 
the gameplay and everything else follows on. Of course, 
it is not up to broadcast quality but the Al is top notch, 
you have fully animated and digitised players, weather 
conditions, etc. It's merely a step below interactive TV. 

What I can say in terms of future development is that 
the 3DO will soon be the leading machine simply 
because it's the most advanced machine. We shall write 
the game first on this machine, and then port them down 
to the PC and other machines. 

3DO is designed to be a seMop box. Are EA working 
on any set-top box tides? How would you define a se^ 


top title and how does it differ from a standard PC 
product? 

It's best to go back to VCR. Currently you can buy one 
for a mere $100 or pay up to $1000. Some have 4 
heads, some can record from one machine to another, 
etc. That's a similar situation with 3DO. We've started at 
the low end. You only have to look at the computer anal¬ 
ogy - Panaonsic, Sony, etc. will offer a middle of the 
range system, maybe, and at the high end the 3D0 user 
will go for the AT&T set top box. High end systems will 
be able to do everything that lower end systems can, but 
they'll also be able to function as the delivery for a vari¬ 
ety of cable companies - down loading info, movies, 
video games. It's an information storage box that will sit 
on top of the TV. What products will be developed for 
this will be totally dependent on the capabilities of the 
networking systems that are going to exist. There will be 
the basic ones like modem play, but in terms of more 
complicated networking the exact technology that's 
going to exist remains to be seen. British Telecom are 
currently doing video on demand in 60,000 UK homes, 
so the process is beginning. Who knows where it will 

- 3DO Magazine 


3D0 Magazine 14 February 1995 


















feature 


CO 

O 

O 


Virtual Vegas 


Americans fastest growing city, the Mecca of neon, has to be the perfect site for o videogame convention. 
The lost decade has seen the Mob'^s city turn into on adult Disneyworld with enormous new casino hotels 
themed ofter ancient Egypt, Or and Treasure Island. Stuart Wynne reports from the future. 



he Consumer Electronic Show has been 
coming to Vegas for over a decade now, 
growing even faster than the city itself 
with the videogames publishers crowded 
into huge tents out the back. Originally 
Vegas was picked simply because it's a good holiday 
resort, Blackpool on a truly insane scale, but as gam¬ 
bling becomes more accepted the city in the middle of 
nowhere has turned to ever more elaborate promotions. 

Treasure Island has a pair of full-size galleons sail 
into battle, the English ship sunk on the hour, every hour, 
while the MGM Grand is the world's largest hotel with 
Oz inside and a theme park out the back. The Luxor is 
probably the most impressive though, a huge black glass 
pyramid with a roof-mounted searchlight visible for 
miles around. Inside it boasts a trio of pyramid themed 
shows, including a holographic display and a stunning 
VR experience directed by 200Vs Douglas Trumbull. 
The latter uses Trumbull's own, amazing hi res 
Showscan technology and is one of the most spectacular 
rides in the world, not that the majority of Vegas' visitors 


Vegas' heart is still on a roulette table and 1995 is 
the year in which the videogames market plays for the 
biggest stakes yet. After hitting their home markets in 
December 1994, both Sony and Sega roll out their new 
machines in America and Europe this autumn. Nintendo 
promise their Ultra64 will hit America, and maybe even 
Europe in October, while Atari's Jaguar CD-ROM Drive 
finally arrives and maybe even Bandai's Apple PowerPC 
machine could appear. Billions and billions of dollars 
will be put on the roulette table to buy advertising, soft¬ 
ware support and, hopefully, market share. '95 is the 
year in which the two-year reign of 3DO and Jaguar as 
high-end machines ends. From now on the pressure is 
on for prices to fall, at last, as the real competition 
begins. 

It's ironic that of all the new machines, the one with 
the most respected specs belongs to the system that start¬ 
ed it all, 3DO. Its M2 upgrade gives 3DO a unique sec¬ 
ond bite of the hi-tech cherry. While the base model 
3DO has established a formidable foundation, with well 
over a hundred titles, M2 will keep 3DO way out in front 
for performance. Dazzling M2 demos were on show to 
developers at the CES and the tech specs are well 
known. Walking around the show it was surprising how 
many developers, even non-3DO ones, had heard about 
M2 and routinely described it as the leading edge sys¬ 
tem. Even the mystery-packed Ultra64 was judged infe¬ 
rior by people actually developing for it. 3DO's future 
isn't certain, there were rumours about Panasonic being 
unhappy about profitability and certainly there aren't 
enough 3DO systems being made for the UK market, but 
while magazines continue to rave about the PlayStation, 
among developers its leading edge reputation has 
already passed to M2. 



riio ;tiK) ( 




EYE OF THE STORM 

Vegas '95 was a show in the shadow of things yet to be 
unveiled. The E3 Show in Los Angles this May is to be 
the launchpad of PlayStation, Saturn and, allegedly, 
Ultra64 - all of which were kept under wraps at Vegas. 
With hurricanes tearing through Los Angles, and Vegas 
as grey and rainy as Blackpool, the January CES was a 
show on the sidelines. 3DO should've dominated with 
masses of great looking new games, from the Doom- 
smashing Killing Time to the awesome Wing 
Commander 3. Unlike the dreary Sega stand, with its 


walled off inner sanctum protecting a single, solitary 
Saturn, and Nintendo's resolutely 16-bit stand, 3DO 
drew real crowds. Not huge, but substantial nonetheless. 
If 3DO had been located within the game halls it could 
have caused a real sensation, as it was the company 
kept faith with its aspirations and was located in the 
multimedia hall - miles from the other games systems. In 
the main electronics halls, GoldStar exhibited its new 
machine with MPEG add-on, while Panasonic had a 
huge display with FZ-lOs all over the place. If the future 
really is multimedia, 3DO's only competition is the 
ancient IBM PC. > 


3D0 Magazine 15 February 1995^ 


















feature 


CO 

O 

O 


> NEWATTHECES 

AMERICAN LASER GAMES 

ALG blasted onto the arcade scene with a flurry of laser- 
spun bullets in 1 990. While Dragon's Lair had used 
laserdisc for a cartoon with idiosyncratic joystick move¬ 
ments at key moments, ALG's Mad Dog McCree made 
the inspired move of adding a lightgun. Rather than 
unintuitive joystick moves, you simply shot the villains 
and avoided shooting the good guys to keep the cheap¬ 
ly filmed, live-action western spooling off laserdisc. Mess 
up, and the laserdisc simply leapt to a death scene. A 
brilliantly simple concept and a string of sequels have 
followed, plus diversification into home versions for 
Mega-CD, PC CD-ROM and 3DO. 

ALG is actually licensed to use 3DO in its arcade 
machines and developed the first 3DO hardware 
peripheral - a lightgun, of course. At the CES a follow¬ 
up gun was announced with a connector allowing 
another gun to be linked up for two player ALG games 
from Mad Dog II on. Expect this around Spring time. 

The suitability of ALG's games for anything more 
than a quick arcade blast is doubtful, but it's a problem 
the company is attempting to address. At the show it 
announced the acquisition of Quantum Quality 
Productions (QQP), also founded in 1990 but devoted to 
strategy games with The PerfecI General and The Lost 
Admiral winning numerous magazine awards. Besides 
continuing to develop strategy games, QQP will appar¬ 
ently be expected to contribute 'strategy' content to 
ALG's arcade games. ALG President Robert Grebe 
described QQP's founder, Bruce Williams Zaccagnino, 
as a games designer on a par with Sid Meier, so who 
knows what ALG's next game will be like. 

Also announced at the show was ALG's determina¬ 
tion to develop interactive adventures for girls, principal¬ 
ly aged 9-14, with a new division imaginatively titled 
Games For Her^''^. Two titles are expected for home for¬ 
mats in '95, including 3DO, beginning with Madison 
High. 

ALG is also branching out by publishing games from 
outside developers; Morpheus International last year 
provided VR Stalker, a simplistic, but entertaining flight 
sim still awaiting a UK publisher. 

Space Pirates: Join the Star Rangers, travel to the far 
ends of the universe, meet strange new life forms... and 
shoot them with your ALG Gamegun. (May '95) 

Drug Wars: Join the police force, explore the com¬ 
plex socio-political problems of foreign countries, meet 
poverty-stricken natives... and shoot them with your ALG 
Gamegun. (June '95) 


ANY CHANNEL, INC. 

This brand-new start-up company is mainly composed of 
ex-employees of Sun Microsystems. Unsurprisingly their 
expertise is in fast, 3D graphics... 

P.O.'d: While the 'pissed off' title may seem rather 
adolescent, the CES prototype showed probably 3DO's 
most impressive 3D yet. Complex structures, featuring 
numerous scuttling aliens, moved about with impressive 
fluidity and speed, effortlessly simulating the first-person 
perspective of a jetpacking marine. The programmers 
even plan to add a move enabling the player to do a 
backflip! Now that's confidence. 

The scenario is a cross between Aliens and Under 
Seige, with you as the cook of elite space marines unit 
on a routine 'bug hunt'. Unfortunately it turns into a 
'marine hunt' which leaves you alone with help a mini¬ 
mum of three months away. Attack is, of course, the best 



//(f 


method of defence so you set about finding alien 
weaponry within a huge, texture mapped city of some 
40jevels. 

If this debut title lives up to its promise, it might not 
only leapfrog Doom, but indeed jetpack over it with con¬ 
siderably more dramatic gameplay. (Spring '95) 

ART DATA INTERACTIVE 

Based in Simi Valley, California, ADI may be just over a 
year old, but founder Randy Scott has been in the busi¬ 
ness for eight years making distribution deals. ADI's first 
release was superbly accomplished conversion of Rise 
Of The Robots, while for the future there's Doom I & II, 
both of which will have extensive, all-new FMV 
sequences besides numerous other enhancements includ¬ 
ing higher res graphics and stunning stereo sound. 

Chess Wars: A Battle Chess for the 32-bit genera¬ 
tion, this grafts live-action footage onto an advanced 
chess engine. Burning up around half a million dollars, 
the film crew shot no less than 27 different prologues 
and 134 battle sequences with a cast of eighteen, plus 
six stuntmen, three camera units and over a hundred 
extras! Preview footage at the show certainly looked fun, 
with some gory decapitations, while the actual chess 
game is claimed to outplay anything currently on the 
market. Most intriguing of all, is the fact the live action 
footage was scripted and directed by Paul W. Cooper, 
who's won no less than three Emmys - TV's equivalent 
of the Oscar. 

CRYSTAL DYNAMICS 

Established in 1982 specifically to exploit the emerging 
32-bit technologies, primarily 3DO, Crystal has become 


undoubtedly one of the hottest software houses around. 
At the show, their main announcement was 
Championship Sports, a new label intended to compete 
with EA's hugely popular EASN brand. The two games 
they had on show certainly looked able to give EA a run 
for their money. 

Baseball game: Although still at a very early stage, 
the early graphics looked very promising. Filmed 
footage of the San Francisco Giants has been used to 
provide motion capture material for Silicon Graphics 
rendered animation. As a consequence the realism of 
the graphics was quite stunning and even non-sports 
fans should be tempted by this one. (March) 

Basketball game: Rough footage from the prototype 
game looked very, very slick with five-on-five action d la 
NBA Jam - only with far more detailed, fluid graphics. It 
came as no surprise that Crystal had found it causing 
considerable excitement at Sega and Sony. (April) 

CYCLONE 

This small start-up company is the brain child of Helmut 
Kobler who used to work in 3DO marketing. He became 
so excited by the machine he left the company, in late 
1993, to develop games for it. The first title due for 
release is Captain Quaser, which was picked up by 
3DO for publishing in June 1994. A second, 3D action 
game is also in development and both will be shown at 
the E3 show in May. Kobler has a lot of support within 
3DO and there's a good buzz about these titles, so 
expect more soon. 

DIGITAL PICTURES 

Company president Tom Zito has been on the cutting 


3 DO Magazine 16 February 1995- 












edge of CD-ROM technology so long a cynic might 
argue it's rusted into historical irrelevance. While Digital 
was only formed in 1991, its core technology owes 
much to NEMO, an interactive TV system Zito and his 
colleagues developed between 1985 and 1988. As the 
company PR proudly boasts. Digital is 'the only compa¬ 
ny to create titles that are one hundred percent... full 
motion video.' Its games are shot like movies, often cost¬ 
ing around $2.5 million with fifty strong production 
crews and 'name' talent such as director John Dykstra 
(Sewer Shark), Last Emperor star Vivian Wu {Supreme 
Warrior), pop icon Deborah Harry and Pet Semetary 
director Mary Lambert (both Double Switch). 

The resulting film footage is digitised using Digital's 
own, multimillion dollar DigiChrome© process and then 
engineered into an 'interactive movie' with InstaSwitch™ 
technology, usually quite smoothly glossing over the 
video branching points - that is, the points where the 
player actually interacts with game. While the gameplay 
is weak. Night Trap and Sewer Shark are arguably the 
worst UK 3DO releases yet. Digital was perfectly placed 
when Sega launched its chronically underpowered 
Mega-CD back in 1992. Digital's early releases proved 
Mega-CD games could look different to cart games and 
Night Trap provided the boon of national controversy. 
Actresses being menaced by aliens proved far more 
newsworthy than any sprites, however brilliantly drawn. 
The company's commitment to new 'new technology' can 
be judged by their first release for 32X - yep, it's Night 
Trap with enhanced graphics. 

Supreme Warrior. The misguided 'interactive movie' 
concept is taken to absurd depths with this attempt at a 
beat-'em-up. SFII it's not. (Soon) 

ELECTRONIC ARTS 

The world's largest independent software publisher and 
a founding partner in the 3DO Company, EA continues 
to be a formidable supporter of 3DO with news leaking 
of a sophisticated snowboarding sim on the way for the 
end of 1995! 

Jmmercenajy: A surprise announcement at Vegas, 
this is a futuristic sci-fi blaster we'll have a full preview 
on next month. (Spring '95) 

INTERPLAY 

Established in 1983, by Brian Fargo, Interplay has 
carved out a formidable reputation for itself with a string 
of original releases. Of late it has enjoyed considerable 
success on SNES with CloyFighters, Lost Vikings and 
Rock 'N' Roll Racing, which inevitably attracted the 
attention of the corporates. In 1994 the company was 
taken over by MCA Universal, a subsidiary of 3DO part¬ 
ner Matsushita, with Fargo actually getting an office on 
the Universal Studios lot. Consequently, rumours abound 
of 3DO conversions of titles like Lost Vikings, plus some 
epic conversions of forthcoming Universal movies. 

Cyberia: A first-person, 3D shoot-'em-up with the 
graphics streamed off disk like Novastorm, it's been rel¬ 
atively well received on PC. (Summer '95) 

KIRIN ENTERTAINMENT 

Founded just last year, Kirin is a division of the 15-year- 
old J.C. Research, a hardware manufacture specialising 
in peripherals such as joysticks. Their first, experimental 
title for 3DO was a conversion of the dire PC title. 
Plumbers Don't Wear Ties. This tedious failure at erotic 
entertainment gave the company confidence to take on 
real games. Besides the two PC conversions below, Kirin 
has a pair of action games in development using its 3D 
rendering process. 



The Perfect General: This popular PC strategy game 
is being reworked for 3DO with the addition of 3D ren¬ 
dered sequences and stereo sound. (May) 

The Grandest Fleet A naval-minded strategy classic 
gets upgraded for 3DO. (August) 

KONAMI 

Although formed in 1969, it was only in the late 
Seventies that the company started its explosive world¬ 
wide growth, riding on the newfangled videogame 
craze. Games such as Gradius, Hyper Olympics and 
Paradious were not only huge successes, but also highly 
influential with Gradius in particular setting a style for 
shoot-'em-ups that is still heavily imitated. On SNES and 
Mega Drive Konami is, if anything, even more respected 
than in the arcades with a string of exceptional titles 
such as the Probotector and Castlevania series. The com¬ 
pany also has a hi-tech division, its Kobe Development 
Centre, which among other things runs a network allow¬ 
ing up to 500 people to participate in race games. 
While a diversification into home computer games was 
an embarrassing failure - it's said Konami bosses simply 
couldn't understand how Elite II: Frontier could be over a 
year late - the company remains committed to new tech¬ 
nology. Konami's sprawling adventures for the PC 
Engine CD-ROM are a particularly popular example of 
its innovative nature. 

Policenauts: Although essentially a port of the PC 
Engine game, Policenauts is such an epic CD-specific 
title that it's doubtful anyone will complain. A manga- 
style adventure, with several action sequences requiring 
nifty sharpshooting, it's brilliantly atmospheric. A sequel 
to the smash-hit Snatcher, you play a policenaut 


charged with breaking up an illegal trade in biomodes - 
human corpses kept alive so that organs can be taken 
from them for transplant operations. The game running 
at the show was still Japanese-language, but an English 
version is apparently in production and will probably cut 
some of the gore from the original. (Spring '95) 

MECC 

This educationally-minded software house is well estab¬ 
lished in the PC market, Oregon Trail being probably its 
best known title. 

DinoPark Tycoon: Basically a variation on the Theme 
Park concept with dinosaurs instead of rollercoasters to 
manage. The financial planning is certainly educational, 
but whether it'll have the pizzazz to compete with 
Bullfrog's classic is open to question. (Spring '95) 

MAGNET INTERACTIVE 
STUDIOS 

This is a company with a cool reputation, originally 
beginning as an Apple Mac graphics shop before mov¬ 
ing on to Silicon Graphics. Its main business is slick 
interactive presentations for mega-corporations, but 
recently its started developing games. The original idea 
was for M/sTstyle adventures, but last year they took on 
five of MicroProse's top games designers making this a 
company to watch. 

Icebreaker. A sci-fi action-strategy game. 

MINDSCAPE/SSI 

Both these American companies have a proud history of 
innovative game design, SSI being renowned for its 
sophisticated strategy games while Mindscape was > 


3D0 Magazine 17 February 1995- 


3DO 











feature 


00 

O 

O 


> an early backer of 16-bit technology. Last year, 
however, they both become British with Mindscape 
being the first purchase of the enormous multimedia 
conglomerate, Pearsons, which also owns The Financial 
Times, a TV company and Future Publishing. As a con¬ 
sequence Mindscape/SSI have become major players 
and much will be expected of them toward the end of 
1995. 

Panzer General: Already heavily acclaimed on PC, 
this^classic strategy game is being upgraded for 3DO 
with authentic WWII film footage, music and sound 
effects. The main campaign puts you in the distinctly 
dubious jackboots of a German general with an all new 
tank group. You must spearhead the German advance, 
from Poland in 1939 right through to American shores 
in 1945. Besides the overall campaign, there are 35 
scenarios which can be played from either the Allied or 
Axis side. 

The detail is incredible, with no less 350 unit types 
"from Tiger tanks to B-17 Flying Fortresses', and hard¬ 
core strategy fans won't be able to resist. Judging from 
the playability of the PC version, even non fans would 
be advised to give it a go. (April 1995) 

Slayer 2: After the warm reception for the original, 
SSI have promised another is definitely on the way for 
late 1995. (TBA) 


PANASONIC 

The company behind the very first 3DO unit has proved 
surprisingly adept at picking up titles to support its sys¬ 
tem. With PC smash SAysf on the way, and SF//X already 
out, Panasonic is definitely a publisher to watch. 

6/OS Fear: Biological Inorganic Operating System 
failure is the full moniker for this ecologically-minded 
strategy game. You're in charge of preserving Earth's 
last remaining resources, including its humans!, before 
total collapse. Developed by the tiny start-up Sense Net, 
this represents an unusual pick-up for Panasonic. 
(Summer '95) 

Fun 'n' Games: An oddball compilation of old clas¬ 
sics. (Spring '95) 

Th e Daed aleus Encounter. This boasted probably the 
most stunning graphics of the show. Okay, it's just more 
FMV eye candy and all interaction was lost due to a last- 
minute glitch, but the scrolling demo still looked very 
good, very stylish and very interesting. If you must do 
FAAV, this is the way to do it with real acting talent such 
as True Lies star TIa Carrere, movie-quality special 
effects and an imaginative plot. The latter has you as 
one of three survivors of an intergalatic war in the 22nd 
century. While you're encased in a mechanical probe, 
your friends Ari (Tia) and Zack are free to move around 
the alien spaceship you've taken refuge on As you 
guide them around, numerous bizarre aliens and unusu¬ 
al hazards crop up presenting various novel puzzles. 
Boasting the unconvincing tagline; 'The Ultimate 
Interactive Science Fiction Adventure' it actually appears 
worthy of investigation - let's hope Digital Pictures take 
note for one. (Spring '95) 

Wicked J 8: Panasonic's slick golf engine gets reused 
for yet another round of 18. (Spring '95) 

PIXIS ENTERTAINMENT, INC 

Set up in February 1992, Pixis sees itself more as a 
'technology company' than anything else. However, with 
titles such as Virtual Vixens and Space Sirens on Mac 
and PC, its current technology seems to have a distinctly 
'adult' edge. The company claims more conversions of 
its PC output to 3DO are planned, although whether 
they'll ever see the light of day in the UK is uncertain. 




NeuroDancer The scenario suggests a bit more wit 
than your usual 'adult' title with the player hacking into 
cyberspace to access glimpses of its eponymous charac¬ 
ters. Whether or not there is actually any gameplay 
remains to be seen, although the company does profess 
to be interested in branching out into mainstream games 
eventually. (Soon) 

PSYGNOSIS 

Established as a cutting edge company, devoted to the 
then new 16-bit formats Psygnosis has acquired a repu¬ 
tation for stunning intros and spectacular graphics. In 
1994 it was acquired by Sony as part of its preparations 
for the launch of the PlayStation. Perhaps for this reason 
the company has no plans to release any of its Japanese 
or American 3DO releases in Europe. 

Lemmings Chronicles: It's ironic that Psygnosis's most 
famous game is by an outside developer DAAA, who are 
now committed to Ultra64. This latest Lemmings epic 
may well be their last, with the next 3D instalment being 
handled by another developer (Soon) 

ROCKET SCIENCE 
GAMES, INC. 

Of all the videogame companies in all the world . Rocket 
Science is without a shadow of a doubt the hippest, most 
coolest of them all Even without actually releasing a 
great game, as yet 

See, the thing with Rocket Science begins with the 
chutzpah of the name - 'hey. whiz-kid, you think you're 
a locket scientist?' - to the best ads since Ultimate: Play 


The Game, to the biggest collection of 
Names in videogame history. If you're 
a movie freak, how about Ron Cobb? - 
the design genius who sketched out the 
ship design of Alien, the cantina of 
Star Wars, Marscapes in Total Recall 
and underwater hardware in Abyss. 
Like special effects? How about Rich 
Cohen, the wizard who at ILM made 
you gasp over T2 and Total Recalls 
Okay, maybe you just want 
videogame designers like Brian 
Moriaty (Loom, Zork, Trinity) and 
David Fox (Indiana Jones and the Last 
Crusade, Zak McKracken, Labyrinth). 

It's a dream company, dreamed up 
by 26-year-old Peter Barrett, the techie 
Name who invented Cinepak while 
working at SuperMac, plus various other whiz kid stuff. 
When he left to set up Rocket Science, investors such as 
Sega and BMG were eager to invest millions of dollars. 
At the heart of Barrett's prospectus was a commitment to 
CD-ROM technology, hi-tech production and platform 
independence As a close friend of many people at 
3DO, and an admirer of their achievements, the deci 
sion to support the format was virtually inevitable. 

All Rocket Science's games are produced using 
'Game Science', which essentially consists of two soft¬ 
ware tools. 'Game Composer' is an application with 
which even the relatively inexperienced can sketch out a 
game design, optimising it to minimise pauses of CD 
accessing. When a game is complete, the 'Game 
Compiler' tool is used to rework it for the various differ 
ent platforms. When the company announced it would 
release two games for 3DO, it essentially committed to 
adding a 3DO routine to Game Compiler Barrett 
expects this to take around three months, after which 
3DO conversions will be almost automatic. 

Also unveiled at the show was Flying Aces, a WWI 
FMV spectacular co-developed with people behind 
Sega's Tomcat Alley. It looks fun, but Barrett admits the 
emphasis on FMV isn't ideal and mainly reflects the limi¬ 
tations of its initial target formats: Mega-CD and PC CD- 
ROM. Rocket Boy and Darkride show the company 
eager to progress. The former is an isometric arcade 
adventure, its eponymous hero rocketed onto a surreal 
planet packed with bizarre puzzles and hazards. 
Darkride looks even more weird, shooting the player 
into the screen at sixty frames per second - the fastest 


3D0 Magazine 18 February 1995" 
















update possible on conventional TVs. It's a rollercoaster 
ride through graphics which appear to have been lifted 
from an Acid house rave. And finally there's Obsidian, 
a A4/s^style "techno-spiritual" adventure game with a 
truly eerie atmosphere. An impressive line-up for sure, 
but just a hint of what's to come once the 32-bit genera¬ 
tion is established, promises Barrett. 

