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cannpuTE 



OCTOBER 1991 



SPECIAL ANNIVERSARY ISSUE 




5 KEYS 
NEW PC TOOl 



$25 VIRUS SOLUTION 
COMPUTE GOES ONLINI 



UTERS 
GO REVIEWED 




THE VOiAGE CONTINUES! 

STAR TREK: 25th Anniversary™. 





MSIlSiEQ 



Fasten your seatbolts, 
hrinf^ your scat hacks to 
an upright position, 
and stow away those 
other computer {^ames. 
You're about to pilot a 
Federation Starship on a 
wild roller coaster ride 
through the final frontier. 
STAR TREK: 25ih Amiversarj 
combines a realistic, 3D space flight 
simulator with a wide variety of role-playing 
adventures to create a gripping game of 
galactic exploration. 

You'll play James T. Kirk and experience 
the thrill of piloting the U.S.S. Enterprise™ 
using Interplay's stunning, new, state-of-the- 
art, digitized model graphics. You'll control 
phasers, photon torpedcjes, shields, 
communications, and warp drives in 
3D space action so real you'll be reaching 
for your airbag! 

Scan and survey hundreds of tractally 
generated worlds and then join a landing 
party sent down to map and interact with 
alien races and artifacts. So beam aboard the 




U.S.S. Enterprise^^', and continue a quarter 
century of exploration and high adventure. 

■ Pull 256 color VGA graphics 

■ Thousands of state-of-the-art, 3D digitized, 
space action scenes 

■ Interact it'i'th dozens of alien races 

■ Navigate Kirk, Spock and Bones on a 
variety of world exploratioru 

■ Complete musical score featuring digitized 
sound effects from the series and major 
sound board support 

■ Easy to use, point-and-click, icon interface 

To order STAR TREK: 25th Annii'cr.sar)', call 
1-800-%9-GAME. Available on MS-DOS 
compatible machines for $59.95. 




MS-DOS Screem Pictured. 

circle Reader Service Number 1 34 



Interplay Prtxliictions 
3710S. Su5iin, Sluil- 100 
Santa Ana, CA 92704 
(714)549-2411 



TU. (Sa7ii<E)l99l Puiumuuni I'laura. All Ri^du Rt'smvJ. ST.Afi 
TREk' fjjiJ L'.S.S. Emerprisd iire Triukvnmks o/ Pummounr Piclutes. 
MS- DOS is a Tioffeni/irk o/Microsc!^ Cfnparahim. 




COrUIPUTEs 

GETTING STARTED WITH™ 



WHY YOU SHOULD GO ONLINE 

Wha(ever you're into, you can find an online 
group that's devoted to it. 
COMPUTE GOES ONLINE 
Put away your pen and stationery— 
COMPUTE\s just an autodial away, 
HOW TO CHOOSE A MODEM 
Contrary to popular opinion, all modems are 
not created equal. 

HOW TO CHOOSE A COMMUNI- 
CATIONS PROGRAM 
A modem without the right program is like a 
radio without an antenna. 
HOW TO CHOOSE AN ONLINE 
SERVICE 

Talk is cheap — even when you pay for your 
words by the minute. 
ONLINE SERVICE SAMPLER 
Six top online services, each with its own distinct 
personality. 
ONLINE COMMUNICATIONS GLOSSARY 
How can you communicate if you don't know what the 
words mean? 



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WHY YOU SHOULD GO ONLINE 



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In (he 1970 movie. Colossus: The Forhin 
Project, the largest American eompulcr 
demands to be connected to the largest Soviet 
computer so that the two computers can share 
their enormous data banks. It seems that curious 
computers and intelligent humans always want to 
know more about the world around them. 

This urge to merge has grown oven stronger 
over the last two decades. In the 1970s, we net- 
worked our dumb terminals by wire to the nearest 
large compuicr. In the 1990s, we can connect our 
personal computers by phone to just about any 
computer — large or small. With personal comput- 
ers, you can have a network based on choice. The 
result is a series of global communities created not 
by geography but by interest. 
• If you're a professional musician, you can chat 
about music with an electronic community of 
musicians on PAN (Performing Artists Net- 
work) — even though you live in a mountain 
lodge in Arkansas and your electronic neighbor 
lives in an apartment building in downtown Tokyo. 



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• If you're an animal-rights activist, you can 
organize an effective letter-writing campaign by 
leaving a message on GEnie's Pets 
RoundTable — even though you have no idea 
where any of the members live. 

• If you have to write a research paper and need 
information on the various federal agency 
libraries, you don't have to travel to Washing- 
ton, D.C.. You can stay where you are and use 
your modem to call the Library of Congress BBS. 

• If you're a beginning poet, you can find other 
poets on the major online services who will 
gladly read and critique your writing. 

No More Excuses 

Whatever your interests — music, sports, invest- 
ments, grassroots politics, movies, programming, 
science fiction — there are online communities 
devoted to the things that you're into. And now that 
modems and communications software are cheaper 
than ever, there's really no excuse for not getting 
involved in online communications, Lt 



COMPETE GOES ONLINE 



Ever wish you could download an article 
from COMPUTE into your word processor 
or lalk with a COMPUTE editor? Maybe 
you'd like to replace a lost disk from a 
back issue of COMPUTE!' s PC Magazine or find 
a COMPUTE book that's been out of print for 
several years. Now you can do all these things 
with a single phone call, 24 hours a day. 

Starling immediately, you can go online with 
COMPUTE on either GEnie or America Online. 
You'll find complete back issues of all the 
COMPUTE magazines for the years 
1991, 1990. and 1989; previously 
published disk products for PC, 
Amiga, Commodore 64, and 
Atari ST computers; the 
complete text of out-of-print 
COMPUTE books; excerpts 
from currently published 
COMPUTE books; digitized 
NASA photos; special feature 
sections for COMPUTE' s 
■ Gelling Slaried with . . . 




booklets and COMPUTE' s Test Lab; and applica- 
tion macros and templates. You'll also be able to 
order COMPUTE products online. 

Over the coming months, we'll be adding a 
submarine simulator game and back issues from 
years prior to 1989. On GEnie, we'll also have a 
complete bulletin board, covering such topics as 
software tips, Windows, industry rumors, feedback 
to editors, programming, hardware care and 
maintenance, and much, much more. 

To reach us on GEnie. type COMPUTE. 
On America Online, make your way to 
the main menu, click on the Com- 
puter and Software icon, click on 
the Computer News and Magazines 
icon, and click on the COMPUTE 
icon. 

Look for more information in the 
main part of this month's COM- 
PUTE — including instructions on 
how to sign up for GEnie and 
America Online. 

— David English 



HOW TO CHOOSE A MODEM 



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If you're going to link up willi builetin hoards 
and iiil'oniiatioii services, you'll need a modem. 
For general telecommunications tasks, such as 
logging on to bulletin boards and downloading 
files, nearly any modem will do. The amouni you 
should spend and (he features you should look for 
depend on how much you'll use your modem. 
Consider these items when selecting a modem: 

• Hayes compatibility. The Hayes command set is 
a group of commands that communications 
software uses to configure the modem. It was 
introduced in the early 1980s in modems 
produced by Hayes Microcomputer and has 
.since become the standard. You'll want Hayes 
compatibility in a modem. 

• Speed. Currently, there's no point buying any 
modem slower than 2400 bits per second (bps). 
Although information services such as GEnie 
and CompuServe are adding 960()-bps nodes, 
most casual users will find 2400 bps adequate. 

• Error correction and compression. Once found 
only in the most expensive modems, error 



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correction and compression capabilities arc now 
available in many lower-priced models. En"or 
correction protocols include Microcom Network 
Protocols (MNP) 2-4 and CCITT V.42. Com- 
pression schemes include MNP 5 and CCITT 
V.42bis, In order for error correction and 
compression to work, modems on both ends of 
the line must have the same capabilities. 
Internal versus external. The choice depends on 
your setup. An external modem needs a serial 
port, a data cable, and an AC outlet: it also 
occupies desk space. On the plus side, you can 
easily move an external modem from computer 
to computer. Because internal modems don't 
require a power supply or case, they're usually a 
little less expensive. In addition, you can usually 
configure an internal modem for COM3 or 
COM4 if your other serial ports are occupied. 
Fax options. Many modems include some fax 
capability. This can be a real convenience, 
letting you send faxes from your PC rather than 
having to wait in line for tlie office fax machine. □ 



HOW TO CHOOSE 
A COMMUNICATIONS PROGRAM 



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While most of the features in communi- 
cations programs are there because 
users need them, many others are 
added simply to keep up with the 
competition. Because of this, buyers are faced with 
a dizzying array of features and options — many of 
which they may not need. Here are some of the 
more important features to look for. 

• Command set compatibility. A communications 
program must use a command set that's recog- 
nized by the modem with which it's used. This 
will, more often than not, be the AT command 
set — or a subset of it. 

• Variable communications parameters. At the '■ 
very least, you should be able to change these 
parameters: communications speed (bits per 
second), the number of data bits in each charac- 
ter, the number of stop bits used, parity, and 
echoplex (duplex). 

• Automatic dialing support. Most modems can 



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dial a number automatically. They can accept a 
number from the communications program (or 
one entered by the user) and dial the number 
without using a telephone set. If you use this 
kind of modem, you'll naturally want software 
that supports autodialing. It should issue the 
commands necessary to tell the modem to take 
the phone line "off hook" and dial a number. 
Originate/answer mode switching. If you plan to 
use your computer and modem to receive as 
well as make calls, your software must support 
switching between the originate mode (make a 
call) and answer mode (receive a call). Manual- 
dial modems usually have an external swiich to 
perform this function. Autodial modems usually 
rely on software commands to switch between 
originate and answer modes. 
Telephone hangup. Most BBSs and online 
services automatically disconnect at sign-off. 
There are some systems, however, that rely on 



the calling system (your system) to disconnect. 
A remote system can also become stuck or go 
berserk and start displaying text or garbage on 
your screen. If the software can't hang up the 
telephone, you'll have to turn off your modem 
or unplug the telephone line. 
Autologon files. Signing on to a BBS or online 
service requires several steps, including ID and 
password entry. If you're accessing an online 
service via a packet-switching network, there 
are additional steps involving routing your call 
to the online service. Fortunately, the sign-on 
process can be automated if your software 
provides autologon files (also known as script 
files or command files). Programs such as 
Cmsxtalk XVI, Crosstalk for Windows, and 
Mirror H! come with template tiles for various 
online services. All you have to do is supply 
your telephone number, user ID, and password. 
Parameter files. Programs that don'i have a full 
scripting language may at least allow you to 
store telephone numbers and parameters in files 
that you can load into memory. Such files save 
you the trouble of entering communications 
parameters every time you dial a system, 
although you still have to go through the sign- 
on process manually. 



Dialing directories. A dialing directory may 
store telephone numbers and communications 
ptuameters, or it may store only telephone 
numbers. Numbers (and parameters, if included) 
are usually stored in a directory format, acces- 
sible by name. With the proper command, the 
program can retrieve a specified number from a 
directory file and direct the modem to dial it. 
Capture buffer. If you're a slow reader, you may 
spend more time than you wish online, pausing 
the screens of text. If your software provides a 
capture buffer, you can hold and temporarily 
store text. Most communications programs with 
capture buffers allow you to access the text in 
the capture buffer and store it in a disk file. 
Backscrolling. Many programs that provide a 
capture buffer also provide a feature called 
backscrolling. This feature allows you to view 
(scroll back over) text in the capture buffer. 
Backscrolling is handy when you need to review 
something that has scrolled off your screen. 
Binary-file transfer protocols. A binaty-file 
transfer protocol (also called error-checking 
protocol) is necessary if you intend to transfer 
programs or binary data files. This is because 
some of the characters used in such files appear 
as end-of-file markers to a receiving system if 



they're being transferred as straight ASCII files. 
Your communications software package should 
offer at least one binary-file transfer protocol. 
The most popular protocols are XMODEM, 
ZMODEM, and Kermit, although several others 
are in use on various systems, among them 
YMODEM and Windowed XMODEM. 

Straight Versus Front-End 

Communications softvifare comes in two broad 
categories: straight and front-end. A straight 
program is a general-purpose telecommunications 
program, while a front-end program is designed to 
communicate with a specific online service. 

Because a finnt-end progrdm is dedicated to a single 
service, it's much easier to use il to automate such tasks 
as E-mail, bulletin board postings, aid file transfers. 
Software packages in this category include Aladdin for 
GEnie, Lotus Express for MCI Mail, and CompuServe 
Infonnation Manager for CompuServe. 

Menu Driven Versus Command Driven 

Like most application programs, communications 
software is either menu driven or command driven. 
Which way a program operates can be very 
important in tenns of your personal preferences. 
A menu-driven program lets you select com- 






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mands from a menu or menus. It may provide one 
menu containing all the commands, or il may use a 
main menu from which you can select submenus. 

Command-driven software displays no menus; 
rather, you issue commands on what is called a 
command or status line, or press a combination of 
keys (usually including the Ctrl or Alt keys) or 
.special designated keys (such as the function keys). 

A number of communications programs are both 
menu and command driven. This is the most 
efficient setup if you're new to telecomputing. □ 



HOW TO CHOOSE 
AN ONLINE SERVICE 



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Perhaps you're new to online communica- 
lions. Or maybe you've only used your 
modem to call your local BBS. Now that 
you've gotten your feet wet. you're 
probably wondering what the online services — such 
as CompuServe, GEnie, Prodigy, and America 
Online — are all about. 

An online service provides modem users with a 
variety ol' information, entertainment, education, 
and cominunication services. In most American 
cities, you can dial these services directly or 
through a ihird-party network (such as Tymnet). 

Variety Pack 

All these systems offer a mix of E-mail, databases 
of one type or another, special-interest groups, 
message bases, and realtime conferences. In 
addition, most of the consuiner services offer some 
or all of the following: 



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News and weatJier. These services include 
regional, national, and international news; 
weather by city, state, or region; and specialized 
news such as sports and financial news. The 
news is from the same sources that other media 
use — newswires and syndicates. 
Financial information and services. Slock, and 
commodity quotes, market reports, and broker- 
age services arc offered online by many of the 
big-name investment companies. Some systems 
can automatically update your portfolio. 
Entertainment. Online entertainment is very 
popular. There are single- and multiplayer 
games, played realtime or via postings in 
message bases. Most online games mirror the 
disk-based computer games, so you'll find a lot 
of role-playing and adventure games. You'll 
also find arcade games (most of these require 
special software or terminal emulation). 



Reference and education. Online encyclopedias 
head die list here. You can find products such as 
Grolicr's Acudewic Anierivaii Encyclopedia and 
Compton's Encyclopcdki on just about every 
service. A variety of other references are also 
available, ranging from Marquis Who' s Wiw to 
the Mus>nziiic Index. Education services include 
the Collei-e Hoard and Peterson's Collcf^e 
Guide, as well as online tutoring, study, and 
degree programs. 

Special-interest groups (SlGs). These are the 
heart of many online services. Known variously 
as Forums, RoundTables, and conferences, SIGs 
host a variety of services, including message 
bases, databases, upload/download services, and 
online advertising and sales. 
Travel services. This usually takes the form of 
travel information that's sponsored by a carrier, 
destination, or travel agency. 
Shopping aiul online product support. Online 
shopping is just now coming into its own. 
Although specialty retailers and computer and 
software discount operations have enjoyed some 
success online over the years, it's taken the 
presence of major national retailers such as 
Waldcnbooks and Sears to legitimize online 
shopping. Online product support — almost 



exclusively for computers and software — has 
been fairly well received, although there seems 
to be competition among online services to be 
the only host for some companies' online 
product support. 

Specialized news and database services. As you 
might expect, there are a number of computer 
news services and columns online. Some are 
unofficial products in the form of special- 
interest newsletters, such as "PC Review 
Online," These arc usually found in the public 
database areas. Others are official products, such 
as Charles Bowcn's "A Nelworker's Journal" on 
CompuServe and GEnie. that are presented in 
their own areas or as menu selections. Special- 
ized newsletters that have nothing to do with 
computing are also showing up. Among these 
you'll find newsletters for occupations such as 
writing, public relations, and advertising. 
Full-text versions of magazines and newsletters. 
Selected computer magazine articles and 
program listings have been popping up within 
SIGs for .some time, but it's only since the late 
[980s that the complete contents of computer 
magazines have been online. Online versions of 
noncomputer magazines, such as National 
Geographic, are much less common. Q 



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ONLINE SERVICE SAMPLER 



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America Online 

Introduced in October 1989, America Online 
(AOL) uses a graphical user interface based on 
GeoWnrks Ensemble, complete with icons and pull- 
down menus. 

America Online features a sophisticated E-mail 
system that lets you review messages you've 
already read, copy them to disk, attach files to 
messages, and check to see whether a message has 
been read. A systemwide member directory lets 
you see where a member is from and read the 
member's profile (if he or she has entered one). 

Special-interest groups, called Forums, provide 
message bases and realtime conference areas. The 
conference areas are referred to as rooms and 
auditoriums. AOL's Forums cover specific comput- 
ing, hardware, and software interests, as well as 
hobby, lifestyle, and personal interests that range 
from science fiction to veterans' concerns. 

You can download files from the individual 
Forum.s or from a central area. AOL uses a propri- 
etary binary file-transfer protocol. 



The ability to search for software from within a 
central area makes it easy to find files. You can 
specify any combination of categories, range of 
lime, or keywords. The search facilities in the 
message bases are similarly well designed. 

Among AOL's other highlights arc national 
news, weather, and sports; stock quotes; travel 
services such as Eaasy Sabre; shopping with Comp- 
U Store online and other vendors; computing and 
consumer news features and coluinns; and access to 
Grotier's Academic American Encyclopedia. 

Online gaming is popular on AOL. There are 
several play-by-mai! games and single-player 
games. Of particular interest is Rahhii Jack's 
Casino, which lets you play blackjack, bingo, and 
other games in realtime with other players or 
against the house. 

AOL's rates are $5.00 an hour during nonprime 
lime and S8.00 an hour during prime time, with a 
$5,95 minimum charge each month. (The minimum 
charge includes one hour of connect time.) You can 
contact America Online at (800) 227-6364. 



BIX 

BIX is an acronym for Byte Information eXcbange. 
Established in 1985, BIX uses the UNIX-based 
COSY computer-conferencing system. (That's 
computer conferencing in the traditional sense of 
the term — meaning conferencing via message 
bases, not realtime conferencing.) 

BIX has four main services: computer 
conferencing, electronic mail, realtime confer- 
ences, and software/file databases. An area called 
options lets you set up and change how BIX 
communicates with you. In addition, you can create 
an online resume with information about yourself 
that other users can access from most prompts by 
typing show resume <useruame> . 

The heart of BIX is its computer-conferencing 
system. The system is based on a series of mes- 
sage-base subject areas called conferences, each of 
which is a part of a group of related conferences. 
BIX currently hosts over 200 conferences. Indi- 
vidual conferences arc further organized into topics 
that are appropriate for the conference subject. 

The conference system is fairly sophisticated. In 
addition to letting you read, scan, post, reply to, 
and search for messages, BIX allows you to locate 
and follow message threads, and much more. You 
can participate in (join) as many or as few BIX 



conferences as you like. And you can select 
specific topics within a conference to participate in. 
(A few conferences are closed, which means that 
you must ask or be invited to join them.) 

BIX's CBix realtime conferencing system is a 
fairly easy-to-use multiband, multichannel CB 
simulator. Features include whispers and handles. 
The system makes interesting use of specific 
terminal features. If your software can emulate a 
VT-IOO or any of a dozen or so other terminals, 
you can take advantage of screen clearing, a chat 
window, a window for whispers, and other special 
features. 

You can find downloads of al! types in special ^ A 
BIX areas called listings. ASCII, Kermit, I I 

XMODEM, XMODEM/CRC, YMODEM, and 
ZMODEM protocols are available for file transfer. 
(Billing is automatically turned off when you 
upload a file.) 

BIX gives users their choice of per-minute 
billing or a flat rate. The flat rate is $39 each 
quarter for unlimited access to BIX, 24 hours a day. 
The hourly rate is $4, 24 hours a day, with an 
annual subscription fee of $59. Neither plan 
includes the costs for access via a packet-switching 
network, such as Tymnet or BlXnet. You can 
contact BIX at (800) 227-2983. 



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CompuServe 

CompuServe is one of the world's largest public 
online services. It was also one of the first commer- 
cial online services to cater to computer hobbyists. 
Established in 1979, CompuServe today has more 
than 730,000 subscribers. 

The TOP menu is like the tip of an iceberg. 
While il shows in general what's there, (here's 
much more than the TOP menu even implies. 
Literally hundreds of services exi.st on 
CompuServe — among them some extremely useful 
areas dealing with electronic communications. 
Beyond this menu lie general and specialized news 
and information services; special-interest groups 
(called Forums) for computer users, professionals, 
hobbyists, and others; online games and other 
entertainment; sophisticated research services; a 
free online tutbrial; and more. 

You'll find the standard newswires, including 
AP, UPI, and Reuters, as well as more exotic 
services, such as TASS. There's also a clipping 
service that delivers news stories to your E-mai! 
box, based on the keywords that you specify. 

CompuServe is particularly strong in online 
research facilities, among them Grolier's Academic 
American Eiwyclnpedia and gateways to Dow 
Jones News/Retrieval Service and several special- 



ized services — including IQuest, a collection of 
more than 700 specialized research databases. 

The Forums feature sophisticated message 
bases, a reasonable database system, and realtime 
conferencing that's separate from the system's CB 
Simulator. 

Also of interest are CompuServe Mail's two- 
way gateways to MCI Mail and Internet. 
CompuServe Mail can handle outgoing fax iind 
telex messages, as well as paper mail. You can also 
use CompuServe Mail to transfer files to other 
CompuServe users. 

Filc-iransfer options in Forum databases, E- 
mail, and certain product areas include ASCII, 
XMODEM, XMODEM/CRC, CompuServe's own 
B and B+ protocols, and others. 

CompuServe's basic rates are $5.00 an hour at 
300 bps and $12.80 an hour at 1200 or 2400 bps, 
through CompuServe's own network, 24 hours a 
day. There are additional charges for higher speeds 
and for access through other networks. Various 
optional service plans are available, and gateways 
and certain other services have surcharges. 

As of this writing, CompuServe is testing a plan 
whereby a specific group of monthly services is 
made available for $7.95 a month. You can contact 
CompuServe at (800) 848-8199. 



DELPHI 

Established in 1982 as an online encyclopedia (the 
first of its kind), DELPHI has evolved into a full- 
service network, providing products and services of 
all types. It's an especially friendly system with a 
real sense of community and a good place to meet 
others who share your interests. 

Like CompuServe's TOP menu, DELPHI'S 
Main Menu is just the tip of the iceberg. DELPHI 
offers a variety of news and information services, 
online entertainment, special-interest groups, two 
online encyclopedias (GroUcr's and the original 
Kiissmaul Encyclopedia), a unique gateway to the 
DIALOG information service, and more. 

DELPHI'S special-interest groups are notewor- 
thy for the BBS-style communication facilities they 
provide and for the software and information that 
are available to download. The SIG message bases 
are extremely sophisticated, letting you find 
messages based on almost any criteria imaginable, 
including content. The SIG database structure is 
equally sophisticated and lets you use multiple 
keywords to narrow or widen your searches. 

Also of note on DELPHI are the weekly online 
realtime poker and trivia tournaments, a scrambled 
word game, and games that take advantage of VT- 
100 terminal emulation. 



You get a personal online storage area, called 
Workspace, which you can use to store your Fdes or 
to transfer your documents for E-mailing. File- 
transfer options in Workspace, SIG databases, and 
certain other areas include ASCII, Kermit, 
XMODEM, XMODEM/CRC, YMODEM, 
YMODEM/Batch, and ZMODEM. 

Of all the E-mail systems offered by consumer 
online services, DELPHI'S is the most powerful yet 
easiest to use (once you learn it). Not only can 
DELPHI members send fax and telex messages, but 
they can also receive incoming telex messages free 
of charge beyond nomial connect-time charges. 

The basic plan costs $6.00 an hour during A rt 

nonprime time, with a $5.95 a month minimum I ^ 

(this covers your first hour online). DELPHI'S 20/ 
20 plan costs $20.00 a month, for 20 hours of 
nonprime-time access. Under this plan, additional 
time costs only SI .20 an hour. The 20/20 plan is 
available only for those who access DELPHI 
through Tymnet and includes the Tymnet charges. 
Unlike the Hat-rale or alternative plans offered by 
some services, the 20/20 plan covers the entire 
service. A few areas, such as DELPHI'S link to 
DIALOG, require a surcharge no matter which plan 
you use. There's also a $39.00 sign-up charge. You 
can contact DELPHI at (800) 544-4005. 



14 



GEtiie 

Established in 1985, GEnie is the fastest-growing 
service of its kind. It enjoys a tremendous growth 
rate, thanl^s to its variety of services, aggressive 
advertising, and friendly price structure. 

GEnie offers the same categories of services as 
CompuServe and DELPHI. News, weather, sports, 
and travel information are particularly strong areas 
for GEnie, as are its versions of special-interest 
groups, called RoundTables, 

The RoundTables are fairly easy to use, even 
though the message bases aren't very sophisticated 
and you can't specify more than one keyword when 
you search a RoundTable's software library. 

Online research facilities include Grolicr's 
Academic American Encyclopedia and a gateway 
to Dow Jones News/Retrieval Service. GEnie's 
news offerings include searchable headline news 
and columns by a number of well-known writers in 
the computer field. There's also a clipping service 
that delivers news stones of interest to your E-mail 
box, based on the keywords you specify. 

With GE Mail — GEnie's E-mail service — you 
can send letters to and receive them from other 
GEnie users, and send paper mail and fax mes- 
sages. GEnie offers a unique option by which a 
GEnie user can have his or her own telex number 



for an extra fee. While GEnie has no personal file 
system as such, you can upload messages to send to 
other GEnie users via a special utility. GEnie's 
mail address file features a flexible search system 
that you can u.se to find both GE Mail addresses 
and the names of people online. 

In addition to trivia, parlor, sports, roIe-pIaying, 
and single-player adventure games, GEnie has 
some very attractive realtime mulliplayer action 
games. In particular. Air Warrior has attracted' a 
large and extremely devoted following. 

GEnie offers 300/1200/2400 baud access 
through its own national network of direct-dial 
local numbers in several hundred U.S. cities. It also 
has an increasing number of 9600-bps and V.32 
nodes, and even some V.42 nodes. 

For just $4.95 a month, you can have unlimited 
nonprime-time use of E-mail, news, and other 
selected services. GEnie charges $0.10 a minute 
during nonprime time for services that aren't 
included in the flat-rate plan (including the 
RoundTable software libraries and realtime 
conferencing). The prime-time rate is $18.00 per 
hour with a surcharge for 9600-bps access. 

Certain products, such as GEnie's gateway to 
Dow Jones News/Retrieval Service, cost extra. You 
can contact GEnie at (800) 638-9636. 



Prodigy 

This high-resolution graphics-based service is very 
different from the other consumer services in both 
how it's set up and what it offers. If you're a 
software junkie looking for downloads or you're a 
realtime conference maven, you won't find those 
things here. But Prodigy has virtually all the other 
trappings of a full-service consumer service. And 
you'll find some unique offerings among its more 
than 750 products and services. 

Prodigy is a partnership of IBM and Sears that'.s 
intended to be a simple yet powerful online service 
for the general con.sumer market. Given its goals, 
Prodigy has done a good job in reaching its 
intended audience — those with computers who 
aren't technically oriented. 

E-mail, news, weather, and travel information 
head the list of Prodigy offerings. Reading news on 
Prodigy is a lot like reading a newspaper; you can 
select news to read by headlines and jump lo other 
articles whenever you wish. Like a newspaper, 
Prodigy offers pictures and charts — in the form of 
color graphics — along with the news. 

Several nationally known magazines are Prodigy 
service providers. Among them is National 
Geographic, which provides an especially attrac- 
tive and enlightening excerpt each month. You'll 



also find Billhoaid music charts. Changing Times 
magazine, and magazines for young adults and 
children (including Weekly Reader). 

Online gaming is also graphics intensive. 
Graphics-based games include Police Artist (a game 
that challenges children to combine different 
elements of faces lo match a suspect's picture) and 
MaclMaze (a role-playing/adveniure game). There's 
even an online Where in the World Is Carmen 
Sandiego? with a new adventure each week. 

Grolier's Academic American Encyclopedia 
heads the list of reference resources on Prodigy, 
which also includes columns and clubs on a variety 
of home, special-interest, and business topics, as ^ C 

well as infomiation from computing and general- I w 

interest magazines. 

Prodigy costs $1 2.95 a month for unlimited 
access, day or night. You can have as many as six 
IDs per household — so you are, in effect, getting six 
accounts for the price of one. Prodigy's 6-, 12-, and 
24-month memberships arc available for $65.70. 
$ 1 1 9.40, and $ 1 99.93. respectively. 

Startup kits are sold for S39.95 at Sears and 
computer stores nationwide. However, Prodigy runs 
constant promotions in which the software is given 
away, along with a month's free trial. You can 
contact Prodigy at (800) 822-6922. U 



ONLINE COMMUNICATIONS GLOSSARY 



16 



baud rate A measure of the speed that a modem can send 
and receive data — specifically, the number of events, or 

signal changes, tliat can occur each second. Because an 
event can contain more than one bit, a modem's baud rate 
and bps are not always the siunc. See also bps. 

bps (bits per second) A measure of the speed thai a 
modem can send and receive data — specifically, the 
number of bits that can be transferred each second. 
Often confused with baud rate. See also baud rate. 

download The process of receiving a file by modem. 
See also upload. 

duplex Communication that occuns in both directions at the 
same time between two computers. One-way communica- 
tion is called simplex, ;uid two-way communication taking 
place in only one direction at a time is called half-duplex. 

E-mail (electronic maiOThe transmission of messages 
from one computer tn another by way of an electronic 
network. This network can be either a local area network 
(LAN) or a larger communications network, such as 
CompuServe or GEnie. 

MNP (Micom Network Protocol) A set of error- 
correction and data-compression standards that was 
developed by Micom and made available to other 



modem manufacturers, 

modem (modulator/demodulator) A device that allows a 
computer to send information over a standard telephone line. 

parity An extra bit thai a modem sends with each 
character to check the accuracy of that character. 
Common types of parity are even parity, odd parity, no 
purity, space parity, and mark parity. 

stop bit The bit that signals the end of a character during 
an online transmission, The data bits that make up a 
character are usually followed by 1, 1.5, or 2 stop bits. 

upload The process of sending a file by modem. See 
also download. 



OUR NEXT ISSUE: 

COMPUTE'S GETTING STARTED WITH™ 

EASY WINDOWS PROGRAMMING 

COMPUTE'S GETTING STARTED WITH™ ONLINE COMMUNICATIONS 
COPYRIGHT r, 1991 BY COMPUTE PUBLICATIONS INTERNATIONAL LTD. 
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. 



@ 



This booldet is piintsd on recycled paper. 



TOLKIEN'S EPIC MIDDLE^EARTH 
TRILOGY CONTINUES! 










fe 



/«. 



'LAST 



The legendary tale lives on, as 
The Two Towers™ picks up where the 
critically acclaimed The Lord of the Rings, 
Vol. I™ left off. The wicked Lord Sauron 
persists in his quest to capture the one true 
ring of power. But now tht Evil Wizard 
Saruman, with his insatiable lust for power, 
is after it as well. 

You, the player, control a party of 
benevolent characters in this captivating, 
role -playing adventure as they battle ores, 
trolls, wargs, ghosts, and oliphaunts. 

You'll travel through the dark and 
mysterious Forest of Fangom, over 
treacherous mountain passes, past the 
great fortress cave complex, through the 
ghastly marsh of the eternal spirits and, 
ultimately, come face to face with the 
mysterious two towers. 

All the color and imagery of 
Middle-earth comes to life with state- 
of-the-art, 256 color VGA graphics, a 
new and enhanced interface, full 
musical score, digitized speech, and 
colorful animations. 





The Two Towers'™ is a stunning 
sequel that will involve you deeply in the 
Tolkien experience. 

■ Stands alone as a game or plays 
as a sequel 

■ Automapping 

m Full screen, 256 color VGA graphics 

■ Complete musical score ar\d mntized 
speech and sound effects for all major 
sownd hoards 

■ Enhanced, easy to me, point'Ond-clkk 
interface 

■ Thoiisanis of screens of Miille-earth 
terrain to explore 

To order The Two Tou^ers^', call 
1-800-969-GAME. 
The Two Toilers™ 
is available 
for MS-DOS 
machines 
at $59.95. 




MS-DOS Screens Pictured. 



Inteiplay Productions 
3710S. Susan, Suite 100 
Santa Ana, CA 92704 
(714)549-2411 

Circle Reader Service Number 135 

The [migram o tmblisM mihOie cmpcraiion of Ae To&ien Eiiait and 
thtir jiulibliCTS, George Allen S Umvin (puhAcn) Ud. The pta o[ The 
LoTdof^Rin^.charaaeriofthehobhits.tmdAeoitercharacatsfrom 
the Lord of ihiRingi art ® George Allen SUnimPuii^ltasLid. J966 
1974 19/9 198; ©l99Mnterttr,'Prc<k:Donj. All rig/its reserved. 
J.R.R. Ti&miTheLordofihRirm.VolU-.TheTv.'oTtAt^n™ is a 
trademmkol htnfi'y Prodiiciions, fnc. MS-DOS u a trademiA o/ 
Miaasofi CfJfpoTaiiGn. 



cannpuTE 



VOLUME 13, NO. 10, ISSUE 134 



OCTOBER 1991 



6 
[DITORIAL LICENSE 

By Peter Scisco 

Americans embrace 

technology even as they 

debate its effects. 

8 

NEWS & NOTES 

By Alan R. Bechtold 

Arcade 3-D, 

voice control for PCs, 

a real editor, 

and more notes on 

the news. 

14 

FEEDBACK 

Legal copies, 

cheers and jeers, how to 

park, bad clusters, 

and more reader mail. 

18 

THE STATE OF COMPUTING: U.S.A. 

By Gregg Keizer 
They're everywhere. 

Computers have 
altered the American 

home and office 

more than any other 

appliance. 

28 

SHAREPAK 

By Richard C. Leinecker 

This month's disk brings 

voice capability, 

3-D designs, world 

conquest, 

and chess to your PC. 

30 

TEST lAB: 386SX DESKTOP 
SYSTEMS 

This month 

we take on ten hot 

SX machines. 




The artwork on our October cover, An Egyptian Dream, was created 
by Marcel Achard at STUDIOS TAARNA. A computer 

artist since 1985, Achard used a software package called Taarna. 

The result provokes images of modern mystery 

and ancient history against a dark desert landscape. 



44 

VIRUSES FROM A TO Z 

By Mark Minasi 

Computer viruses. 

Mysterious and malevolent. 

Be prepared 

for any contingency. 



50 

ON DISK 

By Tony Roberts 
VIRUSCAN, Useful Notes. 

Directory Size, 

Big Desl<, and l^r. Filter 

help your PC. 



52 

POINT & CLICK 

By Clifton Karnes 
GeoV\trks Ensemble is here. 

54 

BUYER'S GUIDE TO 
VIRUS PROTECTION SOFTWARE 

By Chantelle Oligschlaeger 

and Erin Richter 

Here's protection. 

61 

INTRODOS 

By Tony Roberts 
Create macros. 

62 

PROGRAMMING POWER 

By Tom Campbell 

When speed is essential, 

assembly language 

is your ticket to ride. 

66 

TIPS & TOOLS 

Speed up DOS, 
conserve your handles, 

and operate 
QuickBASIC rodent-free. 

68 

HARDWARE CLINIC 

By Mark Minasi 
Choose a hard drive. 



ONLINE 

By Denny Atkin 

Reach out 

and play someone. 

74 

PC TOOLS 7.0 

By Tony Roberts 

Despite bug reports, 

it's still a topflight hard 

disk utility. 



COMPUTE (ISSN 0194-3S7X) is published monthiy in the Uniled Stales and Canada by COMPUTE Publicalions international Lid., 1965 
Broadway Mew Yori(, NY 10023-5965. Volume 13. Number 10. issue 134. Copyrighl © liSI by COMPUTE Publicalions tniernalionai Ud. 
All figlils reseived- Tei. 1212) 496-6100. COMPUTE is a legistBred tiademark of COMPUTE Publications Inlernationa! Lid. I=rinled in Ihe 
iJSA and distributed worldA'ide by Curiis Clfcuialion Company. PO. Box 9102, Pennsauken. NJ 08109, Second-class postage paid al New 
York, NY, and at addiiional mailing oHices POSTMASTER: Send address changes to COMPUTE Magazine, PO Box 3245, Harlan. lA 
51537-3041. Tel. (800) 727-6937, Entire oonlenls copyrighied All -ighis reserved Nothing may be reproduced m wtiale or in pari without 
written permission from Ihe publistier Subscriptions US. AFO - Sia.D-l one year: Canada and elsewriere -S25 94 one year Single copies 
$2,95 In US. The publisher disclaims all responsibility to return unsolicited matter, and a I rights in portions published thereof remain Ihe 
sole property of COMPUTE Publications Internalional Ltd Letters sent to COMPUTE or its editors become Ihe property ol the magazine. 
Editorial ollices are located at 324 W, Wendover Ave.. Ste, 200, Greensboro. NC 27408. Tel. (919) 275-9809, 



COMPUTE OCTOBER 1991 



You must have heard how 'SOOKTO'Bi 
took the PC market by storm... 

Now the HURRICANE... 



^•rt.-^ — :-_ — * i^-., 



"it's the next-generation sound card 
and it is loaded! The operative word is 
"twice." it has twice the sound 
channels (22) of the original Sound 
Blaster with twice the quality of sound 
in stereo, as well as stereo DACs for 
digitized speech and sound effects." 

Computer Gaming World 

August 1991 •[ 



SEE us AT OUR 

3,000 SQ. FT. BOOTH 

#82456 

COMDEX FALL 

SANDS EXPO, OCT 21-25, LAS VEGAS 



COMPUTE August 1991 

" ...Creative Labs is nowturning 
up the volume with the Sound Blaster 
Pro. It's basicallv two Sound Blasters 
on 3 sin gle card_with_additionql 
multimedia features thrown in. It has 
twin FM chips capable of creating 22 
individual voices, two DACs for stereo 
voice and sound-effects playback, a 
stereo nnicrophone jack, and a built-in 
stereo mixer that can adjust the 
volume of all youf Sound Blaster audio 
sources (stereo DAC, stereo FM, 
microphone, stereo line-in, CD-Audio 
and PC internal speaker). 

The built-in mixer makes the 
Sound Blaster Pro fully compliant with 
Microsoft's Multimedia Level 1 
Extensionsto Windows . Multimedia 
software will be able to fade-in, fade- 
out and pan the various audio sources 
to create elaborate sound montages. 

The Sound Blaster Pro includes 
a CD-ROM interface for either an 
internal or external CD-ROM player. 
There's also an internal connector for 
CD-Audio. The MIDI interface is 
compatible with the original Sound 
Blaster's MIDI interface but adds the 
MIDI time-stamp that's part of 
Microsoft's new multimedia standard. 

All in all, the Sound Blaster Pro 
IS chock-full of new features, yet it';-; 
fully compatible with its younger 
brother." 

Reprinted by permisEion ol COMPUTE ©19&1, 
COMPUTE Pubiicallons internaliDnal Lttf 



Micrasolc and W.n<io«s afe regislered Irademarla o! Micrasoll 
Corp and Ad Lib is a regstetK) Iradema/k ol Ad Uj Inc. 
Souiid Blaster »s a trademark ol Ciealiwe Labs. Inc. 



I 

T 



I Slereo/MusicWoic gr§gjeg eh/>pjj/gfeH^JiUnlOTt^ ^ Port I 

Tlie Multimedia Sound Standard 



U:^.^-^ 




^^"W ' 



At a devastating price of $299.95 
and you get a "chock-full of features": 

* Stereo DAC for digitized sound output 

' Stereo voice recording from mic, CD or Line-in 

* Sampling rate 4KHz to 44KHz 

' Stereo 22-voice FM music synthesizer 

* Stereo mixer with digital volume controls 

* MIDI interface with adaptor and cables 
' Built-in CD-ROM interface 

* Joystick Port 

' Microphone AGC amplifier . . 

' Power amplifier (4W per channel) f ^* | 
and loads of FREE bundled software: ^^^ 

* MIDI Sequencer (^ 

* Pro-lntelligentOrgan 

* VEDIT2- Voice Editors Utilities ' 

* SBTALKER - text-to-speech 
synthesizer with DR SBAITS02 

* Talking Parrot - voice in/out 
application. 

' MMPLAY Multimedia Presentation 

* CD music player 

* Windows 3.0 DLL and 
sound applications 






"With its associated software, it has 
quietly (no pun intended, but what the 
heck) become the standard sound system 
for advanced PCs." 
Jerry Pournelle, BYTE June 1991 



'The big question is, at a list price of 
$249.95, is the Sound Blaster worth the 
investment? Yes, yes, a thousand times 
yesiir PC HOME JOURNAL 

How many "yesHI" would you give now 
that the Sound Blaster list price is reduced 
to $169.95! And you get; 

* DAC for digitized voice output 
" ADC for voice recording 

* 1 1 -voice Ad Lib FM synthesizer 

* Full duplex MIDI interlace 

* Joystick Port 

* Microphone amplifier 

* Power amplifier (4W per channel) 

* Bundled software: • Intelligent Organ 

• Talking Parrot • Voice Toolkit 

• SBTALKER • DR SBAITSO 

• Jukebox for Windows 3.0 

Sound Blaster Micro Channel Version 
is also available. 



pSP^r 



North America master distritjutor: 
Brown-Wagh Publishing 
1 SOD Knowles Drive Los Gatos CA 95030 
For your nearest dealer, call 1-800-451 0900 

Tel (408) 378 3838 Fax (408) 378 3577 





'11 




SIUIIQ 



ICREATIVE LABS, INC.I 



2050 Duane Avenue Santa Clara CA 95054 
Tel (408) 986 1 461 Fax (408) 986 1 777 

Outside North America, contact: 



ICREfUIVE TECHNOLOGY PTE LTD. 



75 Ayer Rajah Crescent #02-04 Singapore 051 3 
Tel (65) 773 0233 ' Fax (65) 773 0353 



Largest support of Multimedia, Music, Education, Entertairrment & Productivity software under DOS and Windows 3 

, .. . . ■ . . circle Reader Service Number 125 



76 

WORKPLACE 

By Daniel Janal 

Showing up 

at work is just fine — 

as long as you 

can do it without leaving 

your house. 

' 78 

DEMOTE POSSIBILITIES 

By Rosalind Resnick 

More and more employees 

are working for 

the company from 

home offices. 

Here's how to get 

telecommuting to work 

for you. 

And how to convince 

your bosses 

that it will work for them. 

84 

ARTS & LETTERS 

By Robert Bixby 

Get the adventure 

out of Ventura Publisher 

with some clever 

supporting products. 

86 

WHERE IN AMERICA'S PAST 
IS CARMEN SANDIEGO? 

By Clayton Walnum 

Working proof 

of an age-old adage — 

you just can't 

keep a bad woman down. 

97 

PATHWAYS 

By Steven Anzovin 

The whole idea 

of virtual reality has 

given birth 

to a staggering amount 

of verbal goulash. 



cannPLTc^ 




160 

CONVERSATIONS 

What a long, strange 

trip it's been. 

Dr. Timothy Leary discusses 

mind expansion 
during the computer age. 



98 

TURN A HOME SWEET HOME 
INTO A SMART HOUSE 

By Howard Millman 
This step-by-step guide 

turns that old 
XT into a home sentry. 

104 

FAST FORWARD 

By David English 

Hot 'Lanta dances to the 

wild 'n' funky Windows 

multimedia beat. 

106 

LEMMINGS 

By David Sears 

Run yourself crazy with 

this invigorating 

mental cliff jumper. 

108 

GAMEPLAY 

By Orson Scott Card 

If Prodigy gets it right, 

its name is Legion. 

110 

SPECIAL REPORT 

By Tom Netsel and 

Peter Scisco 

From ants to tanks, 

from outer space to inner 

sanctums, 

this summer's 

Consumer Electronics Show 

had a little 

something for everyone. 

121 

REVIEWS 

Sneak peeks 

at Headline Harry and the 

Great Paper Race 

and Elvira II: The Jaws 

of Cerberus. 

Also, more product reviews. 



COMPUTE GOES ONUNE 

Join COMPUTE'S editors 

and contributors 

on America Online or GEnie, 

Get wired with our expert 

online guide 

following page 72, 



Get over 100 GEnie services and the time 
to enjoy them. Just $#5a month. 




Now enjoy unlimited non- 
prime time usage of over 100 
popular GEnie™ services forjust 
$4.95 a montli*. You get every- 
thing from electronic mail, stock 
closings, single-player games and a 
wide range of bulletin boards to 
news, weather, flight schedules, 
shopping sei-vices and more. 

And for an additional $6 per 
non-prime-time hour*, you can 
also enjoy access to a variety of 
other "valiiable features like software 
libraries, computer bulletin boards 
and multi-placer games. 



Sign-up today. 

1. Set your communications 
sofhvare for half duplex(local echo) , 
at 300, 1 200 or 2400 baud. 

2. Dial toll free 1^0(>63&«369 (or in 
Canacb, 1^00-387-^330). Upon 
connection, enter HHH 



3. At the U#=prompt, enter 
XTX99423,COMPUTE then 
press <RETIJRN>. 

4. Have a major credit card ready. 
In the U.S., you may also use your 
checking account number. 

For more information in the U.S. 
or Canada, caU 1-800638-9636. 




IVe bring good things to life. 



Applii-s oiilv in L .S. Mon. - Fn., 6 PM - 8 AM lofa) ume and all day Sal.. .Sun., and select !uilitUn-s. Prime-iirne liourly rale SIS up lo 2400 baud. Some fcanirn subject la surchanre 
and may nui be available ouuiilc L'.S. Pnccs staled arc U.S. rales as of Sept. 1 , 1991 and arc subject to chanae. Telecommunication .surcharges may apply. Cliaranlce limited to one 

per customer and applies only lo firil month ol use. Not applicable when acremed at 9600 bauri. 

Circle neader Service Number 197 



EDITORIAL LICENSE 



Peter Scisco 



From the cotton 

gin to die computer, 

Americans have 

embraced technology's 

benefits even 

as they have debated 

Its effects. 



Yf ou've got a high-mainte- 
nance, higln-tech rep that 
precedes you to every 
neighborhood cocktail par- 
ty and backyard cool<;out. Hard- 
ly a night passes without your 
getting a call from a friend of 
a friend seeking advice 
about hardware or asking rec- 
ommendations about good 
softv*/are for kids. You're 
known around the office as 
the resident PC troubleshooter, 
though the title never appears 
in your job description. 

On the day you bought 
your PC and brought it home, 
you strapped yourself to a su- 
peroctane booster on a high- 
tech shuttle into the nether re- 
gions of information overload. 
The rarefied atmospherics of 
this newfound land have pro- 
pelled you into frenzied, late- 
night flights across a galaxy 
of Os and Is. 

On each successive voy- 
age you get closer to the rim. 
Each trip into the digital night 
finds you flirting with full-throt- 
tle burnout that threatens to 
fling brain waves and elec- 
trons willy-nilly across the en- 
tire technospectrum. 

You remember what it was 
like at first. After a few weeks, 
you had learned a little about 
batch files. You started writ- 




ing a few of your own. You re- 
wrote AUTOEXEC.BAT, and 
then you swung your sights on- 
to CONFIG.SYS. 

A couple of months later, 
that wasn't enough. You start- 
ed to read all you could 
about PCs. You bought some 
software to optimize your 
hard disk. You bought a new 
word processor. You talked 
your boss into buying a copy 
of the spreadsheet program 
you use in the office so you 
could work at home. 

A couple of months have 
passed. You've become an ex- 
pert at using every XCOPY 
switch. But you're getting 
tired of lugging those floppies 
back and forth to work. You 
suspect that any day your da- 
ta will self-destruct — the latest 
versions of the company budg- 
et will evaporate into a cloud 
of dissipated electrons. Anxi- 
ety begins to dull your techno- 
logical edge. You start look- 
ing around for answers. 

What you see are more com- 
puters. Your world is built of 
systems, Chips control your 
car's engine and your micro- 
wave oven. Your inexpensive 
pocket data card operates 
within a frame of silicon. 
Words like bandwidth, crash, 
virus, and interface creep in- 
to your speech. At home, 
your kids are running up tre- 
mendous bills on a cordless 
phone. Back in the city, 
lunch is served while conversa- 
tions are channeled, corpuscu- 
lar infobits navigating the net 
like synapses fired into the 
cerebral cortex. 

Welcome to America. Tech- 
nology is much more than a 
thread in the fabric of our late- 
twentieth-century society. It's 
irrevocably bound up with the 
way we see ourselves and 
our place in the world. Our his- 
tory is a story of progress and 
setbacks underscored by a 
practically unwavering belief 
in the machines we have cre- 
ated. From the cotton gin to 



the computer, Americans 
have embraced technology's 
benefits even as they have 
debated its effects. 

The advent of the personal 
computer has furthered this un- 
easy alliance by placing pow- 
erful technological tools in the 
hands of individual citizens. 
The air fairly teems with ideas 
for new computing devices of 
every imaginable purpose. 

This month, we examine 
some of those advances and 
the implications of the new 
technology in "The State of 
Computing: U.S.A." Writer 
Gregg Keizer looks at the 
rise of invisible machines, the 
advent of pen-based comput- 
ing, and the roles computers 
play at work, at school, and in 
play. He explores the trend to- 
ward more powerful, less ex- 
pensive computer systems 
that are beginning to fill Amer- 
ican households. And he 
takes a hard look at why so 
many Americans have yet to 
open their homes to the per- 
sonal computer. 

For those of us who have 
adopted the newest in technol- 
ogy, it's sometimes amazing 
that more of our neighbors go 
without. Sometimes it's a mat- 
ter of economics. Sometimes 
it's a matter of computerpho- 
bia. Sometimes it's a simple 
matter of priorities — why 
spend $1,500 on a computer 
to balance a checkbook? 

PCs are still underused, rele- 
gated to the role of fancy cal- 
culators and muscle-bound 
typewriters. 

While it's not up to consum- 
ers to define what's needed, 
technologically, to enhance 
the quality of our lives, we can 
help by spreading the power 
of computing to our friends, 
relatives, and neighbors. 

What can you do to further 
the cause of computing in 
America? Invite some folks 
over to see what the fuss is all 
about. After all, your reputa- 
tion is at stake. □ 



COMPUTE OCTOBER 1991 



National Sales Report 



tm in cnxy HTca. Prm tuimf umrlsf lo 



weY* ia 1I4 nuwejr. 

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FTiatcm hit bu been nay. (Ttut wu ■ jputJ 
Sttkj-Mfy. <n CTtf^ fk»f, dew& tt*ij biltwtj. A 

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me CJilrcn prialcn. WMi tbo looch of ■ 'buaao 
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npartiBi to mifni wl4 lacd to itni]|;|c wnli 

prlaici p(A n ibroucti Bvl Ikoel tbc piece dc 
rcucUflcc — cdoc. 

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Aalcmcnt or cca ■ nDpny BcnO, We've all 
ioof tsttt iXu Qor f3k«re ot u kvt o«K of Ukw 




1994 nB5 



SALES FORECAST 




rigb? Nw iiHctae pki^ ta bto& Or nd. 


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CT%bold a>hci 


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MARKET SHARE 



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CDOil idm, nn ■*'*■''*■* of psatiDj, ^nue^ 
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aai balMt ■ itOtj^ta flHrl om back* cr*« 
tintdy flnbndl d£d|Sir mw f or til. tbe 

Keep [qi the faod. vqik- 



Your Software 
Their Printer. 



National Sales Report 



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bm to «rerT ar^i. Ftonj mtnufKiunng lo 
pRjduci UKtiof la «lei nd swrcbaadttja^ 
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lispie. Ewt iia« «« twiKlwd 10 Otiua ccIdt 
prtntcn. UTe Iw bcce my CTh« »« 1. pubj 
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tho ctidleK ID4U of crypUc ooda Uk otbrr 
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rooUDM — DCdfV. 

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pntiua dflRp bncf at Ktm&fi payable 
uaxcmcu oc even « wnpiity neioo. We've tJ\ 
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MARKET SHARE 



1991 -692 -693 1994 'BOS 



SALES FORECAST 



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Or ytllow. 0^ jar ou of > wfaole ycmm of 
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CMlenJ 

Kwp Hf) tb« food wort. 



Your Software. 

OURPRlim 



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way to get that color. Because Citizen is the one name in 
color printer that gives you everything you need. Quality. 
Reliability. And a very reasonable price. 

Best of all, Citizen printers communicate with the software 
you probably already have -just press "print." It's the easy 



way to print in color, from your simplest needs to your most 
elaborate presentation spreadsheets. Transparencies too. 

For the classroom, the office, or the office at home, there's 
a Citizen printer that's right for 
you. Look into Citizen. And 
make a colorful statement. 
For more information call 
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NATiOHAL SALES REPOST 



Ol 99 E Ciiiien Amtrico Cofpwotio'i 

Cililkfl, Cdta On Conimarid. CcHnrnancl-VM and 4w 

CiKisn logo ore trrK^marki ol i(m Cilinn Wtjich Cs>- [f6. 



©CITIZEN 

CIrcto Reader Service Number 166 




NEWS & NOTES 



Alan R. Bechtold 



Save the 

Itolograpliic 

universe 

In Sega's Time 

traveler 

arcade game. 



Proto Holo Deck 

Claiming to have the "world's 
first ttiree-dimensional holo- 
graphic videogame," Sega of 
America started shipping 
Time Traveler to arcade halls 
across the country in July. 
While most PC game players 
might not take note of the lo- 
cal mall arcade hall, this 
game merits attention. With a 
self-contained Sony 12-inch la- 
ser disc player and 20-inch 
Trinitron monitor, and boast- 
ing digital stereo sound and 
full digital graphics, Time Trav- 
eler may be as close as we'll 




ever get to an interactive 3-D 
entertainment environment in 
this decade (unless virtual re- 
ality really takes off). 

The game itself is straight 
game hall action — a rowdy 
shoot-'em-up that requires 
you to traverse time and bat- 
tle renegade scientists, ninja 
warriors, streetwise punks, 
cowboys, cave dwellers, and 
every other brand of 
adversary imaginable to mod- 
ern arcade game wizards in 
an attempt to (what else?) 
save the universe. 



Time Traveler should be in 
your local arcade hall by now, 
if you're curious. It costs 75 
cents a pop, and you can 
buy more time cubes to keep 
you alive and kicking — sort of 
an interactive wallet. A roll of 
quarters and a willing suspen- 
sion of disbelief should buy 
you a couple centuries of fun. 

Computing sans Keyboard 

A new personal computer ac- 
cessory can literally bring the 
world to those who are physi- 
cally unabie to operate a key- 
board. IBIVl's VoiceType is a 
new multimedia speech recog- 
nition product that allows a per- 
son to use DOS along with fa- 
miliar word processing, data- 
base, and spreadsheet appli- 
cations simply by speaking a 
word or command into the de- 
vice instead of typing it. 
Developed jointly by 
the IBf^ Special Needs 
Systems group and 
Dragon Systems, 
VoiceType adjusts 
to each user's indi- 
vidual speech pat- 
terns and lan- 
guage usage and, 
once it recognizes 
a user's unique pro- 
nunciations, stores 
them for future 
speech recogni- 
tion. The product 
is intended primari- 
ly for those who 
are unable to use a 
keyboard, but any- one can 
use it as a keyboard alterna- 
tive — especially if price isn't 
an issue with the user. 

VoiceType uses IBM's M- 
Audio Capture and Playback 
Adapter and is supported on 
IBfvl PS/2 386 and 486 sys^ 
tems that run 16 iVlHz or fast- 
er. It comes with a user's 
guide, training videotape, on- 
line reference guide, pro- 
grams on 3'/j-inch disks, and 
a headset microphone. The 
product is available through 
Dragon Systems for $3,185. 



For more information on 
VoiceType, contact Dragon 
Systems at 320 Nevada 
Street, Newton, fy/lassachu- 
setts 02160; (800) 825-5897. 

Power Editing 

You've heard of power lunch- 
es, power brokers, and power 
deals. Now there's power ed- 
iting. Good writers know their 
best work requires a second 
pair of eyes to double- 
check — at the very least — for 
grammar, spelling, and those 
inevitable typing errors. 

Artificial Linguistics says its 
new program, PowerEdit, is 
the first software product to in- 
telligently read, manage, and 
manipulate text. To perform 
the functions of a human edi- 
tor and proofreader, Pow- 
erEdit emp\oys proprietary ar- 
tificial-intelligence technolo- 
gy — a text engine — that pro- 
duces a quantifiable data- 
base it uses to intelligently ma- 
nipulate text. It finds and cor- 
rects problems associated 
with business writing — lack of 
clarity, wordiness, ambiguity, 
and incorrect grammar. 

PowerEdlt's text engine rec- 
ognizes more than 1 million 
words and their usages and 
applies 200,000 rules of 
good writing to your writing. It 
works directly with word proc- 
essing software, recommend- 
ing changes to make writing 
powerful, clear, precise, and 
correct- Artificial Linguistics 
president Doug Kramp says 
the company plans to eventu- 
ally license the text engine to 
software publishers for other 
applications needing intelli- 
gent text manipulation, mak- 
ing it a type of operating sys- 
tem or environment in which 
word processors and other 
software programs can run. 
The program sells for $295, 

For more information about 
PowerEdit. contact Artificial Lin- 
guistics, 2301 North Akard, 
Suite 200, Dallas, Texas 
75201 ; (800) 800-4254. 



8 COMPUTE OCTOBER 1991 



It's lite 
Beang A Kid In 



A CkncV Store. 




Any Gar, Any Day, Anyvs*ieie. $29.95 
^^^th fi^e LMUrnited Mileage. 



Just rent from General this September and you'll have some very dclcciablc choices to make. Because for just $29.95 a day, we'll reserve 
and guarantee a midsi/e quality Chrysler c;ir like Uie delicious Gumball Blue Plymouth Acclaim, and we'll upgrade you to your choice of the 
best available car on the lot. We'll even sweeten the deal with free unlimited mileage. Plus OnePass"' miles ^■^^^^^^^^^ 

witli proof of arrival on Continental. And tlie kind of fiist, friendly service that's truly scrumptious. -- -^^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ i 

Tlnis rate applies to drivers 25 and over and is subject to availability, as are colors and flavors. 
Optional LDW Tripsaver'*" $9.99 a day or less. Gas, taxes, airport access fees of 10% or less, if 
applicable, and other optional items are extra; one way drop-off, if allowed, and additional driver 
charges may apply. 

For reservations and information, nationwide, call your travel agent or General at 1-800-327-7607. 
A.sk for rate plan LO. And find out how sweet it is. 

N ATIONWIDK LOCATIONS ]N: Ari/ima. Call fomia. Coloraib. Iloridii, Georgia. Ijiui.siaia. NevaJa. New M«im. NortK Carolina. South Carolina. TMa.s, Uiah. Wa.sliinglon_ More locadons opening. 



. _ ^^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ■" 

«i9G^eral 

jpl ...mdtD'm'mb. 



Wt fcamre ipialiry pruducis of Qh^-sIct CiSfpofanon. 
McKi an: air toj oiuipped for added afay. 



NEWS & NOTES 



Toucb the 
Axxess screen to 

speed-dial 
a phone cumlier. 



Touch Axxess 

New from Oregon Scientific is 
Axxess, a small, lightweigfit 
LCD touchscreen that allows 
you to quickly and easily 
store and retrieve information. 
The large-character, easy-to- 
read screen features numer- 
ous layouts for entering data, 
including convenient QWER- 
TY and alpha keyboards. 

With the mere touch of a fin- 
ger, you can store and re- 
trieve more than 1000 "busi- 




ness cards" of information, 
speed-dial any phone num- 
ber stored, set an audible 
alarm that displays a two-line 
reminder message, print re- 
ports directly from Axxess 
when connected to a PC print- 
er, transfer data to and from a 
PC or from another Axxess 
unit for memory backup, and 
perform numerous other 
handy functions. You can al- 
so enter a personal security 
code to prevent others from 
accessing your machine. 

Axxess can speed-dial 
from most phone systems 
and print from most printers, 
so with the ayj-hour battery 
supply included, it's especial- 
ly useful for business travel- 
ers. Axxess is priced at $599. 

For more information about 
Axxess, contact Oregon Scien- 
tific, 10950 SW 5th Street, 
Suite 275, Beaverton, Oregon 
97005; (503) 646-9806. 

Single Does It 

Upgrading a personal comput- 
er by simply plugging in a sin- 
gie chip would certainly 

10 COt^PUTE OCTOBER 1991 



make life easier for some of 
us, considering how fast com- 
puter technology changes. 
Thanks to Acer America's 
new ChipUp Technology, sin- 
gle-chip upgrades are now 
more than wishful thinking. 

Acer's new system is actu- 
ally an Intel 486SX-based CPU 
that allows you to upgrade 
your system's speed from 20 
MHz to 25 or 33 MHz by sim- 
ply adding a single chip. The 
ChipUp CPU will accept a 25- 
or 33-MHz Intel 486DX micro- 
processor in a low-insertion- 
force socket that also accepts 
the Intel 487SX 20-MHz math 
coprocessor. 

Acer's first challenge in cre- 
ating the ChipUp was how to 
effectively combine the de- 
sign of three system boards in- 
to a single motherboard — a ne- 
cessity for accommodating 
CPUs running at 20, 25, and 
33 MHz. Since every CPU 
type has a different pin assign- 
ment and internal architec- 
ture, autoswitching and detect- 
ing CPU frequency were the 
biggest design hurdles. 

Acer ended up designing 
a dynamic architecture with a 
built-in autodetection feature 
that senses the type of CPU 
in use and then automatically 
switches to the proper system 
speed to match it. The Acer 
design team then made the 
upgrade easy enough for us- 
ers to implement themselves. 

Because Intel's chips are 
readily available off the shelf 
from component dealers world- 
wide, Acer's new system 
gives those wanting to up- 
grade the opportunity to 
shop around for the best- 
priced chips available. Since 
the specially designed 
sockets allow users to easily in- 
sert the Intel chip of their 
choice, both users and deal- 
ers have an easy way to up- 
grade systems on their own 
without technical help. Sug- 
gested retail price for the 
ChipUp is $2,745. 



For more information, con- 
tact Acer America, 401 Char- 
cot Avenue, San Jose, Califor- 
nia 95131; (408) 922-0333. 

Is OS/2 Losing? 

The race between OS/2 and 
Microsoft Windows has been 
running for a long time, but 
the finish line may now be in 
sight. Gartner Group, a lead- 
ing research firm that analyz- 
es trends in the information 
technology industry predicts 
IBM won't succeed in its ef- 
forts to encourage a majority 
of users to migrate to OS/2. Ac- 
cording to Gartner, OS/2's mar- 
ket share will be only half that 
of Windows by 1995. Win- 
dows currently holds 12 per- 
cent of the market, which Gart- 
ner predicts will grow to 41 
percent by that time. 

The fate of OS/2's Presenta- 
tion Manager is hotly debat- 
ed. Gartner believes the oper- 
ating environment has been 
dealt a severe, if not fatal, 
blow by Windows. 

Although OS/2 is consid- 
ered technically superior to 
Windows, it lacks third-party 
appeal, according to Jon- 
athan Yarmis, vice president 
of personal computing at Gart- 
ner. "Without that appeal, it 
doesn't matter how well 
OS/2 performs. Users buy ap- 
plications, not operating sys- 
tems." Yarmis said. 

200 Million Miles per Hour 

It's hard to imagine, but IBM's 
newest multichip package is 
actually capable of speeding 
electric impulses between 
computer cliips at the rate of 
280 million miles per hour. 
The record-breaking pack- 
age, which holds 121 silicon 
chips inside a densely pack- 
ed ceramic module, is current- 
ly in production as part of 
IBM's new System/390 series 
of large computers. 

To take advantage of the in- 
creasing speed of computer 
chips, computer architects 
















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--5^;".,- 



i:,t^ 






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;" 



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^t 












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Art Direction BOB COOK, JEFF DEE, KARL DOLGENER, GLEN JOHNSON, DENIS LOUBET, GARY WASHINGTON 
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VOLUNTARILY 
RATED MP- 1; 

I For Ma\ute Player; 



circle (teacicf Senica Number 104 



NEWS & NOTES 



nianks to 

fflicrosoR Wiiiitows, 

BASIC has 

more than one life 

to live. 



must design equally speedy 
connections between chips. 
In IBM's new package, 121 
chips are tightly packaged 
just three-eighths of an inch 
from each other, which is an in- 
dustry record. 

The chips are mounted di- 
rectly on a new IBM material 
called glass ceramic, which ef- 
fectively transmits signals 
from one chip to another. 
They're connected by tiny 
wires made of copper, an ex- 
cellent conductor of electrici- 
ty. The package resembles a 
multilayered sandwich. 

Although the new IBM chip 
package isn't intended for 
use in microcomputers, once 
the technology is tried and 
true, it could eventually trick- 
le down to the PC platform. 

Still Alive and Kicking 

The advent of Microsoft Win- 
dows actually breathed new 
life into BASIC. Visual Basic 
for Windows 3.0 is the latest 
version of the long-lived, pop- 
ular programming language. 
It's a graphical application de- 
velopment system for Micro- 
soft Windows 3.0 that com- 
bines visual-design tools with 
a powerful general-purpose 
programming language and 
Windows' EXE compiler. 

Bill Gates, Microsoft foun- 
der and chief executive offi- 
cer, forecasts that many thou- 
sands of Windows applica- 
tions will be written in Visual 
Basic. Forty-five independent 
software developers have al- 
ready announced and demon- 
strated more than 60 such 
products, ranging from cus- 
tom controls to add-on DLLs 
for data access and multime- 
dia applications. 

Visual Basic for Windows is 
now available in the U.S. for 
$199. Microsoft already start- 
ed shipment of German and 
French versions and has also 
scheduled other language ver- 
sions to follow. 

For more information, con- 



tact Microsoft, One Microsoft 
Way, Redmond, Washington 
98052-6399; (800) 426-9400. 

Shooting for a Longer Run 

Running out of battery power 
in the middle of a laptop com- 
puting session can be frustrat- 
ing. It can even wipe out the 
bountiful benefits of using a 
portable computer in the first 
place, which is why so many 
companies are diligently try- 
ing to come up with anything 
that will extend battery life for 
portable, laptop, and note- 
book PCs. 

Appian Technology's Pow- 
erMizer is a new Power Man- 
ager Controller chip for laptop 
and notebook PCs that goes 
a long way toward achieving 
the long-life goal. The new 
chip controls circuits and pe- 
ripherals duhng system oper- 
ation, working in conjunction 
with Appian's System 90/SX lo- 
cal-bus-based 386SX chip 
set. Already available to man- 
ufacturers, the new chip 
should start showing up in lap- 
top and notebook PCs soon. 

For more information about 
the PowerMizer, contact Appi- 
an Technology, 477 Mathilda 
Avenue, Sunnyvale, California 
94086; (408) 730-8800. 

Not Just Nintendo 

Super Mario, Princess Zelda, 
Link, and Donkey Kong. For 
the first time, these popular 
Nintendo characters will be hit- 
ting home television screens 
on a video system other than 
Nintendo. They'll be seen on 
Compact Disc Interactive (CD- 
I), a new multimedia technol- 
ogy Magnavox has planned 
for release this year. Nintendo 
of America and American Inter- 
active Media (AIM) reached 
an agreement that will permit 
AIM to develop and market 
CD-I titles featuring the popu- 
lar Nintendo characters. 

AIM is the principal develop- 
er of software programs for 
CD-I systems planned for 



sale through consumer elec- 
tronics stores this fall. The Nin- 
tendo characters will join 
such familiar names as Time- 
Life, Rand McNally, the Smith- 
sonian Institute, ABC Sports, 
Richard Scarry (of children's 
book fame), and others who 
have copublished software 
through AIM for use on CD-I 
systems. Other popular chil- 
dren's characters to be avail- 
able on CD-I software are Big 
Bird, Elmo, Bert, and Ernie 
from "Sesame Street," who ap- 
pear in Children's Television 
Workshop programs devel- 
oped for the new system. 

For more information on 
this software, contact Ameri- 
can Interactive Media, 11111 
Santa Monica Boulevard, 
Suite 700, Los Angeles, Cali- 
fornia 90025; (213) 473-4136. 

FAX on the Go 

Those eleventh-hour rushes 
to the fax machine only to 
wait in line for a leisurely trans- 
mission may soon become of- 
fice history now that Ibis has 
developed a new software pro- 
gram which lets you send fax- 
es with a modem. 

On the GoFAX can transmit 
a one-page document in 20 
to 30 seconds — from your 
computer. If the number 
you're calling is busy, AT&T's 
Service Bureau will redial it 
up to four times during the 
first half hour, leaving your 
computer free for you to work 
on something else. Transmis- 
sion for the first page is 
$3.00, and each additional 
page costs $2.00. The prod- 
uct retails for $69.95. 

For more about On the 
GoFAX, contact Ibis Software, 
625 Second Street, Suite 308, 
San Francisco. California 
94107; (415)546-1917. 



Alan R, Bechtold is editor of 
Info-Mat Magazine, an elec- 
tronic news weekly published 
by BBS Press Service. □ 



12 COMPUTE OCTOBER 1991 




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Circle Reader Service Number 207 



FEEDBACK 



Legal copies, 

cheers and 

jeers, parking 

lessons, 

bad clusters, 

and more 



Copywrong? 

Regarding your answer in the 
June "Feedback," under fed- 
eral copyright laws everyone 
who buys a piece of software 
has the right to make a back- 
up copy for archival purpos- 
es. Tfiat's why programs like 
Copy II PC and Twin Copy 
are legal to use. You owe it to 
your readers to check your 
facts thoroughly before firing 
off a reply. 

DAVID VIERTEL 
AUSTIN. TX 

In your June issue, you told 
Travis fvlay that even a non- 
working backup copy of com- 
mercial software was illegal. I, 
and the folks in the Computer 
Science Department of South- 
ern Arkansas University, 
where I work, have been un- 
der the impression that the 
new copyright law says that 
it's legal to make a backup 
copy. As a matter of fact, 
everyone that I've talked to suf- 
fers from this same delusion. 
How about a clarification of 
the current copyright/backup 
situation? 

JACK RYAN 

EL DORADO, AR 

Your point is well tal^en. Mak- 
ing personal backups of soft- 
ware constitutes "fair use, " a 
loophole In the copyright law 
that allows a teacher to copy 
a page out of a magazine for 
a class, a reviewer to lift quota- 
tions from a novel, or (usual- 
ly) a computer user to copy 
software for archival purpos- 
es. Although that right is ex- 
tended by the law. you can 
at any time give up your 
rights voluntarily by consent- 
ing to a license agreement 
that prohibits making archival 
copies. The best way to dis- 
cover whether it's legal to 
copy is to check your license 
agreement. 

Our understanding of 
May's letter (only a small part 
of which was published) was 
that he had tried making back- 



ups with the standard DOS 
commands and had not been 
successful, which Indicates 
that he was trying to back up 
locked software. License 
agreements on locked soft- 
ware usually specify that no 
copies can be made. Use of 
the software constitutes accep- 
tance of the terms of the li- 
cense. For this reason, cop- 
ies created by DOS or other 
means would be in violation 
of the license agreement — 
and therefore iliegal— whether 
they worked or not. Thanks 
for the opportunity to expand 
and clarify our response to 
this question. 

Hard Disks, Easy Decisions 

"How to Choose a Hard 
Disk" in the tvlay issue was 
great — clean, informative, 
and specific. I especially ap- 
preciated the warnings about 
IDE drives. 

ARTHUR J. SOiNSKI 
SACRAMENTO. CA 

Heodstop 

I use a Vendex Headstart III 
with a hard disk. I've heard a 
lot about a head-parking com- 
mand that should be used 
whenever a computer is 
moved. What's the com- 
mand, and when should I 
use it? Also, can ( have two 
or more hard drives in the 
same machine? 

WILLIAM D, WAGNER 
APO NEW YORK, NY 

Usually the command to park 
the heads of a hard disk Is 
PARK. This command automat- 
ically moves the heads to a po- 
sition where they won't do 
damage to the disk If a shock 
or sudden movement causes' 
the heads to come into con- 
tact with the disk. Some peo- 
ple advise that if your hard 
disk requires parking, you 
should park it every time you 
turn off the machine. Others 
feel that you should only park 
your heads If you're transport- 



ing your computer by car or 
freight. Some hard disks are 
self-parking, and so using the 
PARK command Is unneces- 
sary. On the other hand, if 
you're not sure whether your 
hard disk is self-parking or 
not, prudence would dictate 
that you should use the 
PARK command, if you have 
It. If you don't have it and 
you're determined to park 
your drive. Spin Rite li in- 
cludes a PARK command. It's 
sold by Gibson Research. 
22991 La Cadena, Laguna 
Hills, California 92653. 

As for adding one or more 
hard disks, the primary prob- 
lem with this is the extremely 
small size of your computer 
case. The half-height SVa- 
inch hard disk you have 
takes up all the space availa- 
ble. 

If you have some free 
slots, you could add a hard 
card — a hard disk mounted 
on a card designed to be in- 
stalled in the expansion bus. 
Although the card itself only 
takes up one slot, most 
drives stick so far out from the 
card that the neighboring slot 
will be inaccessible. An exter- 
nal drive might be a solution. 

Not the Same Old 
Same Old 

The magazine that I've been 
getting for the last year isn't 
the magazine I started read- 
ing back in the early eighties. 
The last issue of my subscrip- 
tion was no different from at 
least half a dozen computer 
magazines on the market. 
There's very little in your mag- 
azine that's of interest to me 
any/oor^. I don't care what 
John Dvorak, Jim Seymour, or 
Clifton Karnes has to say 
about networks, laptops, or la- 
ser printers because I proba- 
bly won't ever have one. Your 
magazine isn't a home comput- 
er user's magazine anymore. 

EDWARD R. SALVER 
DES MOINES. lA 



^4 COMPUTE OCTOBER 1991 




Another 



There's a new'TRIS on the block, Its name is 
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This time the falling pieces are letter blocks. Form them 
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Create words horizontally or 
vertically, but don't put all your 
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every time a word lines up, poof! those letters disappear, 
and the blocks below pop up to fill the spaces. So when- 
ever you earn points you stir up the alphabet soup. And 
suddenly that falling M has no HOME to go to. 

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WORDTRIS keeps raining vowels and consonants until 
you've collected enough words to move to the next level, 
or the well fills up. Of course, each successive round ups 
the ante as the blocks fall ever faster. But you can choose 
your difficulty level to match 
your skills, and select from 
single player, cooperative, 
competitive, head-to-head or 
tournament modes. The 
built-in 30,000 word diction- 
ary verifies even the most 
obscure word. 

Set the difficulty level at 
10 and you'll find WORDTRIS 
harder to keep up with than 
the changes in Eastern Europe. 

WORDTRIS. Another great 

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Circle Reader Service Number t52 



FEEDBACK 



Thanks to all who write. We 
read all your letters and try to 
be responsive to our readers' 
interests and concerns. 

Dir Stroights 

After I use the following Quick- 
BASIC statement 

SHELL "DIR > DIR. DAT" 

I would like to be able to ex- 
amine the entries in DIR. DAT 
for ihe subdirectory names 
and then change to those sub- 
directories in order to exam- 
ine the files in each subdirec- 
tory. How can I use the var- 
ious subdirectory names with 
a CD command within the BA- 
SIC program? 

RICHARD KIRCHMEYER 
UTICA. NY 

The following set of QuickBA- 
SIC commands places the di- 
rectory listing in a file and 
then reads the file, creating a 
second file containing only 
the names of the subdirecto- 
ries. It then goes on to create 
a file called FILES in a subdi- 
rectory called TEMP that con- 
tains all the filenames in the 
current directory and all its 
subdirectories. You could use 
some recursive variation on 
this program to look farther 
down the tree. 

dir1$=C0MIVIAND$ 

IF dir1$="" THEN dir1 $="*.*" 

SHELL"md \temp" 

SHELL"[lir "+(iir1$+ 
">\lBmp\temp1" 

0PEN"Memp\lemp1"F0R INPUT 
AS#1 

OPEN'MempMemprFOH OUT- 
PUT AS #2 

OPENMempMilES'FOR OUTPUT 
AS #3 

DO WHILE NOT E0F{1) 

LINE INPUT #1,a$ 

IF LEFr$(a$,1)<>"." THEN 

IF IV1IDS{a$,14,1)="<" THEN 

GOSUB cleanup 

IF a$<>"" THEN PRINT #2,aS 

ELSEIFLEFT$(a$,1)<>" "THEN 

GOSUB cleanup 



IF a$<>"" THEN PRINT #3,3$ 

END IF 

END IF 

LOOP 

CLOSE #1 

CLOSE #2 

OPEN 'Memp\lenip2"F0R INPUT 

AS#1 

DO WHILE NOT E0F(1) 
LINE INPUT #1,aS 
SHELL "dir "+dir1S +'V+a$+ 

">MempMemp4" 
OPEN "MempMemp4"F0R INPUT 

AS #2 
GOSUB cleanup:PRINT #3,:PRINT 

#3,'\"+aS 

DO WHILE NOT E0F(2) 
LINE INPUT #2,aS 
IFLEFTS(a$,1)<>" "AND 

IVIID$(a$,14, 1)<>"<"THEN 
GOSUB cleanjp 
IF a$<> ' " THEN PRINT #3,a$ 
END IF 
LOOP 
CLOSE #2 
LOOP 
CLOSE #1 
CLOSE #3 

SHELL "del MempMemp*.*" 
END 

cleanup: 

a2$:=IVIID$(a$,1D,3) 
FOR 1=1 TO 8 
IF MlD$(a$,i,1)= ' " THEN EXIT 

FOR 
NEXT 

a3$=LER£(aS,i-1) 
IF a2$=:CHR$(32)+CHR$(32) 

+CHR$(32) 
0Ra2$=""THEN 

a$=a3$:RETURN 
a$=a3$+"."+a2$:RETURN 



Readers whose letters appear 
in "Feedback" will receive a 
free COMPUTE'S PC clock ra- 
dio while supplies last. Do you 
have a question about hard- 
ware or software? Or have you 
discovered something that 
could help other PC users? If 
so, we want to hear from you. 
Write to COMPUTE'S Feed- 
back, 324 West Wendover 
Avenue, Suite 200, Greens- 
boro. North Carolina 27408. 
We regret that we cannot pro- 
vide personal replies to techni- 
cal questions. O 



16 COMPUTE OCTOBER 1991 



EDITORIAL 

Editor in Chlel Peler Scisco 

Art Director Rabin C Case 

Executive Editor Ciilton Karnes 

Sfinldr Editor Eineritus Keith Ferreli 

Managing Editor David Hensley Jr. 

Feslures Editor Robert Bi)iby 

Associate Editor David English 

Editor, Gazette Tom N6tS€l 

Associate Editor. Denny Aikiri 

Amiga Rosource 

Reviews Editor 

AsalatanI Editors 



Copy Editors 



Editorial Asslstarrt 
Interns 



Mike Hudnall 
Jiti Ctiarnpton 
David Sears 
Karen HuHman 
Susan Ttiompsryl 
Dana Sloll 

Chantelle Oligscl^laeger 
Erm Rictiter 



ART 

Asslslsnl Art Director Kennelti A Hardy 

Designer Jo Baykin 

Typesetter Terry Casti 

PRODUCTION 
Production Manager De Potter 

Tratlic Manager Barbara A. Williams 
PROGRAMMING 
Pn3flrammlr>g Martager Rictiard C. Lemecker 
Progrsmnlers Bruce Bowden 
Steve Draper 
Troy Tucker 

ADMtNtSTRATIOM 
President Kaihy Keeton 
Executive Vice President, William Tynan 
Operations 
Ottice Manager SyOil Agee 
Sr. Admlnislrattve Assistant, Julia Fleming 
Customer Service 
Administrative Assistant 
Receptionist 



Ellrcda Chavis 
Polly Ciilpam 
ADVERTISiM<3 

Vice President, Peter T Johnsmeyer 
(212)496^100 
James B. Martise 



Associate Publistier 

Vice President, 

Sales Development 

Marketing Manager 



Carofine Hanion 
(OW) 275-9809 
ADVERTISING SALES OFFICES 
East Coast: FuJi-Page and Standard Display Ads^-Ffeter T Johns- 
meyer, Chris CoelhOi COMPUTE Publications International Ltd 
1965 Broadway. Nsjv York, rjY 1D023, (212) 496-6100 Ne* Eng- 
land—Jack Garland. Garland Associates. Inc.. 10 indtisirial 
Park Rd , Hirvgham, MA 02043: (617) 719.5852. East Coast and 
Midwest: Fractional and Pratiuci Mart Ads— Carciine Hanion. 
Product Mart Manager: COMPUTE Publications International 
Ltd., 324 W- Wendover Ave., Suite 200. Greensboro. NC 27408; 
013)27S-9e[]9. Soulheaslern Accts Mgi, Full-Page. Slandard 
Display, and Mail-Order Ads— Haniol Rogers. 1725 K St NW, 
Suite 9C3, Washington. D C. 20006: (202) 723-0320. FioTida- 
J, M Remar Associates. 33C0 NE 192nd Si,. Suite 192. Aven- 
lura. FL 33180: (305) 933- 1467. (305) 933.8302 (FAX), Midwest: 
Full-Page and Slandard Qisptay Ads— Starr Lane. National Ac- 
counts Manager; 1025 Crescent Blvd . Glen Ellyn. IL 60137 
(708) 790-0171. Northwest— Jerry Tnompson. Jules E. Th- 
ompson Co.. 1290 Howard Ave., Suite 303. Burlingame. CA 
94010: (415) 34B-B222. John Taggart. (415) 547-4102, Lucille 
Dennis. (707) 461.B209 Southwest— Ian Lingwood. 6728 Eton 
Ave.. Canoga Park. CA 91303. (318) 992-)777- West Coast: Ftac. 
tional Maii-Otder. Sriareware. and Product Man Ads— Lucille tJen- 
nis, Jules E. Thompson Co.. 1290 Howard Ave,. Suite 303, 
Burlingame, CA 94010; (707)451-8209. U.K & Eu-ope-Bever- 
lyWardale, 14 Lisgar Terr , London W14, England; 01 1441-602- 
3298, Japan— Intergroup Cammuntcations. Ltd,; Jiro Semba, 
President: 3F Tiger BIdg S-22 Shiba-koen 3.Chorae, Minato- ku, 
Tol^yc 105, Japan: 03-434-2607, Classified Ads— Sharon 
Steinkemper, COMPUTE Publications Inlernalitjnal Ltd , 1965 
Broadway. New York, NY 10023. (212) 724.0911 
THE COBPORATtOH 
Bob Guccione (chairman) 
Kaihy Keeton (vice-chairman) 
David J- Myerson (ciiiel operating oflicer) 
Anthony J, Guccione (secretary-treasurer) 
William F. Marlieb Ipres+denL marketing, sales B. circulation) 
John Evans (president, (oteign editions) 
PatrKk J, Gavin (vice president, chiel financial oHicer) 
AOVERTISINQ AND MARKETING 
Sr VP)Corp Dir . New Business Development: Beverly 
Wardale; VP/Dir . Group Advertising Sales: Nancy Keslenbaum; 
Sr, VP/SouIhern and Midwest Advertising Dif,: Peier Goldsmilh 
Otfices: New York: 1965 Broadway. New Yo/k. NY 10023- 5965. 
Tel. (212) 496-6100. Telex 237128. Midwest; 333 N Michigan 
Ave,. Suite 1810, Chicago, IL 60601, Tel (312) 346-9393 
South: 1725 K St NW, Suile 903, Washington. DC 20O06. Tel, 
(202) 72B-0320 West Coast; 6728 Eton Ave.. C:anoga Park, CA 
91303, Tel. (818)992-4777 UK and Europe: 14 Lisgar Terrace. 
London W14, England. Tel 01-828-3336, Japan Intergroup 
Jiro Semba, Tolox J2b469IGLTYO, Fax 434-5970. Korea Kaya 
Advtsng Inc.. Rm 402 Kunshin Annex B/D 251-1. Dohwa 
Dong. Mapo.Ku, Seoul. Koiea (121). Tol. 719-6906, Telex 
K32i4.)Kayaad 

ADMINISTRATION 
VP/Finance, CFO Patrick J Gavin Sr VP/AdminisUative Serv- 
ices Jetj Wnslon. Sr VP/Art & Graphics: Frank Devtno: VP/ News- 
stand Citcuialion: kilarda Orovitz. VP/Director of (Jew Magazine 
DevelcpmenI Hona Cherry; VP Director Sales PromDlions; Bev- 
erly Greiper: VP Production; Hal Halpner. Dir. Newsstand Cir- 
culalion: Paul Rolnick: Dir Newsstand Circulation Distribution: 
Charles Anderson, Jr.. Dir Subscription Circulation: fvlarcia 
Schuitz: Director of Research Ftobeit Rallner; Advertising F^o- 
duction Director: Charfene Smith, Advertising Production Tral- 
Tic Mgr.: Mark Williams; Traffic Dir : William Harbutt. EPS Mgi,. 
Lisa R SulgiL Produclon Mgr.: Tom Stinson: Asst. Production 
Mgr: Nancy flice: Foreign Editions Mgr,: Michaei Stevens: Ex- 
ec. Asst. to Bob Guccione: Diane O'Conneil; Exec. Asst to 
David J. f^flyerson: Teri Pisani: Special Asst, to Bob Guccione; 
Jane Homlish, 






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COMPUTING 




WF alk through the door and shout. 
"I'm home!" and you may get an 
answer from the kids, a spouse, 
and half a dozen computers. 
Computers hide all around your 
house. Touch the membrane panel of 
your microwave, and you call on a mi- 
crochip-based controller. Your tele- 
phone-answering machine may record 
calls not on tape, but in silicon memo- 
ry. That late-model car out in the ga- 
rage is smarter than some of the kids 
you went to school with. And your vid- 
eogame machine does graphics better 
than most business computers. 

Even if you didn't have a personal 
computer in your home, you'd still live 
in a technologically advanced house- 
hold. But because you do include a 
computer in your home's inventory, 
you're part of an important American mi- 
nority that collectively owns more com- 
puting power than such global powers 
as the Soviet Union. China, and India. 

Home computing, once the exclu- 
sive province of electronics hobbyists, 
is now being taken over by millions 
who might never have touched a sol- 
dering iron. As one of those millions, 
you've got a jump on most Americans. 
You know how important a PC is for 
working at home, for accessing im- 
mense amounts of information almost in- 
stantly, for learning and playing with — 
a tool and a toy that would have 
seemed magical only 15 years ago. 

Grabbing a snapshot of home com- 
puting as it flies by is tough. You've got 
to lead it a bit, aiming not only 
where it is today, but where it will be, 
say, next year. So set your sights on 
the present and the future for a picture 
of home computing in America. 

PC, Go Home 

You're in good company. According 
to Link Resources, a New York-based 
market research firm, one in four Ameri- 
can homes has a computer. Over 30 
million computers work at home, not at 
the office or in the classroom. 

Most of these machines run MS-DOS. 
A smattering of Macintosh, Apple, Ami- 
ga, Commodore, and Atari computers 
may sit at home, but the PC has clearly 
won on the home front. That's no sur- 
prise. The foremost reason new comput- 
er owners give for their spending spree 
is to do job-related work at home. We're 
most comfortable with what we know — 
the PCs we use at the office. 

And those home PCs are getting 
more powerful. Where once a floppy 
disk-based PC with a slow microproces- 
sor and a paltry 512K of memory 
served, now home PCs typically in- 
clude a hard disk drive, a color moni- 
tor, a megabyte (or more) of RAM, and 
a 286 or 386SX brain. 