Loadstar: The Legend of Tally Bodine: The debut title 
is a Digital Pictures-type FMV special, a Sewer Shark riff 
which has the player on lunar rails as he delivers dan¬ 
gerous contraband. For a game of its genre, the Mega- 
CD version proved fairly playable and Ron Cobb's 
design work is gorgeous. The company's wit also comes 
through in cut scenes such as the death sequence show¬ 
ing the player's face stripped down to a screaming skull! 
- and it should look a lot sharper on 3DO. 

Cadillacs and Dinosaurs: The Second Cataclysm: 
Another into-the-screen, FMV-blaster, only this time the 
future is Xenozoic with you at the wheel of Cadillac, 
blasting its way through a dinosaur infested rainforest. 
Based on the hip Mark Schultz graphic novel, which has 
already spawned a coin-op, the visuals are distinctive 
and attractive. 

RUNANDGUN!, INC 

Founded almost three years ago, by a trio of graduates 
from Rhode Island School of Design, the company's 
main business is broadcast TV commercials and has 
plenty of expertise in 3D, computer and conventional 
animation. It's also diversifying into entertainment soft¬ 
ware and has worked with VictorMaxx developing 
games for their VR helmet. To get their own branded 
games out, the company has settled on 3DO for their 
debut title. Co-founder Tony Grossman believes it's a 
great platform with excellent support for developers like 
him. He sees his company's main advantages as its 
background in film production and narrative expertise - 
strong storytelling right through the entire game. 

Duellin' Fireman: A spectacular looking 50:50 mix of 
arcade action and interactive movie. Tony describes it as 
"an action-adventure comedy with plenty of energy", all 
set in a weird, mutated environment. (Summer 1995) 

'Another Project': No details on this one, except that 
it will be demo-ing at the E3 show in May. (TBA) 

SPECTRUM HOLOBYTE 

This American giant established a formidable reputation 
for sims with its Falcon series based on the F-16. Last 
year it bought up its long-time rival, MicroProse, and is 
a major player on PC. On other formats its been overly 
cautious, entering the Sega and Nintendo markets late. 
Its first title on 3DO was Sid Meier's CPU Bach, an 
almost foolhardly brave release so early in the system's 
life. Star Trek would appear a safer bet, but will it ever 
appear? 

Star Trek: The Next Generation: A World For All 
Seasons: While hardly 'new at CES', its appearance 
proves a now almost legendary title is still in develop¬ 
ment at least. Originally slated as one of the early 3DO 
releases, even making a star turn on an Equinox pro¬ 
gram years ago, its release has proved as elusive as 
Spock's death. Holobyte signed up with Viacom in 1991 
to produce ST. TNG videogames and hove been careful 
to develop separate games for each formats. If sufficient¬ 
ly successful each game, given its own episode-type title, 
could be converted to other formats. 

As in the Equinox program, the 3DO version contin¬ 
ues to be described as an 'interactive episode' with a 
branching plotline depending on player interaction. This 
sounds ominously like an FMV bore-athon, but also 


promised are action sequences - such as full-blown 
space battle, and 'virtual actors' that are 'unique... in 
electronic entertainment.' Depending on which character 
you choose, the game apparently plays considerably 
different. It certainly sounds intriguing, but all that was 
shown at CES was a slideshow of admittedly great 
screenshots. (Spring '95) 

STUDIO 3DO 

The 3DO Company's very own software house is a rela¬ 
tively small operation, its early efforts such as Monster 
Manor and Jurassic Park being published by other com¬ 
panies. Of late, however, the decision has been made to 
turn it into a major force driving forward the quality of 
3DO software development. While Station Invasion is an 
unofficial sequel to Twisted - a multimedia, multiplayer 
educational title designed to broaden the base of 3DO's 
appeal - the titles below are out-and-out action games. 
Written solely for the 3DO system with on-site advice 
from the system's designers, they look quite exceptional. 

BladeForce: The 3D, jetpacking blast-'em-up that was 
SkyVyper has a new, improved title. No graphics on 
show at the CES though. 

Killing Time: Not so much new, as renamed with 
Time2Die proving to already be copyrighted with some¬ 
one else. It's still basically a Doom clone, although 3DO 
allows for far higher res graphics - as is best illustrated 
by shooting a zombie with the body's snap back reac¬ 
tion and arcing blood proving gruesomely realistically. 
The graphics look as good in play as the early screen- 
shots. (Summer '95) 

TAITO 

Founded in 1953, Taito claims to be world's largest 
arcade manufacturer with 2,400 employees and 
turnover approaching a billion dollars a year. It may not 
have Namco's hi-tech reputation, but its commitment to 
gameplay is second to none with games such as the leg¬ 
endary Bubble Bobble series. Pang and the game which 
started the arcade craze: Space Invaders. For 1995 it 
plans to release games on every home format, including 
3DO. 

Pyramid Patrol: Originally a Laserdisc title, it spools 
most of its graphics off disc with shoot-'em-up arcade 
action overlaid on top. Cinepak makes for reasonably 
sharp graphics, while the PR is unusually honest in 
admitting the game offers 'uncomplicated play for 
beginning players.' (Soon) 

TIME-WARNER INTERACTIVE 

Time-Warner is one of the world's largest entertainment 
groups and has its fingers in numerous multimedia pies, 
including a substantial share in Atari. Its Interactive divi¬ 


sion was formed in 1984 out of Atari Games Corp, 
Tengen Inc and its own Interactive Group. Unsurprisingly 
with such a background, the division's first product was 
an arcade game... 

Primal Rage: Already packing them in the arcades, 
this bloodthirsty beat-'em-up was designed as a corpo¬ 
rate flagship which would be converted down to home 
platforms after its coin-op debut. The basic structure is a 
riff on SFII with seven dinosaur themed characters com¬ 
peting to rule the 'Urth'. The game's USP is its Ray 
Harryhausen look, the graphics being digitised from 
posing incredibly detail stop-motion models created by 
top Hollywood experts. The coin-op looks great and 
plays well, although when you launch a special move 
you do have to wait while it's carried out in suitably 
spectacular fashion. (Autumn '95) 

VIVID INTERACTIVE 

Despite its flaws, 3DO's FMV has won significant back¬ 
ing from the soft porn business which apparently sees it 
as adequate for digitised versions of their titles. Vivid is 
leading the way with no than eleven releases on the 
way, complete with titles such as Naked Reunion, 
Steamy Windows and the commendably direct Sex. 
Previous titles such as Blonde Justice had HM Customs 
concerned anyone could attempt to sell such tedious 
stuff, but they could yet manage to be banned. 

VIRIDIS CORPORATION 

Based in west LA, this is a 90 strong programming stu¬ 
dio which has been around for five years now. Co¬ 
founded by an Englishman, Lee Barnes, it originally con¬ 
centrated on CDi products with hits such as Draw 50 - 
an acclaimed drawing packaging developed with a 
Disney animator. Most recently it finished Zelda 
Adventure, its first stab at an ongoing series by Philips 
based on the famous Nintendo character. Viridis' pro¬ 
gram is yet to be released, but has already been called 
the platform's best title yet by CDi magazine. In 1994, 
the company branched out into PC CD-ROM with games 
such as Annatommy and Eco East Africa. Viridis has 
also developed a proprietary 3D polygon system, 
CyberCAD, which is being used for several PC CD-ROM 
titles and both 3DO projects... 

Dreamer: Although 3DO leaked the title at CES, 
Viridis still regard it as top secret while they negotiate 
with publishers. All they'll admit is that it's 3D and for 
gamers, not educationalists! (TBA) 

'Project X': Another supersecret 3D project, signed up 
by GoldStar at CES and due to be finished by Summer 
1995. (TBA) Dssw 


3DO Magazine 



Magazine! 


3D0 Magazine February 1995- 


3DO 













3D0 


feature 



-3D0 Magazine 20 February 1995- 














Goldstar 


Magazin^ 



3DO GPA lOlM 

Publisher: Goldstar © 0753 691888 Price: £399 Available: May 

And now there are two. The Panasonic FZ-1 3DO is to be joined by 
the smaller, sleeker Goldstar 3DO GPA lOlM. Dave Westley com¬ 
pares and contrasts, finding little to choose between the two. 


ecause the 3DO Company are exception¬ 
ally clever, they don't actually manufacture 
the 3DO consoles themselves, but allow 
third parties to license the hardware and 
manufacture it for them. It's all part of an 
ambitious plan to create a video gaming standard, to 
wipe out the inefficiency of competing formats so that all 
publishers and developers can work on one format 
(theirs, naturally). Empirical evidence that licensing tech¬ 
nology in this way will facilitate world domination isn't 
hard to find. What reigns supreme, with its claws into 
every business, and increasingly into every home? The 
PC of course. And who manufactures PCs? Everyone. 

Unfortunately the PC is positively geriatric, incapable 
of playing state-of-the-art games, and so increasingly 
irrelevant to gamesplayers wanting more than just the 
haze of VGA. It continues to be catered for because of 
one simple reason - the sheer volume of end users. 
Assuming that you're a businessman or woman with the 
primary intention of making money, which would you 
develop for - an under-powered, ageing format but with 
countless millions of users world-wide, or a young, pow¬ 
erful, thrusting format with only a million owners at the 
most? Obviously the former, the one that's going to 
leave your end-of-year, make-or-break, financial-report 
sitting snugly in the black. 

So the fact that the 3DO was released in the UK with 
any games at all was impressive. That 50 or more 
games were nearly ready or actually released seemed to 
defy simple economics. Or did it? 3DO isn't only the 
3DO Company, but the manufacturers as well. 
Companies that have already licensed the technology 
and are madly manufacturing the machines include both 
Panasonic (owned by Matsushita - the largest consumer 
electronics company in the world) and, most recently, 
the $40 billion GoldStar (the second largest consumer 
electronics company in the world (probably)). And you 
don't argue with backing like that. 

The first 3DO machine to be released was, of course, 
the Panasonic FZ-1, which, in contrast to consoles of the 
past, looks luxuriantly expensive. A matt black box and 
futuristic, contoured corners give it a highly distinctive 
edge. Added to its aesthetically pleasing externals is the 
internal, dual-speed CD-ROM drive capable of transfer¬ 
ring over 300k/s and, of course, the wondrously inge¬ 
nious technology of Needal and Mical. 

The Panasonic FZ-1 was joined, in November, by the 
GoldStar 3DO GPA lOlM, released, initially, into the 
US. It's now arriving officially into the UK, and lucky 
souls that we are, we've acquired one from GoldStar UK 
themselves. Though any room for improvements over the 


FZ-1 looked difficult to find, GoldStar have actually 
made one or two adjustments to the basic design to 
allow for a slightly more coherent and robust machine. 

Perhaps the most ingenious tweak is the creation of 
an internal area to plug the FMV module into (it has 
already been released in the States and it seems likely 
that GoldStar will be the first to release a FMV module 
into the UK). At the side of the GoldStar 3DO you'll find 
a flap that, when opened, reveals a small area complete 
with all of the relevant ports where the unit will fit snugly. 
Put the flap back on again afterwards and it will be 
completely out of sight - but not out of mind with all 
those films to watch. As well as being aesthetically more 
pleasing, it also removes the need for a second external 
power supply, as demanded by the Panasonic version. 

The CD-ROM drive itself is slightly more robust than 
Panasonic's, and looks less likely to suffer wear and 
tear. Technophobes might be put off by the fact that you 
have to push a CD down quite hard before it sits on the 
'spoke' properly, and that the 'reader' is exposed for all 
to see. That might make cleaning a little easier, but it will 
also mean the dirt will collect more quickly. 

The most important thing about the GoldStar CD- 
ROM drive, however, is that its access time is faster - 
250ms as opposed to 320ms. This doesn't affect the 
speed that a game will run (the transfer rate is the same) 
but how fast information pockets are found. A game will 
load up faster, as will FMV cut sequences. It isn't a radi¬ 
cal change, but a welcomed improvement nevertheless. 

The aesthetic differences are more pronounced than 
any technological ones. The GoldStar 3DO is two-tone 
grey with a silvery area surrounding the CD-ROM drive 
unit. The machine is smaller, more compact and slightly 
heavier. It looks more like something you'd include as 
part of a hi-fi system. Panasonic and GoldStar have 
gone for two very different 'looks' and opinion is split 
down the middle here as to which one is the nicest. The 
only part of the GoldStar system that we think is a little 
weak is the joypad, which has a nicer shape, but less 
responsive Left and Right buttons and a cheaper, more 
plasticy casing. 

In fact, there's so little difference between the two that 
people are more likely to be swayed by the bundled 
software, rather than any aesthetic or physical feature. 
The Panasonic FZ-1 comes with the respectable 
MegaRace and Total Eclipse. What the GoldStar will be 
packaged with has yet to be decided. In the US it's FIFA 
Soccer and Shock Wave, a line-up which, if repeated 
over here, may just give it the edge. □ dw 

3DO Magazine 



-3D0 Magazine 21 February 1995^ 


3DO 















feature 


[Magazine 


Prepare to be bombarded by o wide range of new 3DO joypads, 
these first arrivals receiving the official, 3DO Magazine bench test... 




hilst the standard 3DO Panasonic pad 
(£39.99) is sturdily built and fairly 
friendly, it doesn't ingratiate itself to 
fervent button bashers with its hard- 
edged A, B and C buttons. Whilst most 
recent (and forthcoming) machine joypads have taken 
inspiration from the brilliant Super Nintendo pad, the 
Panasonic standard has ignored the smooth, bevelled 
edges that made lengthy sessions on games (such as 
Super SFII Turbo) so pain free. Like any successful new 
platform though, the 3DO is being swamped with 
ergonomic re-stylings, and this is just a peek at some of 
the forthcoming pads that should be coming over here. 
It's best hanging on until all these peripherals are avail¬ 
able officially, as import prices can be prohibitive. 


Flightstick Pro 

Produced By CH Products, £TBA, Release Date: TBA 

This uses an analogue 
rather than digital 
mechanism, which 
means that it's rather 
nifty for flight sims - the 
further you push in a 
direction, the faster and 
further the response - 
so this should comple¬ 
ment games like Wing 
Commander III and 
Flying Nightmares 
rather well. It's an enormously heavy piece of hardware, 
the firm base making play sturdy with just one hand, 
and the finish is very pleasing. With three buttons and a 
trigger on the handle, throttle control on the left of the 
stick, centring controls on the right and four buttons on 
the case, this is great fun to use. A Y connector allows 
you to link with another joypad, and the whole thing 
feels gorgeous in play. However, we tried this out on 
Operation JumpGate, where the use of the left, rolling 
throttle dial for speed did cause some irritation if the 
shaft was moved too far to the left, effectively trapping 
the finger that's accelerating. Depending on its price this 
could be of great interest to flying addicts, but compati¬ 
bility must be checked beforehand. 

The 3DO 
Control Pod 

Produced By 3DO, CTBA, Release Date TBA 

Designed as a cheap second controller, dispensing with 
the chain port and headphones to provide an economy 
second-player pad. The triangular shape is fine to hold, 
and although the styling is rather ugly, with meaningless 
raised contours and bevels, it's very light and has a 
nice, smoothed cursor pad, which makes diagonals 



much less painful 
on the thumb. The 
small, round, top 
left and right but¬ 
tons are odd, but if 
this was offered at 
a price substantially 
less than the 
Panasonic stan¬ 
dard, it would make a perfectly acceptable second pad. 

GoldStar Pad 

Produced By GoldStar, £34.99, Release Date: February 

The GoldStar pad has the same, sleek colour and finish 
of the main unit (reviewed this month), and has the 
immediate appeal of being dramatically lighter than 
Panasonic's standard. Ergonomics and features are 
almost identical, with the GoldStar slightly more curvy 
and slimmer, but with more pronounced top left and 
right buttons. The A, B, C and Start/Stop buttons are 
smaller but fine to use, and feel slightly cleaner to jab at, 
with headphones, chain link and volume controls in the 
same positions. The only significant improvement is the 
cursor pad, which has a much shallower indention on 
the cursors them¬ 
selves on a circular, 
responsive disc, 
which makes diag¬ 
onals easier to 
achieve. This cer¬ 
tainly doesn't feel 
quite as robust as 
the military style 
Panasonic, the main casing seam around the centre of 
ours didn't seem that secure, but as a stand alone pur¬ 
chase, it's perfectly serviceable and enjoyable to use, 
and at the price, a great bargain. 

Phase 9 F40 

Produced By Euromax, £39.99, Release Dale: TBA 

This joypad is almost identical in shape to the standard 
SNES classic, with an upraised, responsive cross-shaped 
cursor, smooth, slim moulding and responsive buttons. 
Euromax have moved the shoulder buttons down onto 
the main pad, with an extra Start button also there, 

putting all six, 
colour coded and 
lettered buttons in 
two rows of three. 
Every button 
required for SSFIIX 
in easy reach, an 
immediate and wel¬ 
come advantage 





over the standard pad. The six autofire click switches are 
handy for performing basic moves repeatedly, but the 
slow motion facility (which works by flicking pause on 
and off, rapidly) is pretty hit and miss, and certainly 
didn't prove that effective on any of the games we tried 
it on. The lack of normal shoulder buttons must also be 
born in mind on games like Need For Speed, where the 
re-positioning of gear buttons on the pad face makes 
play almost impossible, but a second version of this joy¬ 
pad with shoulder buttons to address the problem is like¬ 
ly. With no chain link, two Super SFIIX addicts can't 
both use the F40, which is a shame, so if you're hooked 
on this particulat joypad, hang on for a while and wait 
for a shoulder buttoned version to arrive at a similar 
price. It would be a better buy. 

FZ-JJIXP 

Produced by Capcom/Panasonic, £29.99, Release 
Date: out now 

This long awaited six-button joypad, designed by 
Capcom and very much trumpeted as the ultimate acces¬ 
sory to Super SFIIX, is absolutely gorgeous. Sturdily built 
yet very light, the novel, vertical position of the cursor 
pad shaft, with the six buttons positioned at a right 
angle, is an absolute delight to hold, with comfortable 
grip indentations down the back of the shaft. The button 
section is angled so that either thumb or fingers can be 
used, and whilst it takes a while to adjust, you'll soon be 
mastering that game with new found confidence and 
skill. The cursor pad is softer than the Panasonic, and 
very responsive with two extra Start/Stop buttons above 
the cursor, and the six control buttons intelligently posi¬ 
tioned in two lines of three, with Left, Right and Play but¬ 
tons on top. As with the Euromax pad. Need For Speed 
isn't going to work to well without shoulder buttons, but 
a significant improvement over the Euromax controller is 
the addition of a pass connector in a Y with the normal 
connector, so that you can join up with another Capcom 
pad, essential for fans. 

This is great for most games once you get used to it - 
we enjoyed FIFA a lot on it - and at the price, it's both a 
bargain and the best custom pad around. □ mew 



3DO Magazine 


3D0 Magazine 22 February 1995 













3D0 


survey 


[Magazine 


Readership 



Well we've finished our second issue now and, by the time you read this, we will be well into our third - 
more than enough time for you to have cogitated and deliberated on the merits of 3DO Magazine. If you 
have any opinions about the way the magazine should be heading, please fill in this survey. We want to 
produce the perfect magazine for you and we can only adapt if we get feedback. Please send your sur¬ 
veys to 3DO Magazine, Durham House, 124 Old Christchurch Road, Bournemouth, BH1 INF. 


1 • Your Name 

2. Your address 


10 • How do you think we could improve the magazine generally? 


3. Are you Male □ or Female? □ . 

4. How old are you?. 

5. What is your occupation? . 11. What do you dislike the most about the magazine? 

6 . If you are a student, what are you studying?. 


Z. How much does your household earn a year? 
5-1 Ok □ 10-15k □ 15-20k □ 20-30k □ 30+ □ 
8 . How do you rate the sections of the magazine 


12 • what games are you most looking forward to being released? 


Cover 

Good 

□ 

Average 

□ 

Poor 

□ 

Previews 

□ 

□ 

□ 

News 

□ 

□ 

□ 

Reviews 

□ 

□ 

□ 

Letters 

□ 

a 

□ 

Features 

□ 

a 

□ 

Interviews 

□ 

□ 

□ 

A-Z 

□ 

□ 

□ 

Tips 

□ 

□ 

□ 

9. Is there any 

other section that 

you'd particularly like to see? . . 


13 • Are there any features you'd particularly like to see? 


14 • What kind of games do you most like? . 


15. Would you prefer to pay £2.95 □ for a magazine with no CD, or £4.95 
□ for a magazine with CD? 

16 • Will you buy the FMV module when it arrives? . 

17. Would you like a VideoCD section when the module arrives?. 


18. Would you buy a 3DO Modem? 


3D0 Magazine 23 February 1995 










































survey 



[Magazine 


19. Do you own a surround sound hi-fi system? If not, are you thinking about Credit Card 

buying one?. Personal Pension 

. Mortgage 

20 • Do you use your 3DO to ploy music CDs on? . Loon 

21 . what is the peripheral you most want to own? . Health Insurance 

. House Insurance 

22. What computer or consoles do you most want to own? . Life Insurance 


□ 

□ 

□ 

□ 

□ 

□ 

□ 


23. Which 3DO model do you own? 
PAL Panasonic □ 


NTSC Panasonic 
Creative Labs 
3DO Blaster 
NTSC Goldstar 


□ 

□ 

□ 

□ 


32 • Do you smoke? If so, which brand? 

33 • What magazines do you read? 

Edge □ 

Gamesworld Q 

Gamesmaster □ 

C&VG □ 

CD-ROM Magazine □ 


24 • where do you buy your hardware? . Any other(s)? . 

25. Where do you buy your software? . 34, Are you a subscriber to 3DO Magazine? If not, why not? 

26. Do you intend to by any of the following in the next 12 months: . 


TV 

□ 

Cable 

□ 

Video 

□ 

Satellite 

□ 

Car 

□ 

Hi-Fi 

□ 


35. If you don't own a 3DO are you going to purchase one? If not why not? 


36 • Are you interested in purchasing any other console? If so, which one(s) 


27 • What daily newspapers do you read? . . 

. ' . 37. Where do you buy your: 

28 • What Sunday newspapers do you read? . Videos . 

. CDs . 

29 • How many times in the last two years have you been abroad? . Tapes . 

30 • What travel company do you use?. Clothes . . 

. Footware. 

31 • Of the following, what do you have? 38. Which cinema do you go to? 


3 DO Magazine 24 February 1995 














































NEED FOR SPEED 

35.99 


ROAD RASH 

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FIFA SOCCER ALONE IN THE DARK 

35.99 25.99 


WING COMM 

32.99 



JOHN MADDEN 

32.99 

• = NEW ITEM 

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OR POSTED ORDERS. PLEASE 
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3D ATLAS • . 

ALONE IN THE DARK 
ANOTHER WORLD• 
BATTLECHESS* ... 

CYBERCLASH* . 

DEMOLITION MAN 


..29.99 

..30.99 

..39.99 

..33.99 

..34.99 


DIGITAK DREAMWARE •.18.99 

DRAGON • .30.99 

DRAGON’S LAIR .34.99 

ELEVENTH HOUR (18) • .34.99 

ESCAPE FROM 

MONSTER MANOR .35.99 

FAMILY FEUD* .34.99 


OFF WORLD INT. VIRTUOSO 

28.99 34.99 

FIFA SOCCER . 

FLASHBACK * . 

FLYING NIGHTMARES* 

GEX * . 

GRIDDERS* . 