20 COMPUTE OCTOBER 1991 



HOW DID WE GET HERE? 

The path to today's version of home 
computing, fided with false starts, 
dead ends, and half-witted ideas, is lit- 
tered with macfiines fhat should nev- 
er have seen the light of day. 

The Handmade Tale 

IVIillions may compute at home today, 
but less than 15 years ago only a hand- 
ful of hobbyisis had computers at 
home. Some people built ttieir own 
from kits while others bought such 
behemoths as the Radio Shack Mod- 
el I and the Commodore PET. They re- 
joiced when the first floppy disk 
drives replaced cassette tape drives. 

Happy Days 

Computers shoved their way into Amer- 
ican homes by the mlKions during the 
early 19B0s with games and classic 
machines like the Commodore 64, 
Atari 800, and Apple II. Ads played on 
our suspicions that families without 
connputers produced kids who 
couldn't cut it at college, even though 
solid productivity and educational soft- 
ware was nearly nonexistent. The coun- 
try woke up in 1984 to realize home 
PCs were one-dimensiona! applianc- 
es that were too temperameniaf, too 
hard to use, and too expensive. 

The Dark Ages 

Computers went home, but no one 
knew what to do with them. Games 
started shifting to dedicated machines 
like Nintendo, and everyone grew 
tired of filing Christmas-card lists and 
computing home budgets. PCs ruled 
the office, but they were still too cost- 
ly and too tough to use at home. 

Taking the Office Home 

The late 1980s were a time of ex- 
cess — including excess work — so peo- 
ple took work home and realized they 
needed PCs there. Low-priced 
clones helped. The Ivlac struggled to 
hang onto its under-10-percent 
share; older computers hit the closets. 

The Multi Medium 

Windows in 1990 and multimedia in 
1991 redefined the PC as a graphical 
tool that could do at home what it 
could at the office, as well as integrate 
text, sound, music, video, and still im- 
ages into stunning educational, refer- 
ence, and entertainment programs. 

The Future 

Inexpensive PCs with CD-ROM work 
in four of ten American homes. Fam- 
ily workstations control notebook and 
slate computers. Home and office 
PCs talk to each other via modem and 
dedicated networks. Kids use slate 
computers to file homework. High- 
end simulations make up PC play, but 
most electronic entertainment comes 
from the duo of game machine and 
CD-I player, both connected to a TV. 



This trend of high-powered, low- 
priced home computing is accelerat- 
ing. Prices of fast 386 PCs have been 
dropping rapidly. IBfv! cut prices twice 
in less than a month. Brand-name com- 
patible manufacturers like Compaq 
have slashed prices, too, in an attempt 
to keep profits up and box out the 
more marginal PC makers. Consumer 
electronic giants like Samsung and 
Magnavox are pushing PCs in the 
mass market, with discount clubs 
such as Sam's and computer super- 
stores like CompUSA as their ready- 
made outlets. The recession may have 
hurt many PC sellers, but it was good 
news for anyone shopping for a com- 
puter. Today you can bring home an 
amazing machine for around $1,800: a 
20-MHz 386SX complete with two meg- 
abytes of RAM, Super VGA, a 40MB 
hard drive, Windows, and a mouse. 

And it won't be long before the com- 
puter in your home will have even 
more power. Major-league companies 
like Digital promise workstationlike 
graphics in a PC. while AT&T-owned 
NCR has built a minicomputer based 
on the 80486 chip. Though your home 
computer won't be as powerful as 
these monsters, don't be surprised 12 
months from now if you're able to buy 
a 486SX-equipped PC for what you'd 
now pay for a 386. 

More power for less money. That's 
one trend you won't have to wait for. 

Mobile Clones 

We love to take it with us. Even if we're 
not on the move, we like to pretend 
that we soon will be. 

No part of the PC business 
bloomed as quickly during the last 
year as the portable computer market. 
A blizzard of laptop and notebook com- 
puters debuted during 1990 and 1991, 
enticing on-the-go professionals in 
sales, real estate, insurance, and finan- 
cial fields to computenze. 

The average portable computer is a 
no-features featherweight, but recently 
the market has grown to include 286, 
386SX, and even 386 microproces- 
sors; VGA graphics; multiple mega- 
bytes of RAM; large capacity hard 
drives; and long-running batteries. Brief- 
case-size computers compete with 
desktop systems in almost every 
performance area. 

Notebooks, the under-seven-pound 
category, are the hottest draws. Such 
notable examples as the Sharp 6220. 
the Texas Instruments TravelMate 
2000, and the ZEOS 286 all tip the 
scales at around five pounds. These 
machines, and others, are light enough 
to take everywhere you go. 

The rush to faster processors has 
spun down the prices of older, but still 



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capable, portables such as the Toshi- 
ba 1000 SE and the low-end Bondwell 
machines. Portables can be found for 
under $1,000 and make attractive sec- 
ond-computer alternatives to home- 
bound desktop PCs. Laptops already 
account for almost 10 percent of 
home computers. 

One portable trend seems clear, 
and one more muddied. Notebooks 
will get slightly lighter, much less expen- 
sive, and more powerful, and will have 
longer battery life. Hand-held comput- 
ers, called palmtops, probably won't 
work their way into many homes, but fur- 
ther ahead, slatelike computers (with 
pen operating systems) built from inex- 
pensive components may. 

As laptops, notebooks, palmtops, 
and slates become better able to han- 
dle your computing chores, their im- 
pact on home computer purchases 
will be striking. If so many computers 
are bought for at-home work, why 
would you buy a desktop computer for 
the house when you can take your of- 
fice machine home with you in your 
briefcase or your pocket? 

Portable computers freed us from 
the desktop. Wil! they also be able to 
free us now from the separation of 
office and home computing? 

We're All Gutenbergs 

First impressions are important. They 
must be. or we wouldn't spend so 
much time on our home computers 
churning out slick office documents, 
school reports, and family newsletters. 

The notion that almost anyone 
f equipped with a computer can pro- 
duce high-quality printed materials is 
such a powerful idea that millions 
have bought it — along with the neces- 
sary hardware and software. Home of- 
fice workers in particular like how desk- 
top publishing has made their firms 
seem larger than life. 

A laser printer, the crucial component 
of good document generation, is a 
great equalizer. It's difficult to tell wheth- 
er a letter was printed with a Hewlett- 
Packard LaserJet II! at a business or 
with a LaserJet IIP at home. Once too ex- 
pensive for any but the most fanatical 
home publisher, laser printers have 
dropped in price and expanded in fea- 
tures nearly as fast as computers. 

Severai laser printers broke under 
the $1,000 list price barrier last year. 
Leader Hewiett-Packard aimed its Las- 
erJet IIP at the single user and in the 
process discovered a ready market in 
homes and home offices. Companies 
like Okidata, Canon, Toshiba, and Ep- 
son all carry laser printers that com- 
monly sell for around S800. Analysts 
predict that the popular IIP will sell for 
as little as $700 next year. 

22 COMPUTE OCTOBER 1991 



Other printer technologies are mak- 
ing an impression on the home market 
as well. Inkjet printing technology, even 
less expensive than laser, is especial- 
ly well suited for the home, where high 
volume and high speed are less impor- 
tant Portable printers such as the tiny 
two-pound Citizen PN48 illustrate the 
trend in miniaturization. Printer add- 
ons that transform your laser printer 
into a plain-paper fax machine are 
already available . 

With price competition so stiff, home 
computer owners can expect personal 
laser printers — machines that pump out 
four pages or less per minute — to settle 
in the $600-8700 range during 1992. 
More featurebound printers, those with 
PostScript, for instance, will remain 
above the $1,000 mark, but they'll 
close on that magic number. The Texas 
Instruments Microiaser PS-17, for exam- 
ple, often sells for $1,350. Look, too, for 
laser printers to keep shrinking in size 
and for specialty printers to include fax 
reception and printing. 

Beaucoup Bits 

The promises of CD-ROM entice even 
the most jaded home computer user. 
Who wouldn't like an entire encyclo- 
pedia on a disk? By packing hundreds 
of megabytes of data on a platter that 
looks just like an audio CD, CD-ROM 
puts vast amounts of information at 
your fingertips, 

CD-ROM may finally find a way 
home if several computer makers are 
successful in selling their player- 
equipped models. Tandy, a giant in 
the home and home office markets, re- 
cently introduced a senes of comput- 
ers with CD-ROM capabilities. With 
base machines that stretch from a bot- 
tom-end 16-MHz 286 model (Tandy 
M2500 XL/2) to a powerhouse 33-MHz 
386 machine (Tandy M4033 LX), this 
line does much to legitimize home CD- 
ROM. Magnavox's HeadStart/SX-20 
CD computer, part of another CD-ROM 
series, is especially attractive to the 
home user; it includes not only a CD- 
ROM player but also several discs. 

Software has been slow to arrive for 
reference and education, two major ap- 
plications for CD-ROM in the home, but 
there are some excellent discs avail- 
able. Groiier's Illustrated Encyclopedia 
and Bureau Development's U.S. His- 
tory on CD-ROM are outstanding 
discs that by themselves justify the 
price of a player. National Geograph- 
ic 's Mammals: A Multimedia Encyclope- 
dia teaches kids about animals with 
700 color photographs, 150 maps, and 
45 full-motion video clips. 

The shallow software pool and the 
added price of players will keep the lid 
on the CD-ROM market at least through 



1991, After that, al! bets are off. That's be- 
cause multimedia, a hot new complex of 
technology, will push CD-ROM into the 
limelight and possibly generate some 
software that home computer users 
won't want to do without. 

An unknown in all of this is how non- 
computer players like Commodore's 
CDTV and Philips's Magnavox CD-I 
model will affect CD-ROM. These play- 
ers, controlled by hand-held navigators 
and featuring entertainment and educa- 
tional software aimed right at the 
home, are touted by some as the next 
VCR. With no keyboard or computer to 
intimidate, their strategy is to infiltrate 
millions of homes and leave CD-ROM 
computers in the dust. Will they? Ex- 
perts are waffling on that question, On- 
ly one thing is certain: Some form of 
CD is in your home computer's future. 

Someone's Buying the Stuff 

You'd be hard pressed to tell that the 
economy is in a slump if you looked at 
the software sales charts. According to 
the Software Publisher's Association 
(SPA), North American software sales 
were 26 percent higher in 1990 than in 
1989. Lee lacocca would kiil for a 
growth rate iike that. 

Some interesting stories hide among 
those numbers. Naturally, PCs dominat- 
ed the software side of the business 
just as dramatically as they did the hard- 
ware, with nearly 80 cents of every soft- 
ware dollar spent on MS-DOS or Win- 
dows packages during 1990. 

Other systems simply tagged along, 
if they succeeded at all. Macintosh ran 
a very distant second, accounting for 
only 13.3 percent of total software 
sales. The Apple II and Commodore 
64 software droughts so evident on 
store shelves were borne out by the 
SPA data, which showed a 16.5-per- 
cent drop in the former and a whop- 
ping 42-percent decline in the latter dur- 
ing the year. And Amiga software 
couldn't climb out of its small (2-per- 
cent) market share. 

Meanwhile, Microsoft Windows and 
Windows applications ended the year 
as winners, growing nearly 160 per- 
cent over the previous year and corner- 
ing over 10 percent of worldwide soft- 
ware sales. 

Clearly, PCs rule the software roost 
now, and with the W/hdows explosion on- 
ly a little more than a year old, they'll 
continue to crow for years to come. 

Working Hard at Home 

Work is work, no matter where you do 
it. Increasingly, home computers run 
the same software and perform the 
same tasks as machines in the office. 
It's the new, powerful PCs that make 
this possible. With an at-home 286 or 



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386 PC, you can crunch numbers with 
1-2-3. pound out reports with WordPer- 
fect, or compile charts with Harvard 
Graphics long after the l<ids are in bed. 
This power can also form the foundation 
of your home business, letting you com- 
pete with larger companies because 
you're using the same hardware and soft- 
ware tools they use. 

Productivity is l<ing at home, The top 
two home computer uses, reports Link 
Resource, are word processing {69.6 per- 
cent of those with a home computer say 
they use word processing software) and 
file keeping (62.4 percent). Not far be- 
hind are graph and chart making (41 per- 
cent), budgeting (40.2 percent), and 
spreadsheet work (38,6 percent). 

Home computer work is changing, 
though. Integrated software — afforda- 
ble all-in-one packages combining 
word processing, spreadsheet, and da- 
tabase modules — once were the 
home computer user's dream, The 
gleam's gone, it seems, since integrat- 
ed software was the only PC category 
to post a drop from the previous year. 
One possible reason: It's easy to inte- 
grate several separate, full-featured pro- 
grams with a graphical environment 
like Windows or GEOS. 

But financial and tax applications 
show no signs of loosening their grip 
on home computers. Of people who 
are looking to buy their first home com- 
puter, one out of every four indicates 
budget making and tax preparation are 
the reasons for their purchase. The re- 
sult? Quicicen, an easy-to-use personal 
accounting program, appears on virtual- 
ly every bestseller chart. Convenienc- 
es such as electronic bili paying and 
tax filing will become the rule, not the 
exception, at home. 

Although stripped-down versions of 
corporate productivity packages are of- 
ten perfect for the home — LetterPerfect 
instead of WordPerfect, Persona! 
R:BASE instead of R:BASE—\he trend 
is to equip the home with the same soft- 
ware functionality as the office. 

What else would you expect when 
so much work is done at home? 

Go Ahead — Teach Me 

We only pay iip service to educational 
computing. We say we're buying a com- 
puter for the kids, but we don't often put 
our money where our mouth is. Prospec- 
tive home computer owners ranl< their 
children's schoolwork as the second 
most popular reason for wanting to buy 
a machine. More than half of current own- 
ers claim they use their computers for ed- 
ucational applications. But we spend 
less than a third as much on PC educa- 
tional software as we do on games. 

What's the problem? 

Maybe it's the wretched state of 

24 COMPUTE OCTOBER 1991 



much of what's labeled as educational 
by software publishers. With many pack- 
ages crippled by boring and repetitive 
play, crude graphics, and lack of 
sound effects, it's no wonder kids turn 
off the computer and hit the Nintendo 
instead. Fortunately, a few educational 
software publishers are waking up to 
the fact that kids want some sizzle 
with their electronic schoolwork. 

Edutainment, as some call the cate- 
gory, mixes traditional game elements 
with carefully crafted educational ideas 
to subtly teach things to kids. Its ori- 
gins can be found in such long-run- 
ning lines as Broderbund's Carmen San- 
diego games, which successfully com- 
bine learning geography and history 
with detective-style gameplay. More re- 
cent examples come from the Learning 
Company and its Super Solver series. 

These efforts are paying off. Accord- 
ing to the SPA, 1990 was the first year 
that PC educational programs out- 
stripped the combined sales of Apple 
II and fvlacintosh learning software. Ed- 
ucational software sales grew by 48 per- 
cent from 1989 to 1990, beating out 
such stalwart categories as games, 
word processing, and desktop publish- 
ing in the growth race. And though 
much of this increase is undoubtedly 
due to an increased emphasis on the 
PC in the classroom, MS-DOS is the 
first priority of every major publisher 
that sells home education software. 

Home learning's future depends on 
more and better CD-ROM software, 
even more gamelike style, and superior 
speech, The last may be most impor- 
tant, as impressive new text-to-speech 
capabilities — like those pioneered by 
First Byte and now utilized by Davidson 
& Associates — create entirely new 
types of educational software. 

Pick your packages carefully, and 
your kids won't know they're learning. 

Fun Agoinst All Odds 

The numbers are staggering. Over 42 
million Nintendo videogame machines 
sit in American homes. Nintendo sold 
approximately 8 million copies of its Su- 
per Mario Brothers II cartridge. 
Videogame systems and cartridges 
rang up a whopping $3.4 billion in 
sales during 1990. 

By comparison, computer software 
publishers sold only $355 million worth 
of disk-based games last year. Com- 
puter game makers count themselves 
lucky if a program sells 50,000 copies. 

One of the most significant home com- 
puting developments in the last five 
years is the steady erosion of entertain- 
ment. At least one type of game is al- 
ready lost to the cartridge machines. Ar- 
cade games, traditionally built on quick 
joystick action and rapid fire, are all but 



gone from the computer scene. Other 
categories of computer games are in 
danger. Sophisticated sports games 
now show up on cartridge, as do a hand- 
ful of role-playing games and simula- 
tions, such as Ultima and SimCity. 

Game developers fight back with in- 
creasingly complex products, especially 
high-end simulations like SimEarth. hy- 
brid arcade/role-playing games like 
Sfr/ke Commander, and long-iength ad- 
venture games like King's Quest V. PC 
entertainment sales climbed slightly fast- 
er than the overall average, but car- 
tridge systems returned fire with more 
powerful machines like Nintendo's Super 
NES and the CD-equipped NEC Tur- 
boGrafx. Looming behind these are play- 
ers based on CD-I (Compact Disc, Inter- 
active) technologies, which might spell 
the end of most computer games. 

Because PC developers compete 
for a finite number of electronic enter- 
tainment dollars, they must look for 
new ways to play off the home com- 
puter's strengths. The Sierra Network, 
an online amusement park v/here you 
play against opponents via a modem, 
is an area that shows promise. Another 
is an increasing reliance on the PC's 
powerful processor and 256-color VGA 
graphics to handle games that car- 
tridge systems simply can't duplicate, 

Watch, for a small flood of CD-ROM 
games in 1992. Expect to hear more in- 
volved soundtracks and digitized 
speech, see more photographic-style 
graphics, watch more Disney-style an- 
imation, and play more sophisticated 
simulations in the areas of electronic 
life, military weapons, and sports. 

You'll keep playing on the screen. 
But unless home computer games 
fight back, that screen may be your 
television, not your PC's monitor. 

Eyes on the GUI Prize 

The Macintosh is on a roll. Last year's 
lower-priced models — particularly the 
Classic for under $1,000 — literally sold 
faster than they could be built. Surpris- 
ing nearly everyone, the success of the 
Classic and Its color cousin, the LC, 
will put new Macs in at least half a mil- 
lion homes by the end of 1991. 

The Mac's biggest drawing card is 
its graphical user interface (GUI), the 
desktop metaphor where icons repre- 
sent applications and files, mouse 
clicks launch software, and programs 
look and often work alike. Apple's new 
System 7.0 recaptures the lead in GUI 
expectations from Microsoft Windows. 

Windows 3.0 is only a year and a 
half old, and already it's selling half as 
many programs as those for the Macin- 
tosh. The intense interest in Windows 
applications demonstrates that at 
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prospect of a graphical environment. 

But is Windows somettiing important 
for tine tiome? Rigfit now? Hardly. 

Windows' liardware requirements 
leave out all but the best-equipped 
home computer users — those with a 
386SX or 386 machine, two megabytes 
of RAM, and a VGA display. But that's 
not to say that home computer users 
aren't casting eyes on GUIs. 

GeoWorl^s Ensemble — a graphical 
environment complete with minimalist 
applications — sits atop DOS and pro- 
vides an elegant solution for anyone 
with an 8088, 8086, or 286 PC. In 
some ways slicker than Windows, this 
GUI is perhaps best demonstrated by 
America Online, a new telecommunica- 
tions service that simplifies sending E- 
maii and downloading software. 

That's today. What about tomorrow? 

Perhaps one in ten home computer us- 
ers looks at a graphical environment, 
with most of them seeing a Macintosh. 
But the trend toward GUIs seems irre- 
versible, especially for the home user. 
More and more computer mal<ers bun- 
dle Windows or GeoWort<s Ensemble 
with their machines, particularly those 
sold as just another piece of consumer 
electronics.' And GUI ease of use 
makes perfect sense in the home, 
where there isn't always someone 
around to show you what to do, 

Computers must be simpler to use if 
they're to climb out of their one-out-of- 
four-households ghetto. GUIs will be a 
crucial part of the catalyst that takes 
millions more computers home. 

Just Around the Corner 

Home computing rarely stands still 
long enough for anyone to form a com- 
plete picture. In a few years, that pic- 
ture may be nearly unrecognizable. 

"I see a division of computing and 
game playing," says Ken Williams, pres- 
ident and CEO of Sierra On-Line, one 
of the country's biggest computer 
game producers. "There'll be some- 
thing that will sit on top of your TV — 
maybe it's CD-ROM based— that 
looks just like a stereo component." 
That's what we'll play with, says Wil- 
liams, while we relegate our at-home 
work to a more familiar personal com- 
puter. "The next big leap [in games] 
will be to get away from text," Williams 
says. "If the motion picture industry 
had to depend on silent pictures, it 
wouldn't be much." 

Speech is vital to the future of edu- 
cation on the home computer, too, ac- 
cording to Jan Davidson, president of 
Davidson & Associates. "I think there 
will be huge movements in speech 
technologies." she says, adding, "I'm 
sure there will be educational applica- 
tions using very interactive video in 
26 COMPUTE OCTOBER 1991 



very compelling ways." Unlike Williams, 
Davidson isn't bullish on players with- 
out keyboards. "I don't believe the key- 
board is going to go away as quickly 
as other people think. Players certain- 
ly will have their appeal with entertain- 
ment, but I wonder if they'll be useful 
tools for things like education." 

Brian Dougherty, CEO of GeoWorks, 
looks ahead and sees a multicomputer 
home. "There'll be an under-$500 slate 
computer by 1995," he says. Based on 
a pen approach, where you navigate on 
a flat screen with a stylus and write by 
hand, these slate computers are "very 
plausible," says Dougherty. "It's some- 
thing that you can throw in your purse. 
Several people in a home will have 
these, and they'll link them up with the 
home's multimedia PC." 

These three people — and most oth- 
ers who follow home computing — 
agree on one thing; Home computing 
in 1995 will be different, very different. 

Home for Some, Not for All 

Optimists like to think of the computer 
as the VCR of the 1990s, a consumer 
electronic device that soon will end up 
in virtually every home. That's clearly 
not in the cards, not soon anyway At 
the current rate of growth, it'll be the 
turn of the century before even 40 per- 
cent of America's homes have a person- 



al computer. VCRs blink 12:00 in near- 
ly twice as many homes today. 

A home computer is a powerful tool 
all members of the family can use — if 
they'll use it. Barely half the adults and 
a quarter of the kids with a computer in 
their homes use the machine. 

People avoid buying computers be- 
cause they're still too expensive. People 
avoid using the computers they have be- 
cause the machines are still too com- 
plex. Lower-priced, simple-to-work com- 
puters are the key to any dramatic up- 
swing in home computer ownership. 

Some progress glimmers in the dis- 
tance. Graphical user interfaces make 
many computing chores easier and cush- 
ion new users from the arcane ways of 
computers. Multimedia — if by that you 
mean integrating sound, graphics, and 
text into a coherent whole — may shove 
ease of use up another notch. And pric- 
es are slipping, if not tumbling. Whether 
you're buying a laser printer, notebook 
computer, or desktop system, you'll 
spend less this year than last. 

Maybe computers will never occupy 
space in every home. Maybe they 
shouldn't. Not in their current form, not 
in their current roles. But to an increas- 
ing number of Americans, today's 
home computer is as indispensable as 
the television and the telephone. 

America — what a country! D 




"// these test results are correct, then you've picked up 
a computer virus, and you've been digitalized." 



^-^y 








Shi 




Whirling tinrougin the searing desert sl<)es, they 
swooped down on Soviet-made tanks. In seconds, 
the Hellfire missiles and 30 mm cannons punched 
through the hapless units like they were cheap 
tin cans. Now you can ride the pride of Desert 
Storm with Gunship 2000, the only multi-helicopter 
combat simulation. You take total command of a 
five-copter troop. You pick the combat arena- 
from 3 in the Persian Gulf, 3 in Central Europe. 
You meet the kind of challenge that could only 
come your way from MicroProse, the acknowledged 
leader in air combat simulation. Gunship 2000. With 
you at the controls, the enemy has nowhere 
to hide. 



F N T E R I A 1 N M E hJ ■ 



S O F T W A fJ F 



For IBM-PC/Tandy/compatibles. For the latest information on release dates 
and availabtlities. call MicroProse Customer Service al 301 -771 -1151. 9 am to 
5 pm EST, weekdays. £ 1 991 MicroProse Software, Inc., 1 80 Lakefronl Drive 
Hunt Valley, MD 21030, 
ClrclB Header Service Number 157 



SHAREPAK 



Richard C. Leinecker 



Checkmate 

your PC, or let it 

speak. Every 

montli Sharepak 

brings you the 

best of shareware. 



FOUR HITS MADE 
IN THE U.S.A. 

Since this montln's editorial 
theme covers the state of com- 
puting in the U.S., we bring 
you four excellent, state-of-the- 
art shareware products that 
push the techno envelope. 

Straight out of sci-fi flicks, 
SPEAK w\\\ give your comput- 
er a voice all its own. With 
NorthCAD-3D. you can design 
and view complex 3-D ob- 
jects. Conquest gives board- 
game lovers the chance to con- 
quer the viforld. And finally, 
WWX/W/AN challenges you to a 
chess game that pits you 
against the most formidable op- 
ponent of all — your computer. 

If you're new to COMPUTE 
and SharePak, you'd probably 
like to know how we select the 
programs that appear each 
month, First, we look for share- 
ware programs that match the 
theme for this month's issue. 
Second, we spend time down- 
loading files from the online 
services, saving you the cost 
of expensive connect time, 
which would amount to many 
times the cost of buying a 
SharePak disk. Then, we eval- 
uate every program, choosing 
those we think will interest you 
the most. Finally, we work with 
program authors to fix any 
bugs and change any fea- 
tures that we feel are neces- 
sary to make the programs the 
best they can be. 

You'll be glad to know that 
every program and disk is care- 
fully checked for viruses. Also, 
we provide technical support 
during our regular business 
hours. Finally we offer a mon- 
ey-back guarantee — if you 
don't like your SharePak disk, 
just return it for a full refund. 

SPEAK 

This program will make your 
computer "come alive" and 
speak to you. Use any text ed- 
itor or word processor to cre- 

28 COMPUTE OCTOBER 1991 



ate an ASCII file of the text 
you want your PC to speak. 
Then, from the DOS prompt, 
just type SPEAK filename. 
This creates a self-contained 
COM file that holds all the 
speech information. Then to lis- 
ten, you simply type filename, 
and your computer does its 
thing, "speaking" whatever 
you've typed in the ASCII file. 

Although fun to play with, 
SPEAK is much more than a 
novelty program. For in- 
stance, you can create batch 
files that speak, and the pro- 
gram is really invaluable for 
young children or those with 
reading difficulties and for the 
visually impaired. 

Speak runs on any IBM 
compatible with 256K of avail- 
able RAM and any monitor. 
No special hardware is re- 
quired for playback, 

HorfbCAD-3D 

NorthCAD-3D is a design and 
modeling program that lets 
you create, view, and edit 
3-D objects and images. The 
program is completely menu- 
driven, which makes it a 
snap to learn, and it has a ver- 
satile command set that em- 
phasizes conceptual design 
and illustration. 

NorthCAD-3D allows you to 
create drawings from any view- 
point, or you can view the 
same drawing from several 
simultaneous viewpoints — 
even while using the drawing 
functions. Plenty of sample 
files are included that illus- 
trate just what you can create 
with the program — and how. 

To run NorthCAD-SD, you'll 
need an IBM compatible with 
512K of available RAM and a 
CGA, EGA, or VGA monitor. 
Math coprocessors are sup- 
ported. We suggest one to re- 
ally speed things up. 

Conquest 

I'd love to count the hours I've 
spent playing world-conquest 
board games. Now I might 



have to add to that number 
since I got a copy of Con- 
quest. It's a great continua- 
tion of the world-conquest 
board-game tradition. And 
should some of your oppo- 
nents happen to be remote, 
you can play through a mo- 
dem — which is a real boon to 
board-game addicts like me. 

The game looks terrific 
with a lot of colorful screens 
to portray the world and terri- 
tories. An easy-to-use menu- 
driven interface lets you play 
with no hassles. Optional 
mouse support adds a nice, 
professional touch, too, for 
those who would rather not 
fool with a keyboard. If you 
want to know more, you'll 
have to get the disk and 
check out Conquest for your- 
self. You'll love it. 

To play Conquest, you'll 
need an IBM compatible with 
256K of free RAM. You'll 
need a Hercules, CGA, EGA, 
MCGA, or VGA monitor, 

WAXMN 

This is a great chess program 
you'll find hard to beat — in 
more ways than one. First of 
all, the game itself is a formi- 
dable opponent. Even chess 
enthusiasts will have a hard 
time beating WAX/^IAN. Sec- 
ond, you can run the game 
as a stand-alone or as a mem- 
ory-resident program. For ex- 
ample, you can start a game 
and then work in your word 
processor for a white. Then, 
when your intuition kicks in 
and you know what the next 
move should be, you just hit 
the hot key make your move, 
see what the computer does 
in response, and return to 
your word processing while 
thinking of the next move. 

WAXMAN runs on any IBM 
compatible computer with at 
least 65K of available RAM. 
The program runs in text 
mode, which means if you're 
inside a graphics application, 
WAX!\/JAN won't pop up. 3 



With COMPUTE'S SharePak, Youil 



SHARE IN THE SAVINGS! 



SAVE TIME 

We carefully select and test all programs for you 

SAVE MONEY 

Each disk includes two to five programs for one low price 

SAVE KEYSTROKES 

Our free DOS shell lets you bypass the DOS command line 



October's 

SharePak 

disk 

$1.49 

per program! 




SPEAK 



NorthCAD-3D 




Conquest 



WAXMAN 



COMPUTE'S SharePak disk contains the best 
of shareware — handpicked and tested by our staff^ — to 
complement this month's focus. You'll sample entertainment, 
learning, and home office software at a great savings. Each 
SharePak 6\s\<. includes two to five programs plus complete 
documentation for one low price: 

$5.95 for 5y4-inch disk 

$6.95 for 3y2-inch disk 

For even more savings, 

Subscribe to SharePak and receive 

COMPUTE'S SuperShell fnUEl 

For a limited time, you can subscribe to COfvlPUTE's 
SharePak and save more than 37% off the regular cost 
of the disks— plus get COt^PUTE's SuperShell FREE. 
With a one-year paid subscription, you'll get 

• A new 3V2- or 5y<t-inch disk delivered to your home 
every month 

• Savings of over 37% off the regular disk prices 

• Advance notices of COMPUTE special offers 

• COMPUTE'S SuperShell at no additional cost! 

Subscribe for a year at the special rates of $59.95 for 
sy^-inchi disks and $64.95 for sya-incfi disks— and get 
COMPUTE'S SuperShell FREE! 

COMPUTE'S SuperShell rsquires DOS 3.0 or higher- 
Disks available or^ly for IBM PC and compaiibtes. Offer good while supplies lasf. 



For Single Disks 

YES! I want to share in the savings. Send me ttie October 
1991 issue of COMPUTE'S SharePak disk. I pay $5.95 for 
each 5y4-inch disk and $6.95 for each 3y2-inch disk plus 
$2.00 shipping and handling per disk. 

Please indicate flow many disks of each format you would like: 

S'/j-inch at $5.95 eacti 3'/a-incln at $6.95 each 

Subtotal 

Sales Tax (Residents of NC and NY, please add appropriate 

sales tax for your area. Canadian orders, add 7% goods and 
services tax.) 

Shipping and Handling ($2.00 U.S. and Canada, S3.00 surface 

mail. $5.00 airmail per disk) 

Total Enclosed 

Subscriptions 

I want to save even more! Start my one-year subscription 
to COMPUTE'S SharePak right away. With my paid subscrip- 
tion, I'll get a FREE copy of COMPUTE'S SuperShell plus all 
the savings listed above. 
Please Indicate the disk size desirad: 

5'/)-inch at $59.95 per year 3'^-inch at $64.95 per year 

For delivery outside the U.S. or Canada, add SI 0.00 for postage and handling. 



Name. 



Address . 



City. 



State/Province . 
Total Enclosed . 



ZIP/Postal Code_ 



Check or Money Order 



Credit Card No. 
Signature 



MasterCard VISA 

Exp. Date 



(flequired) 



Daytime Telephone No. 

Send your order to COMPUTE's SharePak. 324 West Wendover Av- 
enue, Suite 200, Greensboro, Nortfi Carolina 27408. 

All orders rnust be paid in tf.S. funds by ofieck drawn on a U.S. bank or by money order 
MailarCard or VISA accepted for orders over $20. This offer will be tilled only a! the above 
address and is not made in conjunction with any other magazine or disk subscription of- 
fer. Please allow 4-6 weeks for delivety of single issues or lor subscription to begin. Sor- 
ry, bul telephone orders cannot be accepted. 

Important Notice; COMPUTE's SharePak Is not associated with COMPUTE's 
PC Disk. Please order SharePak separately. 



TEST LAB 



Access hundreds of mega- 
Abytes of data. That's the 
ilpromise of CD-ROM technol- 
* logy, and it's here today, fast- 
er and more affordable than ev- 
er. This month's Test Lab exam- 
ines ten capable CD-ROM drives 
and gives you the information you 
need to understand the technol- 
ogy and make wise buying deci- 
sions. In addition to benchmark 
test results and instructive side- 
bars, this month's Test Lab offers 
hands-on reviews that explore 
everything from installation and 
documentation to special fea- 
tures and software bundles. So 
whether you plan to consult an on- 
line encyclopedia, find a busi- 
ness address, play a game, or 
take advantage of the education- 
al benefits of multimedia CD- 
ROM software, read on. This 
month's Test Lab will help you 
find the CD-ROM drive that's 
right for you. 




CD TECHNOLOGY 
PORTA-DRIVE 

CD Technology's Porta-Drive 
does its job well. Whether you're 
playing a game with your chil- 
dren, researching a report, or 
learning about the world around 
you, this CD-ROM drive takes on- 
ly a reasonable amount of time 
and effort to accomplish what 
you've asked it to do. 

I found it to be slightly slower 

30 COMPUTE OCTOBER 1991 



than my hard drive, an adequate 
speed considering the wealth of 
sounds (on computer CDs — it 
doesn't play music discs), 
sights, and data it allowed me to 
access. To increase the drive's 
speed, CD Technology uses a 
64K memory buffer. 

The Porta-Drive itself is remark- 
ably compact, about the size of 
a hardcover novel, though heavi- 
er at 3.8 pounds. Its two con- 
trols — an eject button and a vol- 
ume slide for the headphone 
jack — make the Porta- Drive by it- 
self much easier to use than an 
audio CD player. CDs enter and 
exit the machine in an accompa- 
nying CD caddy 

installing the Porta-Drive takes 
tittle technical knowledge or me- 
chanical skill. After removing 
your PC's cover, you simply plug 
the card into an expansion slot 
and then hook up the cable to the 
card's port. A separate power 



CD TECHNOLflGY 
766 San Aleso Ave. 
Sunnyvale, CA 34086 
(408) 752-8500 
List Price: $895 
Street Price: $848* 

Warranty: 12 montlis 

(no extended 

warranty) 

Service Plan: flirough 

the company 

(shipping the 

product as an 

authorized return) 



box simply plugs into the back of 
the device. The software driver 
provided with the Porta-Drive in- 
stalls itself on a hard drive, au- 
tomatically altering your AUTOEX- 
EC.BAT and CONFIG.SYS files 
so the machine is ready to go eve- 
ry time you boot up. The driver al- 
lows you to lock and unlock the 
player and eject the CD caddy us- 
ing only keyboard controls. 

If you run into trouble, the user 
manual for the Porta-Drive pro- 
vides adequate information. It's 



well organized and generally 
clear, though it lacks both an in- 
dex and a section of troubleshoot- 
ing tips. The machine comes 
with a two-year warranty Techni- 
cal support is available either 
through a 24-hour bulletin board 
service or by calling the compa- 
ny directly though neither call is 
toll-free. As simple to install and 
operate as the machine is, 
though, most people will proba- 
bly have little trouble. 

Despite the cost of CD-ROM 
drives and their inability to accept 
data from you r computer, t heir stor- 
age potential will obviously ap- 
peal to a great number of comput- 
er enthusiasts. If you're in the mar- 
ket for one of these mass-storage 
marvels, the Porta-Drive has a lot 
to offer in a little package. 

EDDIE HUFFMAN 

Circle Reader Service Number 301 

CHINONCDX-431 

A solid performer from setup to 
shutdown, the Chinon CDX-431 
opens the door to laser disc stor- 
age at a reasonable price. 

This particular Chinon unit 
comes with the CD-ROM drive 
housed in a slim case, a CD cad- 
dy for loading your discs, a SCSI 
interface card, an interface ca- 
ble, and software that includes Mi- 
crosoft's CD-ROM extensions 
and the Chinon device driver. 

Installation is straightforward 
and rather simple, provided 
you're comfortable opening up 
your computer's case. {If you 
aren't experienced in this area, 
ask someone to help you or take 
your PC to a local technician for 
assistance.) 

Software installation is also 
easy. You can install either to 
your hard disk or to a second flop- 
py disk. The setup program will 
copy the CDX-431 device driver 
and Microsoft extensions to the 
directory of your choosing. 



'Test Lab street prices are an average of 
prices advertised m computer magazines 
arid riatiorial newspapers during July 1991- 




® 




CKINON AMERICA 
660 Maple Ave. 
Torrance, CA 90503 
(800) Ml -0222 
List Price: $795.00 
Street Price: $564.33 
Warranty: one year 
Service Plan: tlirougii tlie 
company (customer ships) 



In addition to its CD-ROM ca- 
pability, the CDX-431 gives you 
the ability to play audio CDs by 
means of its CDPLAY program. Af- 
ter you invoke CDPLAY, you can 
program the player as you would 
a CD deck connected to your ste- 
reo. The CDX-431 includes audio 
jacks for connecting speakers (us- 
ing standard RCA plugs) or for 
connecting the drive to a stereo 
system. There is also a head- 
phone jack. 

in several months of use, I had 
virtually no problems running the 
CDX-431, and those few prob- 
lems I did encounter turned out 
to be related to various third-par- 
ty CD-ROfvl applications and not 
to the hardware system, 

I used the drive with a variety 
of text-based and graphics- 
based CDs. The caddy and load- 
ing mechanism worked smoothly 
and without any noticeable deg- 
radation in performance through- 
out my use of it. I was able to 
launch applications both from the 
DOS prompt and from with in 
GeoWorks Ensemble and Micro- 
soft Windows. 
The CDX- \ 
431 offers 
1 5 - k i t o - 
bytes-per- 
second con- 
t i n u o u s 
throughput, 
which makes 
it standard with 
what Bill Gates 
has defined as 
the minimal per- 




formance criterion for a multime- 
dia CD device. 

The company rates the disc's 
access time at 350 milliseconds, 
which is many times slower than 
that of a hard disk. But keep in 
mind that the advantage of CD- 
ROM technology isn't in the 
speed of the access; it's in the vol- 
umes of information available to 
you at any one time and the po- 
tential for providing innovative 
means for presenting and using 
that information. This coming 
year may indeed be the year of 
the CD, as prices drop and man- 
ufacturers like Tandy, Sony, and 
Magnavox bring CD-ROM drives 
and CD-ROM-equipped comput- 
ers to the consumer market. 

Whether you want access to ex- 
tensive databases, the ability to 
play the latest and most compre- 
hensive entertainment and educa- 
tion programs, or the pleasure of 
playing audio CDs as you com- 
plete your office work, the CDX- 
431 will meet those needs. 

PETER SCISCO 

Circle Reader Service Number 302 






GENESIS GENSTAR 
2000 

Setting up the GenSTAR 2000 
turned out to be an exercise in 
plug-and-play simplicity. I just 
popped the SCSI interface card 
into an open slot in my PC, con- 
nected the cable from the card to 
the CD-ROM player, and turned 
the machine on. 

To install the software, I ran 
GenSTAR's setup program, 
which configured my computer to 
automatically ioad two CD-ROM 
drivers at boot-up. I'm using DOS 
5.0. and after a little tweaking, I 
was able to load both drivers Into 
high memory. 

The whole installation process 
took less than 15 minutes. But 1 
was lucky. The interface's default 
interrupt, I/O port, and DMA chan- 
nel didn't conflict with any other 
hardware devices in my PC. If 
there had been a conflict, I 
would've had to know exactly 
how my current equipment was 
configured and be able to adjust 
the SCSI card accordingly The 
GenSTAR manual, despite its mod- 
est appearance (20 loose-leaf 
pages stapled together), con- 
tained clear instructions and illus- 
trations on reconfiguring the 
card and would've been an ex- 
cellent guide had I needed it. 

After installing the GenSTAR, I 
was able to start using it imme- 
diately because of its gaggle of 
bundled CD-ROM software, In- 



GENESIS INTEGRATED 
SYSTEMS 

1000 Sheiard Pitwy., 
Ste. 270 

Minneapolis, MN 
5S426 
(800) 325-6582 
List Price: $499 
Street Price: n/a 
Warranty: 12 months 
^- Service Plan: repair 
or replacement 
through company 
within 2 working days 

OCTOBER 1991 COMPUTE 31 




TEST LAB 



■J^p!tf;&*i5ag- 




tmoNnei' 




eluded are four titles from the Soft- 
ware Toolworks — Reference Li- 
brary, Illustrated Encyclopedia. 
U.S. Atlas, and World Atlas— 
plus Mammals from the National 
Geographic Society and Languag- 
es of the Vtoridfrom the Sony CD- 
ROM series. 

I found Inference Librarylo be 
extremely useful. It boasts a spell- 
ing checker, dictionary, thesau- 
rus, quotation index, general ref- 
erence, history, listings of busi- 
ness addresses and phone num- 
bers, a legal and corporate hand- 
book, and a concise writing 
guide. You can run Reference Li- 
brary eW^ner as a stand-alone pro- 
gram or as a TSR. Either way, its 
easy-to-use interface with pull- 
down menus and mouse support 
makes brov/sing a pleasure. 

The other bundled titles were 
nearly as interesting, useful, and 
entertaining as Reference Li- 
brary. And it's comforting to 
know that if I ever get tired of 
accessing this huge chunk of the 
world's accumulated knowledge, 
I can take advantage of the fact 
that the GenSTAR is also a func- 
tional music CD player by pop- 
ping in a disc, plugging in my ear- 
phones, and tuning in to Mozart. 

CLIFTON KARNES 

Circle Reader Service Number 303 

32 COMPUTE OCTOBER 1991 






PIONEER COMMUNICATIONS 

OF AMERICA 

600 E. Crescent Ave. 
Upper Saddle River, NJ 
07458 
(8D0) 527-3766 
List Price: $1,295 
Street Price: $1,199 
Warranty; one year, 
Including fechaical 
support 

Service Plan: trough 
shipment to Pioneer's 
service center 



PIONEER DRM-600 

Pioneer's DRM-600 CD-ROM 
changer can add volumes of da- 
ta retrieval power to your system. 

The shoebox-size DRM-600 
holds up to six discs, inserted to- 
gether in a special magazine. 
The configuration software gives 
each of these discs a drive 
name. You can switch to these 
discs, access information, and 
run programs just as you would 
from any ordinary disk. The only 
difference is that you can't write 
to the read-only CD-ROMs. 

Once the interface board is in- 
stalled inside the PC, the drive it- 
self is connected via the supplied 
SCSI cable. With only four feet of 
cable to work with, though, I had 
difficulty locating a spot to park 
the rather large DRM-600 while 
still leaving workspace on my 
desk, 

Installation of the device driv- 
ers went smoothly, despite 
sketchy documentation. The set- 
up program is conscientious 
about documenting the changes 
it makes to startup files. 

Once you've installed the DRM- 
600 CD-ROM changer, it's simple 
to operate. I found that the hard- 
ware worked without a hitch. 
Text searches were fast, and 
graphics screens drew quickly, 
though not seamlessly. 



In addition to being useful as 
a computer drive, the Pioneer 
DRM-600 also plays audio CDs. 
The music brightened up our of- 
fice, but the software to control 
the sound was inconvenient and 
poorly documented. 

The DRM-600 includes a 
stereo earphone jack as well as 
RCA jacks so that output can be 
directed to a stereo amplifier. The 
drive package includes a set of 
RCA cables, but again, the short 
length required me to add my am- 
plifier to an already crowded 
desk. 

Two programs are provided to 
handle audio CDs, Multi-Play Con- 
trol allows you to select discs or 
tracks to play, and once the mu- 
sic is underway, you can execute 
other programs on your PC. Sad- 
ly. I found no way to program 
more than one musical selection 
at a time. 

The other program, Juke, al- 
lows you to create tables of con- 
tents for your audio discs and to 
select a program of music that 
can include any or all tracks from 
any or all of the discs in a maga- 
zine. But, since Juke isn't a TSR, 
you can't exit and work with other 
software while the music plays. 
The brief documentation for both 
programs, unfortunately, doesn't 
fully explain the software. 

Being able to insert as many 
as six discs is convenient, but the 
magazine that holds them is diffi- 
cult to manage, The discs must 
be loaded upside down, which 
feels awkward and makes it impos- 
sible to read the labels. 

The Pioneer DRM-600 is a 
sound piece of hardware. As a 
SCSI device, it can be daisy- 
chained with a second drive or oth- 
er devices, and it's a good bet to 
remain compatible as the CD- 
ROM software and hardware 
evolve. Its great capacity makes 
it a candidate for networked en- 
vironments where volumes of re- 
source material could be made 
available to many users. 

TONY ROBERTS 

Circle Reader Sen/Ice Number 304 



PROCOM MCD-ROM 
650/E 

The Procom MCD-ROM 650/E 
drive offers flexibility that mal<es 
it a good choice if you've got 
more than one type of computer. 

The drive that I reviewed includ- 
ed software tor both the PC and 
Macintosh, cables for both units, 
and a SCSI AT-bus interface 
card for the PC (CC16 Enabler— 
$349). The drive itself is housed 
in a nicely styled, light-gray exter- 
nal case with the power supply be- 
side the drive. This makes the Pro- 
com somewhat wider than some 
other drives, so you may have 
trouble fitting it next to your PC on 
a crowded desk. It's actually 
large enough to place under 
most monitor stands, but the plas- 
tic case seems a little too thin to 
support a heavy monitor. Small 
rubber supports allow you to 
place the case vertically, but in 
that position it can be difficult to 
insert and remove discs — the 
case can slide around when you 
push the disc in. 

If you lack experience install- 
ing hardware and software or if 
you're just intimidated by such in- 
stallations, you might want to call 
on an experienced friend for 
help. Depending on what other 
cards you have installed in your 



PROCOM TECHNOLOGY 
200 McCormlck 
Costa Mesa, GA 92650 
(BOO) 800-8600 
List Price: $895 
Street Price: $747 
Warranty: one year 
(extended warranty 
available) 
Service Plan: 
through shipment to 
the company (repair 
and return within 48 
hours) 



PC, you may find yourself chang- 
ing jumpers on the board to alter 
its IRQ numbers and memory ad- 
dresses, not an easy task for be- 
ginners. I found the software eas- 
ier to install than the hardware, 
but because there's no installa- 
tion program, I had to modify my 
CONFIG.SYS and AUTOEXEC 
.BAT files myself, 

Procom's software and board 
also support SCSI hard drives, re- 
movable media drives, and two 
standard PC floppy drives; so 
this setup is a good choice if you 
need to attach other SCSI devic- 
es to your computer. Procom al- 
so includes drivers that allow you 
to use this CD-ROM drive on a 
Novell network. 

Music lovers will appreciate 





PlayCD, an included program 
that you can use to play regular 
music CDs through the drive's 
headphone plug. While you're run- 
ning PlayCD, you can program 
tracks in any order. It's even pos- 
sible to listen to a CD while you're 
working with another program. 

Although the documentation 
for the Procom MCD-ROM 650/E 
doesn't mention support for the 
Amiga, I was able to use the Mac 
cable and a third-party driver 
disk to connect the Procom drive 
to an Amiga and access the Fred 
Fish collection public domain 
disc and run a CDTV game. The 
Procom drive is definitely a good 
choice if you're a family with 
more than one kind of computer 

I didn't have any compatibility 



UNDERSTANDING THE 

AUTO IMAGE RETRIEVE/ 

DISPLAY TEST 

The Auto Image Retrieve/Display 
Test uses our T"/ME_/f program to 
record the actual elapsed time in 
minutes, seconds, and hun- 
dredths of seconds required to re- 
trieve and display 28 black-and- 
white clip-art images from an au- 
tomated display/viewing program. 
The source CD for Shese clip-art im- 
ages is Dover's Clip Artirom Aide 
Publishing. 

—TOM BENFORD. PRESiOENT 

COMPUTER PRODUCT 

TESTING SERVICES 



OCTOBER 1991 COMPUTE 33 






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1, Max out your motherboard first 
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Circle Reader Service Number 195 



TEST LAB 




problems with the MS-DOS CD- 
ROM discs that I tried on the Pro- 
com. If you're looking for a drive 
that has software support for the 
PC and Macintosh, and that can 
be used with other SCSI comput- 
ers like the Amiga, the Procom 
drive is a good choice. 

KIM HORN 

Circle Reader Service Number 305 



SONYCDU-7201W 

The Sony CDU-7201W CD-ROM 
drive offers solid performance 
and some attractive features in a 
long, slim case less than half the 
width of most system boxes, And 
while CD-ROM technology isn't 
brand new, I couldn't help feeling 
just a bit like a kid at Christmas 
as I explored the capabiiities of 
this CD-ROM drive. 

The CDU-7201W performed 
without a hitch, whether the disc 
contained games, information 
about the Civil War, sounds, imag- 
es, or just plain music (you can 
use it to play your audio CDs). 
The only problem I experi- 
enced — not enough memory for 
one of the games — was not the 
fault of the Sony drive at all. I 
was simply trying to load too 
many things into memory at 
once, a problem solved by cre- 
ating a special boot disk for 
when I use the CDU-7201W, 

On the front of the drive, you'll 
find a jack for headphones and a 

36 COMPUTE OCTOBER 1991 



SONY CORPORATION OF 

AMERICA 

Computer Peripheral Products 

Company 

655 River Oaks Pkwy. 

San Jose, CA 95134 
(BOO) 222-087B 
List Price: $800 
Street Price: $699 
Warranty: one year, 
covering parts and labor 
Service Plan: tlirougli 
calls or shipment to 
Sony setvice centers (listed 
on the warranty card) 



volume wheel, as well as an eject 
button, an emergency eject hole, 
the caddy insertion slot, and a 
light to tell you when disc access 
occurs. I did wish for a light in 
front to indicate when the drive is 
on, though. Unless you power on 
all your computer equipment 
with an outlet strip, you'll need to 
check the power switch in back 
of the box to see if it's on. Behind 
the box you'll also find stereo 
phono jacks, DIP switches for as- 
signing a drive number, a 
ground terminal, and two ports — 
one to connect you to the propri- 
etary controller card and the oth- 
er to daisychain with as many as 
three more drives. 

Installing the card and the soft- 
ware to run it is fairly straightfor- 
ward, thanks to good documen- 
tation. Sony gives you the option 
of installing to your hard drive or 
to a floppy If you choose the 
former, the installation program 
will replace your startup files 
and rename the old ones, so I 
recommend installing to a flop- 
py. Once the program is in- 
stalled and you boot up, the soft- 
ware tells you what drive letter 
gives you access to the CDU- 
7201V(/. In my case, it's drive S 
(for Sony?). 

There's also a fairly straightfor- 
ward program allowing you to lis- 
ten to audio CDs (but scant doc- 
umentation for it). ! like being able 
to listen to my Bach CD in back- 
ground mode while using an ap- 



plication on one of my other 
drives. Thanks to the headphone 
jack, I can listen without disturb- 
ing nearby coworkers. 

To protect the drive during 
transportation, Sony employs au- 
tomatic locking of the optical pick- 
up every time the caddy (the de- 
vice that holds the disc) is eject- 
ed. Also, whenever you load or 
eject the caddy the drive automat- 
ically cleans the objective lens of 
the optical pickup. This automat- 
ic maintenance proves particu- 
larly important when you realize 
that CD-ROM drives, unlike your 
stereo turntable and stylus, are 
not user serviceable. The laser 
beam used to access disc infor- 
mation could harm your eyes, so 
Sony cautions you not to open 
the drive's cabinet. 

Sony has established itself as 
a leader in television and audio 
technologies. With its CD-ROM 
drives. Sony is well on the way to 
making quite a name for itself in 
computer technologies as well. 

MIKE HUDNALL 

Circle Reader Service Number 306 



MANAGING YOUR 
MEMORY 

Adding a peripheral such as a CD- 
ROM player can complicate mem- 
ory management. H you're using 
DOS 4.01 and a mouse and if you 
have SHARE loaded, you'll some- 
times have so little memory left af- 
ter loading your CD-ROfvt driver 
that you can't run the CD-ROM ap- 
plications. My experience tias 
taught me to use a memory man- 
agement program like 386Max, 
QEMM-386. or TurboEMS to 
place device drivers into high mem- 
ory areas. The Microsoft exten- 
sions will allow you to use extend- 
ed memory, but even that option 
may not be enough to free your 
CD-ROM drivers for use. Another 
solution would be to update your 
DOS to version 5.0, which in- 
cludes the capability of placing de- 
vice drivers into upper memory 
blocks, leaving low memory free 
for applications. 

—PETER scisco 





ecr-J' 



SONYCDU-7211 

CD-ROM technology is rapidly en- 
tering the world of computing. 
Thie drives, or players as they're 
sometimes called, can access 
enormous amounts of data from 
compact discs (CDs). They oper- 
ate quietly and though CD-ROM 
drives are slower than hard 
drives, their performance is quite 
acceptable. This is my first time 
using one, and I'm impressed 
with what they can do, as well as 
with what they can offer us in the 
computing world. 

The unit I reviewed is a Sony 
model CDU-7211 SCSI CD-ROM 
drive. With it, I received Future Do- 
main's TMC-850 SCSI adapter. In- 
stallation is fast and trouble-free. 



SONY CORPORATION OF 
AMERICA 

Computer Peripheral 
Products Company 
655 fliver Oaks Pkwy. 
San Jose, CA 95134 
(800) 222-0878 
List Price: S950 
Street Price: $824 
Warranty: one year, 
covering parts 
and lalior 

Service Plan: through 
calls or shipment to Sony 
service centers (listed on 
the warranty card) 



Plug the SCSI adapter card into 
a computer slot first. The manual 
that comes with the adapter clear- 
ly explains the setup procedure 
and provides easy-to-follow dia- 
grams. Next, use the supplied ca- 
ble to connect the CD-ROM 
drive to the SCSI adapter, and 
plug in the power cord. 

The last step in the setup pro- 
cedure is to install the software 
drivers, which are conveniently 
provided on both 3'/?- and S'A- 
inch disks. To install the drivers, 
you simply run the SETUP pro- 
gram on the disk. Everything is tak- 
en care of for you. All the neces- 
sary files are copied, and chang- 
es are made to the AUTOEXEC 




.BAT and CONFIG.SYS files. 
When the program is finished, 
you're ready to go. That's all 
there is to it. 

The CDU-7211 is a half-height 
drive, so it easily fits almost any- 
where on your desktop. It fea- 
tures two SCSI bus connectors 
which conform to ANSI stan- 
dards, allowing you to daisychain 
other SCSI devices. The control- 
ler has a 64K buffer memory You 
place your disc in a caddy before 
inserting it in the slot in the front 
of the dhve. 

This CD-ROM drive is capable 
of audio playback and provides 
audio line outputs on the back 
and a stereo headphone jack on 
the front. You also get a pro- 
gram that allows you to play 
your music CDs on the drive. In 
addition to being able to eject a 
caddy with the eject button and 
an emergency eject hole on the 
front of the unit, you can also 
use an eject program to eject 
the disc using only a software 
command. 

If you're considering a CD- 
ROM drive, the Sony package is 
a good choice. It contains every- 
thing you need to get started ex- 
cept CDs. It's very easy to install, 
and since it's a Sony, you can bet 
that it'll be around for a long time. 

TROY TUCKER 

Circle Reader Service Number 307 



UNDERSTANDING THE 
TIMED TEXT DUMP 

How quickly can these CD-ROM 
drives handle text? The Timed 
Text Dump Test uses our TIMEJT 
program to show the actual 
elapsed time in minutes, seconds, 
and tiundredths of seconds re- 
quired to "type" a tiuge text file 
(2,551,206 bytes) from a CD-ROM 
disc file to the PC screen. The 
source file is PHRASE.GON from 
Aide Publishing's The Amazing 
Moby Lexicon CD. 

—TOM BENFORD. PRESIDENT 

COMPUTER PRODUCT 

TESTING SERVICES 



OCTOBER 1991 COMPUTE 37 



TEST LAB 



SUN MOON STAR 
CD-ROM SET 

If you're looking for a capable CD- 
ROM drive with an impressive bun- 
dle of discs, you owe it to your- 
self to check out Sun Moon Star's 
CD-ROM Set. 

Connecting the drive to the 
computer was a breeze, but in- 
stalling the software proved 
more of a challenge. The installa- 
tion process alters your CON- 
FIG.SYS and AUTOEXEC.BAT 
files, and this seemed to be 
where my problems were. Lucki- 
ly, the manual explains what you 
should find when you examine 
these files, and I found that the 
default base address of the 
controller card was the same as 
the address for another of my 
peripherals. To correct the prob- 
lem, I used one of the card's 
eight jumper settings for differ- 
ent addresses. 

I placed the drive between my 
system box and the monitor to 
save space on my crowded 
desk — a convenient setup. The on- 
ly other challenge I faced in set- 
ting up this drive involved the 
drive door, which apparently pop- 
ped out of place during shipping. 
I managed to fish it out easily, how- 
ever, and loaded and ejected 
discs normally without the door. 

Once I had the drive up and run- 
ning, trying out the software bun- 
dled with the Sun Moon Star was 
as exciting as opening packages 
on Christmas morning. 



CHOOSING AN INTERFACE 



An interface card lets your CD- 
ROM drive communicate with the 
host PC, but wtiich kind of card 
should you choose? 

The decision between a SCSI 
(Small Computer Systems Inter- 
face — called scuzzy for short) and 
a proprietary interface is a per- 
sonal one, since many manufactur- 
ers offer their drives interfaced 
either way. For example, the 
Hitachi CDR-3600 comes with a 
Hitachi proprietary interface, 
while the Hitachi CDR-3650 (vir- 
tually the same drive except for 
buffer size) is configured for a 
SCSI inlerface. Proprietary inter- 
faces are commonly sold sepa- 
rately, adding lo the cost of the 
drive (typically $10O-$150 more). 
The SCSI interface allows daisy- 
chaining of up to eight SCSI devic- 
es, such as additional CD-ROM 
drives or hard drives, all using the 
same single interlace card. It's not 
uncommon, however, to have dai- 
sychaining capability with many 
proprietary-interface drives as 
well. For example, the Sony propri- 
etary bus allows for daisychaining 
four CD-ROM drives. 



Performance differences be- 
tween the proprietary and SCSI 
models of tfie same drive are neg- 
ligible (if any exist at all), and in 
some cases, the proprietary inter- 
face actually performs better 
since it is a custom fit rather than 
a universal solution. 

The "mated pair" proprietary ap- 
proach very often optimizes the fea- 
tures of a particular drive, such as 
internal buffer size, and extracts 
the best performance from both 
the interface card and the CD- 
ROM drive itself. The installation/ 
setup procedure is often highly 
automated with proprietary-inter- 
lace drives as well. 

The SCSI interlace provides a 
standard that is ostensibly hard- 
ware independent, tfius allowing 
dealers to sell the same CD-ROM 
drive to a Macintosh owner {since 
the Mac has its own built-in SCSI 
port) or to a PC owner with a SCSI 
interface kit. Several external 
drives are on// available as SCSI 
models, so that should betaken in- 
to consideration when shopping 
for a drive. 

-TOI^ BENFORD 



One disc contains popular 
games from the Software 
Toolworks: Black Hole, Life & 
Death, Bruce Lee Lives, Chess- 
master 2000, Gin King/Cribbage 
King, Hunt for Red October, Bad 
Street Brawler, Crossword Mania, 
221 B Baker Street, and Alternate 
Reality: The City. Also from 
Toolworks you'lt find World Atlas 
and Illustrated Encyclopedia. 




38 COMPUTE OCTOBER 1991 



Both are topnotch, fun-to-use refer- 
ence works. 

You also get Microsoft Book- 
shelf, which includes The Amer- 
ican Heritage Dictionary, f^get's 
II: Electronic .Thesaurus. The 
World Book and Book of Facts, 
Bartlett's Familiar Quotations, and 
half a dozen other reference aids 
to writers. Microsoft's Small Busi- 
ness Consultant & Stat Pack 
comes with the package, too. 

SUN MOON STAR 
Personal Comiiuter Division 
1941 Ringwood Ave. 
San Jose, CA 95131 
(408) 452-7811 
List Price: $995.00 
Street Price: $725.67 
Warranty: 18 months matl-in 
(extended warranty available) 
Service Plan: ttirough tech support, 
or shipping a part or tlie entire 
system to the company 



These programs provide a library 
of government publications and 
statistics, ranging from weekly 
wage averages in 60 different 
communities to affirmative action 
plans, from agricultural commod- 
ities to federal regulations, and 
much more. 

Hot Line lets you dial more 
than 132,000 corporate and gov- 
ernment telephone numbers at 
the touch of a key. And witii Hot 
Line, you can find area codes for 
more than 3,000 cities worldwide 
with the electronic phone book 
and automatic dialer. 

Music fans will appreciate CD 
Guide, an up-to-date listing of al- 
most everything that has to do 
with CD music. 

The Sun f\/loon Star comes 
with an earphone jack and vol- 
ume control that make it conven- 
ient for listening to your favorite 
musical disc while working at 
your computer. 

In all, despite its large footprint 
and somewhat flimsy door, the 
Sun r^oon Star CD-ROM drive 
works well and faster than 1 ex- 
pected. The amount of software 
that accompanies this drive is tru- 
ly awesome, making the total val- 
ue of this package something to 
consider when shopping for a CD- 
ROM drive. 

TOM NETSEL 

Circle Reader Service Number 30S 



UNDERSTANDING THE 

HI-RES COLOR IMAGE 

RETRIEVAL TEST 

The Hi-Res Color Image Retrieval 
Test shows the actual elapsed 
time, in seconds and hundredtiis 
of seconds, required to retrieve 
three high-resolution scanned col- 
or images. Each bar represents an 
average of three image retrieval 
times. U.S. postage stamps 
from Nimbus Information Sys- 
tems' Romware Magazine CD 
are the source of images 
used in this test. 

—TOM BENFORD. PRESIDENT 
COMPUTER PRODUCT TESTING SERVICES 



RADIO SHACK 
A Division ol Tandy 
Martceling Information 
700 One Tanity Center 
Fort Wortii, TX 76102 
(817) 390-3300 
List Price: $399.95 
Street Price: n/a 
Warranty: one year, 
covering parts 
and labor 
Service Plan: 
ttirough retail 
outlets 

TANDY 
CDR-1000 

The Tandy CDR-1000 CD-ROM is 
easy to install if you have a spare 
5'/4-inch half-height bay in your 
PC, an empty slot in your expan- 
sion bus, a Phillips-head screw- 
driver, and an adventurous spirit. 
(If you have all but the screwdriv- 
er or the adventurous spirit, your 
local Radio Shack will install the 
CD-ROM for you.) 

It provides the advantages of 
CD-ROM for a bargain price of on- 
ly $399.95, Tandy isn't known for 
its pnce leadership, preferring to 
make a name for Itself providing 
the widest availability of products 
and service. Still, the under- 
$400.00 price is a breakthrough, 
particularly when you consider 




that this CD drive is one of the few 
that meet or exceed Microsoft's 
multimedia standard of 150K per 
second data transmission. 

Though the data transmission 
is very rapid, the CDR-1000 ac- 
cess time is 800 milliseconds — 
almost a full second to find a par- 
ticular piece of data on the CD, 
which means that if you are using 
your CD for heavy-duty database 
access, you should look for a fast- 
er {and more expensive) unit. 
Since the CDR-1000's forte is 
streaming information quickly to 
the computer once it is found, it's 
particularly suited to playing 
games and other applications 
where animation is important. 

To load a CD, you slide the en- 
tire unitfonAfard like a bureau draw- 
er. When it's nearly all the way out 
of the machine, you can lift a 




TEST LAB 



hinged lid to expose the CD ar- 
ea. Unlike many CD-ROMs, the 
GDR-1000 doesn't use a CD cad- 
dy. You simply place the CD in 
the unit as you would in a porta- 
ble CD player. One less piece of 
cyberjunk to clutter your office. 

Recognizing that the CDR- 
1000 will be the first upgrade 
many users make to their basic 
machine, Tandy put the manual/ 
installation guide together with 
the novice in mind. !t covers in- 
stallation and use of the CD-ROM 
very gradually in step-by-step 
procedures. 

The CDR-1000 is capable of 
playing audio CDs as well as read- 
ing data CDs. It features a head- 
phone minijack and volume con- 
trol in the front panel. The back 
of the expansion card features 
two female RCA jacks, allowing 
you to connect the player to your 
stereo. The audio CD can be con- 
trolled from the command line or 
from the control panel that sup- 
ports a mouse. It will continue to 
play when you start up another 
application, so you won't have to 
make a choice between playing 
music and using your computer 
productively 

The performance, features, 
and price of Tandy's CDR-1000 
are sure to attract attention in to- 
day's increasingly important CD- 
ROM drive market. 

ROBERT BIXBY 

Circle Reader Service Number 309 



TOSHIBA AMERICA 
INFOIIMATrON SYSTEMS 
Disk Products Division 
9740 Irvine Blvd. 
Irvine, CA 92718 
(7U] 583-3001) 
Lfsi Price: $950.00 
Street Price: $685.67 
Warranty: one year 
Service Plan: lliraugh return 
of drive to the company 



TOSHIBA 
TXM-3201AI-PCF 

Now's a great time to buy a CD- 
ROM drive. By the time you read 
this, Microsoft will have released 
its multimedia extensions for Win- 
clows, and the number of new CD- 
ROM !itles will be growing expo- 
nentially Manufacturers are fall- 
ing all over each other as they try 
to gain the edge on price and fea- 
tures. 

If you're the kind of person who 
buys conservatively — who wants 
a product to have a proven track 
record before you'll consider buy- 
ing it — take a good look at Toshi- 
ba's TXIVI-3201A1-PCF. It's con- 
sidered by many to be the work- 
horse of the currently available 
CD-ROM drives and is one of the 
first drives that fully meet Micro- 
soft's multimedia specifications. 




THE HISTORY OF SCSI 



SCSI was originally based on the ar- 
chitecture of the block-multiptex chan- 
nel commonly used on the early IBM 
mainframe computers. This ctiannel 
had the ability to communicate with 
several peripherals simultaneously 
The SCSI specification for personal 
computers was approved in 1986 
(ANSI X3.131-1986). After Apple's 
and Commodore's adoption of 
SCSI, IBM finally offered a SCSI bus 
as standard equipment on some 
PS/2 models in 1989. 

The SCSI standard has provided 
outlines for several commands per- 
taining to different device types 



such as hard drives, printers, and 
tape backups. It also defined phys- 
ical characteristics sucti as pin as- 
signments and cable types. While it 
all looked good on paper, in reality 
there were often conflicts when sev- 
eral SCSI-interfaced peripherals 
were simultaneously accessed. The 
main problem stemmed from too 
much flexibility in the specification. 
The result— some peripherals signif- 
icantly deviated from what was intend- 
ed to be a "standard." Device con- 
flicts and compatibility problems 
cropped up frequently. 

—TOM BENFORD 



40 COMPUTE OCTOBER 1991 



It's also a highly versatile 
drive — you can buyan internal ver- 
sion (XM-3201B, $600) or an ex- 
ternal version, and the external ver- 
sion is available with either a PC 
interface kit (TXM-3201A1-PCF, 
$950) or a Mac interface kit 
(TXM-3201A1-MAC, $850), The 
PC kit includes a SCSI card and 
requires an available slot, but 
you can also plug the TXM-3201 
into a standard parallel port with 
a MiniSCSI (Trantor Systems, 
5415 Randail Place, Fremont, 
California 94538; 415-770-1400; 
$179), 

If you're new to CD-ROM 
drives, you'll appreciate that this 
one is easy to install. You simply 
run a setup program that writes 
the necessary drivers to your 
hard drive and adds a few lines 
to your AUTOEXEC.BAT and CON- 
FIG.SYS files. The PC interface kit 
is manufactured by Future Do- 
main for Toshiba and includes a 
half-slot SCSI adapter card and 
a special SCSI cable. A word of 
warning — although the Future Do- 
main SCSI cable looks like a stan- 
dard Macintosh SCSI cable, it 
isn't wired the same way. If you 



All Benctimark/Performance Test- 
ing is conducted by Computer Prod- 
uct Testing Services (CPTS), an in- 
dependent testing and evaluation 
laboratory based in fvlanasquan. 
New Jersey Every effort has been 
made to ensure Itie accuracy and 
completeness of this data as of the 
date of testing. Performance may 
vary among samples. 



hook the cable to a Mac, you 
could damage your computer. 

The drive worked fine with eve- 
ry CD-ROM disc that 1 tried- 
there was never any loss of data, 
the sound was clear and steady 
(a stereo headphone jack is locat- 
ed on the front of the unit), and 
the SCSI software drivers were al- 
ways able to locate the drive. 

It's not covered well in the man- 
ual, but you can also play audio 
CDs on the TXM-320 1 . In order to 
do this, you have to set the last 
DIP switch {in the back of the 
unit) to the up position. Place an 
audio-CD disk in the caddy — just 
as you would a CD-ROM disk. To 
move to the next audio track, 
press the Open/Close button for 
less than a second. Unfortunate- 
ly, you can't go backwards or 
move randomly through the 
tracks. To eject the disk, press 
the Open/Close button for more 
than a second, 

For a solid and reliable CD- 
ROM drive that has weathered 
the test of time, Toshiba's TXM- 
3201A1-PCF is an excellent 
choice. 

DAVID ENGLISH 

circle Reader Service Number 310 



SCSI-2 

SCSt-2 (still a draft as of this writ- 
ing—not yet an officially adopted 
standard) seeks to alleviate com- 
patability problems by providing 
more stringent hardware design 
guidelines, additional device com- 
mands, better error handling and 
recovery, and enhanced logic tor 
signal routing and device sharing. 
It stnould be noted that not all 
SCSI adapter cards can support 
newer peripherals built to conform 
with SCSI-2 protocols, so check 
the compatibility with your dealer 
before purchasing to avoid prob- 
lems and headaches. 

If you'd tike more information on 
SCSI and SCSI-2, you can contact 
ANSI (American National Stan- 
dards Institute), 1430 Broadway, 
New York. New York 10018. 

—TOM BENFORD 




UNDERSTANDING THE SPEED TESTS 



We ran these and the other tests us- 
ing a 1 6-MHz 386 SX with 2N4B RAM 
and a 512K VGA card attached to 
a high-resolution monitor. 

The speed tests provide two 
kinds of statistically significant da- 
ta: the actual transfer rate of the CD- 
ROM system and the elapsed time 
for a transfer of a CD-ROM file to the 
screen. 

Here's how the tests worked. We 
transferred the CAPTIONS-NAM file 
(1 ,257,344 bytes) on the Compton's 
Mutiimedia Encyclopedia disc Jo 
the screen using our CD-SPEED pro- 
gram while at the same time running 
our TIMEJT program (a stop- 



watch program). 

The bar graph for actual transfer 
rates shows the speeds achieved 
by particular drives as they trans- 
ferred the CAPTIONS.NAM file to 
the screen in 16K blocks. The in- 
dustry standard transfer rate is 
150K per second. There are differ- 
ences in these acluat rates because 
of differences in controller technol- 
ogies, buffers, and software. 

The elapsed time bar graph 
shows how long it took to make the 
transfer. " 

—TOM BENFORD, PRESIDENT 

COMPUTER PRODUCT 

TESTING SERVICES 




OCTOBER 1991 COMPUTE 41 



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It's easy 
to protect yourself 
against ¥^^m 
computer viruses. 

Here's how. 



M 



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T 



F R L 

By Mark Minasi 

"ou've heard about computer viruses — those mysterious, malev- 

' olent programs tliat enter your computer in the dead of night and 

■ zap all of your data. Some virus experts say we'll see thousands 
of different viruses floating around the computer world in the 
next few years. Like Chicken Little, these pundits predict the com- 
puter sky will fall ending computing as we know it. Others say thai 
these virus experts need users to be afflicted with virus hysteria so 
they can Keep their jobs. What's going on? Here's the who, what, why. 
where, and how of viruses. 

Virus is a term in popuiar use that refers to any of a group of un- 
wanted programs— the weeds in your computer garden. By the way. 
the term is a metaphor only— you can't catch a virus from your com- 
puter. 

Why are there viruses? Simply put, a virus is a form of computer 
crime, and often it's not even a particularly inspired crime. tVlicrocom- 
puting has grown up in an atmosphere of trust and cooperation, free- 
ing PC operating environments from the clutter of security systems- 
much like a rurai neighborhood that hasn't had to lock its doors for 
years. 

This open environment has left an opportunity for a few cowardly 
programmers to create these destructive programs. Believe me — 
there's not much to writing a virus that runs on DOS machines. 
There's no more ingenuity in writing one of these than there would 
be in robbing houses in the aforementioned neighborhood. 

The media-inspired vision of virus authors as a class of super pro- 
grammers is misinformed. They're just maladjusted twerps looking for 
some attention in a particularly destructive way 

Parts of Virus 

A virus has two parts, which I'll call the infector and the detonator. 
They have two very different jobs. One of the features of a computer 
virus that separates it from other kinds of computer programs is that 
it replicates itseif so that it can spread (via floppies transported from 
computer to computer, or networks) to other computers. That's what 
the infector does. 
After the infector has copied the virus elsewhere, the detonator per- 



OCTOBER 1991 COMPUTE 45 



forms the virus's main worl<. Generally 
that work is either damaging data on 
your disks, altering what you see on 
your computer display, or doing some- 
thing else that interferes with the nor- 
mal use of your computer. 

Here's an example of a simple virus, 
the Lehigh virus. The infector portion of 
Lehigh replicates by attaching a copy 
of itself to C0MMAND.COM (an impor- 
tant part of DOS), enlarging it by 
about 1000 bytes. 

So let's say you put a floppy contain- 
ing C0MMAND.COM into an infected 
PC at your office — that is, a PC that is 
running the Lehigh program. The infec- 
tor portion of Lehigh looks over DOS's 
shoulder, monitoring all floppy access- 
es. The first time you tell the infected 
PC to access your floppy drive, the Le- 
high infector notices the copy of COM- 
MAND. COM on the floppy and adds a 
copy of itself to that file. 

Then you take the floppy home to 
your PC and boot from the floppy (!n 
this case, you've got to boot from the 
floppy in order for the virus to take ef- 
fect, since you may have many copies 
of C0MMAND.COM on your hard and 
floppy disks, but DOS only uses the 
C0MMAND.COM located on the boot 
drive.) 

Now the virus has silently and instant- 
ly been installed in your PC's memory. 
Every time you access a hard disk sub- 
directory or a floppy disk containing 
C0MMAND.COM, the virus sees that 
file and infects it, in the hopes that this 
particular C0MMAND.COM will be 
used on a boot disk on some comput- 
er someday. 

Meanwhile, Lehigh keeps a count of 
infections. Once it's infected four cop- 
ies of C0MMAND.COM, the detonator 
is triggered, The detonator in Lehigh is 
a simple one. It erases a vital part of 
your hard disk, making the files on 
that part of the disk no longer accessi- 
ble. You grumbie and set about rebuild- 
ing your work, unaware that Lehigh is 
waiting to infect other unsuspecting 
computers if you boot from one of 
those four infected floppies! 

The Worm That Turned 

The term for any program that repli- 
cates itself, like the infector part of a vi- 
rus, is a worm. Some viruses are pure 
worms, like the much-publicized In- 
ternet worm, This wornn ran on minicom- 
puters linked on the Internet network. It 
made multiple copies of itself in a min- 
icomputer, forcing the computer to 
waste time executing the worms, slow- 
ing down response time for legitimate 
users. It also copied itself to other com- 
puters on Internet, spreading so quick- 
ly that it brought the entire network to 
a halt. 

46 COMPUTE OCTOBER 1991 



Such a program will not affect PC us- 
ers, since there are no PC-based net- 
works that can call your computer up 
and dump messages on it automatical- 
ly The kinds of worms found in virus- 
es generally work by injecting copies 
of themselves into executable pro- 
grams. 

This one fact simplifies the task of an- 
tivirus programs. A virus can only infect 
either an executable program — ones 
with a COM, EXE, SYS, BIN, or OVL ex- 
tension — or the area of a disk called 
the boot sector. We can then talk 
about two kinds of viruses: program in- 
fectors and boot sector infectors. 

DOS Boot 

A boot sector is a program and data ar- 
ea on a disk that contains a small pro- 
gram that is essential to the initial boot- 
up process. The unusual thing about 
the boot sector is that it is not a file. In 
fact, it lies completely outside the part 
of the disk that contains files. 

The only way to become infected 
from a boot sector infector virus is to 
boot from an infected floppy. Think 
about that for a moment. The only disk 
you should ever boot from anyway is 
the original DOS floppy, and that's 
write-protected, so it couldn't contain a 
virus unless the Microsoft original was 
infected. You really never have to boot 
from any other floppies except for a 
few old games, so being careful not to 
boot from floppies is one simple way to 
avoid virus infections. 

That simple advice is quite powerful. 
More than 70 percent of the viruses out 
there are boot sector infectors rather 
than program infectors. Of the five 
most common viruses found in the 
U.S., three are boot sector infectors. 

Merely making a habit of keeping 
the floppy drive door open when you 
boot will instantly make you invulnera- 
ble to more than half the viruses out 
there. (What should you do about the 
other kind, the program infectors? 
They're a bit tougher, so hang on for a 
few more column inches, and I'll get to 
them.) 

Whether a boot sector or program in- 
fector, all infectors" modi operandi are 
similar. When you turn your computer 
on, the virus is not active until the infect- 
ed portion is loaded. In the case of a 
boot sector infector, that's immediate- 
ly upon boot-up, since that's when the 
boot sector is executed. 

For a program infector, the virus be- 
comes active when you run the infect- 
ed program. For example, if 1-2-3 
were the only infected program on 
your PC, the virus would only be active 
from the time you ran 1-2-3 until you 
turned the PC off. 

Once active, the virus looks for pro- 



grams or boot sectors to infect. While 
your hard disk has only one boot sec- 
tor, a program infector may slowly in- 
fect every program on your hard disk. 
Boot sector infectors will infect boot sec- 
tors on floppies inserted in your floppy 
drives, and program infectors will infect 
any programs on those floppies. The in- 
fection process — a sort of COPY com- 
mand — is very quick, and it generally 
won't be noticed by the PC's operator. 
Note that because viruses can only 
be spread by booting from floppies 
with infected boot sectors or by run- 
ning infected programs, you cannot be- 
come infected by a data file — that is, a 
7-2-3 spreadsheet, a WordPeriect 6ocu- 
ment, or a dBASE database cannot 
spread viruses. 

Tick, Tick, Tick 

The detonator is usually called a time 
bomb or logic bomb. It's a piece of 
code embedded in a program or the op- 
erating system itself that waits for a par- 
ticular event to occur. When that event 
occurs, the bomb goes off, doing 
some kind of damage. 

Logic bombs have been around near- 
ly since the beginning of computing. 
An early one showed up in a main- 
frame payroll program. The program's 
creator had inserted a clause in the pay- 
roll program that said, in effect, "If you 
find I'm not on the payroll, erase all pay- 
roll files." 

A time bomb is based on a related 
idea, but it detonates according to the 
clock. For example, the detonator por- 
tion of the most common virus in the 
U.S., one called Jerusalem-B, goes off 
every Friday the 13th. Whenever you 
try to run a program, it erases the pro- 
gram instead. On other days, it only 
does minor annoying things to your 
screen. The detonator program in the 
Lehigh example is a logic bomb. It 
says, "Once you've made four copies, 
do the damage." 

Many detonators are fairly harmless, 
although an annoying intrusion on the 
use of your PC. The Cascade virus 
causes letters on your screen to fall to 
the bottom of the screen. No data's 
been damaged, but it does make us- 
ing the computer difficult. 

The New Zealand virus, also known 
as Stoned or Marijuana, occasionally 
keeps your computer from booting, dis- 
playing the message Your PC is now 
Stoned. (There's also a message in the 
virus saying. Legalize Marijuana, but 
due to a bug in the virus, this message 
never gets displayed.) 

The Fu Manchu virus makes child- 
ish, obscene comments whenever you 
type Reagan, Thatcher, or Botha. 

Yankee Doodle, from Bulgaria, 
plays "Yankee Doodle" on the PC 




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speaker at 5:00 p.m.— freeing the work- 
ers, 2S it '.vere. 

Bouncing Ball or Italian causes a 
character to dislodge itself from its orig- 
inal location on the screen and 
bounce around the screen, Pong- 
style. A fev/ viruses have no apparent 
detonators at all, making them pure 
worms. 

Other detonators are quite destruc- 
tive. Erasing the FAT is a popular virus 
pastime. Additionally, the extra time re- 
quired by the infection process when 
performing disk reads or writes may 
cause some PCs to erroneously report 
a timeout error on the ftoppy drive. 

If you'd like to see what some of the 
flashier viruses look like, get a copy of 
VIRSIMUL.ZIP, a harmless simulation 
of several viruses. You can find it on 
the bulletin board of the National Com- 
puter Security Association (NCSA). 
NCSA's BBS number is (202) 364- 
1304; its voice number is (202) 364- 
8252. NCSA also sells books on virus- 
es and computer security. 

Vectors of Infection 

First of all, don't worry too much about 
viruses. You may never see one. 
There are just a few ways to become 
infected that you should be aware of. 
The sources seem to be service peo- 



ple, pirated games, putting floppies in 
publicly available PCs without write- 
protect tabs, commercial software (rare- 
ly), and software distributed over com- 
puter bulletin board systems (also 
quite rarely, despite media misinforma- 
tion). 

Call up computer repairpersons, 
and what's the first thing they'll proba- 
bly do? Boot your system from a diag- 
nostic disk, I've seen three cases in the 
past year of clients being infected by 
third-party service people with diagnos- 
tic disks that were infected. Of course, 
the serviceperson didn't know the 
disks were infected. But be sure to ask 
that any service personnel run their di- 
agnostic disks through a virus check- 
er like VIRUSCAN (V\\ discuss virus 
checkers in a minute) before putting 
them in your machine. 

Many viruses have spread through pi- 
rated — illegally copied or broken — 
games. This is easy to avoid. Pay for 
your games, fair and square. I've 
toured many software companies, and 
believe me — these are not large face- 
less corporations. Most are small oper- 
ations with fewer than thirty employees. 

If you use a shared PC or a PC that 
has public access, such as one in a col- 
lege PC lab or a library, be very care- 
ful about putting floppies into that PC's 



drives without a write-protect tab. Car- 
ry a virus-checking program and scan 
the PC before letting it write data onto 
your floppies. 

Despite all the media hype, comput- 
er BBS systems are usually free of vi- 
ruses. To be really sure, you could 
download files only from big services 
like BIX, GEnie, or CompuServe. 

Now and then you'll see viruses ac- 
cidentally included with shrink- 
wrapped software. Scary as that 
sounds, it's not really something to wor- 
ry about — the number of cases of that 
in the PC world can be counted on one 
hand, with fingers left over. 

Search and Destroy 

Despite the low incidence of actual vi- 
ruses, it can't hurt to run a virus check- 
ing program now and then. There are 
actually two kinds of antivirus pro- 
grams: virus shields, which detect virus- 
es as they are infecting your PC, and 
virus scanners, which detect viruses 
once they've infected you. 

Virus shields sound attractive — keep- 
ing the virus from infecting your PC in 
the first place — but they suffer from a 
major flaw that makes them useless in 
many cases. There's no real way to de- 
tect virus behavior; a shield can only de- 
tect viruslike behavior, such as soft- 



VntV Flossopher 



WiUt I havejinaliy gotten around U> writing 
my own newsl^tr. This tx not a professional 
pri7Tter'sJi>b by any stretch qflbe ima^nation, 
but I hope to iifonn and entertain those who 
are precious to me, ffiy patiemi. 

ThofA'you, 

Dr. 7g7" Ausen 



Something to 
Cheer About? 

I think M, biit liut u tiK quat»n smouoiJins the 



currerd d(M« 



both knfcvMy 
B«. Now, 
I think It a time Out 
' B «i end. Why cb 

"^ . -ttts do ml 



Ye Old 
vs 




Aftcf til tfw dscay his been removed fTT>m^ 
a txpth, it b w£3kc-r beciuse li hji a hole in 
it. [f iniil^in is Kp bi plactd, 'hu bole #^ 
nosi be made cv^la Ulger, which fufther ' ' 
weabrrtS ihc tooih. TIk UTUJgafll that is, 
^03 pbccd tioil noEhing to StKtlglhen the 
icHlh thjl is 
fiUtsJ. 
Wuii 

COfltpOUUS 

lh< oppotiie ii 
tiM, In fK\. 
because 
c(»npDsiUs 
IK bondtd 
iaio jiK* the 

rwojred looth 
is stranger 
ihui t( wu 
before i: wu decAyecJ! 
Q&ci -M-cnJt, ihe result is urocigcr 
virgii Itxilh This ii airioiiitcty rcMtit 
CotKeming ihc (jihctki, or hciw 
iJt seen ]»w those "silver" fiUinji 
does rvQi seem importint to stime pab 
don'i Ihink inyorw is looldng in i 
moutli. BtLt, ihur* ins the ocojior 
sniles thii you notiw th^ b^Kic tr 
silver iguys. In this* sifljilioni the 
"feience ihti ctn bt effected 
hiifi *fTii1|ims. wtwri iS<y ht], 
npojit«. 

_\ The mercury ocmteni of tmalgi 

«nitiv4 issue. Th* Aiwricwi 
believes that >miJj;im is safe and thu] 
10 hum bdCiUM of the mercury li 
but then ut sctcniiBs ihii diugree, 
jiTDRt moveineni in [h« Scwdbuviia 

" This is absolutely 
revolutionary!" 

tnuEttlun outlawed. Thero have even b*im 
this OTurilry ihero are preiently M IW«I iKll h*Vt )tKi» 




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48 COMPUTE OCTOBER 1991 



CiFcl« RAftdef Service Numiwr 199 



ware that directly controls your disk 
hardware. Unfortunately, there is a lot 
of legitimate software that directly con- 
trols disk hardware, leading to many an- 
noying false alarms. After a while, you'll 
get tired of the false alarms, and you'll 
get rid of the software. 

Virus scanners, however, are much 
more convenient. You just run them 
now and then, and they detect any vi- 
ruses that your disks are harboring. 
There are two potential problems with 
scanners, but both are surmountable. 

The first is the sheer number of virus- 
es out there — more than 500, at last 
count. A virus scanner must be able to 
detect any of these monsters, a proc- 
ess that makes scanners big, slow, 
and potentially expensive. At minimum, 
it means that you'll be buying updates 
to your virus scanner program a few 
times per year, 

This issue of COMPUTE'S PC Disk 
contains a terrific scanner from McAfee 
Associates, a California firm specializ- 
ing in antivirus information, software, 
and consulting. Its program is called 
VIRUSCAN, and it's now at version 77. 
You can be sure that the McAfee folks 
stay on top of this market! 

For more information on PC Disk, 
see "On Disk" elsewhere in this issue. 
McAfee requests a $25 registration fee 



for the use of VIRUSCAN if you're a 
household or home office business — 
not an unreasonable price for a little 
computer peace of mind. 

Larger businesses and government 
agencies must get in touch with McA- 
fee to negotiate a registration fee. You 
can reach McAfee at (408) 988-3832 
(voice), or you can get VIRUSCAN di- 
rectly from its BBS at (408) 988-4004. 

The second potential problem for vi- 
rus scanners comes from a class of vi- 
ruses called stealth viruses. In order for 
a virus to exist on a PC, it must reside 
somewhere, generally in the boot sec- 
tor or a program file on the PC's hard 
disk, So virus scanners look in those ar- 
eas for distinctive signatures that char- 
acterize particular viruses. 

But stealth viruses foil scanners. 
They monitor attempts to read the part 
of the disk that the virus lives in. They 
then intercept the read attempt and 
hand the scanner program the image 
of the disk as it would be if it weren't 
infected. "Nobody here but us chick- 
ens," the stealth virus says. 

How do you get around stealth? Sim- 
ple. Stealth only works if the virus is ac- 
tive — if it's been loaded from the infect- 
ed hard disk. Just cold-boot from a 
write-protected floppy before running 
any virus scanner, and you're safe 



from stealth. Ensure that the boot flop- 
py was made with DISKCOPY using 
your original write-protected DOS start- 
up disk after cold-booting from that origi- 
nal startup disk, 

What do you do if you find that you 
are infected? If a program file is infect- 
ed, simply erase it from your hard disk 
and restore a clean copy from your 
backups. If you have an infected boot 
sector, most virus scanners will create 
a clean, uninfected boot sector, elimi- 
nating the virus; if worst comes to 
worst, you could remove an infected 
boot sector by backing up your disk, 
then low-level formatting, partitioning, 
and high-level formatting the disk, al- 
though measures that drastic 
shouldn't be necessary. 

Viruses are something to worry 
about, but not a lot. A little common 
sense and the occasional virus scan 
will keep you virus-free. Remember 
these four points: 

■ Viruses can't infect a data or text 
file, 

■ Before running an antivirus pro- 
gram, be sure to cold-boot from a 
write-protected floppy. 

■ Don't boot from floppies except re- 
liable DOS disks or your original 
production disks. 

■ Stay away from pirated software. D 




May 1991 

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Circle Reader Service Numlaer 156 



OCTOBER 1991 COMPUTE 49 



ON DISK 



Tony Roberts 



The wide 
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yours with 
Big Desk. It turns 
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DEBUG YOUR 
COMPUTER 
WITH VIRUSCAN 

This issue's edition of COM- 
PUTE'S PC Disk includes a va- 
riety of programs thiat nearly 
everyone will find useful. 
These programs were select- 
ed from among hundreds we 
downloaded from bulletin 
boards and online services. 

You can get all tfie pro- 
grams on this month's disk or 
subscribe to a year's wortfi of 
COMPUTE'S PC Disk (wfiich in- 




VIRUSCAN 

In every facet of our lives 
thiese days, we're forced to 
be more security conscious. 
Computers are no exception, 
especially if they hold thou- 
sands of dollars' worth of da- 
ta or hundreds of hours' 
worth of your work. 

You can read all about com- 
puter security in this issue's 
feature called "Viruses From 
A to Z" by Mark Minasi on 
page 44. With VIRUSCAN 
you can take the first steps to 
protect yourself against possi- 
ble disaster. 

VIRUSCAN. from McAfee 
Associates, is 
one of the 
most widely re- 
spected virus 
detection utili- 
ties available 
today. This pro- 
gram checks 



eludes a subscription to COM- 
PUTE} by sending in the 
coupon you'll find on the sec- 
ond page of this column. 

Please note that the share- 
ware programs featured on 
our disks are yours to test and 
evaluate, but if you find the pro- 
grams useful, you should 
send the registration fee to the 
author. 

Registering shareware has 
several benefits. First, regis- 
tered owners receive notifica- 
tion of program updates and 
often are entitled to free up- 
grades. Also, many shareware 
authors send additional pro- 
grams as a bonus when you 
register. Finally, by supporting 
shareware authors, you encour- 
age them to continue making 
high-quality, low-cost, try-be- 
fore-you-buy software availa- 
ble for PC users everywhere. 



your disks for 
the presence 
of more than 
243 known 
computer virus- 
es. McAfee 
works hard to 
continually up- 
date the software to identify 
newly discovered viruses. 

With options for checking 
files, disks, or memory for vi- 
ruses, WRUSC/AA/also sets ex- 
it codes, so you can run it 
from batch files, and its re- 
ports can be directed to data 
files for later reference. 

Registration for home use 
of VIRUSCAN is $25 and in- 
cludes free downloads of up- 
dated versions from McAfee 
Associates' BBS for one year. 
In addition, McAfee offers reg- 
istered home users free infor- 
mation on removing viruses. 

If you trade disks with your 
friends or associates, or down- 
load files from bulletin 
boards, you increase the risk 
of Introducing a virus into 
your system. Running VIRUS- 
CAN regularly can eliminate 
your fears that a hidden virus 



may lurk within your PC, The 
small registration fee is well 
worth that peace of mind. 

Useful Notes 

Here's an information manag- 
er that can help you organize 
the scraps of paper that accu- 
mulate on your desk and in 
your pockets. 

Useful Notes, which can 
run as a stand-alone program 
or as a memory-resident utili- 
ty, could be described as a 
freeform database of compu- 
terized Post-it Notes. Notes 
can range in size from a 
word or two to thousands of 
characters. 

Need to remember a phone 
number? Create a note and jot 
it down. Keep doing this, and 
soon you'll have a pile of 
notes that you can sort, edit, 
and organize. If Useful Notes 
is running memory resident, 
you can pop it up with a key- 
stroke, locate that phone num- 
ber, and pop back to your 
main application in a flash. 

Useful Notes allows you to 
create as many piles of notes 
as you like, so you can sepa- 
rate business notes from 
home notes; or if you share 
your computer, you can sepa- 
rate Mary's notes from Tom's. 

Michael Gardi's Useful 
Notes is shareware and car- 
ries a $20 registration fee. Reg- 
istered users receive an up- 
date with the most recent ver- 
sion of the program, plus a ver- 
sion of Useful Notes that in- 
cludes EMS support. 

Mr. Filter 

This is a program for the tool- 
box. You won't need Mr. Filter 
every day, but you'll be glad 
it's there when you do need it. 
Programmer Jim Gillespie de- 
scribes Mr. Filter as "the first 
line of defense in dealing 
with corrupted text files." His 
goal was to create a quick 
and easy way to fix files that 
won't print or can't be called 
up in your word processor. 



50 COMPUTE OCTOBER 1991 



Mr. Filter removes false 
end-of-file markers, deletes ex- 
traneous control characters, 
and wraps lines longer than 
80 characters. There are also 
options to remove extended 
ASCII characters and to strip 
high bits. 

Mr Filter works by reading 




Mr. Fitter 

an input file, scanning every 
byte, making its adjustments, 
and writing a new output file, 



K 


1 


SHI 








1 


1 


^1 



Directory Size 

leaving the original un- 
changed. The program also 
contains a report-only option 



r.- 


-^:---'::ms^smm^ 


i — -- |ita.«...... — '... i.r 


rn«i^ ■.,.. 


Useful Notes 





that scans a file and reports 
on problems it finds. 

If you use Mr. Filter, you 
can register your copy with 
the author for $12. Next time 
you have a problem text file, 
you could grit your teeth, 
load a disk editor, and man- 
ually search for the problems, 
or you could just run the file 
through Mr Filter 



Directory Size 

This utility is so simple and so 
useful you'll wonder why it 
isn't part of DOS. 

Directory Size paints a 
quick picture of your disk, let- 
ting you know tiie number of 
files stored in each subdirec- 
tory and the amount of disk 
space those files occupy. 

When you're facing one of 
those "I've gotta make some 
room on this hard disk" ses- 
sions. Directory Size shows 
you where the fat is. It's like nu- 
trition analysis for your PC. 

Virginia programmer Keith 
Ledbetter, who has a large 
number of utility programs to 
his credit, offers Directory 
Size as a free program. 

Big Desk 

Here's a program that will 
help cure those overlapping 
windows blues for users of 
Windows 3.0. Big Desk cre- 
ates a virtual desktop that al- 
lows you to spread out your 
applications neatly and hop 
from one to another. 

Big Desk, written by Ian 
Heath of Southampton, Eng- 
land, permits you to configure 
a desktop that's as large as 
eight screens wide by eight 
screens high. 

The program's icon shows 
a minimap of your virtual desk- 
top, and with a click of the 
right mouse button, you can 
move from application to ap- 
plication effortlessly. 

Big Deskis a shareware pro- 
gram. Your donation will help 
to fund programmer Heath's 
graduate studies at the Univer- 
sity of Southampton. 

If you find the program use- 
ful, please register it. The 
registration fee is 20 pounds 
sterling or about $35. Simon 
Phips, a colleague of 
Heath's, says not to be intimi- 
dated by currency exchang- 
es — pay by credit card and 
let the people at VISA or 
MasterCard take care of the 
monetary details. D 



FOR SINGLE DISKS 

YES 1 1 want to power up my PC. Send me the October 1 991 COMPUTE'S 
PC DJsfc I'll pay $9.95 tor eacti 5'A-inch or 3 Vj-inch disk plus $2.00 
shipping and handling perdlsk. 

Please indicate howman/disks of each format you'd like: 

5'A-inch disks at $9.95 each 

3 Vi-lnch disks at $9.95 each 

Subtotal 

Sales tax (Residents of NC and NY please add appropriatesales 

tax foryour area. Canadian orders, add 7% goods and services 

tax.) 
Shipping and handling($2.00U.S. and Can ada,$3.00surface 

mail, $5.00 airmail per disk.) 
Total enclosed 



Sendyourorderto 

COMPUTE'S PC Di^ 

W. Wendover Ave., Sle. 200 

Greensboro, NC27408 

SUBSCRIPTIONS 

I want to save even morel Start my one-yearmagazine and disk subsoip- 
tion to COMPUTE'S PC Os^ right away. 

5'A-lnch $49.95 peryear 

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For delivery outskje the U.S.orCanada, add$1 0.00 for postage and 
handling. 

Name : 



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ZlP/PostalCode- 
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Sendyourorderto 

COMPUTE'S PC Disk 
P.O. Box 3244 
Harian,IA51 539-2424 

AJIoidersmustt»paid>nU,S.fur«^|}yct)sck drawn onaU.S.bankof by money order. 
Masts rCard or VISA accepted for Drder$ovar $20. Thl$oNerwillbelilledonly at tlie 
above address and Is not made in conjunctionwtth any other magazine or disk subsaip- 
tion offer. Reasaallow4fo6 waekstor delivery of Singig issues orforsut>scriptk>n to 
begin. Sorry, but telephone orders cannot be accepted. 
Disks available only Iw IBM PC and compatible amputers. 
i^ffsf good while supplies lasL 



OCTOBER 1991 COMPUTE 51 



POINT & CLICK 



Clifton Karnes 



GeoWorks 

shouts out one 

message 

loud and clear: 

Upgrade now! 



NEW ENSEMBLE, 
HOT NEW DOS 

There's good news this month 
for GeoWorks Ensemble us- 
ers. GeoWorks has released 
an update that adds features 
many of us have been waiting 
for (GeoWorks, 2150 Shattuck 
Avenue, Berkeley, California 
94704; 415-644-0883). 

The biggest story with En- 
semble 1.2 is that GeoWrite, 
the program's word proces- 
sor, has been transformed 
from a desk accessory into a 
full-fledged writing tool that 
comes with a search-and-re- 
place engine and a 100,000- 
word spelling checker. 

Both writers and designers 



IIW tW l^«m IWtMW* Iw aataph i 



L f, irr- 



rTwrr,..:!. it 



My True 
Story 

Don't gel me wrong. I like a 
stormy night and a good 






'"<! SI 



will be glad to hear that print- 
er support has been beefed 
up for this new release, too, 
with drivers for more than 300 
additional printers. 

Topping the list of other en- 
hancements are an Ensemble 
version of the Russian game 
Tetris, more than 50 added 
icons for the DOS room, and 
more screen savers. 

All this certainly sounds 
good, but here's the best 
news: This upgrade is being 
sent free to registered users 
of Ensemble. Now that's 
class! If you're a first-time buy- 
er, the updated retail version, 
which lists for $199.99. 
should be available in stores 
by the time you read this. 

We're going to be seeing 

52 COMPUTE OCTOBER 1991 



more of Ensemble in the fu- 
ture. GeoWorks has an- 
nounced deals with Laser Com- 
puter, Philips, Samsung, Ever- 
ex, and others to bundle the 
package with these compa- 
nies' PCs, Added up, this will 
mean more than 600,000 addi- 
tional copies of Ensemble in 
circulation. More Ensemble us- 
ers mean more incentive for 
publishers to develop pro- 
grams for the environment. 

DOS 5.0 

Windows, Ensemble, and 
DESQVIew have one thing in 
common: If you look below 
the fancy windows and dia- 
log boxes, you'll find DOS. 
These environments sit on top 
of DOS and use DOS servic- 
es, and so in a 
sense, they're 
DOS enhance- 
ments. That's 
why they're 
called interfac- 
es or environ- 
ments rather 
than operating 
systems. 

Does it mat- 
ter which ver- 
sion of DOS 
you're using 
with your GUi? 
If you're running DOS pro- 
grams, it matters a great deal. 
That's why Microsoft's release 
last June of DOS 5.0 (Micro- 
soft, One Microsoft Way, Red- 
mond, Washington 98052; 206- 
882-8080; $99.95) isn't just 
important news for command 
line addicts; it's significant for 
GUI aficionados, too. 

From the first, you'll sense 
that this version of DOS is dif- 
ferent. DOS 5.0 comes with 
the best installation program 
I've seen. It walks you 
through each step of setup 
and even saves information 
about your previous DOS con- 
figuration so you can uninstall 
5.0 and return to your older 
version if you want. 

You won't want to go back. 



though. Just a few minutes 
with 5.0 will convince you it's 
the wave of the future. Here's 
a rundown of what's new. 

First, 5.0 has impressive 
memory management facili- 
ties that allow you to load 
DOS itself into high memory 
on 286 and 386 machines 
and load device drivers and 
TSRs into high memory on 
386 computers. When you're 
running a DOS app from Win- 
dows or Ensemble, you'll 
have much more room for 
your programs. After installing 
5.0, I have about 615K free 
left over in Windows that I can 
use to run my DOS programs. 

Programmers will be glad 
to find that an interpreter-only 
version of Microsoft QuickBA- 
SIC has replaced GW-BASIC. 
And everyone will be glad to 
see EDLIN finally made obso- 
lete by EDIT, an excellent 
text editor with pull-down men- 
us and full mouse support. 

DOS 5.0's DIR command is 
actually useful. Instead of the 
bleak display option served 
up by previous versions, this 
DIR comes with a ton of switch- 
es that allow you to display 
directory information in almost 
any shape or form. There's 
even an option that displays 
files in all of a directory's sub- 
directories. Plus, you can set 
these switches as an environ- 
ment variable so you don't 
have to type them each time 
you issue the command. 

Last, there's DOSKEY, a 
new command line retriever. 
It stores your most recently 
used commands in a buffer 
for quick recall. This kind of 
program is necessary for ex- 
tensive command line work, 
and it's great that DOS finally 
has this type of command. 

All in all, DOS 5.0 is \/ery im- 
pressive. No matter which 
GUI you're running, 5.0 will 
give it more elbow room and 
make the time you spend at 
the command line more pro- 
ductive and enjoyable. □ 



Take your choice of these popular 
children's computer software 



th 



programs worth up to $59.95... 






Wherein the U.S.A. is 
Carmen San Diegu?; 
Reguar Price: SA9.95 
Won Oulstaniiing Soflware 
Award! Learn hundreds ot 
U.S.A. facts. 
Available for IBM and 
Apple II, ITEI^ NUMBER 1 



■ Where in Time is 

■ Carmen San Diego?: 
Regular Price: S49.9S 
Travel ttiraugti Time lo 
capture the villain and tier 
gang. 

Available for IBM and 
Apple II. ITEM NUMBER 2 



I Mavis Beacon Teacties Typing: 
I Regular Price: $49.95 
I Best Home Lemming AwardI 

Fun typing skills for all 

ages. 

Available for IBM and 

Apple II, ITEM NUMBER 5 






I Tne Oregon Trail: 
I Resular Price: $49.95 
Travel with a pioneer family 
across the 1 9th century 
wilderness, learning how lo 
survive. 

Available for IBM and 
Apple II, ITEM NUMBERS 





New Math Blaster Plus: 

Regular Price: $49 95 
Worid's best-selling math 
program has fun 
"Blasfernaut" game. 
Nei« Version Now 
Available for IBM. 
Apple II version's MBP 
ITEM NUMBER 3 

4*;' 




I Ttie tievj Pnrt Shop: 

I Regular Price: S599S 
Ttie most popular graphics 
software in history, Pnnt your 
oiivn cards, banners and signs. 
Printer reQuired. 
Available lor IBM and 
Apple II, ITEM NUMBER 7 



I Mixed-Up Mother Goose: 
I Regular Price: $39.95 
Help Mother Goose find the 
missing pieces to her 
rhymes. 

Available for ISM and 
Apple II. ITEM NUMBER 8 



Stepping Stones I & II: | 

Regular Pnce: 549,95 
From early reading to addition, 
spelling and uocabuteiy. 
Colorful grapbics- 
Available for IBM 
{enhanced version) and 
Apple II. ITEM NUMBER 9 



■ Super Solvers 

■ Outnumbered: 

■ Regular Price: &I996 
A highly- recommended 
program that dev^ps 
math. problsm-soMnfl 
and other skills. 
Available for IBM and 
compatibles onl/. 
ITEM NUMBER 4 

SOFTWARE 
SELECTION 
GUIDE 

Kay to Colors: 

■ Ages 3-7 

■ Ages 7-10 

■ Ages 10-13+ 



ii'e/iiM/' 



s^ 



W^tch your chOdren laiigii and team „.iiwth softwrare that's hm! 



You've got the children. You've got tlie computer. Now you can bring the two 
together and turn leisure lime into learning time with software thaf s fun! 
The Learning Adventure Computer Club takes the work out of software selection 
for you. We review hundreds of computer programs for youngsters — invite 
children like yours to test them — then select only the ones that combine active km 
with measurable learning in: 

* MATH ' SOCIAL SCIENCE AND GEOGRAPHY ' SCIENCE 

• LANGUAGE ARTS AND READING * CRITICAL THINKING SKILLS 
....AND MORE IMPORTANT SKILI^! 

Software Geared to Yoiir Child's Age and Interests 

To find out which programs are best for your child, check the colored square by 
each program: they're keyed in three age groups. 

Blue prcigrams introduce your 3-7 year-olds to the computer with activities that 
arouse their curiosity ...capture their imagination...and instill a lifelong love of 
learning. Red programs turn the Three R's into rip-roaring adventures for 7-10 year- 
olds with programs developed lo supplement their education and turn their 
weaknesses into strengths. Green programs stretch the minds of 10-13-f year-olds 
with sophisticated software that make academic challenges fun and nrwarding! 

How the Club Operates: 

Try your first computer program FREE for 1 5 days at no risk or obligation. Just 
select the software package of your choice, fill out the coupon and mail it today. 

We'll send you the program you select. If you are pleased with the program, you'll 
pay for it at the Charter Members' price of just $9.95 plus shipping and handling, a 
savings of up lo $50.(X) off the reLiil price. 

Then about every four weeks (13 times a year) you'll receive a new Parents 
Newsletter with details about the next selection for your child. To receive the main 
selection, you need do nothing — it will be sent automatically. If you wish to order 
an alternate selection, or wish no selection at all, simply return the card we provide 
to tell us your choice. You will always have at least 10 days to decide. 

Enjoy a IS-Day Free Trial 

What" s more, you will always have 15 days to preview each shipment and return 
any program you don't want. Your only commitment is to purchase thr«- 
additional selections in the next year at regular dub prices. You may cancel your 
membership anytime thereafter. You have absolutely nothing to lose, and a whole 
new world of fun and learning to gain for your children. So don't wait: return the 
coupon today! 

Circle RsKler S«rvl« Numlwr 11B 



Exciting Newsletter...FREE! 

Charter members receive the Learning Adventure 
Computer Qub Parents Newsletter FREE. Featuring a 
host of recommended software for children 3-13-tl 



► 



f 

ifc. 



«rv 



«ft£ 



Man to: Learning Adrantiire"' C ompu ter Ghib 

925 Oak Street. Scranton, PA 18515 Dept. TARAA1 

Y PC f Please send me ttie progtam I have iniiicated below to preview for 15 
* ■■*' • days at no risk or obigation. I may return the program after 15 days and 
have no furttier obligation. If I am pleased with the program, I'll pay for it at the special 
new member prii^ of only $9.95 plus $2.95 shipping and handling, and enroll as a new 
member under the terms outlined on this page. As a new member, I need to buy just 3 
more selections at rep ular club prices in the next year and may cancel any time thereafter. 

Name 



Addre5S_ 
Cit>' 



State_ 



, Zip 



.to preview. (Please fill in 



Telephone ( ) 

1. Please send me item number _ 
iijentification number o1 program shown above.) 

2. AGE Of child (check one): 

_ 3-7 ~ 7-10 10-13+ 

3. Computer you own and size of disk required (check one): 

IBM/Tandy & Compatibles with 5 'A" disk drive 
IBM/Tandy & Compatibles with 3 V?" disk drive 
Apple II Family & Compatibles with 5 Va' disk drive 

4. Child's name 



Child's birthdate: Month. 



Day_ 

5. Please check below if you have a: 

Printer Modem Color Monitor 

6. Parent's Signature. 



Year 



We rtsefve ttie rigtrtlo rwuestaddrtioral mlorniaion or reject aiy application w cancel am memCership Limited 
n rww memlierB in tie coniinenU USA only Eiduding AK. Sales tax wii tK xjded in PA. Wei send you 
details of ItedutBopenrtionwrtli your enrollment siiipfnent and vou have a 15-d3yncK)t*oaiionpriHleoeIo 
dedde if you wis^> to contviue as a memtvr. 



BUYER'S GUIDE 

ID 

VIRUS PROTECnON 

SOFTWARE 




^^ 



X 









BY 

CHANTELLE OLIGSCHLAEGER 

AND 

ERIN RICHTER 



54 COMPUTE OCTOBER 1991 



\ 



PC Productivity Manager 



I 



IV 



Work at your peak potential! 
Break free of cumbersome MS-DOS 
restrictions and limitations! 

Single keypresses or mouse clicks do 
it all for you with COMPUTE'S super 
new PC Productivity Manager. 

Packed with 38 PC batch-file extensions 
and power utilities, this easy-to-use disk 
includes individual help menus for every 
program. You don't have to be a computer 
maven — just press F1 for Help anytime! 

The power utilities alone are worth 
many times the cost of this disk. Imag- 
ine! Programs to speed up your keyboard, 
edit disk files, edit and search memory, 
find a specific text string in disk files — plus 
memory-resident programs such as a pop- 
up calculator, a programmer's reference 
tool, an editable macro key program, and 
a graphic screen-capture utility, and more 
all included on this jam-packed disk. 

Our batch-file extensions add new com- 
mands to standard batch-file language. 
Now you can easily create menus, draw 
boxes, and write strings in your choice 
of colors anywhere on the screen — ail 
with simple, easy-to-use commands. 
Then, add some zest to your batch files 
with a command that lets you play a se- 
ries of notes! 



Plus handy system tools let you delete 
an entire subdirectory with one command, 
find out if the system has enough memory 
for an application before it runs, cause the 
computer to remember the current direc- 
tory so that you can come back to it later, 
and much, much, more. 

OmfERYQuf 
myRODUCTSWTY 

Manager today! 




—timftteUU 








■ 










— 




:i 


-- 

















































|>'t| H\af\ a\ut\ 



Tq. h llq Itt X 



r>Ktlgn:1t 

Clc UI>4»i:1C 

liliclltimartf 




kcj^s eUtu: tke colorj Ictin tm tick to tke 




I 
I 

A 

I 
.1 



■ 

I 
I 



DYES! Please send me _ S% Inch disk(s) ($14.95 each) _ ZVz inch disk(s) ($15.95 each). 



. Subtotal 

. Sales Tax (Residents of NC and NY please add appropriate 
sales tax for your areaXanadian orders, add 7% goods and 
services tax. ) 

. Shipping and Handling (S2.00 U.S. and Canada, S3.00 surface 
mail, SS.OO airmail per disk.) 
Total Enclosed 



_ Check or Money Order _ MasterCard _ VISA 
(MasterCard and Visa accepted on orders with subtotal over $20.) 



C(«ji1 Cafd No. . 
SkpialuTE 



Daytime Telephone Ho. . 
Name 



Wdress. 
City. 



Slate/ 
Province _ 



ZIP/ 
. Postal Code . 



Send your order to COMPUTE'S PC Productivity Manager. 
324 W. Wendover A/e., Suite 200, Greensboro. NC 27408. 



I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 



Although your chances of encountering 
a computer virus are slim, protecting 
yourself with the right software can give 
you peace of mind. You may opt to use 
a resident program that continually mon- 
itors your system: you may want to 
scan new software before you install It. 
No matter what level of virus protection 
you're after, you'll find the software you 
need in this buyer's guide. 

Anti-Virus 1.0 

Requirements: DOS 3.0 or higher, 
512K. IV/ndoivs supported. 
Spectrum of viruses; Protects against 
400 viruses. 

Defense: Memory-resident program re- 
moves 95 percent of viruses tl^at it rec- 
ognizes from infected files, boot sector, 
or memory. Also immunizes files, giv- 
ing them their own antivirus capabilities 
to notify user of any changes and to 
"heal" themselves. 
Network support: Yes. 
Customer support: Central Point Soft- 
ware offers a 24-hour virus hotline, quar- 
terly mailings on new virus signatures 
and upgrade offers, online support on 
BBS and CompuServe (GOGENTRAL), 
and a free virus-protection software up- 
date coupon. 

Comments: Virus Update command al- 
lows users to enter newly discovered vi- 
rus signatures into Anti-'Virus. 

CENTRAL POINT SOFTWARE 

15220 NW Greenbrier Pkw/y., Ste. 200 

Beaverton, OR 97006 

(800) 445-4208— customer service 

(503) 690-8080— technical support 

$129 

AntiVirusPlus 

Requirements: DOS 3.0 or higher, 
256K. 

Spectrum of viruses: Not applicable. 
Defense: Memory-resident program pre- 
vents any penetration of viruses into 
files and disks. It does not detect indi- 
vidual virus signatures, but it does 
send a warning if there is hostile activ- 
ity. Anti'\/irusPlus also monitors DOS 
function calls, allowing the user to run 
an infected program without activating 
the virus. It scans and removes the vi- 
rus code from the infected files as it re- 
constructs the original data. 
Network support: Yes. 
Customer support: Telephone, fax, and 
BBS, 
Comments: Site licenses available. 

TECHMAR COMPUTER PRODUCTS 

97-77 Queens Blvd., Ste. 812 

Rego Park, NY 11374 

(800) 922-0015 

(718)997-6666 

$99.95 (Network prices differ.) 



Certus 2.1 

Requirements: DOS 3.1 or higher, flop- 
py drive and 128K needed for installa- 
tion, 3K to 10K needed when resident. 
Compatible with Windows 3.0. 
Spectrum of viruses: Protects against 
more than 300 viruses and variants. 
Defense: Memory-resident program de- 
tects, identifies, and removes viruses 
and variants in the computer's memo- 
ry, boot tracks, and files. Can be con- 
figured to prevent infected files from run- 
ning or to prevent infected files from 
being copied to or from a systeru. 
Network support: Yes. 
Customer support: Toll-free telephone 
and BBS support. Free quarterly up- 
grades included with purchase of main- 
tenance program (cost depends on pur- 
chase price). Otherwise, upgrades 
cost $25 each. 

Comments: Corporate licensing is avail- 
able, 

CERTUS INTERNATIONAL 
13110 Shaker Sq. 
Cleveland, OH 44120 
(800) 722-8737 
$189 (LAN version for $1,399.) 

CLEAN-UP 

Requirements: DOS 2.0 or higher, 
256K. 

Spectrum of viruses: Protects against 
62 viruses as of June 20, 1991. 
Defense: Stand-alone program disin- 
fects by removing the viral code and re- 
writing the cleaned program. 
Network support: Yes. 
Customer support: Telephone. 
Comments: CLEAN-UP is shareware. 

MCAFEE ASSOCIATES 

4423 Cheeney St. 

Santa Clara, CA 95054-0253 

(408) 988-3832 

$35 

Dr. Solomon's Anti-Virus Toolkit 

Requirements: DOS 2.0 or higher, 
512K. Supports Windows and OS/2 by 
booting from DOS. 

Spectrum of viruses: Detects more 
than 450 viruses and variants. 
Defense: Stand-alone program guards 
against duplicate infections, protects 
from outside infections, and inoculates 
against specific viruses. Checks all the 
executable files, boot sector, and 
hard disk partitions. Looks for the pat- 
terns that viruses create, enabling it to 
check for unknown viruses. 
Network support: Yes. 
Customer support: Telephone and fax 
support. Includes first year of quarter- 
ly upgrades. 

Comments: Site licensing available. Soft- 
ware supplied on read-only disks. 



ONTRACK COMPUTER SYSTEMS 
6321 Bury Dr. 
Eden Prairie, MN 55346 
(800) 752-1333 

$279.95 for one year, Virus Immuniza- 
tion Program available for an addition- 
al $395.00 per year, 

Flu-Shot-t- 1.82 

Requirements: 256K. Compatible with 
Windows. 

Spectrum of viruses: Protects against 
more than 500 viruses. 
Defense: Memory-resident and stand- 
alone programs monitor system and 
stop operation if anything suspicious oc- 
curs. Does not disinfect. 
Network support: Yes. 
Customer Support: Free support is avail- 
able by telephone, BBS, and 
CompuServe E-mail. Discounts on up- 
graded software are available for reg- 
istered users. 

SOFTWARE CONCEPTS DESIGN 

594 Third Ave. 

New York, NY 10016 

(212) 889-6431 

$19 (Includes shipping and handling.) 

HardDrive Overlord! 

Requirements: DOS 3.0 or higher, 
275K. Compatible with Windows 3.0. 
Spectrum of viruses: Not applicable. 
Defense: Memory-resident program de- 
tects viruses on disks and hard drives 
by monitoring activity and notifying the 
user if any problems occur that could 
be virus related. Authenticators vali- 
date programs to ensure that they 
have not been damaged by a virus. 
They also check a program's footprint 
to ensure that it matches the one on 
file. 

Network support: Yes. 
Customer support: Telephone. 
Comments: Site licenses available. 

POP COMPUTER PRODUCTS 
PO. Box 1389 
Evergreen, CO 80439 
(303) 674-0200 
$99.95 

PC/Assure 3,5 

Requirements: DOS 3.0 to 4.0, 640K. 
Compatible with Windows 3.0. 
Spectrum of viruses: Not applicable. 
Defense: Memory-resident program pro- 
tects files from any unauthorized chang- 
es and keeps unauthorized files from 
running on computer. 
Network support: NetAssure is availa- 
ble for each workstation; NetServer is 
available for the file server. 
Customer support: Toll-free telephone. 
Comments: PC/Assure offers security 
features in addition to virus protection. 



56 COMPUTE OCTOBER 1991 



Enhance Your Tandy 



Hard Cards For looo, a, 

SX, TX, SL, TL, SL/2, TL/2, 
TL/3, IBM & Compatibles 
21 Meg 40 MS $229 
32 Meg 40 MS $239 
42 Meg 28 MS $299 
68 Meg 23 MS $359 
85 Meg 16 MS $399 
105 M^ 20 MS $469 
120 Meg 19 MS $499 
210 M^ 15 MS $689 

15 Month Warranty, 30 Day Money 



lOOOEX/HX 
External Hard Drives 

Complete With Controller 

21 Meg 40MS $349 

32 Meg 40MS $359 

42 Meg 28MS $399 

68 Meg 23MS $429 

85 Meg 16MS $449 

105 Meg 20MS $489 

120 Meg 19MS $529 

210 Meg ISMS $699 

BafkCtiamnttt. TOLL FREE HelpLbc 



1000 HX 
Internal Hard Drives 

Complete with c<aitiDUer. Replace i Flc^j' 

42 Meg 28 MS $299 

85 Meg 16 MS $389 

120 Meg 19 MS $489 

130 M^ 15 MS $539 

IDE 'SmartDrive' Forbuutm 

Controller of TUZ, TL'B, RL, RLX 

42 Meg 28 MS $289 
CD ROM For lOOO's and SLOT BOX 
Internal, complete with software $349 



SLOT BOX Seven ruU length 
slots, two 5^5" drive bays, one 3^" 
drive bay. Power and hard drive 
lights. 200 W«tt Power supply, 
cooling fan. Attaches to EX, HX, 
1000, A, SX, TX, SL, TL, SL/2, TL/2, 

RL, Tl/J, and RLX $279.00 



Jpgrading Your Tandy 



lifVxlnt Ycu leolj 



215 information packed pages on 
performance enhancing upgrades 
and Installation. Covers the 1000, 
A, EX, HX, SX, TX, SL, TL, 8172, 
TIV2, RL, and the new TIV3 

$19.95 piusss.oos&H 



Modems and Faxes 

Hayes Compatible, Incluiles SoCtmire 



2400 Baud Internal 
2400 Baud External 
9600 Baud Internal 
Fax/Modem Internal 

9600 Baud Fai, 2400 Baud Modem 

360dpi Mouse w/sottware $49 
Serial Card AiiEi«piH»Ex $29 

Serial Card EX/HX $49 



$79 

$99 
$349 

$159 



jFloppy Drive Solutions 

Internal Eitcriul 

I360K $99 $199 

1.2 Meg $189* $259* 

720K $109 $199 

1 1.44 Meg $189* $259* 

• For all except 1000, A, EX, HX. SX 
720Kor360K <C1 TO 

EnHiml for EX/HX ^J-"^^ 



VGA Combinations 

For SX, TX, SL, TL, SLO, TU2, RL, 
TL;3, 3000's, IBM, Qunpaiiblcs 

Combo $489 

Monitor: 14" CTX 

.28 Dot Pitch 
Card: Paradise 256K 
640 X 480, 256 Colors 

Super Combo $589 

Monitor : 14" CTX 

.28 Dot Pitch 
Card: Trident 1 Meg 
1024 X 768, 256 Colors 



Memory 

1000, A to 640 K W/Clock, Ser. $229 

256KEXorHXto640K $189 

256K 1200 or IBM to 640K $189 

384K SX, EX, HX, SL to 640K $49 

TX,TL. TI72 , TL/3 to 768K $49 

3000^fL from 5 1 2K to 640K $49 

lOOORL to 768K $39 

lOOORLX to One Meg $39 

Memory Above 640K 

MicroMainframe 5150T EMS Board 

More Space for Spreadsheets, Windows, 
and more 

For 1000, A, SX,TX, SL,TL, SL/2,TU2, RL,TIJ3. RLX 



$289 



1 Meg $229 2 Meg 

1 Meg for 1500 or 2810 Laptops, also 
I for Panasonic CF-170, 270, 370 $159 



Math Coprocessors 

For TX, TL, TL/2, TUi, 802«6's up to IZMhi. 

SALE Priced at $139.00 
Math Sprint Socket 

makes 80287 up to 200% faster $59.00 



Speed up Chips 

50% Faster 

For Tandy lOOO.A.SX.imdlBMXr J29 

For lOOOSL, SUl. and AT&T $39 

PC Sprint $75 

100% Faster. For 1000,A, IBM XT 



Tandy, Hayes, IBM. AT & T, 
Windows, are registered 
IVajlcmarks. Prices Subject 
to change witlioat notice. 



(614) -592-4239 Foreign 
(614) -592-1527 FAX 
(614) -594-4 ISO Local 





5265 Hebbardsville Rd 
Athens, Ohio 45701 



UsS* and Caimda 



C.O.D. 



circle Reader Service Number 120 



AMERICAN 
EXPRESS 




^mx 






CENTEL FEDERAL SYSTEMS & 

SERVICES 

Information Security Division 

1 1 400 Commerce Park Dr. 

Reston, VA 22091-1506 

(703) 758-7000 

$399 

PC-cillin 3.0 

Requirements: DOS 2.1 or higiner, 6K, 
one 25-pin parallel port. 
Spectrum of viruses: Four-stage pro- 
gram detects and prevents all known 
and future viruses, quarantines viruses 
coming from external sources. Hard- 
ware Immunizer provides automatic 
boot-sector damage recovery. Sup- 
plies option to remove infected file but 
does not repair it. Hardware Immuniz- 
er contains 1Kb of nonvolatile EPROM 
memory. 

Defense: Device driver and memory- 
resident program cfieck files, file allo- 
cation tables, and the system RAfvl. Al- 
lows a chioice of three virus detection 
sensitivity levels, user definable virus 
warning messages, and automatic on- 
line scan for boot sector viruses. Con- 
tains built-in self-cfieck. 
Network Support: Yes. 
Customer support: Toll-free telephone, 
fax, and BBS support. Updates free for 
first year through BBS. At the end of 
first year, upgrades will cost 15 per- 
cent of the list phce. 
Comments: One-year warranty. Site li- 
censing available. Fully compatible 
with newly developed or upgraded 
memory management systems, includ- 
ing QEMM. 386Max. and DR DOS 5.0. 

TREND MICRO DEVICES 
2421 W. 205th St., Ste, D-lOG 
Torrance, CA 90501 
(800) 228-5651 

$139 {PC Rx, a software-only version of 
PC-cillin, is available for $69, Package 
includes discount coupon to upgrade 
with hardware.) 

SENTRY 

Requirements: DOS 2.0 or higher, 
256K, 

Spectrum of viruses: Not applicable. 
Defense: Stand-alone program creates 
a log file of system and compares it to 
the computer's current state. It dis- 
plays a warning if there's a discrepan- 
cy. 

Network support: No. 
Customer support: Telephone. 
Comments: This is a shareware pro- 
gram. 

MCAFEE ASSOCIATES 

4423 Cheeney St. 

Santa Clara, CA 95054-0253 

(408) 988-3832 

$25 

58 COMPUTE OCTOBER 1991 



Vaccine Toolkit 4.0 

Requirements: DOS 2.0 or higher, 
256K. Compatible with Windows 3.0. 
Spectrum of viruses: Scans for and de- 
tects more than 400 viruses. When a vi- 
rus is detected, it offers options to de- 
lete the file, leave the file as is. or pro- 
vide description of the virus for refer- 
ence. 

Defense: Combined memory-resident 
and stand-alone programs check boot 
sector files, executable-type files, and 
overlays. The software utilizes a listing 
of virus signatures to detect the pres- 
ence of known viruses and warns user 
of potential virus activity through crea- 
tion of executable file checksum. To 
avoid false alarms, the software can be 
"taught" which programs on the sys- 
tem are safe. 

Network support: VacNet is similar to 
Vaccine Toolkit but specifically de- 
signed for networks. Retail price 
$99.95. 

Customer support: Toll-free telephone, 
fax, and BBS support. Updates re- 
leased approximately monthly on BBS. 
Comments: Site licensing and volume 
discounts available. 

WORLDWIDE SOFTWARE 
20 Exchange PI., 27th Floor 
New York, NY 10005 
(212)422-4100 
$99.95 

Virex-PC 

Requirements: DOS 2,1 or higher, 
512K. Compatible with Windows 3.0 
and Novell networks. 
Spectrum of viruses: Detects more 
than 70 viruses, 

Defense: Memory-resident program re- 
pairs files damaged by the most com- 
mon viruses. Once a system is disinfect- 
ed, the program monitors it to prevent 
any other virus attacks. The program 
creates a signature for each file and no- 
tifies the user if any changes have 
been made. 
Network support: Yes. 
Customer support: Microcom offers vi- 
rus upgrades on a quarterly basis. Us- 
ers can subscribe for $75 or buy each 
update for $25. Microcom can be ac- 
cessed through Amehca Online; it also 
offers a free file analysis through that 
network. 

Comments: Site-license discounts avail- 
able; Virex-PC also detects any activi- 
ties of the Trojan Horse program. Virex 
is also available for Macintosh comput- 
ers, 

MICROCOM 
3700-B Lyckan Pkwy. 
Durham, NC 27707 
(919)490-1277 
$129.95 



Virucide 2.2 

Requirements: DOS 2.11 or higher, two 
floppy disk drives or a hard disk drive, 
any monitor or printer, 256K. 
Spectrum of viruses: Detects and de- 
stroys all currently known viruses as of 
May 1991, a total of 490 boot, file, and 
stealth viruses, including those that re- 
side in memory. 

Defense: Stand-alone program scans 
floppy, hard disk, and network drives. 
Restores affected files to normal when- 
ever possible. Provides descriptions of 
all known viruses. Able to run unattend- 
ed. Lets users add to default exten- 
sions for scanning overlays. 
Network support: Yes. 
Customer support: Telephone and fax 
support. Includes an online reference 
file containing detailed descriptions of 
all known viruses. Includes the availa- 
bility of upgrades (approximately quar- 
terly) as new strains develop. If an up- 
grade is released within 60 days after 
purchase, the upgrade is free. After 
that it costs $12. 

Comments: Site licensing available. 
Runs in less than a minute under most 
circumstances. Menu-driven format, 

PARSONS TECHNOLOGY 
375 Collins Rd. NE 
Cedar Rapids, lA 52402 
(800) 223-6925— direct sales 
(800) 369-5000— dealer sales 
$49 

Virusafe 4.02 

Requirements: DOS 3.0 or higher, 
512K, Compatible with Windows and 
DESQView- 

Spectrum of viruses: Recognizes over 
260 known viruses, removes over 160. 
Updated regularly. 

Defense: Memory-resident program 
seeks, identifies, and removes known 
viruses in programs. Also checks pro- 
grams for virus-related changes and 
guards against new virus attacks. 
Network support; Yes. A special fea- 
ture notifies users of virus in any part of 
the network. 

Customer support: Telephone and fax. 
Comments; Site licenses are available 
for Virusafe. Multisafe, which gives the 
user control over who uses the comput- 
er, is also available for $180. 

XTREE 

4330 Sante Fe Rd. 

San Luis Obispo, CA 93401 

(805) 541-0604 

$99 

VIRUSCAN 

Requirements: DOS 2.0 or higher, 
256K. 

Spectrum of viruses: Detects 760 virus- 
es as of June 20, 1991. 



Defense: Stand-alone program scans 
all drives for known viruses. It identifies 
and locates thie virus on the system. 
Network support: NETSCAN is tfie net- 
work file-server version of VIRUSCAN. 
It ctiecks the file server only, while in- 
dividual stations require VIRUSCAN. 
Its price depends upon the number of 
units using this program. 
Customer support: Telephone. 
Comments: VIRUSCAN is shareware. 

MCAFEE ASSOCIATES 

4423 Cheeney St. 

Santa Clara, CA 95054-0253 

(408) 988-3832 

$25 

Virus Checker 

Requirements: IBM PC or compatible. 
Spectrum of viruses: Approximately 
one-third of all viruses. 
Defense: Stand-alone program 
checks disks to see if they have been 
infected. If it finds a virus, it will alert 
the user of the infection. It can only de- 
tect viruses in EXE files. 
Network support: No. 
Customer support: Telephone and 
mail. 

Comments: This is a freeware program 
that can be backed up with Super Vi- 
rus Checker for $25. Super Virus Checl<- 
er uses six programs that more thor- 
oughly detect or remove 99 percent of 
known viruses. 

LEITHAUSER RESEARCH 

4649 Van Kleeck Dr. 

New Smyrna Beach, FL 32169 

(904) 423-0705 

Free 

VirusCure Plus 

Requirements: DOS 2.1 or higher, 
256K. 

Spectrum of viruses: Detects more 
than 500 viruses and removes more 
than 240. 

Defense: Memory-resident program 
scans memory and prevents viruses 
from entering the system. If a virus is de- 
tected, the program wiil destroy it be- 
fore it infects any files. It also repairs 
and restores damaged files. 
Network support: Yes. 
Customer support: Telephone, BBS, 24- 
hour Virus Helpline. Registered users 
may have free upgrades for two years 
after purchase. Afterwards, users can 
buy four upgrades for $30. 
Comments: Site licenses available. 

INTERNATIONAL MICROCOMPUTER 

SOFTWARE 

1938 Fourth St. 

San Rafael, CA 94901 

(800) 833-4674 

$99.95 



Virus Prevention Plus 

Requirements: DOS 3.1 or higher, 
512K. 

Spectrum of viruses: Detects more 
than 400 viruses. 

Defense: Stand-alone program pre- 
vents unauthorized use of the PC. "fin- 
gerprints" all approved programs to 
tell if program has changed, prevents 
unapproved programs from running, 
prevents writing to the boot and parti- 
tion sectors, detects viruses, scans 
new and existing programs, and re- 
moves viruses. 
Network support: Yes. 
Customer support: One hour of free tel- 
ephone support, upgrades for six 
months after purchase. 
Comments: This program uses McAfee 
Associates' VIRUSCAN ior detection of 
viruses. It can also be used with 
McAfee's NETSCAN. 

PC GUARDIAN 

118 Alto St. 

San Rafael, CA 94901 

(800) 288-8126 

(415) 459-0190— inside CA 

$124.95 (With VIRUSCAN. add 

$25.00.) 

VIRUS-PRO 

Requirements: 512K. 
Spectrum of viruses: Not applicable. 
Defense: Stand-alone program detects 
any changes to installed software. It al- 
so maintains records and checks new 
scan files against old scan files. 
Network support: Yes. 
Customer support: Telephone. 
Comments: Corporate VIRUS-PRO as- 
signs an identifier to each PC and al- 
so has a Baseline to compare software 
with the corporate standard. 

INTERNATIONAL SECURITY 
TECHNOLOGY 
515 Madison Ave., Ste. 3200 
New York, NY 10022 
(212) 288-3101 

$49.95 per copy, single-PC version. Vol- 
ume discounts available. Corporate VI- 
RUS-PRO costs between $5 and $15 
per PC depending on the number of 
PCs using the program. 

Virus Secure 

Requirements: DOS 3.0 or higher, Win- 
dows 3.0, 1MB. 

Spectrum of viruses: Guards against 
more than 300 varieties of known com- 
puter viruses as well as unknown 
ones, expandable to over 500 through 
free BBS. 

Defense: Stand-alone program scans 
every file, selected file types, specific 
directories, or any combination for 
changes in files. Drives may be includ- 
ed or excluded from disk scans. 



Network support: No. 
Customer support: Telephone and BBS 
support. Updates will be available 
through data information networks, as 
well as other more traditional means. 
Comments; Site licensing available. 

ABACUS 

5370 52nd St. SE 

Grand Rapids, Ml 49512 

(616)698-0330 

$95 

Virus Stopper 2.0! 

Requirements: IBM PC or compatible. 
Spectrum of viruses: 99 percent of all 
viruses. 

Defense: Memory-resident program 
helps prevent the spread of viruses 
from one disk to another. The program 
also prevents any damage to the sys- 
tem by displaying a warning to the us- 
er so that action can be taken. 
Network support: No. 
Customer support: Telephone and 
mail. 

Comments: This is a shareware pro- 
gram. 

LEITHAUSER RESEARCH 

4649 Van Kleeck Dr. 

New Smyrna Beach, FL 32169 

(904) 423-0705 

$10 

Vi-Spy 6.0 

Requirements: DOS 2.0 to 4.0, 128K. 
Spectrum of viruses: Identifies 20 
known viruses. 

Defense: Memory-resident program 
checks for known and unknown virus- 
es by showing a map of the system's 
memory and checking each area for 
any differences that could be viruses. 
It also checks disks when they are 
first entered into the drive. 
Network support: Yes. 
Customer support: Telephone. Regis- 
tered users are notified of any updated 
information; emergency support is avail- 
able using an ASCII text file. 
Comments: Site licenses available. Ver- 
sion 7.0 will soon be available, but the 
price was not known at press time. 

RG SOFTWARE SYSTEMS 

6900 E. Camelback Rd., Ste. 630 

Scottsdale, AZ 85251 

(602) 423-8000 

S250 

VSHIELD 

Requirements: IBM PC or compatible, 
DOS 2.0 or higher, 256K. 
Spectrum of viruses: Protects against 
760 viruses as of June 20, 1991. 
Defense: Memory-resident program 
scans for known viruses and then moni- 
tors all program load requests. 
OCTOBER 1991 COMPUTE 59 




More than 
50% off! 

Mapping the IBM PC 

by Russ Davies 
ISBN 0-942386-92-2 
010. 9 5 $9.00 

A comprehensive memory and refer- 
ence guide for the IBM PC, this pro- 
grammer's handbook includes program- 
ming tips and techniques, examples, 
and detailed explanations, in addition to 
comprehensive memory and port maps, 
the book provides in-depth discussions 
of the keyboard, video, and sound; cross- 
references the IBM documentatfon; and 
includes a complete list of BASIC to- 
kens. For IBM PC, XT, XT/370, PCjr, 
Portable PC, or 3270PC. 33Bpp 



Mastering 
Quattro Pro 

by Lynn Frantz 
ISBN 0-87455-222-2 
$2 4 . 9 5 $12.00 

Explore Quattro Pro's numerous fea- 
tures in this comprehensive guide 
that's perfect for both new and experi- 
enced users. In this interactive tutori- 
al, you'll learn how to design, create, 
and get the most from your own spread- 
sheets. This reference and guidebook 
will help you master the power of 
Borland's Quattro. 544pp 



Order your copy today. Send the sppropriale amount plus S2 for shipping and handling for each 
book {S4 to Canada. S6 foreign) and applicable sales laJ( lif you live in NC. NJ. or NY) cr GIS tax (if you five in 
Canada) to COMPUTE Books, c/o CCC, 2S00 McClallan Avenue, Pennssuken, NJ 08109, 

Please allow 4-6 weeks for delivery- Offer good w+iile sijpplies last. 




4^^i?^ 



"Your computer will see you now 



VSHIELD prevefits infected programs 
from being loaded and infecting the 
system. 

Network support: It does support work- 
stations, but not file servers. 
Customer support; Telephone. 
Comments; This is a shareware 
program. 

MCAFEE ASSOCIATES 

4423 Cheeney St. 

Santa Clara, CA 95054-0253 

(408) 988-3832 

$25 

WATCHDOG PC Data Security 

Requirements; IBM PC, PS/2, or com- 
patibles with a hard disk drive and one 
floppy disk drive. DOS 2.1 or higher or 
IBM OS/2 1.1 Standard and 1.1 Extend- 
ed required. Also compatibie with Win- 
dows 3.0; 17K required for Basic Secu- 
rity; OK to 50K required for Maximum 
Security depending on EMS memory 
available. 

Spectrum of viruses: Detects, thwarts, 
and reports common computer viruses. 
Defense: The program (device driver in 
CONFIG.SYS) prevents a virus from al- 
tering or destroying any DOS system 
file, including the files used to boot the 
PC from the hard disk and the files 
used to operate the PC. Protects disl< 
drives, directories, program and data 
files, and utilities by placing them with- 
in the security environment. 
Network support: Yes, 
Customer support: Toll-free telephone 
support. One major upgrade per year 
with other upgrades released when 
necessary. Upgrades are free with 
membership ($35 per year) in the main- 
tenance program. Otherwise, up- 
grades are $50 each. 
Comments: Site licensing available. (Vi- 
rus protection is one part of overall 
security software that features ID and 
password control, multiple user permis- 
sion levels, automatic file encryption, 
and audit trails.) 

FISCHER INTERNATIONAL SYSTEMS 

4073 Merchantile Ave. 

Naples, FL 33942 

(800) 237-4510 

$295 (Standard retail; V2 card option, 

called WATCHDOG Armor, $445.) 



Chantelle Oligschlaeger and Erin Rich- 
ter worked with COMPUTE this past 
summer as participants in the Ameri- 
can Society of Magazine Editors 1991 
Magazine Internship Program, Chan- 
telle is a rising senior at the University 
of Missouri in Columbia. Erin was recent- 
ly graduated from the University of Tex- 
as in Austin. The entire staff wishes 
them the best of luck. D 



60 COMPUTE OCTOBER 1991 



INTRODOS 



Tony Roberts 



KEYBOARD 
RESHUFFLE 

How would you like to have 
your own set of DOS function 
keys? Using the ANSI.SYS de- 
vice driver, which extends the 
keyboard and screen func- 
tions of DOS, you can estab- 
lish your own personal set of 
keyboard macros. 

If ANSI.SYS, which is part of 
the DOS package, isn't in- 
stalled on your system, add 
the line DEVICE=ANSI.SYS to 
your CONFIG.SYS startup file. 
(If ANSI.SYS is stored in a di- 
rectory other than your root di- 
rectory, be sure to include the 
complete path so DOS can lo- 
cate the file.) 

ANSI.SYS allows you to re- 
define keys through ANSI es- 
cape sequences. The general 
format for an escape se- 
quence is the combination of 
the Escape character (ASCII 
27), the Left Bracket character 
([), one or more decimal num- 
bers or strings separated by 
semicolons, and a Command 
character. 

To create an escape se- 
quence for key redefinition, 
load the word processor or text 
editor you use to modify your 
AUTOEXEC.BAT and CON- 
FIG.SYS files, fvlake certain 
your editor can save unformat- 
ted ASCII files or text files- 

These commands can't be 
entered directly from DOS be- 
cause the commands must 
contain the Escape character. 
As you may know, pressing 
the Esc key in DOS clears the 
command line — not the effect 
we're trying to achieve. 

Enter the lines below, sub- 
stituting the Escape character 
for the letters ESC at the be- 
ginning of each line. (In many 
word processors, you can sim- 
ply press the Esc key to gen- 
erate the Escape character,) 

ESC(0;67;"DfR A:"P 
ESC[0;68;"D[R A:"13P 



The numbers 0;67 and 
0;68 are the extended charac- 
ter codes for the F9 and F10 
keys respectively. The first of 
the two lines above assigns 
the string DIR A: to the Fg 
key. The second line adds a 
carriage return (ASCII 13) to 
the same command and as- 
signs the string to F10. 

Save the file under the 
name KEYS.ANS; then go to 
DOS and execute the com- 
mand TYPE KEYS.ANS to in- 
stall the new key definitions. 
Press the F9 and F10 keys to 
see how the two versions of 
the command behave. 

Using this procedure, you 
can assign strings to function 
keys to run favorite programs 
with a single keystroke or to 
simplify data entry chores. 

For example, if you're enter- 
ing name and address informa- 
tion into a label program and 
you're working on a local list 
where nearly everyone lives in 
your hometown, you can 
save time by putting the 
string HOf^ETOWN, STATE 
ZIP on a function key. 

Here in Greensboro, North 
Carolina, we have several ZIP 
codes, but they all begin with 
274. I define my function 
keys to include GREENS- 
BORO, NC 274. I simply 
press the assigned key, enter 
the last two digits of the ZIP 
code, and quickly move to 
the next record. 

There are a few things to 
keep in mind when using AN- 
SI key redefinitions. First, you 
can't redefine too many keys. 
The ANSI.SYS driver oniy al- 
lows about 200 characters of 
redefinitions. 

Second, many programs re- 
define the function keys for 
their own purposes. When you 
use those programs, your key 
definitions will be suspended 
until you return to DOS. 

Third, DOS itself uses a few 
of the function keys. You're 
free to redefine them, but you'll 
overwrite the DOS defaults. 



DOS uses keys F1-F6 as com- 
mand line editing keys. 

Lastly, the keys are rede- 
fined using your environment 
space. Make sure you have 
enough allocated in your CON- 
FIG.SYS file. Here's a line from 
a CONFIG.SYS file that gives 
the environment 512 bytes. 

SHELL=COIVIMAND.COIVI /P/E:512 

Redefined keys stay in 
force until you change them 
or reboot. If you develop a set 
of redefinitions that you use 
regularly, you may want to 
place them in your AUTOEX- 
EC.BAT file, so they take ef- 
fect each time you boot up. 

To do this, either have your 
AUTOEXEC.BAT execute the 
command TYPE keyfile, 
where keyfile is the name of 
the file that stores your rede- 
finitions, or add the ECHO 
command to each of your key 
redefinitions and include the 
redefinitions right in the AU- 
TOEXEC.BAT file. 

For example, ECHO 
ESC[0;66;"CHKDSK";13P 
reprograms the F8 key to run 
the CHKDSK program on the 
default disk. 

If you're ready to begin set- 
ting up your own personal mac- 
ros, you'll need the extended 
character codes for the func- 
tion keys. They are 0;59-0;68 
for F1-F10, 0;84-0;93 for Shift- 
F1-Shift-F10, 0;94-0;103 for 
Ctrl-F1-Ctrl-F10, and 0;104- 
0;113for Alt-F1^Ait-F10, 

The that precedes each 
of these code numbers tells AN- 
SI.SYS that the following value 
is an extended character 
code. If you leave off the 0, AN- 
SI.SYS treats the number you 
supply as an ASCII value. 

You could, if you wanted, re- 
define the lowercase a (ASCII 
97} to be an uppercase A (AS- 
CII 65) with the command 
ESC[97;65P. To return a, 
changed key back to normal, 
assign it to itself as in 
ESC[97;97P. a 



Create your own set 
of keyDoard 
macros with a DOS 
program that 
you already have. 



OCTOBER 1991 COMPUTE 61 



PROGRAMMING POWER 



Tom Campbell 



When speetf is 

essential, assembly 

language is 

your ticket for a 

ride on the 

lightning tioit express. 



62 COMPUTE OCTOBER 



ASSEMBLY 
MEANS SPEED 

This issue's program is a 
good example of botli tire ben- 
efits and tire perils of program- 
ming in assembly. It's tiny, but 
its 100 lines would only require 
10 or 12 lines in a higher-level 
language. 

FMFD.COfvf is a utility that 
does nothing more ttian send 
a form feed to the specified 
printer. Some text editors and 
other text-processing tools 
(such as DOS's COPY com- 
mand with LPT as the destina- 
tion) don't offer the courtesy of 
forcing a page break when a 
partial page of text is printed. 
While it's true that you can 
reach over and push the form 
feed button on your printer, 
you may need to perform this 
operation from a batch file. 

The syntax of FMFD is 
FMFD port, where portis an op- 
tional parallel port number 
from 1 to 4. If you omit the num- 
ber, port 1 is assumed. Here 
are some examples: FMFD, 
FMFD 1, FMFD 3. The first two 
examples send a page break 
to LPT1. The third example 
sends it to LPT3. If you use a 
serial port for your printer, 
you're out of luck. 

The first section of 
FMFD. ASM consists of 
equates. Like the #define in C, 
they serve as a single-object 
text-replacement facility. As- 
semblers make a secret first 
pass at your code so they can 
collect equates and macros 
(we'll get to macros shortly); 
then they expand them into a 
temporary file, which is actu- 
ally the file that gets assem- 
bled. In MASM and TASM. the 
/L option creates a file with an 
LST extension exposing the in- 
ner workings of macros and 
equates. The line FormFeed 
EQU 12 means that we can lat- 
er use FormFeed instead of a 
literal form feed character 
(which would corrupt the 

1991 



source file) or the number 12 
and that the assembler will re- 
place it with 12 internally. You 
can also use the equal sign for 
equates. 

The PrintMsg macro looks 
like a subroutine, but it isn't. 
Macros, like equates, work via 
text replacement, but they al- 
low parameters and aren't re- 
stricted to a single line. So in- 
stead of PrintMsg BadChar, 
the assembler will see, on its 
second pass, this code: 

mov dx, es 

mov ds, dx 

mov dx, offset BadChar 

mov ah, 9 

tntZlh 

The .Model directive, pio- 
neered by Microsoft in MASM 
5, is new to assemblers. Its 
purpose is to make multilan- 
guage programming easier 
by automatically supplying 
different default values for pro- 
cedure calls and data (near 
versus far in both cases). 

No doubt Microsoft's own 
programmers got tired of writ- 
ing similar but not identical run- 
time libraries for all their lan- 
guages. Ironically, the Tiny 
model won't work with MASM 
5.1, but it will work with 6.0 
and QuickAssembler, the one 
you're more likely to own. 
Many of OulckAssembler's fea- 
tures couldn't be found in 5.1 
but were debuting in 6.0. Tiny 
will work fine with Borland's 
Turbo Assembler. 

The .Code directive means 
executable code will follow. 
You can alternate several 
.Code, .Data, and .Stack direc- 
tives in each file, but few do. 
It's considered good form to 
collect each element into one 
location. The .Code directive 
stands in for the more archa- 
ic _TEXT SEGMENT WORD 
PUBLIC 'CODE'. 

It's said that .Code is a sim- 
plified segment directive be- 
cause of this, and that's abso- 
lutely true. The old way was 



more flexible but is virtually 
never needed now, except per- 
haps for writing device driv- 
ers. The old segment direc- 
tives are barbaric and unread- 
able, and you should be 
ashamed to use them. 

ORG lOOh forces execu- 
tion to start at address 100 
hex, or 256 decimal. All COM 
files do this. While Microsoft 
tried to prohibit the practice 
some years ago, even to the 
point of dropping COM sup- 
port from every single one of 
its language products, popu- 
lar sentiment was ovenwhelm- 
ingly for COM files. The EXE 
format lets DOS move the pro- 
gram anywhere it needs to 
(EXE files, in fact, are not com- 
pletely linked until just before 
execution starts), but COM 
files are always at least 512 
bytes smaller. This matters if 
you're using a laptop or a 
RAM disk. Plus, there's a vast 
body of source code for COM 
files free for the asking, 

At this point, not a single 
line of executable code has 
appeared. That will change. 
About half of FMFD's 102 
bytes are used in parsing the 
text of the command line, 
which is located at offset 81 h 
in the PSR The PSP or Pro- 
gram Segment Prefix, is a da- 
ta structure that DOS loads 
right before your program 
and which contains lots of use- 
ful values. It so happens that 
in a COM file the segment reg- 
isters all point to the PSP, so 
all we have to do to point 
DS:SI at the command line is 
write the value 81 h to SI. 

The LODSB instruction is a 
nifty little dude that does sev- 
eral things at once. It copies 
the byte pointed to by DS:SI in- 
to AL; then it increments SI to 
point to the next byte. (The 
STD instruction can be used 
to bump SI backward in- 
stead.) The command line is 
terminated by a carriage re- 
turn (ASCII 13— see the 
equates), so we simply loop 



until a nonblank character or 
CR is encountered. Lines like 
tills aren't all that hiard to com- 
prehend. 

cmp al, CR ; Reached end yet? 
je @@Finished ; Yes. 

The value contained in AL is 
compared to 13. If they're 
equal, control passes (via 
jump if equal) to the code la- 
beled ©©Finished. Note that 
Turbo Assembler treats any la- 
bels starting with two @ signs 
as local to that procedure, so 
you can reuse generic labels 
like @@TryNex! or @@Exit as 
often as you want. 

CX was set to before start- 
ing and is set to 1 if a valid dig- 
it is found. If not, CX is still 0, 
and the default value of 1 is in- 
serted. INT 17h, subfunction 
writes a byte to the speci- 
fied printer port whose num- 
ber is written to DX. Port 1 is 
0, Port 2 is 1, and so on. The 
instruction SUB AL, "1' normal- 
izes the ASCII digit by sub- 
tracting the value 49 from 
whatever's in AL, leaving the 
correct binary value. 

While I would normally sug- 
gest that you use DOS to 
open the printer as a file and 
write to it, using INT 17h has 
the welcome side effect of 
omitting nasty messages 
such as Abort. Retry, Fall? if 
the printer device isn'tconnect- 
ed properly or is otherwise en- 
gaged- It just waits awhile 
and then quits. There are 
times when having only a hun- 
dred lines is a virtue! 

Finally, instead of the usual 
RET instruction, the more for- 
mal technique of exiting with 
DOS function 21 h, subfunc- 
tion 4Ch is employed. A RET 
works in COM files but not 
EXE files, so I avoid it. While it 
would save a couple of 
bytes, FMFD.COf\/l still won't 
occupy even the smallest pos- 
sible disk sector. After all, 
this isn't C or Pascal. We can 
afford the extra two bytes. O 



FMFD.ASK " Conpiete program Co send a form feed to any printer 
To afiaeinble using Turbo Assembler: 



TASM FMFE 
J TLIHK /T 


FMFD 






; &iuates 


- 


these are text replAcenencs 


similar to IdeEinea in C^ 


CR 

FormFecd 

LF 




EQU 13 
EQU 12 
EOU 10 
EQU 9 


ASCII 
ASCII 
ASCII 
ASCII 


carriage return* 
form feed chomcter. 
linefeed, 
tab. 


PrintHag 




macro Hessage 

mou dx, es 

mov ds, dx 

mov dx, offset Message 

mov ah, 9 


tk macro, like nn equate, is a 
text- replacement facility. 
This loads the correct data 
segment and uses DOS function, 
9 to print a '&' -terminated 






int 21h 
endm 




message . 



The Tiny model allows you to create .COH files. It's identieal to 
Small inodei except that II Sinal) requires a .Stack directive, and 
2) Tiny acriloy? tha org lOOh to start execution at address 2S6 decimal, 
not changeable as in an .EXB file. 

.Model Tiny 

The -Code directive indicates that the code segment starts. It laatfi 
until the next .Data or .Stack directive. The code segment is where 
executable instructions go. 

.Code 

.COM files start at a fixed lDcation--2S6 i^tes above the PSP, which 
contairvs information used by many programs. The starting address of an 
.EXE file is not known until runtime. ORG sets the program counter to 
100 hex, or 256 decimal. 

ORG 10 Oh 



{ Leave this in as boilerplate. 

tain proc j A PROC is exactly analogous to 

; a PROCEDUPE in Pascal or BASIC. 

)ov si, @Xh ; Start at csrd line. Add 1 to 

; skip the length byte, 
tov ex, Q J Q until a digit is £ound. 

LOD5B fetches the next char pointed to ty D5:SI into 
AL and then increments SI. 



CettJcKtCharT 



SSFinished: 



»0DO5Exit ! 



lodsb 

CBQ^ al, CR 
je e^Finished 
cmp all ' ' 
je GetNextChar 
crap al. Tab 
ie GetNexttrhor 
cmp al , *' 1 ' 
jl eSBadChar 
zmp al, ' 4' 
j^ e^^BadChar 
iriov CX, 1 



cmp CX, 
jne '^fiConvert 
mov ax, ' 1 ' 

sub al, ^1' 

cbw 

mov dx, ax 

mov ah, 

mov al, FormFeed 

int 17h 

mov al, 
irov ah,4Ch 
int 21h 
en dp 



PrintMsg BadChar 
jnp short SftDOSExit 



Copy next char into AL. 

Reached end yet? 

Yes. 

Blank? 

Yes. Keep parsing. 

Blank? 

Yes. 

Honblank char. Is 

it in range " 1' - '4 '? 

LPT4 ijs the farthest 

I 've ever seen. 

Flag that a digit was found. 



Was a digit found? 
Yes. Do nothing. 
No, Default to LPTl . 

Convert to binary and subtract 1. 

Convert AL to a word in AX. 

Copy to UX. for int 17h call. 

BIOS int I7h function 0: Write char 

to printer. Char is in AL. 

Send char to printer. 

Set EREORLEVEL to 0. 
Return to DOS using 
the preferred function call. 



Load the nesaage'e offset address, 
display it to stdaut, and qvit. 



The .Data directive is where program text and other data values 
appear. The 'db* directive means that everything that follows will 
be written unchanged to the data oegment. Messages like the one 
below can use either single or double quotes as delimiters. The values 
CR and LF were defined above, and their literal values will be written 
in as ASCII codes. Don't forget the '$' sign, because DOS function 9 
needs it to end any jneajiBge it prints. 



BadChar 
EKD Begin 



.Data 

db 'Invalid character. 



Must be 1-4. ' ,CR,LF. "S* 



OCTOBER 1991 COMPUTE 63 



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TIPS & TOOLS 



Filed Floppies 

Here's a tip for those who 
have so many floppy disks 
they can't find anything fast. 
Begin by labeling all of 
your disks and putting num- 
bers on them. Be sure to put 
the disks in a box in order, 
where you can easily see the 
numbers. Then, create a text 
file with a text editor or word 
processor in ASCII mode. 
Make a chart with the disk 
number, filename, descrip- 
tion, and other useful informa- 
tion. Make sure that you don't 
use any capital letters (or if 



Keep track of 

floppies, speed up DOS, 

capture i<eypresses 

in batcli files, conserve 

your liandies, and 

operate Quici{BASiC 

rodent-free. 



Closer Patlis 

When programs are in your 
path, it's easy to run them 
from any directory on your 
hard drive. But if your path is 
fairly long and each included 
directory has a lot of files, you 
might have a long wait tor 
DOS to find the program. For 
programs that you run often, 
there's a way to cut to a small 
fraction the time it takes DOS 
to find programs. 

Run a text editor and load 
in your AUTOEXEC.BAT file. 
Find the PATH statement and 
notice the order in which the 



# Name 



Description 



Type 



1 pkzip.exe 

2 cfiapter l.doc 

3 cfieeta.gtf 



archiiving utility program 

the first chapter of my book text document 

gif picture of a cheetahi gif picture 



you do, make sure that you en- 
ter the search string exactly 
as it appears in the text file). 
I've written a sample that I 
named LISTTXT 
Next, create a batch file as fol- 
lows {I call it F.BAT but you 
can call it anything you 
want). Make sure the batch 
file and the DOS FIND pro- 
gram are both in your path or 
in the current directory. The 
F.BAT file will only have one 
line and look like this. 

FIND"%1" LISTTXT 

You can name your text file 
anything you want. Just make 
sure you change the string 
LISTTXT to match whatever 
your filename will be. 

To find a program, type F 
chapten.doc. and you'll see 
the line on which the entry ap- 
pears. It makes finding flop- 
pies easy, and you don't 
have to run a database pro- 
gram to do it. As long as the 
batch file and FIND are in the 
path, you can do a search 
from any directory. 

ROY RA20N 
MEITAR, !SRAEL 



specified directories appear. 
DOS will search them in that 
order to find files that you 
type from the command line. 
Directories that contain pro- 
grams that are used often 
should be first. That way, 
DOS will find them right away 
instead of searching most of 
the other directories first. 

How much time can you 
save? I wrote a COIVI pro- 
gram that was three bytes 
long to reduce the loading 
time. I then disabled my 
cache program so I could ac- 
curately time disk operations. 
Next, a batch file was created 
that ran the small program 50 
times (making sure ECHO 
was off so that screen I/O 
wasn't a factor, either.) 

For the first test I placed 
the small program in my DOS 
directory, made the DOS direc- 
tory the first one in my PATH 
statement, and rebooted. The 
batch file ran in about four sec- 
onds. I then made the DOS di- 
rectory the very last entry in 
my PATH statement and re- 
booted. The elapsed time for 
the batch file execution was 
one minute and four seconds. 



It took 16 times longer than 
the first test. My computer is 
a 386DX that runs at 25MHz. 
Slower computers compound 
the delay. 

RICHARD C. LEINECKER 
RErDSViLLE, NC 

Batch File Keys 

If you ever write a batch file 
and try to create even a sim- 
ple menu, you'll be stuck, 
since you can't get a 
keypress from the user and 
then jump to the appropriate 
section in the batch file. 
Here's a way to create a 
COM file that will wait for a 
keypress and return it to your 
batch file as an ERRORLEV- 
EL. The code that is returned 
is the ASCII code for the key 
that is pressed. 

Make sure that the DOS pro- 
gram called DEBtJG is in 
your path. Enter the following. 
The computer's prompts are 
in italic; you type the charac- 
ters in plain text, 

C>DEB11G GETKEY.COM 
File not found 
-E10D2AE4CD 16B4 4C 

CD 21 
-RCX 
CX 0000 
.-8 
■W 

writing 0008 bytes 
-Q 

This creates a program file 
called GETKEY,COM. 

The following program re- 
turns all alpha characters in 
capitalized form. 

C>DEBUG ALLCAPS.COM 

File not found 

-E 10D 2A E4 CD 16 3C B1 

72 DB 3C 7A 77 

02 24 DF B4 
-E 110 CD 21 
-RCX 
CX 0000 
;8 
-W 

writing 0011 bytes 
-Q 



66 COMPUTE OCTOBER 1991 



Here's a sample batch file 
that uses the GETKEY.COM 
program. 

ECHO OFF 

:BEGIN 

CLS 

ECHO 1. Run QuickBASIC 

ECHO Z.Run XyWrite 

ECHO 3. Run Windows 

ECHO 4.Quii Batch File 

:GETTHEKEY 

GETKEY 

IF ERRORLEVEL 52 GOTO END 

IF ERRORLEVEL 51 GOTO 

WINDOWS 
IF ERRORLEVEL 50 GOTO 

XYWRITE 
IF ERRORLEVEL 49 GOTO 

BASIC 
GOTO GEHHEKEY 
:BASIC 
QB45 

GOTO BEGIN 
:XYWRITE 
EDITOR 
GOTO BEGIN 
:WINDOWS 
WIN 

GOTO BEGIN 
:END 
CLS 

RICHARD C. LEINECKER 
REIDSVILLE, NO 

WordPerfect Paging 

in many programs, pressing 
PageUp or PageDown will 
move to the previous or next 
screen of data. In WordPer- 
fect pressing those keys will 
literally move you to the previ- 
ous or next page. This is es- 
pecially frustrating when you 
want to go to the latter part of 
a page but don't want to 
scroll through the page line 
by line. I have found that 
pressing - or + on the numer- 
ic keypad with NumLock off 
will allow you to move 
through data screen by 
screen with the - key moving 
you to the previous screen 
and the + key moving you to 
the next screen. 

JIMMY QUACH 
PACIFICA, CA 



More Efficient Paths 

The search path I use is rath- 
er long, and it eats up a lot of 
environment space. Here's 
the PATH statement. 

PATH=C:\BATCH;C:\UTILITY; 
C:\DOS;C:\N0RT0N; 
C:\WORDSTAR;C:\DBASE; 
C:\GRAIVI1V1ATIK;C:\ 



I save a considerable num- 
ber of bytes by using the 
DOS SUBST command in my 
AUTOEXEC.BAT file. Here's 
what I've done. 



\DOS\SUBST 
\DOS\SUBST 
\DOS\SUBST 
\OOS\SUBST 
\DOS\SUBST 
\DOS\SUBST 
\DOS\SUBST 



F: C:\BATCH 
G: C:\UTILITY 
H: C:\DOS 
I: C:\NORTON 
J: C:\WORDSTAR 
K: C:\DBASE 
L: C:\GRAMATIK 



Next, I define my path. D; 
is my secondary partition and 
I define E: as a virtual disk. 

Add a line to your CON- 
FIG.SYS file like this: 

LASTDRIVE=x 

where xis the last valid virtual 
drive to be recognized by 
DOS (in my case, L:). 

ROBERT R. DWELLEY 
ROCHESTER, NY 

Tips for Tips 

The PC Hot Tip in the January 
1991 issue of COMPUTE to 
swap the contents of two files 
can be improved upon. 
Here's the example from the 
January issue. 

ECHO OFF 

CTTYNUL 

COPY %1 TEMP.DOC 

COPY %2 %1 

COPY TEMP.DOC %1 

DEL TEMP.DOC 

CITY CON 

For some reason DOS us- 
es two file handles to perform 
a CTTY NUL, yet it only frees 



one for a CTTY CON. If the 
batch file above is run very 
many times, you could wind 
up with a Too Many Files 
Open error. Here's my solution- 
to this rather vexing problem. 

ECHO OFF 

COPY %1 TMP.DOC>NUL 
COPY %2 %1>NUL 
COPY TEMP.DOC %1>NUL 
DEL TEMP.DOC 

BRIAN WREN 
SEATTLE, WA 

Mouseless QuickBASIC 

Help screens. In QuickBASIC 
1 discovered by accident that 
pressing the first letter of any 
hypertext link jumps the cur- 
sor to that topic. If several top- 
ics share a first letter, the cur- 
sor will cycle among them un- 
til you press Enter. And when 
looking at a QuickHelp or De- 
tails screen, Q and D toggle 
between those links. 

Zoom. You can zoom any 
window using Ctrl-FlO, which 
I often find more connfortable 
than clicking the zoom icon. 

Opening files. Make short 
shrift of the Open dialog with 
Tab and the space bar. 
Press Tab to move to the file 
list and press the space bar 
to select a file. The space bar 
often works where Enter does 
in the QuickBASIC and Win- 
dows em\ronmenis, especial- 
ly for clicking push buttons. 

TOM CAMPBELL 
IRVINE, CA 



If you have an Interesting tip 
that you think would help oth- 
er PC users, send it along 
with your name, address, and 
Social Security number to 
COMPUTE'S Tips & Tools, 
324 West Wendover Avenue, 
Suite 200, Greensboro, North 
Carolina 27408. For each tip 
we publish, we'll pay you $25- 
$50 and send you a COM- 
PUTE'S PC clock radio while 
supplies last. □ 



OCTOBER 1991 COMPUTE 67 



HARDWARE CLINIC 



Mark Minasi 



You've decided to 

buy a new 

hard drive. Wtiicli 

l<ind should 

you choose— ESDI, 

SCSI, or IDE? 



TAKING A HARD 
DRIVE THROUGH 
ALPHABET SOUP 

Growing out of your 40-mega- 
byte hard drive? You're in 
good company — plenty of us 
are lool<ing to upgrade. Up 
above 80MB, tiowever, 
there's more to worry about 
than how big it is. 

Computer sellers refer to 
ESDI, SCSI, and IDE drive 
types. Some experts even de- 
bate the merits, fighting tooth 
and nail about which is bet- 
ter—ESDI versus SCSI. 
Here's what all the fuss is 
about and how to choose the 
hard dnve that's right for you. 

First things first; ESDI, 
SCSI, and IDE are all drive in- 
terfaces. No, wait— don't turn 
the page yet! Give me a min- 
ute. To understand what a 
drive interface is, consider 
this: You've got a hard drive, 
and it's attached (inside your 
computer, of course) to a cir- 
cuit board called a hard disk 
controller. 

How do they talk to each oth- 
er? The hard drive and control- 
ler must agree on a lan- 
guage — how fast they should 
communicate with each other, 
what kind of commands they 
can pass back and forth, 
what level of voltage they 
should use to send informa- 
tion, and other odds and 
ends. Together, that's what de- 
fines the drive interface. 

Old Reliable 

Currently, you've probably 
got a drive and controller 
whose interface is the most 
common and basic one, 
called ST506. Having a nice re- 
liable standard like ST506 has 
served the industry well for 
the past few years. Because 
all tfie hardware vendors un- 
derstand ST506, you can buy 
a hard disk from vendor X, 
connect it to a hard disk con- 



troller from vendor Y, and be 
99-percent sure they'll work to- 
gether the first time. 

The ST506 interface is 
good because it's standard, 
but it's bad because it has lim- 
itations that are beginning to 
chafe. ST506 both limits the 
disk's data transfer speed 
and requires too much of the 
CPU's attention, rendering it 
less suitable for multitasking 
environments such as Win- 
dows. 

ST506's maximum data 
transfer rate of 750,000 bytes 
per second (750 KBps) must 
have seemed plenty of room 
to its designers in the late 
1970s. 

Even now, most XTs read 
data from their disks at a max- 
imum speed of 167 KBps, 
and most AT clones clock in 
at 250 KBps to 510 KBps, But 
there are drives available to- 
day that could zap out data 
at 2500 KBps, if their interfac- 
es could handle it. 

I know you're thinking, "On- 
ly power users need that kind 
of speed — I don't, not for the 
things I do." Well, consider 
this — your computer be- 
comes hundreds of times slow- 
er every time it reads or 
writes to the hard disk. Even 
the slowest XT has to wait 
around for its hard disk. 

A 16-MHz 386SX's micropro- 
cessor could, in theory, bene- 
fit from a hard disk that trans- 
fers data at a speed of up to 
8000 KBps. You'd see an im- 
mediate benefit from a faster 
hard disk interface even if 
you're already running flat-out 
at 510 KBps; essentially, it 
would balance your system's 
power better. 

Adding Some ESDI Smarts 

ESDI (Enhanced Small De- 
vice Interface) was designed 
basically as an improved 
ST506. It's designed to han- 
dle a maximum transfer rate 
of 3000 KBps. It does this part- 
ly by moving some of the elec- 



tronics from the controller to 
the drive; it costs a bit more 
but makes for greater speeds 
than are possibie with an 
STSOe. 

The other big difference be- 
tween ST506 and ESDI is in 
the basic intelligence in the 
interface. Under ST506, the mi- 
croprocessor can't tell the 
hard disk controller to go to 
location X on the hard disk 
and start reading the data 
that's there. 

Instead, the CPU must do 
most of the work, telling the 
drive (through the controller) 
exactly how to move the 
disk's read head to the loca- 
tion of the data: "Move the 
disk head a little more , , . 
now just a little 
more . . . now just a bit 
more . . ." 

With ESDI, on the other 
hand, the CPU just says, "Go 
to location X and read the da- 
ta there," and then the CPU 
waits for the controller to do it. 
It's the difference between be- 
ing able to tell someone "Go 
to the living room" and having 
to say "Take one step for- 
ward, then another, and anoth- 
er, and another, then turn 
left, then . . ." You see ESDI 
on larger (300MB+) dhves. 

IDE: A Poor Man's ESDI 

It's reasonable to ask, "Why 
didn't they put some of these 
nifty ESDI features on ST506 
in the first place and save us 
a lot of trouble?" Mainly be- 
cause those ESDI features 
would have cost an arm and 
a leg back in the late 1970s. 
But nowadays they're much 
more affordable. That's why 
most drive vendors are now of- 
fering a low-cost alternative to 
ST506 drives called iDE— Im- 
bedded Drive Electronics (or 
Intelligent Drive Electronics, 
depending on whom you 
ask). 

Like ESDI, IDE puts most 
of the controller electronics 
on the drive itself. The data 



68 COMPUTE OCTOBER 1991 



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is then pumped directly to the CPU at 
up to 1000 KBps — not as good as 
ESDI, but better than ST506. 

Putting the controller and drive phys- 
ically together makes IDEs easier to 
build, which is why IDEs are faster, 
cheaper, physically smaller, less power- 
hungry, and more reliable than corre- 
sponding ST506S. 

There is, of course, one hitch. Many 
data recovery techniques that are avail- 
able on ST506 systems can't be used 
on IDEs. In the words of the chief engi- 
neer of a major drive maker, IDEs are 
disposable. They're great drives, but if 
anything goes wrong, you throw them — 
and your data — away I avoid them at 
the moment and would recommend 
that you do the same, but IDE manu- 
facturers claim that they're working on 
models that are more fixable, When 
that happens, IDE will hound ST506 
out of existence in short order. 



SCSI Raises the Ante 

While some designers were seeking 
greater speed (the main goal, recall, of 
ESDI), others were looking ahead to 
more sophisticated operating systems. 
They sought to design an interface 
that could serve more than just hard 
disks. This new interface could be 
used for tape drives, floppies, and op- 
tical drives of various kinds, to name 
but a few. 

So computer manufacturers have 
developed another peripheral interface 
called Small Computer Systems Inter- 
face (which is abbreviated SCSI and 
pronounced scuzzy— an unfortunate 
acronym, if there ever was one). 

Why have SCSI in addition to ESDI? 
It's simple: SCS! doesn't do what 
ESDI does. SCSI is a bus manager, 
not a drive manager. It lets you put up 
to eight different drives — optical, flop- 
py, whatever — on a single SCS! host 



adapter (you don't call them control- 
lers, for reasons that will be clear later 
in this article). 

That assumes, of course, that all of 
these drives are equipped with a 
SCSI interface, and it also assumes 
that SCSI is a solid standard. It ac- 
tually isn't yet, so in reality your SCSI 
floppy hard disk, and tape drives prob- 
ably couldn't run off the same SCSI 
host adapter. Things are getting bet- 
ter, however, so in a year or two this 
scenario will be more likely to come 
true. 

Suppose, then, that you wanted to 
back up your hard disk to tape and 
you had both a hard disk and tape 
that ran off the same SCSI interface. Un- 
der the normal ST506, IDE, or ESDI 
arrangement, the microprocessor 
would have to do a fair amount of 
work. It would have to issue com- 
mands to first read the data from the 



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70 COMPUTE OCTOBER 1991 



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hard disk, then copy it to the tape 
drive, read some more, and so on. 

A Different Story 

With a SCSI interface, however, the sto- 
ry's different. The CPU just says, 
"SCSI bus, get data X, Y, and Z 1rom 
the hard disk, and copy that data over 
to the tape drive. Let me know when 
you're done." 

And in the meantime, the CPU can 
be busy paying attention to something 
else, like running another program in 
some multitasking environment. 

Under normal DOS, of course, the 
microprocessor will just twiddle its 

72 COMPUTE OCTOBER 1991 



thumbs until the SCSI bus reports suc- 
cess, since DOS is a single-tasking, 
do-only-one-thing-at-a-time operating 
system. 

The way that the SCSI interface can 
support so many kinds of storage de- 
vices lies in its manner of addressing 
these devices. 

As far as it's concerned, your hard 
disk isn't a hard disk — it's just a stor- 
age peripheral with storage areas 
called sectors numbered from to 
some large value. The same Is true for 
floppies, tapes, or optical devices. 

Which leads to an interesting ques- 
tion. The hard disk doesn't see itself as 



a mere collection of sectors — it uses a 
more complex addressing terminology. 
So who does the translation from SCSI 
sector addresses to physical hard 
disk addresses? 

The answer is that every SCSI drive 
has a controller built right onto it, kind 
of like IDE. That controller talks both to 
the drive in whatever language the 
drive prefers and then to the SCSI 
adapter in SCSI language. 

So here's the punch line: SCSI 
drives are really drive-and-controller 
combinations, and those drive-and- 
controller combinations can use any in- 
terface—IDE, ST506, or ESDI, although 
ESDI is the only one I've seen used. 
ESDI is used most often because of 
the raw speed that it offers. 

No Guarantees 

You can see now that SCSI, in and of 
itself, is no guarantee of a fast drive, al- 
though most drives chosen for SCSI 
are, in fact, fairly quick. SCSI really has 
nothing to do with speed, but rather 
with multitasking. 

Remember that ESDI is basically 
just a souped-up version of ST506. 
Drive management is handled mainly 
by the CPU, and that's not a problem 
for single-user systems. 

But what about a local area network 
server that must manage six or seven 
ESDI drives and multiple requests 
from different workstations for data on 
those drives? Because that's a lot of 
work for the CPU, it could benefit from 
distributed intelligence. SCSI provides 
that distributed intelligence. 

In fact, the SCSI host adapter is a 
CPU all in itself. All the PC's micropro- 
cessor would have to do in the six- 
drive scenario is just to issue six data 
requests rapid-fire to the SCSI host 
adapter and then sit back and wait for 
the data to come in. (Actually, it 
wouldn't sit back and wait — a good 
multitasking system would do some- 
thing else while waiting for the respons- 
es to come in.) 

In general, you can count on an 
ST506 interface to transfer data at the 
rate of 250K-750K per second (using 
MFfvl or RLL encoding), an IDE inter- 
face to transfer data at the rate of 1f\/IB 
per second (using ARLL encoding), an 
ESDI interface to transfer data at the 
rate of 1l\/IB-3tvlB per second (using 
RLL encoding), and a SCSI interface to 
transfer data at the rate of 1fvlB-3MB 
per second (using RLL encoding). 

So what's my advice on v^fhich kind 
of drive you should buy today? If 
you're buying a large drive for per- 
sonal use, go with an ESDI drive. For 
a LAN server or a machine that may 
become a LAN server, buy SCSI for a 
slightly more efficient drive, □ 



ONLINE 



Denny Atkin 



REACH OUT 
AND PLAY WITH 
SOMEONE 

You sigh with frustration. "Hon- 
ey, Stephanie is still tying up 
the phone. Won't she ever fell 
her friends good-bye and 
come down and visit the rest 
of the family?" 

"You're right. She should 
hang up and come down here 
and watch Married with Chil- 
dren with the rest of us. It's im- 
portant that she spend time do- 
ing wholesome, family things 
like this," your wife responds. 
"Stephanie Ann! Get off the 
phone and get down here 
right now!" 