50.99 HELL (18)* . 

INCREDIBLE MACHINE*.35.99 

JOHN MADDEN 3DO .32.99 

MEGA RACE .41.99 

NEED FOR SPEED * 35.99 

NIGHT TRAP .28.99 

OFF WORLD INTERCEPTOR * 34.99 

PATAANK * 34.99 

POWERSLIDE .34.99 

QUARANTINE* .34.99 

REBEL ASSAULT* .35.99 

RISE OF THE ROBOTS * .39.99 

ROAD RASH 3DO .35.99 


..25.99 

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MONSTER MANOR THE HORDE 

34.99 34.99 

.35,99 SAMURAI SHODOWN * .32,99 

SEWER SHARK .28.99 

SHERLOCK HOLMES .35.99 

SHOCKWAVE .38.99 

SLAYER* .33.99 

SOCCER KID 3DO * 29.99 

SPACE ACE *.39.99 

SPACE SHUTTLE * .30.99 

STAR CONTROL 2 .34.99 

SUPER WING COMMANDER 32.99 

THE HORDE .34.99 

THEME PARK .39.99 

TOTAL ECLIPSE .34.99 

TWISTED .32.99 

VIRTUOSO .34.99 

WAY OF THE WARRIOR * .. .32.99 

WORLD CUP GOLF • .32.99 

ALL GENUINE UK PRODUCTS 



TELEVISIONS 

SONY KVM1400 14” FST 
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AND FREE SCART LEAD. 

SONY KVM1400 (GREY) .194.99 

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SONY KVWI1401BL (TELETEXT) .244.99 

FREE SCART LEAD 

PLEASE STATE AMIGA, CD32, ST, 3DO, 

SNES, JAGUAR OR MEGADRIVE 1 OR 2. 


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FIFA . 

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OFF WORLD INTERCEPTOR 

TOTAL ECLIPSE . 

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NEED FOR SPEED. 

THE HORDE. 

STAR CONTROL II . 

PATAANK. 

WING COMMANDER. 

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|. MADDEN. 

REBEL ASSAULT. 


.£39.99 

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MAD DOG 2.£44.99 

NOVASTORM .£44.99 

OPERATION jUMPGATE.£29.99 

SLAYER .£29.99 

SHUTTLE.£24.99 

STARBLADE.£49.99 

V.R. STALKER.£44.99 

WAIALAECOLF .£44.99 

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feature 


Biemory Matters 


To enable players to save games, the 3DO has 32K of 
Non-Volatile RAM (NVRAM). Initially The 3DO 
Company regarded this as so generous - a CD32 has 
just 1 K - that they couldn't foresee it being used up. 
Then came The Horde, with its numerous, memory-gulp¬ 
ing save games and a memory editor program was 


hastily cooked up. This comes on the disk supplied with 
your 3DO and is much more flexible than most of the 
memory editors many games come with - The Horde's 
only option is to wipe every single other game's saves! 
Panasonic's FZ-10 actually comes with a memory editor 
program built-in, but one drawback with them all is the 


way the save files describe themselves. While 
'NightTrap' is perfectly clear, our own Interactive 
Sampler is rather obscure with 'S3'. So in association 
with The 3DO Company itself, here's our cut out and 
keep guide to NVRAM file names. You never know 
when it might come in handy. 


NVRAM 

File Name Description 

Title Name 


LaunchOrionOffroad 

LaunchOrionOffroad 

3DO Interactive Title Sampler 1 


S3P 

S3P 

3DO Interactive Title Sampler 1 


Slayer Game 

AD&D Slayer 

Slayer 


alone 1 .save 

Alone 1 Save 

Alone In The Dark 


acd.playlist 

Audio CD&G 

acd.playlist 


cpubach 

cpu.dta 

CPU Bach Information 


CNBTESTSAVE 

Cras'n Burn 

CNBTESTSAVE 


RH_HAUZERJ 

RH_HAUZERJ 

Dr Hauzer 


MonsterManorDataMonster 

Manor Data 

Monster Manor 


FireBall.JDW 

FireBalLJDW 

Fire Ball 


hand_ch4_reika_data 

hand_ch4_reika_data 

Ghost Hunter 


MC_PKING_0 

MC_PKING_0 

Guardian War 


MC_PKING_OJ 

MC_PKING_OJ 

Powers Kingdom 


EAJMF94JAP 

EA JMF94 Japanese 

John Madden Football (Japanese) 


EAJMFB94 

EA JMFB94 

John Madden Football 


EAJMFB94_ 

GREATS EA JMFB94 GREATS 

John Madden Football 


jpieasyhighscores 

JPI easy high scores 

Jurassic Park Interactive 


jpihardhighscores 

JPI hard high scores 

Jurassic Park Interactive 


jpimedhighscores 

JPI medium high scores 

Jurassic Park Interactive 


jpisavedgames 

JPI saved games 

Jurassic Park Interactive 


PIV_KURAM1J 

PIV KURAAAAIJ 

Kyoto Mysteries 


maddog 

Mad Dog McCree 

Mad Dog McCree 


NightTrap.02 

Night Trap 02 

Night Trap 


nitetrap.inf 

Night Trap info 

Night Trap 


KE_HAODEN_lJ 

KE HAODEN IJ 

Nobunaga Haouden 


V_NONTAN_OOJ 

V NONTAN OOJ 

Nontan Volume one 


TE_PRcfgJ 

TE PRcfg J 

Pararancho Incredible Machine 


TE_PR_1J 

TE PR IJ 

Pararancho Incredible Machine 


TE_Pebble_2J 

TE Pebble 2J 

Pebble Beach Golf Links 


TE_Pebble_#l 

TE Pebble #1 

Pebble Beach Golf Links 


MC_PUPPETJ 

MC PUPPET J 

Puppet Tales 


REALPinbalUDW 

REAL Pinball JDW 

Real Pinball 


EA_RR1 

Road Rash 1 

Road Rash 


PHARAOH 1 

Pharaoh 1 

Seal Of The Pharaoh 


Holmes3DOGames 

Holmes 3DO Games 

Sherlock Holmes 


Holmes3DOSetup 

Holmes3DOSetup 

Sherlock Holmes 


EA_SkWvO 

EA ShockWave 0 

ShockWave 


sockid.hi 

Soccer Kid hi-scores 

Soccer Kid 


sockid.save 

Soccer Kid saves 

Soccer Kid 


stellar7.dat 

Stellar 7 Data 

Stellar 7 


stellar/.fame 

Stellar 7 Fame 

Stellar 7 


swc_game.O 

SWC Game 0 

Super Wing Commander 


swc_game.Oe 

SWC Game 0 

Super Wing Commander 


swc_highscore 

SWC H igh Scores 

Super Wing Commander 


SY-TETSU-IJ 

SY-TETSU-IJ 

Tetsujin 


aaaaa.tim 

The Incredible Machine 

The Incredible Machine 


tim.cfg 

The Incredible Machine 

The Incredible Machine 

CO 

SC_GORAKU_lJ 

SC_GORAKU_lJ 

Theatre Wars 

hand_ch4_rei ka_data 

hand ch4 reika data 

Virtual Puppet 

M 

TE_Waialae_l 

Way Scores 

Way Of The Warrior 

W 

wsjr 

WSJR 

Who Shot Johnny Rock 

o 

KE_WINPOS_lJ 

KE_WINPOS_lJ 

Winning Post 




1 1 Magazine) 


3D0 Magazine 26 February 1995 















3D0 


feature 


[Magazine 


Wing Commander III 

3DO KiUed the PC Star 


While Wing Commander III failed by a whisker to make it to 3DO Magazine for review this month, we've 
still managed to collate some vital information to whet your seemingly insatiable appetites. The follow¬ 
ing missive is from Brent Thole (Origin's technical lead on the project) and was discovered by our info- 
nauts, floating through the information superhighway. 




Every shot on this 
page is from the 
gome, not the intro. 
Note the neat explo¬ 
sion and FMV on 
your cockpit display. 
As the Kilrathi rants 
at you, a reflection 
hits the screen. 


"You've also got the fact that the 3DO 
operating system was designed with CD- 
ROM in mind, unlike the PC's MS DOS. 

We can load graphics and sound while 
the player is doing something else, making 
the 'apparent' load times much, much 
faster in the 3DO version. 

"The way people use 3DO machines is 
considerably different from the way peo¬ 
ple use PCs. 3DOs are in people's living 
rooms, hooked up to a decent stereo and 
big TV screens, giving the game more of a 
cinematic feel. There's also the fact that the 
3DO version has no install program, you 
just put in disc one and play! No autoex¬ 
ec.bat, no config.sys, no extended memo¬ 
ry hassles, no SMARTDRV, no configura¬ 
tion conflicts! 

"Overall, both versions are excellent and fun to play 
and we hope people enjoy them both. The 3DO version 
will ship on 4CDs, probably some time in February." 

3DO magazine also managed to track down Joye 
McBurnett, the project leader for Wing Commander III 
and asked her to compare the two versions. Like Brent 
Thale she agreed that while the PC had the muscle, all of 
the sophisticated and dextrous moves belonged to the 
3DO. "In terms of raw processing power, the 3DO is no 
match for a Pentium PC. For this reason we had to 
reduce the number of faces on each polygonal object. 
However, when It comes to video, the 3DO is clearly the 
winner. The 3DO version features a screen resolution of 
320x240 (interpolated to 640x480) and 16-bit colour 


(65536 colours), while the PC version, in SVGA mode, 
provides a resolution of 640x480 and 8-bit colour (256 
colours). Currently, the PC version space flight in SVGA 
on a Pentium averages around 12-15 frames per sec¬ 
ond. The 3DO version currently averages around 20 
frames per second, and may improve before release." 

So there you have it. The definitive childish question 
answered by the impartial experts. Both the PC and the 
3DO system versions have their strengths and their 
weaknesses, but it seems safe to say that those of you 
who are looking for an integrated, cinematic experience 
would be best to buy a 3DO, a whopping great big tele¬ 
vision, a surround-sound hi-fi, a comfy sofa and then 
collapse to enjoy those pseudo sound effects whooshing 
to the left, to the right and even from the deep space 
behind you... □ dw 

3DO Magazine 


e've noticed quite a bit of speculation 
about whether the upcoming 3DO ver¬ 
sion of Wing Commander III will be 
'better' than the PC version. The PC and 
the 3DO are such different platforms 
that both versions have their own strengths and weak¬ 
nesses. The PC requires a very expensive and powerful 
computer to run at its very best [a P60 minimum, with at 
least 8Mb of RAM for SVGA display], enabling it to do 
some really fancy polygonal graphics - like 800-face 
ship meshes, that the current 3DO isn't capable of doing 
so quickly. So, the 3DO version uses polygonal meshes 
that are texture-mapped in real-time, just like the PC ver¬ 
sion, but simpler. 

"Other than that the 3DO version has a lot of fea¬ 
tures that the PC version doesn't have. All of the music in 
the 3DO version is CD-quality, digital stereo music, as 
opposed to mostly mono sound in the PC version. All of 
the cinematic sequences were mixed in Dolby Surround 
Sound for the 3DO version, while the space flight por¬ 
tion of the game uses a very cool, pseudo 3D sound sys¬ 
tem that places 3D sounds all around you, both off to the 
right and the left, even behind you - just using front 
speakers! Also, all of the music was re-recorded on our 
composer's favourite Kurzweil synth, giving the 3DO 
version more body and feeling, especially when com¬ 
pared to SoundBlaster on the PC. 

"The 3DO version also uses 16-bit colour so there is 
less colour-banding and richer colour in general, while 
instead of green-screen VDU graphics you get full- 
colour. Since the 3DO standard uses all of the disc 
space on a CD, we were also able to include extra 
footage that had to be cut away from the PC version, 
including some plot-critical screens that explain why 
some characters do what they do in the game. 


3D0 Magazine 27 February 1995 













3D0 


feature 


[Magazine 


When it first appeared on the PC, Cyan's Myst set the adventure community alight with its breathtaking 
imagery and intriguing puzzles. The 3D0 version is due out in the Spring, but Panasonic granted us an 
exclusive sneak preview to blow us away... 




lot of games claim to have created 
believable, alternate worlds, but few 
have ever created something as tangible 
and emotionally depth-charged as 
Cyan's A/l/sf.. To say that the game is 
composed of over 2,500 rendered images, 40 minutes 
of original music and 66 minutes of animation, goes 
some way to illustrate the intricacies that exist within its 
binary walls - Robyn and Rand Miller, the game's cre¬ 
ators, apparently spent months designing the numerous 
worlds, sketching pictures and going over puzzles. Said 
Robyn: "I have always been very interested in the rich¬ 
ness of things. We would build an incredible amount of 
detail into our models; include everything up to the tini¬ 
est screw or nail." 

The first images SAysf brings encapsulate that fact. 
The Miller brothers' world is so immaculate that no mat¬ 
ter how many CDs Panasonic eventually duplicate, you 
can't help but think that you're the only person to have 
inhabited this perfect place. A tiny, intricately detailed 
bird swoops and circles in the distance, baroque, 
incredibly complex, perfectly detailed buildings surround 
you while a clear blue sea, light glinting off its mercurial 
surface, lies just to the east of you. 

And all the while a tangled web of sound softly dap¬ 
ples at your ears - the bird cheeping, the sea lapping - 
all the more remarkable for the fact that the designers 
were originally dubious about the association of sound 
and computer games: "We didn't want music interfer¬ 
ing with the gameplay. When we finally did a couple of 
songs, though, we realised it didn't have to sound like 
Super Mario Brothers." 

A quasi-graphic adventure, Myst features no people 
as such, the player is left to roam seemingly deserted 


worlds, only occasionally meeting disem¬ 
bodied voices through the various books 
he/she discovers. The game begins with 
such a voice, detailing the loss of a heavy 
tome and its subsequent fall into 'the 
wrong hands'. You actually watch the 
book floating ever downwards against a 
sea of black, its flapping pages illustrating 
the words of the narrator. Eventually it 
lands and the pages settle on an isolated 
picture. Your cursor becomes free to roam 
and the player can click upon the picture, 
zooming into the weird, yet wonderful 
world of Myst through this magical 
process. 

Such books are at the game's core. 

Through them you travel into new worlds, 
meet more disembodied characters and generally 
attempt to make the unfathomable, fathomable. They 
also provide access to all-important information, notably 
that the various worlds of Myst were created by Atrus 
through his writing. You'll also discover that Atrus had a 
wife, Catherine who, through her feminine intuition no 
doubt, was wary of his creations. There were also two 
sons, Sirrus and Achenar who, we later find, have 
caused a great deal of trouble and are now imprisoned 
in two large books in the library. The odd thing (or one 
of the odd things) is that no matter how much you're told 
within these weighty tomes - you never feel as though 
you know anything, discovery and understanding 
always seems a problem away. 

Gameplay within Myst consists of puzzles, or more 
specifically IQ tests, just as idiosyncratic as the game's 
graphics. The solution to each of the tasks is dependent 


upon working out and performing sequences, and layers 
of other problems and riddles, each connecting and 
interweaving to enable you to keep moving. Sometimes 
you'll think a particular problem will never end, before 
one simple crowning act sets off a chain reaction and 
you're thrust into the next, exciting alternate world of 
Myst. 

On the PC, Myst set the adventure world alight. 
LucasArts may well have produced the definitive graphic 
adventure in Day Of The Tentacle, but Cyan just created 
their very own principality from nowhere, subverting 
what had been done before and creating a rival, twisted 
genre of their own. A truly rich experience, all games- 
players worth their salt should give Myst a try as soon as 
they possibly can... □ dv/ 

3DO Magazine 



1 


V 

/ 






Cyan have some- 
howe made each 
still look as if it's a 
24-bit image. A lot 
of problems revolve 
around clocks, right. 
Getting the correct 
time on this one will 
produce o bridge for 
you to travel on. 



3DO Magazine 28 February 1995 















interactive entertainment's nev/ world standard 




Commander HI 

The $6 Million Game Arrives 

Need For Speed, Slayer, 

Samurai Shodown, FIFA, 

Theme Park, PaTaank, 

Pr«view8 include: Gex, 

Cyber Clash, Space Hulk, 

Flying N^htmaies, Rebel 

Assault & more. HHI^IHEr ^E^ii9HE9H 


interactive 


WIN A 3DO System 
& World Cup Golf 
from U.S. Gold 


Off-World Interceptor 


3DO Magazine is the only British publication 
dedicated to the machine of tomorrow, and future 
issues will guarantee even more coverage of 
everything and anything related to this exciting 
new format. Demand for the launch issue has been 
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recommend you fill in this 
subscription form and send it back to us. 

Everyone wants a slice of the future, and only 
3DO Magazine from Paragon Publishing 
delivers... 


NB: Due to fantastic response from software houses^ we expect every issue 
to come with a cover CD demo. Issue One^s subscription offer, based on 
the issue coming without a disc, was therefore closed on February 9th. 



-Magazine 

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3D0 


reviews 




INDEX 

Demolition Man 32 

★ ★★★ 

Family Feud 34 

★ 

Incredible Machine 50 

★ ★★★ 


Iron Angel 37 

★ ★ 

Jammit 46 

★★★ 

Rebel Assault 38 

★★★ 

Return Fire 51 

★★★★★ 

f 

Shanghai 36 

★ ★★ 

StarBlade 44 

'kif'kif 

Station Invasion 48 

★★★ 




ere at 3DO Magazine, you can be sure our 
scores are delivered after hours of painful 
deliberation, often v/ith experts from other 
magazines called in to 


help on specialist titles. 
However, they are only a guide 
and we're not infallible: other 
people may have different opin¬ 
ions. You should also remember 
we are a totally independent mag¬ 
azine and our opinions should in 
no way be presumed to reflect those 
of The 3DO Company. 


% 




3DO? 

Magazine 


3DO Magazine ratings: 

★★★★★ Highly Recommended 

A particularly stunning title, bound to please everyone 
Generally Excellent 
A very impressive game that most people will love 
★★★ Very Good 
A solid, playable game which is good within its genre 

★★ Average 

May appeal to some, but approach with caution 

★ Poor 
A badly flawed title 


Operation JumpGate 42 

Virtuoso 54 

★ 

3D Atlas 40 


3D0 Magazine 31 February 1995 






















3D0 


review 



Publisher: Virgin® 0101 7148338710 Developer: In-house Save Game: Password system Price: £49.99 Available: Now 




Ithough the lavish production of 
Demolition Man is very much next genera¬ 
tion - the first videogame to use the fea¬ 
ture film's actors in special scenes on 
movie sets just to be used in the game - 
the format is reminiscent of the mid-eighties, 8-bit mega¬ 
games pioneered by Ocean. It's composed of multi-for¬ 
mat compilations with a variety of different genre types 
linked only in narrative (anti-actor Sly plays John 
Spartan, the heroic pursuer of super criminal Simon 
Phoenix - Snipes - both exiles of the twentieth century 
enjoying the wonder of the next millennium via cryo¬ 
genic freezing). The idea that everyone's bound to like 
at least one of the games available is understandable 
and with a tie-in to such a big hit, it's unsurprising that 
Virgin should be wary of alienating any paricular genre 
fans - road race game, beat-'em-up, Doom, Op-Wolf? 
- the B-movie action throws up many game possibilities, 
so Virgin have plumped for pleasing everyone with all 
four of the above. 

More than any other game, Demolition Man is 
packed with long scenes lifted out of the source movie - 
from the Blade Runner rip-off intro to endless snippets of 
action as reward for completing each section - and 
these add immensely to the atmosphere. The specially 
filmed sequences - with Sly wandering around roof-tops 
and the like - are also very well done, and go some way 
to convincing the player that this is a harmonious 
homogenisation of action. 

It seems unwise, however, that the first couple of lev¬ 
els to play are all Operation Wolf style games, as how¬ 
ever compulsive this type of action can be initially, it's 
still, essentially, extremely simplistic, and the cursor 
pointing blasting soon becomes wearisome. Despite the 
excellent quality of graphics, with brilliantly animated 
foes shooting and throwing grenades, an impresssive 
end level spacecraft hovering above the horizion it's not 
the sort of thing you really want to play on a drop-dead 
32-bit console, so it's a pleasant surprise when the 
action moves into a Doom variant. But whilst the graph¬ 


After the Mega-CD port disappointments of Nightrap and Sewer 
Shark, Virgin hove bounced bock onto the 3DO with on extremely 
expensive, and superbly produced license in which every lost dollar 
spent con be clearly seen. This is the future of video gomes. 

ics here are of a high stan¬ 
dard (although not as fast or 
smooth as Slayer) and the 
atmosphere is perfectly con¬ 
jured with superb sonics, the 
gameplay isn't really excit¬ 
ing enough in itself. You 
must follow Snipes through 
the large, anonymous tun¬ 
nels, wiping out batches of 
soldiers as your energy is 
slowly diminished. Yet 
despite the superb presenta¬ 
tion, play is, again, rather 
simplistic, with no objective 
other than getting to the end 
alive. The soldiers overpower 
through sheer numbers 
rather than tactics, and the Many sections of the game are connected via small/ digitised sequences 
fact that Snipes can take pot especially filmed for the game. Sly looks rock hard as he poses and struts 
shots at you but not be blast- sequences are very slickly directed, adding 


ed himself is hugely irritating. 

Frustratingly, technically, this is almost outstanding - the 
portable scanner that can be pulled up is nicley done, 
the sound is unbelievable, with Phoenix's laughter and 
taunts pulling you into deeper play - but there just isn't 
enough involvement or variety to make play convincing. 

Similarly, the beat-'em-up and driving portions of the 
game offer little in the way of interaction. The one-on- 
one fighting section is sub Rise Of The Robots for sophis¬ 
tication, with basic kick, punch and jump moves all 
played at a very slow pace. The setting, on top of two 
fast moving cars, is well realised, but play is tedious. 
Again, the high quality of the graphics and soundtrack 
only serve to emphasise the 
rather shallow gameplay. The 
driving section boasts smooth 
scrolling and delightfully ren¬ 
dered cars, but although the 
premise is a chase, in reality, 
threre's little to do other than 
avoid traffic. 

With each game type then, 
the excitement generated by 
progress is significantly dissipat¬ 
ed by the realisation that noth¬ 
ing's quite as good as you'd 
hoped. Certainly, there's no 
game here that could stand up 
by itself (although a simultane¬ 
ous two-player option on the 
Op-Wolf sections would have 
enhanced the package enor- 


enormously to the atmosphere. 

mously), but it's a testiment to the skillful intereaving of 
footage and stylish burning fades that this package 
remains so impressive, although in ambition rather more 
than realisation. 

This isn't to say that Demolition Man is bad, however. 
Whilst each sub-game is rather simplistic, this doesn't 
mean they're not engaging, and throughout, the sublime 
presentation and unbelievable techophile gloss make 
play a curious combination of wonder and disappoint¬ 
ment. This is how games should look, and sound, and 
certainly, the anticipation for seeing new bits of footage 
is a sucessful hook to battle on through some pretty 
tough levels (even on the easiset setting, the rooftop and 
tunnels sections are seriously challenging). Throughout, 
you constantly feel aware of being involved in a big time 
production, and fans of the trashily entertaining source 
flick in particular should be well satisfied by this slick, 
faithful licence. As an engaging promotion for the movie 
itself. Demolition Man serves Virgin and Warner Bros, 
well - this has set the standard for technical achievement 
In movie tie-ins, few films having been so faithfully re¬ 
worked into a videogame with so much attention to 
detail. However, those optimists expecting a collection of 
games equal to Need For Speed, Slayer and Super SFII 
Turbo will be disappointed. The only genre that 
Demolition Mon excels in is the light gun department, 
where play is considerably more fun, but Demolition 
Man remains very much an enjoyable jack of all trades 
but master of none. □ mew 

3DO Magazine rating: ★★★★ 


3D0 Magazine 32 February 1995- 
















Another fight scene/ left/ identical to the earli¬ 
er one in ploy/ but featuring a more flamboy¬ 
ant setting - on top of two fast moving cars. 
Again/ the graphics are quite gorgeouS/ and 
compensate for limited gameplay. 


The roof top/ 
above/ provides 
some stiff competi¬ 
tion/ even on easy 
setting and it 
takes some con¬ 
siderable practice 
to progress to the 
tunnels/ right. The 
hand scanner is a 
nice touch. 


Above right and inset/ 
the shooting gallery 
action boats some fan¬ 
tastic sprites/ which are 
all the more fun to kill 
due to their realism. 

The beat-'em-up sec¬ 
tions/ right/ are equally 
impressive visually/ but 
less fun to play. 


The car chase/ beloW/ is less than thrilling/ but nice looking. 
Another atmosphere piece/ right/ that's quite stunning. 


Magazine | 


3D0 Magazine 33 February 1995- 


3D0 






















3D0 


review 


[Magazine 


Family 

w 




11 n 


Publisher: Gametek 0 0753 553445 Developer: In House Save Game: 4 SRAM Slots Price: £39.99 Available: Now 




LAWYER 


wisted showed how it should be done. A 
hugely innovative program, it dispensed 
with the mundane way game show games 
had been handled in the past, concentrat¬ 
ing instead on current technology to cre¬ 
ate an almost surreal landscape of FMV, Silicon 
Graphics and chromakeyed actors. Not just a pretty 
face. Electronic Arts also journeyed deep into the very 
brains of the genre, re-working the typical questions 
associated with quiz shows into an atypical multimedia 
extravaganza. Dispensing with text-based questions. 
Twisted used the 3DO's graphic capabilities to create a 
mass of sub-games that could be played by anyone, 
anywhere - games which transcended cultural and age 
boundaries. There was a 'sliding tile' variant, for exam¬ 
ple, only all of the tiles were part of a FMV movie... 