"But moth-er!" she cries. 
"Only a few more minutes! 
Dave and I have three ores cor- 
nered, and we're only two dun- 
geon levels away from finding 
the Great Ark!" 

"She's playing Dungeon 
Monger again with that boy 
from North Dakota. Why can't 
she just talk to her local 
friends like I did when I was a 
teenager?" 

That's right, folks. A new ex- 
cuse for your teenagers to tie 
up the phone — online games. 
The biggest inconvenience 
might not be the important busi- 
ness calls you miss, but the 
fact that v;hile they're tying up 
the phone line and the comput- 
er, you can't get online and 
play the games yourself! 

Online gaming has really tak- 
en off in the past couple of 
years. In the early eighties, on- 
line gamers on networks such 
as CompuServe and the 
Source could play versions of 
the original mainframe 
games, including such vener- 
able titles as Colossal Cave 
Adventure and Star Trek. 
While these games were fun, 
they were generally single-play- 
er games, and the only real ad- 
vantage in playing them online, 
rather than playing a version on 



your personal com,puter, was 
that the games were larger in 
scope than the common 64K 
machines could handle. 

As personal computers be- 
came more powerful and the 
IBM PC replaced CP/M com- 
puters and C64s as the de fac- 
to BBS platform, online 
games grew in sophistication. 
Instead of calling up a nation- 
al network to play Adventure 
all by yourself, you could just 
dial your local BBS and chal- 
lenge a number of other play- 
ers to games like TradeWars, 
a multiplayer space game. 
Most of these boards still only 
supported one user at a time, 
so players would have to take 
turns making their moves. 
Still, it was much nicer to have 
a human opponent. 

The late 1980s saw an on- 
line gaming renaissance. The 
biggest networks, 

CompuServe and GEnie. be- 
gan to expand their online gam- 
ing areas. As the old single- 
player adventure games 
dropped in popularity, the net- 
works began to implement mui- 
tlplayer games that took advan- 
tage of the unique features of 
online services. You could log 
on and explore dungeons or 
destroy space armadas with 
people from around the coun- 
try. And unlike most of the 
BBS games, you could inter- 
act with several different play- 
ers at the same time. 

The games became more 
sophisticated. The text-based 
games grew — GEnie's Gem- 
stone HI adventure game is 
larger in scope and more com- 
plex than any of the disk- 
based text adventures. Per- 
haps the biggest groundbreak- 
er was Air Warrior, a multiplay- 
er World War II air combat 
game. No longer were online 
games trapped in the realm of 
text-based interfaces. 

Even when you're not on- 
line, Air Warrior is a superb 
flight simulator, with speedy 
polygon graphics and a real- 



istic flight model. But when 
you log on. the real fun be- 
gins. You're suddenly a WWII 
pilot fighting for one of three 
countries, in your choice of air- 
craft. There may be up to 50 
other players from around the 
country sharing the sky with 
you — or trying to knock you 
out of it. The newest version 
adds both European and Pa- 
cific theaters of operation, as 
well as WWI and Korean-era air- 
craft. Air Warrior is a far cry 
from the early BASIC games 
that used to be popular on 
BBS systems. 

The newest entry into the on- 
line gaming fraternity is the Si- 
erra Network {TSN). At the mo- 
ment it's a fairly limited serv- 
ice, offering games such as 
backgammon, cribbage, 
checkers, and bridge. But 
this flat-rate service, currently 
available in California, plans 
to expand to offer more sophis- 
ticated games in the coming 
SierraLand and adult-oriented 
LarryLand extensions. New 
games should come online as 
the service moves to national 
availability. 

Interestingly, TSN is a com- 
bination of the mainframe and 
BBS gaming techniques. 
When you call TSN, you're 
actually calling the host com- 
puter closest to your geograph- 
ic area. If you want to play a 
game with someone across 
the country, you can, as TSN 
computers are networked us- 
ing the same Tymnet network 
used by major online servic- 
es. Your local TSN computer 
simply hooks up with your 
friend's local node, and you 
can still play across the coun- 
try without incurring long-dis- 
tance charges. TSN is stilt in 
its infancy, but it may portend 
what we can expect from on- 
line gaming in the future. 

Wliat are your favorite on- 
line games? Drop me an E- 
mail note at 75500.3602 on 
CIS. DENNYA on BIX and GE- 
nie, or DENNY on Plink. □ 



The late 1980s saw 
an online gaming 
renaissance. Since 
then, games have 
become multiplayer, 
graphical, and 
more personal, even on 
the big networks. 



OCTOBER 1991 COMPUTE 73 



HOME OFFICE 



COMPUTE CHOICE. To get your PC housekeeping 

chores under control, no other 

toolkit does the job like this longtime favorite. 

Tony Roberts 



PC TOOLS 7.0 



A few versions back, PC Tools 
was a compact set of utilities — 
an easy-to-fiandle tool belt of 
programs to make computing 
smoother. Today it would take 
a pickup truck to hold every- 
thing that's packed into robust 
PC Tools 7.0. 

If you've been computing 
for any length of time, you've 
no doubt assembled a collec- 
tion of programs that do many 
of the things PC Tools does. If 
you're in the market for any 
one utility — say a backup pro- 
gram, a disk cache, a DOS 
shell, hard disk diagnostics, a 
disk optimizer, or a virus detec- 
tor—you can get that and a 
whole lot more in PC Tools. 
While an impressive collection 
of utilities, PC Tools 7.0 falls a 
bit short of perfection. There 
are some apparent incompat- 
ibilities between elements of 
this software and some mem- 
ory managers, some versions 
of DOS, some hardware, and 
some other software. Part of 
this problem, though, stems 
from the fact that much of this 
software must be or can be 
run memory resident, and mem- 
ory-resident software causes 
conflicts by its very nature. 
Some users will have difficulty 
installing and using PC Tools. 
With so many TSRs running 
loose, there's a good probabil- 
ity of conflict. It will take exper- 
imentation and monitoring to 
set up a PC Tools system 
that's stable and safe. 

The difficulty starts during 
the PC Tools installation proc- 
ess. Although it's possible to 
install individual elements of 
PC Tools, the tendency to 
want to install it all — all 7.2 meg- 
abytes of it — to see what eve- 
rything does will override 
most users' intentions to save 
hard drive space. 

74 COMPUTE OCTOBER 1991 







This 
can be 
like letting a 
baby organize 

your button box. Suddenly, 
your carefully tuned system is 
choking on a plethora of new 
TSRs; you're fiddling with com- 
mand line switches and kick- 
ing the dog as crash follows 
lockup and you don't know 
what to blame. You can't 
learn how to run 15 or 20 pro- 
grams at once, so when you in- 
stall PC Tools, proceed me- 
thodically. 

PC Toots comes packed 
with seven books of documen- 
tation, each dedicated to a dif- 
ferent facet of the software. De- 
spite this segregation, finding 
information is sometimes diffi- 
cult because some programs 
are covered in more than one 
manual and the indices are 
not cross-referenced. 

The hypertext-style, oniine 
help files provide excellent 
guidance while you're learn- 
ing the programs, but since 
the help files occupy 1.2MB, 
they didn't last long on my 
overcrowded hard disk. 

PC Tools' installation and 
configuration programs help 
set things up for you, and they 
will take care of rewriting your 
CONFIG.SYS and AUTOEXEC. 



BAT files 
if you like. This 
is fine with plain vanil- 
la setup files, but PC Tools 
unraveled my AUTOEX- 
EC.BAT which includes sever- 
al questions and ERRORLEV- 
EL tests regarding the soft- 
ware I want to load. Still, I put 
these inconveniences out of 
mind once I got a handle on 
what this most recent version 
of PC Tools offers. PC Tools 
7.0 provides a backup pro- 
gram, an undelete utility, and 
a program launcher that are 
bona fide Windows applica- 
tions. The Windows backup 
can run in the background 
and can be scheduled to per- 
form unattended backups at 
a specified time, if you have a 
tape drive. The rest of the 
package, including PC Shell, 
can be run under Windows 
as DOS applications. 

Central Point Backup — a sot- 
id disk-backup utility that is al- 
so sold as a stand-alone pro- 
gram — is aging nicely. This 
incarnation comes with a 
DOS version and a Windows 
version that are compatible. 
You can make a backup in 
Windows and restore it in 
DOS. Configuration options 



are myriad. You can save 
named setup files so it's easy 
to do a full backup one day. 
an incremental backup anoth- 
er day, and a backup of only 
PageMaker documents on a 
tfiird day. 

Like Central Point Backup, 
Commute is also offered as a 
stand-alone program and is 
just as welcome in this bun- 
dle of utilities. A remote com- 
puting utility, Commute per- 
mits connection of two sys- 
tems across a network, via mo- 
dem, or by direct link. With 
this software you can control 
your computer at work from 
your laptop or home comput- 
er; you can transfer files and 
run applications from afar. 

Don't dread the day your 
PC contracts a virus any long- 
er. VDefend, PC Tools ' mem- 
ory-resident virus detection util- 
ity, scans for hundreds of 
known viruses. However, run- 
ning VDefend slows perform- 
ance noticeably, and VDe- 
fend can only detect, not erad- 
icate, viruses. Central Point An- 
ti-Virus (sold separately) takes 
care of that chore. PC Tools' 
DiskFIx and Backup pro- 
grams scan for viruses while 
they work, so you'll have 
some measure of protection 
even if you ignore VDefend. 

Enhancements made to 
the DiskFIx utility include in- 
terleave tuning and low-levei 
reformatting for those hard 
drive controllers that will per- 
mit it. During repair, you're 
allowed to save crucial disk in- 
formation to a floppy so you 
can undo the repair if you 
want. Unformat w\\\ help re- 
cover an accidentally format- 
ted disk. Compress, the de- 
fragmenter and disk organiz- 
er, has some useful new op- 
tions for compression tech- 
nique and file sorting. 

PC Tools 7.0's FlleFix pro- 



gram adds the ability to repair 
damaged dBASE, Lotus, or 
Symphony files. Undelete al- 
lows recovery of files that 
have been accidentally 
erased. This program works 
similarly to DOS 5.0's Un- 
delete command, In fact, Cen- 
tral Point Software licensed ver- 
sions of its Mirror and Un- 
delete utilities to Microsoft for 
use in DOS 5.0. An added fea- 
ture of the PC Tools version, 
however, is Delete Sentry. De- 
lete Sentry works by moving 
deleted files to a hidden subdi- 
rectory on your disk rather 
than actually erasing them. 
The system then can be set 
to purge erased files after a 
specified number of days. All 
of the memory-resident parts 
of the PC Tools package can 
be loaded into high memory, 
if available on your system, 
leaving acres of conventional 
memory available for applica- 
tion programs. In addition 
much of the software in this 
package has been made com- 
patible with Netware net- 
works. 

PC Tools 7.0 also includes 
a new Windows-\'ike graphical 
interface for all its compo- 
nents. A new Application 
Menu System lets you run PC 
Tools utilities and other DOS 
applications from a configura- 
ble cascading menu. PC 
Shell, a DOS-based file man- 
agement system, now permits 
viewing of files in more than 
35 different formats. Desktop 
Manager offers a suite of func- 
tions including appointment 
scheduling, telecommunica- 
tions and fax board support, 
notepad, outliner. autodialer, 
cys/\SE-compatible database, 
calculators, and macro editor. 
The many options offered by 
PC Tools mean flexibility for 
you. If you like working from a 
shell, you can use PC Stieil 




, ■,;i>dl^'<''' ' 



as your 
base and launch 
programs from there. On the 
other hand, if the command 
line suits you, you can exe- 
cute any program from the 
DOS prompt. Although few will 
use every program in this pack- 
age, I can't imagine anyone 
who couldn't find almost daily 
use for some of this software. 

While I encountered no ma- 
jor problems with PC Tools, 1 
did manage to lock the sys- 
tem up several times. I found 
that the Find Duplicates por- 
tion of the Find File program 
hung up every time under DR 
DOS 5.0, but it works fine un- 
der rvlS-DOS. 

You could buy several prod- 
ucts to handle the chores PC 
Tools handles, or you could 
just buy PC Tools. No other 
package bundles so much in 
one box. Despite the minor 
problems mentioned here, PC 
Tools never comes up short in 
the usefulness department. □ 



IBM PC and 
compatibles, 640K 
RAM, hard disk 
(Windows 
aoplications 
require Microsoft 
Windows 3.0 and 
2MB RAM): 
supports mouse. 
Netware Z.1 5 and 
aiiove, and 
Netware 386— 
$179 

CENTRAL POINT 

SOFTWARE 

15220 NW 

GreenDrier Pkwy. 

Beaverton, OR 

97006 

(503) 690-8090 



OCTOBER 1991 COMPUTE 75 



WORKPLACE 



mM 



Daniel Janal 



Look homeward, 

boss. That's 

where you may 

find your 

hest employees. 



YOU CAN 

GO HOME AGAIN 

How would you like to escape 
the perilous drive to work and 
still not miss the excitement 
and intrigue of office politics? 
Why not convince your boss 
to let you do some work at 
home? After all, the commute 
is about 30 seconds, and you 
get to see your kids grow up. 

These days, over 5 million 
workers telecommute, accord- 
ing to Link Resources, a New 
York-based think tank. Not to 
be confused with the self-em- 
ployed, telecommuters make 
arrangements with their em- 
ployers to divide work time be- 
tween office and home. Ar- 
rangements can vary from 
working mostly at the office to 
working mostly at home — or 
somewhere in between. 

Telecommuters can be as 
much as 20 percent more pro- 
ductive than full-time office 
workers, according to a study 
conducted by the state of Cal- 
ifornia, which has its own tele- 
commuting policies. Brad 
Schepp. who has document- 
ed the phenomenon in his 
book. The Telecommuter's 
Handbook (Pharos Books, 
$9.95), says telecommuting 
can not only enhance the qual- 
ity of your life, it can also ben- 
efit your employer. 




pie Computer, AT&T, and JC 
Penney offer telecommuting 
as an option for certain employ- 
ees. Their efforts have paved 
the way for other companies 
to formalize policies. "Every- 
thing in the program is clearly 
spelled out," Schepp says, 
"who can telecommute, how 
they stay in touch with cowork- 
ers and supervisors, and how 
the company applies work- 
men's compensation laws." 

Such companies aren't the 
norm, however. Some 90 per- 
cent of companies that offer 
telecommuting do so informal- 
ly. Mid-level managers don't 
want to involve top manage- 
ment and the inherent red 
tape that follows, Telecom- 
muting goes against the 
grain. MBA programs don't 
condone it, and employers are 
only beginning to understand 
the unique problems of two- 
income households. You 
might have to shop around to 
find a company that's interest- 
ed in having employees tele- 
commute. That type of compa- 
ny will make it worthwhile. 

Other issues that make com- 
panies reluctant to offer tele- 
commuting are providing work- 
men's compensation for acci- 
dents at home, managing nu- 
merous off-site employees, 
and determining the best can- 
didates to work at home. 

The best telecommuters 
tend to be those employees 
v;ho have good working rela- 
tionships with their supervi- 
sors, have been with the com- 
pany for a long time, can work 
independently, are good com- 
municators, and are proven 
performers. And some posi- 
tions are better suited than oth- 
ers to telecommuting. Comput- 
er programmers, writers, trans- 
lators, sales reps, stockbro- 
kers, and attorneys, to name 
a few, fall into that category. 

Schepp says the best tele- 
commuters are "information 
specialists" in jobs that involve 
three basic stages: research. 



execution, and presentation. 
For instance, an architect 
meets with a client to discuss 
house plans, goes home to 
sketch out the blueprints, and 
then meets with the client 
again for a presentation, 

Schepp says that it's in the 
second stage, when the work 
is produced, that telecom- 
muting can be most effective. 
"That's where you need soli- 
tude. You need space and 
peace to do the best possible 
job," he says. 

Because interaction is lim- 
ited, the person must become 
adept at communicating with 
coworkers and supervisors 
and work harder to stay in 
touch via fax, E-mail, and the 
phone. "You've got to do what 
you can to ward off feelings of 
isolation," Schepp says. 

Successful telecommuting 
programs aren't made in heav- 
en, however; they're written on 
paper, with the guidelines 
spelled out and paths and 
tasks clearly defined. Schepp 
advises companies to hire spe- 
cialists to set up programs for 
telecommuting. "They can 
help you avoid the mistakes 
other companies have 
made," he says, "and they 
can hold your hand through 
the entire process." 

That workstyle isn't for every- 
one, however. Some 20 per- 
cent of telecommuters eventu- 
ally return to the office for var- 
ious reasons, often because of 
an inability to concentrate. 

If telecommuting sounds 
like your answer, Schepp ad- 
vises you to start slowly. 
"You'll find it's a learning proc- 
ess. You may find you aren't 
as productive at first— you 
have to get used to distrac- 
tions or not having a support 
staff or a copy machine. You 
have to get used to other 
ways of communicating with 
people. And you show up at 
the office fairly often." 

Showing up is fine — as 
long as you can go home. □ 



INTRODUCING 



CDnnpuTE 



cannpuTE 



******************* 
*** 
*** 
*** 
*** 
*** 

******************* 
***************** 

COMPUTE RoundTabte 



Welcome to Compute/NET 

Hosted by Rick Leinecker 

with assistants 

Tom Campbell 

Stephen Levy 

Peer Plaut 





GEnie 

1. COMPUTE Bulletin Board 

2. COMPUTE Realtime Conference 

3. COMPUTE Software Libraries 

4. About the Roundlabie 

5. Roundlabie News (910702) 

6. About COMPUTE and the COMPUTE Editors 

7. Feedback to the Sysops 

8. Roundlabie and Library Help 

9. COMPUTE Products 

10. Coming Soon in COMPUTE 

11. COMPUTE Back issue Database 
12.C0MPUTE Test Lab 

13. Software Publisfiers' Catalogs 

14. COMPUTE Online Game 



Welcome to the grand opening of 
COMPUTE/Net. A wealth of 
information awaits you. Back issues 
of COMPUTE, hard-to-find 
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can even talk to the editors and 
authors of the magazine. Lots of 
surprises are planned, so keep your 
eyes on us. 

Make sure that you try the 
computer trivia game found in the 
COMPUTE Games section. It's not 



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78 COMPUTE OCTOBER 1991 







MORE AND MORE 

EMPLOYEES 

ARE WORKING FROM THEIR 

HOME OFFICES. 

HOW CAN YOU GET INTO 

TELECOMMUTING? 

READ ON. 

REMOTE 
POSSIBILITIES 

BY ROSALIND RESNICK 

Ask most people to describe their 
dream job, and tliey'il start talking 
about great pay. top benefits, flexible 
I hours, a short commute, and loads of 
quality time to spend with the family. 

Mention the word telecommuting, 
though, and you'll get a blank stare. 

Telecommuting — commonly defined as 
working from the home or a remote loca- 
tion via personal computer, phone, fax, 
and modem — has been around for years, 
but it's only now beginning to catch on in 
a big way. Link Resources, a New York re- 
search firm, estimates that nearly 4 million 
U.S. employees lelecommute on at least 
a part-time basis with more than half a mil- 
lion telecommuting full-time. Just five 
years ago, there were fewer than 100,000 
telecommuters nationwide. 

Who Needs It? 

"Telecommuting is like a lot of other new 
ideas," says Gil Gordon, a Monmouth Junc- 
tion, New Jersey, consultant and publish- 
er of "The Telecommuting Review." a 
newsletter for employers. "I always like to 
remind the skeptics that when the Xerox 
machine first came out, people said, 'Why 
do you need that? We have carbon pa- 
per.' Telecommuting is one of those rare 
things that works out well for both employ- 
ee and employer." 

In other words, what's good for the work- 
er has suddenly become good for corpo- 
rate America. With the recession forcing 
companies to pinch every penny, more and 
more managers recognize that there are siz- 
able bottom-line benefits to letting employ- 
ees work from home. Not only are telecom- 
muters happier and more productive, stud- 
ies show, but having fewer workers at the 



^^J^ 



OCTOBER 1991 COMPLTTE 79 



office or production plant means re- 
duced expenses and overlnead. Telecom- 
muting also lets employers attract and re- 
tain topnotch employees who live far 
from tfie office, suffer from a disability, or 
need to stay fiome to care for a young 
cfiild or an elderly relative. 

Companies and government agen- 
cies that offer telecommuting include 
IBM, American Express, J.C. Penney, 
General Electric, Los Angeles County, 
and the Washington State Hnergy Of- 
fice. Apple Computer, whose 'San Fran- 
cisco Bay area employees 
face an arduous commute 
choked with traffic and pol- 
lution, has started giving 
workers a $1 credit in the 
company store every time 
they work from home. 

ProductivHy and Price 

Many bosses say they've 
been pleasantly surprised 
by how well their compa- 
nies' telecommuting pro- 
grams have worked out. Na- 
tional studies show that pro- 
ductivity can jump by as 
much as 20 percent when 
employees are allowed to 
work from home. 

"I was apprehensive at 
first," says Marti Nurse, di- 
rector of appeals and 
state hearings for the Los 
Angeles County Depart- 
ment of Public Services, 
who counts 35 telecommut- 
ers among the 103 staffers 
she supervises. "But as 
our caseloads have gone 
up, the people who are tele- 
commuting are doing 
more work, and they're do- 
ing it better." 

For Los Angeles County, 
which boasts one of the na- 
tion's largest telecommuting 
programs, employer altru- 
ism is a matter of dollars 
and cents. According to 
Nancy Apeles, the pro- 
gram's assistant manager, 
clerks who work from home for the coun- 
ty assessor's office work 64 percent fast- 
er than their counterparts in the office 
and save the county $30,000 a month. 
Of the 80,000 people who work for the 
county, more than 1200 now are tele- 
commuters, up from 78 when the pro- 
gram was launched three years ago. 
"It's a win-win situation," says Apeles. 

Who's Who 

Who are America's telecommuters? 
Many are mothers with young children. 
Computer programmers tend to gravi- 
tate to telecommuting, while other tele- 

80 COMPUTE OCTOBER 1991 



commuters are technical writers, tele- 
phone operators, and data-entry clerks. 

Los Angeles County, which numbers 
more than 1,200 telecommuters among 
its 80,000 employees, boasts 200 differ- 
ent telecommuting job classifications 
ranging from clerks and social workers 
to auditors and department heads. 

Jim Mitchell, 50, chief of contract mon- 
itoring for the Los Angeles County 
Health Department and a self-described 
modem junkie, set up an electronic bul- 
letin board for his 14 telecommuting em- 




ployees to swap messages. He himself 
works from home 4ya days a week. 

"I do my real thinking at home," says 
Mitchell, who still comes to the office for 
a weekly staff meeting. "I think that com- 
panies that do not offer this option are go- 
ing to find themselves behind the curve 
when it comes to recruiting." 

More typical of the telecommuting 
population are people like Lisa Kilmain. 
28, a senior associate programmer at 
IBM in Irving, Texas. Kilmain wasn't 
ready to go back to the office full-time 
when her daughter, Caitlin, was born 
two years ago. But part-time work 



didn't pay enough to justify what she 
was spending on day care. Thanks to 
IBM's Work-at-Home pilot program, Kil- 
main spent six months as a telecommut- 
er, tapping away at her PS/2 Model 70 
while Caitlin napped. 

"I got a lot done at home while she 
was sleeping," Kllman says. "People 
couldn't walk into my office and say, 
'Hey, what did you do last night?' " 

"Being a parent myself, I knew the im- 
portance of the mother's being present," 
says Ed Denson, Kilmain's boss. "It was 
good for the company, too. 
Lisa was able to accom- 
plish more in her 20 hours 
at home than she would 
have in the office." 

Though Kilmain is now 
back at the office, she 
says she's planning to 
have more children and 
hoping to repeat her tele- 
commuting expehence. 

Chris Stroud, vice presi- 
dent of Financial Data Plan- 
ning (FDR), a Miami soft- 
ware company, tells a sim- 
ilar story about Laura Faico, 
28. Falco, a programmer 
who also fields phone calls 
from customers, cares for 
two young children at 
home while telecommuting 
35 hours a week. Though 
FDP has no forma! telecom- 
muting program, the compa- 
ny has allowed Falco to 
work from home for the last 
2'/2 years because she's a 
talented self-starter. FDP al- 
so picks up the tab for a 
second phone line. 

"After my daughter was 
three months old. I didn't 
want to go back to work." 
Falco says. "I wanted to 
take care of her, The com- 
pany said it was willing to 
try [letting me telecom- 
mute] for three months. 
Now, it's been two-and-a- 
haif years." 
Some of her colleagues 
are even a little envious. "There have 
been other people who have pointed 
to Laura and said, 'She's doing it. Why 
can't we?'" Stroud says. "But Laura's 
job is very suited to working from 
home, and she's an extremely produc- 
tive person." 

Out of Sight 

As Falco's story shows, telecommuting 
is still a privilege, not a right, even at 
the companies that do allow it. The rea- 
son; Many managers worry that home- 
based employees will be tempted to 
sleep late, watch television, raid the 



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refrigerator, or take their kids to the 
park rather than do their jobs. 

Likewise, many employees fear that, 
once out of sight, they'll be out of mind — 
passed over for raises and promotions. 

If you're willing to take that risk and 
you want to persuade your employer to 
let you telecommute, the experts sug- 
gest you try the following approaches: 

• Put yourself in your boss's shoes. 
Show your boss that telecommuting can 
save the company money by shrinking 
overhead. Point out that employees who 
work from home are often more produc- 
tive and can keep working in spite of mi- 
nor illnesses and family emergencies. Ex- 
plain that telecommuting helps boost 
morale and keep good workers. 

• Show initiative. Prove that you've got 
what it takes to work from home — self- 
discipline, organization, and the ability 
to handle tasks and meet deadlines 
without direct supervision. Demon- 
strate these qualities at the on-site job 
you have now. 

• Start small. If your boss won't let you 
telecommute full-time, ask to try tele- 
commuting one day a month. Once 
your employer feels comfortable with 
the idea, you can start lobbying for one 
day a week, two days, or more. 

• Work hard. Even if your boss gives 
you the green light to telecommute, that 
doesn't mean you can't be hauled back 



to the office if your performance falls 
short. Telecommuters are expected to 
meet the same productivity standards 
as staffers who work in the office. 
• Be flexible. If your boss wants you to 
report to the office once a week for a 
staff meeting, don't fight it. 

Trends and Anomies 

Telecommuting experts believe that 
working from home is an emerging 
trend in the workplace of the 1990s, 
not just a flash in the pan. With advanc- 
es in computer and telecommunica- 
tions technology, people can perform 
more and more jobs from home. 

"It's not just women with kids sitting be- 
hind the keyboard," says Gordon, the 
telecommuting guru, "Many more men 
are becoming interested in it, too." 

But not even telecommuting's 
staunchest backers envision a future lit- 
tered with empty office buildings and ur- 
ban ghost towns. The reason? A basic 
human need to talk, meet, and gossip 
with fellow workers face to face. Gor- 
don predicts that no more than 5 to 10 
percent of the nation's work force will 
telecommute at any one time. 

"Telecommuting is not about work- 
ing at home," Gordon says. "It's about 
decentralizing the workplace. For the 
right people and the right reasons, it 
has tremendous value." □ 



BOOKS ON TELECOMMUTING 

There are several publications on telecom- 
muting, including Telecommuting: How 
to Make It Work for You and Your Com- 
pany, by Gil Gordon and Marcia Kelly 
(ISBN 013902339-9, Prentice-Hall). To or- 
der a copy, contact Gordon at 10 Don- 
ner Court, Monmouth Junction, New Jer- 
sey 08852; (908) 329-2266. The price is 
$15.95 lor U.S. orders and $25.95 for for- 
eign orders. Price includes shipping. Gor- 
don also edits "The Telecommuting Re- 
view," a monthly newsletter geared to- 
ward employers. A subscription costs 
$157.00 per year. The address and 
telephone number are the same. 

Other books include The One-Minute 
Commuter by Lis Fleming {ISBN 1- 
877887-14-5; Acacia Books, 1309 Red- 
wood Lane. Davis, California 95616; 916- 
753-1519; $9.95 plus $2.00 postage and 
handling; California residents should add 
$0.75 sales tax). The Telecommuter's 
Handbook by Brad Schepp (ISBN 0- 
88687-571-4; Pharos Books, World Alma- 
nac Education, 1278 West 9th Street, 
Cleveland, Ohio 44113; 800-521-6600; 
$9.95 pius $1.50 postage and handling), 
and Wtirtog from Home: Everything You 
Need to Know About Living and Working 
Under the Same Root by Paul and 
Sarati Edwards (ISBN 0-87477-582-5; Jer- 
emy P Tharcher, 5858 Wilshire Boule- 
vard, Suite 200, Los Angeles, California 
90036: 213-935- 9980; $14.95). 







"Rewind the IPL tape, check the board position and see if the amber light blinks.' 



82 COMPUTE OCTOBER 1991 



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ARIS & LETTERS 



Robert Bixby 



Ventura 

Publisher seems 

destgneif to 

frustrate tlie simple 

creation of a 

saddle -stJtclied 

booklet. 



TAKING THE 
VENTURE OUT OF 
A PUBLISHER 

You can't use Ventura Publish- 
er hr very long without grudg- 
ingly admitting that it has a few 
flaws. It lacks two-up printing, 
for example, and a few other lit- 
tle things that would be nice to 
have. Fortunately, Ventura is 
popular enough to make it 
profitable for small program- 
ming companies to create util- 
ities to fill in the gaps. 

EDCO (EDCO Services, 
12410 North Dale Mabry High- 
way, Tampa, Florida 33618; 
813-960-2356) is such a com- 
pany EDCO provides simple so- 
lutions to two Ventura deficien- 
cies most vexatious to typeset- 
ters: hyphenation and kerning. 

The hyphenation problem in- 
volves words improperly hy- 
phenated according to the 
standard dictionary. This 
shows up when a word contain- 
ing a syllable of a single charac- 
ter appears at the end of a 
line — Ventura often breaks 




words incorrectly. The EDCO 
Hyphenation Dictionary is 
free of these errors, and it al- 
lows you to enter new words 
in the dictionary, complete 
with specified hyphenations to 
prevent errors from occurring. 
You can even specify how 
many letters should appear 
before and after a hyphen to 
prevent short words from 
breaking at all and long 
words from breaking before or 
after single letters. 

LelrTucl< is an interactive 
kerning engine that allows you 
to adjust the Iteming of letter 
pairs in the 24 most popular 
PostScript fonts: roman, bold, 
italic, and bold italic forms of 
Avant Garde, Bookman, New 
Century Schoolbook. Palatino, 
Helvetica, and Times. You can 
specify a change of as little as 
1/1000 of an em space. You 
can even enter letters not or- 
dinarily kerned and specify a 
kerning value. LetrTucl< and 
the EDCO Hyphenation Diction- 
ary are available for $99 each 
or $148 for both. 

2Up Publisher (Laser Age 
Software. 3231 Ocean Park 
Boulevard, Santa Monica, Cali- 
fornia 90405; 213-470-1397; 
$159) is another interesting 
package designed to make up 
for what I consider a glaring 
inadequacy in Ventura: the 
lack of two-up printing. Two-up 
means setting up your pages 
so the resulting printout can be 
folded into booklet form. 

With Ventura you can cre- 
ate landscape pages with two 
frames side by side, but then 
there's the problem of pagina- 
tion. Laying out a booklet unas- 
sisted is both a nightmare and 
a headache rolled into one. To 
create a 32-page booklet, you 
could spend hours cutting 
and pasting text to get it in the 
right positions, and page num- 
bers have to be entered by 
hand. That's a lot of work you 
shouldn't have to do. 

It seems that Ventura is de- 
signed to frustrate creation of 



a simple saddle-stitched book- 
let, but thankfully, 2Up Publish- 
er is designed to take care of 
that problem. You simply ere- 
ate pages in Ventura Publish- 
er us'mg a special format de- 
scribed in the 2Up Publisher 
manual and then print them to 
a file. 2Up Publisher then ex- 
tracts the pages from the file 
and rearranges them so they 
can be saddle-stitched. 

2Up Publisher on\y prints to 
a PCL printer, meaning it uses 
only PCL font files. If you're 
used to printing from Ventura 
for |/l//nG'oivsto a PostScript de- 
vice, the result is an unaccept- 
able change of available fonts. 
Nonetheless, once you've set 
up Ventura to print in the ap- 
propriate format and made the 
necessary adjustments, 2Up 
Publisher wiW generate perfect 
pages as advertised. 

As I've mentioned before, 
I'm a man on a quest; I'm look- 
ing for the perfect pointing de- 
vice to replace the mouse. 
The news from Quixoteland is 
that I may have found my 
true love — a device that 
makes pointing easier and al- 
lows me to draw with a natu- 
ral motion. The creature's 
name is MousePen (Appoint 
Systems, 1332 Vendels Cir- 
cle, Paso Robles, California 
93446; 800^448-1184; $109), 
and though it's a little fat 
around the middle, it works 
like a real pen. 

You can hold it like a pen, 
draw on your mouse pad as if 
it were a sketch pad. and even 
draw with it on other surfaces, 
provided they aren't too siick. 
The mouse ball is a bead with 
a smooth finish rather than the 
rubber-coated ball bearing 
found in most mice. 

Although I have several 
standard mice standing by to 
take the MousePen's place, 1 
haven't rushed back to them 
yet, If the MousePen barrel 
can be made thinner, this 
sharp new input device will 
border on perfection. n 



84 



COMPUTE OCTOBER 1991 



'^'m. * l*^ 







The man 
th@4dtis 




jo' 



^■1 



,-'<- 














Thistimehe^ ' 
in over his l^d. 




Size fAe 








,,5. ^ « 



40 






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C O M I N G T H I S FALL 
J^O A SOFTWARE STORE NEAR YOU. 



10° 



LucasArts 



Lucasfilni Games 



circle Readnr Service Number 111 




Jo" 



40 



DISCOVERY 



COMPUTE CHOICE. With you 

on the job, even Carmen Sandiego can't 

toy with the great American past. 

Clayton Walnum 



■^^wijrxxaa 



WHERE IN 
AMERICA'S PAST 
IS CARMEN 
SANDIEGO? 



Ever since the indom- 
itable Carmen Sandi- 
ego began lier ca- 
pers back in 1985, 
computerists the world 
over have been trying to 
track her down. But when- 
ever she's busted, Ms. San- 
diego gets back on the 
streets faster than a jail door 
swings, You just can't keep a 
bad woman down. After wreak- 
ing havoc in Where in the 
World Is Carmen Sandiego?, 
Where in the U.S.A. Is 
Carmen Sandiego?, Where in 
Europe Is Carmen Sandiego?, 
and Where in Time Is Carmen 
Sandiego?, she's back with 
her trusty time machine, caus- 
ing trouble across the length, 
breadth, and history of the 
United States of America, 

In Where in America's Past 
Is Carmen Sandiego?, you 
hop in your Chronoskimmer 
450SL and follow the Sandi- 
ego gang as they leap from 
time to time, starting prior to 
1800 and going all the way up 
to the present day, {Well, up to 
1988, anyway.) Although your 
goal may be a good arrest, 
along the way you'll learn 
much about important times in 
America's history, from the dis- 
coveries of the first expiorers 
to the inventions of Thomas 
Edison to the introduction of 
rap music. 

A typical game begins 
when ACME headquarters 
briefs you on the most current 
V.I.L.E. (Villains' International 
League of Evil) caper and is- 
sues you a Chronoskimmer for 
a specific period of time. At 




^m 






the start of a case, you know 
only the crime and the crimi- 
nal's gender. To complete 
your mission, you must identi- 
fy, locate, and arrest the crim- 
inal before your time expires. 
The execution of most com- 
mands consumes time, so you 
must examine clues carefully 
and avoid taking unnecessary 
trips or requesting redundant 
information. 

Because Br0derbund's 
America is divided into five 
geographic regions, each of 
which can be visited in any of 
nine time periods, guesswork 
wili yield poor results. You 
must examine each clue to de- 
termine both the region and 
time period to which the crimi- 
nal has fled. The game's doc- 
umentation advises you to "re- 
fer to your personal volume of 
What Happened When." 
Study this impressive tome 
carefully and become thor- 
oughly familiar with its organiza- 
tion. The book contains far too 
much information for anyone 



to simply memorize. 

Luckily, your first time jump 
is automatic, zapping you to 
the last place the criminal was 
sighted. When you arrive at 
your destination, your view 
screen offers a scene from the 
region in the appropriate time 
period, after which you start 
your investigation by choosing 
Ask a Bystander, Consult a 
Source, or Listen In. Whichev- 
er clue you choose, the inter- 
viewee will give information 
that may point to the criminal's 
next destination, time period, 
or both. 

For example, a typical clue 
may read, "She said she was 
going to donate copies of the 
new book. Uncle Tom's Cab- 
in, to a library in Austin." By 
looking up books in What Hap- 
pened When's index, you find 
Uncle Tom's Cabin listed with 
a publication date of 1852. 
You nov/ know your target has 
fled to the Southwest (Austin) 
in the year 1852 (you've also 
learned a little about classic 



86 COMPUTE OCTOBER 1991 



literature, but don't let that wor- 
ry you), and you didn't even 
have to read the full entry in 
the book! Pressing the 
Chronoskimmer's map button 
brings up a map of the U.S. on 
your view screen. You select 
the 1:850-1875 time zone and 
the Southwest region and 
press the launch button, and 
you're off. 

When you arrive in the South- 
west, you learn that "the first 
Texas cattle drive began in 
1866 when a herd of 260,000 
cattle was moved north, prov- 
ing that cattle could be driven 
to market." Interesting though 
this fact may be, it doesn't 
help your search. But press- 
ing the Search button allows 
you to question the witnesses. 

As you search for cfues, 
headquarters may send elec- 
tronic mail, which gives you 
the latest lowdown on your sus- 
pect. Clues like "She had ruby- 
colored hair" let you narrow 
down the suspects, Enter the 
information into your crime com- 
puter. Once you know enough 
about the villain, you're issued 
a warrant. 

The game continues in this 
fashion until you capture the sus- 
pect or run out of time. Some- 
times, you may catch up with 
the suspect before you have a 
valid warrant, in which case, 
the suspect gets off — and you 
get chewed out by headquar- 
ters. If you end up with a war- 
rant for the wrong person, you'll 
really feel like a dink. 

Where in America 's Past Is 
Carmen Sandiego? supports 
most graphics modes, includ- 
ing CGA, EGA, and VGA. Al- 
though obviously best piayed 
in VGA mode, the game's 
EGA mode is an acceptable al- 
ternative, with the CGA graph- 
ics being better than one 
might expect but still tough on 
the old orbs. The VGA graph- 



ics are stunning, with many 
scenes rendered from digit- 
ized photos. 

Not all the graphics are stat- 
ic scenes, however. Each 
time you jump to one of 
V.i.L.E.'s locations, a Sandi- 
ego henchperson makes an 
appearance in a carefully craft- 
ed, always amusing anima- 
tion. I won't give away any of 
the surprises. Suffice it to say 
that, with a full dozen of these 
cartoonlike intermissions built 
in, you'll continue to enjoy 
them for many games. (If you 
don't see an intermission after 
a time jump, you jumped to 
the wrong location or time.) 

While the straight PC-gen- 
erated sound effects are OK. 
this game puts sound cards 
like Ad Lib and Sound Blaster 
through their paces. The pro- 
fessionally composed music is 
reminiscent of that of hard- 
boiled detective dramas, with 
a splash of sexy-cool jazz 
thrown in to keep you grinning 
and bobbing. The sound ef- 
fects accompanying a time 
jump rattle your chair and 
echo spookily as you snap in- 
to your chosen slot in history. 

No software is perfect, of 
course. 'When played using a 
Sound Blaster card, Where in 
America 's Past Is Carmen San- 
diego? sometimes leaves a 
note or two hanging, yielding 
a droning sound that can 
drive you wacky if it goes on 
too long. (This also may hap- 
pen with other sound cards.) 
I also didn't care for the meth- 
od by which the player gath- 
ers clues. Any software built up- 
on a fictional scenario must 
maintain that all-important sus- 
pension of disbelief. Clicking 
on a button labeled Ask a By- 
stander or Listen In reminds 
you that you are, after all, just 
playing a game. It would've 
been much more effective to 



WHERE IN AMERICA'S PAST 
IS CARMEN SANMEGOr 




have a person's portrait pop 
up, as though you were truly 
questioning people met ran- 
domly in the street. As the 
game stands, the Clue but- 
tons might as well be labeled 
Clue 1. Clue S', and Clue 3 for 
all they add to the game's sce- 
nario. These are minor quib- 
bles, however, when com- 
pared with the overall quality 
of the program. 

Although the gameplay var- 
ies only slightly from one title 
to the next, these games con- 
tinue to be entertaining and, 
best of all, painlessly educa- 
tional — a tough combination 
to beat. As parents proved to 
their kids over five years ago 
when the first charming 
Carmen Sandiego adventure 
was released, learning can be 
fun. Where in America's Past 
Is Carmen Sandiego?\s a must- 
have package for anyone inter- 
ested in superior and engaging 
educational software. D 



IBM PC and 
compatibles; 51 2K 
RAM for CGA, EGA, 
Tanity 16-color, 
and Hercules; 640K 
tor MCGA and VGA; 
tiard drive; suoDorts 
mouse or joystick; 
supports Roland 
MT-32, Sound 
Blaster, Ad Lib, 
LAFC-1. and CM- 
32L-$59.95 

BRDDERBUND 
SOFTWARE 
17 Paul Dr. 
San Rafael, CA 
94903-2101 
(800) 521-6263 



OCTOBER 1991 COMPUTE 87 



m^^ l^reheuse/Showrocm 




siicMinlSys 

/Hicrccemputer Series 

PeVi\e and Much More than a Powerful Computer. 



AiiniSys 

2CCC 

SIIG's 12 MHz 80286 mini system 
Standing Siighitly iailer than o 3-1/2" 
diskette, thie extremely compact 
MiniSys 2000 tios many advantages 
over conventional microcomputers. 
Because of its unique small size, the 
MiniSys 2000 opens the doors of 
possibilities for PC based applica- 
tions closed due to size concerns by 
larger, standard PCs. Utilizing the 
surface mount technology and an 
extreme cost-efficient design, ihe 
MiniSys 2000 now makes microcom- 
puter solutions affordable. 

The Minlsys 2000 ... o (oundaton for 
countless applications! 

• Data Entry Workstation 

• Point-of-sale Workstation 

• Home Computer 
Lan Woikstation 

• Voice Mail System 
Standard Feature Includes... 

• 1 MB system memory expandable 
to 2.5 MB 

• 3-1/2" 1.44 Floppy Drive 

• 2 Serial, 1 Parallel, 1 game port, 
TV port 

• Mono/CGA switchabie, IDE 
Interface 

• 110/220VAutosensing Power 
Adapter 

• 1 year On-site/ 
Mail-in Warranty 




$449 



MiniSys 2000 

with VGA Adapter M99 



MiniSys Cuticns: 

9" Monochrome (White) Monitor 

MN-W-QC918 S129.00 

9" VGA Monochrome Monitor 

MN-V-VS0931 $169.00 

Suntouch Jr. 84K Keyboard 

K&-MINI-84K $49.00 

Keypad for Suntouch Jr. 

KB-MINI-Keypad $39.00 

Additional Power Adapter 

NEWI! $49.00 

40 MB Hard Disk Drive 

HD-TE-HD340 $269.00 

MS DOS 4.01 (3.5") 
SW-MS-DOS4,0M $65.00 



Mini§ys 

SIIG's IS MHz 80386SX Mini System 
Star]dard Feature Includes... 

• 1 MB expandable up to 5 MB 
■ 3-1/2" 1.44 Floppy Drive 

• 2 Serial, 1 Parallel, 1 game port, 
Ty'port 

• Super VGA with 512 KB, 
1024x768 controller 

• IDE Interface 

• 1 1 0/220V Autosenslng Power 
Adapter 

• 1 year On-site/ 
Mail-In Warranty 

MiniSys 

3€€€ 

SItG's 25 MHz S0386 Mini Systerr] 
Standard Feature Includes... 

• 2 MB expandable up to 16 MB 

• 3-1/2" 1.44 Floppy Drive 

• 2 Serial, 1 Parallel, 1 game port, 
TV port 

• Super VGA with 512 KB, 

1024x768 controller 

• IDE Interface 

• 1 1 0/220V Autose nsing Powe r 
Adapter 

• 1 year On-site/ 
Mail-in Warranty 



^849 



n,099 



(Bundled with MiniSys) 

1 .2 MB External Floppy Disk Drive 

with 15W P.S. 

FD-E-12A-1 $149.00 



sue, Inc €ti-$ite ^Varranty 

• SIIG stands behind its microcomputer with a full year on-site worranty. 

• Through ttie service facilities of Integroted Automation [nternatlonol, on-site service on SIIG computer Is available from 
coast to coast, including parts of Canada and Puerto Rico. 

• Integrated Automation International (lAI) contacts every computer owner/user wtien the service contract is initiated to 
verify ttieir hardware support needs. After this initial contact, a plan for support tor that system, should it require servicing. 
SIIG and iAI, together offer a comprehensive warranty service to meet the needs of SIIG microcomputer owners. On-site 
warranty details included with each computer system purchase. Extended warranty contracts available from IAI. 




We buy and sell excess mvenlorias..call or lax list. 

20308 Gramercy Place, Torrance, CA 90501 • (FAX: (213) 328-2907 

(800) 345-5568 / (213) 328-3344 

WE ACCEPT: NSI CHARGE, VISA, MC, AMEX, COD, PO'sfrom qualified firms 

20% reslocking fee on all nondafecliva rotums. All relurns'adjuslnnenis must be made wilNn 1 5 

days, CA rssidenis Add 7% Sales Tax PRICES SUBJECT TO CHANGE , 18,50 Minimum Siilpping, 

No Surcharge On 
Crsdil Card Orders. 
WeAce$pL. 



NSIl 




^terCsi^ 




AMERICAN 
EXPRESS 





P-SJkP W)T TO SCAl£ 




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circle Reader Senrice Number 196 



<w waielicuie/ilii^peeiii 



A Poweriul, High Performance 436/ 
25 MHz Tower System 

Designed for use as a file server In a 
mutti-user/multi-tasking environment. 
The use of Intel's 80486 microproces- 
sor Is the basis for the S486-25's 
Impressive performance. The S486-25 
achieves Its phenomenal perfor- 
mance (Laridmark v1. 12 equals 
1 12.7-1 13.2) while still retaining 
downward compatibility with soft- 
ware designed for the less powerful 
80286 and 80386 systems. 



A High Per1onr\ance, High Quality 
386/25 MHz System 




u > < ! ' 'U.i.£jr r .' 1 1 iiUij cnrsB 



a.. 



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The SN386-25 can serve as an 
excellent file server. UNIX& OS/2 
compatible 

Standard Feature: 

• 1 MB of system memor/ 
expandable to 8 MB on-board 
and up to 16 MB with the use of 
an optional 32-blt memory card 

• 5-1/4', 1.2 Floppy Drive 

• 2 serial, 1 parallel, 1 gome port 

• 101 enhanced keyboard 

• Comes with 1 year On^lte/ 
Mail-In warranty 

. PLCC socket for Intel 80387 
and/or Weltek3167math 
coprocessor 

• 8 expansion 
slots 



*1,099 




SIIG. 







High Performance/Cost Effective 
80286/12 MHz System 
Standard Features: 

• 5 1 2 MB of system memor/ 
expandable to 4 MB on-board 

• 5-1/4', 1.2 Floppy Drive 

• 2 serial, 1 parallel, 1 game port 

• 101 enhanced keyboard 

• Comes with 1 year On-Slte/ 
Mail-In warranty 

• Socket for Intel 80287 math 



coprocessor 
7 expansion 
slots 



*599 



SX386-16 

SIIG's response to consumer 
demand for low cost, high 
perform ance microcomputer 

Based on Intel's 603S6SX-16 MHz 
microprocessor, the SX336-16 offers 
complete 80386 compatibility at 
80286 price. 

Standard Feature: 

• 1 MB of system memory 
expandable to 8 MB on-boord 

• 5-1/4", 1.2 Floppy Drive 

• 2 serial, 1 parallel, 1 game port 

• 101 enhanced keyboard 

• Comes with 1 year On-Slte/Mall- 
In warranty 

. PLCC socket for Intel 803B7SX 
math coprocessor 

• 8 expansion 
slots 



«799 



Inc 

Standard Feature: 

• 4 MB of system memory expand- 
able to 16 MB on-board 

• 1 28KB memory cache 

• 5-1 /4', 1 .2 Floppy Drive 

• 2 serial, 1 parallel, 1 game port 

• 101 enhanced keyboard 

• Comes wrlh 1 year On-Slte/Mall- 
In warranty 

. Socket for Weltek 4 167 
floating point math 
coprocessor 

• S expansion 
dots 



$2,495 



SX3§e-2C 

Based on Intel's 803S6SX-20 MHz 
microprocessor, the SX386-20 otters 
complete 80386 compatibility at 
B02B6 price. 




Fully compatible with software 
wfitlen for the 80386 based comput- 
ers while maintaining compatibility 
with programs designed for the less 
powerful 80286 machines. 
Standard Feature: 

• 1 MB of system memory 
expandable to 8 MB on-board 

. 5-1/4', 1.2 Floppy Drive 

• 2 serial, 1 parallel, 1 game port 

• 101 enhanced keyboard 

• Comes with 1 year On-Slte/Mall- 
In warranty 

. PLCC socket for Intel 80387SX 
math coprocessor $Aim 

• 8 expansion ^n*l*l 



iWNorroscAiE 




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We buy and sell excess mvmlories..ca\l or fax list. 
20303 Gramercy Place, Torrance, CA 90501 • (FAX: (213) 328-2907 

(800) 345-5568 / (213) 328-3344 

WE ACCEPT: NSI CHARGE, VISA, MC, AM EX, COD, PO's from quallied lirms. 

20% restocking tee on all non-def eclivs rstums. All fetums/adjiistments must be made within 1 5 

days, CA residents Add 7% Sales Tax. PRICES SUBJECT TO CHANGE. $8.50 Mnimum Shipping. 



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The LA-50 puts all the speed and 
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Features Include... 

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are optional 

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w/ 40MB Hard Drive . 

w/ 80MB Hard Drive.. 42,499.00 

w/ 120MB Hard Drive $2,599.00 




Nctebeck 

At less than 6.6 lbs., the unique 
NBA386SX Notebook PC is the newest 
star In Choplet's lineup or portable 
computers. 




Features Included... 

• 80386SX microprocessor with 
20MHz or 16MHz 

• 1MB RAM expandable to 5MB 

• Built-in 1.44 Floppy & 20M8 Hard Disk 
Drives standard 

• 640 X 480 Block & While supertwist 
CCFT LCD display, up to 32 grade 
scale 

• Fully VGA, EGA, Double Scon CGA, 
HGC and MDA compatible 

• Removable/rechargeable 
Nl-Cd battery 

• Weight 6.6 lbs. with battery pack 

• MS-DOS 4.01 & GW-BASIC 

• MS-Windows 3,0 
& MS-Works 2.0 
ore optional 

• FCC approved 



^2,399 



LX2C2C 
Laptcp 

Ideal for Beginning PC Users 

Economical and Eosy-fo-Use Laptop 
with a contrast-adjustable LCD screen 
Features Included. . . 

• V2a microprocessor with 12/4.77MHz 

• 640KB RAM with AMI BIOS 

• 2C»/IB Hard Disk and one built-in 
1.44MB Floppy Disk Drive 

• 640 X 200 Supertwist LCD Disploy 

• MDA and CGA compatibility 

• RS-232, Porollel Printer. Externol 
Video and External Keyboard Ports 

• MS-DOS 3.3 & GW-BOSIC 

• MS-Works 2.0 is optional 

• FCC approved (adaptor is also 
UL approved) 



M,029 



00 



PX-214Mli 
Super VGA 

NBWIINon-lnteriaced 

• SVGA— 1024 X 768. 800 X 600, 640 X 480 

• Aufo-Stze, Super Fine VGA Graphics 

• Hitachi CRT— Dot Pitch Super 
Fine 0.28 

• Black Screen for 50% better contrast 

• Non-Glare Screen 

• Triple Focus 3 Beam System for crisp 
bright colors 

• Tilt & Swivel Stand & Cables included 

• Dual Voltage 
Power Supply 
(50-60 Cycle) 




rx-i4s 

Super veA 

. SVGA— 1024 X 768, 800 x 600, 640 x 480 

• Comb Filter to eliminate smearing 

• Super Fine VGA Graphics Monitor 

• Hitachi CRT— Dot Pitch Super Fine 0.28 

• Non-Glare Screen 

• Triple Focus 3 Beam System for crisp 
bright colors 

• Tift & Swtvel Stand & Cables included 

• Dual Voltage 
Power Supply 
(50^0 Cycle) 

PX-14S VGA 

• VGA^MO X 480 

• Comb Filter to eliminate smearing 

• Fine Groin VGA Graphics Monitor 

• Hitachi CRT— Dot Pitch 0,39 

• Non-Glare Screen 

• Triple Focus 3 Beom System for crisp 
bright colors 

• Ttit & Swivel Stand «i_Cables included 

• Dual Voltage 
Power Supply 
(50-60 Cycle) 



1 « i.-aDies inciui 

^349 



I & Cables inciuc 

^299 




'SKfe 



We buy and sell excess in ventories..call or lax list 

20308 Gramercy Place, Torrance, CA 90501 • (FAX: (213) 328-2907 

(800) 345-5508 / (213) 328-3344 

WE ACJCEPT; NSI CHARGE, VISA, MC, AMEX, COD, PO's from qualified lims, 

20% restocking lea on all non-deleclive relums , All retumyadjuslmems must be made wKhifi 1 5 

days . CA residents Add 7% Sales Tax. P RICES SUBJ ECT TO CHAtJG E . J8.50 Minimum Shipping. 

No Surcharge On 
Crsdit Card Orders. 
WeAcsepL. 



faster Ca^ 




AMERICAN 
EXPRESS 



lttf> «T TO SC*LE 




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<w ^varelieu§e/€ti€Wi€€iii 

siiG .. SII2IL$-32eS GCAy-SCALC 

The SIRIiJS-32GS offers Gray-scala mode, as well as virtual gray-scale and slngla-blt scanning modes. 

The SIRIUS-32GS scanner Is a valuable 
tool for transforming photos ond other 
Images into graphic Images for use in 
computer applications. With its 256 
shades of gray, image ciarity and 
accuracy are unsurpassed. Industry 
stondord 1-, 4-, B- and 24-bit TIFF file 
formats are fully supported. The scanner 
pockage Includes IMS (Image Manipu- 
lation System) software, gray-scale 
graphic manipulation program devel- 
oped by VI&C Technology. 

FEATURES WITH IMS 

(Image Manipulation Syslem): 

• Manipulate 10 windows simulta- 
neously with full & reduced views 

• Supports expanded, extended, 
and virtual memory configuration 

• Supports popular Loser and Dot 
^^Aat^i:< printer, color or monochrome 
monitors 

• Mouse driven & graphic based 

• True WYSIWYG color selection to help 
Image monipulation 

• On-line user support 

• Auto detection for device drivers 
and configurations 

• On-screen dither pattern and 
gray shade index guidonce 

• Extensive tools for gray-scde 
enhancement, editing, and 
graphic drawing 




l^^^ arstekl |2§ 



HAND SCANNER 




COMPLETE PACKAGE INCLUDES.. 

• Mars 126 5' Scanner & 
Interface Card 

• Scon Kit UtiBty Software & 
User's Manuot 

• Cat Reader OCR Software 
& PC Paintbrush Plus $44 195 



One Year Warranty 



»119' 



• Exchangeable editing between 
gray-scale and 
binary data tfM AAA 

. Many VGA V I jC^M 

modes I f UVV 

supported 

OTHER OPTIONAL EQUIPMENT: 

• Automatic Document Feeder 
(ADF) Scans up to 25 pages at 
once '299" 

• ReadRight 2.0 by OCR Systems, 
for OCR scanning en 80286 or 
6068 based computer $299" 

• PC Paintgbrush IV Plus for 
advanced graphic uses •9900 

CHINON 

/C$-2CCC 

Scanner & Fax Card packaged 
together tor a fraction of the cost. 

• 9dO0 Baud facsimile & Scanner 

• Auto-Redial, Telephone Direc- 
tory & Automatic Cover Sheet 

• Log of foxes sent and received 
COMPLETE PACKAGE INCLUDES... 

• Chinon DS-2000 Scanner 

• ScanFax 96 
Add-in Board 

• Facsimile & 
DS-2000 Utility 
Software 

• Scanner Cable 
& AC Adapter 

• Optional 
- OCR 
-._j Software. 

^299 



SII^IUS 32 
FLATBED 

IMAGE SCANNER 

increase the grophic pertormonce of 
your office with SlIG's Sirius 32 Image 
scanner. To optimize and utilize the 
veratility of this scanner, 
we offer several Interface j^^T^k^ft 
kits, software geared to 9*VUU 
your business needs. %M%M%M 

INTEI^rACE MTS 

GRAPHIC INTERFACE KIT 

S32-DB Interface Card, Scanner 
Cable, DSart Software, PC Paintbrush IV 

Plus '149" 

BUSINESS INTERFACE KIT 

S32-DB Interface Card, Scanner Cable, 

DSart Softwofe, OmnlPage/3e6 OCR 

Software '599" 

DELUXE INTERFACE KIT 
S32-DB Interface Card, Scanner Cable, 
DSart Software, PC Paintbrush IV Plus. 
OmniPage/366 OCR Software «699™ 




QMS is3€e 

FULL PAGE SCANNER 




300 dpi resolution 
6 seconds per page 
Complete with Controller Card, 
Cable & Graphics Software 



^318 



S5 



OCR Software Add Si 49,00 



IW Kjr TO SC«£ 




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We buy and sell excess inventories..call or lax list. 
20308 Gramercy Plac», Torrance, CA 90501 • (FAX; (213) 328-2907 

(800) 345-5588 / (213) 328-3344 

WE ACCEPT: NSI CHARGE, VISA, MC, AMEX, COD, PQ-s from quaiifisd lirms. 

20% restocking tee on all rion-def eciivB returns. All relums/adiustmerts must be made whhin 1 5 

days. CA residents Add 7% Sales Tax. PRICES SUBJECTTO CHANGE. J8.50 Minimum Shipping. 

No Surchtrw On 
Credit Card Orders. 
We AtxepL. 



NSI\ 



VISA 




^ffl^^ 




AMERICAN 
EXPRESS 




1/^Octn, ^3reh€u§e/$hc>vrcem 




TurboScriPt 3 

PostScript Emulation Cartridge 

UDP's PostScript cartridge gives 
you more ttian ottier leading 
brcndsi 

• 47 Postscript fonts — scalable to 
any point size 

• Requires only 1 MB of 
additional printer Memory 

• Works on LaserJet II, IIP, IID, 
and III printers 

• Supports Adobe Type 1 font 
formats 

The TurboScript cartridge give you 
47 tiigh quailty scalabie Postscript 
fonts in any point size, ttiot 12 more 
than i^P's Adobe PostScript or Pacific 
Data's Pacific Page ill Cartridge, it 
requires 1 MB less printer memory. 

TurboScript is ideal for use with 
desktop publishing and WP applica- 
tions such OS Windows, Pagemai<er. 
Ventura Publisher, Microgrofx De- 
signer, WordPerfect, Microsoft Word, 
liiustrotor, Corel Draw and many 
more, 

Postscript features Include scoiing, 
reverse type, rotation, shading, pat- 
terns, stretching, circles, arcs, clipping 
path. etc. 

Two identical versions available for 
printer compatibility,.. TurtxsScrlpt 11 for 
the HP LaserJet II and compatibles 
and TurboScript ill for the HP LaserJet 
IID, IIP and IN. 

Compatible with IBM computers 
and compatibles. An additional 
appietalk-to-paraiiei connector box 
allows you to interface with the 
Macintosh computer. 



^299 



00 



Save $100.00 

$399.00 Retail Price 




47 Scaleable 
Postscript Fonts... 
tliats 12 more fonts tf)an 
your standard postcript 
cartridges! 



Tssssasrmm 




Reverse 




Clipping path 






Perspective 



Turb€2J 

More Printing Power witty 3.6 to 
30 point Fonts 

• Turbo25 gives you fonts from 
25 HP cartridges plus headline 
and zingbat fonts 

• Contains 152 fonts, 22 charac- 
ter sets and 220 "zingbats" 

• Includes drivers for most WP 
software, Including the new 
Windows 3 environment 




The Turbo25 Is designed to 
provide you with economy, 
felexiblilty and versatility. You get 
the most from your laser printer. 
Name the application: word pro- 
cessing, mathematics, legal, scien- 
tific and technical, tax forms, big 
bold headlines, spreadsheet... 
Turbo25 cartridge adds all the right 
touches, with headline fonts, 22 
symlxJi sets, 3.6 & A.& point type for 
spreadsheets to 30 point type for 
headlines; portrait and landscape, 
mono-spaced and proportionally 
spaced fonts, and much more. 

Exceptional type quailty. Hand 
tuned fonts give you crisp and sharp 
images. And you'll eliminate the 
need to store and download soft 
fonts, giving you faster printing and 
more computer memory. 

Works with the HP LaserJet II, IIP, 
IID and III as we!l as other HP car- 
tridge compatible printers. 

$17000 

*' ^Save $120.00 

$298.00 Retail 




CpW^I 



f^"^ 




We buy and sell excess in ventonBS..cBll or fax list 

20308 Gramercy Place, Torrance, CA 90501 • (FAX: (213) 328-2907 

(800) 345-5508 / (213) 328-3344 

WE ACCEPT: NSl CHARGE VISA, MC, A).(EX, COD. PC's Irom qualified lirnis. 

20% restocking lee on all non-delective relums. All returns'adjuslmer*s mysl be made within tS 

days. CA residents Add 7% Sales Tax. PHIC ES SUBJ ECT TO CHANG E . J8.50 Winimym Shipping. 

No Surcharge On 
Credit CataOiiera. 



faster Ca^ 




AMERICAN 
EXPRESS 



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Pr€-6J 



HP ProCollection Equivalent 




• 65 Fonts from the most popular 
HP tyfiestyle. Many in portrait 
and landscape. 

' Lots of legai character sets 

• Font sizes from 3,6 to 14 points 

• Largest selection of drivers, 
provided by software vendors 

The Pro-65 gives you more of the 
fonts you use everyday. This car- 
tridge Is compatible with all HP 
LaserJets, Including compatibles lll<e 
Epson EPL-6000 and Toshiba 
PageLoser6. 



M29 



00 Save 50% 

$249.00 Retail 



Paper & 
Envelope Trays 

For LaserJet II and IID 

Letter Size Tray, 200 sheet capacity 

m-lD 359.00 

Legal Size Tray, 200 sheet capacity 
(#T-LG) $59.00 

Envelope Size Tray, 15 envelope 
capacity (#T-EN) 569.00 

Buy 2 Trays 

SAVE 16% 

Buy 1 set of 3 Trays 

SAVE 25% 



TurbeGeia 

167 complete font sets, 
22 symbol sets and 
222 graptiic symbols 

• tf's3,6body copypt. tolts 
48 pt. headline font makes 
this cartridge great for word- 
processing 

• 3.6 & 4.8 pt. fonts for Spreod 
sheets 

• Script fonts from 1 2 pt. to 43 
point malces terrific certificates 

• 1 4 different fonts for scientific 
and technical typing 

• Driver support for many popular 
wordprocesslng & spreadsheet 
programs. Including Windows 

. Worl<svi/i!h HP LaserJet II. IIP, IID, 
III, HID, Epson EPL-7000, Star 
Macronlcs. & Star LoserPrintor 4. 
Other printers may be able to 
use this cartridge if they emu 
late one of printers mentioned. 




^9S9^^ Save $100.00 
'-V%M $339,00 retail 



'Hett^f! 



UDP MEMORY BOARD for 
HP LaserJet HIP. Call. 



All UDP Products comes 

wllh 60-day unconditional 

money back guarantee. 

Ten year warranty on 

all products. 




4C19 

Laser Font Card 

UDP Compatible 

Font Card for 

IBM 4019 & Compatible Printers 

• Packed vi/tth 209 Fonts. 

• Emulates Pacific Data's "25 in 
One' cartridge 

• All font In portrait; the printer 
rotates all fonts to landscape 

• Come with drivers for many 
popular applications and Win 
dows 3.0 (with VGA screen fonts) 
In both HP emulation and IBM 
native modes. 

• Plus... access to Pacific Data's 
"25 In One' driver, HP's 
ProCollection driver, IBM's 
Universal Card (#800) driver 
and other drivers for HP and 
IBM fonts. 

• Typestyles: UDP Helv, UDP Tms, 
Tms Math, Prestige Elite, Moth 
Elite, Courier, Letter GotNc, 
ftesentotlon. Presenter, Une 
Draw, PC Line and Tax Line 

• Headline fonts, 16 symbol sets, 
3.6 to 18 point type 

%7mV^ Save $100.00 

tmUlM $350.00 Retail 

C6 Dar Codes 
&H€re 

Zip+4 Bar Code 
Save 5. 7 per Envelope * 



Barcode 3-of-9 
IZ rit/8.1 pitch 

iiiDiiiiiiaH 

I?pt/4.6 pilch 

lllllllllilHIIIillll 

EAK/UPC JO nii 

IIIIIHllllll 

13 mi) 

iiiiiuiyiiiiii 



Lcllcr Galhic 9-S [»int 

Letter Gothic 

12 point 
Letter Gothic 

U point 
Lino Draw 12 point 

H» ^^' 

OCR-A IS point 
OCR-B 12 point 
US ZP 

...ll..l.l.,ll„l.,l,j,l. 



?%w„. 



•Bar Code 3 of 9 & "UPC Codes 



»119 



All in 1 Carfridgell 

00 SAVEIII 
$195.00 Retail 



• Call U.S. Post Office for further 
information. 



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Wb buy and sell excsss invenioriBS..catl or lax list. 
20308 Gramercy Place, Torrance, CA 90501 > (FAX: (213) 328-2907 

(800) 345-5588 / (213) 328-3344 

WE ACCEPT: NSI CHARGE. VISA, MC, AWEX, COO, PC's from qualified lirms. 

20% restocking fee on all non-cJefeclive rBtums, All relums/adjustmanls must be made wittiin 15 

days, CA residents Add 7% Sales Tax. PRICES SUBJECT TO CHANGE, J8,50 Minimum Shipping. 

Ho Surcharge On 
Cr&dil Card Orders. 
WeActepL. 



LsIerCa^ 




AMERICAN 
EXPRESS 




^^^-Wapeh©u$e)€h©Mfx^m 



IBM PS/2 MEMORY 



CAT. I 



DESCaiPTlOH 



NSI 



3*5348 512KB UtjgradePS/SMJae 

30F53M 2MB Upjrado PS/2 30 286 

W5037S 2Me Meowiy Adapt* 6450367 

M5O603 1MB SIMM RmTo-EGI; 121 

M50e04 2MB SIMM PS/2 aiZ-70 

645006 2MeSIMMPSJ2 70-A21 

34f 2933 4M6 SIMM PM 55SX; 6SSX 

6450375 1 MB Msm. BO PSS 80-041 

6450379 2MBU8m.BD PS/2 80 111-321 

6451060 4MB Mem.BD Pa2 80-A21A3( 

6450605 2-BWB Xpand Mem. PS/2 70S80 w'2MB 

34FM77 2-1 4MB Xpand BD PS'2 70480 W2MB 

M506D9 2-1 4MB Xpand BD. PSffi E0-«5SX 

■M/zm 
CALL FOR PS/1 MEMORY 



AST MEMORY 



CAT.t DESCRIPTION 



500510O01 


512K Upgrd Kit Prem 286 FASTRAM 


3Sno 


SOOSIMGS 


2MaUp8riilCIPc8raWS 386SX; 

WS 286: Bravo 236 S SaSSX; Ranpage 

Pbs 266; Admlj Pfam 12; Ran Admlj 

Advantage 

1MB Upgrd Kit Preiiiuni 386 


lis 00 


5005HHTO 


9800 


£00510-004 


4M6 Upgid Kit Prem 386; Rampase 

Pbs'MC;AdvntQ235 6 386 

1 MB Upgid Kit Ptsm 386C; 38&16 


310.00 


500510«7 


65.00 


5005(0-008 


<MB upgnl Kjl Prem 336c: 386/16 
Advanced FASTRAM, FASTbcanj 386 


230.00 


500510^)10 


512K Upgrd Kit Prem WS 386SX 5 
WS 286; Brawj 286, Rampago 1 286 


3000 






500510-011 


128KLIp9rtiXi1 Bravo 286 


40.00 


5OO7DM01 


51 2K Upgri Kil Ad»n K: Rampage PC 
5I2K Upgrd Kit Rnpaga Pluife 


40 OC 


5OO70MO3 


40 fx; 


500718-001 


1 MB Mod. Pism 38&25 i 3S6SX/1 6 


6500 


500718^X2 


1MB Mod. Prem 336^-25; SX/16: 
485«i2ST; 25TE: 25; J5E; 
Adapter Board 500722-004 
2MB LteardBt Prem 486 Series 
SMB Kit Prem 486 Series 


75.00 


500718-001 


tB6.DC 


5007e(M101 


670,00 


SOOSIB^XH 


1 -16MB Exp BdPr6m38&2S-33; 
Prom 4«6's 


450,00 


ASTSX20 


IMBModPienvII.WSXfflO 


84.00 


HP (CPU) MEMORY 


Cit.« 


DESCRIPTION 


NSI 


D1364A 


2Maup-KltV8ctraQS/l6S 
SES12 PC 


114.00 


}ie«iA 


IMB Up-Kil VECTHA 
O&20PC;RS25PCi20C 


6? on 






J1H2A 


1MB Up-IOl VECTHA 
O&20PC;RS25PC4 20C 


?s4no 






}1S40A 


1MflUp-KitVECTFWQS/16S 


62.00 


)154QA 


1WB Up-Kil VECTRAQS/16S 


62.00 


KISM 


1WBWodVECTRA4e«PC 


reoo 


32151A 


4),(BModVECTRA4S6PC 


262.00 


Kt52A 


BMB Mod VECTRA 3a6/2S,486PC 


9X.00 


D23aiA 


2MBModVECTRA336?5re 


144.00 



ZENITH MEMORY 



CAT J 



DESCRIPTION 



NSI 



ZA1 80-64 2MB Card Supar Span SX; 2e6E 24O00 

ZA1 80-66 1MB Card Super Spon 286; 2B6E 180,00 

Ml 80-86 2MB Card Super SponSX(ALPHAl 240,00 

ZA1 80-87 2MB Card Super Spoil SX (BETA) 240,00 

ZA3034ME 1MB Card Tuit»Spw1386E 1S9IXI 

ZA3034ME2 4MB Card Tult» Sport 386E 590,00 

ZA3034ME2 4MB Card TurtM Sport 386E 590,00 

ZA36O0ME 1MB Mod. 2 -386.20- 25-S)-33E 79,00 

ZA3600MG 2MG Mod. Z-386/20-2S-33 130,00 

ZA3800ME 1MB Mod. Z-386.20-2S-33-33E 79 00 

ZA3800MK 4Ma Mod. Z-386,»-25-33-33£ 268,00 



TOSHIBA MEMORY 



CAT. I 



DESCRIPTION 



44 OC 
12800 
395.00 

68,00 
108,00 
128,00 
279,00 

9600 
158,00 
298.00 
348.00 
388.00 
38800 



PCE-PA7137U 
PC7-PA830IU 
PC8-PA8302U 
PC9-PA8340U 
PC9PA8341U 
PC10-PAe304U 

PC12-PA8307U 
PC12-PAS309U 
PC14-PA8306U 
PC14-PA8311U 

PC14-PA8312U 

PC(5-PA$30eU 



3MB Mem Card Pert. T3200 

2MB Worn Card Port. T5100 

2MB MemCard Port TIGOO 

512K Mom Card Port. T3100E 

2MB Mom Card Put TSIOCE 

2Ma Mm Card Port T5200 

TosMa Desiop 18500 

2MB Mem Card Pert T3200SX 

4MB Mem. Card Port. T3200SX 

2MB Mom Card Pirt T1200XE 

IMBMemCartPorl-TiaOOSE; 

T10OOXE 

2WB Mem Carti Port. T1000SE; 

TIOOOXE 

2MB Mem Card Port T3I00SX 



NEC MEMORY 



Cit.« 



DESCRIPTION 



APCH655X 2MB Mod Powermate 386/25 45800 

APCHS66X SMB Eipanson Bd. Powwmale 38625 1,190.00 
APCH657X SMB Base M PoKamule 38&25 1^50 00 
APCH850E 1MB Ejpartsion Bd. Powemiale SX PLs 240.00 
APCH862E 4Me Eliatsoo Bd. Powormato SX Plus E90 00 
PC21-2I 1MB CD PfoSpead 2a6;3e6SX 245.00 

PC21-22 4Ma CD PniSpeod 2e6;386SX 569.00 

PC21-26 2M9 CO Pi^Speed 2e6;3B6SX 309.00 

PC3t.21 2M8 CO ProSpeed 386 3;9,KI 

PC3I-22 8MB CD PfoSpeed 386 1.190,00 

KI>J20Ofl«X 2WB EnJ. Bd. Poweimate SX Pto 440.00 
KrN8000«X aW8 Eip. Bd. Ponormate SX Plus 1,190,00 



irH:|;lJ:IL'hJ:li',T??T;T-n 



Cat.f 



WORKS WITH 



NSI 



H33474B 

H33475a 

H33477B 

H334438 

H33444a 

H33445a 

EP1000 

EP2000 

EP4000 

11 1000 

TBtOOO 

TE2000 

TB3000 

TE4000 

1039136 

1039137 

1038675 

M600S 

MOXK 

S63-1300 

S63-1B80 

^i'A 

PAlOCfl 

PA20O0 

PA3000 

PA4000 



1MB 
2MB 
<MB 
1MB 
2MB 
4MB 
1MB 
2MB 
4M3 
IMB 

1MB 

2M3 

SMB 

4MB 

1MB 

2MB 

3.5Me 

lUB 

4MB 

1MB 

2Ma 

4MB 

IMS 

2Ma 

3Ma 



HPLaser Jet IIP,II(. HID 


99.95 


HPLaser Jet IIP.III. HID 


139.95 


HPLasef Jet IIP.III, HID 


214.95 


HPLaser Jel in IID 


99.95 


HPlaserJetllillO 


139.95 


K^LaserJellli 110 


214.95 


Epson EPL-6000 


129.00 


Epson EPL -6000 


169.00 


Epson EPL-6000 


249.00 


Taias InsUument 


129.00 


McJoLaser PS 




Toshiba Pago Laser 6 


118.00 


Toshitia Pago Laser 6 


164.00 


Toshiba Pago Laser 6 


208.00 


Toshiba Page Laser 6 


248,00 


IBM Laser 4019;4019E 


129.00 


IBM Laser 40I9:MQ19E 


169-00 


IBM Laser 4015.4019E 


229,00 


Apple LaserWriter ll/hnX 


85.00 


Apple LaserWriter ll/STO 


319.00 


Canon LBP-8II 


119.00 


Canon LBP-SII 


189.00 


Canon LBP-SII 


269.00 


Panasonic KXP4420; 


118K1 


KXP4450I 




Panasonic KXP4420; 


164,00 


KXP4450i 




Panasonic KXP4420; 


208.00 


KXP4450 




Panasonic KXP4420; 


248.00 



SIMM MODULES 



120 100 



COMPAQ MEMORY 



DESCRIPTIOH 



NSI 



22B0O 
168,00 
162,00 
120,01 
168,00 
168.00 

168.00 
389.00 
168.00 
218.00 

276.00 

(62-00 



NSI 



107331-001 S12KB Upgrade Portabte (II 38.00 

107332-001 2MB Upgrade Portals III 1!800 

107651-001 1MB Module Portable 386 21800 

107653-001 4Ma Xpand Mom. Portable 386 630.00 

107654-001 4MB Mem. Xtonson Portable 386 630 00 

108063«I1 IMBXfand Memory DP386-16 28800 

108O7O«lt 4MB Xpand Memory □P38e-16 63000 

108071-001 1MB Ktemory Upgrade DP386-16 108 00 

108072.001 4MaMsn«iy Upgrade DP386-16 438.00 

110235^01 1MB Men»ry BD SB 286 16200 

1ID237-X1 4WB Memory BD Sit 286 63000 

112534-001 4M3 Module DP386S-16 23800 

113131-001 1 we Module DP386286E, 386 20-2iE 9600 

113132-001 4MB Module DP2Ba6£, 386 20-25E 22800 

113633-001 IMBXpandMom, DP386S-16 14800 

1 1 3634-001 4WB Xpand Mem. DP386S-1 6 358 00 

113644-001 1MB Xpand Mem. DP38620E,2SE 14800 

113645-001 4MB Xpand Mem. DPSae 20E, 25E 358 00 

113646^X11 1MBWxluleDP33€S-16 11000 

115144-001 1MB ModuteDP3e6-33. 486-25, Sy^ro 15800 

116561-001 8Ma (Aldule 486-25, Syspro 89900 

116568-001 32MB »A)dule DP4S625, Syspro 4,99000 

117077-001 512KB Mem, BO PortijWLTE 11900 

117031-001 IMBMenvBDPonatJe LTE2S6 9900 

117081-002 2MaMen»ryBOPortab)eLTi28« 153.00 

118304-001 IMS Module tor SLT/386 17400 

118304-001 2MB Modulo lor SLT/386 270.00 

1ie305^XM 4MB Modulo for SLT/3a6 63000 

1)6688-001 1 MB Module DP286N,386N 9000 

118689-001 2MB Module 0P386N. 3663-20 16800 

118690-001 4MB Module DP2a6N. 386N, 3S6S-20 39600 

118700-001 0-(MS Exp BD DPJoGN. 386N 1O80O 



i\M:Um 



RESEARCH 



BOCARAM/XT— Provides up to 2W8 of eipanded memory 
for 8 bit bus. Operates up to 1 2 MHz. Uses 256K 0-f!AM- 

wilh OK S120.00 

vtilh 512K 139.00 

Mill 2M8 199.00 

BOCARAM/AT RUS-Pnsvides up lo SMB of oitendsdl 
etpaoded or baddiH memny. Operates up lo 33MHz and is 
sset thru software. Uses 256K D-RAM— 

»ilh OK $109.00 wlh 4MB $289.00 

milh 2MB 199.00 wilh SMB 459.00 

BOCARAU/AT-l'O PLUS-Provides up to 4Ma o( Xlended. 
Xpanded or badrfiD memory. For 16 til tjus. Operates up lo 33 
MHz and is sel thru sodwa/e. has serial and parallel port. Uses 

1MB DRAM- ivilh OK S149.0O 

Mlh 2MB 239,00 

BOCARAM 30— Provides up la 2MB m espanded nwmorv 
lot IBM PS/2 model 25, M and e-W b(« irilano 3.5' Hooov 
risks. Uses 256K D-RAM- 

wlh OK S109-00 

wth 2MB 199.00 

BOCARAM 50/eO-Provides up lo 4MB expanded, extended 
or baddill memory lor PSr2 model 50, SO. Uses 1 MS D-RAM- 

wth OK S119.00 

»ilh 2MB 209.00 

with 4MB _ 299.00 

BOCARAM SOZ-Pmvides up lo 2MB, wait stale, 
expanded or eirlerided memory for IBM, PS/2 model 50, 50Z, 
60. Uses 11MBD-RAM- 

wilh OK ™ $99.00 

*i1h 2MB 18S.0O 



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49MB 28ms 3.5" 
42MB 2Sas HH 
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122MB 2flms VA 
44MB Kms 3.5" 
84MB sons HH 
1»MB20rrem 
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211MB 15ciB 3.5' 
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33SMB16!iftsHH 
94UB IBms HH 
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XT423M ESDI) 203UB16msFH 1.129.00 

)a43a0E (ESDI) 338WB16msFH 1,240.00 

XT6380E (ESDI) 3G0MB14msFH 1,285.00 

XTS76(!£ lESDI) 676MB ISms FH 1,865.00 

805! A (IDE) 42WB28ma3.5* 279.00 

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CONTROLLER CARDS 



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Most MS-DOS machines and turbo 
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Cat t BOX387SX-16 $159.00 

80287 Math coPmcessor 

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spedally designed <or tha s£7XLT) Up to 5(7% lasler than 
previous Intel 287 Math Co-Processors. 

80287 XL $99.00 

80287-1 MHz $89.00 

80287-8 MHl $6900 

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CompuAdd 810, 
Cat » BOX8087-1 , $99 00 

8087-2 

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runring et BMKz or less, Including the IBM PS^ Model 30 
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lunring at SMHi or less, induiding the ISM PC, XT, and 
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Wb buy and sell excess inventories..call or lax list. 
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PATHWAYS 



Steven Anzovin 



'Twas briHig, and the slilhy toves 
Did gyre and gimble in the wabe: 
Ail mimsy v/ere tlie borogoves 
And the mome ralhs outgrabe. 

Those lines from Lewis Car- 
roll's "Jabberwocky" may not 
sound like the future of com- 
puting to you, but if you listen 
closely, you can fiear them in 
all the talk about VR {Virtual Re- 
ality}, perhaps the ultimate 
computer buzzconcept. 

The whole idea of VR, 
which we'll define here as "a 
computer-generated simula- 
tion of real experience," has 
given birth to a staggering 
amount of verbal goulash, 
much of which makes "Jabber- 
wocky" sound sensible. 

Virtual reality, artificial reality, 
synthetic reality, cyberspace, 
cyberarts, multimedia, hyperme- 
dia, or whatever it is — you 
know there's some basic con- 
fusion here when the experts 
can't agree on what to call it — 
is hot stuff right now. 

It's attracting plenty of 
press, including this maga- 
zine, and the attention of 
some big players in the indus- 
try — Autodesk, Apple, IBfVl, 
Microsoft, VPL Research, 
Evans & Sutherland, and 
many more. But since re- 
searchers really don't know 
what they're doing yet, VR 
stuff tends to stay in the labs. 
In fact, most of it's just theoriz- 
ing — virtual VR, so to speak. 

Not much VR has filtered 
down to the real-world level — 
a few pieces of hardware, like 
the Gold Brick for the Mac, 
and some innovative software 
like Vista for the Amiga. You 
have to look in the journals 
and attend the conferences to 
get a real sense of where VR 
research is headed. 

Writing in last year's sum- 
mer issue of Multimedia Re- 
view, Randal Walser, manager 
of the Autodesk Cyberspace 
project, outlined a VR world sys- 



tem that involves a puppet (a 
virtual actor in the virtual 
world} controlled by a patron 
(a real person in the real 
world). This puppetmaster par- 
adigm leaves me cold — too 
schizophrenic. Remember the 
"Twilight Zone" episode in 
which the evil dummy takes 
over the ventriloquist? 

I go for the virtual telepre- 
sence model espoused by 
Scott Fisher, formerly of the NA- 
SA Ames Research Center, In 
this concept you can take on 
an entirely different identity 
(someone rich and famous, for 
example) and interact with oth- 
ers in their virtual identities. In 
other words, instead of just 
watching 'Star Trek," you can 
be in it. As you can see, con- 
ceptualizing about VR is still at 
the infotainment level. 

Some thinkers warn us to 
ground our virtual realities in 
some aspect of true reality, 
lest we lose our way in them. 
(Maybe it's the VR theorists 
who have lost touch with reali- 
ty,) While mora! and ethical 
questions don't come up often 
in mainstream VR research, 
VR does have its own Moses, 

At the last Virtual Reality Con- 
ference held in San Francisco 
in December 1990, Professor 
Michael Benedikt of the Univer- 




sity of Texas brought down 
from the mountain seven com- 
mandments for the design of vir- 
tual realities, including: 

• The world is indifferent to 
the user. 

• One may not enter a space 
invisibly. 

• Shared spaces exist by 
the consensus of those 
sharing them. 

It seems that Benedikt's main 
concern is to prevent cyber- 
spatial voyeurism. That takes 
all the fun out of it for me. but 
my personal favorite is, "Each 
world contains fewer dimen- 
sions than itself." Think about 
that for a minute. 

The academic approach to 
VR, however, is not for every- 
one. The really interesting ac- 
tion is elsewhere. For a look at 
the outlaw fringe of VR — as 
well as other bizarre manifes- 
tations of the electronic age — 
check out Mondo 2000 mag- 
azine (RO. Box 10171, Berke- 
ley, California 94709}. 

Self-described as a "mutaz- 
ine" for cyberpunks, hackers, 
crackers, and wild-eyed vision- 
aries. Mondo 2000 is kind of 
a blend of Interview, Motiier 
Jones, Shaman's Drum, and 
New Media Age. It covers eve- 
rything from weird electronic 
conspiracies — if you believe 
the letters to the editor, there 
are a lot of them out there — 
to the latest trends in drug- 
free expansion of the senses. 

The race for VR (as Mondo 
2000 likes to call it) is fascinat- 
ing to follow, and the VR toys 
are fun to play with, but you re- 
ally have to wonder, why are 
we so anxious to escape into al- 
ternate realities? And given the 
state of the real world, what 
makes us think the virtual 
worlds we create will be any 
better than the real thing? 

Such questions make me a 
bit anxious about the "frabjous 
day" when VR is — you'll ex- 
cuse me — a reality. O 

OCTOBER 1991 



What makes us 
think the 
virtual worlds we 
create will be 
any better than the 
reai thinn? 



COMPUTE 97 



w^^'^^ 




.Tie ^^•-■.v^>^y wgvv?jy7wt^ 



y^- "~^.St 









Ni-r^'«; 



'-„,-i!: 



PART 







■ USE YOUR 
PC FOR INTELLIGENT 
HOME SECURITY 

TURN A 



M 



BYHOWARDMILLMAN 
PHOTOGRAPHY BY MARK WAGONER 




1 ■ f ant to make a computer hap- 
IJIf py? Give it something to do 
Uyover and over again. Let it 
W Wcheck a window several times a 
second to see if it's been forced open, 
or take indoor and outdoor tempera- 
tures and constantly adjust the heat ac- 
cordingly, or "look" to see if someone's 
entered a room and then turn on the 
lights if it's after 7:00 p.m. These are typ- 
ical activities in a computer-controlled 
Smart House. 

In 1984, the National Association of 
Home Builders (NAHB), vi/ho coined 
the term Smart House, developed the 
idea of a computer-controlled home — 
whether a house, condominium, or 
apartment — that would allow owners to 
spend more time pursuing life's re- 
wards and less time performing routine 
household tasks. The result of that idea 
is a 40-million-dollar prototype the 
NAHB hopes will evolve into an indus- 
try standard. 

In the meantime, the Electronic Indus- 
tries Association (EIA) is already promot- 
ing a competing standard; the Consum- 
er Electronics Bus, or CEBus. The pri- 
mary difference between NAHB's 
Smart [House and ElA's CEBus is that 
the Smart House uses a central comput- 
er, while the CEBus requires individual 
devices to have on-board inteiligence 
and computers to exchange data with 
each other through a common lan- 
guage. Generally the NAHB standard 
appears well suited to control equip- 
ment and processes while the CE- 
Bus delivers greater versatility in 
controlling appliances. 

In addition to NAHB and CEBus, ex- 
isting standards such as X-10 are also 



clamoring for a piece of this quickly 
expanding market. X-10 devices are 
popular because they use the home's 
existing electrical wiring to carry a 
superimposed signal that controls 
lights and appliances. However, a ma- 
jor problem with X-10 is that because 
they're line-carrier devices, line voltage 
electrical noise sometimes falsely 
triggers wired-in appliances, 

A Low-Cost High-IQ 
Security System 

The computer-in-residence system de- 
signed by COMPUTE uses a central 
computer for two reasons: It involves a 
lower initial cost, and it's easier to ret- 
rofit into an existing building, which 
makes it a good system to use as a 
model for your own smart house. 

COMPUTE'S system consists of four 
elements: sensors to sample physical 
events such as temperature, light, 
sound, motion, and heat; analog/digital 
cards to convert data received from 
the sensors into digital form so the com- 
puter can understand it; a personal 
computer with compatible control soft- 
ware to analyze and act on the data it 
receives; and a series of relays to con- 
trol different pieces of equipment, proc- 
esses, and appliances. Since many da- 
ta-acquisition and control (DA&C) func- 
tions are time based, your computer 
should contain a battery-backed clock 
and calendar, 

This may all sound expensive, but in 
fact, you can assemble it for less than 
S600 if you already have a PC. In fact, 
if you have an old XT collecting dust 
in the closet, that's the one you 
should use. Control software that 



BASE SYSTEM SUPPLIES 



SI 42 
$142 
S 69 
$ 34 
S 12 



Alpha RE-140 eight-relay output card 

Alpha AD-142 eight-channel analog/digital input card 

Alpha AR-133 PC bus adapter 

Alpha CA-162 ribbon cable for two cards 

Alpha PS- 126 12-V power supply 

Alpha offers a special package for $379 that Includes these components as well as 
its CD-113 light sensor and TS-111 temperature sensor, which you'll learn about in 
January's COMPUTE. 

ALARM SYSTEM SUPPLIES 

Radio Shack 49-488 internal/external 12-V siren $19.95 

Radio Shack 49-495 surface-mount magnetic contact S 3.59 

Radio Shack 49-496 magnetic contact for concealed mounting $ 3.99 

Radio Shack 49-521 glass-break sensor $ 3.95 

Radio Shack 49-531 passive infrared detector $59.95 

Radio Shack 278-777 double-shielded cable for analog inputs $ 7.95 
Radio Shack 278-874 six-conductor telephone station wire tor digital 

inputs and ali low-vottage outputs $14.99 
Radio Shack 278-1440 100-foot SPT-2 IB-gauge lamp cord for interior 

120-V circuits (use weatherproof cable for exterior locations) $21.95 

Radio Shack 22-127 120-V AC/2-V DC power supply $26.95 



operates the security system is written 
in BASIC and will run under BASICA 
or GW-BASIC on essentially any PC, 
including older ones (see Program- 
ming Your Smart House below). 

The first task you'll want to assign 
your computer is providing perimeter se- 
curity According to a recent U.S. Jus- 
tice Department survey burglaries are 
four times more likely to occur in 
homes without intrusion alarms. In ad- 
dition to your improved peace of mind 
and the property protection, an added 
bonus to having a system is that some 
insurance companies provide premium 
reductions for homes protected by se- 
curity systems, Be sure to check with 
your insurance company to find out if 
you're eligible for such a premium. You 
may want to switch carriers if not. 

At some time or another, most any 
alarm system is going to inconven- 
ience you — and your neighbors — to 
some degree, usually in the form of nui- 
sance alarms. A major reason for nui- 
sance alarms is dumb alarm systems 
that "think" every occurrence warrants 
an all-hands alert. Such systems are 
usually activated by a solitary event. 

Conversely a smart alarm system 
will compare data received from its dif- 
ferent sources to determine if a verifia- 
ble alarm condition exists. The system 
we've designed here employs two sen- 
sor circuits. Circuit 3 on the analog/ 
digital board you'll use monitors win- 
dows and doors with magnetic con- 
tacts; circuit 4 uses a low-cost passive 
infrared detector. When the two data- 
reporting sources independently con- 
firm activity, the alarm will sound. 

While you'll design in some safe- 
guards, you should also recognize 
that excessive caution is undesirable. 
Too many precautions mean an overen- 
cumbered alarm system may not oper- 
ate when it should. 

PLEASE NOTE: THE FOLLOWING 
SECTION INVOLVES WIRING YOUR 
SYSTEM TO DANGEROUS HOUSE- 
HOLD ELECTRICAL CIRCUITS. UN- 
LESS YOU ARE EXPERIENCED WITH 
HOUSE-HOLD CIRCUITS. LEAVE ALL 
HIGH-VOLTAGE WIRING TO A 
LICENSED PROFESSIONAL. 

Installing the Smart 
Security System 

The first step of installing the system 
is to define the areas of your home 
you want to include. Depending on the 
number and type of sensors you 
choose, the cost of your alarm system 
components should only total between 
$20 and S150. 

Your computer's interface will re- 
main the same for all installations. Al- 
pha Products' DA&C cards are recom- 



100 COMPUTE OCTOBER 1991 




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HOMEBOT 



Samsung's SCOUT-ABOUT may not be 
R2D2, but it's tlie closest thing yet to a 
personal droid— particularly if you're tooth- 
ing for a convenient way to guard your 
home and, according to its makers, if 
you're on a budget. The robot will sell for 
less than $1,000 when it arrives in 
stores and catalogs next February 

The SCOUT-ABOUT is what Samsung 
calls a home service robot, but its main 
function is to guard your personal prop- 
erty. It will roam any area of your home 
for up to 50 hours al a time, making its 
way around objects over two inches 
high, stopping to check out Itie condi- 
tions of the area it patrols. Using a dual- 
detection ultrasonic and passive infrared 
sensory system, the SCOUT-ABOUT 
alerts an automatic digital dialer by way 
of radio signals if it detects body heat, 
motion, a consistent change in air tem- 
perature, or shattering glass. 

If it isn't convenient for the robot to 
roam, you can plug it into a wall socket 
where it acts as a stationary monitor. Run- 
ning on batteries alone, it will monitor 
from an idle position for about 70 hours 
before needing a recharge. 

The robot is perfect for apart- 
ments, condominiums, vacation homes, 
small businesses, or any other place 
needing effective intruder security that's 



simpie to implement. And at under 16 
pounds, it's portabie enough to use in au- 
tomobiles, boats, and campers. 

Since SCOUT-ABOUT is equipped 
with a radio transmitter, it can act as a 
one-way monitor for the baby's room, al- 
lowing you to hear everything within 150 
feet of the robot. The SCOUT-ABOUT 
package also includes a medical alert 
pendant with a button that directiy acti- 




vates the autodialer. So if you've fallen 
and can't get up, the SCOUT-ABOUT 
may not come to your rescue, but the 
autodialer will. 

For $1,000, you can assemble a 
much more elaborate security system 
than the SCOUT-ABOUT— one that mon- 
itors your entire house. Robots won't 
roam your house, but you'll be secure. 
—JILL CHAMPION 



mended for their excellent quality, 
ease of use, availability, and competi- 
tive prices, and because Alpha's con- 
trol software, SMART1, is included 
free of charge with orders. However, 
you should certainly feel free to shop 
around for what you consider tine best 
components and prices. 

One recommended card is Alpha's 
AR-133 PC bus adapter, which plugs in- 
to any available 8- or 16-bit expansion 
slot of a PC. Also, Alphia makes a CA- 
162 ribbon cable, which contains two 
connectors that accept the RE-140 
eight-relay output card and [he AO- 
142 eight-cfiannel analog/digital input 
card, which you'll use, 

Circuit 3 on the Alpha AD-142 uses 
magnetic contacts to detect open 
doors and windows. For surface- 
mount contacts. Radio Shack's 49-495 
surface-mount magnetic contact 
works well. For concealed mounting, 
use Radio Shack's model 49-496 con- 
tact. Although circuit 3 appears to 
have only two sensors, it will accommo- 
date many more, including a glass- 
break sensor such as Radio Shack's 
model 49-521 . Circuit 4 uses a passive 
infrared detector, such as Radio 
Shack's model 49-531, to confirm an in- 
truder's entry. 

Install the sensors in series so that 
power flows through each one. Since 
this is normally a closed system, an 
alarm condition exists if any one sen- 

102 COMPUTE OCTOBER 1991 



sor "opens." You can install multiple de- 
tectors (in the same or different areas) 
by wiring them into a series circuit. 

The RE-140 card, mentioned earlier, 
governs the output — flashing lights and 
a siren. Wire the flashing-light circuit to 
120-volt output on the RE-140 card. 

Connect the siren to low-voltage out- 
put 7 on the RE-140. For the external si- 
ren alarm, use Radio Shack's 12-volt 
model 49-488 or an equivalent model. 

Wires for low voltage (outputs 4, 5, 
and 6) on the RE-140 can be 24 
gauge. Use a minimum three-pair ca- 
ble to allow for future expansion and 
spares. Wiring between the 120-volt out- 
puts to the light or lights must be at 
least 16 gauge and rated for 120-volt 
service. Be sure to install a snubber cir- 
cuit here, or make sure your electrician 
installs it, to protect the relay's points 
against arcing and to protect the com- 
puter against stray signals. 

Programming Your Smart House 

You must have the right software to op- 
erate any computer-based security sys- 
tem. You can order a free copy of Al- 
pha's GW-BASIC control software, 
SMART!, when you buy Alpha compo- 
nents. Data Systems Services also of- 
fers an easy-to-use, menu-driven BA- 
SIC program for $134. Both companies 
are listed in the product information 
box at the end of this article. 
Your basic security alarm system 



should now be complete. That's all 
there is to it. In January's issue 
of COMPUTE, you'll learn how to ex- 
pand the base system you just set up 
to include two more elements of intelli- 
gent home security — temperature con- 
trol and lighting management. 

Your March issue of COMPUTE w\\ 
conclude the smart house series. 
There, you'll learn about sophisticated 
applications that range from using re- 
mote control to operate your applianc- 
es by telephone to transmitting realtime 
still video images over ordinary tele- 
phone lines to using infrared as well as 
direct-voice command of your comput- 
er's control programming. D 

This compuler-in-residence system is designed to 
be installed by you. If you're not familiar with 120- 
volt circuits, or if your local building cedes prevent 
you from installing line-voltage wiring, have a li- 
censed contractor install the wiring to the lights. 



PRODUCT INFORMATION 

For more informalion about buying 
security-system components and con- 
trot software, contact the following 
companies, Radio Shack products 
can be purchased through a local Ra- 
dio Shack store. 

Alpha Products 

303 Linwood Ave. 
Fairfield, CT 06430 
(800)221-0916 
(203) 259-8813 

B&B Electronics 

4000 Baker Rd. 
Ottawa. IL 61350 
(815) 434-0846 

Data System Services 

38 Amber Dr. 
Croton, NY 10520 
(914)271-6883 

Electronic Energy Control 

380 S, Fifth St, 
Columbus, OH 43215 
(800) 842-7714 

Real Time Devices 

820 N. University Dr. 
P.O. Box 906 
State College, PA 16804 
(814) 234-8087 

You're encouraged to request home 
automation catalogs from the follow- 
ing companies, which carry a fascinat- 
ing assortment of equipment and de- 
vices to control practically every ap- 
pliance and process in your home. 

Heath Company 

P.O. Box 1288 
Harbor, Ivll 49023 
(800) 444-3284 

Home Automation Laboratories 

5500 Highlands Pkwy., Ste. 450 
Atlanta, GA 30082 
(800) 445-9605 
(404)319-6000 



THE ULT 



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tkJ. 



Congratulations - it's 1995 and you've been selected for the hottest seat 
in helicopter history: the cockpit of the Pentagon's new AH-73M 4. 

Thunderhawk™. So zip up your flight suit, adjust your sunglasses, and J|| 
control your nerves 'cause this one makes Nam Jk 

look like a day at the beach! AH-73M ^ 

Thunderhawk is the most advanced 
helicopter combat simulation 
ever brought to 
the computer _^ 
screen. ^- 



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Available soon for IBM and Amiga. 
Thunderhawk is a trademark of 
Virgin Games, Inc. 
Virgin is a registered trademark of' 
Virgin Enterprises. Ltd. i' 

©1991 Virgin Games and ' 

Core Design. All rights reserved. ' 
Virgin Games, Inc. 1S061 Fitch A^ 
Irvine. CA 92714 1(80O]VRG-INO7l 



K^^iteedi^ 119^ 







Thunderhawk "soars above 
the rest with these 
features: 



c^jiasxsa*-' 1 f^- 



A helicopter armed with ti 

^' tin weaponry, 
Electronic countermeasures, 
functioning displays and 
'computer-aided targeting 
systems. if 

Realistic missions involving 

^actual military conflicts and 

contingency plans. p 

/A^rue interactive "world- 
outside your cockpit, with 
other locations and 

-^characters that respond to 
your actions. 

Campaign scenarios with 



FAST FORWARD 



David English 



Asymetrix's 

ToolBook 1.5 was 

lust one ol 

the new moltlmedla 

products 

shown at COMDEX. 



WE'RE OFF TO 
SEE THE WIZARD 

They call it Hot 'Lanta. It's the 
home of Ted Turner, a movie 
theater that only runs Gone 
with the Wind, and Spring 
COMDEX, the massive comput- 
er trade show. In past years, 
COMDEX has been a hard- 
ware show, but this year the 
organizers added WINDOWS 
WORLD, a Wndowsshow-with- 
in-a-shov>/. Guess where the 
biggest crowds were. That's 
right — most of the attendees 
spent most of their time check- 




enough, Upgrade Kits). If you 
choose the upgrade path, 
you'll generally get the Win- 
dows multimedia extensions. 
a CD-ROM player, and a 
sound card. 

Not surprisingly, the two big- 
gest PC manufacturers were 
busy showing off their soon-to- 
be-released Multimedia PCs 
and Upgrade Kits. IBM is offer- 
ing two Upgrade Kits that can 
transform a PS/2 into either a 
Training System or an Informa- 
tion Delivery System (more 
product names for lawyers). A 
Training System is a 386- 
based PS/2 that includes a 
VGA monitor, 
a laser disc 
player, and 
IBM's M-Mo- 
tion sound 
card, as well 
as support for 
touch input. 
An Information 



Untf ti4ite ^Wtwey l^rnb iMriTtci \iivi\wi 
ttmrntrntni stiDulit he Il'mllf'dlt>!tii!'1'cltawi(i9 
— dtlii^cildniiiiy: 



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104 



ing out the latest offerings in 
Windows programs. 

Within WINDOWS WORLD, 
you could find a seclion de- 
voted to l/lZ/ndoi-vs-based mul- 
timedia products (sort of a 
show-within-a-show-within-a- 
show). Microsoft was touting 
the imminent release of Micro- 
soft Windows graphical en viron- 
ment 3.0 + Multimedia Exten- 
sions 1.0- That's the official 
name for what Microsoft used 
to call Multimedia Windows. 
It's a name only a lawyer could 
love and journalists and com- 
puter users will quickly come to 
hale. According to Microsoft, 
the official informal name is Win- 
dows with Multimedia. 

Whatever you call it, it 
should be available by the 
time you read this, either in the 
form of new PCs (officially 
called Multimedia PCs) or up- 
grade kits (called, oddly 

COMPUTE OCTOBER 1991 



I 



Delivery Sys- 
tem is a 286- 
based PS/2 
with VGA 

graphics, a 
CD-ROM, and 
an 8-bit sound card. 

Tandy the other big PC man- 
ufacturer, announced three 
Multimedia PCs— a 16-MHz 
80286. a 20-MH2 80386SX, 
and a 16-MHz 80386DX, All 
three include an internal CD- 
ROM drive, Tandy's multime- 
dia sound board {with full MIDI 
support and Sound Blaster 
compatibility), and a VGA 
Plus video card and monitor 
(for a resolution of 640 x 480 
with 256 colors). Tandy's Up- 
grade Kits include Windov/s 
with Multimedia, a CD-ROM 
drive, and Tandy's multimedia 
sound board. The kits sell for 
$799.95 (with an internal CD- 
ROM drive) and $899.95 (with 
an external CD-ROM drive). 
By the way Tandy's new inter- 
nal CD-ROM drive is a real bar- 
gain at $399.95, and it fully 
nneets the Microsoft multime- 
dia specifications. 



Turtie Beach Systems 
showed its new 16-bit sound 
card, called MultiSound, 
which provides CD-quality 
sound for S995. With a top- 
selling Proteus synthesizer 
built into the card, this repre- 
sents a truly significant price 
breakthrough for adding pro- 
fessional-quality sound to Win- 
dows applications. 

In software. Passport De- 
signs announced that its latest 
version of Master Tracks Pro 
(S395.00) supports Windows 
with Multimedia. It's currently 
the top Windows-based MIDI- 
sequencer program, but ex- 
pect one of the major Macin- 
tosh MIDI-software develop- 
ers to announce a competing 
Windows product real soon 
now. Brown-Waugh showed 
its new Cyber Animator 
(S199.95), a low-cost Auto- 
desk Animator competitor 
that can read Animator FLI 
files. You can have individual 
animation frames trigger 
sound effects that play 
through a Sound Blaster, 

Asymetrix demonstrated a 
faster version of roo/6oo/( (ver- 
sion 1 .5, $395). It displays ob- 
jects on the screen 30-40 per- 
cent faster than before. A spe- 
cial multimedia version of Tool- 
Book should be available by 
the time you read this. And U- 
Lead wowed the crowd with 
its new PhotoStyler (S795). a 
slick new image-processing 
program that's similar to Ado- 
be Photoshop and ColorStu- 
dio on the Macintosh. It's the 
first serious 24-bit-coior photo- 
editing program for tlie PC. 
More are on the way 

The rest of the new multime- 
dia hardware and software 
will have to wait for future 
columns. Spring COMDEX 
proved that multimedia isn't all 
smoke and mirrors. These are 
real products that can turn 
frustrated nonprogrammers 
(or tinkering weekend program- 
mers) into professional-level 
multimedia wizards. D 



MORE 
MORE 






nights, however, are a different story! 

ERNIE IS BACK! 

Welcome to Speikasting 201: The Sorcerer's Appliance. 
Ernie Eaglebeak is back, at Sorcerer University for his 
sophomore year and he wants to join a fraternity. No 
problem, except for those quaint, harmless initiation 
rituals known collectively as. , . HELL WEEK! 

RETURN TO ANIMAL HOUSE 

Every night, in a mysterious chamber below the fraternity 
house, a vindictive pledgemasterdons a ceremonial chicken 
suit and burdens Ernie with a series of ridiculously impos 
sible hazing tasks. Fortunately, Ernie knows where to 
get help. He creates it! 

A TALE OF HIGH EDUCATION AND LOW MORALS 

Harnessing the powers of the mysterious Sorcerer's 
Appliance, Ernie creates a woman. Meet Eve. (It's only 
been done once before, and that time it cost the guy a 
rib). Eve is the ideal woman. Well, maybe not ideal, but 
certainly entertaining. 



PBLEGEND 

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MORE BREWSKIS. 
JOKES. 

Ah, college life! Tree- WE HOPE YOU'VE DONE YOUR HOMEWORK 

Join Ernie and Eve in this hilarious romp through the 
bedrooms, turrets, and tunnels of both Sorcerer Univer- 
sity and nearby Barmaid U (where grading on a curve 
takes on a whole new meaning). To pass this course 
you'll need to cast ridiculous spells, solve ribald puzzles 
and "interact" with gorgeous women. Any questions? We 
didn't think so. Class dismissed. 



lined walks. Hushed 
study halls, hy- 
covered professors. 
The days are filled 
with the quiet pursuit 
of knowledge. The 



From the scandalous imagination of Steve Meretzky, 
Speikasting 201 is the sequel to his award-winning hit, 
Speikasting 101: Sorcerers Get All Tiie Girls. These games 
may be considered unsuitable for young minds, as they 
contain material and situations that children have already 
seen in far greater detail on 
daytime television. Avail- 
able for MS-DOS and 
compatibles. 




SPELLCASTINOJ 

<lD@(g!l!E! 
APPLIAl 




w^^^ 



ENTERTAINMENT 



COMPUTE CHOICE. Ride herd over a passel 
of adorable—but shortsighted — 
rodents in this subterranean diversion. 

David Sears 



LEMMINGS 



106 



I feel driven to play Lem- 
mings, and it's not just 
for the entertainment val- 
ue. Perhaps Psygnosis 
has tapped into tfie hu- 
man instinct for survival in 
formulating this perfect 
blend of puzzle, strate- 
gy, and action, 

Better known for its 
less sedate titles that 
have you blasting every ob- 
ject that dares scroll past on 
a starscape, Psygnosis down- 
shifts here with surprising re- 
sults. Unlike most of its other 
games — unlike most games 
from any software house — Lem- 
mings doesn't exasperate. 
Though at times you'll be hard 
pressed to move all your lem- 
mings from point a to point b, 
you'll sense a solution to eve- 
ry level just around the corner, 
no matter how difficult the gam- 
ut of pitfalls appears. Nor 
does /.emm/ngs depend heav- 
ily on your manual dexterity. 
Don't expect to mistime the 
same segment of play over 
and over again. Sure, you'll 
plummet to your death a cou- 
ple of times, but you'll do bet- 
ter Your onscreen brothers de- 
pend on you. 

As the primary controller for 
all the characters in Lem- 
mings, you not only must plan 
a mass exodus from each per- 
ilous level but also must learn 
the personality traits of your 
charges. First and foremost, 
your cartoonish brethren 
need guidance because they 
possess the brainpower of 
common hamsters. Once the 
hatch opens in the ceiling of 
each cavernous level, lem- 
mings drop at an alarming 
rate. They amble forward in 
their baggy tunics, little green 
tufts of hair bouncing, until 
they smack into a wall or rocky 

COMPUTE OCTOBER 1991 




outcrop- 
ping, Then it's full re- 
verse and off in the op- 
posite direction until they en- 
counter a similar barrier. We 
might respect the little guys' 
determination; like most ro- 
dents, they'll pace back and 
forth, slamming into objects 
and swarming in a manner that 
renders them all but impervious 
to your selection and guidance 
of individual lemmings. If you 
have a task for a particular lem- 
ming to perform, you'd best as- 
sign the duty before you lose 
him in the crowd. 

To provoke a lemming to a 
specific action, position the 
crosshairs over the standard- 
issue lemming and click. De- 
pending on which attributes 
you've chosen on the icon 
bar, you've just designated a 
specialized worker, or hero, if 
you prefer. On the icon bar, 
you'll find what might seem a 
perplexing array of customiza- 
tion choices, but that confu- 
sion will fade fast. If you don't 
alter at least a few lemmings 
in each level, you won't see 
much of the quirky, exhilarat- 
ing, and torturous world that 



lemmings populate. Of 
course, they don't experience 
the apprehension of future lev- 
els as much as you might, 
since they see only the walls 
in front of them. 

Often you'll want to send a 
scout ahead to pave the way 
for the masses and to reveal 
the traps. To do this, let the 
first lemming out of the gate 
pass; then change the next 
lemming to a Blocker. He'll 
stand in the path of the oncom- 
ing gang with his hands up in 
defiance. The others will 
bump into him and rebound to- 
ward the gate. You might 
need to plant another Blocker 
to stem the tide in that direc- 
tion; pitfalls exist everywhere, 
and your entire crew could fall 
into a crevice, lost forever. 

Meanwhile, your intrepid 
explorer may encounter a verti- 
cal cliff, a column, or another 
sheer surface. Select the Climb- 
er icon and transfer that abili- 
ty to the explorer, and he'll 
clamber straight up. Should 



he face a fatal drop on the oth- 
er side of the mountain, acti- 
vate the Floater icon and trans- 
fer that safety feature to your 
trailblazer, and no matter how 
far the drop, he'll parachute se- 
renely down thanks to a trusty 
umbrella. Unlike most of the at- 
tributes you can imbue. Climb- 
ing and Floating have staying 
power. Until the lemming gift- 
ed with either or both of those 
powers dies or reaches the 
next level, he will retain those 
abilities. 

When your front runner 
clears the first mountain only 
to be stopped by a lava flow, 
do you worry? No, just add 
Builder to his list of talents, 
and he'll construct a bridge 
that will support any amount of 
pedestrian traffic. You can't 
use bridges for everything, 
though. Sometimes you'll 
have to tunnel horizontally, verti- 
cally, or diagonally through a 
piece of rock or other sub- 
stance. Lemmings supplies 
you with suitable iconic op- 
tions for surmounting these 
obstructions — Basher, Digger, 
and Miner, respectively. 
When excavating drones run 
out of material to displace, 
they revert to type and won't 
dig again unless you reassign 
them special abilities. 

With diligence, you'll guide 
the first of your lemmings out 
of the worst culs-de-sac and 
to the egress. There, he'll hap- 
pily bail out of the cavern, show- 
ing you the bottoms of his feet 
as he crawls up and over to 
safety. But what about the oth- 
ers? Up to 99 lemmings might 
have been involved in this sub- 
terranean peregrination, and 
we've left them back at the en- 
trance, bouncing off the walls 
and one stolid Blocker, Here 
Lemmings teaches the art of 
sacrifice. To finish the level, 
that Blocker — the one who's 



done such a commendable 
job deferring his brothers' 
date with destiny — well, he'll 
have to die. Choose Bomb 
and click on your poor, dutiful 
Blocker. A five-second count- 
down display begins over his 
head and stays there until the 
fateful explosion occurs. 

Don't expect remorse or 
gratitude from the rest of the 
group. For them, the Blocker 
just delayed progress. With 
their mindless intent to go plac- 
es, the surviving lemmings 
will troop over the crater left by 
their defunct comrade, 
through tunnels excavated by 
their long-gone nameless kin, 
and over bridges erected es- 
pecially for them. Rather like a 
civil servant, no lemming 
should expect thanks for a job 
well done; neither should you. 

Your reward for completing 
a level and orchestrating the 
actions of so many myopic, dis- 
affected jokers is a password; 
with it you can return to this 
point in the game without per- 
forming any sort of disk- 
based save-game procedure. 
You also merit the intense sat- 
isfaction that comes from sur- 
viving — even vicariously — the 
worst the world (or game de- 
signers) can throw at you. 

You'll have to play Lem- 
m/ngsfor the PC solo. The de- 
sign team left behind the two- 
player version offered for oth- 
er machines. Don't fret over 
that loss too much; the two- 
player game might seem 
more entertaining at first be- 
cause players can cooperate, 
but soon enough, they'll start 
killing off each other's lem- 
mings just because they can. 
Playing Lemmings on your 
own should provide adequate 
challenge and allow you to fo- 
cus on the real object of the 
game — saving as many lem- 
mings as possible. 




Though not the most graphi- 
cally detailed creatures, lem- 
mings animate flawlessly, and 
when they combust, explode, 
drown, or grind themselves in- 
to hamburger, you'll be quite 
aware of what they go 
through. With a sound card. 
Lemmings supplies a satisfac- 
tory array of thuds and chirps 
and — while not traditional 
Psygnosis disco by any 
stretch— a charming sound- 
track. 

Squint at Lemmings, and 
you'll see a number of meta- 
phors ideal for mention in the 
conversational circles of the 
sociologically minded. Draw 
comparisons between Lem- 
mings and the me-first. me- 
now generation; your friends 
who never piay computer 
games will marvel at your in- 
sight and wonder if they 
shouldn't buy a machine of 
their own. Mention the fun, too, 
of course — that sells more 
games than any amount of po- 
litical correctness, D 



IBM PC and 
compatibles, 51 2K 
RAM, CGA, EGA, 
VGA, or Tandy 16- 
CQlor; supports Ad 
Lib and Sound 
Blaster, supports 
mouse and 
joystick— $49.99 

Also available lor 
Amiga— $49.99 
and Atari ST— 
$49.99 

PSYGNOSIS 

29 St. Mary's Ct. 

Brookline, MA 

02146 

(617) 731-3553 



OCTOBER 1991 COMPUTE 107 



GAMEPLAY 



Orson Scott Card 



Prodigy, yoa've got 
a great tiling 

going. All yoo have 
to do to make 

it perfect is to teli 

your editors 

to lighten uii. 



CENSORING 
THE FUN OUT OF 
PRODIGY? 

A few columns back I talked 
about the online service Prod- 
igy. All the good things I said 
are still true: It stiti has the sim- 
plest interface I've seen for 
allowing complete novices to 
access everything the service 
offers, But in one area, at 
least, Prodigy has succumbed 
to the principle that guides far 
too many software compa- 
nies: "Do it my way, you poor 
ignorant user," 

Oddly, the area where Prodi- 
gy is blowing it in a big way is 
with one of its besi'itieas: edit- 
ing the bulletin boards. 

The bulletin boards are ma- 
jor sources for online entertain- 
ment, A witty few engage in 
scintillatmg conversation 
while others listen and think 
and occasionally interject com- 
ments of their own, It's the elec- 
tronic equivalent of the gener- 
al store. 

People often post "public 
conversation" that should 
have been private, so when 
you sign on, you have to 
wade through mountains of 




meaningless personal trivia. 
Prodigy had the right idea 
when it installed editors for the 
bulletin boards to weed out 
messages that ought to have 
been sent privately. When you 
browse through the board, 
you're given a menu of all the 
possible subjects and can 
take a look at any that seem 
interesting. You waste far less 
time trudging through things 
that don't interest you before 
getting to the things that do. 

Alas, there are problems, 

First, when Prodigy returns 
a message to you, its expla- 
nation is coid and impersonal 
and tells you almost nothing 
about why your message was 
deemed unworthy It can be 
frustrating when a message 
you spent time composing is 
rejected without an apology. 

Second, it has run into a 
standard problem with all ed- 
itors everywhere — Correction 
Anxiety Syndrome: The editor 
is reading along and hasn't cor- 
rected anything in a long time 
and gets more and more nerv- 
ous (what mistakes am I miss- 
ing?) until finally he starts cor- 
recting things that aren't 
wrong at all. When I talked to 
a Prodigy troubleshooter (a per- 
son without authority whose 
job is to listen patiently until 
the complainer feels better), I 
was told proudly, "After all, 
more than 26,000 messages 
have been posted." "Out of 
how many?" I asked. "More 
than 28,000," he said. 

Since Prodigy is rejecting al- 
most 8 percent of the mem- 
bers' postings, practically 
everyone is going to have a 
message rejected for every 
dozen postings. 

Third, its rules are too rigid. 
For instance, some users 
were playing games they had 
invented in the Writing topic of 
the Arts Club. Under subject 
headings like "12-Word Love 
Stories" and "3-Word Stories," 
they were inventing clever and 
resourceful phrases and sen- 



tences that implied whole nov- 
els of characters, relation- 
ships, and events; many were 
screamingly funny. 

Suddenly Prodigy wiped 
out the game, rejecting all new 
postings to those subjects. 
Why? Because the Writing top- 
ic was "not meant to be used 
for posting original literature," 

How absurd! These people 
weren't posting the stories 
and poems they meant to mail 
off to magazines. They were 
playing games together, and 
the games were killed be- 
cause the editors didn't under- 
stand them. 

Here you have an entertain- 
ment network that sells adver- 
tising time for public conversa- 
tions, many of which are won- 
derfully clever and entertain- 
ing and informative. 

Then, as if it entirely missed 
the point of its own enterprise. 
Prodigy hires people to step in- 
to the room and, with almost 
no understanding of what the 
conversation is about, say, 
"You've gotten off the subject. 
You'll have to talk about some- 
thing else." Or, "We never 
thought of anybody's using 
this topic this way so stop it," 

Prodigy, you've got a great 
thing going. All you have to do 
to make it perfect is to tell 
your editors to lighten up. 

Let your users create enter- 
tainment for themselves. 
Keep on rejecting the fru// pri- 
vate conversations, but let the 
rest of the messages through. 

If you don't, I'm afraid you'll 
find the best and most crea- 
tive of the conversational ists go- 
ing to some other service, and 
you'll soon find Prodigy — both 
the good and the bad — dead 
and buried, 

I hope other services are 
looking at what Prodigy is do- 
ing right, because if they 
learn the right lessons and 
avoid the "Do it my way" princi- 
ple, we will eagerly embrace 
those services the way we've 
tried to embrace Prodigy □ 



108 COMPUTE OCTOBER 1991 



"A UNIQUE MINDBOGGLINC CAME OF ADVENTURE. ROMANCE AND SALyATIONI" 




•'^"' >^-^^ 






PC COMPATIBLE 
AMIGA 
ATARI ST 
(COMING SOON) 
CDTV & MACINTOSH 



LEMMINGS 

from 







Available from your local 

dealer or call: (617) 739 7478 

PSYGNOSIS 

29 SAINT MARYS COUHT 

BROOKLINE MA 02146 



Amiga® & CDTV® are trademarks of Commodore Business Machines Inc. Atari ST® Is a trademark of the Atari Corp. Macmtosh^" is a trademark of Apple. 



Circle Reader Service Number IBS 



'<0\'AX>':>'^'--'''^'i''^'K:^'^X:i' 






PECIAITREPOR 



BY TOM NETSEL AisiD'>erER SCISCO 

This summer's Consumer 
Electronic Show 
had a little bit for 
everyone. 





BO JACKSON BASEBALL 




Complete view of all the action on the 
bases when you are at bat. 

circle Reader Service Number 165 

Bo Jackson Baseball: ® and TM 1991 
Data East USA, Inc. All rights reserved. 
Manufactured by Data East USA. Inc. 
under license from Tiger Electronics, Inc. 
IBI\fl PC is a registered trademarl< of IBM. 



Detailed, crisp graphics. 



More than 100 stats thai you can track 
on an authentic 162 game schedule. 



Data East USA, Inc., 

1850 Little Orchard St., 

SanJose,CA 95125 

(408) 286-7074 






Better sound, 

improved graphics 

and adventures, 

more creative play, 

and a host of 

roles are on the way 

with this year's 

crop ot consumer 

entertainment 

software and hardware. 



'hiie the rest of the 
'consumer electronics 
industry languishes in 
' recession, computer 
makers and software develop- 
ers are experiencing steady, 
if less than spectacular, 
growth. The thrills surround- 
ing the PC and videogame ex- 
hibits at the 1991 Internation- 
al Consumer Electronics 
Show in Chicago were bol- 
stered by advances in PC soft- 
ware entertainment and a 
new generation of videogame 
consoles. More than 250 com- 
panies that had never partici- 
pated in a Summer CES, in- 
cluding IBM, Wang Labs, 
Leading Edge, and Prodigy, 
picked up on the excitement 
Here's a preview of some of 
the products that are heading 
your way this fall. 

Accolade 

Who is kidnapping the big- 
gest stars in Hoilywood? To 
help you solve this sinister mys- 
tery, call in the man who 
found the world's greatest en- 
tertainer in Accolade's first 
graphic adventure. Search for 
the King, and now stars in the 
sequel, Les Manly In: Lost in 
LA. (S59.95). 

Mike Ditka Ultimate Foot- 
ball ($54.95) is the first foot- 
ball simulation to feature multi- 
angle player perspective, al- 
lowing computer coaches to 
view the action from any of 
four different viewing angles. 

In Elvira II: The Jaws of Cer- 
berus ($59.95) players must 



rescue Elvira from the ghastly 
Cerberus, a 60-foot tall, three- 
headed demon. See our 
Sneak Peel< of this game on 
page 121 in this issue. 

AdLib 

The competition among 
sound-card makers heats up 
with Ad Lib's announcement 
of its Gold Series. The Gold 
PC-1000 ($300} is a basic 
sound card for disk-based ap- 
plications that features a micro- 
phone jack and tabletop micro- 
phone, game and MIDI ports, 
and standard stereo input/out- 
put jacks. The Gold PC-2000 
($400) adds a SCSI interface 
for CD-ROfvl applications. The 
Gold MC-2000 (S500) is de- 
signed for the IBM PS/2 MCA 
bus. All of the cards carry 20 
channels of synthesized 
sound, 2 channels for sam- 
pled sound, stereo recording 
and playback, enhanced FM 
synthesis, 12-bit stereo digital- 
to-anaiog conversion and oth- 
er professional features, Orig- 
inally scheduled for a late sum- 
mer release. Ad Lib says chip 
shortages have delayed re- 
lease of the Gold Series until 
late fall at the earliest. 

Broderbund 

Game designer Chris 
Crawford is back with Patton 
Strikes Back ($59.95). This 
strategy game puts you in 
command of Allied or Axis 
troops during the Battle of the 
Bulge. This war game empha- 
sizes tactical thinking over 



weapons skills. It's packed 
with data and analysis. 

California Dreams 

Take over as leader of Po- 
land's workers union in Solidar- 
ity ($59,95) and attempt to 
lead the country to freedom in 
the face of tremendous Sovi- 
et military and economic pres- 
sures. Or, take the helm of a 
high-tech submarine in 
Wreck Hunters (price not avail- 
able at press time), the work- 
ing title of a new interactive 
game in which you search for 
sunken treasure. 

Data East 

Data East's latesi combat 
game is — get this — compati- 
ble with Novell networks. 
Guide a fleet of mechanized 
droids against an alien race 
that has practicaliy obliterat- 
ed humanity from the face of 
the planet. Operate scout, sup- 
ply, and soldier robots over a 
harsh landscape, A two-play- 
er mode allows for coopera- 
tive play against the mysteri- 
ous aliens, The network ver- 
sion will support from six to 
seven players. The stand- 
alone version of Ultrabots 
Sanction: Earth will ship to 
stores this month. The compa- 
ny expects to have the net- 
work version ready by late No- 
vember (just in time for that 
Christmas office party). The 
price wasn't available at 
press time. 

Data East's other introduc- 
tions included Battlefield 



112 COMPUTE OCTOBER 1991 



KEEP YOUR FRIENDS ON THE CUTTING EDGE OF 
COMPUTING WITH A GIFT 8UDSCRIPTI0N TO COMPUTE! 



Sl!'K'Ml|^J|)IT0{WK2L_^AHARPf iUN HiSTER 




J 




suMiyp 





Keep your friends up-to-date on the 
latest news, technologies, hardware, 
software and lots, lots more in tfie 
world of home office computing- 
Give them a holiday gift subscription 
to COMPUTE! 





Jem- 

The first 12 issue gift subscription you give 
is only $12.97 That's a savings of S22.43 
(63%) off the newsstand price. Each addi- 



tions! gift is only $9.97-a huge savings 
of $25.43 (71%). To include the COMPUTE 
Disk with a subscription, add an additional 
$30 per subscription. 

Use the coupon below to send us your 
gift list. As soon as we receive it well send 
you attractive gift cards you may use to 
announce your generous gifts to your friends. 



Every montii COMPUTE is published in 
four different editions, each with a special 
section devoted to a specific computer 
type... IBM & Compatibles, Amiga, 
Commodore 64/128 and the multi edition 
which includes all three special sections 
You choose the edition that will be best for 
your friends 




Talte your friends beyond the pages of the 
magazinel Give them the COMPUTE Oisl(. 
a bi-monthly, hands on companion to 
COf^PUTE Magazine. ..and a valuable 
addition to your gift! 



D YES, send a one year (12 issues) 
subscription to COIVIPUTE to my friends 
as listed below. 

Send to: 

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Address .. 

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RnlOin 


Each 

AldillonaiGIN 


MAGAZIHE 
ONUr 


SI 257 

(SAVEUIU) 


(SAVEKS.«) 


MAGAZINE 
iOISK 


S42J7 


S3357 



Check magazine edition: 

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a Commodore 64/128 D Multi Edition 

D Ai so, send the companion disk along with the subscription 

Send to: 

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aty. 



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Gilts ca^ds will be sent to you toarno^nce your gitts. 



YWDN2 



; Mail to: COMPUTE RO. Box 3244 Harlan Iowa 51S93 ! 




Adventure games 

that move from 

city streets to outer 

space, from 

underground to the 

magic realms of 

imagination— plus 

sports, fliglit 

simulators, and laser 

television. 



2000. the working title for a 
tank-battle game ($59,95), Bo 
Jackson Baseball (S49.95), 
and ABC Wide World of 
Sports Boxing (price unavail- 
able at press time). 

Electronic Arts 

Big new products from EA in- 
clude Chuck Yeager's Air Com- 
bat ($59.95) and Ear! Weaver 
Baseball II ($49.95). A Sneak 
Peek of Air Combat appeared 
in the July issue of COMPUTE. 
Racing fans can get behind 
the wheel of Mario Andretti's 
Racing Challenge ($49.95). 

Powermonger ($49,95), 
from the makers of Populous, 
casts you as the leader of a 
displaced tribe newly arrived 
in an uncharted territory. 



Electronic Zoo 

This fall, look for Eco Phan- 
toms ($49.95), a struggle for 
earth's survival; The Ball 
Game ($49,95), a test of strat- 
egy and reflexes; Geisha 
($49,95), the Orient of the fu- 
ture; Star Collection ($29,95), 
a collection of great arcade 
hits; and Peghole ($49,95), a 
classic tactical game. 

Konami 

Simpson fans can get radical 
with Bart Simpson's House of 
Wbirdness ($49,95), an adven- 
ture/strategy game that chal- 
lenges players to be as re- 
sourceful as Bart, Simpson's 
Arcade ($49,95) is a conver- 
sion of the coin-op. 
Challenge your ninja skills 



and fight crime in Manhattan 
with Teenage Mutant Ninja Tur- 
tles: The Adventure ($49,95), 
If you want more Turtle ac- 
tion, try Teenage Mutant Nin- 
ja Turtles: The Arcade Game 
($49,95), More movie action 
is heading your way with 
Back to the Future III ($39,95) 
and Predator 2 (S^9. 95). 

Baseball card collectors 
have a new utility to help 
them manage and track their 
collections. It's the Official 
Collector Series — Baseball 
Card Collector ($49,95). This 
could make an excellent holi- 
day gift for the hardball fan 
on your list. 

Topping the long list of 
Konami's brand-new role-play- 
ing games is Steve Peterson's 



LASERWARE 



Recent innovations could change the way we re- 
gard our favorite optically-based storage device. 

Ttie Commodore booth at CES was almost entire- 
ty devoted to CDTV, a portent of the impending con- 
sumer interest in CD technology. 

North American Phiiips/Magnavox was once 
again showing their long-delayed CD>1 (Compact 
Disc-Interactive) player, this time promising that it 
would ship in October. Similar in concept to 
CDTV, the CD-I player has a few advantages: it 
sports a 16-million-color palette, a slightly faster 
processor and, most important, has the marketing 
muscle of Magnavox, Sony, and Matsushita 
(Panasonic) behind it. However, it also has its 
share of disadvantages: It's more expensive 
($1400 compared to CDTV's $999), and its "thumb- 
stick" controller is less familiar to American kids 



than the CDTV's Nintendo-like joypad (and more 
fragile). 

Another CD product making the rounds was So- 
ny's consumer-oriented CD-ROM drive for the IBM 
PC, Called the Laser Library, the system consists 
of an external CD-ROM drive with audio capability 
and a collection of six topnotch CD-ROM titles. The 
entire library retails for $699, 

With Kodak's new Photo CD, you can take pic- 
tures using conventional 35mm film, and then 
have those photos developed and stored on com- 
pact disc for viewing on a TV or lor use in image- 
processing software. Photo CDs will work with ei- 
ther a CDTV, CD-I, or dedicated Photo CD player, 
Kodak expects Photo CD processing to be avail- 
able by June 1992. 

DENNY ATKIN and DAVID SEARS 



114 COMPUTE OCTOBER 1991 



W f^ 



Like some sleek, metallic bird of prey, it slices through the thin 
air of the desert night. Below, the enemy's radar frantically 
scans, searching for a sign. But the only warning is the ^ 
deafening roar of ordnance demolishing its target. Before 
fighters can scramble, this airborne apparition vanishes, like a 
ghostly dream. 

It's the Persian Gulf, January, 1991 . And the F-117A has just 
come calling. 

Now you can fly the Stealth Fighter that ruled the desert skies, 
thanks to MicroProse, the acknowledged leader in air combat 
simulation. Slide silently through the Kuwaiti Theatre, or any of 
8 other worlds. Test yourself against challenging enemy artificial 
intelligence. Tangle with battle-hardened pilots, using the 
exclusive MicroProse option that allows you dogfighting action. 

Feel your adrenalin surge as you penetrate dense threat 

environments, destroying high value targets with pinpoint., 
accuracy. ^ 



•-ft':' 0X^^y:l^:^-^ ':'',-■ 



F-117A Nighthawk Stealth Fighter 2.0. Find out how it feels 
to own the night. 




\t^e Definflfv* Simulotiofl ot 



HAWK 



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STEALTH FIGHTER 2.0 






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For IBH-PCn-andyfcompatibtes. For the latest information on release dates and availabilities, call MicroProse Customer Service at 301-771-1 151 , 9 am to 5 pm EST, weekdays. "1991 
MicroProse Software, Inc. 

Circle Reader Service Numlier 169 



&j:;il-:.I?i.v.-J5lLS*s;.-^S-. ■■; ,:)ti ■■ 






The war for the hearts and minds of Ameri- 
ca's videogame players reached a peal^ at 
this summer's CES, with volleys from all ma- 
jor players. The smoke won't clear until af- 
ter the holiday season. Sega announced a 
new CD-ROM accessory for the Genesis, 
Nintendo aligned itself with N.V. Philips and 
CD-I, NEC launched a new line of CD-ROM 
interactive videogames, and SNK added 
12 new titles to its NEC GEO library. 

On the Sega front, an affordable CD- 
ROM accessory for the Genesis was an- 
nounced for an early 1992 release. The play- 
er's high-speed laser pick-up drive 

mechanism, 16-bit microprocessors 
in both the Genesis machine and the 
CD-ROM drive, a large-capacity 
RAM buffer, advanced biaxial rota- 
tion and zoom functions, and eight- 
channel digital stereo sound source 
should add up to supersonic game 
action, CD-quality audio, arcade- 
style sound effects, and graphics to 
the max. 

Sega's biggest game news was 
Sonic the Hedgehog. Faster than a 
speeding bullet and sure to gain the 
quick allegiance of arcade gamers 
everywhere. Sonic is reason enough 
for anyone to buy the Genesis ma- 
chine. Sonic the Hedgehog replaces Al- 
tered-Beast as the game packaged with 
Genesis machines. 

By year's end, Sega plans to have 17 
new Genesis games out. Those include 
Toe Jam & Earl, featuring two very cool, 
rhythmically inclined, junk-food-loving ali- 
ens from the planet f^unkatron; Fantasia, tak- 
en from the Walt Disney classic; and the 
underwater military simulation 688 Attack 
Sub. 

Digital stereo sound, multiple scrolling 
screens, three-dimensional graphics, and 
a palette of 32,768 colors blast through 
Nintendo's Super NES, scheduled to 
reach store shelves this September. De- 
spite the troubled economy, Nintendo pre- 
dicted it will sell more than 2 million Super 
NES units by year's end, priced around 
$200 each, and 6 million games for the ma- 



VID NEWS 

chine, most of which will cost around S50 
apiece, Nintendo has no plans to abandon 
either its 8-bit Nintendo Entertainment Sys- 
tem or the popular hand-held Game Boy 
machine. 

The company also announced that it 
would work with N. V. Philips to develop a 
CD-ROM accessory for the Super NES 
that would be compatible with both the 
new video game system and CD-I, Ninten- 
do also intends to pursue its work with So- 
ny on a separate CD-based game system. 

NEC dropped the price of its TurboGrafx- 




16 system to $99.99 and concentrated its 
efforts on the TurboGrafx-CD player, 
which sells now for $299. For $149.99, a 
new version of the TurboGrafx-16 system, 
called Bonk Superset, is packaged with 
two TurboPad controllers, a TurboTop adap- 
tor that allows for up to five players al 
once, and NEC's most popular game. 
Bonl<'s Adventure. 

NEC also sealed a deal with Paramount 
Pictures to release ICOM Simulations' CD- 
ROM version of the The Addams Famiiy. 
Based on the popular sixties television 
show, the movie is scheduled to premiere 
in November. Also in NEC's new CD-ROM 
library Sherlock Holmes, Consulting Detec- 
tive, based on the renowned clever guy, us- 
es digitized movie footage of live actors. 
For J.8. Harold Murder Club, digitized still 
photos blended with voices will be used. 



For an educational tour through prehistoric 
times. Magical Dinosaur Tour is an animat- 
ed encyclopedia featuring 200 types of di- 
nosaurs. The games will retail for $61.99 
each. 

SNK attracted more players to its 
pricey, but graphically superior, NEO GEO 
system with 12 new action games ranging 
from sports to fantasy, 

For sports buffs, there's Top Players 
Golf, which gives players a bird's-eye 
view of the course and then lets them 
"stand" behind the onscreen golfer to 
_ drive the ball with real-life perspec- 
tive. League Bowling's multilink ca- 
pability adds more zest Shan real 
lanes can offer. Riding Hero puts 
gamers in the fast lane of motorcycle 
racing, whizzing around mountain 
curves and barreling down ocean 
straightaways, Baseball buffs should 
delight over Baseball Stars Profes- 
sional, with real-voice announcers 
and umpires making the calls for over 
20 different teams. 

For the combat thirsty, there's the 
fast-reflex action of Ninja Combat, dog- 
fights galore in (he enemy-filled air 
zones of Ghost Pilots, and bloody jun- 
gle battles as veterans return to Vi- 
etnam in NAM- 1975. James Bond wanna- 
bes go up against a formidable terrorist 
group in The Super Spy 

Sci-fi fanatics get the challenge of a life- 
time trying to destroy the super computer 
that controls thousands of lunatic androids 
in SNK's Cyber-Lip. Fantasy lovers can 
wreak havoc on cities while wrestling mon- 
sters in King of the Monsters. 

In Magician Lord, players assume the 
role of Elta, a young magician able to as- 
sume new identities while searching for 
books of wisdom and magic in four uncan- 
ny dimensions— a real treat for fantasy ar- 
cade fans. Rounding out the selection, fast- 
action arcade game fans should love the 
challenge of jumping Blue through a host 
of strange cities in Blue's Journey. 

JILL CHAMPION, CHANTELLE OLIGSCHLAEGER, 
ERIN RICHTER 



Champions ($59.95), a nnultipart adven- 
ture with more than 20 villains to con- 
quer. The Killing Cloud ($49.95) has 
you fighting an organized gang in San 
Francisco. For the nnore fantastically 
oriented, Riders of Rohan ($49.95) 
gives players a chance to build their 
own saga in true Tolkien flavor. If Mid- 
dle Earth doesn't appeal to you, per- 
haps outer space does. Try 
Spacewrecked: 14 Billion Light Years 
From Earth ($49.95). Or venture into in- 
ner space in the ancient thriller 
Bloodwych ($39.95). For couch pota- 
toes. Mission: Impossible ($49.95) com- 
bines action, adventure, and role-play- 
ing — if you choose to accept it. 

Two Konami simulations include 
Team Suzuki ($39.95) and Top Gun 

116 COMPUTE OCTOBER 1991 



Head-to-Head Dogfighting Simulator 
($49.95). Action gamers can test their 
roller derby skills in the high-contact 
game RollerBabes ($39.95). Speedball 
5 ($39.95) is a futuristic sport featuring 
armor and weaponry. 

LucasArts Entertainment 

Guybrush Threepwood is back in a 
swashbuckling adventure called The Se- 
cret of Monkey Island II: LeChuck's Re- 
venge ($59.95). Visit new puzzle-pack- 
ed islands with many of the zany char- 
acters from the first game. And look for 
an original game not based on a mov- 
ie in Indiana Jones and the Fate of At- 
lantis ($59.95). Indy is drawn into the an- 
cient mysteries of the fascinating and 
legendary undersea world. 



Maxis 

This fall's oddest game just might be 
S/m/\nr (price unavailable), an ant col- 
ony simulation (no kidding) complete 
with rival bands of black and red ants, 
a hungry spider, a nosy kid with a 
mean garden hose, and a pesky dog. 
Try to get your colony inside the 
house, where the really good food is, 

MicroProse 

fvlicroProse has a large slate of prod- 
ucts scheduled for fall and spring re- 
leases. Topping the list is Sid Meier's 
Civilization {price unavailable). This sim- 
ulation begins in 4000 B.C. and play- 
ers must develop an entire civilization 
from a small, nomadic tribe. By baianc- 
ing economics, politics, and defense, 



WHETHER ITS GOLF, 
AIR COMBAT OR ADVENTURE 

caruiPUTE 

HAS THE OFFICIAL GUIDE 



THE OFFICIAL GUIDE TO 




COMPUTER GOLF 




i*^ THE OFFICIAL BOOK OF 

KING'S 




Hnti trvi itoi tor tMitt u 
MUgn cm ctprttNUCI OC4»H wtlh Jott ttatoM' UfHr^tvt 
OcJt ft Cdltib Dhoti wM* t n fcWfwaltBft « Vm dMgn 
end ovation o( a> ma lock Hdooii go/ HfTUKMefu. 

MIKE HARRISON 



THE OFFICIAL 

GUIDE TO JACK NICKLAUS 

COMPUTER GOLF 

by Mike Harrison 

Foreword by Jack Nickiaus 225 pages 

$12.95 

Here's the inside story. Learn how 

professional course designers decide 

where to put bunkers, trees, and 

greens. Also includes tips for all the Jack 

Nickiaus golf games, including Jac/f 
Nickiaus' Unlimited Golf& Course Design. 

This is the only authorized 

guide to all the Jack Nickiaus computer 

simulations from Accolade. 



Donald B.Trivede 
Kwj's Qnj*f }~V and the Ultit on Skn-a'* 



THE OFFICIAL 

BOOK OF KINCS QUEST, 

SECOND EDITION 

by Donald B. Trivette 

Foreword by 

Roberta Williams 176 pages 

$12.95 
Finally you'll be able to find 

the magic treasures 

in all five King's Quest games. 

Covers King's Quest t-V 




THE OFFICIAL 
BOOK OF ULTIMA 

by Shay Addams 
Introduction by Lord British 244 pages 
$14.95 
Written with the assistance of 
Lord British, Ultima's creator, this official 

guide includes inside information 
nowhere else. Packed full of found hints, 
tips, anecdotes, and never- 
before-published clues for all six 
t//f/ma adventures. 



OTHER OFFICIAL GUIDES FROM COMPUTE: 

The Official F-19 Stealth Fighter Handbook • The Official F-15 Strike Eagle Handbook • The Official Book of Leisure Suit Larry 



fl 



YPCI □ I want the official guides 
A ^^U* checked below. 



Z! The Ollicial Guide to Jack Nickiaus Computer aolf (236-2) $12.95 

D The Oflicial Book of Ultima (228-1) S14.9S 

Z The Ollicial F-15 Strike Eagle Handbook (231-1) $12.95 

Z The Ollicial F-19 Steallh Fighter Handbook (217-6) $14.95 

„ The Ollicial Book ol King's Quest, 2nd Ed. Covers KQ l-V (245-1) $12.95 

_ The Ollicial Book al Leisure Suit Larry (215-X) $12.95 

Subtotal 

Sales tax (Residents of NC, NY. & NJ add appropriate sales tax. 

Canadian orders add 7% goods and services tax.) 

Stiipping and Handling: S2 per book US; S4 Canada; $6 foreign 

Total Enclosed 



D Check or nnoney order 
Signature 



a MC D VISA 



n 



Aect. No. 



.Exp. Date. 



Street Address. 
City 



. State . 



.ZIP. 



All orders must be paid in U. E. lunds drawn onaU.S. bank. Orders will be 
shipped via UPS Graund Service. Olter good wtiile supplies last. 

Mail to Compute Books 
c/o CCC 

2500 McClellan Ave. 
Pennsa uken , N J 0ei09 7131 C 



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it's possible for the tribe to evolve into 
a civilization of tomorrow. The game 
may be played for an entire 6000-year 
span or in 100-year periods — not real 
time, of course. 

Flight simulator fans can fly in nine 
worlds in F-117A ($69.95). Look for en- 
hanced graphics, replay options, 
night views, sprite explo- 
sions, and more. 

The spring of 1992 will 
bring MicroProse's first fanta- 
sy role-playing game. Live 
in fifteenth century Germa- 
ny, a violent time of three 
popes, powerless emperors, 
gangster nobles, and venal 
clergymen. Darklands em- 
phasizes people's belief in 
witches, magic, alchemists, 
and dragons. Guide your par- 
ty of four on a quest for 
fame, fortune, and immortal- 
ity in the Dark Ages. 

Also slated for future release from 
MicroProse and its Paragon subsidiary 
are Codename: White Shadow (price 
unavailable), Flames of Freedom 
($49.95), and Twilight 2000 {$59.95). 

Origin 

Once again Richard "Lord British" Gar- 
riott and Origin have plans to transport 
you to another world in the popular Ul- 



tima series. Look for improved tech- 
nology and better narrative elements in 
Ultima VII: The Black Gate ($79.95), 
scheduled for release in December. 

The popular sword and sorcery ele- 
ments combine with more screen de- 
tail, 256-color VGA graphics, new meth- 
ods of conversing and interacting with 




characters, and sounds so real that 
you can actuafly hear rivers flowing 
and crickets chirping. 

Another eagerly awaited release is 
Wing Commander IT. Vengeance of Kil- 
raf^/ ($79.95). This starfighter sequel of- 
fers exciting 3-D VGA graphics set on 
digitized backgrounds and will take 
advantage of speech synthesis that em- 
ploys the speech chip in the CMS 



Sound Blaster. Also, another step in 
the Wing Commander series is Chris 
Roberts' Strike Commander ($79.95). 
This time you are part of a mercenary 
squad, flying a fine line between right 
and wrong, profit and loss. You must 
determine the viability of missions 
from a moral as well as a logistical 
standpoint. Pilot a stagger- 
ing array of aircraft from a 
P38 to an F22 Lightning 2 
as you engage rival squad- 
rons and renegade Third 
World dictators. 

Spectrum HoloByte 

Wordtris ($39.95) is a must 
buy for any fan of word 
games and puzzle challeng- 
es. Manipulate falling letter 
blocks so tfiat they spell 
words either horizontally or 
vertically on the screen. 
The Cyrillic connection 
continues with Crisis in the Kremlin 
($59.95), in which you assume the 
role of Soviet President. Guide the 
U.S.S.R, out of its present economic 
quagmire and inherent instability, or 
risk social disintegration. 

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with several of their more popular 
games slated for CD-ROM release. 
They include Space Quest IV, Leisure 
Suit Larry I, and King's Quest V: All of 
the CD-ROM titles are priced at $59.95 
and are designed for the IBM PC. 

On the MS-DOS disk side, you'll be 
seeing Mixed Up Fairy Tales ($49.95), 
Castle ofDr Brain ($49.95), 
EcoQuest: The Search for 
Cetus ($59.95), Leisure Suit 
Larry 5: Passionate Patti 
Does a Little Undercover 
mrk{$S9.QS). The Laffer Util- 
ities ($34.95), Conquests of 
the Longbow: The Legend 
of Robin Hood ($59.95), 
and Police Quest 3: The Kin- 
dred ($59.95). 

Sierra's Dynamix subsidi- 
ary will bring Nova 9 
($34.95), a sequel to Stellar 
7, and Adventures of Willy 
Beamish ($59.95) to the PC 
screen this fall and winter. 

Strategic Simulations 

SSI introduced its first IBM sports 
game, Tony La Russa's Ultimate Base- 
ball ($49.95). Every essential detail of 
major league baseball is provided; 
play a whole season or one game in a 
variety of levels. As current as today's 
headlines, Conflict: twiddle East 



($59.95) is a new strategy war game fo- 
cusing on desert combat. SSI also has 
a new AD&D "goidbox" game. Gate- 
way to the Savage Frontier ($49.95). 

Three- Sixty 

Three-Sixty's fa!! lineup includes two 
war games and a sports package. The- 




atre of War ($49.95) is a strategy war 
game boasting a 3-D filled-polygon en- 
vironment. Patriot ($59.95) is a land- 
based war game. The ABC Wide 
V\forld of Sports Winter Olympics 1992 
($49.95) gets the events down cold. 

UBI Soft 

In Battle Isle ($49.95) your goal is to 
capture the most terrain possible in a 



world made of islands. For sports 
fans, Pro Tennis Tour II ($49.95), im- 
proves on the original by including fe- 
male opponents, the choice of strong 
or weak points of your player, doubles 
play, a training mode, improved graph- 
ics and better music. Here's your 
chance to improve your net play. 

Virgin Games 

Fantasy and flight fill the bill 
here. Conan the Cimmerian 
($49.99) puts you in the role 
of Conan. You must avenge 
the deaths of your family 
and friends who were mas- 
sacred by the ravening 
hordes of Thoth Amon, high 
priest of the vile cult of Set. 
If that sounds like a little too 
much fun, you can get 
down to business with Corpo- 
ration ($59.99), an action 
game that has you tracking 
down a mutant robot. 

If flying is more in your line, then 
Thunderhawl< ($49.99) puts you in the 
seat of the AH-73M Thunderhawk heli- 
copter gunship. Shuttle ($59.99) is de- 
signed as an accurate simulation of NA- 
SA's Space Shuttle. During play you'll 
be asked to perform various feats like 
repairing satellites, maneuvering your 
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9th RECORD-BREAKING YEAR! 



64/1 28 VIEW 



You've asked for it, 

so here it is. Gazette goes online 

witli QuantumLinl<. 

Tom Netsel 



Gazette is going online. 
Many of you have 
asked for it, and now 
it's here. Gazette will 
soon have its own area on 
QuantumLink, the Commo- 
dore-specific online service. 
Soon you can call a local 
telephone number with your 
computer and modem, con- 
nect to Q-Link, and then 
move to the Gazette area. 
Once connected, you'll 
have access to millions of 
bytes of 64/128 information 
from our back issues of 
Gazette. Right now our staff 
is busy compiling more 
than six years' worth of arti- 
cles, reviews, and programs 
to have them available by 
the September 15 target 
date. 

Q-Linkers (Q-Link mem- 
bers) will be able to down- 
load practically any of the 
material that has ever ap- 
peared in Gazette. If you 
want to learn about disk 
drives, printer care and selec- 
tion, music, graphics, 
GEOS, telecommunications, 
or other 64-related subjects, 
chances are that it's been 
covered in Gazette and it'll 
be online for downloading. 

If you're planning to buy 
software for your 64 or 128 
and you don't know which 
of several possible titles 
might best suit your needs, 
check the Gazette reviews. 
There will be hundreds of 
software reviews available 
of both current and classic 
64 and 128 titles. Best of all. 
this information will be avail- 
able when you want it and 
as close as your telephone. 
Think of all the great type-in 
programs that have ap- 
peared in Gazette over the 
years: games, utilities, edu- 
cational programs, and pro- 
ductivity pieces. Now you 



can obtain any or all of 
these great programs with- 
out going through the effort 
of typing them in. Simply 
download and run. 

Look for message areas, 
product information, and 
more. Each month Gazette 
publishes the best articles 
and programs that we can 
find, and we're constantly 
looking for new and exciting 
programs to offer our read- 
ers. As a convenience to pro- 
grammers and fo expedite 
our search for new software, 
programmers will be able to 
upload their submissions. 
We'll download them, test 
them, and reply to the au- 
thors much faster than we 
can by mail. Artists can also 
upload their "Gazette Gal- 
lery" submissions. Of 
course, we'll still accept sub- 
missions mailed on disk, but 
the upload feature wiil 
speed up the process. 

Are there COiVlPUTE 
books dealing with the 64 or 
128 that you want but find 
they're out of print? We'll 
have many of these titles on- 
line for downloading. That's 
right: Download a whole 
book, read it onscreen, and 
print out the sections you 
need. This will be the only 
source for some of this 64/ 
128 information. 

We are excited about this 
new venture. We may not 
have every feature up and 
running on opening day but 
we expect the Gazette sec- 
tion to be a valuable online 
resource for 64 and 128 us- 
ers. If you're not familiar 
with QuantumLink or you're 
not yet a member, check 
elsewhere in this issue for a 
special introductory Q-Link 
offer. When online, feel free 
to say hello or send some E- 
mail. My handle is Gaz. □ 



CONTENTS 

64/128 VIEW 

Gazette is going online. Look for it soon 
on QuantumLink. Download your favorite 
progranns, reviews, articles, and books. 
By Tom Netsel. 


G"l 


TOO VALUABLE TO WASTE 

Despite the shift to IBM compatibles, schools 
Nova Scotia still put their 64s to valuable use. 
By John Elliott. 


G-2 

in 


REVIEWS 

Bible Search, Star Control, Dragons of Flame, 
Centauri Alliance, and Screen-Pro 64. 


G-8 


FEEDBACK 

Questions and answers. 


G-16 


MACHINE LANGUAGE 

Handle most of your input/output commands 
with just six easy Kernal calls. 
By Jim Butterfield. 


G-19 


BEGINNER BASIC 

Crashproof your programs. (Part 2.) 
By Larry Cotton. 


G-20 


PROGRAMMER'S PAGE 

128 SYS calls, the midnight bug, and more. 
By Randy Thompson. 


G-22 


GEOS 

Fight the jaggies, and be proud 
to display your GEOS documents. 
By Steve Vander Ark. 


G-23 


D'lVERSIONS 

Virtual reality at the mall. 
By Fred D'Ignazio. 


G-24 


PROGRAMS 

Speedway 
MOB Mover 
HoverJet 
Add Checl< 
Song Machine 


G-25 
G-26 
G-30 
G-33 
G-34 



G-1 



TOO VALUABLE TO WASTE 



JOHN ELLIOTT 



G-2 COMPUTE OCTOBER 1991 




SCHOOLS III NOVA SCOTIA 

PUT 64S TO WORK, 

DESPITE A MOVE TOWARD IBMS. 




OCTOBER 1991 COMPUTE Q-3 



One Commodore 64 sits at the 
back of an elementary ciass- 
room, That's the way it is in many 
Canadian schools now. The 64 is 
used only as a reward for students 
who have completed their work. During 
those moments of use. the computer be- 
comes an arcade-style game machine. 
Commodore 8-bit computers are a 
largely underutilized resource in Canadi- 
an schools, and a number of boards of 
education are replacing the 643 with 
IBfvl-compatible PCs at a cost many 
times that of the 64s. I am told at edu- 
cational technology conferences that 
this is a common situation throughout 
North America. 

I teach at Nova Scotia Teachers Col- 
lege. The college is located in the city 
of Truro (population 14,000), about 50 
miles north of Halifax, Nova Scotia. 
While many of the people in this prov- 
ince speak English and are of Scottish 
and Loyalist descent, significant minor- 
ities speak Micmac (an Indian lan- 
guage), French, or Gaelic. The cam- 
pus is the academic center for 600 
students who practice their teaching 
throughout Nova Scotia. As a member 
of the faculty, I meet with student teach- 
ers and get to see how they and other 
teachers utilize computers in their class- 
rooms. With school budgets being 
what they are, not everyone has made 
the switch to PCs, In many cases teach- 
ers and learners are employing exist- 
ing equipment to further current curric- 
ular aims. This means using the 64 for 
something more useful than playing ar- 
cade games. Here are some examples 
of what I've found. 

Word Processing 

Grade 1 children are using a word proc- 
essor (SpeedScript) to compose two- 
page stories. In this case they work 
with a battery of six 64s in the central 
computer room. During their language 
period they may be found either in 
their classroom or working on the 64s. 
At one point while the teacher and I 
were chatting, we were politely inter- 
rupted. A child wanted to know how to 
format his paragraphs. 

As my teachers in training entered 
the province's classrooms, they 
learned the benefits of using an idea 
organizer to prepare before composing 
their documents. An idea organizer 
such as Thinking Cap allows a writer to 
brainstorm, switch sequences, easily 
erase, and do most word processing 
tasks. The outliner automatically organ- 
izes the document into appropriate cat- 
egories. Most students are eager to be- 
gin writing, and they resist preparing an 
organizing outline before composing a 
document, but Thinl<ing Cap's ease of 
use usually placates their objections. 

G-4 COMPUTE OCTOBER 1991 



Word Processing Enhancements 

fvly teaching interns have learned a 
number of other computer techniques 
that they can share with the children 
they teach. Once they use a spelling 
checker on their files, they then use a 
frequency check and a thesaurus pro- 
gram to deal with excessively used 
words. Since the 64's memory is lim- 
ited, separate programs must be load- 
ed sequentially. 

The Write Stuff word processor for 
the 64 has an auditory option that, 
when activated, will say letters, words, 
or sentences with different intonations. 
There are educational possibilities 
with such features that can benefit 
both the visually impaired and students 
who are learning to touch-type. 

Classroom Newspapers 

Some elementary classes are prepar- 
ing school newspapers with 
Newsroom publishing software. This is 
an effective way of providing a means 
for communicating both within a 
school and with the community. Stu- 
dents also get a good idea of the dif- 
ferent aspects of newspaper produc- 
tion, from writing to publishing. 

Iviodems allow both text and images 
to be shared between buildings or be- 
tween a 64 and a PC as long as they 
both are working with Newsroom. The 
possibility remains for an electronic 
newspaper that can be read exclusive- 
ly from the monitor. 

Electronic Communications 

Several elementary classes are com- 
municating between buildings via mo- 
dem. They either link up directly or 
leave messages on a local bulletin 
board. In the latter case they are also 
in contact with members of the gener- 
al public who have a wide range of 
backgrounds and ages, f^any smaller 
schools do not use modems because 
administrators are reluctant to tie up 
their one voice line. If an electronic bul- 
letin board is used, messages can be 
composed and saved to disk before 
the destination is dialed. This keeps tel- 
ephone tie-up time short. Now that 
1200-baud modems for the 64 cost 
less than 350, message sending and 
capturing times should be very short. 
Received messages can be read from 
disk or buffer after the phone is hung 
up. 

The One-Computer Classroom 

A few schools manage to block out 
weekly computer time during which a 
class may visit the school computer 
lab for an extended period of time. How- 
ever, most of computer activities I 
have described work with one 64 in 
each classroom, ivlany of these activi- 



ties occur during language period and 
are consistent with the whole philoso- 
phy of language instruction. 

The single-computer classroom can 
also use a student-controlled data- 
base. Students select the topics under 
which information about several 
events, places, or people will be en- 
tered. As they do their research, they 
enter the appropriate categories in the 
database. Higher level thinking begins 
when comparisons are made among en- 
tries under the same category. 

Classroom Management 

Much of the software recommended 
here can effectively help teachers equal- 
ly as well as students. The v/ord proc- 
essor can be used to compose student 
handouts. The idea organizer can 
help plan a unit of work. Newsroom 
can be used to develop a parent-teach- 
er newsletter. Some teachers use 
short BASIC programs to alphabetize a 
class list, enter and average grades (or 
marks), and rank the class by grade. 

I allow my student teachers the op- 
tion of submitting papers on disk. Us- 
ing the insert option of the v/ord proc- 
essor. I place comments where they 
are relevant. The authors make their al- 
terations and resave the document, 
with or without the insertions. 

For classroom display purposes, I 
use a scroll program that rolls my com- 
ments from the top to the bottom of the 
screen. It permits a choice of screen 
and text colors and accompanying mel- 
odies. For my convenience, I video- 
tape these sequences and take them 
into any class that has access to a 
VCR. These tapes help me demon- 
strate points during lectures. 

Student Programming 

fvlany of my teachers in training have 
taught young children to program in BA- 
SIC. These elementary students can 
develop simple multiple choice tests or 
programmed learning sequences for 
each other. It takes them about an 
hour to learn the required BASIC com- 
mands. As the children develop quiz- 
zes, they gain a sense of control over 
the machine, while analyzing the con- 
tent of the test material itself. 

Both student teachers and children 
learn to develop sequences in which a 
wrong answer causes the program to 
suggest what kind of thinking could 
have led to the correct answer. If the an- 
swer is correct, an explanation ap- 
pears as to why it is correct. 

Music and Sound 

I look forward to demonstrating my SID 
Symphony stereo cartridge and accom- 
panying program to those of my col- 
lege and elementary classes who are 



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Ceililled *«*, Bant Check Money Oideis, *pp(m«i P.O s, Visa, ^^35!lMcald, Amci, Optma. DtncrsCiub. Caifr Blanche, 
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clearance. PricesandavailabililiisubjKtiochangewiihoiitnoiicc, Nslrcsjjonsililolorlvpographiccirtirs. Beluraof 
dclcclhre merchandise muslha«c prior leiurn aultioriialion number or returns wll not bo accepted. Shipfiinj 1 Handling 
additional. Second Daytl^citDarAiravailableaicmiacosl Canadian otd«sph:ascallloishippingia1cs. APOFPO 
oidorapleascadaiir!i9hlppinglhandling|mininiumSl5|. AIIAPOFPOordcrsarcshippedfirsiclasspriorllyalt. V/e 
checliloicredJlcafdllKllDCAlBM231 



i;..atiT?.«gSgjffSi^j^igSR3^;>(B8i!iSf'iWP-*'> 



interested in music. While the 64 normal- 
ly allows three simultaneous music chan- 
nels, the stereo cartridge doubles this 
range. Much of today's popular music 
is composed and performed via multi- 
track computers. Most students would 
benefit from gaining some experience 
and understanding of this process. 

I purchased a Voice Master Jr. dig- 
itizer that allows my 64 to recognize spo- 
ken words. Handicapped students or 
those who simply wish to limit their key- 
board contact can benefit from this in- 
put device. 

Elementary Economics 

All of the hardware and software I 
have described here would cost $300 
at most. A full-featured word processor 
for any of the PC compatibles could 
easily cost that much. The 64s are al- 
ready in place in many of our class- 
rooms. For as little as $30 each, these 
computers could be effectively utilized 
with one or two pieces of productivity 
software. For a couple of hundred dol- 
lars more, a school couid share all of 
the other hardware and software I 
have mentioned. 

I'd like to make a final point about 
making effective use of what you 
have, and this is true whether you're a 
school administrator or an individual 
computer owner. A friend of mine 



World Geography 

for Commodore 64 and Apple II 




Full-color 3-D rotating globe! 
World Geography is the fun way to 
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"The entire presentation is oulslnnding . . . 
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Spelling prngrtim in a gante ahaw fonriat 
Full refund if not completely satisfied! 

800 829-5551 

Outside US call 408 402-1351 

BOBCO Interactive Software 

zoo 7th Ave., Suite 111, Santa Cruz, CA 85062 



found some PETs in a school store- 
room, He had his elementary children 
compose their documents with Paper- 
clip loaded on these older machines. 
They then loaded their compositions in- 
to Paperclip III on a 64 for final format- 
ting and printing. The point is that the 
children learned about writing and 
they were able to take copies of their 
completed papers home to show their 
parents, The children didn't care how 
old the computers were or how much 
they cost. 

As I write this article with 
SpeedScript on a VIC 20 with 24K ex- 
pansion, my wife is organizing a report 
employing Thinking Cap on our 64. I 
will later port this article via cassette to 
the 64 for word counting, word use anal- 
ysis, spelling check, formatting, and 
printing. 

In our family, the 64 and VIC 20 get 
used almost daily, handling a variety of 
sophisticated chores and projects. 
With very little additional expenditure of 
time, energy, or money, we should be 
able to use the 64 and its ancestors in 
our classrooms to expand our stu- 
dents' learning experiences. These re- 
sources are too valuable to waste. 



John Elliott teaches both curriculum 
and research paper courses at Nova 



Scotia Teachers College. He also di- 
rects workshops regarding the class- 
room use of computers. □ 



PRODUCT LIST 

Not atl of the products John Elliott men- 
tions In fiis article are readily available. 
Some titles are out of print, and some of 
the publishers have gone out of busi- 
ness, tvlany of the items can be found at 
larger software retailers, such as Soft- 
ware Support International, (600) 356- 
1179. The following products, however, 
should still be available at the address- 
es given. 

SID Symphony— $39.95 

CREATIVE MICRO DESIGNS 

15 Benton Dr. 

P.O. Box 646 

E. Longmeadow, MA 01028 

(413) 525-0023 

SpeedScript— $U. 95 
COMPUTE PUBLICATIONS 
Gazette Disks 
324 W. Wendover Ave. 
Greensboro, NC 27408 
(919) 275-9809 

The Write Stuff— $19.95 
BUSY BEE SOFTWARE 
PC. Box 2959 
Lompoc, CA 93438 
(805) 736-8184 




circle Reader Service Number 112 



INTRODUCING 



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About COMPUTE/NET 
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COMPUTE/NET. A wealth of 
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of COMPUTE, hard-to-find computer 
books, super software, dazzling 
pictures, challenging games, prizes, 
a complete bulletin board, and 
much more are here. You can even 
talk to the editors and authors of the 
magazine. Lots of surprises are 
planned, so keep your eyes on us. 




FIND US ON Q-LINK 



FREE Q-LINK STARTER KIT 
FREE TIME, ORDER TODAY! 



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return the coupon, and we'll send 
you the Q-Link Starter Kit and 
software free, waive your first 
month's membership fee, and credit 
you with one hour of "Plus" time to 
try the service. Your S9.95 monthly 
fee gives you unlimited access to 
all of our "Basic" services online, 
including a searchable encyclope- 
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services. After your free hour, 
you'll pay only $4.80/hour-just 8 
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of the service. 



Q-Link \s a registered service mark of 
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REVIEWS 



BIBLE SEARCH 

"The apple of his eye" and 
"Escaped with the skin of my 
teeth." Recognize these 
phrases? They are two of the 
most common cliches — the 
kind that got you into trouble 
with your high school English 
teacher. Do you know what 
else they have in common? 
Their origin is the Bible, and 
now they can also be found 
on disk for your 64 or 128. 

"Let all the people say, 
'Amen,' " is another common- 
ly used phrase. 

SOGWAP Software pre- 
sents Bible Search 3.1 in 
which Michael Miller has 
achieved the remarkable by 
offering the complete King 
James Version of the Bible 
on four double-sided 1541/ 
71 disks, with an exhaustive 
cross-referenced concor- 
dance on two more, The pro- 
gram itself uses one disk. 

Bible Search can search 
for and display words or vers- 
es easily and swiftly, even 
allowing for disk swaps. This 
speed allows you to spend 
more of your time meditating 
on scripture rather than look- 
ing for it. 

The program opens with a 
setup menu that allows you 
to manipulate screen colors. 
In addition, you can alter the 
colors that indicate italics, 
the words of Christ, basic Bi- 
ble text, the computer 
prompts, and the user's re- 
sponses. After you have set 
your colors, pressing Return 
takes you into the program, 
where you can request to 
see a specific verse or begin 
a search for a word or spe- 
cific phrase. 

When a verse is dis- 
played, you can view it in con- 
text with the verses that im- 
mediately precede and fol- 
low it. You can scroll forward 
and backward through sur- 
rounding text or skip to the 
first verse of the previous or 

G-B COMPUTE OCTOBER 1991 



next chapter. You can re- 
quest a range of verses, too, 
Output can be directed to 
screen, disk, or printer. By 
successive moves you 
could print out the entire Bi- 
ble straight from the pro- 
gram or save it to disk for 
use with a word processor, 
which would allow you to cus- 
tomize your printout. 

Bible Search will find sin- 



less than three minutes. 
Pressing f3 displays the first 
verse that contains the 
search words. Press f3 re- 
peatedly to bring up more 
verses with matching words. 
Bible Search utilizes a com- 
pressed database com- 
posed of eight relative (REL) 
files. It has the complete text 
of the King James Version of 
the Bible and an exhaustive 



S06UAP SOFTUARE'S 



bIE)LE SERPCH 



COPYRIGHT 1996 MICHAEL R. HILLER 



♦4*^ KJU BIBLE - SETUP HENU ♦♦♦* 



PM = 81 
SL = 48 



e-TEXT COLOR PM = 

1-ITfiLICS SL = 

2-WORDS OF CHRIST 
S-CHAPTER/UERSE MARKER 
4-BORDER (46 COLUMK MODE) 
5-PROGRAM PROMPTS 

G-]:rii«:<iti:{iiij:i»] 

mSE COLOR 

Fi TEXT DISK DRIUE g 8 
F3 COMCORDftHCE DRIUE g 8 
F5 TEXT OUTPUT DRIUE tt 8 



Locate any phrase in the Bible in less than two minutes. 



gle words or groups of 
words. It divides the Bible in- 
to four sections (hence She 
four disks) and searches one 
section at a time. Being a 
smart program, it not only 
tells you when you have in- 
serted the wrong disk or 
side in the drive but also 
tells you which one to put in. 
When it has found all the vers- 
es in the section that contain 
the search word(s), it informs 
you of how many there are. 
You can display the refer- 
ence list oi verses in a 
search buffer. A screen 
dump allows you to print out 
the list. 

For example, the word 
judge appears in 170 vers- 
es. To search the entire Bible 
for this information and print 
out the list of verses took 



English concordance of 
1 2,800 words and 700,000 in- 
dexed verses. A single-disk 
word search takes five sec- 
onds. Miller has noted a 
worst-case word-search 
time, using the 1541, of two 
minutes for the whole Bible. 
This is believable, judging 
by our experience. 

This program will run on 
several hardware configura- 
tions. The 128 version of Bi- 
ble Search 3.1 supports 
REU and has an 80-column 
screen option. It is Fast Load/ 
JiffyDOS compatible, al- 
though they aren't really need- 
ed. Bible Search 3.5 (not 
reviewed) is available for the 
1581 and hard drives. This 
version reputedly can 
search the entire Bible in 
five seconds. We ran the pro- 



gram on our 64 with two FSD 
Excelerator Plus drives and 
a Star NX-1000 printer with 
MW350 interface in Commo- 
dore emulate mode. The two 
drives made the program 
quite comfortable to use, but 
with the various drive config- 
urations it offers, Bible 
Search provides a good ex- 
cuse to buy more hardware. 

Generally, churches, Bi- 
ble study groups, and Bible 
scholars don't have much 
money. Miller himself says 
that students for whom mon- 
ey is no concern should 
equip themselves with a PC 
and the IBM version of his pro- 
gram. For many people this 
is not a viable alternative. For 
them, the 64 version of Bible 
Search is a handy tool. It's 
fast, thorough, and easy to 
use. In fact, for some peo- 
ple, it would be worthwhile to 
buy a 64 just to run this pro- 
gram. Use it for Bible trivia 
quizzes. Print out passages 
of scripture to be highlight- 
ed, picked apart, criss- 
crossed, and written on. 
.With a word processor's spe- 
cial fonts, you can print out 
cards or posters of your fa- 
vorite Bible quotes. 

The manual is clear and 
well written. It even has a glos- 
sary that includes the defini- 
tion of SOGWAP. Like many 
programs, Bible Search sug- 
gests you make and use a 
backup copy. A reasonably 
good copy program is includ- 
ed. Because of their size, 
however, the cross-refer- 
ence disks cannot be cop- 
ied on a 1541. There is a 
warning to this effect — but 
the suggestion to copy 
disks is on page 3, and the 
warning about the reference 
disks is buried on page 18. 

We found only two other 
problems with the program. 
You have to pound Run/ 
Stop-Restore to get a re- 
sponse (its function is to re- 
set the program to the first 



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Commodore 64/128 Power Basic (0998) 

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Creating Arcade Games on the Commodore 64 (361) 

Machine Language Games for the Commodore 64 (0610) 



D Mapping the Commodore 64 (0823) 

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D Machine Language for Beginners (116) 

D 40 Great Submarine Simulator Adventures (1722) 

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REVIEWS 



menu). And where is the Re- 
vised Standard Version of 
the Bible? The King James 
Version and New Internation- 
al Version are currently avail- 
able; a Revised Standard Ver- 
sion would be a welcome 
addition to this series. 

Bible Search is one of 
those programs so deceptive- 
ly simple to use that its sophis- 
tication is overlooked. You 
have to think about the 
scope of what you're search- 
ing to appreciate just how 
good this program is. Mi- 
chael Miller has transcribed 
the Word of God onto a new 
medium. As a Christian, he 
could not have spread 
God's Word better than he 
has by making use of his pro- 
gramming talents this way Bi- 
ble students, Christian or 
not, can be thankful he did. 

Oh, yes. Our Bible refer- 
ences? "The apple of his 
eye" is found in Zechariah 
2:8 and in Deuteronomy 
32:10. "Escaped with the 
skin of my teeth" is from Job 
19:20, and "Let all the peo- 
ple say, "Amen' " is from 
Psalms 106:48, 

DAVE and ROBIN MINNICK 

Commodore 64 or 128— $59.95 for 
KJV, $69.95 for NIV, $5,00 for gospel 
demo 

SOGWAP SOFTWARE 

115 Bellmont Rd. 

Decatur, IN 46733 

(219) 724-3900 

Circle ntader Service Number 344 

STAR CONTROL 

The time: the twenty-seventh 
century. The place: outer 
space. The Ur-Quan Hierar- 
chy, a confederation of inter- 
galactic slave traders, is on 
a deadly rampage. 

Held at bay for centuries 
by the Alliance of Free Stars, 
the Hierarchy is now on the 
verge of grinding the Alli- 
ance into space dust. Earth, 
formerly judged too weak to 
be part of the Alliance, is 

G-IO COIVlPUTE OCTOBER 1991 



called upon for assistance in 
stemming the tide of the Ur- 
Quan menace. Is it a case of 
too little too late, or will the Al- 
liance's newest member be 
up to the challenge? Blend- 
ing strategic elements with ar- 
cade-style action. Star Con- 
trol pits you (commanding 
either the Alliance's or Hierar- 
chy's forces) against a hu- 



er, for example, fires heat- 
seeking tactical nuclear 
weapons and, for its special 
power, has a primarily defen- 
sive laser that also acts as a 
short-range offensive weap- 
on. On the downside, tfie 
Cruiser is both slow and vul- 
nerable. 

Each player may operate 
one fleet of seven ships. 



u t nnoLJL,r;-3 — 31 
CHENJESU E" 
EfiRTHLJNG E[ 
yEHRT II 

mem J I 




Star Control rs an outer space blend of strategy and action. 



man or computer opponent 
in a fight for control of the oth- 
er's star base. Initially it's dif- 
ficult to coordinate both stra- 
tegic and combat elements, 
but you can have the comput- 
er do the thinking or fight the 
battles for you. 

From your Fleet Com- 
mand View — a gridlike, plan- 
et-filled screen — you and 
your adversary send ships 
out from your star bases. 
Your objectives are to devel- 
op colonies, build mines and 
fortifications, and attack the 
enemy or defend yourself. 

All of the four Alliance and 
four Hierarchy races fly their 
own distinctive aircraft, 
each with unique weaponry 
special powers, maneuver- 
ing characteristics, and weak- 
nesses. The Earthling Cruis- 



These may be replaced as 
long as there is money to 
pay for them. The prices of 
spacecraft vary so deciding 
whether to buy a less expen- 
sive but weaker ship imme- 
diately or risk possible anni- 
hilation while waiting for the 
cash to purchase the best is 
a strategic choice. 

Colonies, mines, and for- 
tifications, though equally im- 
portant, provide different ben- 
efits. Colonies are recruiting 
areas for new members and 
quick routes for ship move- 
ment. Mine production 
earns you star bucks, which 
may be spent at the star 
base to purchase new 
ships. Fortifications make it 
difficult for your opposition to 
destroy your mines and col- 
onies and reach your strate- 



gically important star base. 

Because you can perform 
only three actions per turn, de- 
termining whether to con- 
struct a ship, move a piece, 
build a mine or fortification, 
develop a colony or attack 
an enemy requires an accu- 
rate reading of the situation. 
To further complicate mat- 
ters, you can't build on or de- 
velop some planets. 

After a player has complet- 
ed a turn and has placed a 
ship on one or more planets 
containing enemy craft, the 
screen shifts from the Fleet 
Command View to the Conn- 
bat Transition Screen. In this 
mode all opposing ships oc- 
cupying the same sector go 
at each other until a victor 
emerges. 

Most combat screens con- 
sist of a star-laden canvas oc- 
cupied by a pair of ships. 
Two gauges — one measur- 
ing crew strength and the oth- 
er fuel usage — fill the bottom 
quarter of the screen. Your 
crew is depleted with every 
hit you take: however, it's pos- 
sible to recruit new mem- 
bers. Fuel is expended by fir- 
ing weapons or by using spe- 
cial powers and is replen- 
ished when your ship stops 
moving. Unfortunately, the 
more you stand still, the 
more vulnerable you are. 

At first there are no push- 
overs among the competi- 
tion, so you'll need to build to 
the challenge slowly. For 
this reason it's best to begin 
in the practice mode and in 
the easiest of three difficulty 
levels. Without having to wor- 
ry about the strategy re- 
quired in the full game, you 
can set your mind to inflict- 
ing destruction on enemy 
spacecraft. 

When you've tired of prac- 
ticing, you may engage in a 
melee with the enemy fleet. 
This pits your four ships 
against your adversary's 
four, one pair at a time. The 



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AT AFFORDABLE PRICES 

All Gazette disks are menu-driven for ease of use — and they feature complete 
documentation. Just load and you're ready to go! 