Gametek, ignoring the innovations made by 
Electronic Arts, have adopted a depressingly literal 
approach to the genre. Family Feud's questions are not 
based upon something that the contestant can get wrong 
- history, politics, etc. - but on the subjective responses 
of the general public on various issues. Thus you might 
get asked: "What do you do on Sundays that you don't 
do on any other day?" and you have to guess the most 
typical response - like go to church, read the paper, go 
for a walk, etc. 

Any game that so strongly relies on the responses of 

One of the worst things in Family Feud is that there 
will be words that you simply won't have heard 
about - making the game impossible to win. 


Below: To win a round you have to 
guess every answer the public gave 


CONTRACTOR 


CARPENTER 


ARCHITECT 


ELECTRICIAN 


PLUMBER 


On the PC, Gametek are on a roll. Not only hove they managed to 
get Dennis Hopper to star in their latest gome. Hell, they've also 
released on inspired Doom variant. Quarantine, and a nifty space 
game. Star Crusader. With such success stories, hopes were high for 
their first 3DO system release, a license of the US show. Family Feud. 

the general public is obviously going to 
be culturally specific. The Americans and 
the British might well share a common 
language but, judging by this game at 
least, while they say potarto, we chirp 
pofayto. Not only do the American pub¬ 
lic give weird responses to most ques¬ 
tions, they also seem to have a large 
vocabulary that's simply missing from 
ours. Knowledge is assumed about US 
TV: "What's the best night in for TV?" 
and American sports: "How long does a 
Football Pro last in the major leagues?" 

The most common culturally specific ref¬ 
erence of them all, however, is made to 
US states: "What state is known for its 
abundant prairie land?", for example. 

Naturally winning, even in 'extremely 
thick' mode, is nigh on impossible. many questions that a British player 

Yet even had Gametek gone to the extra effort of tak- ** 
ing straw polls from a British audience this game would Whilst the presenter of EA's game subverted and paro- 
still be a pretty dull affair. There's none of the imagina- died every host before him, Gametek merely mimic the 
tion of the truly twisted Twisted, and none of its flair, cheesey dialogue of the true-life show. Indeed, while the 

presenter of Twisted ran about, shouting and screaming, 
alternately cajoling and cheering on the groovy competi¬ 
tors, the presenter in Family Feud only ever stands in the 
same place and consistes of just 3 stills - one for read¬ 
ing the questions, one for telling the player whether he's 
got an answer right or wrong and one for clapping. Sad 
and pathetic, instead of laughing with the game you end 
up laughing at it - naturally not a good state of affairs. 

There also seems to have been very little effort put 
into the game's scenery. While Twisted offered a daz¬ 
zling variety of multi-coloured sets and props, in Family 
Feud you're offered the same three in an endless, repeti¬ 
tive cycle. The result? The game looks as cheap, plasticy 
and 70's (in a brown flare's kind a' way) as the real 
thang. 

Last but by no means least, the game lacks the imme¬ 
diacy of a true gameshow with the means to answer any 
question restricted to typing in a response. While 
Twisted allowed you to instantaneously respond to a 
question by clicking upon an icon, for example, here 
you have to spend an age moving a cursor move back 
and forward, clicking on the letters that make up the 
word that you want. In the slick, crafted API multimedia 
age. Family Feud has no place - and can be of interest 
only to the masochistic sociologist attempting to under¬ 
stand the seemingly disturbed American psyche. □ dw 

3DO Magazine rating; ^ 


3D0 Magazine 34 February 1995 








































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3D0 


review 



Triple 

Threat 


Publisher: Activision 0 081 7429400 Developer: In House Save Game: Password Price: £TBA Available: Feb/March 



his oriental variation on dominoes, invent¬ 
ed at the turn of the century, is a popular 
gome for gamblers across the world, and 
variations on it have appeared on most 
consoles through the years (Activision's 
SNES adaptation was very popular). Whilst fans of the 
game will be pleased that EA are launching a 3DO ver¬ 
sion, they may be disappointed at the fairly tame version 
on offer here, with none of machine's capabilities 
stretched in any way to enhance this visually undramatic 
board game. With so many visually outstanding, innov¬ 
ative re-workings of tried and tested game types on the 
3DO (Road Rash, John Madden, Fifa International], 
owners have justifiably become expectant of superlative 
eye-candy on even the most jaded genre releases. But if 
you have a puzzle game of the stunning simplicity and 
addictivness of, say. Tetris, lame aesthetics can be for¬ 
given, and the Shanghai series of games certainly has 
the world fame to build high expectations in novices. 

At the beginning of a basic game, 144 tiles appear 
on screen, some on top of each other in up to four piles. 
Although initially, all these tiles will be bunched togeth¬ 
er, later on, small islands dissipate to the corners of the 
screen. Each tile has a symbol (traditional mode offers 
the usual Mah-Jong pattern, but Zodiac icons, musical 
instruments or flags of the world can be selected, 
according to which is easiest on the eye). The object of 
the game is to identify and select two matching tiles, 
causing them to vanish, a total absence of tiles resulting 
in Game Over. The difficulty is that only unblocked tiles 



The two-player games are tremendously frustrating 
but great fun. You can't stop looking at the scores! 


Simultaneous two-player gomes ore always welcome to alleviate the 
solitary pastime of gaming, and this cult Activision puzzler is as wel¬ 
come on 3DO as it's been on previous systems. 





can be selected - those that are 
either on the outside edge and not 
partially covered or any tile that 
can move left or right without dis¬ 
turbing another - and whilst this 
premise takes a while to grasp (for 
me at least), it soon becomes 
instinctive, and you merrily lower 
levels and disintegrate tiles until 
you suddenly can't find any more 
matching ones, and get stuck 
again. Pairs must be selected strate¬ 
gically, as dissolving unimpor¬ 
tant tiles can leave top layer 
blocks fixed, covering a 
pyramid below and effec¬ 
tively jamming progress. To 
make life easier, there are 
three undo credits available, 
and should you fluff up and 
completely foil progress, you can 
re-shuffle all the tiles and carry on. An 
arcade mode makes things more difficult, by shuffling 
neighbouring tiles into the space of any dissolved pairs, 
effectively mutating the pattern at every turn. 

In one-player mode, you can struggle away at your 
own pace, or try to progress against a time limit (which 
is tough). Each level completed moves you on to another 
background, the ultimate aim being to navigate across 
the 30 levels that make up the Great Wall Of China, the 
monochromatic stills of which provide the background to 
the action. 

This package has drawn together a wide range of 
Shanghai variations though, to provide the most com¬ 
prehensive console 'dedication' to the game ever, and a 
good value package for puzzle fans. As well as the 
arcade and original mode, there are four different tile 
games, Beijing, Great Wall, Golden Tile or Classic 
Shanghai. Beijing features sliding tiles. Great Wall has 
tiles falling from the top of the screen to replace matched 
pairs and Golden Tiles has, well, a hidden, golden tile 
which must be reached first. 

Whilst all are good fun in single player mode, it's 
with two players that Shanghai Triple Threat really 
comes into its own, providing the sort of simple, utterly 
addictive and competitive play that prevents you from 
leaving it alone. There's no doubt that this could have 
been radically re-worked for 3DO, with more interesting 
tile patterns and flashier backgrounds, but it's arguable 
that the engrossing format demands some restraint, and 
whilst the tiny patterns can become an eyesore, all in all 
this is an enjoyable package that's a must-have for puz¬ 
zle fans, but still recommended for anyone with two joy- 
pads and a friend who wants some intense competition. 


Puzzlers traditionally get a rough deal due to their 
inevitable lack of visual sumptiousness, but Shanghai 
Triple Threat has a strong enough source game design 
to lift it above more transient novelty titles, and if you 
can be persuaded to taste its distinctive oriental flavour, 
you should be engrossed for a very long time. □ mew 

3DO Magazine rating: ★★★ 


It's all rather daunting at first - whichever symbols 
you choose, there always seems to be far too many. 


3DO Magazine 36 February 1995 
























3D0 


review 



Publisher: TBA 0 N/A Developer: Synergy Save Game: 4 SRAM Slots Price: £TBA Available: TBA 





he most immediately enjoyable attraction 
of Iron Angel is that you play an immoral, 
nasty robot on the side of anarchy and 
destruction, serving a mad, fascist scientist 
in his quest to destroy the world - it's 
much less pressure than saving the world - and this 
unusual narrative is brilliantly unfurled by yet another, 
drop-dead gorgeous 3DO FMV intro sequence that 
smacks of fine art more than main stream videogames, a 
stunning concoction of brilliantly choreographed action 
that really pulls you into the game. It open with a seduc¬ 
tive flyby of an anonymous, Japanese cityscape, neon 
lights twinkling and blipverts blaring, before you're 
drawn towards a video monitor, the face of your superi¬ 
or, the mad scientist, staring blankly at you. 

There then follows a bizarre and wonderful pseudo 
re-birth sequence, with your robot's form bathed in light, 
spinning through a void, delightful ambient music meld¬ 
ing with despairing screams and synthesiser riffs, creat¬ 
ing an intro that actually engages, emotionally. When 
the game itself opens, you're fully prepared to be 
absorbed in a genuinely powerful game experience. 

The fact that this is a Doom variant would appear to 
be in it's favour - I'm no fan of the genre, but the first 
person perspective is undeniably involving - but Iron 
Soldier disappoints immediately due to the poor screen 
update, which is very poor when compared to Slayer or 
Demolition Man. if the screen was bursting with wide, 
monster-packed levels and extravagant locations, this 
would be excusable, but Iron Angelis set solely within 
the confines of a claustrophobic, metal, prefab tower 
block, with narrow, low corridors and small, empty 
rooms, although the ceilings and floors aren't rendered, 
which damages the penned-in atmosphere somewhat. 
Also damaging is the width of your robot. Although the 
view is first-person, your shoulders feel wider than the 
doorways, and this, combined with the jerky scrolling, 
makes progress slow and awkward. On the intro 
sequences, your robot is a brilliant hybrid of 
80's, Transformer style super weaponry 
and Iron Man inspired nuts and bolts, 
beautifully rendered, but in-game, 
you never 'see' yourself, just a clut¬ 
tered, jumbled view screen with your 


You can tell how seriously the Japanese take videogames by the 
amount of money and effort applied to the intro of Iron Angel Of The 
Apocalypse - very seriously. They're intense, those Japanese guys... 

gun arm hovering at the right and a 
static cursor sight, and it's a shame the 
action never pulls back to show your¬ 
self, as was pulled off in Virtuoso. The 
importance of the intro sequence to 
build atmosphere for this game 
becomes clear as further play reveals 
more, glaring inadequacies. 

Although Iron Angel bills itself very 
much as a role-playing game, there 
simply isn't enough interaction here to 
really compensate for the awkward 
control system. Lifts interconnect the 
many floors, store rooms offer new 
weapons, extra shield energy and save 
game positions and there's maps to 
collect revealing floor plans, but the environment is 
sparse and rather dull. The ultimate objective of collect¬ 
ing puzzle pieces is a rather lazy incentive inducement, 
and they're inevitably left lying around, protected by a 
baddie or two, with no real adventuring required, just 
exploring stamina. The baddies themselves, small, Dalek 
clones who attack mindlessly, are nicely rendered but 
ridiculously easy to pick off, and to anyone used to the 
variety of Doom will seem dull in comparison. 

However, there's no denying that this game does 
exert a certain pull, partly due to the excellent, atmos¬ 
pheric sound effects - dull moans and wails, a sense that 
there's something going on just around the corner - and 
partly due to the repetitive nature of play. Maybe it's just 
the sustained impact of the awesome intro that builds the 
game up so effectively, but for all its inadequacies, 
there's a sense of self-importance about Iron Angel that, 
although completely at odds with the rather poor pro¬ 
gramming, gives the game a genuine aura. 

Definitely not for everyone, but sci-fi freaks may 
get some pleasure if they invest considerable 
time into this curious release. □ mew 

3DO magazine rating; irir 


The mad scientist, above, 
or is it the programmer 
himself, who's apparent¬ 
ly a guru of multimedia 
art. Right, the art itself, 
which IS good. 


Above, a moron droid gets off a shot before being 
toasted by your rather sad pellet gun. Below, the 
disembodied limbo you occupy before game com¬ 
mencement. The graphics go downhill fast. 


3DO Magazine 37 February 1995 















review 



Publisher: Electronic Arts ® 0753 549442 Developer: LucasArts Save Game: Passwords Price: £44.99 Available: Now 



he sensational impact of LucasArts' first 
CD-ROM-specific release isn't difficult to 
analyse. A lengthy FMV-intro consisting 
mainly of Star Wars movie footage sets 
the scene perfectly, whilst the pristine CD- 
quality music and sampled sound effects are awesome. 
The game itself promises to take the player from training 
missions on Tatooine to a death-defying assault on the 
Death Star itself. 

As you might expect (fear) of a groundbreaking PC 
CD-ROM game. Rebel Assault is an FMV-special with all 
the graphics pre-rendered and streamed off disc. On the 
positive side, LucasArts have at least made a real effort 
at disguising the game-style's limitations. The FMV is 
actually bigger than can be displayed, giving the player 
an illusion of control as joystick movements alter what's 
seen on screen. The game's structure is similarly innova¬ 
tive; rather than simply dropping a few into-the-screen 
blasting sequences into a montage of film clips, there's a 
real effort to cram in lots of game types, with an impres¬ 
sively varied range of settings and vehicles, drown from 
both Star Wars and Empire, plus all the unfilmed back- 
history - it's a real fans' product. 

The game begins with the player's character, either 
male or female according to choice, flying training mis¬ 
sions such as blasting through an asteroid field, zipping 
through tightly twisting canyons in an A-Wing and so 
on. There are over twelve missions in all, loosely formed 
into a narrative which includes a prolonged Noth 
sequence where you battle AT-ATs, chase Probots 
through caves and get out on foot to shoot stormtroop- 
ers. Most of the missions are into-the-screen blasters, lots 
of targets to shoot and plenty of dramatic manoeuvres 
with arrows pointing the way to go. But there's also sev¬ 
eral overhead view blasters and the stormtrooper level is 
good fun in particular, if only because it's a pleasant 
change. The stages are all quite long, but when you fin¬ 
ish them a password provides a welcome reward. 

On the PC, all this variety and the superlative presen- 



Masses of FMV, rapid-fire action and John Williams' soundtrack have 
made Rebet Assault the spearhead of PC CD-ROM driving. But does it 
really have the Force? Retrospective criticism of the PC original has 
called into question the actual quality of gameplay present in this tie- 
in extravaganza and the 3DO conversion features none of the re¬ 
working applied to the recent Macintosh adaptation... 

totlon won some rove reviews, 
but a few doubting Thomases 
argued the Emperor was, if not 
naked, at least rather thinly 
attired. Beneath the stylish 
graphics, the gameplay suffered 
from the limited interaction and 
repetitiveness of any FMV-type 
game. Because it's all preren¬ 
dered, it's always the same pat¬ 
tern and success comes down to 
simply memorising what hap¬ 
pens next. Also, while the 
graphics were impressive for a 
PC they were still far from per¬ 
fect with plenty of blotchy, 
blocky artefacts. 

On the 3DO system you 
might expect far more impres¬ 
sive visuals, but you'd be disappointed. Unlike the 
enhanced Mac version, the 3DO version appears rushed 
and fully retains all the blotchy imperfections. The movie 
cut-sequences are well integrated and impressively 
lengthy, but the quality is variable and often quite poor 
- especially in comparison with Virgin's Demolition 
Man. The dubious FMV might be a niggling flaw with 
another game-type, but with Rebel Assault, FMV is the 
game and the in-game visuals are just as problematic as 
the presentation stuff. Some sections, such as the com¬ 
puter generated stormtrooper assault and most space 
combat scenes are just about perfect visually. The Death 
Star attack, with perfectly defined TIE 
Fighters and X-Wings floating about 
the screen is highly impressive. More 

The AT-AT attack, left, features 
some initially impressive, spooled 
sequences, ^dly, the graphics 
break up quite ^dly. 



Much of the success of Rebel Assault on PC can be 
attributed to the brilliant atmosphere created by the 
endless cut-away sections, some lifted from the 
movie and others created specifically. However, 
these seem shaky on 3DO now, when compared to 
the stunning (and more original) JumpGate, And 
like all FMV sequences, they soon get tedious. 

often, however, the visuals swarm with encoding arte¬ 
facts. Dramatic missions through twisting valleys, cav¬ 
erns and riverbeds are reasonably fun to play, but the 
scenery is blocky and unimpressive. The various over¬ 
head shoot-'em-up sections, a neat idea for adding 
some variety, are seen through a hazy filter of poorly 
encoded graphics. Even the various static pictures, such 
as fellow pilots' faces, are often quite grainy with a typi¬ 
cally PC lack of colours - a 3DO system could, of 
course, manage photorealistic visuals. 

Overall, Rebel Assault is a real disappointment then. 
As always with these type of FMV-spectaculars, game¬ 
play is simplistic and ultimately very repetitive. Poor 
encoding means the graphics, which should compensate 
for gameplay limitations, simply don't. Ironically, it's 
Star Wars fans themselves rather than casual gamers 
who'll be most saddened by Rebel Assault, the complete 
waste of this licence being difficult to bear. If LucasArts 
can't do a decent Star Wars game, who can? This was 
obsolete before it even arrived on 3DO, and is a sad 
debut for such a big devleloper. Ftopefully, next time 
they'll go for gameplay rather than a big name and 
easy conversion work. □ ssw 

3DO Magazine rating; 


-3D0 Magazine 38 February 1995- 























The opening training mission for Hebei Assault isn't 
that inspiring, a simple left and right 'avoid the 
spooled landscape' affair, which is saved only by 
decent cut-away scenes (below). 


The attack on the Death Star, left and 
above, features some of the best action on 
offer, with a combination of brilliantly 
effective use of the Star Wars movie, and 
some decent 3D blasting games at last. 


Below, a rather tepid, chase the 
Probot section. Again, rather poor 
quality spooled backgrounds. 


This 3D assault on the planet surface is like Shock 
Wave, except it's no good. A forced altitude means 
you never get close to those scout walkers, dimin¬ 
ishing the fun somewhat. One of the easiest levels. 


I PILIJIS 


HITS lU 


SCfUft 


Magazine] 


-3D0 Magazine 39 February 1995 


3D0 






















3D0 


review 


[Magazine 



Publisher: Electronic Arts © 0753 549442 Developer: Multimedia Corporation Save Game: No Price: £TBA Available: TBA 



curious release on first sight, this is multi¬ 
media at its very best, taking a potentially 
devastatingly boring subject (geography) 
and using the power of a console to inject 

_ a mega-topne of excitement and, most 

importantly, interaction. The cover line, 'The world isn't 
flat. Why should your atlas be?", is a clear indication of 
the program's most obvious attraction - no pages to flip 
and no magnifying lens required, just zoom into and 
rotate the planet freely - but it's also rather disingenuous 
because there's a lot more than place names in here. 

After selecting just what you want to be visible on 
your globe, the most obvious decision is to zoom in. This 
is possible with nine different types of zoom, culminating 
in satellite images of cities and terrain that are quite 
overwhelming. Another immediately stunning option is 
to watch 3D fly-by's of the Alps, Himalayas, Rockies and 
Sheep Mountains, which are fast and impressive. Also 
available, although more of interest to geologists than 
casual explorers, are topographic illustrations of any 
given location, which can be rotated and zoomed into, 
or viewed on time-lapse to show predictions of environ¬ 
mental change. 

Click on any country, and an information-filled post¬ 
card will appear that can be rotated to read a brief 
social and geographical report on the selected place, 
but the real tour de force of 3D Atlas lie in the video 
documentaries that can be pulled up on each city, each 
detailing significant aspects of politics, environmental 
dangers, population, animal life and more. These are of 
a very high standard, both technically and editorially, 
with concise, simply worded appraisals and literally 
thousands of interesting facts. 

Although this wealth of information could be over¬ 
whelming, EA have cleverly inserted a quiz game which 
allows up to four people to implement their new found 
knowledge of the globe. Around The World picks a 
starting point then asks you questions ranging from pop- 


Billed as a Multimedia expedition to understanding planet earth, this 
is EA's brave stab at providing some edutainment for the more 
responsible 3DO owner with family ties... 

ulation to geography and environ¬ 
ment, correct answers winning you 
air miles, the ultimate objective being 
to circumnavigate yourself back to 
your original location. These multiple 
choice questions are never dull, and 
basic flag identification and country 
of origin tests are wisely spread 
between more unusual queries - such 
as how many nuclear bombs have 
been exploded since WWII. The quiz 
is very entertaining, with occasional 
bursts of FMV to spice things up, but 
the second challenge is selecting 
from a choice of three locations, the 
destination you want to travel to with 
your air miles. The shortest, straight- 
est route is the key to winning, but 
you might be surprised at how slim 
your geographic knowledge is when 
you end up flying all over the place, endlessly picking 
the least useful next location. This is great fun, especially 
with a few people jostling around the 3DO, shouting 
complete guesses, and as an aid to learning, it's proba¬ 
bly the most immediately useful section of this package. 

Whilst gamers blissfully free of hatchlings will blithely 
avoid this package, unfortunates in possession of chil¬ 
dren have an obligation to purchase 3D Atlas, since it's 
a quite excellent learning tool that few early and pre- 
teens will be able to resist. The chief inadequacy of stan¬ 
dard schooling - lack of interaction, transference of facts 
made un-interesting through the tedious process of com¬ 
munication and inability to impart a sense of reality and 
relevance - have been dissolved here, the program skil- 


The picture quality in the excellently compiled docu¬ 
mentaries is of a very high standard, with clean cuts 
and fast accessing times. The mini-films can also be 
freeze-framed to study particularly interesting stills. 

fully Implementing all the features associated with the 
very best multimedia learning aids. Whilst you could 
lead a child through 3D Atlas with structured, logical 
progression, the tremendous user interface allows for 
intuitive, exciting lateral steps, one area of investigation 
easily flowing to another, cross referencing made 
incredibly easy since at any time you can pull out, spin 
the globe, and go somewhere else entirely, the impor¬ 
tant ingredient of choice being a powerful aid to reten¬ 
tion of information. Perhaps the most profound effect of 
exploring earth via 3D Atlas is that although you see 
snapshots of cultures and environmental situations you'd 
never seen before, the overall impression is of a place 


In 1989, developing countries poid more than 
$133 billion to creditors in developed counties. 


Left, there's a lot 
of money talk in 
3D Atlas, to let 
you know just 
who owes who. 
Another deeply 
depressing fact, 
right 


f 


-3D0 Magazine 40 February 1995- 















Whltli country’s land area is grentpr 
than that of Ihn ollirr tvro connlries 
combined? 


/oHianri 

Kamibin 

Gabon 


It's horrible facts like this one (above) 
that makes 3D Atlas a bizarre combi¬ 
nation of fun and misery. Most are 
pieces of information you've heard 
before, but the mix of imagery and 
caption brings everything home. The 
FMV sequences that appear in the 
quiz game enhance the appearance 
considerably, making winning fun. 


smaller and more integrated than you'd ever imagined. 
This sense of unity is an important achievement - with 
the chief emphasis of 3D Atlas wisely focusing upon 
environmental damage, a lot of facts and figures about 
the ozone layer and wildlife destruction combine to pro¬ 
vide a relevance that cannot be achieved by mere shout¬ 
ing. 3D Atlas quietly reminds you of both the world's 
smallness and painful fragility, and this is perhaps even 



more commendable than its excellent geographic tutor¬ 
ing. An excellent juncture for specialist 3DO software to 
develop from, this is a powerful and commendable mul¬ 
timedia package that deserves serious attention, and 
provides a standard that all future multimedia products 
should aspire to. □ mew 

3DO Magazine rating: ★★★★ 



The Around The World quiz is fun but very difficult 
(for me at least). Better than learning at school. 



Magazine] 


-3D0 Magazine 41 February 1995- 


3D0 




























3D0 


review 



JiumpGate 

Publisher: Electronic Arts ® 0753 549442 Developer: ATG Save Game: 5 SRAM Slots Price: £29.99 Available: Now 



irst things first. The superlative intro from 
Shock Wave has, remarkably, been sur¬ 
passed for Operation JumpGate, which 
features a mini-movie of epic proportions 
to whet the appetite. This trailer looks bet¬ 
ter than any recent sci-fi movie, with extraordinary War 
Of The Worlds inspired vignettes of death and destruc¬ 
tion that simply astonish, both in their variety and vision. 

In-game, everything looks familiar at first, with the 
cockpit sheath of your FI 77 fighter folding back to 
reveal smooth scrolling, barren landscapes, but the 
strange panoramas you skim above now are of the alien 
planet rather than earth - the new war against the aliens 
has shifted to an offensive attack. The delightful female 
flight controller is at hand again, passing information 
and tactical plans via a small VDU on your control 
panel, and these info bursts are significantly enhanced 
over Shock Wave, with more detailed analysis and 
impressive computer visuals. 

More assistance is required however, as these new 
missions are significantly more sophisticated than their 
predecessors. Whereas Shock Wave required little 
thought, offering only a collection of barren landscapes 
to blitz, JumpGate inserts a variety of mini missions into 
each, large section, so there's a variety of situations to 
absorb and tackle, from destroying energy fields to 
allow bombing sorties, to avoiding alien ships employ¬ 
ing radar jamming devices and flash flares to blind you. 
And it's not just the missions that have become more 
sophisticated. Enemy spacecraft and ground artillery 
have been revolutionised in the seven year hiatus 
- they are ferocious, both in firepower and 
manoeuvrability. The new fighter planes, all 
gorgeously texture mapped and animated, 
are lovingly designed, from conventional. Star 


The sublime presentation of Shock Wave couldn't disguise the rather 
lacklustre gameplay within, the repetitive shoot-'em-up action soon 
wearing thin. But in a bold marketing move, EA have released five 
new missions that re-commence the adventure seven years after the 
original alien invasion of earth... 

Wars inspired snub fighters to ethere¬ 
al, darting, bat-shaped planes that 
hover on their side, almost impossible 
to hit, before spinning around and 
screaming into your cockpit window. 

Ground installations which previously 
crouched, waiting for destruction, now 
boast laser turrets and heavy defences, 
and as well as walkers and homing 
mines, small, impossibly fast strike 
planes defend in formation over sensi¬ 
tive alien installations. The enemy 
attack routines also seem more intelli¬ 
gent; assaults are less kamikaze-like as 
fighters circle, chase and bomb, mak¬ 
ing continual forward acceleration 
essential for survival. Your homing mis¬ 
siles vanish in a blink, as you attempt 
to escape from hostile territory in 
search of a welcoming refuel craft, which hover for sev- 



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Wv; 

V ■ V 

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V 

* / - v 

• - * =» 

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- . . __ 



The icy caverns and valleys of level two, above, hide an army of 
enemy aircraft and ground artillery. Fast, precise shooting is 
required to progress further into this tough blaster. 


eral minutes 




in safe zones before vanishing. The option 
to just blast through the terrain avoiding 
air traffic is closed for your ship, 
however, as surviving enemies 
regroup at later points in the mis¬ 
sion to attack again. Later levels 
soon boast a sky full of enemy 
hardware and explosions, leav¬ 
ing you literally dazzled by the 
intensity of the action. 

Whilst actual play in 
JumpGate is significantly improved 
over Shock Wave then, the flaw that 
ran through the original is still present: 
missions are even longer here, each hav¬ 
ing five or six mini sections, but each time 


you die, you're thrown back to the very start. Since just 
mission one takes twenty minutes to complete, inevitably 
there's a lot of time spent replaying earlier sections, 
which is very frustrating. It's a lazy way to extend the 
game's life, and considering that you must buy the origi¬ 
nal Shock Wave to play these five (admittedly long) mis¬ 
sions, JumpGate's value for money could be called into 
question. 

That said, fans of the original will need no persuad¬ 
ing to buy this much improved update. If you relished 
the brilliant sci-fi theme, brilliantly realised to provide a 
fantastic atmosphere in ShockWave, Operation 
JumpGate will be a welcome chance to continue the 
adventure, with seriously improved gameplay and even 
better graphics. □ mew 

3DO Magazine rating: iririr 


The texture mapped design of the alien craft (left) is 
superb. Each has a distinctive flight pattern, can 
shake off your target locking system with ease and 
hit fast and hard. JumpGate is serious arcade action. 



3D0 Magazine 42 February 1995- 


















MAHA 


SEARCHIK^ 


Captured left, 
is that rare 
moment when 
your cursor 
flashes to tell 
you a target is 
locked. 
Clipping with 
your lasers is 
tough, but 
guided mis¬ 
siles are 
extravagant 
and must be 
saved for 
tougher craft. 


Above, your attack coordinator, who adds a dash of 
glamour to this 50's B-movie extravaganza. Oh, the joy 
of being reprimanded by her enticing tones. 


The War Of The 
Worlds style intro 
(above) is packed 
with tremendous 
pieces of art, that 
reach out and pull 
you into this 
visually stunning 
game. Also 
impressive are the 
brilliantly 
designed new 
enemy croft, insets 
left and above, all 
lightning fast. 


CO 

o 

O 


-3D0 Magazine 43 February 1995- 





































3D0 




[Magazine 


review 


Publisher; Panasonic ® 0344 853146 Developer: Namco Save Game: 3 Continues Price: £TBA Available: Now 



influential/ so unquestionably epic 
so beautiful as Namco's 1991 coin-op smash: 



part from the shattered glass title screen, 
there's nothing in StarBlade to betray the 
fact that it's just a game. The intro is a 
classic piece of tight, minimalistic realism 
with a couple of tactical displays outlining 
the threat posed by Red-Eye, a mechanical planet men¬ 
acing an innocent world. As arrows arc across the 
screen, supplementary information flashes up in the bor¬ 
ders while a clipped, military voice outlines the plan. In 
the game itself voices are blurred with static as a group 
leader passes on invaluable tactical advice, while co¬ 
pilots keep you updated on their progress. Your own 
lasers are fairly quiet and, since you're firing them so 
much, that's a good thing, but then how do you explain 
the 'shuhh-shuhh' sound that sporadically erupts out of 
the mix? This bizarre, alien effect is superbly unsettling. 
Overall, the soundtrack wraps the entire game in an 
utterly convincing atmosphere, anchoring the often 
bizarre graphics into an adrenaline-pumping sense of 
militaristic realism. 

StorBlade's original graphics are the most innovative 
and intriguing 3D shapes that have ever been crammed 
into a single game. The Anglo-Japanese Starwing is 
one, long homage to StarBlade, recreating entire chunks 
of the game in their entirety while using its style to 
inspire the rest. The shapes look real, they're like noth¬ 
ing you've seen before but somehow the scale, their 
sound as they pass you and, crucially, the way they 
move, make it a truly convincing experience. The news 
that the 3DO StarBlade would feature enhanced, tex¬ 
ture-mapped graphics could have caused a storm of 
controversy - a nose job on a videogame Mona Lisa. 
The fact that the original version's graphics are retained, 
as an option, shows how respected they are... but now 
they're obsolete. 3DO StarBlade features some of the 
most aesthetically-polished texture maps yet seen. The 
game's first scene is the most impressive ever in a 


There are few games so genuinely 
and, ultimately, 

StarBlade. 

videogame. The launch tun¬ 
nel drops away, your ship 
tilts and the sky's flickering is 
revealed as the dazzle from 
the mirrored face of a 
minutely detailed starship, 
effortlessly cutting through 
the flames burning off the 
hulk of a doomed battleship. 

Again and again, the game 
awes you not only with the 
imagination and detail of its 
visuals, but also the presenta¬ 
tion. The way the game 
poses itself, moving you 
around and around, with 
snap turns and vertigo-induc¬ 
ing rolls, gives it the look and 
feel of a movie shot by an 
Oscar-winning cinematogra¬ 
pher - on 18 different kinds 
of speed. 

Pretty looks aren't everything of course, and the fact 
remains that StarBlade is locked on rails like any other 
FMV game. The route, the attacks, the tactics - they're 
always the same and the arcade version's limited ability 
to move the screen about is lost. Yet while most FMV 
games soon become tedious through their repetitiveness, 

I found StarBlade different. Aside from its sheer beauty, 
there's the ferocity of its attack. Even StarBlade veterans 
find the new version tough, energy is soon lost and, 
unlike Rebel Assault, there are no passwords, just three 
continues making every tiny fraction of energy vital if 
you're going to see it 
through to the end. Also, 
for this type of game, 
StarBlade is relatively 
thoughtful, because there 
are so many targets filling 
every frame of the game. 
It's not about simply blast¬ 
ing everything - no-one 
could blast every alien in 
StarBlade - instead victo¬ 
ry goes to the person who 
can prioritise. You must 
constantly evaluate, from 

The spaceyard is one of 
the most lethal sections 
of the game. Laser 
bolts come from every 
direction, hammering 
your ship like a 
hailstorm. Only the 
quick will survive. 


The original StarBlade was a classic of its time, but 
few people would prefer the original polygons, 
right, to the new, texture mapped version, above. 
This scene is right at the start of the game and is a 
real jaw-dropper with the mirrored ship's front liter¬ 
ally dazzling the player. 

second to second, which threat to your survival is the 
most critical. Should you hit the torpedo about to fill 
your screen, or take the hit so you can blast the battle¬ 
ship that is about to launch a salvo of three more? The 
tactical element adds immeasurably to the game's 
addictivity. Whereas in Rebel survival is basically a 
question of memorising enemy attacks, with StarBlade 
you're constantly wondering about your tactics - which 
targets should you hit first in order to best preserve your 
precious shield. 

Despite its difficulty, StarBlade is rather small for its 
pricepoint. It won't take you very long to get to the end 
and after that the game simply wraps around - albeit 
with an immense challenge before you do get right to 
the very end. Nevertheless, as a piece of arcade history 
StarBlade is difficult to resist. Particularly ironic is the 
fact that while Rebel Assault is far newer, bigger and 
more ambitious, it's StarBlade which looks the more 
advanced. Partially this is because the encoding is so 
much sharper. Rebel often looks quite blotchy and lack¬ 
ing in colour, while StarBlade is beautifully colourful and 
razor-sharp throughout - on my 23-inch TV at least. 
Also, it's so much faster, more dramatic and, yes, 
unspeakably ferocious. If you think you're up to its chal¬ 
lenge, check it out. □ ssw 

3DO Magazine rating: ★★★★ 




3DO Magazine 44 February 1995- 
























OS36SOO 


Above, an apocalyptic scene from the first battle. Below, screens from the 
launch and briefing sequences - stylistic masterpieces. 


Your ship zooms up, turns, then 
dives down into an alien city as mis¬ 
siles swarm upwards, left. In the 
arcades, StarBlade's success led to 
Galaxian 3, currently the centre¬ 
piece of Namco's Japanese arcadia 
with a huge room on hydraulics to 
simulate its acrobatic turns. 


Too late! An 
enemy missile 
fills your screen, 
left, seconds 
before impact. 
Below, Red Eye, 
the artificial 
moon trying to 
destroy your 
own world. 



Magazin^ 


3D0 Magazine 45 February 1995- 


3D0 
























review 



Publisher: TBA © N/A Developer: GTE Interactive Save Game: Passwords Price: £TBA Available: TBA 




etting a game in a ghetto may be accept¬ 
able for a crime-fighting blaster or beat- 
'em-up, where the hero is liberating or 
I fleeing his economically deprived sur- 
I roundings, but playing a character who 
actually lives in a (politically incorrect) dump is down¬ 
right perverse. Did the market research guys figure that 
kids f^l a hip affinity with young, broke, street basket¬ 
ball wasters? Are all future videogame alter-egos to be 
resiliently apathetic slackers? You're so hard-up, appar¬ 
ently, that you can't even afford the dubious luxury of 
sporting friends, so a full team game is out of the ques¬ 
tion, and instead you cavort and lob with just one, 
makeshift basketball net in one of three, desperately 
derelict settings, atmospherically decorated with burning 
oil drums and graffiti-sprayed brick walls. These graph¬ 
ics are not of the standard we've come to expect of the 
3DO, and betray the 8-bit origins of the game, as do 
the rather simply animated three main characters. 
The/re certainly not badly done, but with such a simple 
scenario, they really need to be extra special in way of 
compensation. However, they are characterful, and the 
bleach blonde, tightly clad Roxy proved to be an enor¬ 
mously popular character choice. A wider range of bas¬ 
ketball players would have been appreciated though, as 
experimentation between just three is fairly short lived. 

The action in Jammit is extraordinarily simple; each 
character can run, leap, attack (foul) and dribble the 
ball, the most common aim being to reach twenty-one 
points before your opponent, although ten point sudden 
death scenarios appear later on. The further away from 
the net you score, the more points you get, and pushing 
or shoving reward your opponent with three penalty 
shots. The screen scrolls (not too smoothly) across about 
one and a half screens worth of tarmac, giving you free 
reign to dodge the irksome hoodlum pursuing you, but 
whilst this outrageously simplistic premise 
appears moronic to begin with, things 
soon appear to be better than the out 
line would suggest. 

Before each match, you can gam¬ 
ble as much money as you've got on 

The two-on-one final battle is the 
toughest scrap, with fouls galore. 


This ancient MegaDrive game doesn't seem a likely source of inspira¬ 
tion for 3DO conversion, its previous incarnation being generally ill- 
received due to the abundance of excellent full team basketball 
games available. But since Jammit is the first 3DO dabble at 'netball 
for men', the slate is clean to assess this thoroughly peculiar title. 

the match outcome, and after you've 
cleaned out your opponent (the bigger 
your bet, the fewer sessions required 
to empty his pocket) you're moved on 
to a new game style. These are pro¬ 
gressively more entertaining variations 
of one-on-one basketball - all shots 
must be made from moving X's, cer¬ 
tain scores must be leap-frogged to 
avoid point deductions, shots must be 
clean or they're ignored - culminating 
in a two-against-one climax that is 
both great reward and good fun. The 
game is packed with streetwise sam¬ 
ples as the street gang 'dis' and mock 
each other, and a noisy beatbox 
blasts out hip hop riffs that all add to 
the atmosphere. 

The only graphical fair Jammit can boast of (apart 
from the delicious Roxy), is the close-up cut-ins that 
appear when you actually leap for the basket, showing 
the players in more detail to assist blocks and shots. 

Although these aren't exactly state-of-the-art (the players 
float rather too much and are minimally animated), they 
do add some visual panache conspicuously lacking from 
the rest of the game. They also eliminate arguments as to 
who actually scored or blocked successfully. 

In one-player mode, these variations must be played 
in order (with a handy password saving your progress), 
but in two-player, any gamestyle and any of the 
three scummy locations can be chosen, and 
there's no doubt that the game comes into 
its own with two players pushing and 
jostling against each other. Despite, or 
rather because of the immense simplici¬ 
ty of ploy, the action is fiercely addictive 
and maddeningly competitive. There's a 


The sublime Roxy scores again (sadly, not with me) 
against the rather ominous backdrop. Sad, isn't it? 

wide range of tactics to develop for each style of game, 
the stark objectives belying a fairly sophisticated core 
playability. Despite a sense of regret at the retrograde 
graphics, this visual drabness fails to completely sabo¬ 
tage Jammit, as do the numerous flaws, such as slow¬ 
down, poor scrolling, lack of animation frames and diffi¬ 
cult to judge 3D. With presentation on par with an EA 
sports title this could have been a minor classic, but 
there's no doubt that if you're taken with the scenario, 
you'll get a lot of pleasure from this quirky release. 
However, this doesn't provide much in the way of com¬ 
petition against a full team basketball game, and with 
the 3DO widely recognised as having the very best 
sports simulations around, a premiere league slam- 
dunkin' smash would appear to be long overdue. □ mew 

3DO Magazine rating: 


-3DO Magazine 46 February 1995 

























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3D0 


review 



Publisher: 3D0 ® TBA Developer: Studio 3DO Save Game: No Price: TBA Available: TBA 


This edutainment game gives you and your youngest the chance to 
work for a ^^Powerhouse (TV station) producing some top draw 
entertainment../^ Heady heights indeed, unless your children are as 
precocious as the kidz in this game. 



I I uiz shows seem popular fair for 3DO sys- 

[ terns in America, but Station Invasion, 
though aimed at the pre-teen audience, is 
the first package to feature the profession- 
I 1 al polish and simple playability of the 

genre's classic, EA's Twisted, unsurpising since Studio 
3DO developed that title as well. Using similar live 
action footage pasted onto computer generated back¬ 
drops and utterly simplistic yet fairly compelling quizzes. 
Station Invasion accurately re-creates the ultra-bright, 
candy coated environment that permeates every crap 
American gameshow and soap you've ever seen. 

The setting of a TV studio is a good premise to build 
upon and the story makes good use of the material - an 
average TV production house has been invaded by kids, 
who are not only starring in, but actually running the 
shows. There are five programmes battling it out in the 
network ratings ("it's all about gutz, brainz and ratings, 
kid"), all vehicles for abominable young brats, such as 
Ernie Go-Lucky, host of Wl;iat's That Smell, and Angelica 
D'Jour, glam and fab, teen star of Sundaes Of Our 
Lives. You pick which show you want to produce, and 
can compete for ratings against up to four other people. 
Your child prodigy gives each of you a mundane task or 
puzzle to solve, and the winner gets points which equal 
ratings figures. As another reward (?) the wining pro¬ 
ducer gets to screen the next, sixty second segment of 
their winning program, before moving on to round two. 
The whole audio and visual assault is linked by a pre- 
pubescent female news reporter and her dog, who pass 
irritating comments from the comfort of their sofa studio. 

The min-programmes are well produced (for a 
videogame), and although the wit and cynicism of 
Twisted isn't visible, there's still an element of parody 
that adds humour to the predicably stupid, over-the-top 
clips. What's That Smell is pretty banal, but Sundaes Of 


Our Lives is a genuinely amusing spin 
on Alice and Blossom, with Angelica 
victimising her podgy friend and flirt¬ 
ing with a milkshake boy to amusing 
effect. The graphic design of these 
star vehicles is consistently impressive, 
which is fair compromise considering 
their shortness, and as an incentive to 
beat your chums and grab that air 
time, they work very well. 

The puzzle games that make up 
the bulk of this package are well pre¬ 
sented (though simply styled, they're 
well themed) and blissfully free of too 
many specifically American questions 
(that so plagued Family Feud}. 

Instead, there's simple maths ques¬ 
tions, spelling teasers, sliding puzzle 
games (complete a picture of a classi¬ 
cal composer whilst his most famous 
tune plays in the background, and 
you're rewarded by a brief biogra¬ 
phy), identify the object and pick the musical instrument 
that's playing. This is one of the more innovative sub¬ 
games, using the console's capacity for audio and visual 
questions rather more effectively than the others, and it's 
a shame more games exploiting the 3DO's capabilities 
couldn't have been implemented. Perhaps the most 
enjoyable game though, is the Script Rewrite section, 
where you must pick from a small selection of random 
verbs, nouns and adjec¬ 
tives, words that will be 
then inserted into an 
unread script (a telling 
indication of how these 
shows are written?). The 
re-reading of the mystery 
script is hilarious, as well 
as having the obvious 
benefits of explaining the 
difference between action, 
name and descriptive 
words. Great fun. There's 
not many of these games, 
so they soon start repeat¬ 
ing themselves, but they're 

All the kids in this game 
are quite completely 
horrible, but this 
bespectacled nerd is the 
most unpleasant and 
has the most annoying. 
How Do They Do That 
style game show. Quite 
infuriating. 


Anjelica D'Jour, permanently pouting star (and she 
knows it) of Sundaes Of Our Lives, a low budget 
soap that revolves entirely around her empty, 
gossip dominated life. 

all enjoyable enough and obviously, the point is that 
they skilfully disguise the mathematical, geographical 
and historical questions with cute graphics and over 
excited sound FX. The three difficulty levels are also well 
judged, with easy being fairly moronic (sorry - good for 
youngsters) whilst hard had me stumped. 

Whilst it's easy to dismiss all this day-glo activity as 
crass and simplistic initially, there's actually a fair level 
of sophistication to the game. The way the various seg¬ 
ments of show, quiz, report, ratings update etc. are all 
invisibly linked, lacking any pregnant pauses common to 
less well designed video game shows, is a testament to 
some well-worked design, with youngsters never given a 
chance to get bored. As a piece of edutainment soft¬ 
ware, this is highly commendable, and whilst British kids 
may blanche at the sickly, gooey atmosphere ever pre¬ 
sent, those with a more developed cynicism should enjoy 
laughing at the vile gameshow stars and their enormous, 
transparent egos. This treads a narrow path between 
education and good fun very successfully, and offers a 
clear outline for future edutainment packages to follow. 
A more British variant, with a bit more doom, gloom, 
rain and cynicism would go down a treat though, 
preferably programmed in Manchester. Fornow, howev¬ 
er, Studio 3DO seem to have cornered the market in 
gameshows, with two fabulous releases. □ mew 

3DO Magazine rating: ★★★ 




3D0 Magazine 48 February 1995- 



















The enjoyable pre¬ 
sentation of even 
the simplest games 
such os identify the 
geometric shape 
(right), go some 
way to making 
Station invasion a 
consistently enjoy¬ 
able package. 
Below, some more, 
high quality scenes 
from the soaps and 
quizzes. 


Right, the 
excellent Spot 
That Instrument 
quiz which 
identifies the 
non-musical 
duffer easily. 


Magazine! 


-3D0 Magazine 49 February 1995- 


3D0 













































3D0 


review 


\ Magazine 


The 

Incredible 


Machine 


Publisher: Sierra © 0734 303322 Developer: Dynamix Save Game: Automatic Save Price: £39.99 Available: Now 




Dynamix's The Incredible Machine hit the PC a year ago and ruptured 
many a mind. A deeply peculiar, unhealthily addictive, brain-bending 
puzzle game, it gets 3DO Magazine's vote as the most original title of 
the month - quite an achievement when you look at some of the 
more obscure Japanese releases that are around. 

able to work out how to use those 
elements and relationships to make 
a machine capable of achieving the 
goal that's been given. Dynamix 
have Included 208 mind-teasers for 
you to 'enjoy'. Naturally the first is 
ridiculously easy, the last nigh on 
impossible. 

Given that the game requires a 
fair degree of (learned) knowledge, 

Dynamix have also included 30 
Training Missions, allowing the 
player to get used to the various 
machine parts. Persevere with these 
and you'll soon have acquired all of 
the knowledge that you'll need to 
complete puzzle 208. However, 
knowledge and the ability required 
to put everything together are two 

quite different things. If you're anything like me you'll Above, a Silicon Graphic 
have to stare at a particular puzzle for ages before representorion of a fypi- 
you'll be able to solve It. The weird thing is once you can ^ reochon. 
solve it you'll flap your arms and wonder what all of the fuss was about. 

The Incredible Machine's 
Machine Mode effectively 
gives the game an everlasting 
lifespan, allowing the player to cre¬ 
ate torturously complicated machines of his or her own, 
using the various relationships between the 70 mechani¬ 
cal parts to near-interminable effect. Imagine you've just 
discovered the ability to line up hundreds of dominoes 
and push one to set off a chain reaction. That's the kind 
of effect that you get here - but stupendously more var¬ 
ied. By pushing one thing you can get little men to fall 
off platforms and onto see-saws that will push a basket¬ 
ball into the air and onto a dynamite plunger - and so 
on. Most of the fun here is derived from watching these 
reactions, the fruits of your pained labour. 

Obviously The Incredible Machine won't appeal to 
everyone - the arcade-fanatic will merely scratch his 
head before rummaging around his/her game collection 
for a more immediate and frenetic blaster. Yet there will 
be many for whom The Incredible Machine will become 
a dangerous obsession, who will not be able to sleep 
until they've solved that one, anoying puzzle they've 
been working on all day (and if they're truly addicted, 
all night). I fell into the latter category and now could not 
do without this wondrous game. There is, simply, a 
ghost in my machine without it. □ dw 


3DO Magazine rating: ★★★★ 


PUZZLE 20: 


Oet the basketball 
across ail the ^aps arkJ 
Into the wooden prt on the 
rl^ht side of the screen. 