SpeedScript $11.95 

COMPUTE Publications' most popular program 
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checkers for both 64 and 1 28 versions, plus an 
additional dozen support programs, including 
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Gazette Index $7.95 

Every article and department from Gazette — July 
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features, games, reviews, programming, "Bug- 
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Disk features puil-down menus, help screens, 
superfast searching/sorting capabilities, and 
much more. 

Best Gazette Games $9.95 

Best dozen arcade and strategy games ever 
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Gazette's Power Tools $9.95 

Fourteen of the most important utilities for the 
64 ever published in Gazette. For serious users. 
Titles: MetaBASIC, Disk Rapid Transit, Mob Maker, 
Ultrafont+, Quick!, Disk Editor, Basically Music. 
PrintScreen, 1526 PrintScreen, Fast Assembler, 
Smart Disassembler, Comparator, Sprint II, and 
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Ttie GEOS Collecllon $ 1 1 .95 

Gazette's best 1 3 programs for GEOS and GEOS 
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128 Classics $11.95 

Thirteen of Gazette's best 1 28 programs, including 
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REVIEWS 



winner of each dogfight con- 
tinues against another from 
the loser's roster until one 
side has eliminated all oppos- 
ing vessels. 

Though fast moving and 
exciting, the battle sequenc- 
es are a throwback to tne ear- 
ly days of electronic gaming. 
In fact, the graphics, anima- 
tion, joystick control, and 
play action are reminiscent 
of that venerable videogame 
antique Asteroids — except 
now asteroids shoot back. 

Graphically, the strategic 
screen is less sophisticated 
than the combat screen. 
Star bases, ships, mines, 
and the like are represented 
by simple, two-dimensional 
shapes. Stars are represent- 
ed by simple dots. 

Documentation consists 
of a 30-page illustrated man- 
ual that does a good job of 
setting forth the rules and de- 
scribing the races of partici- 
pants and their spacecraft. 

As a solo contest, Star Con- 
trol is a disappointment. 
Even with the difficulty set- 
tings favoring the computer, 
you'll soon find it relatively 
easy to outwit and outfight it. 
The game shines in the two- 
player mode, where equals 
can battle it out or mis- 
matched opponents can bal- 
ance the odds by playing at 
different difficulty settings, 

The bad news about Star 
Control is that it has little to 
offer anyone looking for some- 
thing new or original. The 
good news about it is that 
players who like an outer 
space setting, a capture-the- 
flag-style challenge, and an 
emphasis on action and strat- 
egy will not be disappointed. 

LEN P0G6IALI 

Commodore 64 or 128— S33.95 

ACCOLADE 
550 S, Winchester Blvd. 
San Jose, CA 95128 
(800) 245-7744 

Circle Reader Service Number 345 

G-12 COMPUTE OCTOBER 1991 



DRAGONS OF 
FLAME 

Imagine an Advanced Dun- 
geons & Dragons session 
coming to life on the comput- 
er screen, and you'll have 
Dragons of Flame. It's an ex- 
citing combination of magic 
and might. 

Strategic Simulations' role- 
playing epics in the gold box- 
es take a traditional ap- 
proach to role-playing 
games (RPGs). They pre- 
sent an overhead view of the 
landscape and a side view 
of the action during combat. 
Silver box action games, 
such as Dragons of Flame, re- 
ly heavily on arcade combat 
in addition to the skills, mag- 
ic, and monsters found in oth- 
er RPGs. 

Unlike its predecessor. He- 
roes of the Lance. Dragons 
of Flame is not too difficult 
and, as a result, is a lot more 
enjoyable. Other features 
and changes make Dragons 
the better of the two and an 
example for the future. 

The appeal of Dragons 
and Heroes is the quick ac- 
tion found in both games. 
When you play AD & D on pa- 
per, there is no way to see 
the results of slaying a giant 
spider or defeating a hobgob- 
lin. The gold box AD & D 
games show combat, but it's 
noi controlled by a joystick. 
Dragons brings to life the 
imagined action and adds a 
lot of neat elements to round 
out the adventure. This is no 
arcade game, and you'll 
have the large amount of 
time spent solving the game 
as proof. 

The goal of Dragons is to 
rescue a number of slaves 
held by the evil Draconians 
in the fortress of Pax Thar- 
kas. Along the way, you'll be- 
friend the elves of Qualinesti 
and travel through the wilder- 
ness and caves of Sla-Mori. 



This game is based on the 
second AD&D Dragon- 
lance game module and 
reflects the thought and 
preparation that goes into 
these modules. The wilder- 
ness maze is large and 
keeps you from reaching the 
fortress and caves. Many 
challenges await before you 
must tackle the maze, so 
don't feel lost if you don't 
find it immediately. 

More than half of the 
screen is filled by the action 
window. It can show either 
the wilderness view or com- 
bat view. The overhead wil- 
derness view depicts your im- 
mediate surroundings and 
helps to guide you through 
the landscape. This view is 
new to Dragons. 

When enemies draw near, 
it's necessary to switch to 
the combat view. You view 
combat from the side and on- 
ly see the leader of your par- 
ty and the opponent. Using 
the joystick and the key- 
board for spells, you battle it 
out with the monster. This is 
the fun part of the game. It's 
very rewarding to take out a 
monster and watch it disap- 
pear after a few well-placed 
blows. It makes all those 
years spent playing arcade 
games worthwhile. 

The other parts of the 
game screen are a collec- 
tion of icons for up to ten 
members of your party and 
a compass rose that indi- 
cates the party's current orien- 
tation. The icons indicate play- 
er status and damage. You 
can rearrange the party at 
any time except during bat- 
tles. Rearranging your party 
becomes necessary at 
times because only certain 
characters have the abilities, 
skills, or magic to defeat par- 
ticular monsters. You have to 
exercise your brainpower to 
decide on the proper leader, 
but these decisions in real- 
time are exactly what would 



happen if the AD& D world 
actually came to life. 

You use the joystick to 
move the party icon around 
the landscape or to fight bat- 
tles. The space bar activates 
other options and com- 
mands, such as Take, Drop, 
Open, Shut, and Save 
Game. It takes no time at ail 
to learn the game system. 
The game relies heavily on 
how quickly you can make de- 
cisions, win battles, and com- 
plete miniquests. Dragons 
will send you to many loca- 
tions to look for special ob- 
jects and weapons. Major 
goals reveal themselves at 
the appropriate time. 

Graphics in Dragons are 
very nice, particularly in the 
combat view. This side view 
shows a lot of detail, both in- 
doors and outdoors. The mon- 
sters move well, although a 
lot of them are the same size 
as your party leader. The wil- 
derness view accurately re- 
flects the overall map found 
on the back of the game man- 
ual. You won't need this 
view for much more than ori- 
entation. The animation of 
the monsters and characters 
is smooth. You'll need to 
move quickly to defeat your 
opponents. 

Sounds and music are not 
extensive in Dragons, but 
they keep the atmosphere of 
the game ominous, After see- 
ing this game on more pow- 
erful computers, I was sur- 
prised with the power that 
the designers pulled out of 
the 64. SSI does the ma- 
chine justice. 

Once again, SSl's manual 
in Dragons serves as an ex- 
ample of fine documenta- 
tion. Unlike other AD & D com- 
puter games, there is not a 
lot to read. The bulk of the 
manual is for background in- 
formation and character de- 
scriptions. Game com- 
mands and controls are on a 
quick-start card. The end re- 



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REVIEWS 



circle Reader Service Njnil»r 128 



G-14 COIvlPUTE OCTOBER 1991 



suit is that you'll be playing Dragons 
shortly after you open the package, and 
the blentd of action and adventure will 
make you forget about your pen-and- 
paper AD& D sessions. Dragons of 
Flame takes the spirit of AD & D adven- 
tures and the action of imaginative bat- 
tles and colorfully blends them on your 
computer's screen. 

RUSS CECCOLA 

Commodore 64 or 128— $29 95 

STRATEGIC SIMULATIONS 

Distributed by Electronic Arts 

1820 Gateway Dr. 

San Maleo. CA 94414 

(416)571-7171 

Circle Rearjer Service Number 346 

CENTAURI ALLIANCE 

As a member of the rebel coalition, you 
must complete a series of dangerous 
missions in Centauri Alliance. Michael 
Cranford, designer of Bard's Tale, has 
set this roie-playing adventure in the 
Star Wars-like world of the twenty-third 
century. Missions entail journeying to 
various planets, where you will negoti- 
ate mazes, combat menacing aliens, en- 
counter deadly traps, and locate valu- 
able items. 

You assemble a party of eight indi- 
viduals from six races of beings. Friend- 
ly aliens and mechanoids you meet 
along the way may also join your party. 
Characters differ not only racially but in 
terms of their attributes (strength and 
IQ, for example) and disciplines. 

The four disciplines are an expertise 
in weapons and fighting, skills in main- 
taining and repairing biological and me- 
chanical systems, metamorphic ability 
(being able to change shapes), and 
psionic talent (the ability to focus brain 
waves to achieve desired ends). 

Most interesting are the over 80 psion- 
ic skills. Some are as simple as being 
able to slow down an opponent. Others 
are more exotic, such as encasing en- 
emy forces in shifting sheets of rubble 
or bringing on earthquakes that affect 
only your adversaries. 

No single race is competent in all 
four disciplines. Donsai, for instance, 
are capable warriors; Praktors are the 
only beings able to change shape. As 
a result of this specialization, it is essen- 
tial that you assemble a well-balanced 
team, if you hope to succeed. 



Initially, a character is skilled in one 
aspect of a single discipline. F-or exam- 
ple, a warrior might be adept at hurling 
weapons or using explosives but not at 
close-quarter fighting in a meHee. Only 
by gaining experience can a character 
become trained in other disciplines. 

Gamepiay is made easy by a series 
of menus accessed via joystick, key- 
board, or mouse. The game's combat 
system is also uncomplicatec — if unin- 
spired, A single figure representing 
your party and one or more enemy fig- 
ures are placed on a small hex grid. 
From this position you can attack, 
move to an adjoining space, c flee. Be- 
fore attacking, you may command indi- 
viduals to engage in a melae, fire a 
weapon, dodge, or use psionic or met- 
amorphic powers. After all options are 
chosen, the message screen displays 
the results of the battle. 

You travel through and view your sur- 
roundings in either the first-person per- 
spective, 3-D mode, or from overhead. 
Although the 3-D perspective is more 
attractive, the top view is more practi- 
cal. It provides a better overall sense of 
your location and includes an .automap- 
ping feature. Unfortunately, v/hen you 
move to another maze, the program 
does not retain your previous map for 
later use. Fortunately, you can save a 
game in progress, 

Centauri Alliance comes on three dou- 
ble-sided disks, so players v/ill spend 
dozens of hours with the game. Less 
worthwhile is the time spent v/aiting for 
each battle to load. Use these occa- 
sions to study the lengthy manual and 
field guide, which do a good job of pro- 
viding atmosphere and explaining the 
rules. The manual itself is an entertain- 
ing addition to this software package. 

Before long, some players will grow 
tired of searching rooms, traveling be- 
tween planets, increasing v/eaponry, 
and fighting battles. Diehard fans of role- 
playing games, however, will consider 
Centauri Alliance a solid addition to 
their software libraries, 

LEN POGGIALI 

Commodore 64 or 128— $29,95 

BR0DERBUND 

17 Paul Dr. 

San Rafael, CA 94903 

(4151492-3200 

Circle Reader Service Number 347 



SCREEN-PRO 64 

If you're looking for a use- 
ful program to help you de- 
sign screens and simple 
animated sequences, consid- 
er Screen-Pro 64. You'll find 
it handles tfiese chores 
easily. 

One of its many features is 
that Screen-Pro 64 allows 
you to save load screens 
you have designed. BASIC 
doesn't give you this free- 
dom. In addition, it lets you 
copy screens so that mini- 
mal changes are required 
when chaining together 
screens for animation. 
Screen-Pro augments the ed- 
iting commands that are 
built into the 64 and makes 
them easier to use. 

Screen-Pro 64 comes 



packaged with two disks. 
One is for the different col- 
or modes available on the 64 
and the other is for single 
color only. The color version 
lets you chain a maximum of 
17 screens in an animation se- 
quence. The monotone ver- 
sion lets you use 34. 

Demonstration programs 
show how to design for a 
3-D effect, change colors of 
key screen elements, and oth- 
er effects. The program is 
great for creating dynamic 
and colorful title screens. 

RUSS CECCOm 

Commodore 64 or 128— $24.95 

ACCUTONE PRODUCTIONS 
36 Myers CI. 
Medford, OR 97501 
(503) 772-4890 

Circle Reader Service Number 34S 



Big Blue Reader 128/64 

Read & Write IBM PC Disks! 

Big Blue Reader 128/64 is a fast, easy-to-use, menu driven program 
for novice and expert alike. Transfers word processing, te)rt, ASCII, and 
binary files between Commodore 64/128 and IBM PC compatible 360K 
5.25" and 720K 3.5" disks. Includes both 064 & CI 28 programs. 
Requires 1 571 or 1 581 Disk Drive, Does nol work using 1541. 
BBR 128 Version 3.1 upgrade, $18+ original BBR disk. 

Big Blue Reader 128/64 only $44.95 



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^^5 AND 

^ MONEY 

Yes, save time and money! Subscribe to the Gazette 
Disk and get all the exciting, fun-filled Gazette pro- 
grams for your Commodore 64 or 128— already on 
disk! 

Subscribe today, and month after month you'll 
get all the latest, most challenging, and fascinating 
programs published in the corresponding issue of 
COMPUTE. 

New on the Gazette Disk! In addition to the 
programs that appear in the magazine, you'll also 
get outstanding bonus programs. These programs, 
which are often too large to offer as type-ins, are 
available only on disk— they appear nowhere else. 

As another Gazette Disk extra, check out 



"Gazette Gallery," where each month we present the 
very best in original 64 and 128 artwork. 

So don't waste another moment. Subscribe to- 
day to compute's Gazette Disk and get 12 issues 
for only $49.95. You save almost 60% off the single- 
issue price. Clip or photocopy and mail completed 
coupon today. 

Individual issues of the disk are available for 
$9.95 (plus $2.00 shipping and handling) by writing 
to COMPUTE, 324 West Wendover Avenue, Suite 
200, Greensboro, North Carolina 27408. 



YES! 



Start my one-year subscription 
to COMPUTE'S Gazette Disk right away 
for only $49.95.* 

n Payment enclosed (ctieck or money order) 
D Charge D MasterCard D Visa 

At^. No Exp. Date 

Signature 

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(Requirad] 



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* flesKJents ot NC arxJ NY. please add aDpropriata sales tax for your area. Canadian 
orders, add 7% goods and services tax. CjCTOBER 1991 CDMPUTE G-15 



FEEDBACK 



Questions and 
answers 

about previous 

programs, 

printer ribbons, 

and more 



Bug-Swatter 

SpeedScript users who've 
been editing tineir dictionaries 
with the SPEEDCHECK.DM 
program have been seeing 
SYNTAX ERROR IN 260. The 
problem is the part of pro- 
gram line 260 which follows 
the colon and looks like this: 

IFSTORFTHENRETURN 

Commodore BASIC tries to 
make sense of it with the in- 
terpretation 

IF S TO RF THEN RETURN 

Since this statement is mean- 
ingless in BASIC it results in a 
SYNTAX ERROR. It's a text- 
book illustration of the danger 
of running together the ele- 
ments of a BASIC instruction, 
even though the 64 and 128 al- 
low you to do so. The actual 
logic should read: 

IF ST OR F THEN RETURN 

To make the correction, just 
load SPEEDCHECK.DM like 
any other BASIC program, 
list line 260, make the 
change above by adding 
spaces, and save the pro- 
gram back again. If you have 
any uncertainty about how to 
do any of these steps, either 
experiment with a copy of the 
SpeedScript 6'\sk or ask some- 
one who is certain. 

Several readers have written 
to complain that William 
Chin's Memo Card program 
(September 1989 and the 
1991 Gazette PowerPak disk) 
will not reload data from disk 
without an occasional 
STRING TOO LONG ERROR 
appearing. The problem can 
easily be fixed by replacing 
line 1350 in the Memo Card 
BASIC program with the follow- 
ing and adding some addition- 
al code. 



G-16 



1350iNPUT#1,HR 

COMPUTE OCTOBER 1991 



1352 FOR 1=0 TO HR:TS=" " 
1354GET#1,AS:IFA$=CHRS{13) 

THEN 1358 
1356 T$=T$+A$:GOTO 1354 

1358 IF T$="<-"THENT$=" " 

1359 IWS$(I)=TS 

I would like to commend the 
author of CoilCalc. which ran 
in the June 1991 issue. It is a 
fine program that will be of in- 
terest to many electronic hob- 
byists. However, the program 
will not function in Option 1 be- 
cause of errors in lines 580 
and 585. Here are the correc- 
tions that should fix the prob- 
lem. 

580 IN=INT(100*((.5+VAL(CD$)) 
T2)*((TN(GA)'VAL(CL))T2)) 

585 IN+INT(IN/((4.5*VAL(CD$))+ 
{1Q*VAL(CL$)))) 

ROLAND BURGAN 
HANCOCK, Ml 

More Nkhe Programs 

Robert Marcus' CoilCalc 
(June 1991) is one of the 
best and most useful pro- 
grams you've published in 
years. In the user group of 
which I am a member (and 
"stuckee" called the presi- 
dent), a substantial percent- 
age of members are radio am- 
ateurs, technicians, or engi- 
neers, fvlany of us are photog- 
raphers, pilots, rebuilders of 
elderly automobiles, model air- 
plane flyers, chemists, and 
otherwise technically interest- 
ed in the world around us. 
How about some more niche 
programs of interest to any or 
all of the above? 

B. CHANDLER SHAW (WA6EWY) 
GRANADA HILLS, CA 

We'll be happy to consider 
such programs. So how 
about it, readers? Do you use 
your 64 with some hobby or av- 
ocation? If you've written a pro- 
gram that helps you get more 
enjoyment out of some other 
activity, send a copy of it with 
instructions on disk to the Ga- 
zette Submissions Reviewer 



for possible publication. We 
pay for programs we publish. 

Graphs Wanted 

There is a program called 
128 Graph Designer written 
by Danny Komaromi in the Ju- 
ly 1987 issue. I wojid like to 
see it written for the 64. 

HUSSELL WRIGHT 
MILWAUKEE, Wl 

128 Graph Designer is a 
good program that lets users 
create pie charts, bar 
graphs, and line charts on the 
128, but there Is no 64 ver- 
sion. If a bar chart vjill fill your 
need, Tim Ruiz wrote a pro- 
gram called EZ Bar Charter 
(September 1989) that works 
with either the 64 or 128. It 
plots up to eight items on a 
vertical bar chart and prints 
the resulting graph to screen 
or printer If someone would 
like to submit a good chart pro- 
gram for the 64, we 'II consid- 
er it for publication. 

Printer Ribbons 

Where can I obtain ribbons 
for my VIC 1525 printer? I un- 
derstand the printer is no long- 
er made. 

DON SYWASSINK 
SIERRA VISTA, AZ 

Try Ramco Computer Sup- 
plies. P.O. Box 475, Manteno, 
Illinois 60950: (800) 522- 
6922, Canadian readers can 
call (800) 621-5444. Ramco 
has them in stock, but call for 
the latest prices and shipping 
information. 

Printer Plug Revisited 

In July's "Feedback" Bob Chal- 
fant said he was looking for a 
36-pin plug so he could print 
documents in Epson mode 
with his SR 2000 Dual Inter- 
face printer. Radio Shack 
stocks a connector that they 
apparently use for their own 
printers. It might work. It's 
called a 36-Position Male Print- 
er Connector and the catalog 
number is 276-1533. 



The Gazette 

Productivity 

Manager 

(Formerly PowerPak) ^"^ 

Harness the productivity 
power of your 64 or 128! 

Turn your Commodore into 
a powerful workhorse, keep track 
of finances, generate reports 
in a snap, manage your 
money in minutes- 
all witli the new 1991 
Gazette Productwity 
Manager! Look at all 
your 64/128 Productivity 
Manager disk contains. 

GemCalc 64 & 128— 
A complete, powerful, user- 
friendly spreadsheet with all 
the features you'd expect 
in an expensive commercial pacl(age 
(separate 64 and 128 versions are included). 
Most commands can be performed with a single keypress! 

Memo Card— Unleashes the power of a full-blown 
database without the fuss! Nothing's easier — it's a 
truly simple computerized address file. Just type in 
your data on any one of the index cards. Need to edit? 
Just use the standard Commodore editing keys. 
Finished? Just save the data to floppy What could be 
easier? 

Financial Planner — Answers all of those questions 
concerning interest, investments, and money manage- 
ment that financial analysts charge big bucks for! You 
can plan for your children's education and know 
exactly how much it will cost and how much you need 
to save every month to reach your goal. Or, decide 
whether to buy or lease a new car. Use the compound 
interest and savings function to arrive at accurate 
estimates of how your money will work for you. 
Compute the answer at the click of a key! 

DON'T MISS OUT ON THIS 
POWERFUL WORKHORSE! 




(MaslerCard and Visa accepled on orders with subtotal over S20). 



D YES! Please send me Productivity Manager (ligk(s) 

(SI 4.95 each). 

Subtotal 

Sales Tax (Residents of NC and NY please add appro- 
priate sales tax for your area. Canadian orders, add 
7% goods and services tax.) 

Siiipplng and Handling (52.00 U.S. and Canada, S3.00 

surface mail, S5.00 airmail per disk.) 

Total Enclosed 

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CrHII t'ard fSg, , 



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(R(4)iilt^) 



tily 

Stttr/ 
froijnr^ _ 



ZIP/ 
_ Pi»tkl Codt . 



Send your order lo Gazette 1991 Productivity Manager, 
324 W, Wendover Ave., Ste. 200, Greensboro, NC 27408, 



FEEDBACK 



Questions 

about calendars. 

expanded 

memory, and 

static 



G-18 



My only quarrel with it is 
ttiat the back shell is plastic. 
This is no good for shielding if 
the connector is to be used in 
a radio frequency environ- 
ment, such as around 
amateur radio equipment. 

A second solution would 
be to contact Newark Electron- 
ics about a line of Amphenol 
"Micro-Ribbon" connectors. 
These have metal shells and 
may be obtained in styles 
that come straight out of the 
connector or at right angles. I 
am not sure if there is a New- 
ark store in Mr. Chalfant's 
town of Renton, Washington, 
but I know there are two of 
them in nearby Bellevue. 

WALTER C, WARMAN 
S, BURLINGTON, VT 

If Bob Chalfant is still looking 
for a 36-pin plug for his print- 
er, he doesn't need it. Leave 
the printer connected as it is 
now for Commodore mode, 
then turn off all the DIP switch- 
es except for number 8. 

This works because the 
necessary interface is already 
built into the printer and it 
would be the same as con- 
necting a serial cable to an in- 
terface, then running a 36-pin 
cable to the printer. 

In my opinion the SR 2000 
is one of the best 9-pin dot ma- 
trix printers available because 
of this dual interface. If some 
utility program requires a Com- 
modore printer, you can 
change back by turning on 
DIP switches 3, 6. and 8. Any 
time you change the DtP 
switches, you must turn the 
printer off and on again for 
the changes to take effect, oth- 
erwise the printer will contin- 
ue to operate in whatever 
mode it was in before you 
changed them. 

JACK STANTON 
MARTINEZ LAKE, AZ. 

More Calendar Comments 

Apparently Gazette's most fa- 
mous lament has become 
Monthly Calendar (March 

COMPUTE OCTOBER 1991 



1989). For the record, here's 
one more change. If you are 
using the program from Ga- 
zette Disk with a Panasonic 
KX-P1090 printer with a PPI se- 
rial to parallel interface (CBM 
801 equivalent), you will get a 
scrambled calendar printout. 
Line 1280 is one character 
too long. Delete one Shifted ' 
from the end of line 1280 and 
insert one at the beginning of 
line 1290's siring. 

PETER KUBISCHTAL 
FOUNTAIN VALLEY, CA 

Why Expand Memory? 

What exactly is the purpose 
of expanding the 64's memo- 
ry, using cartridges such as 
the 1750? On an IBM, certain 
amounts of memory are re- 
quired to use certain soft- 
ware. Is there any software 
for the 64 that requires more 
memory than what the 64 
has? 

JOHNVEILLEUX 
ORRINGTON, ME 

There's no software that we 
know of that requires a 64 to 
have more memory than was 
built into it. On the other 
hand, several software pack- 
ages, such as GEOS, can 
make use of RAM expansion 
if it's available. And many pro- 
grams^games particularly— 
use the disk drive for virtual 
storage when either the pro- 
gram or its data Is too large to 
be loaded and maintained in 
memory all at one time. 

Games are one example of 
why more memory is better, 
but here are some others. Busi- 
ness applications can use larg- 
er spreadsheets and data bas- 
es. Programmers can write 
larger programs which allow 
for more highly-developed 
code and more sophisticated 
interpreters or compilers. 

Extra memory can help 
graphics when several scenes 
must reside in memory at 
once for smooth screen up- 
dates. A computer can do 
great things with digitized i 



sound, but a lot of storage 
space is needed to contain rea- 
sonable sound samples 

Where speed isn't a critical 
factor disk drives are a prac- 
tical means of extending the 
64's 64K limit. But where 
speed and quick .-esponses 
are needed, more memory is 
very handy indeed. 

Monitor Static 

I've noticed that whenever I 
put my hand near the screen 
of my 1701 monitor I can feel 
the hairs on the back of my 
hand stand up. Is "his some- 
thing j should be worried 
about? 

GEORGE W. BLACK 
ATLANTA GA 

What you feel helps your mon- 
itor's screen to giow, but it 
won't Induce the same effect 
in humans. You're feeling stat- 
ic electricity a natural phenom- 
enon produced on every mon- 
itor. You can also feel the 
same tingling sensation by 
touching the back of your 
hand to a televisicn screen. 
An electron tube in a TV or 
monitor fires a beams of elec- 
trons at the screen which 
causes portions of it light up, 
producing the Image you see. 
This process causers a static 
electric charge to build up on 
the screen and this charge 
acts like a magnet, either at- 
tracting or repelling the hairs 
on your arm. It won't harm 
you, but static electricity can 
damage semiconductor mate- 
rials. That's why It's a good 
idea to touch something met- 
al to drain away the charge be- 
fore you touch any computer 
chips or components. 

If you have a ques'ion, com- 
ment, or problem, v/e want to 
hear from you. Send your let- 
ters to Gazette Feedback, 
COMPUTE Publica'ions, 324 
West Wendover Avenue, 
Suite 200, Greensboro, North 
Carolina 27408. D 



MACHINE LANGUAGE 



Jim Butterfield 



SIX COMMANDS 
ARE KEYS TO 
INPUT/OUTPUT 

Input and output are easy from 
BASIC— the authors of BASIC 
made it that way. Trying to com- 
prehend them in machine lan- 
guage, however, can make a 
grown programmer cry 

It doesn't have to be that 
hard. Commodofe made it con- 
fusing by including several Ker- 
nal jump locations that are gen- 
erally only used by the Kernal 
itself— calls like UNTALK and 
UNLISTEN. Most program- 
mers could code for a career 
and never use them. Why? Be- 
cause you can do almost all 
your ML input and output with 
just six Kernal calls. You 
might need a little help from 
the BASIC language, which is 
always in place on the 8-bit ma- 
chines; but it's not hard to 
learn six system calls. The pro- 
grammers' manuals often list 
dozens of calls, but most of 
them are rarely needed. 
That's confusing to a begin- 
ner. CHROUT or BSOUT 
($FFD2) sends a character to 
the output stream. GETIN 
{$FFE4) gets a character from 
the input stream. STOP 
($FFE1) scans the Run/Stop 
key. CHKIN {$FFC6) switches 
the input stream to a logical 
file. CHKOUT or CKOUT 
($FFC9) switches the output 
stream. CLRGHN or CLRCH 
($FFCC) restores input/output 
streams to defaults. 

Mnemonics vary among the 
manuals, but the routines' lo- 
cations — and their jobs — are 
the same for all Commodore 8- 
bit machines. You'll even find 
them on the original PET com- 
puter from clear back in 1977. 

To use these call address- 
es, all you need to do is set up 
any needed registers and 
then make the call with a JSR 
instruction. Some of these 
calls destroy the contents of 



your registers; you'll need to 
know about this and preserve 
the register contents if you 
need to use them later. 

To output a character, load 
the ASCII character code into 
the A register, and JSR 
$FFD2. The character will go 
to the output stream (the 
screen, if you haven't 
changed things by using 
$FFC9). All three data regis- 
ters {A, X, and Y) have their val- 
ues preserved. 

To get an ASCII character 
into the A register from the in- 
put stream, use JSR $FFE4. If 
you haven't changed the input 
stream (with $FFC6), the char- 
acter will come from the key- 
board input buffer. This call 
will not wait; it always returns 
immediately If there's no char- 
acter available (often the 
case when you're reading the 
keyboard), A will contain a val- 
ue of binary 0. When reading 
data files (with the input 
stream switched via $FFC6), 
system call $FFCF CHRIN, per- 
forms an identical action to 
that of GETIN. All three data 
registers may have their con- 
tents changed by this call. 
Save these values to memory 
if you will need them. 

To check Run/Stop, use 
SFFE1. If the Run/Stop key is 
being pressed at this instant, 
the call will return with the Z 
flag set. A BEQ (Branch 
EQual) instruction allows you 
to take appropriate action, 
such as stopping the pro- 
gram. A machine language pro- 
gram will not respond to a 
press of the Run/Stop key un- 
less you include calls to 
SFFEI in your code. The con- 
tents of registers A and X will 
be affected by this call. You'll 
find that register A contains in- 
formation about a few other 
important keys. 

Switch your computer's in- 
put/output streams with 
$FFC6 and $FFC9, Load the 
logical file number into the X 
register, and then call SFFC6 



to switch the input stream or 
SFFC9 to switch the output 
stream. The stream should be 
restored to its default later by 
means of a call to SFFCC. The 
logical file number means that 
the file should previously 
have been opened; this may 
be done from machine lan- 
guage, but you'll find that it's 
often easier to use the BASIC 
OPEN command. 

Once the fife is open, you 
may switch the input or output 
stream to it as many times as 
you wish. 

When you're finished with 
the file, you must always re- 
member to close it. If you 
have both input and output 
streams switched at the same 
time, it would cause confusion 
on the serial bus. All three da- 
ta registers may be changed 
by this call. Save their con- 
tents in memory if you expect 
to need them later. 

Restore default input/output 
streams with SFFCC. This com- 
mand sets the input stream to 
the keyboard input buffer and 
the output stream to the 
screen. It takes care of all nec- 
essary cleanup work. For ex- 
ample, devices on the serial 
bus may be told to untalk or un- 
listen. Registers A and X will 
be affected by this call. 

To demonstrate how this 
procedure operates, here's a 
short program to enter that ac- 
cepts input characters from 
the keyboard and then process- 
es them. If you tap the B key, 
the letter A will print, tap the C 
key and B will print, and so on. 
A will transform to Z. 



GO 


JSR 


SFFE4 




CMP 


#$41 




BNE 


NEXT 




LDA 


#$5B 


NEXT 


BCC 


PASS 




SBC 


#S01 


PASS 


JSR 


SFFD2 




CMP 


#$0D 




BNE 


GO 




RTS 





Manuals list 
dozens of machine 
language calls, 
but you can handle 
most input and 
output requirements 
with six 
Kernal calls. 



OCTOBER 1991 COMPUTE G-19 



BEGINNER BASIC 



Larry Cotton 



Make your 

programs so friendly 

that even 

beginners can input 

data wittiout 

strife or hassle. 



G-20 COMPUTE OCTOBER 



CRASHPROOF 
DATA ENTRY 
PART 2 

Last month we started working 
on a way to make the most us- 
er-friendly programs ever writ- 
ten. This subroutine would let 
computer novices enter data 
into your programs without a 
chance of their crashing them 
or being presented with a cryp- 
tic REDO FROM START. 

Continuing with the 
crashproof program, let's 
have another look at line 150, 

150 IFA$<CHR$(32)0RAS> 
CHR$(95)0RAS=CHRS(34) 
THEN12Q 

We want to restrict the user's 
input to numbers, letters and 
certain punctuation. The 
above line will do just that. 
Here's how to analyze what it 
will and will not accept. 

Refer either to your comput- 
er's User's Guide or Program- 
mer's Reference Guide for an 
ASCII and CHRS Code chart. 
This list shows what charac- 
ters will show on your TV or 
monitor screen if you type 
PRINT CHR$(X), for most of 
the values of X from to 255. 

Conversely, the list also 
shows the values which 
would be obtained by typing 
PRINT ASCC'X"), where X is 
any keyboard character. 
Type in a few examples of 
each in immediate mode, 

As mentioned last month, 
each character has a unique 
ASCII value. The ASCII value 
of £, for instance, is 69. 

GET A$ in line 120 waits 
for user input. If he or she 
types £ A$ could be thought 
of as either For CHR$(69); like- 
wise 6 can be treated as ei- 
ther 6or CHR$(54). 

ASCII values 32-47 and 
58-64 print a space and 
most of the punctuation. Val- 
ues 48-57 print the numbers, 

1991 



while 65-90 cover the capital- 
ized alphabet. You could cut 
it off there, but I included five 
more printable characters 
with ASCII values 91-95. 

The symbols < {less than) 
and > (greater than) are usu- 
ally used to compare numeric 
values; for example, IF A < 5 
THEN . . . means if the value 
of A is less than five, then 
some action is taken. You can 
also use < and > to compare 
strings' CHR$ values. 

Thus IFAS < CHR$(32> OR 
AS > CHR$(95) THEN 120 
means if the ASCII value of 
the entered character is less 
than 32 or greater than 95, 
then program control jumps 
back to line 120 for another 
GET. If the value falls in the 
range 32-95, the character 
will be accepted, and control 
will fall to the next line. 

We don't want the cursor to 
move if the user enters a quo- 
tation mark, thus the state- 
ment ORAS=CHR$(34) near 
the end of line 150. The rou- 
tine will accept apostrophes, 

Also, we don't want the cur- 
sor to move if the first char- 
acter entered on a line is a 
space, so we add this line: 

160 IFA$=CHR$(32)THENIFL=0 
THEN120 

L is line length, which is set to 
zero in line 100 — the cursor ap- 
pears in the leftmost screen 
position. If it's there when the 
space bar is pressed, pro- 
gram control just goes back 
for another GET If the ASCII 
value of the entered charac- 
ter falls within the range 33- 
95. inclusive, control passes 
to the next line. 

170 PR1NTD$AS;:BS=B$+A$:L=L+1: 
IFL=80THENPRINTCHR$(32);: 
GOT0190 

This rather long BASIC line 
first deletes the cursor, then 
prints the entered character 
with PRINTDSAS. Note the 



semicolon, which keeps the 
printed informaticn on the 
same line. 

B$ will be the su.n of all the 
individual ASs until the Return 
key is pressed. It starts out 
life as nothing, than begins 
lengthening as the AS charac- 
ters are added. L increments 
by 1 as the line gets longer. 
The IF-THEN tests for an arbi- 
trary maximum line length of 
80 characters (two screen- 
width lines). If L becomes 80, 
a space is printed and control 
is passed to a line which 
waits for either the Return or 
Del key to be pressed. 

After the character is print- 
ed to the screen, v/e want to 
advance the cursor one posi- 
tion to the right and wait for an- 
other character to be typed. 
Go back to line 110. 

180 60T0110 

The next line was called from 
line 170. Two full screen lines 
have been entered without a 
press of the Return key; L is 
80. The only two ihings we 
want the user to preiss are the 
Return key itself or tfie Del key 

190 GETA$:1FA$< >R$/iND 
AS< >D$THEN190 

This line will loop indefinitely 
until one of the above-men- 
tioned keys is pressed, in 
which case control passes to 
the next line: 

20D IFAS=DSTHENGOSIJB210: 
GOT0110 

Pay close attention now. If the 
Del key is pressed (defined in 
line 20 as D$), we call a sub- 
routine to take the necessary 
action. 

If the Return key is 
pressed (A$=R$), control just 
falls through to line 210 or 
220, which then becomes the 
end of the subroutine called 
in line 30. 

The last two lines are the 



subroutine for pressing the Del l<ey. 

210 IFL=OTHENPR!NTD$;:RETURN 
220 PRINTDSAS;;L=L- 1:B$=LER$(B$,L) 
:RETURN 

The first line checks to see if L=0. If so, 
the cursor is at its beginning position, 
it's deleted, and control returns to 110. 

If L is anythiing but zero, line 220 
kicks in, prints two deletes and decre- 
ments L. B$ becomes the L-length left 
end of B$ and control returns to line 
110 (sent there by line 140 or 200). 

Try running the program now. A 
nonblinking horizontal-line cursor will 
greet you. Try typing anything, random- 
ly, as fast as possible, including spac- 
es, deletes, and so on. Just don't 
press the Shift Lock key. After typing 
several characters, press Return. 

Then, in immediate mode, type 
PRINT XS. You should see an exact 
clone of the originally input characters. 
X$ is the input string, with which you 
may do as you wish. 

Remember, any key repeats. TTie rou- 
tine accepts all capital letters, all num- 
bers, and most punctuation except dou- 
ble quotes. It will not accept lower 
case letters, cursor control characters, 
and so forth. Once you've hit Return, 
there's no going back. □ 



3-D GRAPHICS DESIGN 

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— RunMojolinf I9SS 

ForCommodortb4/US in 64 mode 
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S?.^.*?? Add 54.00 for shipping and handling, for 
CO. 13. add an additional S4.00. (California resi- 
dents please include 6^'ii sales \ixi. 




Professional-EducationaUHome Applications 
Architects, Engineers, Designers, 
Programmers, Students 

tht Software 

2369 CHESTNUT STREET 

SUITE 162 

SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94123 

ORDER LINE • (415) 913-1081 
FAX • (41S) 923-1084 

Dealers'Distributors inquiries welcomed- 



CJrcle Reader Service Number 177 



Use the handy 
Reader Service Card 

in the back of the 
magazine to receive 
additional information 

on our advertisers. 




FUNctional 
Weekend 
Projects for 
C-64 Ultra-Usersl 



• Automotive Duell/Tach Diagnostics 

rttxiidm vvilh Inkrfat.e SthKinalks Sd.OO 



• Nome Sentr)' - Residential Security 

On Disk with Intciface Sthcinalics $20.00 



Send Check or Money Order to: 



Cl^ATIVE SPECIALTIES 

P. O. Box 7361 

Richmond, VA 23221 

Allow 5-4 Weeks for Delivery 



circle Reader Service Numtjer 139 



COMPUTE'S 

SpeedScnpt Dish 



A powerful word processing 
package for Commodore 64 
and 128 owners 

A Great Deal for Commodore 
Users! 

• SpeedScript for the 64 

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• Date-and-time stamp 

• 80-coluran preview for the 64 

• Turbo save and load 

• Plus more than a dozen other SpeedScript 
support utilities all on one disk (including 
full documentation) 



Hi 




copies of COMPUTE'S 



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Mail personal check or money order to 

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Greensboro, NC 27408 

Residents of Nunh Carolina and Nc^v- York, add appropriaic tax for your area. Canadian 
orders, add "'"V. ({ood and services tax. 

Please allow -1-6 weeks far delivery. Program available only an ^l^'inch disks, 



PROGRAMMER'S PAGE 



Randy Thompson 



Here are some tips 

from readers 

about 128 SYS calls, 

the midnight 

bug, and more. 



SYS aus, 

UNTIMELY BUGS, 
AND MORE 

Towering stacks of "Program- 
mer's Page" submissions are 
taking over my computer 
room. It must be time for an- 
other column of reader tips 
(cleaning my room wouldn't 
liurt. either). 

SYS 128 

SYS calls such as the ones be- 
low are an important addition 
to any programmer's bag of 
tricks. The following are spe- 
cific to the Commodore 128. 



ID INPUT "A = ";A 
20 INPUT "B = '^B 
30 A = A XOR(A,Bj 
40 B = A XOR(A,B) 
50 A = A XOR(A,Bj 
60 PRINT "A = ";A 
70 PRINT "B = ";B 

Since the 64 lacks an exclu- 
sive OR (XOR) function, 
here's how the program can 
be entered on that computer: 

10INPUT"A = ";A 

20 INPUT "B = ";B 

30 A=(A OR B) AND NOT(A AND B) 

40 B=(A OR B) AND NOT(A AND B) 

50 A=(A OR B) AND NOT(A AND B) 

60 PRINT "A = ";A 

70 PRINT "B = ";B 



SYS Command 

SYS 42977 



SYS 57416 

SYS 51069 
SYS 51328 
SYS 51346 
SYS 51598 
SYS 5034 1„x 
SYS 51794 
SYS 51830 
SYS 51851 
SYS 51871 

SYS 51900 
SYS 51954 
SYS 51966 



Function 

Calls the ARE YOU SURE? message and re- 
turns the ASCII code of the key pressed in the 
accumulator 

Goes directly to 64 mode (does not collect 
$200) 

Cancels quote mode and reverse mode 
Switches to lowercase mode 
Switches to uppercase mode 
Rings bell 

Clears screen line x (0-24) 
Clears the current screen line 
Clears from cursor to the end of the line 
Clears from the start of the line to the cursor 
Clears from the cursor to the end of the 
screen 

Scrolls the screen up one line 
Enables block cursor 
Enables underline cursor 



ROD BENNETT 
BALTIMORE, MD 

Strange Swap 

Here's a trick that's sure to 
make you think — think about 
how it works, that is. It's an un- 
usual way to swap the values 
of two variables, something 
that's quite common in sorting 
algorithms. What's unique 
about this method is that it 
doesn't use a third variable. It 
uses the XOR function in- 
stead. Here's how the swap 
works in BASIC 7.0 on a 128: 



This program takes advantage 
of the fact that (A OR B) AND 
NOT(A AND B) produces the 
same result as A XOR B. 



MARK LINTON 
BALTIMORE. MO 



What Time Is It? 

Shortly after completing Au- 
gust's column, I received a let- 
ter that further explains the 
inconvenient CIA chip mid- 
night bug documented in 
that column. This letter, sent 
by Anthony Garza of Creative 



Specialties, has been edited 
slightly for size: 

As you know, the 64 con- 
tains two 6526 CIA chips, 
each having an independent 
TOD clock. Each clock's hour 
register has an a.m./p.m. flag 
that's controlled by bit 7. You 
clear bit 7 when it's a.m. and 
set bit 7 when it's p.m. When 
setting one of the hour regis- 
ters, I noticed that bit 7 is re- 
versed whenever you select a 
time within the hour of 12:00. 
A simple cure for this is to set 
the a.m./p.m. flag to ^he incor- 
rect value when choosing 
times between 11:59 and 
1:00. For example, if you set 
the time to 12:47 p.m., you 
must set the hour register to a 
decimal 18 (that's 12 in bina- 
ry coded decimal) instead of 
146 (18 + 128). Interestingly, 
if you read the hour register af- 
ter setting it to 18. the CIA 
chip returns the desired value 
of 146! This a.m./p.m. flag re- 
versal occurs only curing the 
hour of 12:00. 

I thought that this quirk in 
the TOD chip might be a prob- 
lem with my 64, but the a.m./ 
p.m. bug occurs on a backup 
64 that I use as well as seven 
other machines that oelong to 
some of my friends and asso- 
ciates. Programmers should 
add this information to their 
Commodore 64 Program- 
mer's Reference Guide. 
since it's not men:ioned in 
that book or in any other 
book that I can find 

Thanks for all the great tips, 
guys. It's always a pleasure to 
share such useful information 
as this with our readers. 

"Programmer's Page" is inter- 
ested in your programming 
tips and tricl<s. Send all sub- 
missions to Programmer's 
Page. COMPUTE'S Gazette, 
324 West Wendove' Avenue, 
Suite 200, Greensboro, North 
Carolina 27408. We pay $25- 
$50 for eacfi tip we use. D 



G-22 COMPUTE OCTOBER 1991 



GEOS 



Steve Vander Ark 



FIGHTING 
THE JAGGIES 

A friend of mine recently com- 
mented that he could spot a 
GEOS document a mile away. 
With those blocky fonts, he 
jeered, there wasn't one yet 
he'd care to use for his own 
correspondence. 

As a bona fide GEOS fanat- 
ic, I felt compelled to impart a 
littie of the gospel according 
to Berkeley, to share with him 
the delight one can experi- 
ence from a proportional font 
coming off a 9-pin printer. 

A 9-pin printer is capable of 
some truly remarkable print- 
outs. Then why is it necessary 
for GEOS to use such a jaggy 
print routine? 

The GEOS system does all 
its work, whether graphics or 
text, on an internal hi-res 
"screen" in RAM. This bitmap- 
ped image is iarger than the 
screen displayed by geoPaint 
or geoWrlte: the only way to 
see it all is with a preview op- 
tion. The printer routine puts a 
dot on the page wherever 
there was one on this internal 
screen, producing a faithful 
dot-for-dot image of what was 
created with the application. 

Two factors affect the result- 
ing printout from any applica- 
tion: the printer doing the print- 
ing and the software telling it 
how to do it. A laser printer 
can print astoundingly clear im- 
ages, but it will still have the jag- 
gies unless you use one of the 
ten or so GEOS laser fonts. A 
24-pin printer has built-in 
fonts as crisp and clean as 
any you'll see from a daisy- 
wheel printer or fancy typewrit- 
er, but GEOS can't use them. 
Your best bet, actually is still 
a 9-pin Epson-compatible dot- 
matrix printer, using a new rib- 
bon for nice dark printing. The 
rest of the responsibility then 
lies with the software. In 
GEOS's case, the job is as- 
signed to printer drivers. 



Perhaps an explanation is 
in order as to what drivers re- 
ally do. The world of comput- 
ers has never settled on a stan- 
dard way of doing things in 
the way that video recorders 
have pretty much settled on 
VHS. Each device comes pre- 
set with its own set of codes 
and commands for operation; 
each piece of software has to 
know them all if it wants to com- 
municate with all these differ- 
ent devices. This is true of 
hard drives, light pens, and 
printers. The code one printer 
uses to initialize itself might 
switch on the boldface option 
for another model. 

GEOS was designed to be 
as generic as possible, wheth- 
er you use an Okidata or an Ep- 
son printer. It's up to you to 
customize GEOSwith the trans- 
lation routine it needs for your 
particular setup. Those rou- 
tines are called device driv- 
ers — input drivers for light 
pens and joysticks, printer driv- 
ers for printers. Each driver con- 
tains the needed codes for 
GEOS to tell the device what 
to do. In the case of printers, 
it's supposed to put dots on pa- 
per wherever there are dots 
on the screen. 

Those jaggies, which are 
the stairstep pattern along any 
diagonal line or curve in a dot- 
matrix printout, are the nec- 
essary product of creating 
lines out of individual dots. Of 
course, the closer the dots 
can be squished together, the 
cleaner the printout should 
look, but a GEOS screen con- 
tains dot location information 
for only 60 or 80 dots per 
inch, no more. The fancier 
fonts some packages offer get 
their siick appearance simply 
from having more dot data for 
each area of the page. Since 
GEOS has no such capabiiity, 
we are out of luck. 

But we can cheat. Instead 
of putting a dot for each 
screen dot and leaving it at 
that, we can go back over 



those dots with another set 
that's just a little bit off from 
where we printed on the first 
pass. This process will 
smooth out the printing by fill- 
ing some of the jaggies with ex- 
tra dots. Printer drivers which 
tell the printer to print the im- 
age more than once, each 
time offset by a fraction of an 
inch, are called multistrike driv- 
ers. There are a number of 
them available for GEOS. 
Most are double-strike drivers, 
which add one set of dots to 
the original set. There are also 
quad-strike drivers, which pro- 
duce a total of four dot imag- 
es, each slightly offset. 

There is even a six-pass driv- 
er called EX-800 available for 
Epson and compatible print- 
ers, it's a program by Kevin 
McConnell that's available for 
downloading from Quantum- 
Link and many BBSs. Its print- 
outs are impressive, some- 
times rivaling a laser printer's 
for clarity, especially on small- 
er fonts. The extra dots take a 
while to print, so printing time 
is noticeably longer. 

It is also possible to turn the 
printing chore over to a pro- 
gram calied Lasermatrix, 
which interprets the page as 
it prints it. You have to custom- 
ize the basic driver with a num- 
ber of technical details related 
to your printer for it to do the 
job, but the resulting printout 
is very clean with a minimum 
of jaggies. 

Lasermatrix comes with an 
elaborate and rather technical 
customizer routine for use 
with your particular printer. 
The procedure takes some 
time and requires a careful 
reading of your printer manu- 
al, but the results are worth it. 
If you use an Epson compati- 
ble, which includes the 
Panasonic line, there is a Las- 
ermatrix version already 
worked out for you. This ingen- 
ious shareware program is 
available on QuantumLink and 
on local bulletin boards. D 



Here are some 
tips to help 
you eliminate 
ttie jaggies 
from your GEOS 
documents. 



OCTOBER 1991 COMPUTE G-23 



DIVERSIONS 



Fred D'Ignazio 



VIRTUAL REALITY 
HITS THE 
SHOPPING MALLS 



Try on 

a new coat, a 

hairstyle, 

or even a new 

life at a 

virtual reality 

Itloslc. 



G-24 



Recently I was a speaker at 
the National Educational Com- 
puting Conference (NECC) in 
Phoenix. Arizona. While at the 
conference, I stopped at the 
Commodore booth and saw 
the Mandala Exhibit. 

Mandala is a virtual music 
studio, complete with several 
virtual (computer-synthesized) 
instruments that you play by 
whisking your hands through 
thin air. By making the right 
movements, you can piay in- 
struments that only exist on a 
mosaic of computer screens — 
and in your imagination. 

I immediately saw a use for 
Mandala-type exhibits in the en- 
tranceways of large stores at 
shopping malls. There already 
are touchscreen kiosks inside 
all major department stores 
that tell you where to buy jew- 
elry, china, wedding dresses, 
and blue jeans. A Mandala- 
style kiosl< would go one step 
further. It would let you select 
items in the store for possible 
purchase, then try them on in 
virtual space. You could com- 
bine your image with that of 
anything in the store. You 
could try on new hats, shoes, 
coats, and coiffures. 

Smaller virtual-space kiosks 
could aiso be inside retail 
stores in the mall. Virtual dress- 
ing rooms would let customers 
see themselves in clothing 
much faster than having to en- 
ter a real room, take off old 
and try on new garments. 
There would be no more twist- 
ing and turning in front of mir- 
rors, trying to see how a gar- 
ment looks from all directions. 

Virtuai-reality kiosks and 
rooms in the mall's stores 
would attract customers for 
their novelty value and for the 
sheer convenience of being 
able to see yourself in the 

COMPUTE OCTOBER 1991 



store's products in a fraction 
of the time it would normally 
take to try things on. 

Game arcades at the mall 
would be revolutionized by 
Mandala-style videogames. 
The small boxes that attract 
kids and their quarters would 
be replaced by game walls 
where one or more players or 
combatants would stand, 
ready to be blasted into a vir- 
tual game world where they 
could interact with objects 
appearing on the game wall's 
picture screens. 

Other kids would prefer rent- 
ing bodysuits that included vir- 
tual sunglasses. These glass- 
es would actually be tiny flat- 
screen computer monitors 
that let you see, in color and 
3-D, the game world that you 
had paid to enter. Each time 
you moved in your body suit, 
you'd see that movement re- 
flected in your player's posi- 
tion inside the computer's vir- 
tual game world. You would 
literally see the world through 
the eyes of a player inside 
that world! 

Down the road I see 
Kinko's photocopying stores 
transformed into virtual-reality 
sen/ice bureaus. Who could re- 
sist the opportunity to enter a 
store and experience a thrill- 
ing vacation in the Himalayas 
or a hang-gliding journey over 
the Smoky Mountains or a 
white-water rafting expedition 
down the Colorado River? 

These stores could shape a 
reality for you that is so vivid, 
so multisensory, so complete 
that you would swear you 
were there — where there 
could be anywhere from the 
driver's seat of a souped-up 
Ferrari to the helm of Donald 
Trump's yacht. You could re- 
place J.R. on the TV soap "Dal- 
las" and be surrounded by 
beautiful stars, or have Arnold 
Schwarzenegger's body with 
your head on it. 

Virtual-reality copy stores 
would feature cut-and-paste re- 



alities that you could sample 
in the store; copy onto video- 
tape, disk, or CD; and take 
home to show your friends. 

You want to sing lil<e Madon- 
na, Sting, or Pavarotti? You 
could go to a virtual-reality 
copy store and create a video- 
tape of you singing in the Hous- 
ton Astrodome or the Toronto 
Skydome, where your stage 
high jinks and your favorite 
singer's voice would ignite a 
crowd of thousands. 

Like the Kinko's. of today, 
many of the virtual-reality work- 
stations would be self-service. 
You could pop in a videotape, 
disk, or optical disc and make 
several virtual-reality copies. 
Virtual-reality copy stations 
could be a hit with people look- 
ing for a gift to give someone 
on their birthday, wedding, 
graduation, or other special 
occasion. They would also be 
used to create virlual-reality 
postcards, letters, and multime- 
dia faxes to family and friends 
in distant locations. Show 
them the fun you're having. 

Virtual-reality k osks, ar- 
cades, and copy stores might 
be a hit in future malls. The on- 
ly danger is that they would be 
too delicious and seductive 
("Create a new reality in ten 
minutes for only $9,951") that 
those people who drop in to a 
new virtual reality rray elect to 
drop out of their dreary, hum- 
drum real reality. 

Chain-hopping from reality 
to reality may become a new 
social disease. Reality hop- 
pers may eventually become 
as ubiquitous as today's drug 
addicts and panhandlers. 

"Can you just spare two 
bucks''" pleads the wild-eyed 
reality hopper to a passerby in 
a late 1990s shopp ng mall. "I 
was on the Orient Express rac- 
ing across Europe toward Is- 
tanbul, and my quarter ran 
out. I've got to get back on 
that train, man. Someone com- 
mitted a murder, and only I 
can figure it out." □ 



PROGRAMS 



SPEEDWAY 



Daniel Lightner 

Speedway is a SpeedScript file reader 
and disk management program. You 
can view any information tfiat may be 
in a SpeedScrip! U\e while you are writ- 
ing a BASIC program or even while an- 
other program is running. 

Speedway also gives you access to 
a command window that allows you to 
enter disk commands or view a disk di- 
rectory. 

Speedway is written in machine lan- 
guage. To enter it, use MLX. our ma- 
chine language entry program. See 
"Typing Aids" elsewhere in this section. 
When MLX prompts, respond with the 
following values. 

Starting address: CA71 
Ending address: CFB8 

Be sure to save a copy of the program 
before exiting MLX. 



Put It to Use 

To use Speedway, load it with the ,8,1 
extension. After it has loaded, type 
NEW and press Return. Then type SYS 
51825 to activate the program. Right 
away you'll see a prompt for a 
SpeedScript file. To view a file, place 
the proper disk in drive 8, enter the file- 
name, and press Return. The listing 
can be halted for easy reading by press- 
ing any key Then press any key to con- 
tinue, A listing can be aborted by press- 
ing the Run/Stop key. This will also 
return you to BASIC. Enter SYS 51825 
to activate the program again at any 
time. 

To activate the disk command win- 
dow when the program is asking for a 
SpeedScript ii\e, enter $ and press Re- 
turn. You'll then be presented with a 
menu of seven commands. 

1. Directory 

2. Scratcli 

3. Rename 

4. Copy 

5. Validate 
B. Format 
7. Quit disk 

Simply enter the number of the com- 
mand. To see a directory, press 1. 



Should a 


directorv 


have more fil 


es 1 


CB81:03 


C0 


00 


F0 


CA 


4C 


D2 


FF 


07 


than can be displayed on one screen, 
press any l<iey to halt the listing and 


CB89:AC 
CB91:03 
CB99:03 


34 
60 

4C 


03 

AC 
50 


99 
34 

CB 


35 

03 
20 


03 
C0 
D2 


EE 
01 
FF 


34 

B0 
38 


46 
69 

11 


press any key to restart it. 








CBA1:AD 


34 


03 


E9 


01 


8D 


34 


03 


C5 


Press 


2 to scratch 


a file. 


f you 1 


CBA9:4C 


50 


CB 


A9 


0D 


20 


D2 


FF 


IE 


change your 


■nind after making this se- 


CBB1:20 


D2 


FF 


A9 


12 


20 


D2 


FF 


5F 


lection, simply enter 
doesn't exist on the disk 


a name that 


CBB9:A9 

CBC1:D2 
CBC9:D2 


96 

FF 
FF 


4C 
20 
A9 


D2 
D2 
3E 


FF 
FF 
4C 


A9 
A9 
D2 


0D 
9A 

FF 


20 
20 

A0 


63 

EF 
32 


The Copy and Rename commands 


CBD1:00 


B9 


5B 


CF 


20 


D2 


FF 


C8 


55 


will ask you for new and oid filenames. 


CBD9:C0 


4E 


D0 


F5 


60 


EA 


A0 


00 


CE 


For example, 


to rename COMPUET to 


CBE1:B9 


SF 


CE 


20 


D2 


FF 


C8 


C9 


08 


COMPUTE, press 3, enter COMPUTE 
as the new name, and press Return. En- 


CBE9:00 
CBF1:FF 
CBF9: 3B 


D0 
A5 
F0 


F5 
CB 
20 


20 
C9 
C9 


66 
38 
08 


CE 
F0 
F0 


20 
IE 
22 


E4 
C9 
C9 


0A 
94 
IE 


ter COMPUET {the 


old name 


) and 


CC01:0B 


F0 


28 


C9 


10 


F0 


2E 


C9 


68 


press Return 


again. The Copy function 


CC09:13 


F0 


30 


C9 


18 


F0 


03 


4C 


El 


works in 


a similar manner 








CC11:EF 


CB 


4C 


E4 


FF 


20 


6F 


CD 


9A 


The Format command wi 


1 format a 


CCi9:4C 


OF 


CB 


20 


42 


CC 


4C 


DF 


0A 


disk, ask 


ng 


first for 


a disk 


name and 


CC21:CB 
CC29: 4C 


A9 
DF 


01 
CB 


85 
A9 


FB 
00 


20 
85 


77 
FB 


CC 
20 


9F 
23 


then an ID. If you should accidentally 


CC31:77 


CC 


4C 


DF 


CB 


20 


F5 


CC 


DS 


enter Format, 


Rename, or 


Copy, )ust en- 


CC39:4C 


DF 


CB 


20 


0F 


CD 


4C 


DF 


94 


ter an asterisk (*) at the first prompt to 


CC41:CB 


20 


E4 


FF 


A9 


flD 


20 


D2 


F9 


abort the command. 












CC49:FF 


20 


20 


CE 


20 


49 


CB 


A0 


3A 


Press 6 to validate 
The Quit option wi 


a disk in drive 8. 
1 return you to the 


CC51:00 
CC59:C0 
CC61;03 


B9 
03 
99 


51 
D0 
4B 


CF 
F5 
03 


99 
A0 
C8 


48 
00 
CC 


03 
B9 
34 


C8 
35 
03 


3D 
3B 
61 


SpeedScripf filename prompt. To abort 


CC69:D0 


F4 


18 


AD 


34 


03 


69 


03 


0k 


this screen and retu 


n to BASIC 


, enter 


CC71:8D 


34 


03 


4C 


02 


CE 


20 


E4 


74 


an asterisk and 


Dress Return, 






CC79:FF 


A9 


00 


20 


D2 


FF 


20 


3C 


34 




















CC81:CE 


20 


49 


CB 


AD 


35 


03 


C9 


82 




















CCa9:2A 


F0 


68 


A5 


FB 


C9 


01 


D0 


B5 


^nrPfVlIf 


■ «« 
















CC91:10 


A0 


00 


B9 


57 


CF 


99 


43 


6C 


SPEEDWat 
















CC99:03 


C8 


C0 


03 


D0 


F5 


4C 


AF 


D5 


CA71:A0 


00 


A9 


00 


8D 


20 


00 


8D 


AS 


CCA1:CC 


A0 


00 


B9 


54 


CF 


99 


43 


C2 


CA79 


21 


D0 


A9 


93 


20 


D2 


FF 


A9 


38 


CCA9:03 


C8 


C0 


03 


D0 


F5 


A0 


00 


DE 


CA81 


9A 


20 


D2 


FF 


20 


D0 


CB 


20 


C2 


CCBl:B9 


35 


03 


99 


4B 


03 


C8 


CC 


34 


CA89 


AC 


CB 


A0 


00 


B9 


A9 


CF 


20 


B0 


CCB9:34 


03 


D0 


F4 


AD 


34 


03 


85 


61 


CA91 


:D2 


FF 


08 


C0 


0C 


D0 


F5 


20 


65 


CCC1:FB 


A9 


0D 


20 


D2 


FF 


20 


2E 


6C 


CA99 


:BE 


CB 


20 


49 


CB 


AD 


35 


03 


9C 


CCC9:CE 


20 


49 


CB 


A0 


00 


A6 


FB 


07 


CAAl 


.C9 


24 


F0 


07 


C9 


2A 


F0 


09 


95 


CCD1;A9 


3D 


9D 


4B 


03 


E8 


B9 


35 


5C 


CAA9 


4C 


B3 


CA 


20 


DE 


CB 


4C 


71 


DD 


CCD9:03 


9D 


4B 


03 


E8 


C8 


CC 


34 


2E 


CABl 


CA 


60 


AC 


34 


03 


a2 


00 


BD 


FD 


CCE1:03 


D0 


F3 


8A 


8D 


34 


03 


18 


B3 


CAB 9 


B5 


CF 


99 


35 


03 


EE 


34 


03 


E3 


CCE9:AD 


34 


03 


69 


03 


8D 


34 


03 


18 


CACl 


ca 


Ea 


E0 


05 


D0 


Fl 


CE 


34 


82 


CCFl:4C 


02 


CE 


60 


20 


E4 


FF 


A0 


47 


CAC9 


03 


AD 


34 


03 


A2 


35 


A0 


03 


31 


CCF9:00 


B9 


4E 


CF 


99 


48 


03 


C8 


85 


CADI 


20 


BD 


FF 


A9 


02 


A2 


08 


A0 


CC 


CD01:C0 


03 


D0 


F5 


A0 


00 


A9 


03 


92 


CAD9 


02 


20 


BA 


FF 


20 


C0 


FF 


A2 


76 


CD09:BD 


34 


03 


4C 


02 


CE 


20 


E4 


0E 


CAEl 


02 


20 


C6 


FF 


20 


CF 


FF 


20 


B9 


CDlltFF 


A9 


0D 


20 


D2 


FF 


20 


4A 


DB 


CAE9 


CF 


FF 


A0 


00 


20 


42 


CB 


A5 


C2 


CD19;CE 


20 


49 


CB 


AD 


35 


03 


C9 


IC 


CAFl 


CB 


C9 


40 


D0 


37 


20 


CF 


FF 


CE 


CD21:2A 


F0 


D0 


A0 


00 


B9 


4B 


CF 


7F 


CAF9 


C9 


IB 


B0 


0D 


18 


69 


40 


4C 


55 


CD29:99 


48 


03 


C8 


C0 


03 


D0 


F5 


3A 


CB01 


0A 


CB 


C9 


SB 


S0 


0A 


18 


69 


C6 


CD31:A0 


00 


B9 


35 


03 


99 


4B 


03 


BF 


CB09 


10 


C9 


IF 


F0 


17 


20 


D2 


FF 


EC 


CD39:C8 


CC 


34 


03 


D0 


F4 


AD 


34 


0D 


CBll 


20 


B7 


FF 


C9 


00 


D0 


03 


4C 


D3 


CD41:03 


85 


FB 


A9 


0D 


20 


D2 


FF 


68 


CB19 


F0 


CA 


A2 


00 


20 


C6 


FF 


A9 


F5 


CD49:20 


58 


CE 


20 


49 


CB 


A6 


FB 


A9 


CB21 


02 


4C 


C3 


FF 


A9 


0D 


20 


D2 


D9 


CD51:a9 


2C 


9D 


4B 


03 


E8 


A0 


00 


32 


CB29 


FF 


4C 


11 


CB 


A5 


CB 


C9 


3F 


El 


CD59:B9 


35 


03 


9D 


4B 


03 


E8 


C8 


5A 


CB31 


F0 


E8 


20 


42 


CB 


A5 


CB 


C9 


F9 


CD61:C0 


03 


D0 


F4 


18 


8A 


69 


03 


48 


ca39 


40 


F0 


FA 


20 


42 


CB 


4C 


F0 


59 


CD69:8D 


34 


03 


4C 


02 


CE 


A9 


0D 


A9 


CB41 


CA 


A5 


CB 


C9 


40 


D0 


FA 


60 


59 


CD71:20 


D2 


FF 


A9 


01 


A2 


5A 


A0 


54 


CB4 9 


A0 


00 


A9 


00 


8D 


34 


03 


20 


C9 


CD79:CF 


20 


BD 


FF 


A9 


02 


A2 


03 


5F 


CB51 


E4 


FF 


C9 


00 


F0 


F9 


C9 


14 


AB 


CD81:A0 


00 


20 


BA 


FF 


20 


C0 


FF 


IF 


CB59 


F0 


38 


C9 


0D 


F0 


20 


09 


7B 


98 


CD89:A2 


02 


20 


C6 


FF 


A9 


9A 


20 


63 


CB61 


B0 


ED 


C9 


20 


90 


E9 


C9 


22 


E9 


CD91:D2 


FF 


A0 


00 


20 


CF 


FF 


20 


0B 


CB69 


F0 


E5 


C9 


2C 


F0 


El 


AC 


34 


SB 


CD99:CF 


FF 


20 


CF 


FF 


8D 


B0 


02 


B7 


CB71 


03 


C0 


14 


F0 


DA 


20 


D2 


FF 


49 


CDA1:20 


CF 


FF 


0D 


50 


02 


F0 


49 


CA 


CB79 


20 


89 


CB 


4C 


50 


CB 


AC 


34 


01 


CDA9:20 


CF 


FF 


AA 


20 


CF 


FF 


20 


54 



OCTOBER 1991 COMPUTE G-25 



PROGRAMS 



CDBl 

CDB9 

CDCl 

CDC 9 

CDDl 

CDD9 

CDEl 

CDE9 

CDFl 

CDF9 

CE01 

CE09 

CEll 

CE19 

CE21 

CE29 

CE31 

CE39 

CE41 

CE49 

CE51 

CE59 

CE61 

CE69 

CE7I 

CE79 

CESl 

CE8 9 

CE91 

CE99 

CEAl 

CEA9 

CEBl 

CEB9 

CECl 

CEC9 

CEDl 

CED9 

CEEl 

CEE9 

CEFl 

CEF9 

CF01 

CF09 

CFll 

CF19 

CF21 

CF29 

CF31 

CF39 

CF41 

CF49 

CF51 

CF59 

CF61 

CF69 

CF71 

CF79 

CF81 

CF89 

CF91 

CF99 

CFAl 

CFA9 

CFBl 



CD 
CF 
BS 
C9 
CB 
4C 
FA 
C3 
CD 

m 

FF 

BA 

03 

0F 

00 

C0 

16 

D0 

20 

60 

FF 

00 

C0 

A5 

B9 

FF 

FF 

20 

20 

4D 

4E 

2E 

43 

20 

52 

20 

4E 

2E 

59 

2E 

54 

2E 

54 

2E 

49 

44 

20 

45 

20 

4E 

4E 

20 

53 

3A 

50 

43 

54 

4F 

55 

4F 

20 

20 

52 

53 

4C 



BD A9 
FF F0 
CD A5 
40 F0 
C9 40 
EB CD 
60 A9 
CD A9 
A5 CB 
20 C6 
A9 0F 
FF AD 
20 BD 
20 C3 
B9 2C 
07 D0 
CF 20 
F5 60 
D2 FF 
A0 00 
C8 C0 
B9 3F 
0C D0 
BA 20 
20 96 
A9 20 
20 A5 
D2 FF 

44 49 
4D 41 
55 00 
2E 2E 
54 4F 
2E 2E 
41 54 
2E 2E 
41 4D 
2E 2E 
0D 20 
20 56 

45 0D 
2E 20 
0D 20 
20 51 
53 4B 
20 4E 
4E 45 
20 3E 
3E 20 

41 4D 

49 51 
3E 4E 
30 3A 
24 0D 
45 45 
4F 50 
20 31 
4D 50 

42 4C 
4E 53 
4C 54 
52 49 
45 53 

50 45 



20 20 
26 20 
CB C9 
IE 20 
F0 FA 
A5 CB 
0D 20 
00 35 
C9 40 
FF A9 
A2 08 

34 03 
FF 20 
FF 4C 
CF 20 
F5 50 
D2 FF 
A0 00 
C8 C0 
B9 33 
0C D0 
CF 20 
F5 60 
B4 FF 
FF A9 
20 D2 
FF C9 
4C AB 

53 4B 
4E 44 
0D 20 
20 44 
52 59 
2E 2E 

43 48 
2E 2E 

45 0D 
2E 20 

35 20 
41 4C 
20 36 

46 4F 
37 20 
55 49 
0D 00 
41 4D 
57 20 
20 4E 

44 49 

45 20 
55 45 
30 3A 

43 30 

54 48 

44 57 
59 52 
39 39 

55 54 
49 43 
20 49 

44 9D 

47 48 

45 52 
45 44 



D2 FF 
D2 FF 
3F F0 
DC CD 
20 DC 
C9 40 
D2 FF 
C6 4C 
F0 FA 
02 4C 
A0 0F 
A2 48 
00 FF 
CC FF 
D2 FF 
A0 00 
C8 C0 
B9 21 
0B D0 
CF 20 
F5 60 
D2 FF 
20 CC 
A9 6F 
0D 20 
FF 20 
0D D0 
FF 93 
20 43 
20 4D 
31 20 
49 52 
0D 20 
20 53 



0D 
20 



20 34 
43 4F 
2E 2E 
49 44 
20 2E 

52 4D 
2E 2E 
54 20 
20 4F 
45 20 
4E 41 
41 4D 

53 4B 
3E 20 
20 49 
56 30 
3A 52 
45 20 
41 59 
49 47 
31 20 
4 5 0D 
41 54 
4E 54 
41 4C 

54 53 
56 4 5 
20 46 



45 20 3P 20 50 20 



20 47 
4C 56 
29 F4 
A5 10 
CD BC 
D0 81 
4C Bl 
9B 8B 
A9 59 
C3 28 
20 16 
A0 D0 
A9 9D 
A0 F4 
03 C4 
B9 Al 
0B AE 
CF CB 
F5 F9 
D2 C6 
A0 B9 
CB 5F 
FF F8 
85 E2 
D2 5B 
D2 31 
F6 F6 
0D 42 
4F 5F 
45 C0 
2E 62 
45 E2 

32 86 

43 77 

33 81 
45 87 
20 56 
50 BF 
2E 0B 
41 D6 
2E eB 

41 42 
2E C9 

44 67 
4C CF 
3E BE 
4D 8C 

45 94 
20 07 
55 DD 
44 5B 
3A IB 
30 61 
53 F0 
0D E6 
4 8 AC 

43 0F 
50 95 
49 8B 
40 49 
4C 75 
20 05 

44 35 
49 7C 
52 0E 



MOB MOVER 



Daniel Lightner lives in Sidney, Mon- 
tana. He is the author of Plotter, which 
was published in September. □ 

G-26 COMPUTE OCTOBER 1991 



Brian Schkerke and Dave Farquhar 
Have you ever tried to position sprites 
onscreen? At best it is a tedious and frus- 
trating process, and you can waste 
hours in a futile attempt to use direct 
POKES to position them. Even 128 own- 
ers with iDuilt-in sprite commands at 
their fingertips face an uphill battle. 

To alleviate this problem and reduce 
the time required for this vital but diffi- 
cult task from hours to minutes, we 
give you MOB Mover. 

MOB Mover allows programmers to 
position and manipulate up to eight 
sprites onscreen; then it prints the BA- 
SIC code required to duplicate the 
screen for use in other programs. The 
program even lets you enter text and po- 
sition the sprites around the text. 

Every sprite register can be manipu- 
lated, and the program is packed with 
features! The coordinates of each 
sprite are displayed onscreen, and up- 
on quitting the program, you are given 
all the necessary commands (POKEs in 
the 64 version and various others in the 
128) to achieve the same effects that 
you had before exiting. 

Typing It In 

Both MOB Mover 64 and MOB Mover 
128 are written in BASIC. To avoid typ- 
ing mistakes, use The Automatic Proof- 
reader to type them in. See "Typing 
Aids" elsewhere in this section. When 
you've finished, save the program to 
disk before running. 

Note to 128 owners: You can type in 
either version of the program in 128 
mode, but it requires the following di- 
rect mode command after running The 
Automatic Proofreader. 

POKE 828,173 

This command sets the function keys 
to return the same values as in 64 
mode. To return the keys to their pre- 
vious definitions, enter POKE 828,183. 

Using the Program 

Before loading and running MOB Mov- 
er, you should consider several 
things. First, if you wish to use your 
own sprite definitions, you must load 
them with a binary load (,8,1), define 
them by using direct POKEs, or use a 



sprite editor, such as Sprite Magic, 
which resides out of the way of BASIC 
memory. (Owners of 128s should use 
the BLOAD command or use the built- 
in sprite editor.) 

If you wish to use a custom charac- 
ter set, load and activate it. also. MOB 
Mover doesn't clear the sprite definition 
area unless so commanded, so your 
sprite definitions will rema n safe in 
memory, and unless your chsracter set 
lies on a page of memory /ou com- 
mand MOB Mover [0 fill, it should also 
be in no danger of being overwritten. 

A Few Terms 

Some terms used within the program 
need explaining. The active sprite is 
the sprite which is currently being 
moved and whose data line appears in 
reverse video, The header is made up 
of the topmost two screen lines and is 
where all prompts appear. The operat- 
ing screen is the screen which is nor- 
mally seen, and the display chart is the 
table of numbers on the left side of the 
screen. In the 64 version only, an aster- 
isk that appears before a sprite's data 
line signifies that the sprite is beyond 
x-coordinate 255 onscreen and must 
have the MSB X set for it. No need to 
worry — the POKEs given when you ex- 
it the program will tell you how to set 
that. 

After loading and running MOB Mov- 
er, you'll see the title screen briefly, 
and then the operating screen will ap- 
pear. In the 64 version, sprite will be 
set to the middle of the screcjn and ap- 
pear as garbage unless page 192 is 
the location where you defined your 
sprites, 

In the 128 version, if sprite 1 is acti- 
vated, it will be black (and thus invisi- 
ble) and will "hide" all sprites below it. 
Sprite is the only sprite currently on, 
so only its data line is displayed, The 
numbers in the data line represent the 
sprite number, x-coordlna;e, and y- 
coordinate, respectively. 

Help is available at any time by press- 
ing the H key. As a convenience to 
128 owners, help screens are also print- 
ed to the 80-column screen. This 
screen is otherwise unused oy the pro- 
gram and can be activated by simply 
switching your display. For those of 
you who don't have an 80-column dis- 
play, the H command is still available. 



Commands 

The first command to learn is how to 
move a sprite. This is done by using ei- 
ther the cursor keys or a joysticl<: in 
port 2. In the 128 version, the keypad 
may also be used. This moves the 
sprite by one pixel at a time. Because 
this could become tedious, the step val- 
ue may be increased. Press S and en- 
ter the new value you wish to have 
sprites move by. You can also press I 
and directly enter x- and y-coordinates 
for the sprite. However, using this meth- 
od, you cannot move the sprite beyond 
the first 255 positioris onscreen; you 
must do this manually. (The 128 ver- 
sion, due to its sprite commands, 
doesn't have this limitation,) 

To change the active sprite, press 
A. You'll be prompted to enter a num- 
ber from to 7 (1 to 8 in the 128 ver- 
sion), and that sprite will then be 
switched on. Due to its coordinates, def- 
inition, and/or color, this sprite may not 
be visible onscreen. Any sprite whose 
data line appears onscreen is activat- 
ed, however. 

If you wish to center all sprites, 
press the Up Arrow key. This will posi- 
tion all sprites onscreen at the original 
location of sprite 0. 

Turn On, Fill, and Cycle 

To turn on all sprites, press the Aster- 
isk key. This will instantly turn on all 
eight sprites, which again may not be 
visible due to no definition, screen co- 
ordinates, or color. 

If you want to fill a sprite, press F. 
This will turn the active sprite into a sol- 
Id single-color box, making it visible. 

Hit B to cycle through the available 
background colors. To cycle through 
the foreground colors, press C. MOB 
MovermW not allow these two colors to 
be the same. To change sprite color, 
press the space bar. This, too, will cy- 
cle through the available colors, To cy- 
cle through multicolors one and two, 
press < and > respectively. Sprite col- 
ors are not limited in any way by this 
program's parameters. 

Chart, Poke, and Multicolor 

To toggle the display chart on and off 
(and have full use of typing on the 
screen), press D. If the display chart is 
off, OFF will appear in the header. Oth- 
erwise, the position is empty. 



If for some reason you need to 
poke to a location in direct mode, you 
can use the Back Arrow key. This will 
allow you to poke any number from 0~ 
255 into any location from 1-65535. 
While values outside these boundaries 
are ignored, no other error checking is 
done, so use this command with cau- 
tion. 

Multicolor mode can be toggled by 
using the f1 key. Nothing noticeable 
will happen if you have filled the 
sprites in; however, it may have a very 
noticeable effect if you have your own 
sprite definitions in memory. 

Use f3 and fS to toggle x- and y- 
expansion, respectively. These affect 
only the active sprite, as does f1. 

If your sprite definition lies at a 
page other than 192, you can use the 
P command to set the pointer to the lo- 
cation of your own definitions. To reset 
all sprite pointers to their default val- 
ues, press Clr/Home. 

Enter Text 

To type onscreen, you can use the T 
command. This will allow you to type 
on the screen as necessary. If, howev- 
er, you type over the display chart with- 
out first turning it off, your text will be 
danfiaged when the chart is updated. 
To exit this mode, press Shift-Return. 

Turning sprites on and off is done 
by using the Plus and Minus keys. 
Note that when you switch to a sprite, 
it's automatically turned on. 

Toggling sprite priority is achieved 
by pressing the Equal Sign. This allows 
you to determine whether the fore- 
ground or sprite has display priority. 
Thus, you can decide whether a sprite 
will appear on the plane in front of (de- 
fault) or behind the text screen. Due to 
the limitations of the VIC-ll, lower-num- 
bered sprites always appear in front of 
higher-numbered sprites, regardless of 
priority. 

When you want to exit the program, 
press E. You'll be asked whether you 
want the necessary commands to du- 
piicate the screen you have just creat- 
ed to be sent to the screen or printer. 
Press P for a hardcopy or any other 
key for screen output. Remember to 
first turn on your printer before select- 
ing this option. After the program finish- 
es, it will exit to BASIC with your sprite 
definitions unaffected. 



Hints and Tips 

When all eight sprites are onscreen at 
once, chart updates can slow down 
the program's responsiveness. To 
avoid this, turn the display chart off ex- 
cept when needed. MOB Mover is rel- 
atively unaffected by fast loaders, RAM 
disks, ML monitors, extensions, and oth- 
er similar memory-resident programs. 
However, to be safe, test MOB Mover 
with your favorite set of utilities before 
attempting anything important. 

MOB MOVER 64 

AS CLR 

KP 5 REM COPYRIGHT 1991 - COMP 
UTE PUBLICftTIONS INTL LTD 

- ALL I?IGHTS RESERVED 
PJ 10 POKE S3280,.: POKE 53281,.: 

PRINT" (N) {WHT} {CLRj 

{10 DOWN}"; iPRINTTAB(13) 

"{HKRVSI mob MOVER! 