Push 'A' to continued ^ 


Below, at the start of the game 
you'll be offered three modes of 
ploy: Solve Puzzles, Build A 
Machine or Tutorial Mode. Puzzles 
in Tutorial Mode and Puzzle Mode 
combined add up to 238! 


ierra's sage decision to release Dynamix's 
Incredible Machine means that the 3DO 
system can now boast one of, if not the, 
best puzzle games ever to have made it 
onto a computer or console format. 
Different to any other game released (except, of course, 
the sequel, Sid And ATs Incredible Joans) it offers two 
modes of play - either the player has to solve individual 
'puzzles' or build his or her own sprawling 'machine'. 
That might immediately put the technophobe off - but 
wait until you see the kind of thing Dynamix have in 
mind. 

In the Puzzle Mode, at the start of each new game, 
you'll be told your somewhat bizarre-sounding goal. 
That might be: 'Make the Monkey move' or 'Make all of 
the dynamite go off'. Confused? Well, you see, each 
new screen will be composed of several atomistic parts, 
connected in some way or other. You might have a 
'Pokey The Cat', a 'Mort The Mouse', a 'Dynamite 
Plunger', a 'See-Saw' and a 'Pinball Bumper' (there are 
70 different 'machine parts' in all) and be told to make 
Mort The Mouse get in his hole. Success relies on the 
player knowing the specific relationship between each of 
these elements (that Pokey The Cat makes Mort The 
Mouse run; that light shining onto a Magnifier will light 
a Fuse, etc.) and have a mind dextrous enough to be 


3D0 Magazine 50 February 1995 





























review 



Return Fire has come from nowhere and looks set to go down as one of, if not the, best two-player 
game on the 3DO system. Dazzling 3-D technology, stunning pre-generated landscapes, four awesomely 
powerful attack-vehicles and a challenge bigger than any faced by Schwarzenegger make this a bril¬ 
liant start to the year for the 3DO. Create your very own Lebanon in miniature - get Silent Software's 
exasperatingly addictive Return Fire. You wouldn't believe how much fun war could be. 


3DO Magazine ^ 1 February 1995 












3D0 


review 



Publisher: The 3DO Company C* TBA Developer: Silent Software Save Game: SRAM Slots Price: £TBA Available: TBA 




ike all the best games, Return Fire revolves 
around a beautifully simple premise - 
annihilate your opponent. Like all of the 
best games again, lurking beneath this 
simple surface are engagingly complex 
intricacies that beg to be explored and mastered. A 
potent concoction of Syndicate and Cannon Fodder, 
Return Fire brilliantly implements an isometric/top- 
down view of the action with miniaturised dogs of war 
as its players. 32-bit technology allows a revolutionary 
break from the static perspective and non-scrolling limi¬ 
tations of a fixed landscape, the 3DO providing a real¬ 
time generated backdrop with atmospheric 
zooms into the action, fast scrolling, detailed 
landscapes and realistic use of urban ter¬ 
rain. Static screenshots may not look much 
- but wait until you see the game's light¬ 
ning moves, and impressive, true 3D virtu¬ 
al display. 

Every game pits the green forces against 
the brown, irrespective of whether you're play¬ 
ing a one or a two-player game. Each side must 
send out a chosen vehicle (tank, APV, jeep or chopper) 
to journey through the enemy battlements to find the 
opponent's flag tower. The flag must then be returned 
(only the jeep can be used to actually recover it) to the 
Allied base to secure victory. Naturally though, it isn't 
that easy. Enemy battlements are huge, with Kafka- 
esque corridors of roads linking one encampment full of 
missile-firing turrets and gun-toting helicopters to anoth¬ 
er. The flag tower is often found right at the centre of 
enemy forces, accessible only after mad, deathly battle. 
Mines are everywhere you don't expect them to be, 
destroying your tank/whatever in one mighty explosion. 
Your opponent, moreover, may well have decided to 
abandon his search for your flag and just be gunning 
for you - chasing you down long, stretching roads in his 
mother of a helicopter. 


Vehicle selection is the most 
important immediate concern at 
the beginning of each game, but 
this is fairly simple at first. It's 
best to use the helicopter, initial¬ 
ly, to recon the area, discover 
where the enemy flag tower is so 
that you can determine the 
fastest, most efficient route to get 
there. Unfortunately, the heli¬ 
copters aren't the most effective 
vehicles to use against enemy 
jj- , battlements so, once 
you've worked out 
your way-points, it's 
best to fly back to 
^ your base and 
^ replace your craft 
with a tank or APV 


3DO 


Magazine o 

o* 


and wipe out a path 
to the flag. The APV is 

particularly effective at destroying airborne ene¬ 
mies, but both are excellent at punching a hole through 
the enemy's line, leaving the way fairly clear for your 
weak, poorly armed jeep to nip thorough to the flag and 
back. X 

The first one-player mission lets you get used to the 
way the game works. There are no enemy battlements, 
no enemy craft - just the flag tower. Silent Software 
have ensured that the learning curve given to the player 
is such that you're never confused, but always up 
against a challenge. Just as you think you've mastered 
the game's intricacies, another 'trick' is learnt, momen¬ 
tarily giving you an advantage over your opponent - 
until he/she discovers something you don't know and 
the game starts to swing in the other direction. At first, 
just shooting down an enemy helicopter with your tank is 
incredibly difficult, chances are it'll destroy you pretty 

Left, a plane's been downed above 
your APV. Below, a chopper is 
ready to launch. It's the most diffi¬ 
cult craft to control, but the fastest 
and good for checking out where 
trouble is likely to occur early on. 


The extraordinary zooming and scrolling of Return 
Fire is best demonstrated when your new vehicle 
rolls out of storage. The camera zooms in close as 
your tank rolls onto the tarmac, before smoothly 
pulling back to give a wide view of any enemies. 
This looks like no game ever seen on a console. 

quickly. But when you've stopped flailing wildly, and 
master the separately controlled turret, it begins to get a 
little easier. Eventually, with just a little bit of luck, you'll 
be shooting the things down left, right and centre. 

While the game's design is undoubtedly exceedingly 
good it's the graphics that go a long way to explain 
Return Fire's success. The 3D is perfect, the miniature 
craft and building are architectural marvels. The authen¬ 
ticity of the spiralling landscape means that the terrain is 
usable - you can actually shelter behind buildings and 
creep up on opposing forces. Some of the buildings are 
also 'interactive' - the player can re-fuel at oil installa¬ 
tions, or pick up ammo at enemy bases. Moreover, 
everything is up for being destroyed - most cities look 
like Beirut at the worst of its troubles, rubble and burning 
buildings lying prostrate beneath your feet. It's great fun 
levelling an enemy city in this way, especially in two- 
player mode, your devastating effect 
mirrored on your opponents crumpled 
face as you destroy his buildings, run 
over his (populated) tents and waste 
his forces. There can be no doubt that 
two player games are a key to a plat¬ 
forms success and the 3DO is fast 
gaining a valuable collection of them. 
As well as SSF2X, John Madden, FIFA 
Soccer and Off The Road Interceptor, 
thanks to Silent Software, the 3DO 
company can now include another 
one. And if Return Fire doesn't sell a 
hundred thousand pieces of hard¬ 
ware, the world will have proved itself 


3DO Magazine 52 1995- 



































Above, the brown tank and green APV merrily scoot around 
each others territory, blasting with gusto, blissfully ignorant 
of each other. If you spot your opponent collecting his flag, 
though, it's time to seek and destroy at great speed. 


an unfair place to be. 

It's the graphic details within Return Fire that make 
the game such a joy. You'll get a real kick when you 
destroy your first building and watch its tiny inhabitants 
running for cover. With your tank you can then run them 
over and hear the sickest of squishy noises. And don't 
think this is mindless violence. Fail to run them over and 
they'll start lobbing grenades at you or taking pot shots 
from unreachable corners. A gorgeous touch is being 
able turn the jeep into an amphibious craft - it's vital, in 
fact, when you need to get to a remote island but the 
bridge, connecting it to the mainland, has been 
destroyed by the enemy. 

Return Fire may seem like Sensible Software's much 
vaunted Cannon Fodder, and It is - but it's got so much 


more to it that you cannot fail to be blown away. 
Imagine Cannon Fodder with an instantly addictive, all¬ 
action, simultaneous two-player mode, state-of-the-art 
graphics, a true 3-D terrain, four types of perfectly mod¬ 
elled vehicles of destruction and a game engine requir¬ 
ing sophisticated strategy and planning. Only then can 
you possibly begin to appreciate just what an advance 
this game is, and what a wise Investment you made 
when you bought the most advanced console in the 
world, the 3DO - the only platform that could possibly 
have delivered such an extraordinary, and completely 
essential, title. Make sure that you reserve your very own 
copy today. □ dw 

3DO Magazine rating: ★★★★★ 



Your selection of hardcore military hardware sits 
snugly beneath ground, each offering unique 
advantages to be weighed up before selection. 


3D0 Magazine 53 February 1995- 


3D0 





















































































3D0 


review 


[Magazine 


Virtuoso 


Publisher: Elite © 0922 55852 Developer: Elite Save Game: Level Save Price: £44.99 Available: Now 




On the PC, iD's Doom has been cloned by the world and his dog. 
Quarantine, Isle Of The Dead, Corridor 7, Dr Radiaki - the list of 
doomed also rans is endless. Only one game generated the sort of 
hype to suggest it might be in with a fighting chance - Elite's 
Virtuoso, which is also one of the few to make it to your 3DO system. 


O n the PC, networked Doom reigns 
supreme. Business men have calculated 
that the loss of profits generated from the 
decreased efficiency of their work force 
runs into millions. Indeed, even within 
usually jaded software houses it's a 'banned' game - no 
one is allowed to play it until after working hours. 

It should be no surprise then to find a whole host of 
companies trying to cash in on iD's success - to provide 
stop-gap games until the release of LucasArts' Dark 
Forces and/or iD's very own SVGA Quake. Virtuoso 
fits very neatly into this category. A 'me too' game, 
there's very little about it that's unfamiliar. It opens with 
the central character standing with his back towards you 
whilst a number of crab/scorpion hybrid's creep 
towards you with poisonous intent. Those acquainted 
with these Wolfenstein inspired shooters won't have to 
think twice - will naturally reach for the fire button and 
pump the little buggers full of lead. 

A good start. The digitised, leather-clad, shotgun tot¬ 
ing sprite is exceedingly well animated, as are the ene¬ 
mies that surround him. Explosions are nicely gory - if 
slightly unrealistic - and the sound FX are meaty enough 
to give the game a little substance. However even in this 
first moment of glory there are tell-tale signs of the 
impending crapness to come. The sound track, per¬ 
formed by the unsigned band Thai Dyed Suicide, is sub¬ 
standard sub-pop/grunge and fails, wholeheartedly, to 
integrate itself with the game itself. You'll also immedi¬ 
ately notice that the environs are gritty, lacking both 
colour and detail, that you can't move and fire at the 
same time and if you try to dart out of the way of in¬ 
coming bullets, that movement is slow and jerky. 

In fact the 3DO system's version of Virtuoso is an 
almost exact replica of the PC one - which is ludicrous. 
The 3DO system excels at being able to generate texture 
maps on the fly. Its twin-custom graphics 
engine, with its bundle of built in tricks 
and cheats make it the perfect vehicle 
for the Doom type game so, in theory 
at least, its detail, resolution and/or 
speed of movement should have been 

A spider guards the end of level 
exit. Be wary of its poisonous bile. 


a considerable improvement over 
the PC Virtuoso. The fact that iTs 
slightly worse (it's certainly a lot 
slower than the game running on 
a standard 486 DX2 66Mhz PC) 
is criminal. 

Persevere, however, and you'll 
be rewarded with some neat little 
touches. The various 'monster' 
sprites that you'll find lurking 
throughout the game are always 
imaginative, and the three differ¬ 
ent levels (composed of five or 
more stages) provide a wide vari¬ 
ety of landscapes for you to 
explore. The programmers have 
also incorporated a number of 
characters you should recognise - 
there's Judge Dredd's robot from 
2000AD; Robocop's ED-209, the snowman from the 
Super Nintendo's Clay fighter... 

Yet for all these knowing references. Virtuoso remains 
very much a sub-standard game. The graphic engine 


just isn't in the same league as something like Crystal 
Dynamics' Off-World Interceptor or even EA's Escape 
From Monster Manor. This fact, coupled with the game- 
play faults of being too slow, not being able to turn 
around fast enough to shoot things coming from behind 
in time and the monstrous design flaw of not being able 
to move and shoot simultaneously make Virtuoso one of 
the weakest 3DO system releases so far. Even the rather 
unadventurous Demolition Man sub-game offers infinite¬ 
ly better graphics and action, and with the challenging 
depth of Slayer and smooth simplicity of Escape From 
Monster Manor as rivals, this is unlikely to make any 
impact on the 3DO market. An inauspicious launch for 
Elite then, who really should have responded to the 
many criticisms levelled at the PC version and drastically 
re-worked this poor Doom clone. □ dw 

3DO Magazine rating; ir 


^DO Magazine 54 February 1995 





















JAGUAR 


ETC 


new and used barf alns 
part exchange welcome 



0303 850410 


2ncl floor 88 Sandsate Road 
Folkestone Kent CT20 2AA. 


Mannerings 

Sound & Vision 

0181-422-2070/2778 


PANASONIC 3DO CENTRE 

TOP UK SOFTWARE 


Alone in the Dark £34.99 

Demolition Man £34.99 

Dragons Lair £34.99 

FIFA Soccer £37.99 

John Madden Football £35.99 
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Need for Speed £37.99 


Off World Interceptor £38.99 

Pataank £34.99 

Rebel Assault £37.99 

Road Rash £37.99 

Super Wing Commander£35.99 
Theme Park £38.99 

Full Software Range in Stock 


HARDWARE 

Panasonic 3DO Player inc. Joypad £379.99 
3DO Control Pad £37.99 


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EROTIC 3DO SOFTWARE STRICTLY EOR THE OVER 18s 

_ (These titles are also available for CD-i) _ 


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THEME PARK 44.99 

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GEX 44.99 

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3D0 


codes 


[Magazine 


System Codes 


We've been swamped with requests for Rebel Assault and Demolition Man codes over the last few 
weeks, but we've also managed to rustle up a few more, excellent cheats to make life easier. 


FIFA INTERNATIONAL SOCCER 



The ultimate football game on any system at present, 
this has all the handy cheats and trick modes of its 
MegaDrive parent, each offered after bashing a com¬ 
puter controlled team. If you're having difficulty 
though, here's the list in full. 

To enter a code, start a match and enter the com¬ 
bination (A, B and C buttons and L and R for shoulder 
buttons buttons) in the correct sequence whilst the 
menu for team strategy etc. is on screen. The game 
will inform you if you've entered it correctly, and all 
can be input simultaneously for a truly wacky game. 
Hot Potato Mode: CRABBRLABABBR 
Makes receiving the ball rather awkward. 

INVISIBLE WALLS MODE: ABBACABABBA 
Indoor football for all those players who keep wallop¬ 
ing the ball out of play. 

LASER BALL MODE: LACRBALL 

Because it's fast. 

GIANT PLAYER MODE: BABARBABBAR 

They're very big. 

BIG BALL MODE: BCBALLABALL 

Guess. 

METALLIC MEN MODE: BARCLBAABBA 

Armoured team. 

BEEFCAKE MODE: RALBACLABA 

Pink suits on super fast players. 

RADICAL CURVE MODE: CRCAABRABBL 

Unbelievable after touch. 

BRUTE MODE: RABBACLLBACL 

A newly vicious team. 

CRAZY BOUNCE MODE: LABARRACCA 

The world's gone mad. 

From Craig Milne, Aberdeen 

DEMOLITION MAN 

Passwords 

Whip through this slick tie-in on Normal Skill Level 
with these handy codes. I defy anyone to complete this 
bruiser on the hardest difficulty setting. 

21JNR2BCS 

MT3PH2V7Q 

HH69HJB94 

H5NMHJBW 

W8NN12Q2C 


M5WDC2KN5 

GPHRWZFRH 

GQG7J2YC9 

JR42G2PJH 

JOHN MADDEN FOOTBALL 

Giant Cheat 

Still the best sports simulation on any machine, this 
cheat turns your team into 12 foot giants. If nothing 
else, it's certainly ominous for your opponent. 

Press pause, then tap the top-right button, A then 
P. The crowd will cheer to let you know the cheat has 
worked. 

Cheat Cheat 

To expose the plays of your opponent (surely the most 
heinous of cheats), press B, top left, A and B. Another 
cheer, and now you need never lose. 

Press A and X when paused to reset these cheats if 
you're overcome with guilt. 

WAY OF THE WARRIOR 

Boss Codes 

This noisy and visually stunning beat-'em-up is a lot 
more fun with these secret cheats to use the two, enor¬ 
mous boss characters. Type in the the below as player 
names, go to VS mode, move the character selection 
box to the right of crimson Glory and hurrah, you've 
got the two biggest meanies to battle with ever seen. 

A Gavin Jun 11, 1970 - Play as Kull 
J Rubin, Jan 6, 1970 - Play as Abbot 
PARANOID MAY 5 1975 - Play In a rather weird 
cave. 


REBEL ASSAULT 



Level Codes 

A curious mixture of poor and playable games, this 
has had the office phone ringing non-stop, with impa¬ 
tient Star Wars fans demanding to know the later 
codes. Well, here they are, to be used on the easy 
setting. 

BOSSK Asteroids 

ENGRET A-Wing Surface 

RAIRRA Star Destroyer attack 

FRIJA Shoot Tie-Fighters before base, then ground 

forces at Mos Eisely: 


LAFRA More asteroids 

DERLIN Caves, chasing the Probot In snowspeeder 

MOLTOK At-Ats 

MORAG Stormtroopers 

TANTISS Protect transport 

OSWAFL River bed, Yavin training 

KLAATU Tie-Fighters, approaching Death Star 

IRENEZ Death Star surface 

LIANNA Surface cannon 

PAKKA Trench 

Failure to blast the core reactor with your photon tor¬ 
pedoes ends the game, sadly, so aim accurately if you 
don't want to have to restart. 


JAMMIT 



Level Codes 

This addictive game has had Dave and myself glued 
to the monitor trying to work through all of the differ¬ 
ent game variations. Here's all of them (playing as 

Roxy). 


DKRBNSN - 2 Hot 
STPKRNR - Poison 
SSNHYDN - Frenzy 
JNFRBCN - In 2 It 
LRNCHLS- Sweat 


PLWRHDS - Slams Only 
STWSPKN - Cut throat 


OFF-WORLD INTERCEPTOR 

Extra Money 

There's no doubt that with no save game or pass¬ 
words, this superb game is very difficult, so to enable 
you to splash out on every extra bit of hardware 
available, here's a brilliant cheat to get more money. 
Go to the options screen and press A, B, C, A, B, C, 
A, B, C, A, B, C, A, B, C, A, B, C and Left Shift. Pop to 
the shop and you'll have $9, 999, 990! 


SUPER STREET FIGHTER II X 

Be Akuma in Vs. Mode 

In the Vs. character select mode, highlight Ryu with 
your control pad, then simultaneously hold down all 
the kick and punch buttons and Select until Akuma's 
face appears. □ mew 

3DO Magazine 


■5DO Magazine 56 February 1995 
















3D0 


competition 



A 24 Carat 
GoldStar 


face The Challenge of The Futurel 
Your Chance To Win A Brand New GoldStar 3DO System 


Y 


ou've seen the 
news. You've 
read the 
reviews. Now 
here's your 
chance to win the most 
advanced home entertain¬ 
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Launched only this month, 
the GoldStar 3DO Interactive 
Multiplayer System is state- 
of-the-art technology at its 
very best. Fast, powerful and 
realistic, this system takes 
games playing into a new 
dimension. 

Based on advanced 3DO 
interactive technology, the 
GoldStar GPA 101M (to give 
it its official title) features a 
double-speed CD-ROM drive, 
a powerful digital signal to 
belt out stereo sound, full 
motion video capability - 
which will allow you to watch 
the latest video-CDs - and 
photorealistic images in 
smooth, full colour. 

To enter this exclusive compe¬ 
tition, all you have to do is 
answer the following 
question and send your reply 
on a postcard to: 

3DO Magazine GoldStar 
Competition, 

Paragon Publishing Ltd., 
Durham House, 

124 Old Christchurch Road, 
Bournemouth, 

Dorset BHl INF 


What storage device does 
the GoldStar 3DO System 
use? 

a. double speed CD-ROM 
drive 

b. hard disc 

c. cartridge based unit 

Closing date for entries is the 
30th of April. 



3DO Magazine 57 February 1995 
















letters 


CO 

O 

O 


3DO Interactive 


Champagne bottles and congratulatory faxes (well, more of the latter) from across the globe poured into our 
humble offices following the launch of 3DO Magazine, the enthusiasm of the industry being matched by the 
public vote of confidence, making it a very merry Christmas at Paragon towers. Whilst we confidently expected 
existing 3DO machine owners to try our new publication, we were surprised and pleased to discover that many 
people bought the magazine before buying a 3DO - we seem to have persuaded a lot of people to join the 
cause. Please address positive correspondence (or negative, if you must) to: 3DO Magazine Mail, Paragon 
Publishing Ltd., Durham House, 124 Old Christchurch Road, Bournemouth BHl INF or Fax us on 0202 299955. 


Dear Ed., 

Well, what can I say? Tm impressed! It looks like Tve 
made two good decisions within a month for a change: 
buying a 3DO and subscribing to this mag. 

Tm glad to see you have a news section that brings 
all the snippets of information together - it's usually the 
first thing I look for in any new mag. 

I thought the interviews were interesting and informa¬ 
tive: it's nice to know that there are people of this calibre 
in the 3DO's corner and they're not resting on their lau¬ 
rels but looking to the future (i.e. the M2 Accelerator) 
which, if what R. J. Mical says is true (and the software 
is good enough) should hold the machine up against the 
new super consoles (you know the ones I mean!), which 
don't look quite so impressive now. Any more interviews 
in the pipeline? 

More features please! The Wing Commander III arti¬ 
cle was pretty thorough and I liked the number of 
screenshots you used. After all, it's all very well writing 
about how good the game looks, but how do we know if 
all we get is text? 

I would also definitely like to see more profiles of 
other companies which are supporting the 3DO (with 
exclusive screenshots of their up-and-coming software 
titles of course!). 

Right, I think that's the grovelling finished with, so on 
to other matters. 

Flying Nightmares. I just hope that this will play as 
good as it looks because it should be outstanding. The 
only problem I have with this is the ten billion year wait 
until it's released! And is the Flightstick Pro out yet? 
What's the financial damage? 

What's happened to Theme Park^ I heard that it 
might not be released until January if at all! 

I must also congratulate Electronic Arts on their titles 
for the 3DO system, especially Road Rash and FIFA 
Soccer which are the best versions on any format (and I 
can't wait for Space Hulk). Any news of them doing NHL 
'95 Ice Hockey^ 

In closing, and just to cheer you up, I might write 
again! I could try editing this letter but I already edit a 
PBM newsletter and besides, you get paid for editing 
because that's what an Editor does (or is that 'delegate 
responsibility'? I can never remember that one...). 

Anyway, good luck with the magazine and I hope 
that the 3DO scene continues to gather speed. I've 
already got three mates to buy 3DOs after I showed 
them Road Rash\ 

Craig Milne, Aberdeen 

Glad you're happy with everything, Craig, and thanks 
for the FIFA codes. The magazine brief was to convey 
just how much activity was going on around the 3DO 
world, emphasising the long term potential and enor¬ 
mous industry support rather than just blasting through 
all the great games, and as you can see, we've contin¬ 
ued all the features you enjoyed and shall continue to 
hassle everyone in the industry for interviews as long 
as there's a phone in the office. 

Flying Nightmares does look fabulous - it's been 
one of the most eagerly received previews of last 
month - and the Flightstick Pro should be available 
soon, but nothing's confirmed as yet. 


Theme Park is scheduled (as I write) for a January 
13th release, so you should be able to get your hands 
on it by the time you read this. We'll have some rather 
superb cheat codes for that next month. 

I don't think EA's importance to the success of the 
3DO can be over estimated - their early releases hove 
made (and still are making) a tremendous impact - 
we're still ploying Road Rash and Madden to death in 
the office - and we're all counting down the minutes 
to Syndicate and Space Hulk. Just a five minute session 
of the latter, a few weeks ago, had us pleading with 
our favourite EA rep not to take it away. He did 
though. Nothing's confirmed on NHL '95, but I'd be 
surprised if EA didn't consider it a potential 3DO 
release for later this year. 

I asked our editor, Dave, what delegation meant, 
but he said he preferred to explain by demonstration, 
tapping his Mickey Mouse watch, sternly. On with the 
letters, I think... 

Dear 3DO Magazine, 

You've made a young man very happy over Christmas, 
with your staggeringly good launch issue. After months 
of trawling through infantile multi-formats trying to get a 
decent overview of 3DO software from the juvenile ranti- 
ngs of complete dullards, I've finally got a real games 
bible for my machine. I think I was most pleased by the 
high quality of your reviews and features, the up-market 
journalism reflected delightfully in the classy design that 
really caught my poorly eye (too many crap magazines). 

As a jaded ex-CD32 owner (it used to be the future 
of video games) the wonder of playing arcade perfect 
gems like Super Streetfighter // X is even more pro¬ 
nounced, and whilst I've been doing a lot of overtime at 
my typing temp job lately (big building, boring people) 
to pay off my 3DO overdraft, it's been worth it. The only 
problem is that I can't get out of debt, because super 
games like Need For Speed and JumpGate keep rob¬ 
bing me of my money. Life is hard. 

The buzz for 3DO at my local Game really is grow¬ 
ing, with gangs of doe-eyed sheep gawking at FIFA and 
Road Rash before jiggling their pound coins and bleat¬ 
ing forlornly. A quick glimpse at a 32X game usually 
finishes them off. It's great to have the best machine 
around. 

I don't have any questions, to be honest, I just wanted 
to convey my enthusiasm for your new project, and wish 
you well for the future. If you want to reward my heart¬ 
warming good nature with a year subscription, that'll be 
just fine, thanks. 

Sebasrian Paine, Winchester 

The rosy glow your praise imbued was swiftly lost 
(along with your subscription) at the cessation of your 
letter. More subtlety in future begging letters please. 


Dear 3DO Magazine, 

It's great to see a mag devoted to the 3DO at last, as I 
won't have to buy three separate mags to get my 3DO 
information anymore. 

Although the reviews and layout of the magazine 
was really good, it seemed a bit short, especially for 
£4.99. The CD was disappointing, being just a copy of 
the 3DO sampler disc released in the US more than six 
months ago, and the Off-World Interceptor demo wasn't 
exactly as action-packed as the picture you illustrated on 
your cover. 

Anyway, I've decided to subscribe, and wish you a 
successful future. Would it be possible to have a 
Japanese info section with import reviews, as this is 
about the biggest market In the world. Jap cover CDs 
are great too, full of new demos... take note. 

I'm looking forward to seeing your magazine 
improve and develop In the future, and wish you all the 
best of luck. 

Stephen Jenkins, Carisbrooke 

Whilst, superficially, the first issue may hove appeared 
slim, there was a lot of information packed on every 
page, don't you think? OK, so ^t was smaller than the 
overage console mag, but the market must be tested 
before we throw thousands of pounds on a new maga¬ 
zine, particularly a publication dedicated to a new 
machine. We're still cramming a bit this month, with so 
much software and news to cover, but I think we offer 
exceptional value for money for the amount of editori¬ 
al content. The enormous success of our first issue 
means the future looks bright for a larger magazine in 
the near future. 

I appreciate that if you'd already gotten hold of the 
3DO Sampler disc, appeal of our magazine must hove 
dimmed, but to be fair, the sampler disc wasn't offi¬ 
cially available in this country, and there would have 
been few people such as yourself who would already 
own the disc. I also think you're being a touch unfair 
suggesting that the disc wasn't up to much in the first 
place. As an introduction to some of the first 3DO 
games available in this country, I think it was an excel¬ 
lent teaser, with mostly playable demos of high quality 
releases. True, some people would already have 
bought several of these games, but most would not - 
remember the 3DO system has only been available in 
the UK a few months officially - and certainly from the 
response we've received, most readers seem more 
than satisfied. Future discs are being negotiated now, 
and we'll make every effort to ensure that subsequent 
discs are eagerly received. 

Jap coverage - our 3DO World section deals with 
all that's hot in Japan and elsewhere, OK? □ mew 

3DO Magazine 


3D0 Magazine 58 February 1995 














RNDCOMMS TODAY 


The UK’s best selling mag 
Says who? 



Jack Schofield 


The Trade: ^ Great ^^ Startling^, ^excellent” 
- Computer Trade Weekly 
Our Readers: We're the UK's best-Sellers __— 


This Month: 

The Internet in Africa - 
How the global 
And Doing your 
What will 
Plus: The UK's 


( 





3D0 


directory 


Highly Recommended 


Where Mark Wynne rounds up the best of lost month's gomes. 


all of which demand serious attention... 



FIFA International, Electronic Arts, £44.99 

A stunning showcase for the technical prowess of the 3DO, and, 
specifically, the EA Canadian team who programmed it, FIFA 
International is one of the first, true Next Generation titles to appear, 
with phenomenal graphics, superlative sonics and a thoroughly enjoy¬ 
able football game itself tucked beneath all the stunning gloss. There's 
a huge range of camera views, tournaments, obscenely slick replay 
modes and, most impressively of all, a six-player game (if you've got 
a few 3DO joypads), and whilst gameplay could have been tweaked 
to correct a few inadequacies with the 16-bit original, few will be 
immune to the thrill this game invokes. Essential. 



Road Rash, Electronic Arts, £44.99 

Taking a playable but technically uninspiring MegaDrive racing 
game, EA wrapped some of the most exciting graphics ever seen on a 
home console around this simple race-and-punch bike game, creating 
a 'must have' title that still rates as one of the most sumptious peices of 
programming around. With superb FMV interludes that actually add 
to the game rather than distract, thumping rock tracks from bands 
you've actually heard of (Sound Garden, Therapy? etc.) and furiously 
compelling gameplay, this is a prime example of just what your 3DO 
can do. Without peer in its genre [Need For Speed being more of a 
simulation than an arcade game), this is unmissable. 



The Horde, Crystal Dynamics, £39.99 

Although this sneaked onto PC first. The Horde was originally devel¬ 
oped for the 3DO, by none other than Crystal Dynamics, and it's one 
of the finest original games we've played. The premise is simple - pro¬ 
tect, nurture and reap profit from small areas of land, defending your¬ 
self and your property from regular attacks from red, hungry 
Hordlings - but this doesn't convey the huge satisfaction gained from 
play. It's like no other console title, combining utterly addictive game¬ 
play, marvellous rewards for successful play and some of the best 
FMV sequences ever, being funny, literate and involving. The most 
unique title on 3DO, and essential for arcade and strategy fans alike. 



John Madden Football, Electronic Arts, £39.99 

The first game on the 3DO system to really knock the 16-bit consoles 
on the head. Madden is a definitive piece of programming, providing 
one of the most complete marriages of graphical panache and richly 
rewarding gameplay around. Initially, it's the graphics that will blow 
you away - the superbly detailed players, smooth scrolling stadium 
and stunning action replays - but this is the first American Football 
game to to look so good it'll hook anyone into the initially confusing 
sport. The complexity of the game is its own reward, and whilst one- 
player games are thrilling, with another joypad and a friend to battle 
aginst, this is the best two-player game available on any system. 



Samurai Shodown, Crystal Dynamics, £39.99 

A hip Neo Geo fighting game, this has been faultlessly converted to 
3DO by the prolific Crystal Dynamics, retaining all the quirky original¬ 
ity of the arcade game to recreate a hugely enjoyable beat-'em-up. 
The hook is the inclusion of weapons, from enormous swords to 
vicious dogs, and this gives the genre a much appreciated shot in the 
arm. The generous blood spilling and thrilling characters all combine 
to make this a stunning conversion, which may not have the long term 
appeal of Super SFII Turbo, but looks just as good and could inspire a 
similar level of fanatical worship-dom on the 3DO as it has every¬ 
where else. Another breath-taking flourish by Crystal Dynamics. 



The Need For Speed, Electronic Arts, £44.99 

A dream come true for boy-racers the world over, this is the most real¬ 
istic and thrilling race game ever, with superbly rendered dream cars, 
long, challenging tracks plus about two tonnes of slick presentation. 
Competing against computer controlled opponents along busy 
American highways and countryside. Need For Speed has the most 
gorgeous interface ever designed - never has a video game captured 
the thrill of driving with such accuracy and to such exciting effect. This 
is one of the most addictive games around, and with a superb action 
replay feature, multiple views, tough opponents and realistic sound 
effects, is guaranteed to hook anyone. A transcendental experience. 



Off-World Interceptor, Crystal Dynamics, £39.99 

Ripping out the successful graphics engine of their brilliant Total 
Eclipse, Crystal Dynamics have casually created a visually stunning 
road-combat game that simply couldn't be done any other machine. 
With beautiful, enemy infested planet surfaces to race through, drop- 
dead music and high addictivity, this is enormous fun, particularly 
enjoyable as a two-player, split screen head-to-head. Although it lacks 
the finesse of, say. Need For Speed, for arcade fans this is hardcore 
entertainment, damaged only by a lack of a save game facility, which 
makes repeated solo play exhausting. Technically faultless, this offers 
satisfying short-term fun and endless two-player war. 



Super Street Fighter II Turbo, Panasonic, £60 

What can we say? The most accurate conversion of the most famous 
arcade game, the 3DO could have no better ally for its cause than this 
exemplary title. All the characters, all the moves, special combinations 
and brilliant sound, this is Street Fighter II in your own home at a frac¬ 
tion of the cost. True fans will need Capcom's special pad to get the 
most out of the game, as the 3DO pad isn't that comfortable for long 
stretches of button bashing, but it's a small additional outlay for the 
privilege of playing this mega-game. Impressive enough to convert 
any novice to the joys of this superior beat-'em-up, there's no reason 
anyone should be without this game, except perhaps poverty. 



Theme Park, Electronic Arts, £34.99 

A brilliant twist on Sim City, this replaces the boring task of urban 
renewal with the thrilling job of running a theme park. Vending 
machines, entertainers, bouncy castles and eventually thrill-packed 
roller coasters, this has near limitless scope for building and maintain¬ 
ing a small slice of heaven. Theme Park immediatley attracts more 
than Sim City since it's so much more fun to watch your visitors, ask 
them questions and lure them onto rackety, tumble-down rides, than 
just stare at a distant town. This is very seductive, simple, yet extraor¬ 
dinarily sophisticated and it remains one of the most brilliant games 
ever written, with the 3DO version being the best yet. 


3D0 Magazine 60 February 1995 


















6 fl(ne SHUCK 

Oealmg m 3D0 stnce February 1994 Itle are the marhet leaders m this fidd 


nwsuiraijjGA 

Alone in the Dark 
Demoition Mon 
Need for Speed 
Oex 

Iron Angel OTA 
Rebel Assault 
Rood Rash 
Samurai Showdown 
Total Edpse 
Theme Park 
ArK>ther World 
Bottle Chess 
Mega Race 
MghtTrap 

Off World Interceptor 
Skiyer 

Space Shuttle 
Star control II 
Virtuoso 

Waiolai C C Golf 
Way of the Warrior 
Dragons lair 
Rfa&>ccer 
Monster maixx 
Burning Soldier 
Grldders 

kxxecMDle Machine 
Maddog Mcree 
Oceans felow 
Rashback 
Dragon 

Maddens Football 
Jurassic Park 
Sherlock Holmes 
Potoonk 

Pebble Beach Golf 
Powers Kingdom 
Shockwave 
Opn, Jumpgate 
Soccer Kid 
Streetfighter 2 Turbo 
Wing Commander 
TheHoorde 
Twisted 


wt* r --- 

34.99 

34.99 

43.99 

44.95 

34.99 

39.99 
39.99 

39.99 

29.99 

42.99 

29.99 

29.99 

39.99 

32.99 

34.99 

39.99 

33.99 

29.99 

39.99 

36.99 

39.99 

29.99 

38.96 

34.99 

33.99 

29.99 

27.95 

39.99 

38.95 
CaH 

39.95 

29.99 

34.99 

29.99 

29.99 

27.95 

34.99 

39.99 

34.99 

29.99 

54.99 

34.99 
34.99 
34.99 


20.00 

25.00 

30.00 

30.00 

25.00 

25.00 

26.00 

25.00 

15-00 

30.00 

20.00 

15.00 

15.00 

20.00 

20.00 

25.00 

15.00 

20.00 

20.00 

25.00 

20.00 

15.00 

26.00 

20.00 

20.00 

15.00 

16.00 

16.00 

15.00 

N/A 

30.00 

15.00 

15.00 

16.00 

15.00 

15.00 

20.00 

20.00 

15.00 

20.00 

40.00 

20.00 

20.00 

20.00 


f I8£ £49.99 

O 

HYATT World Cup Golf 

S.2Q.Q9 With this ADI 

o 

UK 3D0 089.99 

r uiamifiiniPTonsT. 

DDUDLGVDVIiOfl 


Maa Order 


O 


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Bug seLL S< 
excDATXje 
QATnes <S< SAve 
cnopey! 

o 

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imf ialnrefy axaft fafatat bf aWfaa (7-10 4aft). Wa eaa 
alsa baat aatf af aar a a ayatitara ariaat, jatt ^baaa tba 
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i THEN LOOK OUT FOR OUR SMALLER 
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FIFA SOCCER 

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OFF WORLD INTERCEPTOR £36.00 

JOHN MADDEN 

£37.00 

SLAYER 

£39.00 

ROAD RASH 

£39.00 

SOCCER KID 

£27.00 

NEED FOR SPEED 

£39.00 

THE HORDE 

£34.00 

REBEL ASSAULT 

£39.00 

SUPER WING COMM 

£34.00 

SUPER STREETFIGHTER II TURBO £52.00 

PATAANK 

£29.00 

SHOCKWAVE II 

£27.00 

SHERLOCK HOLMES 

£35.00 

FAMILY FEUD 

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STAR CONTROL 2 

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VIRTUOSO 

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SAMURAI SHODOWN 

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3D0 


directory 


[Magazine 



Alone In The Dork 
Infogrames, £39.99 

The game that made Infogrames' name, Alone In The Dark 
shattered preconceptions about what PC gaming was about 
when it was released in the winter of 1993. Multiple camera 
angles, haunting polygon graphics and a Voodoo inspired 
storyline made it the most intimate and atmospheric adventure 
of the time. It still looks pretty amazing even now, and is well 
worth a look - especially if you're a fan of Lovecraft inspired 
chillers. 

(issue 1, Raring: ★★★★) 

Another World 
Interplay, £39.99 

Originally an Amiga game. Another World was a welcome 
twist on the platform genre. Using rotoscoped sprites and inti¬ 
mate camera angles it achieved a cinematic gloss for the plat¬ 
form genre - quite an achievement at the 16-bit time. The 
3DO system's version doesn't tamper with the game's near 
perfect fundamentals, but adds 256 colours to bring the game 
up to date a little. A stylish conversion of a 16-bit classic. 

(issue 1, Raring: ★★★) 

Battle Chess 
Krisolis, £39.99 

All 3-D chessboards, bar none, are fundamentally flawed in 
that a piece closest to the screen will obscure those pieces 
behind it. Battle Chess doesn't prove to be an exception to the 
rule, and the visual-candy isn't sweet enough to make the 
extra squinting that's required worthwhile. To its credit the 32- 
bit RISC chip of the 3DO system powerhouses a V8 chess 
engine and the game incorporates a clear and simple 2-D 
board for the more serious player. 

(issue 1, Raring: ^Ar'Ar) 

Burning Soldier 
Panasonic, £39.99 

A distinctly Japanese game. Burning Soldier follows where 
Microcosm and Novastorm have been before by transposing 
interactive sprites onto an uninteractive, pre rendered back¬ 
drop. Naturally that makes for a fairly linear adventure, but 
one also with in-your-face manga esque graphics to whet the 
appetite of any shoot-'em-up fan. 

(issue 1, Raring: ★★) 

Dragon's Lair 
Elite, £39.99 

More of a cartoon than a game, Sullivan Bluth's arcade classic 
wows those who watch the game, but frustrates those who are 
actually playing it. Gameplay is restricted to pressing the cor¬ 
rect button at exactly the right time. This gets very tedious. The 
quality graphics - drawn at the Don Bluth studios - are amaz¬ 
ing however, and can be attributed to the game's cult success, 
(issue 1, Raring: 

Escape From Monster Manor 
Electronic Arts, £39.99 

The 3DO system's answer to iD's Wolfenstein/Doom games 
shows that the 3DO system is more than capable of the first 
person 3D perspective arcade game currently causing such a 
sensation on the PC. In fact, EFMM shows that the 3DO sys¬ 
tem, with its ability to create translucent sprites and gorgeous 
texture maps, is more than a match for its 15 year old coun¬ 
terpart. Unfortunately, what EFMM lacks is iD's design skill, 
and the pure, unadulterated rush of the their Doom games. 
Let's hope Art Data Interactive (respxjnsible for porting Doom 
and Doom 2) can merge the technology with the gameplay, as 
this is rather dull. 

(issue 1, Raring: ★★★) 


The most important thing for any new console is software. Without it 
you've got an expensive lump of plastic of no use whatsoever. 
Fortunately though, no 3DO system owner need worry about that 
problem. With over 50 games already out, and many more to come, 
the 3DO system boasts a diverse and quality-packed back catalogue. 


FIFA Inlemorionol 
Electronic Arts, £44.99 

The most stylish and visually impressive soccer game there has 
ever been, Electronic Arts met the huge pre-release hype with 
a product unusually more than worthy of the attention. From 
the superb FMV intro, spliced with in-game action scenes 
hardly distinguishable from real-life, to the multitude of cam¬ 
era angles, slow motion controls and sound FX, FIFA 
International is a game that looks good enough to eat. Purists 
may argue that gameplay isn't a match for the no frills 
Sensible Soccer, but then they're just sad. Worth buying a 
3DO system for, especially with the four player option. 

(issue 1, ★★★★★} 

Gridders 

The 3DO Company, £39.99 

36 levels of torturous puzzling action, Gridders is one of the 
more unusual games to have made its way onto the 3DO sys¬ 
tem. The aim of the game Is to collect gems, secreted within 
moving blocks. To get the gems out you have to stop the 
blocks moving - a feat far from simple. Most blocks won't stop 
when you stand in their way, they'll just crush you. Gridders is 
entertaining for a while but the lack of any real catch means 
that its pleasures are ephemeral - you'll soon want to move 
onto a game with a little more substance. Like Shangai Triple 
Threat... A reasonable attempt to create the success of a puz¬ 
zler like Tetris, but ultimately flawed. 

(issue !,★★★) 

John Madden Football 
Electronic Arts, £39.99 

Inarguably the best American Football game on any format 
ever. EA's masterpiece merges together incredibly detailed, 
beautifully animated sprites, with stereo sound, FMV and 
gameplay made in heaven. John Madden Football also comes 
with a plethora of options allowing the complete beginner and 
the football pro alike the perfect level of competition. Brilliant 
in one player mode, unmissable in two. 

(issue 1, Raring: irkitkit) 

MegaRace 
Mindscape, £39.99 

Developed by French software house, Cryo, MegaRace was 
initially developed for the PC before being updated and uprat¬ 
ed for the 3DO system. Using pre-rendered backdrops the 
scenery is naturally stunning, and the foreground sprites (the 
cars) surprisingly realistic. Unfortunately, MegaRace suffers 
from the infliction that all pre-rendered games do - shallow¬ 
ness of gameplay. It's all too simplistic and repetitive. 

(issue 1, Raring: ★★★) 

Night Trap 
Virgin, £39.99 

Oh dear. Originally developed for the MegaCD, Nightrap is a 
sad little exploitation title that goes for the adolescent audience 
by offering the player the chance to view semi-clad girlies run¬ 
ning about a besieged house. The FMV is of a high standard - 
much better than the acting - and prsentation is very slick, but 
this is killer blow to FMV heavy products, with very little 
involvement. Our rating soys it all. 

(issue 1, Raring: 


Off-World Interceptor 
Crystal Dynamics, £39.99 

Off World Interceptor is one of those games that couldn't be 
done on any other machine, relying on the 3DO system's twin 
custom engine to generate its glorious backdrops in real time. 
The graphic engine is, in fact, a variant of the Total Eclipse 
one, only this time it's been used to build a racing game - 
with a difference. Winning here doesn't mean getting past the 
finishing line first, but destroying your enemy before he/she 
destroys you. With lasers, missiles, bombs, etc. at your dispos¬ 
al there's going to be explosions aplenty. Okay in one-player 
mode (lack of a save game is frustrating), brilliant in two. 

(issue 1, kkkkk) 

PaTaank 

Crystal Dynamics, £39.99 

Instead of the conventional top down view of the pinball table, 
P.F. Magic actually place fbe camera behind the pinball. Stick 
with it and the game begins to make some sort of (weird) 
sense. Instead of having flipp>ers your 'craft' has a supply of 
velocity which you must use to guide it around, hitting power- 
ups and bonuses as you go. Odd, but strangely enjoyable, it's 
certainly an acquired taste. 

(issue 1, Raring: ★★★) 

Powers Kingdom 
Panasonic, £39.99 

A very Japanese RPG which boasts some impressively cine¬ 
matic effects. There's plenty of combat and it's quite addictive, 
however over the long term it does suffer from repetitiveness. 
Not exciting enough to please arcade buffs, and not sophisti¬ 
cated enough to woo RPG addicts, this is an interesting failure, 
(issue 1, Raring ^^:Ar) 

Real Pinball 
Panasonic, £39.99 

More conventional than Pataank, Real Pinball dispenses with 
the top-down view of a pinball table, opting instead for the 
more realistic foreshortened view. Unfortunately, the poorly 
defined graphics make everything in the distance almost 
impossible to see. Real Pinball is also poorly programmed with 
the ball moving as though it's surrounded by treacle. Not one 
of the best games the 3DO system has to offer. 

(issue 1, Raring ^) 

Rise Of The Robots 

Art Data Interactive, £44.99 

Rise Of The Robots was in development for so long that many 
began to doubt that it would ever arrive. Arrive it did, howev¬ 
er, and immediately confounded the sceptics with its glorious 
graphics and okay-ish gameplay. Rise Of The Robots may be 
no match for SuperStreet Fighter 2 in respect of its combat 
engine (you can't even jump over your opponent!), but its visu¬ 
als are truly next generation stuff - if you're shallow enough to 
care about such things... 

(issue 1, Raring 'A'^Ar^'A') 

Road Rash 

Electronic Arts, £44.99 

Another game that could only be done on the 3DO system. 


3D0 Magazine 02 February 1995 















EA's Road Rosh is a glorious insight into things to come. 
Marrying orcode-slyle instant addiction with home computer 
style depth it's also, arguably, the best game released on the 
3DO system to date. With over five different types of terrain, a 
sound track including the likes of Therapy? and SoundGarden, 
increasingly powerful motorbikes and brilliant FMV this is a 
'must have' game - only just missing out on being perfect by 
the absence of a two-player mode. 

(issue 1, RaHng; ★★★★★) 

Sewer Shark 
Virgin, £39.99 

With Blade Runner's FX whiz John Dykstra responsible for 
directing the game, the cinematic experience of Digital 
Pictures behind him. Sewer Shark was always going to be an 
FMV-heavy product with a distinctly movie-style look and feel. 
What's surprising, perhaps, is that gameploy, though limited, 
isn't actually all that bad with fast, frenetic shoot-'em-up action 
throughout. It's just a shame about the incredibly cheesy, all- 
American dialogue and the limitations of a game engine over¬ 
shadowed by such products as Shock Wave (see below). 

(issue 1, Rating: 

Shockwave 
Electronic Arts, £39.99 

Although this features some of the most impressive presenta¬ 
tion around (the end-of-the-world-is-nigh scenario is superbly 
realised), gameploy is rather lacklustre, with simple objectives 
and overly long, repetitive missions. Fans of the blasting genre 
should be entertained by the action though - few would deny 
the technical accomplishment achieved - and the newly 
launched data disc. Operation JumpGate, with five new mis¬ 
sions, certainly provides a much more challenging and enjoy¬ 
able game. It's just a shame you need to buy the original to 
play the new missions. 

(issue 1, Rating: ★★★) 

Samurai Shodown 
Crystal Dynamics, £39.99 

Samurai Showdown is widely regarded as the best beat-'em- 
up available on the saturated Neo Geo market. Huge, colour¬ 
ful, brilliantly animated sprites, richly detailed backdrops and 
twelve very different characters to choose from make the game 
an immensely rewarding experience. It may not be quite as 
fast as SSFIIX, nor quite so sophisticated, but its bold charac¬ 
ters, colours and wide variety of locations put this neck and 
neck with its better known peer. 