{OFFl^G} 
AE 20 FORX=1TO1000:NEXT:V=5324 

8 :B1= 2040:82=19 2: PR I NT" 

tCLR) En}"; :GOSUB40 
KA 30 GOSUB850:GOSUB90:GOStJB13 

30:GOTO30 
CQ 40 C(l)=. :C(2)=l:FORX=.T07: 

S (X) =.iF0RY=lT0 2:C0(X,Y) 

=V+(X*2+C(Y)) :NEXTY,X 
XH 50 SV=1:BC=. :CC=1:S (.)=1:AS 

= .:FORX».T07iPOKE{B1+X) , 

{B2+X) :next 
MM 60 SPS="{40 SPACES }":POKEV+ 

21,l:POKEV+16, . 
HA 70 F0RX=.T07:ID5 (X)=" ":NEX 

T 
SQ 80 P0KEV+21,l:POKEV+28, . :P0 

KEV+23 , . : POKEV+29 , . : RETU 

RN 
SM 90 PRINT"[H0ME} (RVS}MOB 

{ SH I FT-SPACE } MOVERTTOFF ) 

{2 D0WN}";:IFC0=1THENPRI 

NT"{2 UP}{10 SPACES } 0FF " 

: RETURN 
XB 110 PRINT:F0RX=.T07:IFAS=XT 

HENPRINT"(RVS}''; 
DF 120 IFS{X)=1THENPRINTID$(X) 
;X;":";STR$(PEEK(C0(X,1 
))) " /";STRS(PEEK(C0(X, 

2) ) ) ; 

BD 130 IFS{X)=1THENPRINT"C0FF} 

{5 SPACES}" 
MM 135 PRINT"{OFF)"; ;NEXT:RETU 

RN 
QS 140 BC=BC+1:IFBC=16THENBC=. 
FG 150 IFBC=CCTHENBC=BC+1 
HP 160 POKE532a0,BC:POKE532Sl, 

BC: RETURN 
HF 170 CC=CC+1:IFCC=16THENCC=. 
PK 180 IFCC=BCTHEMCC=CC+1 
QE 190 P0KE646,CC:RETURN 
RE 200 HSGS="NEW STEP VALUE" :G 

OSUB820: INPDTA$ : SV=VAL ( 

OCTOBER 1991 COMPUTE G-27 



PROGRAMS 



SD 
EJ 



JD 

MF 
BE 



210 
220 



230 

240 
250 



KD 260 



EB 270 



HC 


280 


KP 


290 


PD 


300 


JF 


310 


KM 


320 


JE 


330 



RE 340 



HE 
BP 



QD 
AE 



350 
360 



370 
380 



DG 390 



JE 

BJ 

RF 

GG 

SK 

AF 

SB 

KR 

QK 
QX 

FH 

QJ 

FE 



391 
400 



R5) :IFSV<=.THENSV=1 

RETURN 

MSG$="FILL SPRITE #"+ST 

R5(AS)+": [y/N] ":G0SUB8 

20:GOSUB870 

IFA$="Y"THEIJ250 

RETURN 

SP=(PEEK(B1+AS) )*64:FOR 

X=.T063: POKES P+X, 255 :NE 

XT: RETURN 

PRINT" {RVS} {OFF) {LEFT} 

"; :GETA$: IFAS="{DOWN}"0 

RA$=" { UP )"ORA$="{ RIGHT} 

"ORAS="{LEFT}"THEN3 20 

IFaS=" {HOME) "THEN PRINT" 

"; :PRINTA$; :GOTO260 
IFA5=CHRS (13)THEN3ia 
IFA5=CHR$ (141)THENPRINT 
" ",-:RETURN 
PRINTA$; :GOTO260 
PRINT" ";;PRINTA$,-:GOTO 
269 

PRINT" {LEFT}"; JPRINTAS 
;: GOTO 2 60 

MSG$="CHANGE ACTIVE SPR 
ITE'S POINTER TO":GOSUB 
820:INPUTA$ 

A=VAL(A$) :IFA<=.THENRET 
URN 

POKEBl+aS, A: RETURN 
HSGS="CHANGE TO SPRITE 
{SPACeTI [0-7] ":G0SUBa2 
0:GOSUB870:A=VAL(A$) 
IFA>7THENA=AS 
AS=A:S (AS)=1:P0KEV+21,P 
EEK(V+21)OR(2jAS) :RETUR 
N 

HSG$ = "I_NPUT X COORDINA 
TE":G0SUB82 3: INPUTIS:C1 
=VAL(I$) 

IFC1<0ORC1>2 55THENRETUR 
N 

GOSUB850:MSG$="I.NPUT Y 
(SPACE}C00RDINATE":G0S 
UB320:INPUTI$:C2=VAL(I$ 



410 IFC2<0ORC2>255THENRETUR 

N 
420 P0KEC0(AS,1) ,C1:P0KEC0( 

AS, 2) ,C2:RETURN 
650 P0KEV+21,FEEK(V+21)0R(2 

I AS) : RETURN 
660 P0KEV+21,PEEK (V+21) A«D ( 

255-2[AS) :RETURN 
670 FORX=.T07:POKEBl+X,B2+X 

: RETURN 
680 MV=PEEK(C0(AS,1) ) : IFMV- 

SV<0ANDXP (AS) =1THEN710 
690 IFMV-SV<0THENRETURN 
700 HV=MV-SV:POKE {C0(AS,1) ) 

,MV: RETURN 
710 POKE (V+16) ,PEEK(V+16)AN 

D(255-(2fAS)) :IDS(AS)=" 
":MV= (MV-SV)+255:XP(S) 

720 POKE (CO (AS,X) ) ,MV:RETUR 

730 MV=PEEK{C0(AS,1)) :IFMV+ 



EK 
MQ 



740 



ME 760 



OP 


770 


GE 


780 


AG 


790 


GM 


800 


FH 


810 


SK 


820 


SD 


830 


HH 


840 


HB 


850 


RQ 


860 


GH 


870 


PM 


880 


MX 


390 


MF 


900 



JH 
QE 
JC 



SV>2S5ANDXP(AS) =.THEN76 


IFMV+SV>255THENRETURN 
750 MV=HV+SV:POKE(CO (AS,1) ) 
,MV: RETURN 

POKE (V+16) ,PEEK{V+16)0R 
(2[AS) :MV=MV+SV:MV=HV-2 
55tP0KEC0( (AS,1) ) ,MV:XP 
(AS)=1 

ID$ (AS) ="*": RETURN 
MV=PEEK(C0(AS,2) ) :IFMV- 
SV<.THEKRETORN 
MV=MV-SV:P0KE (CO (AS, 2)) 
,MV:RETURN 

MV=PEEK(C0 (AS,2) ) :IFMV+ 
SV>255THENRETURN 
MV=HV+SV:POKE (CO (AS,2) ) 
,MV: RETURN 

PRINT" {HOME} ";SP$;SP$; 
FORX=1TO40:PRINT"^"; :NE 
XT 

PRINT" {HOME }"|MSGS; :RET 
URN 

PR I NT " { HOME } " ; S P$ ; S P$ ; S 
P$;SP5 
PRINT" {home}"; : return 

POKE 198, . ;WA IT 198,1: GET 
A$: RETURN 

SC= (PEEK(V+39+AS) ) :SC=S 
C+1:IFSC=2 56THENSC=. 
POKE( (V+39)+AS) ,SC:RETU 
RN 

IFMC(AS)=.THENMC(AS)=1: 
POKEV+28,PEEK(V+2 8)OR (2 
fAS) ; RETURN 

IFMC(AS)=1THENMC{AS)=. : 
POKEV+2 8,PEEK(V+28)AND ( 
255-2TAS) :RETURN 
IPXE (AS}=.THENXE (AS)=1: 
POKEV+29,PEEK(V+29)OR(2 
|AS) rRETURN 

IFXE (AS) =1THENXE(AS)=.: 
POKEV+29, PEEK (V+29) AND ( 
255-2fAS) rRETURN 
IFYE (AS) = .THENYE(AS)=1: 
POKEV+2 3,PEEK (V+23)OR (2 
\kS) : RETURN 

IFYE{AS)=1THENYE (AS)=. : 
POKEV+2 3,PEEK(V+23) AND( 
255-2|AS) :RETURN 
IFPR(AS)=.THENPR(AS) =1: 
POKEV+27,PEEK(V+27)OR(2 
fAS) : RETURN 

IFPR(AS)=1THENPR(AS)=. : 
POKEV+27, PEEK (V+27) AND ( 
255-2IAS) :RETURN 
IFC0=.THENC0=1: RETURN 
IFCO=1THENCO=. :RETURN 
FORX=.T07:FORY=1T0 2:POK 
ECO (X,Y) ,.:NEXTY,X:RETU 
RN 
MC=PEEK(V+37) !MC=MC+1; 
IFMC>256THENMC=. 
1010 POKEV+37,MC: RETURN 
1020 MC=PEEK(V+38) :MC=MC+1: 

IFMC>256THENMC=. 
1030 POKEV+38,MC:RETURN 
104 MSG?="LOCATI0N TO POKE 



SK 910 



GX 920 



CA 930 



JF 940 



AG 950 



AK 960 



AH 96 5 



970 
98 
990 



XD 1000 



SQ 

AS 

ES 
DQ 



■iX 1050 
ES 1060 

XK 1070 

ED 10S0 
EF 1090 

GJ 1100 

EH 1110 
RP 1120 



FA 1121 
DE 1122 
EC 1123 



CM 


1130 


XJ 


1140 


AH 


1150 


FB 


1160 


SE 


1170 


RG 


1180 


OG 


1190 


QQ 


1200 


PB 


1210 


SC 


1220 


DX 


1230 


RC 


1240 


PG 


1245 


RX 


1250 


EC 


1260 


FE 


1270 


MP 


1280 



" :GOSUB820:INPUTA$:LO= 

VAL(AS) 

IFLO<=.ORLO>65 5 35THENB 

ETURN 

GOSUB350:MSG5= "NUMBER 

{SPACE}T0 P0KE":G0SUB8 

20: 1NPUTA5:NU=VAL(A5) 

IFNU<0ORNU>255THENRETU 

RN 

P0KEL0,NU:RETURN 

IFA0=.THENA0=1: POKEV+2 

1,255:F0RX=.T07:S {X)=1 

: NEXT: RETURN 

IFA0=1THENA0=. ;P0KEV+2 

1, . :F0RX=.T07:S (X)=0:N 

EXT: PRINT" {CLR)" : RETUR 

N 

FORX=.TO7:POKEC0 (X,l) , 

155:P0KEC0 (X,2) ,130:NE 

XT: RETURN 

MSGS="SCREEN OR PRINTE 

R?":GOSUB820:WAIT198,1 

:GETA$ 

IFA$<>"P"THENS=1 

0PEN4, (4-S) ,7 

PV-PEEK(V+21) :P0KEV+21 

,. :PRINT#4,"{CLR}L0CAT 

ION" , "POKE" , "OBJECTIVE 
ti 

PRINT #4, V+21,PV, "TURNS 

ON SPRITES 
F0RX=,T07:IFS (X)=.THEN 
NEXT:GOTO1160 
PRINT#4,B1+X,PEEK(B1+X 
) ,"SPRITE"X"POINTER":N 
EXT 

F0RX=.T07:IPS (X)=.THEN 
NEXT:GOTO1180 
PRINT#4, (PEEK(B1+X)) *6 
4 , "DATA" , "SPRITE "X"DAT 
A": NEXT 

IFSTHENPK$="{2 down}pr 
ESS ANY KEY TO CONTINU 
E": PRINT PK$:G0S0B8 70 
IFSTHENPRINT" {CLR} LOCA 
TION","POKE","OBJECTIV 
B 

F0RX=.T07:IFS (X)=.THEN 
NEXT:GOTO1220 
PRINT#4, (V+39+X) ,PEEK( 
V+39+X) ,"SPRITE"X"COLO 
R":NEXT 

IFPEEK{V+28)THEN12 50 
PRINT#4, (V+28) ,PEEK(V+ 
28), "SET MULTICOLOR HO 
DE 

PRINTt4, (V+37) ,PEEK(V+ 
37) , "MULTICOLOR 1" 
PRINT*4,V+38,PEEK(V+3 8 
) , "MULTICOLOR 2 
PRINT #4, V+29, PEEK (V+29 
) ."S^PRITES X EXPAND 
PRINT#4,V+2 3,PEEK(V+23 
) ("SPRITES Y EXPAND 
IFSTHENPRINTPK$:G0SUB8 
70 

IFSTHENPRINT" (CLR)LOCA 
TION", "POKE", "OBJECT IV 



G-28 COMPUTE OCTOBER 1991 



1141 

1149 

1151 

1159 

1161 

1169 

1171 

1179 

1181 

1189 

1191 

1199; 

llAl; 

11A9; 

llBl; 

11B9: 

llCl; 

11C9: 

llDli 

11D9: 

llEl: 

11E9; 

llFll 

11F9; 

1201; 

1209; 

1211: 

1219; 

1221; 

1229; 

1231; 

1239; 

1241; 

1249; 

1251; 

1259; 

1261; 

1269; 

1271; 

1279; 

1281; 

1289; 

1291; 

1299; 

12A1; 

12A9; 

12B1; 

12B9; 

12C1; 

12C9; 

12D1; 

12D9; 

12E1; 

12E9; 

12F1; 

12F9; 

1301; 

1309; 

1311; 

1319: 

1321; 

1329; 

1331; 

1339; 

1341: 

1349; 

1351; 

1359; 

1361; 

1369; 



AD 13 
05 D0 
Da 29 
8D 03 
04 D0 
0D CD 
13 CF 
CE 11 
4C AF 
60 AD 
0E CF 
0D CF 
0D CF 
CF 29 
FC 07 
A9 26 
AD 03 
08 D0 
A9 24 
AD 08 
08 D0 
CE 08 
8D 03 
F0 03 
0C CF 
01 60 
AD 09 
0A D0 
D0 23 
F0 IB 
AD 09 
0A D0 
E9 81 
B4 E4 
E8 E8 

AD aa 

29 10 

0B AD 
23 BD 
10 F0 
04 B0 
D0 9D 
0D D0 
0F D0 
01 8D 
27 8D 
15 D0 
0B CF 
D0 3E 
29 03 
00 D0 
D0 EE 
0C D0 
8D 09 
D0 D0 
AD 15 
60 CE 
70 CE 
AD 54 
4C IF 
CF 29 
5C 13 
F0 F5 
C9 03 
7C 0F 
53 AD 
A9 22 
4C C7 
CF 29 
60 A9 



CF C9 
C9 D5 
F3 SD 
CF 60 
01 60 
05 D0 
CD 0B 
CF A9 
14 CE 
16 CF 
F0 0B 
A9 91 
29 08 
04 F0 
8D FD 
8D FC 
D0 C9 
CE 0A 
8D FC 
D0 C9 
EE 0A 
CF F0 
CF AD 
4C IE 
AD 0B 
EE 0B 
D0 29 
4C 3B 
EE 0C 
CE 0B 
D0 29 
AC 0B 
8D 0B 
E5 E5 
E9 E9 
CF 00 
F0 17 
01 DC 
14 CF 



60 

60 



0C D0 
69 0A 
69 0A 
0A CF 
FE 07 
09 C0 
8D 12 
CE 2B 
D0 19 
F0 11 
0E D0 
CE 0E 
CF EE 
0D A9 
D0 29 
05 CF 
8D 05 
CE D0 
13 AD 
6F 09 
4C 40 
EE IF 
D0 03 
AD 02 
02 CF 
8D F8 
13 CE 
0F D0 
23 8D 



04 B0 

D0 0D 

15 D0 

AD 0F 

AD 09 

B0 01 

CF F0 

01 80 

17 CF 

8D n 

AD 01 
8D 16 
F0 2A 
0B A9 
07 4C 
07 8D 
IE F0 
D0 4C 
07 SD 
F7 F0 
D0 4C 
01 60 
0D CF 
12 A9 
CF 09 
CF CE 
01 F0 

12 CE 
CF AD 
CF EE 
01 D0 
CF B9 
D0 60 
E6 E6 
EA EA 
60 AD 
AD 0E 
8D 0D 
AD 0D 
AD 0B 
A2 03 
CA 10 
8D 0D 
SD 0F 
80 3ft 
8D FF 
3D 15 
CF CE 
CF AD 
AD 0C 
B0 09 
4C E6 
D0 AD 
0D D0 
00 3D 
3F 8D 
F0 01 
CF 20 

06 AD 
00 DC 
6F F0 

13 AD 
CF AD 
CE IF 
CF 29 
29 04 

07 SD 
21 CF 
03 CE 
F8 07 



14 AD 4E 
AD 15 E3 
A9 00 BC 
CF 29 75 
D0 69 7C 
60 AD 2B 

01 60 20 

46 CF 76 
F0 01 FF 
CF AD ID 
DC 8D 36 
CF AD 96 
AD 00 7C 
25 8D 64 
E9 11 F3 
FD 07 2D 
06 CE 03 
E9 11 3B 
FD 07 C4 

06 EE 0A 
E9 11 57 
A9 03 5E 
29 02 AD 

02 8D 89 

11 D0 IE 
09 D0 F0 

03 CE 9B 
0C CF 67 
0B CF 3 
09 D0 34 
03 EE 5B 

47 12 B2 
E2 E3 CE 
E7 E7 BE 
EB EB C6 

15 00 92 
CF F0 E3 
CF A9 56 
CF 29 74 
CF C9 0B 
BD 03 9E 
F7 AD 40 
D0 AD 2B 
D0 A9 3B 
CF R9 86 

07 AD 3D 
D0 AD Dl 
09 CF C5 
2B CF C5 
D0 CD FB 
EE 0C EC 

12 CE El 

14 CF 30 
EE 0F 98 
0A CF 09 

15 D0 12 
60 AD A2 
46 0F B7 
57 CF 6F 
8D 02 FA 
06 20 6F 
00 CF EE 
IF CF 60 
CF 20 43 

08 F0 63 
F0 19 16 
F9 07 7F 
AD 21 AB 
IF CF 0A 
8D F9 60 



1371 

1379 

1381 

1389 

1391 

1399 

13A1 

13A9 

13B1 

13B9 

13C1 

13C9 

13D1 

13D9 

13E1 

13E9 

13F1 

13F9 

1401 

1409 

1411 

1419 

1421 

1429 

1431 

1439 

1441 

1449 

1451 

1459 

1461 

1469 

1471 

1479 

1481 

1489 

1491 

1499 

14A1 

14A9 

14B1: 

14B9; 

14C1: 

14C9: 

14D1: 

1409: 

14E1: 

14E9: 

14F1: 

14F9: 

1501: 

1509: 

1511: 

1519: 

1521: 

1529: 

1531: 

1539: 

1541: 

1549: 

1551: 

1559; 

1561: 

1569: 

1571: 

1579: 

1581: 

1589: 

1591: 

1599: 



: 07 AD 00 
:CE 2D CF 
:A9 07 8D 
;CE 00 D0 
:13 AD 57 
:CF 4C C7 
;07 8D F9 
lF5 F0 E6 
:CF C9 08 
;2D CF EE 
;EE 02 D0 
:CF F0 01 
;CF AD 02 
:4C 04 14 
;AD 00 CF 
;57 CF 49 
;EE 00 CF 
;D0 29 01 
;4C 21 14 
;EE 01 CF 
;CE 00 CF 
;D0 29 01 
;AC 00 CF 
;D0 60 20 
4C 7C 0F 
AD 15 D0 
; 54 CE D0 
00 DC 29 
03 BD 00 
10 F7 AD 
A9 01 8D 
A9 27 3D 
AD 15 D0 
AD 00 CF 
CF D0 2A 
CF CE 07 
IC A9 00 
D0 29 F3 
CF BD 53 
A9 20 9D 
8D 2B D0 
CE A2 06 
90 08 A9 

22 CE CA 

23 CE 09 
07 99 48 
10 ED 60 
12 15 AO 
A9 0C 8D 
15 03 58 
8D 14 03 
03 58 60 
EA 00 00 
F0 03 EE 
D0 2D AC 
53 D3 EE 
B9 00 67 
50 CF A8 
D0 05 A9 
03 99 53 
49 CF D0 
D0 A9 0B 
80 49 CF 
4C AA 16 
4C CF D0 
3A CF C9 
15 AD 43 
20 25 16 
CF C9 06 
4C CF BD 



EE 
D0 



D0 
B9 47 
5C 13 



D0 C9 IE 
AD 2D CF 
20 CF CE 
CE 02 D0 
CF 49 0C 

13 A9 21 
07 AD 00 

20 CF 
08 A9 
2C CF EE 
4C C7 13 
60 A9 03 
CF 29 02 
A9 02 8D 
C9 11 D0 

02 3D 57 
CE 01 D0 
F0 03 CE 
CE 01 CF 
AD 00 CF 
EE 01 D0 

03 EE 
12 
20 

AD 03 CF 

29 01 F0 

03 4C 50 
10 F0 01 
D0 9D 04 
2C CF 8D 
03 CF 8D 
FA 07 8D 

09 0C SD 
8D 13 CF 
AD 4D CE 
D0 CE 05 
3D 03 CF 

15 00 
C9 2E 

04 60 
8D 2A CF 
BD 
00 

10 EE A0 

30 99 70 
D8 99 70 
78 AD 14 
15 03 8D 

14 03 A9 
60 73 AD 
AD 13 15 
20 16 15 

00 00 AD 
20 D0 CE 
50 CF A9 
4F CF AC 
29 0F 69 
AO 4F CF 
06 4C 4A 
D8 8D 71 
0F A9 00 
8D 21 D0 
AD 00 CE 
C9 01 F0 
lA 20 E0 

01 D0 03 
CF C9 01 
4C 43 16 
Fa 22 A2 
El 16 90 



SD 
04 
53 



23 CE 
90 23 



F0 


19 


55 


10 


03 


F7 


20 


CF 


A4 


4C 


C7 


Dl 


8D 


57 


81 


8D 


F8 


CA 


D0 


C9 


37 


AD 


2D 


04 


00 


8D 


B4 


00 


D0 


16 


CE 


07 


ED 


8D 


07 


B5 


F0 


03 


BE 


01 


CF 


5C 


09 


AD 


01 


CF 


60 


C2 


AD 


01 


IE 


02 


D0 


2R 


D0 


21 


11 


F0 


lA 


F8 


AD 


01 


31 


02 


D0 


C9 


80 


03 


D5 


E8 


13 


99 


D0 


46 


9A 


0F 


AD 


CI 


14 


AD 


0B 


60 


A2 


BD 


D0 


CA 


E0 


2E 


CF 


E0 


3A 


CF 


79 


FB 


07 


FE 


15 


D0 


Fl 


CE 


04 


C4 


80 


04 


AA 


00 


D0 


33 


AO 


15 


D2 


AE 


2E 


43 


D0 


05 


79 


A9 


02 


8E 


EE 


28 


F4 


C9 


0A 


80 


CE 


FE 


7F 


06 


B9 


D0 


04 


A9 


A3 


03 


33 


4B 


03 


8D 


72 


13 


15 


F0 


15 


8D 


5B 


12 


15 


32 


3D 


15 


4F 


4C 


31 


A7 


35 


CF 


Al 


4E 


CF 


8A 


01 


99 


5A 


4F 


OF 


A5 


04 


3D 


6B 


29 


07 


82 


15 


A9 


0A 


CF 


CE 


F3 


3D 


20 


A7 


A9 


0F 


3F 


D0 


03 


59 


51 


AD 


DF 


15 


AD 


CD 


20 


F9 


CA 


00 


03 


FD 


AD 


4C 


06 


06 


8E 


IC 


00 


D4 


AF 



15A1 


:9D 


07 


D4 


CA 


10 


F4 


A9 


80 


CB 


15A9 


:8D 


04 


D4 


8D 


0B 


D4 


A9 


81 


8F 


15B1 


:8D 


04 


D4 


8D 


0B 


04 


60 


A9 


20 


15B9 


:80 


8D 


04 


D4 


8D 


0B 


D4 


60 


F7 


15C1 


:EE 


01 


CE 


F0 


14 


AD 


01 


OE 


B4 


15C9 


:8D 


00 


D4 


29 


07 


D0 


09 


EE 


64 


15D1 


:02 


CE 


AD 


02 


CE 


8D 


01 


D4 


0A 


15D9 


.60 


A9 


02 


8D 


00 


CE 


60 


AD 


61 


15E1 


.02 


OF 


C9 


7F 


F0 


0C 


C9 


6F 


EC 


15E9 


F0 


0D 


A9 


0F 


8D 


01 


D4 


4C 


5C 


15F1 


F8 


15 


A9 


05 


80 


01 


04 


60 


DD 


15F9 


AD 


43 


CF 


F0 


01 


60 


A9 


08 


B9 


1601 


8D 


41 


CF 


8D 


42 


CF 


8D 


44 


C7 


1609 


CF 


A9 


01 


8D 


43 


CF 


A2 


06 


25 


1611 


BD 


E8 


16 


9D 


07 


04 


CA 


10 


24 


1619 


F7 


A9 


80 


8D 


0B 


D4 


A9 


81 


15 


1621 


SD 


0B 


D4 


60 


AD 


42 


CF 


69 


F6 


1629 


0A 


8D 


42 


CF 


8D 


08 


D4 


CE 


03 


1631 


41 


CF 


D0 


12 


A9 


0F 


8D 


08 


D9 


1639 


D4 


A9 


10 


SD 


0B 


04 


A9 


00 


14 


1641 


8D 


3A 


CF 


8D 


43 


CF 


60 


AD 


5D 


1649 


46 


CF 


F0 


31 


C9 


03 


F0 


2E 


28 


1651 


C9 


01 


F0 


3B 


A9 


80 


8D 


0B 


E9 


1659 


D4 


A2 


06 


BD 


EF 


16 


9D 


07 


4F 


1661 


D4 


CA 


10 


F7 


A9 


02 


8D 


0S 


A4 


1669 


D4 


A9 


F8 


8D 


05 


CD 


A9 


03 


13 


1671 


3D 


46 


CF 


A9 


80 


8D 


08 


D4 


AF 


1679 


A9 


81 


80 


0B 


D4 


60 


A9 


80 


39 


1681 


SD 


0B 


D4 


A9 


00 


8D 


46 


OF 


FE 


1689 


8D 


43 


CF 


80 


3A 


CF 


60 


A9 


9B 


1691 


80 


BD 


0B 


D4 


A2 


06 


BD 


EF 


A8 


1699 


16 


9D 


07 


D4 


CA 


10 


F7 


A9 


96 


16A1 


06 


8D 


08 


D4 


A9 


F6 


4C 


6C 


B0 


16A9 


16 


A9 


01 


80 


00 


CE 


80 


02 


9C 


16B1 


CE 


A9 


96 


80 


01 


CE 


A2 


06 


E9 


16B9 


BD 


El 


16 


9D 


00 


D4 


CA 


10 


D2 


16C1 


F7 


A9 


03 


8D 


15 


D4 


A9 


01 


DD 


1609- 


8D 


16 


D4 


A9 


11 


8D 


17 


D4 


39 


1601 


A9 


IF 


BD 


18 


D4 


A9 


80 


BD 


A9 


16D9- 


04 


D4 


A9 


81 


8D 


04 


04 


60 


11 


16E1- 


FF 


01 


05 


09 


80 


07 


FO 


FF 


99 


16E9: 


07 


09 


09 


S0 


07 


73 


FF 


07 


26 


16F1: 


09 


09 


80 


37 


F7 


00 


00 


00 


25 



Mike Sedlezsky lives in Misstssauga, 
Ontafio, Canada. □ 



ADD CHECK 



Daniel Lightner 

This handy utility checks any program 
stored on a disk for the program's start- 
ing and ending addresses. Add 
Check, which is short for Address Check- 
er, also gives the number of bytes the 
program occupies. 

Add Check is written in machine lan- 
guage. To enter it, use MLX, our ma- 
chine language entry program. See "Typ- 
ing Aids" elsewhere in this section. 
When MLX prompts, respond with the 
following values. 

Starting address; 0301 
Ending address: 0A9g 

OCTOBER 1991 COMPUTE G-33 



PROGRAMS 



Be sure to save a copy of the program 
before exiting MLX. 

Add Check loads and runs like a BA- 
SIC program. Provide the program 
name and make sure the disk with 
that file is in drive 8; then hit Return, 

Add Check checks the disk and 
drive to make sure they're ready; then 
it reads the file and returns the starting 
address and the ending address plus 
1. The number of bytes is then dis- 
played. If you wish to check another 
program, just type RUN again and 
press Return. 



36 2E 

8D 66 

02 4D 

09 4D 
0R 7B 
F5 54 

03 87 
A9 D5 
FF FA 
00 57 
34 38 
CE 66 
FF 02 
FF 91 
11 72 
FF 6E 
11 E8 
FF CF 

10 54 
F3 65 
17 90 
00 IE 
7C 94 
FF BC 
5C DF 
17 4E 
17 51 
FF 22 
7A 15 
FF E7 
80 0D 
FF ED 
80 08 
A9 BF 
09 12 
0R E7 
F5 6E 
A9 6F 
A0 19 
C8 7D 
FE E8 
FF BF 
0A 26 
F5 A2 
CD 50 
D2 12 
34 4C 
F9 DB 
20 B3 



ADD CHECK 












0801 


:0B 


08 


0A 


00 


9E 


32 


30 


0809 


32 


00 


00 


00 


00 


A9 


00 


0811 


.20 


D0 


80 


21 


D0 


80 


B2 


0819 


.A9 


93 


20 


D2 


FF 


20 


07 


0821 


.20 


E5 


09 


A0 


00 


B9 


52 


0829 


20 


D2 


FF 


C8 


C0 


0B 


D0 


0831 


.20 


F3 


09 


20 


73 


09 


A 9 


0839 


A2 


93 


A0 


0A 


20 


BD 


FF 


0841 


0F 


A2 


08 


A0 


0F 


20 


BA 


0849 


2B 


00 


FF 


AC 


34 


03 


A2 


0851 


BD 


96 


0A 


99 


35 


33 


EE 


0859 


03 


C8 


E8 


E0 


05 


D0 


Fl 


0861 


34 


03 


AD 


FF 


FF 


FF 


FF 


0869 


FF 


FF 


7B 


11 


F2 


FF 


FF 


0871 


FF 


FF 


FF 


7F 


11 


FF 


AF 


0879 


F2 


FB 


FF 


FF 


11 


FF 


Fl 


0881 


BC 


11 


FF 


Bl 


11 


FF 


FF 


0889 


FF 


Bl 


11 


FF 


FF 


10 


B3 


0891 


FF 


FB 


FF 


Bl 


11 


FF 


FF 


0899 


B2 


FB 


FF 


F6 


FF 


FF 


FF 


aSAl 


10 


3B 


FF 


FF 


FF 


3C 


FF 


08A9 


48 


08 


FF 


66 


F8 


FF 


08 


08B1 


88 


6A 


66 


81 


9A 


6F 


FF 


08B9 


FF 


76 


81 


9A 


6F 


FF 


FF 


08C1 


7B 


FF 


88 


FF 


58 


08 


FF 


08C9 


01 


88 


80 


81 


9A 


6F 


FF 


08D1 


58 


00 


FF 


8C 


FF 


58 


01 


08D9 


5C 


00 


FF 


38 


FF 


5C 


03 


08E1 


8E 


76 


FF 


3C 


FF 


77 


SE 


08E9 


FF 


88 


FF 


7A 


81 


4E 


6F 


08F1 


81 


F8 


00 


9F 


FF 


FF 


08 


08F9 


88 


6A 


67 


FF 


02 


20 


C3 


0901 


A9 


0F 


20 


C3 


FF 


A5 


FB 


0909 


BC 


02 


A5 


FC 


8D 


BD 


02 


0911 


0D 


20 


D2 


FF 


AD 


B2 


02 


0919 


FF 


F0 


56 


A0 


00 


B9 


50 


0921 


20 


D2 


FF 


C8 


C0 


13 


00 


0929 


A6 


FB 


A5 


FC 


20 


CD 


BD 


0931 


0D 


20 


D2 


FF 


20 


D2 


FF 


0939 


00 


B9 


70 


0A 


20 


D2 


FF 


0941 


C0 


11 


D0 


F5 


A6 


FD 


A5 


0949 


20 


CD 


BD 


A9 


0D 


20 


D2 


0951. 


20 


D2 


FF 


A0 


00 


B9 


81 


0959- 


20 


D2 


FF 


CB 


C0 


12 


00 


0961: 


AD 


BB 


02 


AE 


BA 


02 


20 


0969: 


BD 


A9 


0D 


20 


D2 


FF 


20 


0971: 


FF 


60 


A0 


00 


A9 


00 


8D 


0979: 


03 


20 


E4 


FF 


C9 


00 


F0 


0981: 


C9 


14 


F0 


39 


C9 


0D 


F0 



0989 


C9 


7B 


B0 


ED 


C9 


20 


0991 


C9 


22 


F0 


E5 


C9 


2C 


0999 


AC 


34 


03 


C0 


14 


F0 


09A1 


D2 


FF 


20 


B4 


09 


4C 


09A9 


AC 


34 


03 


C0 


00 


F0 


09B1 


02 


FF 


60 


AC 


34 


03 


09B9 


03 


EE 


34 


03 


60 


AC 


agci 


C0 


01 


B0 


03 


4C 


7A 


09C9 


02 


FF 


38 


AO 


34 


03 


0901 


8D 


34 


03 


4C 


7A 


09 


09D9 


39 


06 


0A 


20 


D2 


FF 


09E1 


4C 


D0 


F5 


60 


A9 


00 


09E9 


FF 


20 


02 


FF 


A9 


96 


09F1 


FF 


60 


A9 


0D 


20 


02 


09F9 


D2 


FF 


A9 


9A 


20 


02 


0A01 


3E 


20 


D2 


FF 


60 


0D 


0A09 


44 


2E 


20 


43 


48 


45 


0A11 


00 


43 


4F 


50 


59 


52 


0A19 


48 


54 


20 


31 


39 


39 


0A21 


43 


4F 


40 


50 


55 


54 


0A29 


50 


55 


42 


4C 


49 


43 


0A31 


49 


4F 


4E 


53 


20 


49 


0A39 


4C 


20 


4C 


54 


44 


0D 


0A41 


4C 


20 


52 


49 


47 


48 


0A49 


20 


52 


45 


53 


45 


52 


0A51 


44 


46 


49 


4C 


45 


20 


0A59 


40 


45 


20 


3F 


96 


53 


0A61 


52 


54 


49 


4E 


47 


20 


0A69 


44 


52 


45 


53 


53 


20 


0A71 


45 


4E 


44 


49 


4E 


47 


0A79 


44 


44 


52 


45 


53 


53 


0A31 


96 


4E 


55 


40 


42 


45 


0A89 


4F 


46 


20 


42 


59 


54 


0A91 


20 


9A 


49 


2F 


4F 


2C 


0A99- 


52 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 



90 E9 2E 
F0 El 50 
DA 20 B5 
7A 09 E3 
CA 20 05 
99 35 lA 
34 03 E0 
09 20 39 
E9 01 A9 
A9 00 16 
C8 C0 76 
20 02 A7 
20 02 19 
FF 20 8E 
FF A9 4A 
41 44 94 
4 3 4B 2C 

49 47 59 
31 20 AE 
4 5 0D EC 
41 54 F5 
4E 54 D3 
41 4C 6F 
54 53 B9 
56 45 45 
4E 41 8F 
54 41 49 
41 44 43 
9A 96 F8 
20 41 E9 
20 9A 22 
52 20 DF 
45 53 F8 

50 2C 70 
00 00 06 



Daniel Lightner, a frequent contributor, 
lives in Sidney, Montana. □ 



SONG MACHINE 

Daniel Lightner 

You don't have to know anything about 
musical theory in order to make music 
with this program and a 64. Song Ma- 
chine is a program for designing 
sound and music or for entering music 
out of songbooks and playing it back. 
With the 64's three voices, you can en- 
ter chords as well, producing some rath- 
er sophisticated arrangements. 

Song Machine is written in machine 
language. To enter it, use MLX, our ma- 
chine language entry program. See "Typ- 
ing Aids," found elsewhere in this sec- 
tion. When /WLX prompts, respond with 
the following values. 

Starting address: 0801 
Ending address: 2277 

Be sure to save a copy of the program 
before exiting MLX. 



Making Music 

When you're ready to use Song Ma- 
chine, load and run it as you would a 
BASIC program. Two staffs, a bass 
clef, and a treble clef will appear on 
the screen. Up the left side of the 
screen are the names of the notes that 
correspond to the various lines and 
spaces of the musical staffs, These 
notes represent the range of pitch for 
each level of the staff. 

On the right side of the screen is an 
area that is framed off from the rest of 
the staff. This is where you edit notes. 
At the top of this area, you will see a 
note with two little flags extending 
from its stem. This is a sixteenth note. 
Press the N key, and you can scroll 
through the whote range of nine notes, 
five rests, and the flat and sharp acci- 
dentals. Hold the Shift key down as 
you press N to scroll back through 
them. Now scroll back to the sixteenth 
note. 

Below the staffs you'll see a tine in- 
dicating which of the 64's three voices 
you are editing and the instrument 
that the voice is set to emulate. Press 
to toggle the voice on and off. Turn 
the voice on now. 

Play a Note 

Use the cursor key to move the note 
up and down the staff. Make sure the 
volume on your monitor is turned up; 
then press P to hear what the note 
sounds like. Move the note and try 
again. Now use the N and P keys to 
scroll through the notes while playing 
them. Notice the different time values 
for the different types of notes; these 
time values and pitch values are 
based on figures found in Commodore 
64 Programmer's Reference Guide. 

When you first run the program, 
you'll see the number at the top left 
of the screen. This indicates the num- 
ber of the note being edited. Using the 
Cursor Right key, move the note off the 
work area. The note now being edited 
is number 1. There are 999 places per 
voice reserved for notes, from 0-998. 

Now, using the steps mentioned 
above, adjust the note and move it off 
the work area. Repeat this process sev- 
eral more times. Hold down the Shift 
key and press P. The notes will play up 
to the last one before the work area. 
Use the Cursor Left key to move back 



G-34 COMPUTE OCTOBER 1991 



a few notes and play them again. 
Press the space bar if you wish to 
abort playing. There are seven differ- 
ent instruments from which to select. 
Press the I key to change them. 

To move to another voice, press V. 
Remember that you cannot hear a 
voice until you turn it on and that if an- 
other voice is still on, you'll hear it, too. 
The voices will play only up to the num- 
ber of notes indicated for each voice. 

Sharps and Flats 

There is no time lapse when using the 
sharp and flat accidentals. If a sharp, 
for instance, is placed on any F line, 
then all the notes on any F line will be- 
come sharp. Should Song Machine en- 
counter another sharp accidental on 
the F line, notes on these lines will be 
returned to normal. To return the F to 
sharp, another sharp accidental must 
then be entered. Flats toggle on and 
off the same way 

When played, rests are silent, but 
their values correspond with those of 
notes of the same length. For example, 
a quarter rest will hold for the same 
length of time as a quarter note. A half 
rest will hold for the same length as a 
half note, and so on. 

Copy a Range 

Music quite often is repetitive, using 
the same range of notes again and 
again. Rather than having to reenter re- 
petitive passages manually, you can 
use Song Machine's special command 
for copying them. To enter the Copy 
mode, press the Shift key and the C 
key simultaneously Below the staffs a 
prompt appears indicating that the com- 
puter is ready for input. 

First, enter a V and then either a 1, 
2, or 3 for the voice that you'll be cop- 
ying from. Next, press the colon (:) fol- 
lowed by a number less than 999 to in- 
dicate the note where you'll begin cop- 
ying. Then press the Minus key {-) fol- 
lowed by another number less than 
999 to indicate the last note in the 
copy range. Now enter TOV and the 
number 1 , 2, or 3 for the voice that you 
want the range to be copied to. Then 
type another colon followed by a num- 
ber to indicate where you want the 
range to start. The press Return. 

The following example is how a typ- 
ical copy line might look. 



THe Song Machine notes, 
rests, and occidentals 





Thirty-second 
note 





Sixteenth 
note 





Eighth 
note 


0' 


Dotted eighth 
note 





Quarter 
note 


J* 


Dotted quarter 
note 


o 


Half 
note 


o» 


Dotted 
half note 


o 


Whole 
note 


-— 


Whole 
rest 


— 


Half 
rest 


t 


Quarter 
rest 


7 


Eighth 
rest 


f 


Sixteenth 
rest 


% 


Sharp 


b 


Flat 



V1:0-467TOV3:734 

This example copies the range of 
notes 0-467 of voice 1 and places 
them in voice 3 starting at note 734. 

To copy a range of notes within the 
same voice, you might have a line that 
looks something like the following. 

V3:0-15TOV3:16 

Type a $ at any time to list the disk di- 
rectory. Pause the listing by hitting any 
key. The Run/Stop key aborts a listing. 

Hold Shift and press S or L to enter 
the Save or Load mode. Just give the 
desired filename and press Return. 
The program saves the same amount 
of memory each time whether it's used 
or not. 

To clear the current voice, press CIr/ 
Home. Press Shift-Clr/Home to clear all 
the voices. When you're ready to stop, 
press Shift-Q to quit the program. 

COMMAND TABLE 



N and Stiift-N 


Scroll through notes 




V 




Change voices 






1 




Change i 


nstruments 




P 




Play edit 


note 








Shift-P 




Play string of notes 









Toggle voice 


on/off 




Space bar 




Abort Play mode 






Shift-C 




Copy mode 








Shift-S 




Save file 










Shilt-L 




Load file 










Clr/Home 




Clear active voice 




Shift-Clr/Home 


Clear all voices 






$ 




Directory 










Cursor Up/Down Move notes 


up/down 






staff 










Cursor Left/Right Move note pointer left/ 






right 










V2;0-15TOV2:16 Copy format 








Shift-Q 




Quit 










SONG MACHINE 










0301:22 


08 


0A 00 9E 


32 


30 


38 


BB 


0809:38 


20 


53 4F 4E 


47 


20 


4D 


B9 


0811:41 


43 


43 49 4B 


45 


20 


31 


29 


0819:39 


39 


31 20 20 


20 


20 


20 


IE 


0821:00 


00 


00 EA 19 


30 


80 


AD 


57 


0829:24 


08 


8D B2 02 


AD 


25 


03 


43 


3831:8D 


B3 


02 AD 26 


08 


85 


FD 


6A 


0339:AD 


27 


08 85 FE 


A9 


8E 


85 


84 


0841:FB 


A9 


08 85 FC 


18 


A5 


FB 


A2 


0849:6D 


B2 


02 8D B4 


02 


A5 


FC 


CB 


0B51:6D 


B3 


02 80 B5 


02 


A0 


00 


15 


0859:B1 


FB 


91 FD 18 


A5 


FB 


69 


0C 



OCTOBER 1991 COMPUTE G-35 



PROGRAMS 



0861 


:01 


85 


FB 


A5 


FC 


69 


00 


85 


40 


0A91 


F0 


37 


A5 


CB 


09 


40 


F0 


13 


Al 


0CC1 


:AE 


77 


00 


FF 


22 


2E 


A2 


66 


84 


0869 


:FC 


IS 


A5 


FD 


69 


01 


85 


FD 


EA 


0A99 


A5 


CB 


C9 


3F 


F0 


2B 


A5 


CB 


EB 


000 9 


:77 


40 


FF 


22 


2E 


A2 


FF 


31 


FC 


0871 


:A5 


FE 


69 


00 


85 


FE 


A5 


FB 


B0 


0AA1 


A8 


04 


CB 


F0 


FC 


A5 


CB 


09 


A3 


0CD1 


:70 


16 


FF 


F0 


52 


A5 


13 


31 


37 


0879 


:CD 


B4 


02 


F0 


03 


4C 


88 


08 


4F 


0AA9 


40 


F0 


FA 


A9 


00 


20 


02 


FF 


A2 


0CD9 


:FF 


16 


FF 


22 


52 


A5 


16 


77 


66 


0881 


:A5 


FC 


CD 


B5 


02 


F0 


03 


40 


OE 


0AB1 


20 


E4 


FF 


AA 


20 


E4 


FF 


20 


6E 


0CE1 


:CA 


FF 


22 


2F 


FF 


31 


42 


57 


37 


0889 


:59 


08 


6C 


26 


08 


08 


AO 


18 


4F 


0AB9 


23 


87 


A9 


20 


20 


D2 


FF 


20 


E4 


0CE9 


;CA 


FF 


22 


2F 


FF 


36 


77 


00 


66 


0891 


:D0 


29 


F0 


69 


0C 


8D 


18 


00 


A0 


0AC1 


E4 


FF 


F0 


09 


20 


D2 


FF 


D0 


20 


0OF1 


:FF 


22 


2F 


06 


26 


CA 


8E 


D8 


2B 


0899 


:78 


A5 


01 


29 


FB 


85 


01 


A0 


9A 


0AC9 


F6 


A9 


01 


20 


03 


FF 


20 


CC 


11 


0OF9 


:02 


E0 


00 


F0 


IE 


AE 


D9 


02 


BB 


08A1 


:00 


B9 


00 


D0 


99 


00 


30 


B9 


14 


0AD1 


FF 


A5 


CB 


09 


40 


F0 


FA 


A9 


CA 


0001 


:E0 


00 


F0 


20 


CA 


8E 


09 


02 


Fl 


08A9 


:FF 


D0 


99 


FF 


30 


B9 


FE 


01 


59 


0AD9 


00 


80 


F3 


03 


40 


16 


81 


20 


DO 


0009 


:E0 


00 


F0 


18 


AE 


EF 


02 


6C 


DB 


0BB1 


:99 


FE 


31 


B9 


FO 


02 


99 


FD 


7C 


0AE1 


E4 


FF 


85 


FB 


20 


E4 


FF 


05 


72 


0011 


:11 


03 


AE 


D4 


02 


BE 


04 


D4 


BE 


08B9 


:32 


B9 


FC 


03 


99 


FC 


33 


B9 


0F 


0AE9 


FB 


60 


20 


60 


82 


20 


E4 


FF 


70 


0019 


:40 


61 


84 


AE 


05 


02 


8E 


0B 


0C 


08C1 


:FB 


D4 


99 


FB 


34 


B9 


FA 


05 


40 


0AF1 


40 


E4 


FF 


20 


39 


8F 


A0 


00 


B0 


0021 


:D4 


4C 


70 


84 


AE 


D6 


02 


BE 


72 


08C9 


;99 


FA 


35 


B9 


F9 


06 


99 


F9 


FF 


0AF9 


B9 


E7 


94 


20 


02 


FF 


08 


00 


62 


0029 


:12 


04 


4C 


7F 


84 


20 


BB 


84 


90 


08D1 


:36 


C0 


FF 


F0 


04 


08 


40 


14 


20 


0B01 


06 


D0 


F5 


20 


60 


8F 


20 


52 


E2 


0031 


:20 


5E 


85 


A9 


00 


80 


Fi 


02 


5A 


08D9 


:8a 


A5 


01 


09 


04 


85 


01 


58 


D4 


0B09 


8F 


A0 


00 


B9 


06 


02 


99 


21 


3D 


0039 


:20 


B9 


85 


20 


32 


85 


20 


DB 


45 


08E1 


:A9 


80 


85 


FB 


A9 


32 


85 


FC 


75 


0B11 


4E 


08 


C0 


06 


00 


F5 


20 


00 


58 


0041 


:86 


20 


eB 


37 


60 


AD 


C2 


02 


CD 


0BE9 


:A0 


00 


B9 


2D 


95 


91 


FB 


08 


08 


0B19 


82 


40 


E3 


82 


20 


39 


SF 


A0 


CD 


0049 


:09 


01 


F0 


29 


C9 


02 


F0 


4A 


BB 


08F1 


:C0 


48 


D0 


F6 


A9 


00 


80 


E5 


40 


0B21 


00 


B9 


El 


94 


20 


02 


FF 


08 


40 


0051 


:ad 


CA 


02 


80 


CO 


02 


AD 


OB 


A3 


08F9 


:03 


A9 


00 


80 


21 


D0 


80 


20 


56 


0B29 


C0 


06 


D0 


F5 


20 


60 


8F 


20 


5C 


0059 


:02 


8D 


CD 


02 


AD 


AF 


02 


80 


6F 


0901 


:d0 


AD 


14 


03 


80 


11 


03 


AD 


FD 


0B3i 


52 


8F 


20 


C0 


32 


20 


FC 


82 


75 


0061 


;B3 


02 


AD 


B0 


02 


8D 


B4 


02 


48 


0909 


:15 


03 


8D 


12 


03 


78 


A9 


23 


A9 


0B39 


A0 


00 


B9 


21 


4E 


99 


06 


02 


51 


0069 


:A0 


Bl 


02 


30 


B5 


02 


AD 


B2 


A3 


0911 


:8D 


14 


03 


A9 


84 


80 


15 


03 


71 


0B41 


08 





06 


D0 


F5 


A9 


00 


8D 


9D 


0071 


:02 


8D 


B6 


02 


60 


AO 


C6 


02 


30 


0919 


:58 


20 


49 


83 


A9 


00 


8D 


BF 


E8 


0B49 


F3 


03 


40 


36 


31 


20 


CC 


FF 


20 


0079 


:8D 


00 


02 


AO 


07 


02 


80 


CD 


D7 


0921 


:02 


8D 


C0 


02 


80 


01 


02 


8D 


D4 


0B51 


A9 


00 


8D 


15 


00 


85 


90 


A9 


C0 


0D81 


:02 


AD 


A7 


02 


8D 


B3 


02 


AD 


0A 


0929 


:B7 


02 


80 


ee 


02 


8D 


F3 


03 


06 


0B59 


.00 


A2 


08 


A0 


01 


20 


BA 


FF 


21 


0DB9 


:A8 


02 


3D 


B4 


02 


AD 


A9 


02 


91 


0931 


:A0 


00 


A9 


00 


99 


21 


4E 


08 


7F 


0B61 


AD 


34 


03 


A2 


35 


A0 


03 


20 


38 


0D91 


:BD 


B5 


02 


AD 


AA 


02 


80 


B6 


2A 


0939 


:C0 


06 


D0 


F6 


A0 


00 


A9 


00 


0F 


0B69 


BD 


FF 


A9 


01 


80 


F3 


03 


60 


46 


0D99 


:02 


60 


AO 


08 


02 


8D 


CC 


02 


F0 


0941 


:99 


00 


D4 


C8 


C0 


19 


D0 


F6 


4A 


0B71 


:A9 


B0 


85 


FB 


A9 


36 


35 


FO 


27 


0DA1 


:AD 


C9 


02 


8D 


CD 


02 


AD 


AB 


9B 


0949 


:20 


20 


8F 


A0 


00 


A9 


00 


99 


31 


0B79 


A9 


FB 


A2 


29 


A0 


4E 


20 


D8 


Al 


0DA9 


:a2 


80 


B3 


02 


AD 


AC 


02 


80 


70 


0951 


:F8 


07 


C8 


C0 


08 


00 


F6 


A0 


08 


0631 


:FF 


A9 


00 


8D 


F3 


03 


40 


36 


55 


0DB1 


:B4 


02 


AO 


AD 


02 


8D 


B5 


02 


EA 


0959 


:00 


A9 


07 


99 


27 


00 


CB 


C0 


IF 


0B39 


:81 


A9 


00 


A2 


FF 


A0 


FF 


4C 


03 


0DB9 


:AD 


AB 


02 


8D 


86 


02 


60 


AD 


9B 


0961 


:03 


D0 


F6 


A0 


00 


A9 


46 


99 


61 


0B91 


:05 


FF 


A0 


00 


AE 


02 


02 


CA 


F5 


0DC1 


:C2 


02 


09 


01 


F0 


0E 


09 


02 


50 


0969 


01 


D0 


C8 


C8 


C0 


10 


00 


F5 


B3 


0B99 


:BD 


99 


95 


85 


FB 


BO 


90 


95 


A5 


0DC9 


:F0 


14 


AO 


CI 


02 


09 


01 


F0 


50 


0971 


;A0 


00 


A2 


00 


BO 


05 


95 


99 


32 


0BA1 


85 


FC 


A9 


19 


91 


FB 


18 


A5 


D2 


0DD1 


:17 


40 


15 


87 


AD 


BF 


02 


C9 


OF 


0979 


00 


D0 


C8 


C8 


E8 


E0 


09 


00 


13 


0BA9 


FB 


69 


01 


85 


FB 


A5 


FC 


69 


6A 


0009 


:01 


F0 


00 


4C 


15 


87 


AD 


00 


F9 


0981 


F3 


A0 


00 


B9 


DE 


95 


99 


A7 


79 


0BB1 


00 


85 


FC 


A5 


FB 


DD 


9F 


95 


4F 


0DE1 


:02 


09 


01 


F0 


03 


4C 


15 


87 


99 


0989 


02 


C8 


C0 


0C 


00 


FS 


A9 


01 


5A 


0BB9 


F0 


03 


4C 


15 


83 


A5 


FO 


DD 


6E 


0OE9 


:40 


07 


87 


A9 


10 


85 


06 


A9 


65 


0991 


8D 


C2 


02 


80 


C3 


02 


A9 


02 


AP 


0BC1 


A2 


95 


00 


DE 


BD 


A5 


95 


85 


CB 


0OF1 


:00 


85 


03 


20 


60 


E5 


20 


FA 


20 


0999 


8D 


C4 


02 


A9 


03 


80 


C5 


02 


5A 


0BC9 


FB 


BD 


A8 


95 


85 


FC 


A9 


00 


2F 


0DP9 


:36 


A9 


10 


85 


D6 


A9 


00 


85 


FE 


09A1 


20 


DD 


8E 


20 


66 


83 


20 


39 


C9 


0BD1 


91 


FB 


08 


91 


FB 


60 


AD 


02 


61 


0E01 


;03 


20 


60 


E5 


A0 


00 


B9 


94 


08 


09A9 


8F 


A9 


0D 


20 


02 


FF 


20 


D2 


3B 


0BD9 


02 


48 


A9 


01 


8D 


02 


02 


20 


E3 


0E09 


:93 


20 


02 


FF 


08 


00 


06 


D0 


77 


09B1 


FF 


20 


02 


FF 


A0 


00 


B9 


ED 


80 


0BE1 


05 


83 


EE 


C2 


02 


20 


05 


83 


83 


0E11 


:F5 


AD 


02 


02 


09 


01 


F0 


12 


52 


09B9 


94 


20 


02 


FF 


CB 


C0 


40 


DB 


13 


0BE9 


EE 


02 


02 


20 


05 


83 


68 


80 


FE 


0E19 


:C9 


02 


F0 


IC 


A0 


00 


B9 


EC 


OF 


09C1 


F5 


A0 


00 


20 


A0 


84 


20 


E4 


35 


0BF1 


02 


02 


60 


20 


12 


84 


A9 


IF 


00 


0E21 


:93 


20 


D2 


FF 


08 


00 


07 


D0 


91 


09G9 


FF 


C9 


ID 


F0 


5F 


C9 


9D 


F0 


4F 


0BF9 


20 


02 


FF 


A9 


00 


20 


D2 


FF 


FO 


0E29 


.F5 


60 


A0 


00 


B9 


E2 


93 


20 


00 


09D1 


5E 


C9 


11 


F0 


60 


09 


91 


F0 


F4 


0C01 


20 


02 


FF 


20 


02 


FF 


20 


FE 


B5 


0E31 


02 


FF 


08 


C0 


05 


D0 


F5 


60 


93 


09D9' 


59 


C9 


4E 


F0 


5B 


C9 


CE 


F0 


74 


0C09 


83 


A9 


00 


20 


02 


FF 


20 


FE 


06 


0E39 


A0 


00 


59 


E7 


93 


20 


02 


FF 


IE 


09E1- 


5A 


C9 


56 


F0 


5C 


09 


49 


F0 


FA 


0011 


83 


A0 


00 


A9 


BE 


85 


FB 


A9 


5B 


0E41 


08 


00 


05 


D0 


F5 


60 


AD 


C2 


EE 


09E9: 


SB 


C9 


4F 


F0 


39 


09 


50 


F0 


97 


0C19 


04 


85 


FO 


85 


FE 


A9 


CI 


85 


34 


0E49 


02 


09 


01 


F0 


0A 


C9 


02 


F0 


74 


09F1; 


56 


C9 


D0 


F0 


49 


C9 


03 


F0 


B4 


0021 


FD 


A9 


78 


85 


30 


A9 


04 


35 


BF 


0E51 


00 


AD 


C5 


02 


4C 


03 


85 


AD 


22 


09F9: 


54 


C9 


13 


F0 


ID 


C9 


93 


F0 


42 


0029 


31 


A9 


78 


85 


32 


A9 


08 


35 


IB 


0E59 


03 


02 


40 


D3 


85 


AD 


04 


02 


00 


0A01: 


IF 


C9 


D3 


F0 


0F 


C9 


CC 


F0 


CA 


0031 


33 


A2 


00 


BO 


FC 


93 


91 


FB 


BC 


0E61 


09 


01 


F0 


18 


C9 


02 


F0 


27 


Al 


0A09: 


0E 


C9 


24 


F0 


46 


C9 


Dl 


F0 


18 


0039 


BD 


09 


94 


91 


FD 


BO 


82 


95 


9F 


0E69 


09 


03 


F0 


36 


09 


04 


F0 


45 


32 


0A11: 


18 


4C 


39 


81 


4C 


66 


82 


40 


D0 


0041 


91 


30 


A9 


0A 


91 


32 


C8 


BD 


AS 


0E71 


C9 


05 


F0 


54 


09 


06 


F0 


63 


02 


0A19: 


8F 


82 


20 


05 


83 


4C 


36 


81 


25 


0049 


75 


95 


91 


30 


A9 


0E 


91 


32 


91 


0E79 


C9 


07 


F0 


72 


A9 


AE 


85 


30 


C4 


0A21: 


20 


49 


83 


4C 


36 


81 


40 


F7 


15 


0051 


88 


IB 


A5 


FB 


69 


28 


35 


FB 


IB 


0Eei 


A9 


93 


35 


31 


A9 


16 


85 


32 


FO 


0A29: 


39 


4C 


E2 


FC 


4C 


87 


38 


40 


IF 


0C59 


A5 


FC 


69 


00 


85 


FC 


18 


A5 


A6 


0E89 


A9 


94 


85 


33 


4C 


71 


86 


A9 


62 


0A31: 


25 


89 


4C 


C9 


89 


40 


CF 


89 


07 


0061 


FD 


69 


28 


85 


FD 


A5 


FE 


69 


IE 


0E91 


A7 


85 


30 


A9 


93 


85 


31 


A9 


42 


0A39: 


4C 


0B 


SB 


4C 


B2 


8A 


40 


03 


88 


0C69 


00 


85 


FE 


18 


A5 


30 


6B 


FF 


09 


0E99 


10 


85 


32 


A9 


94 


85 


33 


40 


73 


0A41: 


8C 


4C 


9A 


8A 


4C 


47 


SA 


20 


5F 


0071- 


FF 


FF 


FF 


FF 


02 


FF 


FF 


FF 


9F 


0EA1 


71 


86 


A9 


9A 


85 


30 


A9 


93 


CA 


0A49: 


69 


SB 


4C 


36 


81 


20 


20 


8F 


58 


0079: 


63 


FF 


FF 


03 


FF 


FF 


FF 


FF 


7F 


0EA9: 


85 


31 


A9 


22 


85 


32 


A9 


94 


09 


0A51: 


4C 


36 


81 


20 


CC 


FF 


AS 


CB 


08 


0081: 


FF 


02 


FF 


FF 


FF 


FF 


FF 


FB 


46 


0EB1: 


85 


33 


4C 


71 


86 


A9 


35 


85 


C9 


0A59: 


C9 


40 


00 


FA 


A9 


00 


80 


15 


A9 


0C89: 


AF 


F3 


FF 


FF 


FF 


FF 


FF 


F6 


60 


0EB9: 


30 


A9 


93 


85 


31 


A9 


28 


85 


29 


0A61: 


D0 


A9 


01 


80 


F3 


03 


A9 


93 


03 


0091: 


90 


31 


60 


6F 


FF 


F0 


FF 


F0 


0A 


0EC1: 


32 


A9 


94 


85 


33 


4C 


71 


86 


80 


0Ae9: 


20 


D2 


FF 


A9 


01 


A2 


06 


A0 


20 


0099: 


FF 


FF 


98 


FF 


Fl 


A6 


90 


BB 


98 


0EC9: 


A9 


C0 


85 


30 


A9 


93 


85 


31 


76 


0A7I: 


00 


20 


BA 


FF 


A9 


24 


80 


35 


13 


0CA1: 


9B 


FF 


88 


81 


FF 


EB 


FF 


27 


87 


0EO1: 


A9 


2E 


85 


32 


A9 


94 


85 


33 


FF 


0A79: 


03 


A9 


01 


A2 


35 


A0 


03 


20 


16 


0CA9: 


FF 


01 


01 


02 


FF 


0F 


ID 


22 


0B 


0ED9: 


40 


71 


86 


A9 


CB 


85 


30 


A9 


62 


0A81: 


BD 


FF 


20 


C0 


FF 


A2 


01 


20 


31 


0OB1: 


57 


F0 


FF 


7F 


FF 


FF 


22 


20 


IB 


0EE1: 


93 


85 


31 


A9 


34 


85 


32 


A9 


AF 


0A89: 


C6 


FF 


20 


60 


82 


20 


52 


82 


C6 


0OB9: 


03 


FF 


77 


CA 


FF 


22 


2E 


A2 


76 


0EE9: 


94 


85 


33 


40 


71 


86 


A9 


D4 


AA 



G-36 COMPUTE OCTOBER 1991 



BEFl 


:S5 


30 


A9 


93 


85 


31 


A9 


3A 


C9 


1121 


:F0 


60 


AD 


CB 


02 


C9 


03 


F0 


74 


1351:02 


85 


FB 


AD 


B2 


02 


60 


CD 


7A 


0EF9 


:85 


32 


A9 


94 


85 


33 


20 


9A 


B7 


1129 


:03 


4C 


Bl 


83 


AD 


CA 


02 


C9 


05 


1359:02 


85 


FC 


4C 


F6 


8A 


18 


AD 


06 


0F01. 


:86 


A0 


00 


Bl 


32 


91 


FB 


C8 


3E 


1131 


:E7 


90 


0B 


A9 


00 


80 


CB 


02 


37 


1361:A9 


02 


60 


CC 


02 


85 


FB 


AO 


23 


0F09 


:C0 


05 


D0 


F7 


Bl 


32 


A0 


00 


F9 


1139 


:8D 


CA 


02 


4C 


36 


31 


18 


AD 


6F 


1369:AA 


02 


60 


CD 


02 


85 


PC 


4C 


5C 


0F11 


:91 


FD 


AO 


Fl 


02 


C9 


01 


F0 


76 


1141 


:CA 


02 


69 


01 


8D 


CA 


02 


AD 


CF 


1371:F6 


8A 


18 


AD 


AD 


02 


60 


CC 


B0 


0F19 


:0D 


Bl 


30 


C9 


2A 


F0 


07 


20 


10 


1149 


:CB 


02 


69 


00 


8D 


CB 


02 


4C 


EA 


1379:02 


85 


FB 


AD 


AE 


02 


60 


CD 


82 


0F21 


:D2 


FF 


C8 


4C 


8C 


86 


60 


AD 


73 


1151 


:36 


81 


AD 


C7 


02 


C9 


03 


F0 


4F 


1381:02 


85 


FC 


A0 


00 


Bl 


FB 


C9 


3C 


0F29 


:C2 


02 


C9 


02 


F0 


15 


C9 


03 


F4 


1159 


:03 


4C 


El 


38 


AD 


C6 


02 


C9 


2b 


1389:00 


F0 


08 


33 


Bl 


FB 


E9 


01 


C2 


0F31 


:F0 


22 


A9 


02 


85 


FB 


A9 


04 


E9 


1161 


:E7 


90 


0B 


A9 


00 


8D 


C6 


02 


50 


1391:4C 


61 


8B 


A9 


0F 


4C 


61 


8B 


3A 


0F39 


:85 


FC 


A9 


04 


85 


FD 


A9 


02 


55 


1169 


:8D 


C7 


02 


4C 


36 


81 


18 


AD 


DE 


1399:AO 


C2 


02 


C9 


01 


F0 


18 


C9 


E9 


0F41 


85 


FE 


60 


A9 


09 


85 


FB 


A9 


88 


1171 


:C6 


02 


69 


01 


8D 


C6 


02 


AD 


ED 


13A1:02 


F0 


23 


18 


AO 


Bl 


02 


6D 


31 


0F49 


.04 


85 


FC 


A9 


DS 


35 


FO 


A9 


07 


1179 


:C7 


02 


69 


00 


80 


C7 


02 


4C 


09 


13A9:CC 


02 


85 


FB 


AO 


B2 


02 


60 


00 


0F51 


.02 


85 


FE 


60 


A9 


10 


85 


FB 


4C 


1181 


:36 


81 


AD 


C9 


02 


C9 


03 


F0 


9F 


13B1:CD 


02 


85 


FC 


4C 


4F 


8B 


18 


8E 


0F59 


A9 


04 


85 


FC 


A9 


D6 


85 


FD 


B3 


1189 


:03 


4C 


11 


89 


AD 


C3 


02 


C9 


59 


13B9:AD 


A9 


02 


6D 


CC 


02 


85 


FB 


AD 


0F61 


A9 


02 


85 


FE 


60 


A9 


02 


85 


A8 


1191 


:E7 


90 


0B 


A9 


00 


80 


C3 


02 


91 


13C1;AD 


AA 


02 


6D 


CD 


02 


85 


FC 


FE 


0F69 


D6 


A9 


00 


85 


D3 


20 


6C 


E5 


93 


1199 


:8D 


C9 


02 


4C 


36 


81 


18 


AD 


8F 


13C9:4C 


4F 


SB 


18 


AO 


AD 


02 


60 


72 


0F71 


20 


FA 


86 


A9 


02 


85 


D6 


A9 


47 


llAl 


:C8 


02 


69 


01 


3D 


C8 


02 


AD 


27 


13D1:CC 


02 


35 


FB 


AD 


AE 


02 


60 


E8 


0F79 


00 


35 


D3 


20 


6C 


E5 


AE 


CC 


9A 


11A9 


.C9 


02 


69 


00 


3D 


C9 


02 


4C 


42 


13D9:CD 


02 


85 


FC 


A0 


00 


Bl 


FB 


4C 


0F81 


02 


AD 


CD 


02 


4C 


23 


87 


A0 


84 


llBl 


•36 


81 


20 


3E 


38 


AD 


C2 


02 


B9 


13E1:C9 


0F 


F0 


08 


18 


Bl 


FB 


69 


33 


0F89 


00 


A9 


20 


20 


D2 


FF 


C8 


C0 


01 


11B9 


C9 


01 


F0 


36 


C9 


02 


F0 


64 


IF 


13E9:01 


4C 


61 


3B 


A9 


00 


91 


FB 


F4 


0F91 


20 


D0 


F6 


60 


A0 


00 


B9 


F3 


45 


llCl 


AD 


CB 


02 


C9 


00 


F0 


03 


4C 


A0 


13F1:8d 


B8 


02 


4C 


36 


81 


18 


AD 


A7 


0F99 


93 


20 


D2 


FF 


C8 


C0 


04 


D0 


06 


11C9 


51 


89 


AD 


CA 


02 


C9 


01 


B0 


43 


13F9:B5 


02 


60 


CC 


02 


85 


FB 


AD 


CI 


0FA1 


F5 


60 


A0 


00 


B9 


F7 


93 


20 


DB 


llDl 


0D 


A9 


03 


80 


CB 


02 


A9 


E7 


BF 


1401:B6 


02 


6D 


CD 


02 


85 


FC 


18 


C7 


0FA9 


D2 


FF 


C8 


C0 


05 


D0 


F5 


60 


0E 


1XD9 


8D 


CA 


02 


4C 


36 


81 


33 


AD 


50 


1409:AD 


B3 


02 


60 


CC 


02 


85 


FD 


83 


0FB1 


8D 


E3 


03 


8E 


E2 


03 


A2 


09 


4A 


llEl 


CA 


02 


E9 


01 


80 


CA 


02 


AD 


30 


1411:AD 


B4 


02 


60 


CD 


02 


85 


FE 


D4 


0FB9 


8E 


E4 


03 


A0 


B0 


AD 


E2 


03 


C7 


11E9 


Ca 


02 


E9 


00 


80 


CB 


02 


4C 


9B 


1419:A0 


00 


AD 


C2 


02 


C9 


01 


F0 


9D 


0FC1 


DD 


BE 


95 


AD 


E3 


03 


FO 


8F 


B6 


llFl 


36 


81 


AO 


C7 


02 


C9 


00 


F0 


E9 


1421:40 


C9 


02 


F0 


24 


AD 


CI 


02 


88 


0FC9 


95 


90 


0F 


8D 


E3 


03 


AD 


E2 


FA 


11F9 


03 


4C 


83 


89 


AO 


C6 


02 


C9 


10 


1429:C9 


01 


00 


25 


AD 


09 


02 


C9 


85 


0FD1 


03 


FD 


8E 


95 


80 


E2 


03 


C8 


E2 


1201 


01 


B0 


0D 


A9 


03 


3D 


C7 


02 


ED 


1431:01 


B0 


19 


A0 


00 


A2 


00 


B9 


77 


0FD9 


D0 


E3 


98 


CA 


F0 


11 


C9 


B0 


29 


1209 


A9 


E7 


8D 


C6 


02 


4C 


36 


81 


49 


i439:AB 


95 


95 


30 


E8 


CB 


C0 


08 


46 


0FE1 


F0 


03 


8D 


E4 


03 


2C 


E4 


03 


CE 


1211 


38 


AD 


C6 


02 


E9 


01 


3D 


C6 


EA 


1441:F0 


10 


C0 


0E 


00 


Fl 


4C 


19 


DE 


0FE9 


30 


05 


AD 


E5 


03 


F0 


05 


29 


84 


1219 


02 


AD 


C7 


02 


E9 


00 


SD 


C7 


F4 


1449:8C 


4C 


F8 


SB 


A9 


01 


8D 


F0 


FF 


0FF1 


7F 


20 


02 


FF 


CA 


10 


C4 


60 


B2 


1221 


02 


4C 


36 


81 


AD 


C9 


02 


C9 


9A 


1451:02 


60 


A2 


10 


4C 


B5 


3B 


A2 


DA 


0FF9 


AD 


CD 


02 


C9 


00 


D0 


0A 


AD 


44 


1229 


00 


F0 


03 


4C 


B5 


89 


AD 


C8 


A6 


1459:10 


4C 


Fl 


8B 


A2 


10 


4C 


15 


96 


1001 


CC 


02 


C9 


07 


B0 


03 


4C 


7E 


5A 


1231 


02 


C9 


01 


B0 


00 


A9 


03 


80 


96 


i461:8C 


AD 


BF 


02 


C9 


01 


D0 


E9 


31 


1009 


87 


A9 


07 


80 


CE 


02 


AC 


CE 


B7 


1239 


C9 


02 


A9 


E7 


8D 


C8 


02 


4C 


56 


1469:AD 


D7 


02 


C9 


01 


B0 


DD 


A0 


62 


1011- 


02 


B9 


4F 


93 


80 


15 


D0 


18 


3E 


1241 


36 


31 


38 


AD 


C8 


02 


E9 


01 


E5 


1471:00 


A2 


00 


B9 


B9 


95 


95 


30 


5D 


1019! 


AD 


B5 


02 


60 


CC 


02 


85 


FB 


0A 


1249 


8D 


C8 


02 


AD 


C9 


02 


E9 


00 


AB 


1479:E8 


C8 


C0 


03 


F0 


09 


C0 


0E 


5F 


1021 


AD 


B6 


02 


60 


CD 


02 


85 


FC 


5B 


1251 


80 


C9 


02 


4C 


36 


81 


20 


3E 


E9 


1481:00 


Fl 


4C 


19 


8C 


AD 


C0 


02 


48 


1029- 


38 


AS 


FB 


EO 


CE 


02 


85 


FB 


B2 


1259 


88 


4C 


D5 


89 


20 


3E 


88 


4C 


7F 


1489:C9 


01 


D0 


C5 


AD 


08 


02 


C9 


EB 


1031 


A5 


FC 


E9 


00 


85 


FC 


18 


A9 


9A 


1261 


E6 


89 


Bl 


FB 


C9 


01 


90 


03 


CC 


1491:01 


B0 


B9 


A0 


00 


A2 


00 


B9 


EB 


1039- 


D0 


85 


27 


13 


AO 


B3 


02 


6D 


37 


1269 


38 


E9 


01 


91 


FB 


80 


B7 


02 


E4 


1499:C7 


95 


95 


30 


E8 


C8 


C0 


08 


B4 


1041- 


CC 


02 


85 


FD 


AD 


B4 


02 


6D 


8A 


1271 


4C 


36 


81 


Bl 


FB 


C9 


16 


F0 


B3 


14A1:F0 


BA 


C0 


0E 


00 


Fl 


A0 


00 


79 


1049 


CD 


02 


85 


FE 


38 


A5 


FD 


ED 


B3 


1279 


F7 


13 


69 


01 


91 


FB 


80 


B7 


2C 


14A9:B1 


FD 


AA 


BD 


CA 


94 


A3 


Bl 


07 


1051 


CE 


02 


85 


FD 


A5 


FE 


E9 


00 


E6 


1281 


02 


4C 


36 


81 


AD 


C2 


02 


C9 


DE 


14B1;30 


C9 


01 


F0 


28 


Bl 


32 


C9 


C9 


1059- 


85 


FE 


38 


A9 


FF 


ED 


CE 


02 


F4 


1289 


01 


F0 


IB 


C9 


02 


F0 


2E 


AD 


48 


14B9:01 


F0 


31 


A0 


00 


BD 


40 


94 


DA 


1061 


85 


30 


A9 


07 


E9 


00 


85 


31 


81 


1291 


CI 


02 


C9 


01 


F0 


03 


A9 


01 


5C 


14C1:91 


34 


BD 


57 


94 


91 


36 


Bl 


F5 


1069 


AC 


CE 


02 


A2 


00 


Al 


FB 


C9 


46 


1299 


3D 


CI 


02 


4C 


36 


81 


A9 


00 


05 


14C9:FB 


AA 


C9 


09 


B0 


2D 


BD 


36 


50 


1071 


19 


F0 


43 


18 


69 


80 


81 


30 


65 


12A1 


80 


CI 


02 


4C 


36 


81 


AD 


BF 


D4 


1401:93 


A0 


00 


91 


40 


18 


Bl 


42 


0D 


1079 


18 


A5 


FB 


69 


01 


35 


FB 


A5 


E0 


12A9- 


02 


C9 


01 


F0 


08 


A9 


01 


8D 


E6 


1409:69 


01 


91 


44 


60 


A0 


00 


BD 


B0 


1081 


FC 


69 


00 


85 


FC 


18 


A5 


30 


96 


12B1 


BF 


02 


4C 


36 


81 


A9 


00 


80 


63 


14E1:6E 


94 


91 


34 


BD 


85 


94 


91 


9A 


1089 


69 


01 


85 


30 


A5 


31 


69 


00 


17 


12B9 


BF 


02 


4C 


36 


81 


AO 


C0 


02 


71 


14E9:36 


4C 


3A 


8C 


A0 


00 


BD 


9C 


60 


1091 


85 


31 


B9 


57 


93 


85 


26 


Al 


0E 


12C1 


C9 


01 


F0 


03 


A9 


01 


80 


C0 


06 


14Fl:94 


91 


34 


BO 


B3 


94 


91 


36 


74 


1099 


FD 


C9 


19 


F0 


26 


AA 


18 


A5 


0F 


12C9: 


02 


4C 


36 


81 


A9 


00 


8D 


C0 


0A 


14F9:4C 


3A 


8C 


SA 


48 


A9 


00 


91 


3B 


10A1 


FD 


69 


01 


85 


FD 


AS 


FE 


69 


81 


12D1 


02 


4C 


36 


81 


AO 


C2 


02 


C9 


2F 


1501:34 


91 


36 


Bl 


FB 


C9 


0E 


F0 


9F 


10A9 


00 


85 


FE 


BD 


5F 


93 


A2 


00 


75 


12D9 


01 


F0 


IC 


C9 


02 


P0 


30 


18 


27 


1509:09 


C9 


0F 


F0 


24 


68 


AA 


4C 


7F 


10B1 


81 


26 


C0 


01 


90 


04 


88 


4C 


36 


12E1 


AD 


C5 


02 


69 


01 


80 


C5 


02 


FB 


1511:41 


8C 


Bl 


FD 


AA 


BD 


CA 


94 


8B 


10B9 


DE 


87 


60 


AD 


B8 


02 


81 


FB 


DE 


12E9 


C9 


08 


F0 


03 


4C 


36 


81 


A9 


2B 


1519:A8 


Bl 


30 


C9 


01 


F0 


0B 


A9 


32 


10C1 


4C 


E6 


87 


AD 


B7 


02 


81 


FD 


54 


12F1 


01 


8D 


C5 


02 


4C 


36 


31 


18 


29 


1521:01 


91 


30 


A9 


00 


91 


32 


4C 


C7 


10C9 


4C 


10 


88 


AD 


C2 


02 


C9 


01 


B2 


12F9. 


AD 


C3 


02 


69 


01 


3D 


C3 


02 


84 


1529:80 


8C 


A9 


00 


91 


30 


4C 


80 


52 


10D1 


F0 


18 


C9 


02 


F0 


28 


18 


AD 


CF 


1301 


C9 


08 


F0 


03 


4C 


36 


81 


A9 


44 


1S31:8C 


Bl 


FD 


AA 


BD 


CA 


94 


A8 


63 


10D9 


.AF 


02 


60 


CC 


02 


85 


FB 


AD 


98 


1309: 


01 


8D 


03 


02 


4C 


36 


31 


18 


02 


1539:Bl 


32 


C9 


.01 


F0 


0B 


A9 


01 


lA 


10E1 


60 


02 


60 


CD 


02 


85 


FC 


4C 


Dl 


1311: 


AD 


C4 


02 


69 


01 


3D 


C4 


02 


OF 


1541:91 


32 


A9 


00 


91 


30 


4C 


80 


5C 


10E9 


.82 


83 


18 


AD 


A7 


02 


6D 


CC 


38 


1319: 


C9 


08 


F0 


03 


4C 


36 


81 


A9 


5C 


1549:8C 


A9 


00 


91 


32 


4C 


80 


8C 


80 


10F1 


;02 


85 


FB 


AD 


A8 


02 


6D 


CD 


C4 


1321: 


01 


30 


C4 


02 


4C 


36 


81 


18 


3A 


1551:AD 


B3 


02 


80 


DA 


02 


AD 


B4 


47 


10F9 


: 02 


85 


FC 


4C 


82 


88 


18 


AD 


F4 


1329: 


AD 


C2 


02 


69 


01 


8D 


C2 


02 


73 


1559:02 


80 


DB 


02 


AD 


B5 


02 


80 


59 


iiai 


:AB 


02 


6D 


CC 


02 


85 


FB 


AD 


BF 


1331; 


C9 


04 


F0 


03 


4C 


36 


81 


A9 


73 


1561:DE 


02 


AD 


B6 


02 


80 


OF 


02 


A4 


1109 


: AC 


02 


6D 


CD 


02 


85 


FC 


A0 


4D 


1339: 


31 


8D 


C2 


02 


4C 


36 


81 


AD 


A7 


1569:AD 


C2 


02 


80 


E0 


02 


AD 


CC 


6B 


1111 


; 00 


A2 


00 


60 


20 


3E 


88 


AO 


9A 


1341: 


C2 


02 


C9 


01 


F0 


18 


C9 


02 


10 


1571:02 


80 


El 


02 


AD 


CD 


02 


80 


92 


1119 


:C2 


02 


C9 


01 


FB 


34 


C9 


02 


54 


1349; 


F0 


28 


13 


AD 


Bl 


02 


6D 


CC 


0D 


1579:E2 


02 


20 


20 


8F 


A9 


00 


A0 


5F 



OCTOBER 1991 COMPUTE G-37 



PROGRAMS 



1581:90 


99 


E3 


02 


C8 


C0 


09 


D0 


DA 


17B1:00 


99 


4C 


03 


C8 


C0 


2A 


D0 


6E 


19E1: 


91 


8E 


86 


FF 


A2 


A2 


A2 


A2 D8 


1589:F8 


A9 


00 


80 


F0 


02 


AO 


E3 


42 


17B9:F6 


60 


20 


39 


8F 


20 


60 


8F 


60 


19E9: 


A3 


FF 


FF 


73 


FF 


FF 


3A 


32 CB 


1591:02 


CD 


C6 


02 


F0 


06 


20 


29 


32 


17C1;20 


99 


90 


4C 


52 


8F 


A9 


13 


74 


19F1: 


FF 


FF 


A2 


AB 


FF 


FF 


FF 


FF 33 


1599:8E 


4C 


25 


8D 


AD 


E4 


02 


CD 


6E 


L7C9:85 


D6 


A9 


00 


85 


03 


20 


6C 


CD 


19F9: 


FF 


FF 


26 


FF 


22 


FF 


FF 


FF 02 


15A1:C7 


02 


F0 


06 


20 


29 


8E 


4C 


BD 


17Dl:ES 


20 


FA 


86 


A9 


13 


85 


D6 


3E 


1A01: 


FF 


FF 


22 


FF 


FF 


0F 


71 


73 0C 


15A9:25 


8D 


A9 


01 


80 


E9 


02 


4C 


73 


17D9:A9 


00 


85 


03 


4C 


6C 


E5 


A9 


54 


1A09: 


FF 


FF 


B2 


FF 


AF 


FF 


A3 


73 CB 


15B1:3D 


8D 


AD 


F0 


02 


C9 


01 


F0 


CC 


17E1:13 


85 


06 


A9 


00 


85 


D3 


20 


4E 


lAll: 


FF 


FF 


B3 


C4 


F8 


FF 


FF 


40 10 


15B9:11 


18 


AD 


E3 


02 


69 


01 


8D 


AB 


17E9:6C 


E5 


4C 


FA 


86 


20 


E4 


FF 


7F 


1A19- 


F0 


88 


FF 


44 


FB 


4E 


91 


17 27 


15C1:E3 


02 


AD 


E4 


02 


69 


00 


8D 


AS 


17F1:A0 


00 


A9 


3E 


20 


D2 


FF 


A9 


7F 


1A21 


0D 


08 


FF 


FF 


05 


17 


FF 


0B 6A 


15C9:E4 


02 


A9 


00 


80 


F0 


02 


AO 


FD 


17F9:9A 


20 


02 


FF 


A9 


00 


BD 


34 


74 


1A29 


FF 


FF 


05 


17 


FF 


08 


FF 


OF 6F 


15Dl:E5 


02 


CD 


C8 


02 


F0 


06 


20 


B5 


1801:03 


20 


E4 


FF 


C9 


00 


F0 


F9 


81 


1A31 


05 


17 


18 


03 


FF 


FF 


0C 


97 E0 


15D9:65 


8E 


4C 


ee 


80 


AD 


E6 


02 


30 


1809:C9 


14 


F0 


40 


C9 


7B 


B0 


Fl 


D4 


1A39 


91 


FF 


17 


IC 


08 


FF 


FF 


05 20 


15E1:CD 


C9 


02 


F0 


06 


20 


65 


8E 


BE 


1811:C9 


11 


F0 


ED 


C9 


13 


F0 


E9 


CD 


1A41 


17 


8F 


08 


FF 


FF 


05 


17 


IF 47 


15E9:4C 


66 


8D 


A9 


01 


80 


EA 


02 


36 


1819:C9 


ID 


F0 


E5 


C9 


22 


F0 


El 


ac 


1A49 


08 


FF 


DF 


05 


17 


19 


08 


FF FA 


15F1:4C 


7E 


8D 


AD 


F0 


02 


09 


01 


92 


1821:C9 


2C 


F0 


DD 


C9 


0D 


F0 


10 


Bl 


1A51 


FF 


0C 


97 


91 


FF 


17 


0F 


08 17 


15F9:F0 


11 


18 


AO 


E5 


02 


69 


01 


C9 


1829:AC 


34 


03 


C0 


14 


F0 


02 


20 


53 


1A59 


FF 


FF 


05 


17 


CB 


08 


FF 


FF 06 


160I:8D 


E5 


02 


AD 


E6 


02 


69 


00 


9A 


1831:D2 


FF 


20 


B5 


8F 


4C 


74 


8F 


50 


1A61 


05 


17 


CC 


08 


FF 


DF 


05 


17 98 


1609:8D 


Ee 


02 


A9 


00 


8D 


F0 


02 


AA 


1839:AC 


34 


03 


C0 


00 


F0 


C2 


4C 


CE 


1A69 


48 


08 


FF 


FF 


04 


81 


FF 


FF E9 


1611:AD 


E7 


02 


CD 


CA 


02 


F0 


06 


71 


1841:02 


FF 


AC 


34 


03 


99 


35 


03 


9F 


1A71 


FF 


16 


Fl 


18 


FF 


16 


E9 


04 IB 


1619:20 


Al 


8E 


4C 


A7 


80 


AD 


E8 


0C 


1849:EE 


34 


03 


60 


AC 


34 


03 


C0 


61 


1A79 


B6 


FD 


08 


FF 


75 


16 


ED 


04 6D 


1621:02 


CD 


CB 


02 


F0 


06 


20 


Al 


DC 


1851:01 


B0 


03 


4C 


74 


8F 


20 


D2 


48 


1A81 


Be 


69 


08 


FF 


FF 


FF 


16 


FF 98 


1629:8E 


4C 


A7 


80 


A9 


01 


8D 


EB 


05 


1859;FF 


38 


AD 


34 


03 


E9 


01 


80 


DF 


1AB9 


04 


86 


FD 


08 


FF 


77 


16 


FF B7 


1631:02 


4C 


BF 


SD 


AD 


F0 


02 


C9 


41 


1861:34 


03 


4C 


74 


8F 


4C 


20 


93 


BE 


iA91 


04 


B6 


69 


08 


FF 


7B 


88 


81 A3 


1639:01 


F0 


11 


18 


AD 


E7 


02 


69 


40 


1869:AD 


7E 


03 


C9 


01 


F0 


09 


C9 


B4 


1A99 


■FF 


FF 


05 


FF 


EF 


00 


FF 


FF IE 


1641:01 


8D 


E7 


02 


AD 


E8 


02 


69 


EC 


1871:02 


F0 


14 


C9 


03 


F0 


4F 


60 


08 


lAAl 


.FF 


05 


F0 


F9 


9F 


55 


FF 


91 B8 


1649:00 


8D 


E8 


02 


AD 


E9 


02 


C9 


F8 


1879:A9 


00 


8D 


F6 


02 


AD 


7F 


03 


6B 


1AA9 


:1F 


FF 


0C 


FF 


FF 


04 


81 


FF 02 


1651:01 


F0 


0A 


20 


F2 


8D 


C9 


0D 


EB 


1881:38 


E9 


30 


8D 


FS 


02 


60 


AD 


40 


lABl 


IFF 


FF 


16 


F0 


68 


FF 


16 


E9 11 


1659:F0 


2F 


4C 


FC 


8C 


AD 


EA 


02 


16 


1889:7F 


03 


38 


E9 


30 


A8 


A9 


00 


57 


1AB9 


:04 


B6 


FD 


08 


FF 


01 


16 


ED FE 


1661:C9 


01 


F0 


0A 


20 


F2 


8D 


C9 


23 


1891:80 


Fe 


02 


80 


F5 


02 


C0 


00 


98 


lACl 


:04 


B6 


69 


08 


FF 


CC 


FF 


16 9C 


1669:0D 


F0 


IE 


4C 


3D 


SD 


AO 


EB 


48 


1899:F0 


16 


18 


AD 


F5 


02 


69 


0A 


3A 


1AC9 


:FF 


04 


B6 


FD 


08 


FF 


41 


16 8E 


1671:02 


C9 


01 


F0 


14 


20 


F2 


8D 


D4 


18A1:8D 


F5 


02 


AD 


F6 


02 


69 


00 


C3 


lADl 


:FF 


04 


B6 


69 


08 


FF 


45 


80 BF 


1679:C9 


0D 


F0 


0D 


4C 


7E 


80 


AS 


D9 


iaA9:8D 


F6 


02 


88 


C0 


00 


00 


EA 


B9 


1AD9 


:00 


B9 


89 


03 


99 


7F 


03 


C8 77 


1681:CB 


C9 


3C 


F0 


01 


60 


A9 


0D 


86 


18B1:AD 


80 


03 


38 


E9 


30 


18 


60 


6A 


lAEl 


:CC 


88 


03 


00 


F4 


AO 


88 


03 7E 


1689:60 


AD 


DA 


02 


8D 


B3 


02 


AD 


B9 


18B9:F5 


02 


80 


FS 


02 


AD 


F6 


02 


20 


1AE9 


:80 


7E 


03 


20 


08 


8F 


09 


0D 8C 


1691:DB 


02 


8D 


B4 


02 


AD 


DC 


02 


AB 


13C1:69 


00 


80 


F6 


02 


60 


AD 


7F 


34 


lAFl 


:F0 


4F 


18 


AD 


7A 


03 


6D 


F5 01 


1699:8D 


B5 


02 


AD 


DF 


02 


80 


B6 


ED 


18C9:03 


38 


E9 


30 


A8 


A9 


00 


80 


43 


1AF9 


:02 


85 


34 


AD 


7B 


03 


6D 


F6 AB 


16Al:02 


AD 


E0 


02 


80 


C2 


02 


AD 


9F 


i8Dl:F5 


02 


80 


F6 


02 


C0 


00 


F0 


A2 


1B01 


:02 


85 


35 


18 


AD 


7C 


03 


6D 94 


16A9:E1 


02 


8D 


CC 


02 


AD 


E2 


02 


54 


1809:16 


18 


AD 


F5 


02 


69 


64 


80 


3C 


1B09 


:F5 


02 


85 


36 


AD 


7D 


03 


6D AS 


16B1:8D 


CD 


02 


4C 


36 


81 


AD 


A7 


D7 


18E1:F5 


02 


AD 


F6 


02 


69 


00 


80 


F5 


IBll 


:F6 


02 


85 


37 


18 


AD 


7A 


03 D6 


16B9:02 


8D 


B3 


02 


AO 


A8 


02 


8D 


82 


18E9:F6 


02 


88 


C0 


00 


00 


EA 


AD 


F9 


1B19 


:69 


E7 


80 


7A 


03 


AD 


7B 


03 20 


16CltB4 


02 


AD 


A9 


02 


80 


B5 


02 


CC 


18F1:80 


03 


38 


E9 


30 


A8 


C0 


00 


es 


1B21 


:69 


03 


BD 


7B 


03 


18 


AS 


30 2A 


16C9:AD 


AA 


02 


8D 


B6 


02 


A9 


01 


A2 


18F9:F0 


16 


18 


AD 


FS 


02 


69 


0A 


9A 


1B29 


:69 


01 


85 


30 


A5 


31 


69 


CC 


16D1:8D 


C2 


02 


AD 


E3 


02 


80 


CC 


9F 


1901:8D 


F5 


02 


AD 


F6 


02 


69 


00 


25 


1B31 


:85 


31 


AS 


FC 


C5 


31 


B0 


03 52 


16D9:02 


AD 


E4 


02 


8D 


CD 


02 


AO 


84 


1909:80 


Fe 


02 


88 


C0 


00 


00 


EA 


IB 


1B39 


:4C 


BB 


92 


A5 


FC 


C5 


31 


F0 83 


16E1:BF 


02 


C9 


01 


D0 


47 


A9 


01 


AF 


1911:AD 


81 


03 


38 


E9 


30 


18 


60 


0C 


1B41 


:01 


60 


AS 


FB 


CS 


30 


B0 


F9 CE 


16E9:8D 


Fl 


02 


20 


B9 


85 


20 


69 


29 


1919:F5 


02 


8D 


F5 


02 


A9 


00 


60 


FB 


1B49 


:A0 


00 


Bl 


FB 


91 


34 


Bl 


FD 84 


16F1;8B 


60 


AD 


AB 


02 


8D 


B3 


02 


IC 


1921:F6 


02 


8D 


F6 


02 


60 


AD 


34 


91 


1B51 


:91 


36 


18 


A5 


FB 


69 


01 


85 48 


16F9:AD 


AC 


02 


80 


B4 


02 


AD 


AD 


F7 


1929:03 


C9 


0C 


90 


13 


C9 


13 


B0 


70 


1B59 


:FB 


AS 


FC 


69 


00 


85 


FC 


18 55 


1701:02 


8D 


B5 


02 


AD 


AE 


02 


8D 


24 


1931:0F 


AD 


36 


03 


C9 


31 


F0 


09 


4B 


1B61 


:A5 


FO 


69 


01 


85 


FD 


A5 


FE 95 


1709:B6 


02 


A9 


02 


8D 


C2 


02 


AD 


91 


1939:C9 


32 


F0 


20 


C9 


33 


F0 


37 


31 


1B69 


:69 


00 


85 


FE 


18 


A5 


34 


69 IE 


1711:E5 


02 


8D 


CC 


02 


AD 


E6 


02 


C7 


1941:60 


AD 


A7 


02 


80 


76 


03 


AD 


IE 


1B71 


:01 


85 


34 


A5 


35 


69 


00 


85 3F 


1719:8D 


CD 


02 


AD 


C0 


02 


C9 


01 


3F 


1949:AB 


02 


80 


77 


03 


AD 


A9 


02 


9D 


1B79 


:35 


18 


AS 


36 


69 


01 


85 


36 F8 


1721:D0 


0B 


A9 


01 


ao 


Fl 


02 


20 


18 


1951:80 


78 


03 


AD 


AA 


02 


80 


79 


95 


1B81 


:A5 


37 


69 


00 


85 


37 


AS 


FC 06 


1729:B9 


85 


20 


69 


8B 


60 


AD 


AF 


19 


1959:03 


4C 


02 


91 


AD 


AB 


02 


8D 


27 


1B89 


:C5 


31 


F0 


0A 


A5 


34 


CD 


7A CI 


1731:02 


80 


B3 


02 


AD 


B0 


02 


80 


IC 


1961:76 


03 


AD 


AC 


02 


80 


77 


03 


48 


1B91 


:03 


F0 


0C 


4C 


BD 


92 


AS 


FB 4B 


1739:B4 


02 


AD 


Bl 


02 


80 


B5 


02 


C6 


1969:AD 


AD 


02 


8D 


78 


03 


AD 


AE 


D0 


1B99 


:C5 


30 


F0 


0D 


4C 


FF 


92 


A5 DA 


1741:AD 


B2 


02 


8D 


B6 


02 


A9 


03 


20 


1971:02 


8D 


79 


03 


4C 


02 


91 


AD 


A2 


IBAl 


:35 


CD 


7B 


03 


F0 


03 


4C 


06 B7 


1749:8D 


C2 


02 


AD 


E7 


02 


80 


CC 


39 


1979:AF 


02 


80 


76 


03 


AD 


B0 


02 


4F 


1BA9 


:93 


60 


A9 


00 


60 


A0 


00 


B9 07 


1751:02 


AD 


E8 


02 


80 


CD 


02 


AD 


7E 


1981:8D 


77 


03 


AD 


Bl 


02 


8D 


78 


BC 


IBBI 


:7F 


03 


C9 


30 


90 


F4 


C9 


3A CA 


1759:C1 


02 


C9 


01 


D0 


CF 


A9 


01 


4C 


1989:03 


AO 


B2 


02 


8D 


79 


03 


AD 


25 


1BB9 


:B0 


F0 


C8 


CC 


7E 


03 


D0 


EF FB 


1761:8D 


Fl 


02 


20 


B9 


85 


20 


69 


A2 


1991:35 


03 


C9 


56 


00 


AA 


AO 


37 


81 


IBCl 


:4C 


OB 


8F 


08 


10 


18 


20 


30 OB 


1769:83 


60 


A0 


00 


A9 


00 


85 


FB 


DD 


1999:03 


C9 


3A 


00 


A3 


A0 


00 


B9 


6D 


1BC9 


:40 


61 


80 


04 


80 


40 


20 


10 IE 


177l!A9 


20 


85 


FC 


A9 


EA 


85 


FD 


FE 


19A1:3S 


03 


C9 


3A 


F0 


09 


C8 


CC 


16 


IBDl 


:08 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 0C 


1779:A9 


95 


85 


FE 


Bl 


FD 


91 


FB 


27 


19A9:34 


03 


F0 


94 


4C 


12 


91 


C8 


B4 


1B09 


:00 


00 


00 


00 


80 


C0 


E0 


F0 C9 


1781:18 


A5 


FB 


69 


01 


85 


FB 


A5 


F6 


19B1:A2 


00 


B9 


35 


03 


C9 


2D 


F0 


4A 


IBEI 


:F8 


FC 


FE 


FF 


0F 


00 


0B 


09 7F 


17B9:FC 


69 


00 


85 


FC 


18 


AS 


FD 


7A 


19B9:0E 


9D 


7F 


03 


E8 


C8 


CC 


34 


B2 


1BE9 


:07 


05 


03 


01 


46 


4A 


4E 


52 9F 


1791:69 


ai 


85 


FD 


A5 


FE 


69 


00 


41 


19C1:03 


F0 


03 


4C 


25 


91 


60 


8E 


95 


IBFl 


:56 


5A 


SE 


62 


66 


6A 


6E 


72 08 


1799:85 


FE 


A5 


FB 


C9 


00 


F0 


03 


Fl 


19C9:7E 


03 


C8 


A2 


00 


09 


35 


03 


93 


1BF9 


76 


7A 


7E 


82 


86 


8A 


BE 


92 10 


17A1:4C 


EF 


8E 


A5 


FC 


09 


24 


F0 


66 


19D1:C9 


54 


F0 


0D 


9D 


84 


03 


E8 


DA 


1C01 


96 


9A 


9E 


11 


IE 


20 


20 


20 El 


17A9:a3 


4C 


EF 


BE 


60 


A0 


00 


A9 


82 


19D9:C8 


CC 


34 


03 


F0 


E8 


4C 


40 


5E 


1C09 


.20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


20 41 



G-38 COMPUTE OCTOBER 1991 



ICll: 
1C19: 