(issue 1, Rating: ★★★★★) 

Slayer 

SSI/Lion Entertainment, £39.99 

Well known on the PC for their Ravenloft series, SSI looks set 
to make a respectable name for themselves on the 3DO system 
too. Slayer uses a graphic engine similar to that in Doom, giv¬ 
ing the player a first person perspective to view the action 
around him. It feels slightly more arcadey than most computer 
based RPGs - there is, for example, an emphasis on combat - 
yet there's enough that's typical of the genre to satisfy even 
traditionalists. A welcome addition to the 3DO system's 
increasingly diverse back catalogue. 

(issue 1, Rating: ★★★★) 

Soccer Kid 
Krisalis, £39.99 

Soccer Kid Is one of the better platform games to have been 
released Into the console world over the last year. One of the 
main reasons for this is that the eponymous hero is able to do 
more than just run and jump, but also use his ball to cannon 
opponents, jump to high up places and so reach otherwise 
inaccessible areas. These skills allow for more sophisticated 
gameplay and varied scenarios - which has to be a good 
thing in this the most tired genre of them all. Well coded and 
great fun. 

(issue 1, RaHng 

Star Control II 

Crystal Dynamics, £39.99 

Star Control was originally released far before my time in the 


ascetic days of 8-bit games and its conversion to the 3DO 
does little to enhance the geriatric look. Sprites are blobby, 
backgrounds near non-existent - yet that doesn't matter too 
much. This game is all about gameploy. One player mode is 
good, the two-player shoot-'em-up action plain fantastic. 
Once you've popped you just won't be able to stop. 

(issue 1, RaHng: ★★★★) 

Super Street Fighter IIX 
Panasonic, £60 

The definitive beat-'em-up, Capcom's Street Fighter 2 sold 
more 16-bit Super Nintendos than any other game. An 
incredibly sophisticated combat engine allowed for moves, 
countermoves and even counter-counter moves so that master¬ 
ing the intricacies of the games was near impossible. The 3DO 
system's version is naturally the most comprehensive conver¬ 
sion of them all being arcade-perfect. Despite the slightly high 
price, this is one of the select group of 'must have' games, 
absolutely unmissable for any serious beat-'em-up fan. 

(issue 1, RaHng: ★★★★★) 

Super Wing Commander 
Electronic Arts, £39.99 

First released on the PC as long ago as 1991, the game's 
developers. Origin, have re-written the original Wing 
Commander game to take account of the 3DO system's 
impressive hardware. As well as replacing the drab 1940's 
style in-game sections with state-of-the-art FMV, the in-game 
graphics are now fully textured mapped and as super-smooth 
as only the 3DO system allows. Indeed the only thing that has 
stayed the same is Origin's insistence on a strong narrative to 
provide a backdrop to the action. Intelligent and action- 
packed - what more could you ask for, except, perhaps. Wing 
Commander ///? 

(issue 1, RaHng: ★★★★) 

The Horde 

Crystal Dynamics, £39.99 

An inspired idea perfectly translated into binary form. The 
Horde successfully integrates a number of gaming styles into a 
brilliantly comprehensive package. The object of the game is 
simple - protect your village from the Hordlings and so allow 
it to grow and flourish. Actually achieving that goal will be for 
from simple, however. You'll have to set your traps in the right 
place, position your Knights and Archers where they're need¬ 
ed - and run about like a mad thing squishing the vile red 
beasts with your trusty sword. Entertaining and addictive, this 
is a frighteningly good game, with concept perfectly realised, 
(issue 1, RaHng: ★★★★★) 

The Lost Files Of Sherlock Holmes 
Electronic Arts, £39.99 

The Lost Files Of SherIcKk Holmes was one of the first 'multi- 
media' releases, appearing on the PC sometime ago now. Its 
tag of multimedia was acquired simply by virtue of the FMV 
sections which would pop up in a small window were you to 
talk to someone, or an event was triggered. Unsurprisingly the 
FMV will foil to inspire many 3DO system owners now, which 
leaves the gameplay. Unfortunately, this is for too linear and 
slow moving to provide long-lasting appeal. 

(issue 1, RaHng: kk) 

The Need For Speed 
Electronic Arts, £44.99 

Screenshots don't do The Need For Speed justice for the sim¬ 
ple reason that it's not the motionless car sprites that are 
impressive, but the clever mathematics that govern them. 
Perhaps for the first time ever in the console world the player 
is provided with vehicles whose momentum feels eerily real - a 
fact that makes the crashes so visually authentic and spectacu¬ 
lar. There are eight super-cars to race (and trash) including 
the Porsche 911, Ferrari Testerossa, Dodge Viper and the 
Honda NSX, plus any of these cars as your pace opponent. 
Driving has never, ever been so fun. 

(issue 1, RoHng: 

Theme Pork 
Electronic Arts, £34.99 


Bullfrog's brilliantly addictive sim game set within the craaazy 
world of the Theme Park gives the player complete control 
over a mass of variables, and abandons him there. As you'd 
expect, each of these variables is intricately linked - put an ice 
cream vendor too close to a ride, for example, and you'll have 
kids throwing up everywhere. An incredibly compulsive game, 
Theme Park will appeal to those 3DO system players who 
want a little more than just fast, photon spitting sprites from 
their games. Atmospheric and absorbing, this is a stunning 
piece of entertainment. 

(issue 1, RaHng: ★★★★★) 


Magazine | 


Total Eclipse 

Crystal Dynamics, £39.99 

One of the first games to have come out on the 3DO system 
and also one of the best. Crystal Dynamics' Total Eclipse gen¬ 
erates imagery in real time on a par with anything in pre-ren- 
dered games. Total Eclipse allows you real freedom of move¬ 
ment (within a fairly wide corridor) to explore its gorgeously 
detailed, yet terribly hostile environment. With sublime sound 
FX and music, 20 levels (including terrifying tunnel sections) a 
wide array of weapons and brilliantly rendered enemies, this 
is marred only by an extraordinarily high difficulty setting, 
(issue 1, RaHng: ★★★★) 


Twisted 

Electronic Arts, £39.99 

One of the most innovative and intriguing games for the 3DO 
system yet. Twisted uses the 3DO system's FMV capability to 
produce the world's first true multimedia gameshow. The basic 
objective is for you, and up to five friends, to get to the top of 
a spiralling stair case. Naturally, getting there will be difficult 
with all sorts of mental puzzles and general knowledge tests 
put in your way. Wisely, EA have included various difficulty 
settings so that both the adult and the child can be catered for 
simultaneously. Bizarre, innovative and good fun. 

(issue 1, RaHng: ★★★) 


Waialae Country Club 
Panasonic, £39.99 

Despite the obvious lack of courses in Waialae Country Club, 
the game still wins you over with gorgeous digitised graphics, 
which are much more impressive than US Gold's World Cup 
rival. Gameplay isn't quite so sophisticated though, and whilst 
novices will be satisfied by this slick, polished sim, serious 
golfers will be left wanting much more in the way of variety. 
Considering the space available on a CD, the course deficien¬ 
cy can only be blamed on laziness rather than memory restric¬ 
tions, a fault that can be levelled at all 3DO system golf soft¬ 
ware at present. 

(issue 1, RaHng: ★★★★) 


Way Of The Warriar 
Interplay, £39.99 

Whilst the extravagant, boldly digitised characters of Warrior 
immediately inspire excitement, play reveals a relatively poor 
Mortal Kombat clone. A hard rock soundtrack blasts along 
with the bloodthirsty action, and some of the backdrop 
designs are extraordinary, but play is awkward, the controls 
lacking an intuitive feel and close quarter combat's difficult to 
accomplish. Flawed fun. 

(issue 1, RaHng: ★★★) 


World Cup Golf 
US Gold, £39.99 

An altogether more serious stab at the golfing genre, this 
doesn't quite succeed in being the portentous sim to end all 
golfing sims it clearly wants to be. The digitised graphics are 
rather drab and the much vaunted FMV clips of your tee-offs 
don't really work. However, the degree of control available 
over the ball is impressive, as are the enormous array of play 
options and tournament styles. Sadly, a lack of courses crip¬ 
ples this as much as its less ambitious golfing rivals, and the 
rather sluggish nature of play will alienate non-genre fans baf¬ 
fled by the pace. 

(issue 1, RaHng: ★★★★) 

3DO Magazine 


3D0 Magazine 63 February 1995- 


3DO 













3D0 


previews 


I 


[Magazine 







The world of 3DO software just keeps expanding. Below is a list of the titles already 
announced, but there's many more in development across the world, including 
several EA titles already in production for the M2 upgrade. 


ART DATA INTERACTIVE 

Doom I 

The phenomenally successful first-person perspective 
blaster is upgraded for the 3DO sysem. [Spring] 

Doom II: Hell On Earth 

The current PC mega-hit is bound to be huge on 3DO. 
[Spring] 

CRYSTAL DYNAMICS 

Cyber Clash 

Heavily armed robots clash in a spectacular 3D arena. 
[Spring] 

Gex 

Hype-cute, hyperactive platformer. [January] 



DIGITAL PICTURES 

Corpse Killer 

A Caribbean-set, FMV heavy shoot-'em-up which 
requires a light-gun for best results. [TBA] 

Supreme Warrior: Ying Heung 

A bizarre FMV fighting game. [TBA] 

DOMARK 

Flying Nightmares 

State-of-the-art sim based around Harrier jumpjet. 
[April] 

ELECTRONIC ARTS 

PGA Tour Golf 

Likely to be the very best golf game there has ever 
been (honest!), despite the stiff competition from US 
Gold and T&E Soft. [Soon] 

Syndicate 

A subtly re-worked version of the PC version. 
Syndicate should be a release that everyone wants. 
Hugely atmospheric and entertaining, it'll stretch both 
your mind and your trigger finger. Ballistically huge. 
[April] 

Space Hulk 

A raved over shoot-'em-up cum strategy hybrid based 
on the famous board game is brilliantly upgraded for 


the 3DO system. [March] 

Wing Commander 3 

The most expensive video gome ever made with stun¬ 
ningly smooth FMV, and dazzling 3D in-game action. 
Stars Mark 'Luke Skywalker' Hamill. 



ELITE 

Power Slide 

A 3D rallying game with the emphasis on realism. 
[June] 

Dirt Racer 

Elite's attempt at the Off-The Road Race game. [April] 


GAMETEK 


Quarantine 

A Doom-style gome on wheels, shooting and running 
over zillions of enemies. [Soon] 

Hell 

A cyberpunk adventure starring none other than 
Dennis Hopper as Mr Beautiful. Grace Jones co-stars, 
along with femme fetale, Stephanie Seymoure. A sure¬ 
fire hit? [April] 



INFOGRAMES 

Alone In The Dark 2 

More of the same superb stuff, only bigger and even 
better. [Spring] 

Alone In The Dark 3 

The final installment. This time set in the Wild West (in 
a ghost town no less). [May] 


INTERPLAY 

Kingdoms 

400Mb of FMV is brilliantly integrated into a classic 
adventure. Sequels are already being planned, as is a 
coin-op version. [TBA] 

MINDSCAPE 

A. Maze 

A stunning first-person perspective SF sports game for 
up to eight players. [TBA] 

Dragon Lore 

A mythological adventure with stunning, pre-rendered 
graphics from Cryo. [August] 

Warriors 

A 3D fighting game which, using Atried's own 3D Bio- 
Motion system, is claimed to the most realistic yet. 
[TBA] 

Panzer General 

Superb strategy game from none other than SSI 
(Strategic Studies Institute). Raved about on the PC, if 
you like strategy games, you'll love this. [May] 



PANASONIC 

Myst 

Acclaimed and atmospheric CD-ROM adventure 
comes to the 3DO system. A smash on the PC its 
quirky puzzles and amazing pre-rendered visuals 
gave creators, Robyn and Rand Miller, an unparal¬ 
lelled following. A 'must have' for adventure 
aficionados. [TBA] 

Seal of the Pharaoh 

Intriguing Japanese, first-person perspective RPG 
recently redubbed for the American market. [TBA] 

Tetsujin 

Doom-s/ype 3D blaster. [Soon] 

RAGE/COCONUTS 

3DO Striker 

The incredibly popular, super fast Amiga game gets 
upgraded for the 3DO system with FIFA-s/y/e graph¬ 
ics. If you like your football games, then Hiis has to be 


, 


i 

I 

■( 

i 


i 


3D0 Magazine 64 February 1995- 

























one of the most eagerly awaited 3DO system releases 
of the coming year - especially if it manages to marry 
gameplay with the uprated visuals. [April] 

RENEGADE 

Several titles are under active consideration for conver¬ 
sion, but as yet nothing can be announced. Speedball 
il heads our most wanted list! 

SIERRA 

An early 3DO backer with the disappointing Draxon's 
Revenge and fun puzzler Incredible Machine now 
released officially (see page 50). Future releases such 
as a conversion of Red Baron are still under 
consideration. 

SPECTRUM HOLOBYTE 

Star Trek: The Next Generation 

A truly epic project which has been in development for 
over a year. Purposely designed for the 3DO system, 
it's got stunning 3D graphics and a unique game struc¬ 
ture that threatens to blow away any Star Trek fan. A 
must buy when released. [Spring] 



STUDIO 3DO 

The All New People's GameShow 

Post-communist gameshow likely to be somewhat like 
the multimedia extravaganza Twisted. Expect weird 
puzzles, general knowledge questions with an 
American bias, and much, much more. [Spring] 

Blade Force 

Heli-Pak wearing vigilante roams the streets in 2110- 
or should that be flies through the streets. [Spring] 

Killing Time 

An abandoned island is the site for some frantic. 
Doom-style action with stunning graphics. Early sight¬ 
ings look very impressive with monstrous amounts of 
gore - blood and guts spurting out of bullet ridden 
bodies. Marvellous. [Soon] 

U. S. GOLD 

Flashback 

The follow-up to platformer the classic 16-bit plat¬ 
former, Another World, expect more rotoscaped, pseu¬ 
do 3-D graphics with an emphasis on a movie-style 
look. [Soon] 



VIRGIN 

Cannon Fodder 

Sensible Software's incredibly addictive shoot-'em-up 
finally makes its way onto the 3DO system. March 
your crack troops of tiny men through an isometric 
enemy landscape shooting as you go. Warning - 
you only have a finite number of soldiers to waste on 
the battlefield. [March] 

Digital Dreamware 

One of the more unusual 3DO releases Digital 
Dreamware represents a rave-type multimedia pro¬ 
ject complete with groovy sounds and visuals. Looks 
interesting. [TBA] 

Dragon 

A hyper-violent Street Fighter 2 clone with the differ¬ 
ence that there can be anything up to three mean 
mother fighters upon the screen simultaneously. 
Originally released to rave reviews on the Super 
Nintendo if you like your beat-'em-ups in any shape 
or form this looks a more than promising release. 
[February] 


Lost Eden 

An epic adventure, featuring dinosaurs and mankind 
unrealistically co-operating in mystical prehistoric 
times. A Cryo production. Lost Eden should be a gor¬ 
geous-looking production, though with their uncon¬ 
vincing MegaRace lurking insidiously in the back¬ 
drop, questions must remain over its gameplay. 
[March] 

Heart Of Darkness 

Said to be Another World for the 32-bit, 3DO domi¬ 
nated next generation, first impressions suggest an 
absolutely stunning looking - and playing game. 
[April] 

11 th Hour 

The sequel to the million selling CD-ROM extravagan¬ 
za, 7th Guest. Release (on PC) has been put back 
several times now which suggests that Virgin want it 
to be something special when it's released later this 
year. Fantastic, CD-streamed adventure with a horrif¬ 
ic bent, 11 th Hour will hove either a 15 or 18 certifi¬ 
cate upon release. [TBA] □ 



CO 

O 

O 


3D0 Magazine 03 February 1995- 














3D0 


next issue 



[Magazine 


Coming Soon 



3DO/3 


REVIEWS 

Gametek's mega interactive movie Hell, the 
cyberpunk maelstrom staring Dennis Hopper 
hits the 3DO in style 

Cult adventure Myst and gorgeous RPG 
Seal Of The Pharaoh wing their way over 
from Panasonic... 

Electronic Arts deliver a cluster of killer 
games, including Space Hulk, Syndicate and 
PGA Tour Golf, plus, at last, a full review of 
the game everyone's been waiting for, Wing 
Commander III... 

Rage deliver the eagerly anticipated con¬ 
tender for ultimate football simulation, the 
SNES hit given that special, 3DO magic in 

3DO Striker... 

After wooing us with two, fabulous 
gameshow hits. Twisted and Station Invasion, 
Studio 3DO go ballistic with a Doom killer, the 
extraordinary Killing Time... 

And also boarding the Doom bandwagon, 
Gametek offer the PC smash. Quarantine... 

More rotoscoped arcade adventure as 
U. S. Qold follow up /pother World with 
Flashback... 

Plus an avalanche of eagerly awaited titles 
from Virgin, with Cannon Fodder, Dragon, 
Lost Eden and Hearts Of Darkness 


FEATURES 

Dave Westley chews the cud with legendary 
developers, EA Canada, who reveal the 
genius behind FIFA International and Need 
For Speed, and reveal their plans to top these 
3DO classics... 

We also discuss the potential 3DO mania 
that will be provoked by the release of the 
PC's biggest success of '95, the completely 
wonderful Magic Carpet from Bullfrog .. 

Plus all the usual features you'd expect 
from 3DO Magazine including a look at 
American Laser Games' Gamegun, and its 
rapidly expanding catalogue of titles available 
soon. 

Issue 3 of 3DO Magazine will be a tran¬ 
scendental experience scheduled for the 
30th of March. Reserve a copy from 
your newsagents or join our 
rapidly expanding army of sub¬ 
scribers. Whatever happens, 
don't miss 3DO magazine 
3, the ultimate guide to 
3DO reality... 


3D0 Magazine 66 February 1995 









SCOTLAND 


GAMES 


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. £47.00 

DEMOLITION MAN. 

. £38.00 

REBEL ASSAULT. 

. £38.00 

THEME PARK. 

. £38.00 

^ SECONDHAND GAMES IN STOCK tY 

PLEASE CALL FOR LATEST RELEASES 1 

DEEP LOGIC 


P.O BOX 42 


LOWESTOFT 


SUFFOLK 


NR32 4XB 


101302 Sei3S3I 



with this ad iF 
total amount 
is over £25. 


Also Specialise m 

Japanese Animation, 
Martial Arts Films, 
Honq Konq Films 
& Ex-rental Films 


Tel: 021 5111436 
Fax: 021 544 7041 


WALES 


CHESHIRE LANCASHIRE 



3A OXFORD RD, 
LLANDUDNO 
GWYNEDD, 
LL30 IDH 




TEL 0492 870081 


SorrwAKS Express 

MAIL ORDER 

^01925 828455 ^ 

3DO Player £379.99 

with Pebble Beach 

SOFTWARE 

ALONE IN THE DARK 39.00 

NEED FOR SPEED 39.00 

ROAD RASH 39.00 

SAMURAI SHOWDOWN 39.00 

THEME PARK 39.00 

MEGA RACE 19.00 

More new ond used titles available 
PART EXCHANGE WELCOME 

6 BUTTON JOYPAD 29.00 

3 BUnON JOYPAD 39.00 

Send cheques/PO's to: 

UNIT 1C, CAUSEWAY PARK, OFF WILDERSPOOL CAUSEWAY 
WARRINGTON, CHESHIRE. WA4 6RF 
P&P add £1.50 games / £6.00 consoles 

SELECTION OF NEW & USED 

GAMES AVAILABLE ■■■■i 
AT BRUCHE VIDEO, OFF GREEN LANE, US4 
PADGATE WARRINGTON 


STEWART 

ELECTRONICS 

85 Penny Meadow, Ashton-U-Lyne, Lancs 

Tel: 061 339 0504 

PANASONIC 

SDO’s 

£379 

All software new 
& U.K. versions. 

Theme Park £39.95 
FIFA £39.95 
Need for Speed £39.95 
Road Rash £39.95 
Control Pads £37.95 - 
Phone for latest! 

At least 10% 
off all releases 


♦ 

8 


3DO 


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Ask for written details 


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STAFFS._LONDON MIDDLESEX 


NEW AGE 


GAMEPteo 
3DO TITLES 


Another World (29/1/95) 34.99 
Family Feud 32.99 

Space Shuttle (13/2/95) 32.99 
Powers Kingdom 36.99 

Quarantine (13/2/95) 36.99 
Need For Speed 42.99 

S.Slreetfightcr II 55.99 

Off World Int. 45.99 

D. Dreamwarc (2/2/95) 18.99 
Monster Manor 36.99 

Rebel Assault 39.99 

Pataank 36.99 

Mad Dog McCree 29.99 

Sewer Shark 34.99 

Shock Wave 34.^ 


Cyberclash (1/3/95) 34.99 

Flashback (11/2/95) 34.99 

FIFA Soccer 42.99 

Theme Park 39.99 

Samurai Shodown 34.99 

Gex (27/1/95) 34.99 

Rise Robots (20/3/95) 39.99 

Road Rash 39.99 


John Maddens 
3D Atlas 
W. Commander 
Slayer 
Night Trap 
Virtuoso 
Shock Wave 2 


32.99 
(20/3/95) 54.99 

34.99 

41.99 

34.99 

34.99 

25.99 


3DO 


4 


3D0 EXTRA 

BLASTER 




PADS NOW 

CARDS 


o 


AVAILABLE 

£349.99 


gTTTT 


£39.99 


i 

inni 


♦ 

8 


PANASONIC FZ1 MULTIPLAYER 

INCLUDES FREE GAME 
^ CALL FOR LATEST PACK 

_ ALL TITLES GENUINE NEW UK. NO IMPORTS _ 

ALL PRICES ARE INC. DELIVERY. PLEASE MAKE CHEQUES PAYABLE TO MBS, 
219/221 CANNOCK ROAD, CHADSMOOR, CANNOCK, STAFFS, WS112DD. 

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COMPUTER GAMES & CONSOLES 

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The latest njyicial & import 
games for your console. 

MEGA DRIVE (NintenddJ 



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MASTER SYSTEM 

l6Aillf8011 
PC CD-ROM 


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WE BUY & SELL 

SECOND HAND GAMES!! 

OPEN MON-SAT 10:00«w6:0Qfiw 



081 767 2575 


CORNWALL CORNWALL HEREFORD. 


CONSOLE CONNECTIONS 

TH Introducing the 
S world’s FIRST 
U 3DO Infra-Red Joypad 

STEALTH 

Complete with X 2 PADS and a Receiver 
No messy wires 

Latest Infra-Red Technology enables a 

range up to 18 metres 

Can be used at ANY angle of 360° within 6 metres 

Low power consumption 

Auto battery saver 

Slow motion 

Independent turbo control 
Compatible with all 3DO systems 

PH ONLY £39.99 + £2.00 P&P 

MAIL ORDER: 0872 261065 

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S 1 GAME 

511TB £399.99 

FIFA Soccer Theme Park 

John Madden Off World Int. 

Need for Speed Mega Race 

Road Rash Shock Wave 

+ MANY MORE CALL... 


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TEL 0989 767655 FAX: 0989 768563 















































































































































Rememtier pr first set of 



blochs? 









4 

iSIHsDo 



Neltpuion't 
forget these. 


They’re Gridders^'^ - 
huge crusher blocks 
designed to stop you 
from solving this exciting 
action strategy game for 300^'^ systems. 

Enter the futuristic 3D industrial world known as 
the Gridders Corporation. Using strategy, logic and 
skill, you must negotiate over 30 different levels - 
each with a new puzzle to solve - to unlock the 
secret technology located in the basement of this industrial complex. 

Each level in Gridders can be solved in more than one way, and each is more challenging than 
the last. The secret is to disrupt the pattern of the Gridders as they move in 
their mysterious patterns across the factory grid. 

You’ll encounter Killer Gridders and other hazardous objects as you try to 
release the green pyramids from Generator Gridders. These are the key to 
moving from one level to another. You will also need to find and use life-saving objects along the 
way. And listen to your cyber-dog. Fidex^*^ - his bark can save your life. 

With CD quality music, animated plot sequences and incredible 3D effects, you’ll need 
plenty of the grey matter or very quick feet to beat the Gridders. One wrong move...and they’ll 
be scraping you off the block with a shovel. 

The 3D0 sijstefn and 3D0 softuiare are available from Game Limited, selected 

HNV stores, Virgin Negastores and all good independent dealers. Tetragon^^Gridders^’^andFidex^'^oretrodemarksolTetragonlnc. 

Call: 0800 444220 for your local dealer. 




3DO