1C21: 
1C29: 
1C31: 
1C39: 
1C41: 
1C49: 
1C51: 
1C59: 
1C61: 
1C69: 
1C71: 
1C79: 
1C81: 
1C89: 
1C91: 
1C99: 
ICAl: 
1CA9: 
ICBl: 
1CB9: 
ICCl: 
ICC 9: 
ICDl: 
1CD9: 
ICEl: 
1CE9: 
ICFl: 

icpg: 

1D01: 
1D09: 
IDll: 
1D19: 
1D21: 
1D29: 
1D31: 
1D39: 
1D41; 
1D49: 
1D51: 
1D59: 
1D61: 
1D69: 
1D71: 
1D79: 
1D81: 
1D89: 
1D91: 
1D99: 
IDAl: 
1DA9: 
IDBl: 
1DB9: 
IDCl: 
1DC9: 
IDDl: 
1DD9: 
IDEl: 
IDE 9: 
IDFI: 
1DF9: 
1E01: 
1E09: 
lEll: 
1E19: 
1E21: 
1E29: 
1E31: 
1E39: 



20 54 

47 20 

45 96 

48 41 
4F 52 
54 45 
4F 2A 
48 4F 
43 4F 
20 54 
2A 20 
47 55 
4F 4E 
9A 20 
IC 20 

46 70 
6B 6B 
73 73 
7D 20 

4 00 
00 21 
00 F0 
10 00 
00 51 
25 21 
10 0F 
07 07 
87 A5 
D2 18 
0C 47 
IF ID 
0E 0D 
06 05 
DF 9C 
4E DA 
ED 2F 
17 16 
0B 09 
6B CI 
60 EF 
F7 El 

05 04 
04 03 
03 02 
41 44 
20 3F 

47 48 
20 43 
0D 50 
54 49 
54 4C 
4C 4C 
53 20 

45 44 
60 GE 
60 78 
60 60 
66 7E 
60 78 
66 66 
66 7C 
60 6E 
00 00 
03 01 

51 52 

52 53 
64 00 
50 36 

46 4e 
5A 03 



48 45 20 
4D 41 43 
56 4F 49 
52 50 53 
44 2A 20 
2A 20 50 
20 58 59 
4E 45 2A 
52 44 49 

52 55 4D 

53 54 45 

49 54 41 
4 5 9A 20 

54 48 52 
4F 4E 10 
6B 6B 6B 
6B 6D 20 
7D 20 6E 
20 El 00 
00 11 60 

09 00 20 

10 00 00 

00 21 60 
5A 09 50 
IF IC 19 
0E 0C 0B 
06 05 3C 
30 IE 60 
SF 30 8F 
98 35 2F 
lA 17 15 
0B 0A 09 
39 6B 3E 
B5 IF EF 
8F F7 El 
2C 27 23 
13 11 10 
08 08 07 
DF 86 87 
03 C3 EF 
61 77 A7 
03 02 01 
02 01 00 

01 00 06 
20 3F 53 
43 4F 50 

54 20 31 
4F 4D 50 

55 42 4C 
4F 4E 53 
20 4C 54 
20 52 49 

52 45 53 
00 00 00 
66 66 30 
60 60 7E 
60 66 3C 
66 66 66 
60 60 60 
66 60 78 
66 66 7C 
60 60 60 
20 06 04 
06 04 02 

53 54 55 

54 58 01 
ES 03 10 
3E 46 80 
C6 Ca CA 
6F 03 0F 



53 4P 

48 49 

43 45 

49 43 

46 4C 

49 41 
4C 4F 
20 41 
41 4E 

50 4 5 
45 40 
52 2A 

54 57 
45 45 
20 4F 
6D 20 

20 es 

73 73 

41 09 

00 10 

00 00 

11 66 

00 20 

32 2C 

16 15 

0A 09 

Ci 3E 

IF Dl 

68 61 

2A 27 

13 11 

08 07 

DF 86 

03 D2 

E9 77 

21 ID 
0E 0D 
06 05 
DF 9C 
4E DA 
ED 98 
00 06 

06 05 
05 40 
41 56 
59 52 
39 39 

55 54 

49 43 
20 49 

44 0D 

47 48 

45 52 
00 3C 
00 7E 
00 3C 
00 18 
00 7E 
00 78 
00 7C 
00 3C 
00 00 
02 07 

07 20 

56 57 
00 0A 
27 B0 

50 20 
02 02 
D4 0E 



4E 07 
4E D6 
20 63 

48 B3 

55 08 
4E AC 
50 20 

4 3 2f 
2A A3 
54 E0 
20 5E 
20 D0 
4F 87 
9A E2 
46 E4 
70 E6 
73 70 
73 B5 
00 D9 
00 36 

11 65 
00 41 
El 39 
2A FF 

12 E7 
08 FA 
A2 78 

03 IE 
E9 59 
23 04 
0F EC 
07 0D 
A5 91 
EF 37 
A7 F7 
lA 10 
0B CD 

05 IC 
B5 B0 

30 03 

06 OF 
05 B0 

04 D4 
4F Fl 
45 E6 

49 C6 

31 10 
45 29 
41 84 
4E IB 
41 F0 
54 92 

56 E6 
66 86 
60 3A 
66 37 
3C 15 
60 AA 
6C DC 
66 A7 
66 74 
00 15 

05 DC 

50 C4 

51 3E 
00 7F 
80 DB 
3E 0B 
02 ED 
D4 3E 



1E41: 
1E49: 
1E51: 
1E59: 
1E61: 
1E69: 
1E71: 
1E79: 
1E81: 
1E89: 
1E91: 
1E99; 
lEAl: 
1EA9: 
lEBl: 
1EB9: 
lECl: 
1EC9: 
lEDl: 
1ED9: 
lEEl: 
1EE9: 
lEFl: 
1EF9: 
1F01: 
1F09: 
IFll: 
1F19; 
1F21: 
1F29: 
1F31: 
1F39: 
1F41: 
1F49: 
1F51: 
1F59: 
1F61: 
1F69: 
1F71: 
1F79: 
1F81: 
1F89: 
1F91: 
1F99: 
IFAl: 
1FA9: 
IFBl: 
1FB9: 
IFOl: 
1F09: 
IFDl: 
1FD9: 
IFEl: 
1FE9: 
IFFl: 
1FF9: 
2001: 
2009: 
2011: 
2019: 
2021: 
2029: 
2031: 
2039: 
2041: 
2049: 
2051: 
2059: 
2061: 
2069: 



D9 02 

61 03 

D4 02 

03 D4 

0B 04 

EB 0A 

3E 68 

00 00 

00 00 

80 00 

00 80 

00 3F 

00 00 

00 00 

00 00 

00 00 

00 00 

80 00 

00 80 

00 3F 

00 00 

00 00 

00 00 

00 00 

00 00 

80 00 

00 80 

00 3F 

30 00 

00 00 

00 00 

00 00 

00 00 

30 00 

00 80 

00 3F 

00 00 

00 00 

00 00 

00 00 

00 00 

80 00 

00 80 

00 3F 

30 00 

00 00 

00 00 

00 00 

00 00 

80 00 

00 80 

00 21 

00 00 

00 00 

00 00 

00 00 

00 00 

80 00 

00 80 

00 21 

30 00 

00 00 

00 00 

00 00 

00 00 

00 00 

00 00 

00 21 

.00 00 

.00 00 



D6 02 
01 D4 
04 D4 
07 D4 
37 55 
30 B0 
4 2 50 
00 00 
00 00 
00 B0 
00 00 
30 00 
00 00 
00 00 
00 00 
00 00 
00 00 
00 80 
00 00 
80 00 
00 00 
00 00 
00 00 
00 00 
00 00 
00 80 
00 00 
80 00 
00 00 
00 00 
00 00 
00 00 
00 00 
00 80 
00 00 
80 00 
00 00 
00 00 
00 00 
00 00 
00 00 
00 80 
00 00 
80 00 
00 00 
00 00 
00 00 
00 00 
00 00 
00 30 
00 00 
80 00 
00 00 
00 00 
00 00 
00 00 
00 00 
00 80 
00 00 
80 00 
00 00 
00 00 
00 00 
00 00 
00 00 
00 00 
00 00 
00 00 
00 00 
00 00 



80 00 
3F 80 



12 D4 4C 

00 D4 D7 

S3 03 68 

D8 02 D5 

73 91 AF 

36 98 3A 

46 38 4A 

00 00 00 

00 B0 00 

00 00 80 
IE 
00 

00 00 00 

00 00 00 

00 00 00 

00 00 00 

00 B0 00 

00 00 80 

30 00 IE 

3F 80 00 

00 00 00 

00 00 00 

00 00 00 

00 00 00 

00 B0 00 

00 00 30 

80 00 IE 

3F 80 00 

00 00 00 

00 00 00 

00 00 00 

00 00 00 

00 80 00 

00 00 80 

80 00 IE 

3F 80 00 

00 00 00 

00 00 00 

00 00 00 

00 00 00 

00 80 00 

00 00 80 

80 00 IE 

3F B0 00 

00 00 00 

00 00 00 

00 00 00 

00 00 00 

00 80 00 

00 00 80 

80 00 IE 

21 30 00 

00 00 00 

00 00 00 

00 00 00 

00 00 00 

00 30 00 

00 00 30 

80 00 IE 

21 B0 00 

00 00 00 

00 00 00 

00 00 00 

00 00 00 

00 00 00 

00 00 00 

00 00 IE 

21 00 00 

00 00 00 

00 00 00 



03 65 

02 69 

03 C0 
02 79 
CD A3 
80 42 
00 DB 
00 B5 
00 80 
00 12 
80 AE 
IE CF 
00 DD 
00 E 5 
00 ED 
00 F 5 
00 00 
00 4F 
80 EE 
IE 10 
00 IE 
00 26 
00 2E 
00 36 
00 02 
00 90 
80 30 
IE 51 
00 77 
00 67 
00 6F 
00 77 
00 81 
00 D0 
80 70 
IE 91 
00 9F 
00 A7 
00 AF 
00 B7 
00 CI 
00 11 
80 B0 
IE 92 
00 F7 
00 E7 
00 EF 
00 F7 
00 02 
00 51 
80 F0 
IE 99 
00 20 
00 28 
00 30 
00 38 
00 4 3 
00 92 
80 32 
IE 9B 
00 79 
00 69 
00 71 
00 79 
00 81 
00 39 
00 CD 
IE 09 
00 Al 
00 A9 



2071: 
2079: 
2081; 
2089; 
20911 
2099; 
20A1; 
20A9: 
20BI; 
20B9i 
2001; 
2009; 
20D1; 
20D9; 
20E1; 
20E9; 
20F1; 
20F9; 
2101; 
2109; 
2111; 
2119; 
2121; 
2129; 
2131; 
2139; 
2141; 
2149; 
2151; 
2159; 
2161; 
2169; 
2171; 
2179; 
2181; 
2139; 
2191; 
2199; 
21A1; 
21A9; 
21B1; 
21B9; 
21C1; 
21C9; 
21D1; 
21D9; 
21E1; 
21E9; 
21F1; 
21F9; 
2201; 
2209; 
2211; 
2219; 
2221; 
2229; 
2231; 
2239; 
2241; 
2249; 
2251; 
2259; 
2261; 
2269; 
2271; 



00 00 

00 00 

00 00 

80 00 

00 B0 

00 3F 

00 00 

00 00 

00 00 

00 00 

00 00 

00 00 

00 00 

00 00 

00 00 

00 00 

00 00 

00 00 

00 00 

00 00 

00 00 

00 00 

C0 00 

00 00 

00 00 

00 00 

00 06 

80 00 

0E 00 

00 01 

00 00 

01 90 
00 00 
00 00 
00 00 
00 00 
00 20 
00 0C 
A0 00 
00 00 
00 00 
00 00 
00 00 
20 00 
IE A0 
00 0C 
A0 00 
00 00 
00 00 
00 00 
00 00 
00 00 
00 00 
00 0C 
E0 00 
00 00 
00 00 
00 00 
00 00 
00 00 

02 00 
00 02 
30 00 
00 00 
00 00 



00 00 

00 00 

00 00 

00 B0 

00 00 

80 00 

00 00 

00 00 

00 00 

00 00 

00 00 

00 00 

00 0F 

00 00 

00 00 

00 00 

00 00 

00 00 

00 00 

00 00 

00 00 

00 00 

0F C0 

00 00 

00 00 

00 00 

00 00 

07 00 

00 06 

30 00 

0C 00 

00 00 

00 00 

00 00 

00 00 

00 20 

00 00 

20 00 

0C 20 

00 00 

00 00 

00 00 

00 00 

0C 20 

00 00 

20 00 

0C 20 

00 00 

00 00 

00 00 

00 00 

00 00 

00 00 

C0 00 

0C C0 

00 00 

00 00 

00 00 

00 00 

02 00 
00 02 
60 00 

03 00 
00 00 
00 00 



00 00 
00 00 
00 B0 
00 00 
80 00 
3F 80 
00 00 
00 00 
00 00 
00 00 
00 00 
00 00 
00 00 
00 00 
00 00 
00 00 
00 00 
00 00 
00 00 
00 00 
00 00 
00 00 
00 00 
00 00 
00 00 
00 00 
03 00 
00 0F 
00 00 
06 00 
00 06 
00 00 
00 00 
00 00 
00 00 
"00 00 
20 00 
IE 20 
00 00 
00 00 
00 00 
00 00 
00 00 
00 IE 
20 00 
IE 20 
00 00 
00 00 
00 00 
00 00 
00 00 
00 00 
00 00 
00 00 
00 00 
00 00 
00 00 
00 00 
00 00 
00 02 
00 00 
02 C0 
00 02 
00 00 
00 00 



00 00 Bl 
00 00 B9 
00 00 34 
80 00 16 
IE 80 BE 
00 IE D3 
00 00 El 
00 00 E9 
00 00 Fl 
00 00 F9 
00 00 02 
00 00 0A 
0F C0 E7 
00 00 lA 
00 00 22 
00 00 2A 
00 00 32 
00 00 3A 
00 00 43 
00 00 4B 
00 00 53 
00 0F 6A 
00 00 Bl 
00 00 6B 
00 00 73 
0C 00 93 
00 01 IE 
00 00 F4 
03 00 01 
00 0C 28 
00 00 3D 
00 00 4C 
00 00 B3 
00 00 BB 
00 00 C3 
20 00 0E 
00 20 FC 
00 IE 72 
00 00 B7 
00 00 EB 
00 00 F3 
00 00 FB 
00 00 04 
20 00 53 
00 20 2D 
00 IE B2 
00 00 F7 
00 00 2C 
00 00 34 
00 00 3C 
00 00 45 
00 00 4D 
IF E0 3B 
00 IF FA 
00 00 63 
00 00 60 
FF 00 75 
00 00 7D 
00 00 85 
00 00 D5 
02 60 21 
00 03 40 
00 00 4E 
00 00 AD 
00 00 B5 



Daniel Lightner, v/ho lives in Montana, 
likes to fish and raise Hinnalayan cats 
when he's not programming. D 



OCTOBER 1991 COMPUTE 



S-39 



THE AUTOMATIC PROOFREADER 



Philip I. Nelson 



The Automatic Proofreader helps you 
type in program listings for ttie 128 and 
64 and prevents nearly every kind of 
typing mistake. 

Type in Proofreader exactly as list- 
ed. Because thie program can't chieck 
itself, type carefully to avoid mistakes. 
Don't omit any lines, even if they con- 
tain unusual commands. After you've fin- 
ished, save a copy before running it. 

Next, type RUN and press Return. Af- 
ter the program displays the message 
Proofreader Active, you're ready to 
type in a BASIC program, 

Every time you finish typing a line 
and press Return, Proofreader displays 
a two-letter checksum in the upper left 
corner of the screen. Compare this re- 
sult with the two-letter checksum print- 
ed to the left of the line in the program 
listing. If the letters match, the line prob- 
ably was typed correctly. If not, check 
for your mistake and correct the line. 

Proofreader ignores spaces not en- 
closed in quotation marks, so you can 
omit or add spaces between keywords 
and still see a matching checksum. 
Spaces inside quotes are almost al- 
ways significant, so the program pays 
attention to them. 

Proofreader does not accept key- 
word abbreviations (for example, ? in- 
stead of PRINT). If you use abbrevi- 
ations, you can still check the line by 
listing it, moving the cursor back to the 
line, and pressing Return. 

If you're using Proofreader on the 
128, do not perform any GRAPHIC com- 
mands while Proofreader is active. 
When you perform a command like 
GRAPHIC 1 , the computer moves eve- 
rything at the start of BASIC program 
space — including the Proofreader— \o 
another memory area, causing Proof- 
reader to crash. The same thing hap- 
pens if you run any program with a 
GRAPHIC command while Proofreader 
is in memory. 

Though Proofreac^er doesn't interfere 
with other BASIC operations, it's a 
good idea to disable it before running 
another program. To disable it, turn the 
computer off and then on. A gentler 
method is to SYS to the computer's 
built-in reset routine (65341 for the 128, 
64738 for the 64). 

AS CLR 

KK 10 VE=PEEK(772)+256*PEEK(77 
3) :[,0 = 43:HI = 44:PRIKT" 

G-40 COMPUTE OCTOBER 1991 



(CLR) {WHT} AUTOMATIC PROO 
FREADER FOR "; 
EB 20 IF VE=42364 THEN PRINT " 

64" 
AA 33 IF VE=-17165 THEN L0 = 45:H 
I=46:GRAPHIC CLR;PRINT"1 
28" 
KK 40 SA=(PEEK(LO)+256*PEEK(HI 
))+6:F0R J=SA TO SA+166: 
READ B:POKE J,B:CH=CH+B: 
NEXT 
QF 50 IF CHO20570 THEN PRINT 
{ SPACE }''*ERROR* CHECK TY 
PING IN DATA STATEMENTS" 
:END 
PD 60 FOR J-1 TO 5:READ RF,LF, 
HF:RS = SA-t-RF:HB=mT (RS/25 
6) :LB = HS-{256*HB) 
XB 70 CH=CH+RF+LF+HF:POKE SA+L 

F,LB:POKE SA+HF,HB:NEXT 
SB 80 IP CHO22054 THEN PRINT 
{SPACE} "*ERROR* RELOAD P 
ROGRAM AND CHECK FINAL L 
INE":END 
PH 90 IF VE=17I65 THEN POKE SA 
+14,22:POKE SA+ia,23:POK 
ESA+29,224:POKESA+13 9,22 
4 
JS 100 POKE SA1-149,PEEK(772) :P 
OKE SA+150,PEBK(773) :PR 
INT" (CLR) PROOFREADER AC 
TIVE" 

SYS SA:POKE HI,PEEK{HI) 
+1:P0KE (PEEK(LO)+256*P 
EEK(HI) ) -1,0:NEW 
DATA120,169,73,141,4,3, 
169,3,141,5,3,88,96,165 
,20,133,167 

DATA16 5,21,133,168,169, 
0,141,0,255,162,31,181, 
199,157,227 

DATA3,2a2,16,248,169,19 
,32,210,255,169,18,32,2 
10,253,160 

DATA9,132,180,132,176,I 
36,230,180,200,185,0,2, 
240,46,201 
XJ 160 DATA34,208,8,72,165,176 
,73,255,133,176,104,72, 
201,32,208 
GH 170 DATA7,165,176,208,3,104 
,208,2 26,104,166,180,24 
,165,167 
KH 130 DATA121,0,2,133,167,165 
,168,105,0,133,168,202, 
208,239,240 
RM 190 DATA202,165,167,69,168, 
72,41,15,168,185,211,3, 
32,210,255 
BR 200 DATA104,74,74,74,74,168 
,185,211,3,32,210,255,1 
62,31,189 
RM 210 DATA227,3,149,199,202,1 
6,248,169,146,32,210,25 
5,76,86,137 
HJ 220 DATA65,66,67,68,69,70,7 
1,72,74,75,77,80,81,82, 
83,88 
XR 230 DATA 13,2,7,167,31,32,1 
51,116,117,151,128,129, 
167,136,137 [1 



FA 


110 


PS 


120 


PS 


130 


xs 


140 


JC 


150 



ONLY 

ON 

DISK 

In addition to the type-in programs 
found in each issue of the maga- 
zine. Gazette Disl< offers bonus 
programs and original 64 and 128 
artwork. 

WorldMap 64/128 

Bruce M. Bowden 
Greensboro, NC 

Worldlviap 64 and WorldMap 128 
give you three different ways of look- 
ing at our planet. View it as seen in 
a Mercator projection, from any po- 
sition above the equator, or from 
above either pole. You can save 
any of these high-resolution 
screens for use in paint programs 
or for creating your own slide 
shows. 
Order this disk ($9.95 plus $2.00 
shipping and handling) from Ga- 
zette Disk, COMPUTE Publications, 
324 West Wendover Avenue, Suite 
200, Greensboro, North Carolina 
27408. Save by calling (800) 727- 
6937 and ordering a year's sutDscrip- 
tion — 12 disks and 12 magazines 
for only $39.95. 



TYPING AIDS 

MLX. our machine language entry program for 
the 64 and 1 28, and The Automatic Proofread- 
er are ulilities tttat help you type m Gazette pro- 
grams without making mistakes. To make 
room for more programs, we no longer include 
these labor-saving utilities in every issue, but 
they can be found on each Gazette Disk and 
are printed in all Issues of Gazette thfough 
June 1990. 

If you don't have access to a back issue or 
to one of our disks, write to us, and we'll send 
you free copies of both of these handy pro- 
grams. We'll also include instructions on how 
to type in Gazette programs. Please enclose a 
self-addressed, stamped envelope. 

Write to Typing Aids. COf^PUTE's Ga- 
zette. 324 West Wertdover Avenue, Suite 200, 
Greensboro, North Carolina 27408. 



REVIEWS 



Get a head start on Headline Harry's Great Paper Race, take a look 

at the sequel to Elvira, and scrutinize an abundance of other evaluations. 



HEADLINE HARRY 
AND THE GREAT 
PAPER RACE 

You have only three hours 
left before your deadline, 
Miss it and Marvin fvluckrak- 
er's devious reporters will 
print their falsified stories on 
the front page of the Diaboli- 
cal Dally. Not only will you 
have to face your angry edi- 
tor, Headline Harry but the 
public will never learn the 
true story Such is the life of 
a reporter in Headline Harry 
and the Great Paper Race, a 
game that combines lessons 
in modern history, geogra- 
phy, and problem-solving. 

Both older children and 
adults will enjoy sifting 
through the abundant facts 
when they join Headline Har- 
ry's crusade to stop the press- 
es of the scheming competi- 
tion. Choose the region of the 
United States that you most 
want to tackle and decide 
which historical event from 
that area warrants a lead sto- 
ry. File the story before your 
deadline arrives. To make mat- 
ters more difficult, you might 
lose time traveling, discover- 
ing information, or falling prey 
to one of Marvin Muckraker's 
reporters. 

The animated adventures 
include digitized speech 
and music, and are available 
in 16- or 256-color versions. 
Players can only explore 12 
stories, but the upcoming 
teachers' edition will allow for 
three times that many. A con- 
venient save-game feature al- 
lows you to save stories in 
progress. 

Headline Harry doesn't 
promise that scooping the Di- 
abolical's reporters will be 
easy; it takes perseverance. 
But students, especially, will 
find this fact-chasing mission 
a welcome break from 
clunky history books. Com- 



plex, but not frustrating, Head- 
line Harry is good news for 
rookie reporters looking to 
build their problem-solving 
skills. 

CHANTELLE OLIGSCHLAEGER 

Scheduled lor release: August 1991 

IBM PC and compatibles. 512K RAM 
(640K lor MCGA and VGA 256 col- 



ELVIRA II: 
THE JAWS OF 
CERBERUS 

As a horror movie queen, El- 
vira seems to encounter 
more than her share of prob- 
lems. In this impressive se- 




Your interstate journey begins in Headline Harry's office where lie 
assigns you a front-page story. 




Elvira II: The Jaws of Cerberus will curdle your blood and raise 
your hacl<les witt) its strikingfy morbid graphics. 



or); CGA. EGA. MCGA, VGA, Tandy 
16-color. and Hercules; requires 
Inard drive; supports Ad Lib, Sound 
Blaster, PS/1 sound cards; supports 
mouse— $49,95 for 16-color version, 
$59.95 for 256-colar version 

DAVIDSON & ASSOCIATES 
3135 Kashivja St. 
Torrance, CA 90505 
(213) 534-4070 

Circle Reader Service Numtaer 312 



quel to the first Elvira adven- 
ture game, the demonic, 
three-headed Cerberus kid- 
naps our favorite delicate 
creature and makes off with 
her to a darksome location. 
As always, your job entails 
saving the day using your 
wits, a full complement of 
spells, and persistence. 



Somewhere in the studios 
of Black Widow Productions, 
on one of three sound stag- 
es, you'll find the kidnapped 
Elvira. Whether she's prison- 
er within the traditionally 
haunted Victorian house, the 
spider-infested catacombs, 
or the foreboding graveyard, 
as her rescuer you can ex- 
pect to encounter chilling spe- 
cial effects and surprises, in- 
cluding some decomposing 
corpses. Accolade intended 
Elvira II: The Jaws of Cerbe- 
rus to out-shock and out- 
creep every other adventure 
game on the market and 
they succeed. The detailed, 
macabre sets and horrific, an- 
imated monsters engender 
an atmosphere of perfectly 
delightful dread. 

As in the first game, you'll 
find the controls necessary 
to explore Elvira's world on 
screen at ali times. New and 
notable, however, is a clever 
health icon in the shape of a 
human body that clearly in- 
dicates your character's stat- 
us, including number of hit 
points per body part. This in- 
dicator becomes skeletal as 
you take damage. Eerie! 

Better than a horror dou- 
ble feature, Elvira II: The 
Jaws of Cerberus will test the 
mettle of experienced adven- 
turers. And while Elvira her- 
self might offer some mo- 
ments of comic relief, this 
frightfest packs more gasps 
than laughs. 

DAVID SEARS 

Scheduled for release; October 1991 

IBf^ PC and contpatibles. 512K 
RAM; CGA. EGA, VGA. or Hercules: 
supports Ad Lib, Game Blaster, Ro- 
land MT-32, and Sound Blaster; sup- 
ports mouse and joystick — S59.95 

Also available for Amiga— S59, 95 
and Atari ST— 559.95 

ACCOLADE 

550 S. Winchester Blvd. 

San Jose, CA 95128 

(408) 985-1700 

Circle Reader Service Number 313 

OCTOBER 1991 COMPUTE 121 



r-r-r-^^^^ r-'9' ^'-^ J^ J' ^^ ^ f^)^ ^}^ ^ J' ^ ^ ^'J » J JW^^jfj'^ ^^^^ j.^^ ^ ^^ 9 J J ^^ j^ 



'J^^ Jf 1^ 





The greatest hero for the Hyborean Age was a fierce 
barbarian born of the harsh northlands, 

CONAN THE CIMMERIAN 



ou have heard the tales of Conan's adventures. Only 
now will you have the opportunity to live the life of 
this fierce barbarian from the land of Hyborea. 

Our odyssey begins with murder mosi foul. When 
Conan's village is massacred by the ravening hordes of Thoth 
Amon, high priest of the vile cult of Set, Conan vows to avenge 
the death of his family and friends. 

In your search for vengeance, you as Conan, will explore 
Hyborea to seek out its hidden secrets and learn of its powers. 
Visit over 200 locations - taverns and inns, crypts and 
dungeons, temples and tombs, lavish homes and poor hovels - 
to learn the mysteries of Hyborea's sorceries to help Conan 
overcome its manj' natural and supernatural perils. 
Only with luck, courage and constant struggle will Conan have 
the chance to force a reckoning with the powerful Thoth Amon, 




AVAILABLE FOR THE IBM AND AMIGA THIS SUMMER. 
SUGGESTED HETA1L-S49.99 

TM and © 1991 Conan Propcnics Inc 

Cover illuslralion © 1990 Boris Vallejo. 

© 1991 Virgin Games. Inc. All righls rt servtd. 

Virjin® ts > rcgiiltrrd Iradcnutk of \ irgin Enlrrprlies, Ltd. 

Virgin Gimts, Inc. 18061 Hilth Ave. Inini;, Calirumia 927H 



^ ^ ^t^f^j'^^^^J'^^J^-^^ Tf 




' r ^^ ff ^ V /VV t /j^j^,,, -rT 



It X.J 1 J IJ J 



-> ^ -> ^ r -■ ■> ^ ^ -- ^ -> J- :^-^ ^ -^ ^^ ^ j;^^^^ J- ^^1^., ^.H^ -r-STL 



^ ^ ^-^^ ^ '^ ^ ^ -r^ JT \^J^\t'\ 




i. y /.9 >.y / / A,/ / J / / ry ^ 




m(''(f'(U((<r^ 



' ^s,is,^iJi^ ^ '^' '^'^ "^ "^ "^ 




n Spirit of Excalibur, the Knights of the Round Table 
fought to defend medieval Britain from the evil 
sorceress, Morgan Le Fay. Morgan, dabbling in dark 
arts beyond even her ability to control, had summoned 
a great Lord of Demons, the Shadowmaster. 

With Morgan's death, the Shadowmaster was freed to work his 
evil will against the unprepared folk of Britain. Striking in the 
night, he imprisoned the King with a spell, stole the greatest 
treasures of the realm and kidnapped Nineve, the court 
enchantress. With the loss of the sword Excalibur and the newly 
recovered Holy Grail, Britain begins to sicken and die. The 
Shadowmaster must be stopped! 

Command knights and whatever followers they are able to 
recruit to track the Shadowmaster through hazardous, beautiful 
and mysterious medieval Spain. Explore the hundreds of villages 
and cities, fortresses and castles, dungeons and palaces and all 
the secret places where the Shadowmaster may dwell. 

Seek what aid you can as you acquire and learn the use of the 
sorceries of Moorish Spain, for only with the aid of 
enchantments and the loyalty of strong allies will you stand 
a chance of ridding the world of the demonic Shadowmaster 
once and for all. 



I 



s 

^ 



AVAILABLE FOR THE IBM, AMJGA, ATARI 5T AND MAC THIS SUMMER. 
SUGGESTED RETAIL - SM.99 

Developed by Syncrj^islic Soflwire. 

C 1991 Virgin Games, Inc. 

Vii^n«£ is a rtgistcred tradcmafk oF Virgin Enlerprises, Lid. 

Vengeance of Excalibur v, i trademark of Virgin Games. Inc. 

Virgin GjillK, Inc. 18061 Filcb .A%c.. Inlnc, California 927H 



Circle Ret<f«r S«rv<» Number 17S 





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RE YOU TOUGH ENOUGH TO TAKE O! 
21st CENTURY AND SAVE MANKIND FROM 
HIS UNHMELY DESTRUCTION BY 
I A GENETICALLY ENGINEERED 

WAR MACHINE?!? I 

Talk about your work-related stress! As a ZODIAC 
special agent, your job is to crack the complex 
security systems of the Universal Cybernetics 
Corporation and track down the mutant robot they 
have designed as the ultimate killing machine. 

You'll arm. yourself with a whole arsenal of 
weapons - everything from hologram, projectors to 
special vision enhancement visors to thermal 
infra-red image intensiflers. If all else fails - 
you'll have to rely on your own psychic powers! 
FEATURES INCLUDE: 

^ I6-leveI 3-dimensionaI environment complete 
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■ Realistic action control of six characters: 2 
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■ 360 degree vision g-j 

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'HHrIJ space flight siznulatox to end all 
WT simulators, SHUTTLE is the most accurate 
I and comprehensive simulation of NASA's 
1 I Space Shuttle ever produced for the home 
computer. 

With the aid of Mission Control, you will master 
such challenges as deploying and repairing 
satellites, launching spy satellites, maneuvering 
your craft in zero gravity, attaining the correct re- 
entry trajectory, and pulling off complicated 
landings. 

Advanced polygon and elliptical graphics, along 
with actual land and star maps were used to create 
the breathtaking 3D panoramas of the Orbiter and 
its environment, which can be ^ewed from any 
angle at any time. tIi^ 

Other features include: lr(%l%(%[l 

■ Authentic control panel display ^M-W * ' •* 

■ Detailed com.prehensive training and reference 
Ajii-xnanual . 

'lilfJuitterous training, scientific and "Star Wars" 
IJIjJXSDI) Missions 

Multiple help levels from "novice" to "veteran" 
Various launch and landing sites 
Orchestral quality music 
Fold-out Shuttle flight deck poster 

iVULSBLErOR 

THE IBM, IMIG JL ilfD AT2IU ST LiTE SUMMER. 

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Circle Reader Service Number 179 



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REVIEWS 



PUBTECH FILE 
ORGANIZER 

To judge from third-party de- 
velopers' efforts, Microsoft re- 
ally missed the mark with the 
Program Manager and File 
Manager in Windows 3.0. A 
dozen replacement file man- 
agers and shells (program 
launchers) — and a few prod- 
ucts that do both — promise 
an improved Windows envi- 
ronment. One of the best of 
these, PubTech File Organ- 
izerS.O, makes good on that 
promise. 

File Organizer strives to 
simplify controlling the com- 
puter within Windows. As 
with many simplifications, it 
gets harder before it gets eas- 
ier. If you have several hard 
disks and many files, for in- 
stance, the first screen you 
see after installing File Organ- 
izer is downright scary. The 
320-meg hard drive on my 
Arche Legacy 386-33 is par- 
titioned into ten drives with 
an assortment of installed 
printer drivers. The initial 
screen displays a double 
stack of drive icons along 
the right side and a row of 
printer driver icons across 
the bottom. A row of icons 
representing minimized appli- 
cations runs above the print- 
er icons. Of the 22 icons on 
the screen, none will run an 
actual program. Not even 
the Windows desktop acces- 
sories are available. To 
launch an application, click 
on the icon for the program's 
hard drive. That opens a win- 
dow with a folder icon for 
each directory in the drive 
and icons for all the files in 
the root directory. If your de- 
sired executable file is in a 
subdirectory, click on its fold- 
er and find the appropriate 
file icon. Double-click, and 
you're running. 

That's not easier than the 
Windows Program Manager. 

126 COMPUTE OCTOBER 1991 



File Organizer provides 
three easier ways to launch 
a program: putting the pro- 
gram's icon on the desktop, 
assigning a special hot key 
to the program, or adding it 
to the pull-down applications 
menu. All work well. 

If you put icons on the 
desktop, though, you'll fill 
your aiready-crowded desk- 



manipulation. To move an en- 
tire subdirectory from one 
drive or directory to another, 
grab its folder and drag it to 
where you want it. Dragging 
a file to the trash can icon de- 
letes the file. To print a file, 
drag its icon onto the printer 
icon. To start an application 
and load a file, drag the file 
icon onto the application 




Ml jp m £f 

t-ci /■<> .nfi fj^--. -f c-i i-»rirti..., nt.irf,j--. t,jjii..f.vi I ,. 11— T>pg}- 

PubTech File Organizer grants you superior control of Windows 
files through improved icon control. 



top quickly. Instead, move to 
the Desktop Utilities function 
(which has its own separate 
manual) to create any num- 
ber of custom desktops. For 
instance, you could have a 
desktop with Excel and its as- 
sociated subprogram icons 
afong with icons for your 
most frequently used spread- 
sheet files, Pull up your Ex- 
cel desktop, and you're 
ready to work. Or if you have 
a regular task that involves 
several separate applica- 
tions, create a desktop with 
those applications already 
running. Although creating 
the desktop files can take 
some time, you have an end- 
lessly customizable front 
end for Windows. 

File Organizer has fea- 
tures, however, that you can 
enjoy right out of the box, 
most notably icon-based file 



icon. Almost any file manage- 
ment task is done solely by 
clicking on and moving 
icons. 

For file management by 
icon, File Organizer is top- 
notch. As a Program Manag- 
er replacement, it takes a 
shift of gears and extra time 
to set up an appropriate 
batch of customized desk- 
tops. If you persist, though, 
and thoughtfully customize, 
you'll have a Windows shell 
that suits you perfectly. 

RICHARD O, MANN 

IBM PC AT and compatibles (286. 
3B6. or 486), 640K RAM. DOS 3.0 or 
Windows 3-0. hard disk; mouse rec- 
ommended— S199.95 

PUBLISHING TECHNOLOGIES 
7719 Wood Hollow Dr., Ste, 260 
Austin, TX 78731 
(800) PUB-TECH (sales) 
(512) 346-2835 

Circle Reader Service Number 314 



BUSHBUCK 
CHARMS, 
VIKING SHIPS, 
& DODO EGGS/ 
GEOJIGSAW 

A scavenger hunt by any oth- 
er name could never be this 
much fun. BushBuck 
Charms, Viking Ships, & Do- 
do Eggs (yes, that's the 
name) is superior education- 
al software. Not only will you 
gain an understanding of the 
world's cultures and in- 
crease your knowledge of ge- 
ography, but you'll have fun 
along the way. 

The object of the game is 
to fly to the different coun- 
tries of the world and gather 
various common objects in 
each country you visit. Each 
location offers a special at- 
traction or contains some his- 
torical significance; their de- 
scriptions can help you later, 
so read them all carefully. 
Points accumulate as you dis- 
cover objects. Colorful, de- 
tailed maps and creative, an- 
imated sequences add inter- 
est, while the musical scores 
tend to stick with you for 
hours after you play. 

Play alone, against anoth- 
er player, or against one of 
the included villains: Pierre, 
Natasha, and Otto von Slink- 
enrat, a real stinker who 
slimed his way to the top of 
the PICKLE (Preserving Indi- 
vidual Cultures and Knowl- 
edge in Lands Everywhere) 
Foundation. 

My complaints are minor. 
Gathering all 15 objects re- 
quires some time; a save- 
game feature would be appre- 
ciated. And although recom- 
mended for all ages, I 
wouldn't expect BushBuck 
Charms to hold the interest 
of very young children un- 
less they're able to read and 
decipher maps. Children 



with those skills will love the 
game, if they can persuade 
Mom and Dad to quit playing 
for a while. 

Another PC Globe educa- 
tional game, GeoJigsaw, is 
far more suitable for young 
children. The color-cycling 
feature (available for VGA sys- 
tems only) creates an illusion 
that the 12 puzzles are ani- 



While GeoJigsaw not as 
strong a teaching tool as 
BushBuck Charms, both 
games offer children an op- 
portunity to learn and enjoy 
themselves at the same 
time. And at a cost of $39,95 
for GeoJigsaw and $49.95 
for BushBuck Charms, learn- 
ing comes at bargain prices. 
JOYCE £[;:es 




Scavenger hunts go global and show their educational side in 
BushBuck Charms, Viking Ships, & Dodo Eggs. 



mated. Puzzle choices 
range from depictions of di- 
nosaurs to the solar system. 
Additional puzzle disks 
would offer variety, but none 
were offered on the order 
blank included in the game 
box. 

Puzzles may be cut into 
as few as 6 or as many as 
294 puzzle pieces— just re- 
member that you have to put 
the pieces back together. 
Puzzle pieces are easy to 
move with a mouse or joys- 
tick. A keyboard option is 
available, but maneuvering 
pieces using this option is dif- 
ficult. The game supports on- 
ly the PC speaker, but it 
does reward a completed 
puzzle with musical notes. A 
puzzle is automatically 
saved in its current state if 
you quit the game. 



BushBucl< Charms, Viking Ships. & Do- 
do Eggs 

IBM PC and compatibles, 512K 
RAM, CGA, EGA. or VGA; mouse 
and Ad Lib sound card optional— 
S49.95 

GeoJigsaw 

IBM PC and compatibles, 512K 
RAM, CGA, EGA, MCGA, VGA, or Tan- 
dy 16-color; mouse Optional — $39.95 

PC GLOBE 
4700 S, McClintock 
Tempe, AZ 85282 
(602) 730-9000 

Circle Reader Senice Number 315 



PC DISKLOCK 

Data security is increasingly 
becoming a top-priority is- 
sue for small business own- 
ers and corporate fvllS man- 
agers alike. Now Fifth Gener- 
ation Systems, maker of the 
Mace Utilities, offers a solu- 



tion to this growing problem 
with PC Diskiock. 

Disklock provides compre- 
hensive protection of sensi- 
tive data through the use of 
primary and secondary pass- 
words, selective locking and 
encryption of files, and an au- 
dit trail of unsuccessful log- 
on attempts. 

Disktock's password sys- 
tem draws the first line of de- 
fense. When installing the pro- 
gram, the user selects a pri- 
mary password and, option- 
ally, a secondary password. 
When using the primary pass- 
word, the user has full ac- 
cess to all files and directo- 
ries on the system, while 
someone logged on under 
the secondary password can- 
not access locked or encrypt- 
ed files. This sort of simple se- 
curity is useful in situations 
where several users, some 
of whom do not require ac- 
cess to sensitive files, share 
one computer. 

In addition to the general 
security provided by the pass- 
word system, Diskiock pro- 
vides two methods of safe- 
guarding selected files. By 
locking a file, you make it in- 
accessible to users logged 
on under the secondary pass- 
word. Encrypting a file, in ad- 
dition to making it inaccessi- 
ble to secondary users, also 
encodes the data in a way 
that makes it unintelligible. 
You can decrypt files only 
with the primary password 
you chose earlier. 

As a final safety feature, 
Diskiock keeps a log of ali un- 
successful log-on attempts. 
D/sWoc/c stores the time and 
date of each failed entry 
attempt in a file called 
Disklock.log, which you may 
review periodically. 

Does the average user 
need a data guardian such 
as Diskiock? Probably not. 
Its main use will be to pro- 
vide security in business en- 
vironments where several us- 



ers share computers contain- 
ing sensitive information. Be- 
cause of its thoughtful de- 
sign, PC Diskiock places a 
minimal burden on legitimate 
users while keeping the bad 
guys, and the merely curi- 
ous, at bay. 

RICHARD RAPP 

IBM PC. and compatibles. 512K 
RAM, hard drive; mouse opliofial— 
S189 

FIFTH GENERATION SYSTEMS 
10049 N. Reiger Rd. 
Baton Rouge, LA 70809-4559 
(504) 291-7221 

Circle Reader Sendee Number 316 



HARD NOVA 

Nova's not your typical twen- 
ty-first century housewife con- 
tent to sit home tending the 
antigravity machine. Armed 
with a generous supply of 
Sonic Mace and a Stun 
Club, this spacegoing barra- 
cuda seeks a more fulfilling 
life of contract kidnapping, 
assassination, and smug- 
gling assignments. Nova's a 
mercenary, and she stays 
alive by never dropping her 
guard or her weapons. 

Hard Nova offers a combi- 
nation of arcade action, role- 
playing, and strategy — pro- 
viding a little something for 
everyone, including a 
choice of playing a male 
lead (Stark) instead of a fe- 
male (Nova). First-rate graph- 
ics begin with the opening 
screens and culminate in a 
visual explosion as you trav- 
erse a stargate (providing 
you keep your Bremar-Nav 
sentient alive long enough to 
lead you through). 

The graphics do more 
than just provide colorful eye- 
wash, however; they serve to 
help orient you to your rapid- 
ly changing alien surround- 
ings, reveal the whereabouts 
of your few friends and many 
enemies, and occasionally 
supply a way to rest your war- 

OCTOBER 1991 COMPUTE 127 



REVIEWS 




From the command chair in Hard Nova, yau'il conduct serious, but 
diverting, mercenary action. 



weary brain by playing Zero- 
G Roulette. 

The gee-whiz technology 
evidenced throughout Hard 
Nova extends beyond its top- 
quality graphics to encom- 
pass numerous ingenious 
ways to pillage, plunder, 
maim, and murder. In the 
four distant frontier worlds 
where you ply your trade, the 
power of your weapons con- 
tributes directly to the length 
of your life. 

Hard Nova provides one 
of the deadliest and most 
diabolical assortments of per- 
sonal or ship-based arma- 
ment this side of, well, Ariel. 
Weapons alone, however, 
do not guarantee survival; 
you still need what on Earth 
would be called people 
skills. Most often when you en- 
counter aliens or humans, 
you try to kill them (or they 
kill you). 

Remaining alive and victo- 
rious requires that you col- 
lect useful, strategic, and cur- 
rent information. You do that 
by questioning foul-smelling 
bartenders, beautiful wom- 
en, and spiritless aliens. You 
need not be polite— say (or 
do) whatever is needed to 
get your answers. 

It's all in a day's work for 
a mercenary, and you'll 
fight anything, if the price is 

128 COMPUTE OCTOBER 1991 



right. You've come a long 
way, baby. . . . 

HOWARD MiLLMAtg 

IBM PC and compatibles, 512K 
RAM, EGA, MCGA, or VGA; supports 
mouse, hard drive recommended, 
supports Roland MT-32, Ad Lib, and 
PS/1 sound boards— $49.95 

ELECTRONIC ARTS 
1820 Gateway Dr. 
San tvlaleo, CA 94404 
(800) 245-4525 

Circle Reader Service Number 317 

FASTBACK PLUS 

Let's face it; most of us don't 
back up our hard drives as 
often as we should. We see 
it as a tedious, time-consum- 
ing, and generally unpleas- 
ant experience. But thanks 
to the award-winning Fast- 
back Plus, this doesn't have 
to be true. 

Fastback Plus includes a 
host of features, such as sup- 
port for floppy, tape, and re- 
movable drives, as well as 
multiple hard drives. Ad- 
vanced data compression, er- 
ror detection, incremental 
and differential backups, 
and automatic disk format- 
ting make backup chores 
less onerous and more re- 
warding. A macro facility al- 
lows you to automate your 
backups. The only major fea- 



tures missing from Fastback 
Plus are disk image backups 
and LAN support. The omis- 
sion of disk image backups, 
used most often when sav- 
ing data to a streaming tape 
drive, seems odd consider- 
ing the wealth of options 
you're offered in other areas 
of the program. 

Be that as it may, Fasf- 
bac/cP/us offers the average 
user more than enough choic- 
es. The data compression op- 
tion allows you to choose be- 
tween minimizing either the 
number of disks used or the 
amount of time used to per- 
form the compression. The 
macro facility is extensive 
enough for all but the most de- 
manding backups, and you 
can even choose between 
the original command line in- 
terface or the new point-and- 
click one. This allows users 
of the original Fastback io up- 
grade to the new package 
without having to rewrite 
their existing macros and 
batch files. 

You are buying a well-con- 
ceived package when you 
pick up Fastback Plus. The 
Fastback Plus manual offers 
advice on developing a reg- 
ular backup regimen and ex- 
plains the program's fea- 
tures in understandable 
terms. You can choose from 
a multitude of options and, 
most importantly, Fastback 
Plus is fast. So unless you 
need specialized features 
such as disk image backups 
or LAN support, Fastback 
Plus is the program to make 
hard drive failure a tempo- 
rary condition at worst, 

RICHARD RAPP 



IBM XT and compatibles, 330K RAM, 
hard disk — 1189 

FIRM GENERATION SYSTEMS 
10049 N. Reiger Rd, 
Baton Rouge, LA 70809 
{504) 291-7221 



Circle Reader Service Number 318 



LINKS 

CHAMPIONSHIP 

COURSES 

Access Software's hot 1990 
release, LINKS: The Chal- 
lenge of Golf, came with an 
incredibly detailed, digitized 
version of Torrey Pines 
South Golf Course in south- 
ern California, The designers 
promised additional cours- 
es — these are the first out of 
the chute. 

Just a few miles from Ac- 
cess's former offices, you'll 
find the setting for the Boun- 
tiful, Utah, course— high in 
the foothills of the spectacu- 
lar Wasatch Front Moun- 
tains. Access captured the 
course in the fall, with gor- 
geous colors festooning the 
mountainside in the back- 
ground. (Firestone is also 
dressed in its autumn best.) 

Since Bountiful is in the 
hills, the course has lots of 
up- and downhill fairways 
moving across steep hill- 
sides. A ball hit out of the fair- 
way may end up anywhere. 
Watch out for the windows of 
the nearby condos! I live on 
the Wasatch Front. I can tes- 
tify that playing this course 
on the computer captures 
the look and feel of a brisk 
18 holes in the mountains on 
a sunny fall day. 

The Firestone Country 
Club of Akron, Ohio, is a 
world-class course, the site 
of many PGA tournaments. 
It's also a duffer's nightmare. 
The densely tree-lined fair- 
ways continually obscure 
your view of the pin. If you 
don't have precise control of 
your hooks and slices, you'll 
spend hours in the woods, hit- 
ting trees on almost every 
stroke. 

In short, it's a challenge. 
You'll fine-tune your skills 
here — or vie for a spot in the 
Hail of Shame. There's no mid- 




-Access brings an autumnal Bountiful tiome 
to LINKS fans. 

die ground. These beautiful courses 
have been lovingly re-created in as- 
tounding detail, right down to the 
types, shapes, and colors of the trees, 
buildings near the course, and scenery 
in the distance. LINKS is a great game. 
With these realistic courses (and many 
more to come), it should remain popu- 
lar indefinitely. 

RICHARD MANN 

IBM PC and compatibles, requires LINKS: The Chal- 
lenge of Go/f— S24.95 for Bountiful Golf Course— 
$24.95 for Firestone Counlry Club 

ACCESS SOFTWARE 

4910 W, Amelia Earhart Dr, 

Salt Lake Oily, UT 84116 

(800) 800-4880 

(801)359-2900 

CIrete Reader Service Number 313 

VOLKSWRITER 4 

Do the words advanced, powerful, and 
professional intimidate you? To the res- 
cue comes the Volkswriter line of word 
processors, offering power and ad- 
vanced capabilities with an inviting 
menu interface and simple commands. 
And while Vo/tewr/fer 4 targets manag- 
ers and professionals, anyone who's fa- 
miliar with word processing will quickly 
pick up the commands. 

Six tutorial files introduce such ba- 
sics of word processing as storage, 
retrieval, and creation of files. These tuto- 
rials end with more complex capabili- 
ties, like changing type styles and lay- 
outs, using embedded commands, and 
creating macros. Extensive online help 
is also available at the touch of a key, 
By the time you work through the tutori- 
als, you'll realize that even advanced 
word processing really isn't difficult, 
and you just might begin to enjoy it. 



CanYouDoABetter 
Job Than Gaby? 




THEKHENIUN 

Coming live in October fft^rff" 

Spectrum HohByie 

2061 Challenger Drive. Alameda. CA 94501 (5 101 522- 1 164 



Circle Reader Service Number 167 



NordicTrack introduces,.. 

Simple instmctions 

for changing your spare toe: 





IBum more calcxies. 
Studies show that the 
combined use of both your 
upper and lower body during 
exercise burns more calories in 
less lime. Unlike exercise bikes, 
ireadmilLs, and siairclimbers that 
only work your lower body, 
NotdicRow TBX is a total-body 
exerciser. 



2PutNordicRowTBX 
towtrkforyou. 

Split-resistance settings for the 
upper and lower body allow you 
10 fine-njne your own workoul 
and burn maximum calories. A 
rcvolulionaiy Back Stress 
Mana^emem System works to 
suppon your lower back for safe, 
effec[i\'e exercise. 



3 Take just 20 minutes a 
day, three times a week. 

With NordicRow TBX there's no 
need to drive to the health club. 
You can work out in the comfort 
and convenience of your own 
home! NonlicRow TBX gives you 
a superior cardiovascular woikoul 
that lones and shapes all the 
muscles in your entire body. 



Try NordicRow TBX in your 

own home for 30 davsl 




NordicRow 



11 NoeDicTe;icK 



FREEVIDEOi 



i VTOEOiScHCRB cAu.1-800-468. 

Or write: NordicTrack, 141 Jonattian Blvd. H., Depl. 32BJ1, Chaska, MN 55318 



1-800-468-4491 



circle Rsader Service Number 119 



L'1991 NordicTrack, Inc., A CML Company 



REVIEWS 



Maybe you want to carry 
work to and from the office. 
Don't worry if you receive 
files from coworl<ers in a dif- 
ferent file format. Volkswriter 
4 automatically reads Word- 
Star {3,3-5,5), WordPerfect 
(5,0 and 5,1), Microsoft 
Word (3.0-5.0), Lotus 1-2-3 
(releases 1 and 2), and Dis- 
p/aywr/fe files. And for an ad- 
ditional $69, you can pur- 
chase Volks Word for Word. 
a file-conversion utility that 
converts more than 30 file for- 
mats. 

Unlike some other word 
processors, Volkswriter 4 
doesn't require you to 
change the type style of a 
document to print it with a dif- 
ferent printer driver. Voll<swrit- 
er 4 tries to match the layout 
type styles with those of the 
new printer driver, or you 
can alter the type styles man- 
ually. Install or create type 
styles for specific purposes, 
such as inserting fieaders at 
the top of pages. 

Noteworthy features in 
Volkswriter 4 include page 
preview, a keyboard display 
chart, a calculate crossfoot 
option for columns of num- 
bers, the ability to insert 
page numbers as Arabic or 
Roman numerals, the ability 
to insert nonprinting com- 
ments, the change case com- 
mand, and the notepad. 

Save paper by using the 
page preview option , {Th is op- 
lion is onty available for sys- 
tems with a graphics card,) 
Embed special printing char- 
acteristics such as boid, ital- 
ic, underline, subscript, and 
superscript easily, or send Es- 
cape codes to your printer 
with the CMD command. Or 
display the little known Ctrl 
key assignments in a box at 
the top of the screen with the 
keyboard assignment com- 
mand; that way, you won't 
have to laboriously search 
for elusive key assignment ta- 
bles in your DOS manual. 

130 COMPUTE OCTOBER 1991 



Calculate in column or 
row format, and use the 
crossfoot method to figure 
rows and columns simultane- 
ously — instead of loading 
your spreadsheet for such 
simple calculations. You also 
can sort text columns in as- 
cending or descending or- 



characters to draw boxes 
around text. With Volkswriter 
4, you simply highlight a 
block of text and use the Alt- 
B command to draw a dou- 
ble or single line box around 
the highlighted block of text. 
Creating macros with 
Volkswriter 4 poses no more 



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t I, liter - Select 



Here the user-friendly Vo^kswrWer 4 displays some of its myraid 
available options on the main menu. 



der by name, ZIP code, and 
so on. This option comes in 
handy for sorting names and 
addresses for use with the 
mail-merge option. 

With the special page-num- 
bering options, you can use 
Roman numerals for the ta- 
ble of contents and index, 
and Arabic numerals for the 
rest of the document. And 
since capitalization typos oc- 
cur often, the caps change 
command offers a quick way 
to correct the errors without 
retyping an entire word or 
line, W3//cswr/fer 4 's notepad 
option lets you keep notes 
for yourself. If you think of 
something while working on 
a document, key it in and 
send it to the notepad. It will 
be cut from the current doc- 
ument and appended to a 
file that you specify. 

Most word processors 
lack an easy way to use line 



threat than tying your shoe- 
laces. Even users who've nev- 
er created a macro will enjoy 
experimenting with this fea- 
ture. 

The word count command 
saves you time. You needn't 
move to the top of a docu- 
ment to get an accurate 
word count. To count the 
words in a specific section of 
a document, merely high- 
light the text in question be- 
fore choosing the word 
count command. 

More special features in- 
clude mail merge, undelete 
(up to 900 characters), stor- 
age of blocks of text to a sep- 
arate file, and printing in land- 
scape or portrait modes. The 
most impressive capabilities 
of this package include the 
310,000-word thesaurus and 
Grammatik IV. 

You can purchase sever- 
al accessories separately for 



a reasonable sum. These in- 
clude an extended 610,000- 
word thesaurus; specialized 
dictionaries with computer, le- 
gal, and medical words; and 
multilingual dictionaries, the- 
sauruses, and dictionaries, 
This version of the pro- 
gram doesn't include mouse 
or bitmap graphics support 
or an indexing feature, but it 
wasn't intended to be anoth- 
er desktop publishing pack- 
age, either, Vo//('sivr/fer4can 
be a useful tool for manag- 
ers and other professionals 
and even students who 
need to meet term-paper 
deadlines (the footnote fea- 
ture is outstanding). And 
with a 3Q-day money-back 
guarantee, you can't lose. 
This word processor truly 
puts the power of words into 
the hands of the people, 

JOYCE SIDES 

IBM PC and compatibles; 640K 
RAM; CGA, EGA, VGA, or Hercules 
(for print preview); hard disk — S249 

VOLKSWRITER 

One Lower Ragsdale Or,, 

BIdg, 2, Ste, 100 
Monterey, CA 93940 
(408) 648-3000 
Circle Reader Service Number 320 

STREET ROD 2 

Do you want to be King of 
the Road without spending 
the big bucks for a top-qual- 
ity racer? Do you lack the 
smarts to build a monster ma- 
chine from scratch or the 
guts to push the pedal to the 
floor? If so, then Street Rod 
2 might be just your ticket. 

You'll begin by selecting 
your first set of wheels and 
spare parts from the want 
ads. Even though there are 
25 autos and 60 parts to 
choose from, with only 
$1,200 to spend, a Ford 
Fairlane and a few new tires 
are about all you'll be able to 
afford. 

Next it's into the garage, 
where you can perform cos- 




After a brief pit stop, cruise the streets 
searching for racing action. 

metic surgery by spray-painting your 
monster, cliopping its roof, and remov- 
ing tiie bumpers. To improve your chanc- 
es against the competition, pop the 
hood and tune your engine or bolt on 
a new part. With Street Rod 2, you can 
even roll under the body and do some 
serious work, adding differentials, muf- 
flers, and exhaust manifolds. Eventual- 
ly, substitute a top-performance manual 
transmission for that easy-to-shift, but 
decidedly inferior, automatic. 

When you arrive at the local drive-in, 
sit tight until a beatable car cruises by. 
Then challenge the driver (male or fe- 
male) to a drag race on a mile-long 
straight track or to a road race on either 
of tw/o 2V2-mile courses. 

If you're not off the line fast enough 
on the drag strip, you'll eat mouthfuls of 
your opponent's dust, if you jump off 
too quickly, you'll blow your engine and 
yourself right out of the competition. 

On the road, controlling your speed 
on turns and sensing when to brake 
and downshift are essential for victory 
and for continued good health. Be 
warned: Cops are everywhere, ready to 
ticket you if you can't outrun them. 

A ruined engine, a dropped transmis- 
sion, and other damages can be re- 
paired — if you have the cash. At other 
times, you might want to write your 
heap off as a loss and junk it for a few 
bucks. 

Three months is all the time you'll 
have to go from rank amateur status to 
being an opponent worthy of the King 
of Street Racing. Winning lots of races 
and regularly upgrading your vehicles 
with your earnings are the keys to vic- 
tory. Don't expect to complete the pro- 
gram in one sitting; the save-ganfie op- 
tion comes in handy. 

Though enjoyable and exciting, the 
racing sequences add little new to the 




THE BIG BOOK OF 

PC SPORTS 

BY KEITH FEHRELL, EDITOR DMNI 
PETER BCISCD, EDITOR IN CHIEE COMPUTE 

Here it is-the PC sports book that covers all the bases. If you're looking for 
a PC sports game, or need help with the ones you have, this is your ace in the 
hole. Collected here are in-depth reviews and strategies for more than 60 of 
the hottest PC sports games, Also includes software discounts worth over 
$100. Order your copy today. 

Send $14.95 pins $2 shipping and fiandling for each bod; ($4 Canada, $6 foreign) 
and applicable tax'' to: 

COMPUTE Books 

c/oCCC 

2500 McClelan Ave. 

Pennsauken. NJ 08109 

* Residents of NO, NJ. and NY add appropnate sales tax Canadian ordefs please add 7% Goods and Servces tax 
Al orders mtst tje paid in US funds drawn on a US bank Please akw four to six weeks for detvery. 
Offer good wfite supples fet 

10SP91C 



OCTOBER 1991 COMPUTE 131 



REVIEWS 



genre in terms of action or 
cliallenges. Whether using a 
mouse, joystick, or key- 
board, you'll experience 
more than your share of kil- 
ler crashes before you be- 
gin to master the controls. 
The garage segment is 
more original, and, thanks 
to a responsive point-and- 
click interface, easier to hian- 
dle. In all locations the graph- 
ics, animation, and sound 
are excellent. 

If you fantasize about the 
ultimate machine but you 
drive a ho-hum buggy, con- 
sider taking to the road with 
Street Rod 2. It won't make 
you think your Chevette is a 
Corvette, but it'll let you ex- 
perience the sensation of 
driving a superfast monster 
car — without the danger 
and at a fraction of the cost. 

LEN POGGIALI 

IBM PC and compatibles, 512K RAM 
(e-lOK for Tandy), CGA, EGA, Tandy 
16-color, or Hercules: Ad Lib and 
Sound Blaster supported, mouse and 
joystick optional— $39,95 

Also available for Amiga— $39.95 

CALiFORNIA DREAMS 

Distributed by Electronic Arts 

1820 Gateway Dr. 

San Mateo. CA 94404 

(800) 245-4525 

Circle Reader Service Number 321 

THE COMPLETE 

WRITER'S 

TOOLKIT 

While it won't replace a seri- 
ous writer's reference library 
and while one of its functions 
isn't quite up to scratch. The 
Complete Writer's Toolkit \s a 
welcome addition to the re- 
sources available to the writ- 
er. The Toolkit contains six 
modules, as many or as few 
of which you can install as 
you like. Five of these — The 
American Heritage Electron- 
ic Dictionary, Roget's II Elec- 
tronic Thesaurus, Written 

132 COMPUTE OCTOBER 1991 



Wbrd III, The Abbreviation Ex- 
pander, and The Concise Co- 
lumbia Dictionary of Quota- 
tions — can be made memo- 
ry resident and hot-keyed in- 
to windows over your text with- 
in your word processor. 

Three of these modules 
may get limited use: Written 
Word III is a reliable hand- 
book on the basics of gram- 




Every serious writer needs a 
serious toolkit. 

mar, spelling, and punctua- 
tion, though its sections deal- 
ing with research papers 
and resumes are too gener- 
al to be very useful. On the 
infrequent occasions you 
need it. The Abbreviation Ex- 
pander provides the full 
terms for abbreviations you 
type into the Lookup Screen 
and allows you to add to its 
list, and The Dictionary of 
Quotations may actually 
slow down your writing — 
chiefly because of the temp- 
tation to linger and browse 
through the 6000 quotations 
which can be accessed by 
topic, author, or index, and 
imported directly into your 
text file. 

In a writer's toolkit, 
though, the real test cases 
are the dictionary and the 
thesaurus — and these are, 
surprisingly, better than I 
had hoped for. While not as 
comprehensive as its hard- 
cover parent, The American 



Heritage Electronic Diction- 
ary contains 115,000 entries 
and provides succinct but 
detailed definitions; you can 
also look up words within 
the definition simply by plac- 
ing the cursor on the word 
and hitting Enter. The Spell- 
ing and Wildcard modes let 
you search for words even 
if you're unsure of their spell- 
ing, and there's even an An- 
agram mode for people 
who want to cheat at word 
puzzles. 

While I wish Roget's II 
Electronic Thesaurus had 
been based on a more tradi- 
tional model, its versatility 
makes it attractive. Type in 
your word, and the thesau- 
rus window splits into two col- 
umns — one with the word's 
definitions, the other with its 
synonyms. Moving the cur- 
sor from definition to defini- 
tion changes the displayed 
list of synonyms; tab over to 
the synonym column, and 
you can check the defini- 
tions for each of its words. 

The sixth module, The 
Houghton fvlifflin Grammar 
and Style Checker, is not 
memory resident but can be 
accessed from DOS if you 
want to check an imported 
text file for grammar, spell- 
ing, punctuation, and style. 
It also contains a Stats op- 
tion that counts the words in 
your file and rates its reada- 
bility. Anything that would re- 
duce the drudgery of proof- 
reading is welcome, but 
unfortunately, using The 
Checker is a little like hav- 
ing your work proofed by a 
C-level freshman comp stu- 
dent. Though it usually catch- 
es the most blatant errors, 
some subtleties escape it. 
For example, it may con- 
fuse participles with verbs 
or fail to recognize a ger- 
und as a subject. And some- 
times its advice is just 
wrong; in the sentence "The 
Grammar and Style Checker 



is weak," it reads Grammar 
and Style Checker as sepa- 
rate nouns and recom- 
mends you change is to 
are. The Checker allows you 
to enable or disable Its gram- 
mar rules and thereby cus- 
tomize it to some extent; how- 
ever, to use this option, you 
have to know enough about 
proper usage not to need it 
in the first place. Use it with 
caution. 

Despite this weakness, 
the other modules of The 
Toolkit are serviceable on- 
line references. The Toolkit 
may conflict with some mem- 
ory-resident programs, so 
you'll need to experiment a 
bit to see what it works well 
with. If you do have prob- 
lems, check with the people 
on the support line listed be- 
low; I found them to be help- 
ful and patient even with 
idiot-level questions. 

ANTHONY MOSES 

IBM PC and compatibles: 512K 
RAM, 70K in TSR portion (require- 
ment lowered to 10K m latest ver- 
sion — Ed.): requires 5MB disk space 
(for all six moduies) — $129 

SYSTEMS COMPATIBILITY 
401 N. Wabasti, Ste, 600 
Chicago, IL 60611 
(312> 329-0700 (sales) 
(312)527.4357 (support) 
Circle Reader Service Number 322 



PLAN IT! 



Do you worry that Social Se- 
curity won't be enough after 
retirement? If so, take a look 
at Plan It!. This software ad- 
viser helps you plan for finan- 
cial security in your golden 
years. Plan It! provides a 
clear picture of what you 
must save now and how 
much your yearly retirement 
withdrawals can be, in order 
to preserve your retirement 
spending power. 

Plan It! also offers invest- 
ment strategies for insur- 
ance and college planning. 
The insurance module calcu- 



Just what you need to 

manage your checkbook. 

And just what you don't 



If all you need is an easy way to manage your checkbook 
and budget, why buy an accounting software program 
laden with confusing jargon? Amortization and payroll 
capabilities? Properties tracking? It doesn't make sense. 

'Strictly Personal' is an easy-to-use checkbook 
management and budgeting program. Period. It 
works just like a checkbook, but takes less 
paperwork and time. 

The program organizes ajid balances your 
checking account, lets you set up a yearly 
budget with up to 90 expense categories and 




tracks it on a quarterly basis. The program also provides 
banking acti\it)' reports and prints checks. Just what you need. 
' Plus, you get free telephone support. With answers to your 
questions in a language you can understand - English, And 
a 60-day, money-back guarantee. 

So, if all you've been looking for is a checkbook 
management and budgeting software program, 
look no furtlier. 'Strictly Personal' is all you need. 

.«// 1-800-682-2140 «o./o 

order your cop)'- just $39.95 + $3-50 shipping. SC residents, 

add 5% sales tov. If not lOCfA salisfwd. return mthin 60 days 

for a full refund (shipping excluded). 



Personal Checkbook Management AND Budgeting. Period. 

GrterfFam9a.m.to9p.(n. EST.TOaysaweek. VIS^ 5 VastefCafd. IBM® PC, n>T. PS/2 a-id 100% CompaiilSes. Hani disk, Moosairoma'colof. POMS-OOS version M or higher. ©1991 TlsMeiyatGfffl*.'™:. 
Al i^s reserved woltlmde. MenvaB Sottvta-e On.. Die MeryaitGroKi, he, P.O. Box 1 00, Bluffton, SC 29910. 'Stfctf/ Pasoial' is a regetsal tfademart: of The Wenyal Giwjp, Inc. Al other iraderrate admowtedged. 



Circle Reader Service Number 191 



lates the value of your cur- 
rent policy and analyzes 
your life insurance needs 
and benefits. The college 
module suggests three finan- 
cial options to safeguard a 
sufficient nest egg for your 
children's college education. 
Each of Plan lt!'s three 
modules calculates how 
much you need to save in or- 
der to attain your economic 
goals. Dollar projections de- 
pend upon financial data 
that you enter (that is, your in- 
come needs, age, interest 
earnings, and the annual in- 
flation rate). You can print re- 
ports concerning "what if" 
scenarios, keep track of 
your investments with the soft- 
ware's portfolio manage- 
ment system, and use the fi- 
nancial calculator to deter- 
mine loan payments. The pro- 
gram's menu-driven inter- 
face and context-sensitive on- 
line help simplify operation. 
If you feel like a financial os- 
trich, Plan It! pulls your head 
out of the sand and plants 
your feet squarely on the 
path to a secure retirement. 

CAROL HOLZBERG 



IBM PC and compatibles, 512K 
RAM, 80286 or faster microproces- 
sor— $79.95 

HALO SOFTWARE CONCEPTS 
P.O. Box 64 

4300 Old Barker Hill Rd. 
Jamesville. NY 13078 
(BOO) 484-1008, #3571 

Circle Reader Service Number 323 

STUDYWARE FOR 
THE SAT 

Competition can be a good 
thing, but it sometimes 
means heartbreak for high 
school students who've set 
their sights on attending a 
prestigious college or univer- 
sity. These students need an 
edge to improve SAT {Scho- 
lastic Aptitude Test) scores 
to get into those institutions, 
and help comes from Slu- 
dyWare for the SAT. 

StudyWare comes not on- 
ly with an informative and 
easy-to-understand user's 
manual that offers strategies 
and tips for taking the SAT, 
but also with Cliffs SAT Prep- 
aration Guide, a sister publi- 
cation of Cliffs Notes. Cliffs 



Guide offers two practice ex- 
ams with removable SAT- 
like answer sheets. Also in- 
cluded in Cliffs Guide are a 
study guide checklist, a dis- 
cussion of two approaches 
to taking the SAT, and strat- 
egies for completing each 
SAT section, including anto- 
nyms, analogies, sentence 
completion, reading compre- 
hension, mathematics, and 
quantitative comparisons. All 
of these topics are covered 
in StudyWare's useful prac- 
tice exams. 

Special features in the pro- 
gram include mouse sup- 
port, pull-down menus, and 
an onscreen glossary with 
over 450 listings. There's al- 
so an onscreen clock to 
help you keep up with the 
amount of time you've used 
for each question. 

To start, choose Test, 
Drill, or Exam. If you're inter- 
rupted, use the Pause option 
to stop the exam clock until 
you're ready to continue. 
Drills help to improve your 
speed, and with the Math 
Drills you can choose to prac- 
tice squares and square 



roots, units of measure, 
word problems, algebraic op- 
erations, ratio/proportion, 
quantitative comparisons, ge- 
ometry, and more. In Tutor 
mode, an explanation ap- 
pears for the answer you 
choose, whether the an- 
swer's right or wrong. 

Your scores are automati- 
cally tallied, and you can 
view the results in three 
ways: Topic Priority Break- 
down, Items Missed, or Re- 
sults Graph. The Topic Prior- 
ity Breakdown displays 20 
categories with the compos- 
ite results of your correct an- 
swers. This report lists the 
page numbers in Cliffs 
Guide where you can study 
that topic. 

I encountered a few curi- 
ous typographical errors and 
a mismatched explanation for 
one of the math problems. 
When I called Study'Ware, a 
spokesperson thanked me 
for calling and promised to 
send a disk with fixes to me 
and any registered user who 
callsthe full-time technical sup- 
port department, 

I was impressed that Stu- 

OCTOBER 1991 COMPUTE 133 



REVIEWS 



dyWare holds its own when 
compared with other SAT pro- 
grams. It offers more than 
800 onscreen questions and 
more than 4000 explana- 
tions. It also displays more 
true math symbols than the 
two other leading SAT pro- 
grams by Barron's and Da- 
vidson and Associates, 

If you're looking for a way 
to help your children score 
higher on the SAT put Stu- 
dyWare on your shopping 
list. Whether they're taking 
?he SAT for the first time or 
the tenth time, they can't go 
wrong by studying more. Stu- 
dyWare for the SAT\s the per- 
fect tutor, and with a price 
tag of $49.95, it's an invest- 
ment in the future with poten- 
tially great returns. 

JOYCE SIDES 

IBM PC and compatibles, 256K 
RAM; graphics card, mouse, and 
hard drive optional — 549,95 

STUDYWARE 

4760 Ivlurphy Canyon Rd . Ste, A 

San Diego, CA 92123 

(619) 495-0190 

Circle Reader Service Number 324 



Q-D0S3 



Even if you feel right at 
home with the DOS directory 
and file structure, you may 
find hard disk housekeeping 
tedious using only DOS. You 
may also have trouble every 
now and then remembering 
where you put a particular 
file, or, if you have more than 
one disk partition, where you 
put a particular directory. 

One solution calls for a gra- 
phical user interface (GUI). 
Some of us don't like GUIs. 
They tend to be slow and to 
require such involved proce- 
dures that by the time you fin- 
ish with all the GUI protocol, 
you might as well be back 
with DOS, A prime example 
of a better solution, Q-DOS 
5 won't slow you down at all. 
The program installation 
puts Q-DOS 3 in your path 

134 COMPUTE OCTOBER 1991 



statement, so you can call it 
from any directory. Q-DOS 3 
occupies only about 9,5K 
RAM and provides very con- 
venient mouse support, 
though a mouse is not essen- 
tial. The first option on its com- 
mand line is Directory, and if 
you click on that option or 
type D, the directory struc- 
ture of your current drive ap- 
pears as a tree with your cur- 
rent directory highlighted. 
Want to change directories? 
Use the mouse or arrow 
keys to choose your destina- 
tion, click again, and you'll 
see a listing of files in that di- 
rectory, with size and date. 

Want to look at another 
drive? Click on the Change 
Drive box, and you'll see a 
list of your drives. Click on a 
drive, and you'll see a tree of 
the directories and subdirec- 
tories of that drive. Click on 
your choice, and you move 
to that directory of the drive. 

The 0-DOS 3 command 
line remains available al- 
ways. Can't find a file? Click 
the Find box on the com- 
mand line. You'll be asked 
for the filename as well as 
whether you wish to search 
all drives or only the current 
drive. 

Deletion of a directory 
which has subdirectories 
seems interminable using 
DOS. You must go from one 
subdirectory to another, de- 
leting files, then return to the 
parent directory and delete 
the subdirectories one by 
one. Finally, DOS will let you 
delete the directory — unless 
there are hidden files some- 
where, which the DOS Delete 
command will not touch. Not 
so with O-DOS. One click 
brings up the tree, another 
highlights the undesired direc- 
tory or subdirectory, a third 
gives the Erase command, 
and a fourth confirms that you 
really wish to do this, after 
which the directory and all its 
subdirectories and files, hid- 



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"'^HMF 



Use DynaComm's script editor to automate your log-in proceaures. 



den or not, go away. 

The program boasts 
many other fine features. To 
name just a few, you can al- 
ter file attributes {hidden, sys- 
tem, read only, and so on), 
rename files and directories, 
and erase or unerase files. 
Its response is snappy, and 
its documentation is good. 
Personally, I have habitually 
despised file handlers, grum- 
bling, "I know how to handle 
my files and directories, 
thank you. I don't need any 
help from any dumb pro- 
gram." 0-DOS 3 has 
changed my mind. 

CHARLES IDOL 

IBM PC and compatibles, 384K 
RAW— $99,95 

GAZELLE SYSTEMS 

42 r^. University Ave. 

ProvQ, UT 84601 

(800) 233-0383 

Circle Reader Service Number 325 

DYNACOMM 
ASYNCHRONOUS 

For those who prefer mice 
and icons, telecommuni- 
cating in the PC environment 
can prove a tortuous affair. 
Many Windows 3.0 users 
were probably delighted to 
find a basic telecom and ter- 
minal emulation program, Ter- 
minal, right in Windows. Fu- 
tureSoft, the company that 



wrote the admittedly limited 
Terminator fvllcrosoft, offers 
a fully loaded version called 
DynaComm. 

No matter what network or 
computer you need to con- 
nect with, you'll find Dyna- 
Commfebuiit-in flexibility com- 
forting. DynaComm supports 
the most common binary 
transfer protocols, including 
XMODEM (checksum and 
CRC), YMODEM (batch 
mode), YTerm, Kermit, and 
CompuServe B+, but not 
ZMODEM, the fastest and 
most advanced protocol. 
The long list of terminal emu- 
lations includes DEC VT52, 
VT100, VT220 (but not 
VT102), ADDS VP/60, HP 
700/94, IBM 3101 , Televldeo 
925/950, and CompuServe's 
VIDTEX. Keyboard remap- 
ping proves an essential fea- 
ture when communicating 
with a terminal that uses a key- 
board layout different from 
that of the standard PC. The 
manual contains tables that 
list all the keyboard ASCII val- 
ues for the terminals Dyna- 
Comm emulates, if you real- 
ly need to know. 

Since you may carry out 
text transfers in the back- 
ground, you can run other ap- 
plications during uploads. In 
fact, DynaComm fully sup- 
ports Microsoft's Dynamic Da- 
ta Exchange (DDE). So, for 
example, the text file you've 



caruiPUTE 



!fiv*y!t:4VJt:(:M:n;i>:yf^ 



TIPS, & STRATEGIES 

FOR THE MOST POPULAR PC GAMES! 



THE OFFICIAL BOOK 
OF ULTIMA 

by Shay Addams 
Introduction by Lord British 

Written with the assistance of 

Lord British, Ultima's 

creator, this book includes 

inside information 
found nowhere else. Packed 

full of hints, tips, 
anecdotes, and never-before- 
published clues for all six 
Ultima adventures. 244 pages 

TURN & BURN: 

THE AUTHORITATIVE 

GUIDE TO FALCON 

by Howard Bornstein 
Foreword by Oilman Louie 

For both the beginner 

and experienced 

Falcon pilot, this book has a 

wealth of information, 

special tips, and proven 

strategies that wilt make you 

the master of the 
skies. Covers all versions of 

Fa/con and each of 
the 12 missions. 248 pages 




THE OFFICIAL BOOK OF 

LEISURE 

SUIT 

LARRY 

Covers i.arri/1, 2, and 3. 



Includes Information found 
nowhere else- 
packed full of hInB. maps, 
and tidbits. 



RALPH ROBERTS 

IIH HELP FROM 



AL LOWE TSZ.'^J, 



COMPUTE! Booji 



THE OFFICIAL F-19 

STEALTH FIGHTER 

HANDBOOK 

by Richard Sheffield 

Foreword by 

Major "Wild Bill" Stealey 

Take to the skies with F-19 

Stealth Flgtiter and test this 

amazing aircraft. Learn all the 

thrilling maneuvers of this 
fantastic new fighter. Here's the 
key to mastering Micro- 
Prose's F-19 Stealth Fighter 
simulator. 184 pages 

THE OFFICIAL F-15 

STRIKE EAGLE 

HANDBOOK 

by Richard Sheffield 
Foreword by Sid Meier 

Fly like an ace with 
MicroProse's best-selling F-15 
simulators. Covers both F-15 

Strike Eagle and FIS Strike 
Eagle II. You'll perform tactics 

and manuevers you never 
thought possible. Filled with 
step-by-step instructions and 

clear diagrams. 224 pages 



THE OFFICIAL BOOK OF LEISURE SUIT LARRY 

Written with the help of the creator and designer of Leisure 

Suite Larry, this best-selling book covers Larry I, II, and III. 

Packed full of all the hints and tips any Larry enthusiast could 

want. This official book also includes Larry's life story. 

an exclusive interview with Larry Laffer, and some candid 

comments from Larry's women. 228 pages 



1 Mils Pie! 



I want more hints and tips. 
Please send me the books checked below. 



□ The Official Book at Lsistire Suit Lariy (215X) $12.9S 
a The Official F-15 Strike Eagle Handbook (2311) S12.95 

□ The Official F-19 Stealth Fighter Handbook (2176) S14.95 
a The Official Book of Ultima (2281) $14.95 

D Turn S Burn: The Aulhorilative Guide to Falcon (1978J $12.95 



. Sales tax (residents of NC. NY. & NJ add appropriate sales tax). 
Canadian orders add 7% goods and services tax. 

. Stiipping and Handling: $2 U.S. and Canada: S6 foreign 

. Total Enclosed 



D Cfiecl( or money order 



Slier good while supplies last. 

All orders musl be paid in US. luniis drawn on a US bank. 
Orders vfill be shipped via UPS Ground. 

MAIL TO: Compute Books 
c/o CDC 

2500 McClellan Ave. 
Pennsauken, NJ 08109 






REVIEWS 



just received can be automat- 
ically inserted into a Micro- 
soft Word document, or, 
with the right script, a Word 
document can be uploaded 
automatically from Dyna- 
Comm. Data can run both to 
and from DynaCommand oth- 
er programs in multiple chan- 
nels. Expect a severe reduc- 
tion in program speed if 
there's much data exchange 
going on. though. 

Another useful feature for 
avid telecommunicators is 
DynaComm's ability to open 
up to eight terminal windows 
simultaneously. Fully edita- 
ble, terminal windows come 
with options for custom text 
styles, colors, tabbing, and 
formatting. You can also per- 
form full search-and-replace 
operations, which become 
very useful when you receive 
lots of junk characters in a 
file. 

The Director program (re- 
ally a special script) is Dyna- 
Comm's home base. Direc- 
tor functions as an integrat- 
ed phone dialer and phone 
book, and provides easy ac- 
cess to settings, files, and 
iog-in parameters. You can 
choose most actions by click- 
ing on buttons and making 
menu choices, so communi- 
cating becomes about as sim- 
ple and friendly as possible. 
Through Director )/ou can al- 
so create function key mac- 
ros and scripts that auto- 
mate communications 
chores, fvlany other environ- 
ments are possible with Dy- 
naComm, but most users 
will stay primarily in Director 

If you need to write elab- 
orate scripts, DynaComm in- 
cludes a powerful, event-driv- 
en script language that also 
contains the tools to create 
custom user interfaces, com- 
plete with user-definable 
menus and dialogs. A 400- 
page manual shows you 
how to use the script lan- 
guage, but unless you have 

136 COMPUTE OCTOBER 1991 



some programming experi- 
ence you won't find it easy 
going. 

Simple log-in scripts 
aren't too difficult (one is thor- 
oughly explained in the man- 
ual), but a typical segment of 
one of the more elaborate 
sample scripts confounded 
me. Log-in procedure 
scripts for several of the 
more popular services, such 
as CompuServe and GEnie, 
come with DynaComm, so 
you may not need to wrestle 
with scripts until you're quite 
comfortable with the pro- 
gram. 

Probably the easiest way 
to begin involves the Record- 



LAN interfaces built in; most 
other communications pro- 
grams make you buy special 
LAN versions. This in itself 
would recommend Dyna- 
Comm to businesses using a 
LAN. The other attractive ca- 
pability for Windows-based 
businesses is that users famil- 
iar with Terminal can use 
DynaComm right away and 
learn the more complex func- 
tions of the program as nec- 
essary, Or an industrious net- 
work administrator can write 
and install custom scripts so 
that the average user 
doesn't have to worry about 
advanced functions at all. 
As powerful a telecom pro- 




PC-IQ makes the austere DOS environment a mare temperate one. 



er script, which creates 
scripts of your actions as you 
make a connection. You can 
edit scripts created with Re- 
corder as you gain proficien- 
cy. The manuals, especially 
the Script Reference, seem 
reasonably well written and 
complete, but they might be 
hard to follow if you only re- 
cently took up computer com- 
munications. I'd recommend 
the online tutorials instead. 
The online help's a possible 
supplement to the tutorials, 
but too often brief to the 
point of uselessness. 

DynaComm has LAN sup- 
port for NetBIOS and other 



gram as you could ask for 
and definitely the most pow- 
erful one currently available 
for Windows. DynaComm 
still isn't for everyone, and 
not everyone should ask for 
it. If you communicate with 
only a few easily accessible 
systems, such as Compu- 
Serve or your boss's PC, 
then Terminal may be all 
you need: why pay for 
more? But for the profession- 
al telecommunicator with a 
need for advanced LAN 
compatibility and a desire to 
customize the VWncfows envi- 
ronment, DynaComm's, the 
only choice. 



STEVEN ANZOVIN 



IBM PC and compatibles. Windows 
2.11 or higher: Windows 3.0 recom- 
mended— $295 

FUTURESOFT 

1001 S. Dairy Ashford 

Houston, TX 77077 

(713) 496-9400 

Circle Reader Service Number 32S 



PC-IQ 



I am enamored of icons, pull- 
down menus, and point-and- 
click control. However, I 
work in a DOS world, with its 
command line interface and 
cryptic error messages. As 
every PC computing enthu- 
siast knows, typing appropri- 
ate commands at the infa- 
mous DOS prompt requires 
utmost precision. Typograph- 
ical errors return puzzling re- 
sponses such as Invalid num- 
ber of parameters or File 
creation error. Enter PC-IQ, 
a natural-language DOS inter- 
face that uses artificial intelli- 
gence to translate DOS com- 
puterese into everyday lan- 
guage. Not only does PC-IQ 
understand plain English, 
but it ast<;s for clarification 
when it can't interpret a com- 
mand or when it requires 
more information to execute 
an instruction. Online help is 
always available. All docu- 
mentation is clearly written. 
Even computer novices will 
not be intimidated. 

In order to run PC-IQ and 
its associated utilities, you 
must install it on a hard disk. 
Installation is a breeze even 
though the PC-IQ directory 
takes up almost two mega- 
bytes of disk space. Be 
aware that PC-IQ's Install op- 
tion modifies the path state- 
ment in your AUTOEX- 
EC.BAT file and also makes 
changes to the default set- 
tings of your CONFIG.SYS 
file. You'll be able to retrieve 
the original files, however, be- 
cause PC-IQ renames them 



SOFTW/ 

A fidl selection of software and accessories for tfje IBM aiid Amiga. 
Specialists in International Saks • Competitive Pricing • Satm day shipping 



GAMES 



4-DBming 33 

6S8 Attack Siib Combo 24 

A-iO Tank Ktlef 37 

A. Siim's Dea'ef's Chotce 32 

A. Slim's Real Poksr ...19 

A.T.P. Flighi Coinnian!Jer.........,.37 

ABC's Monday Night Footbalt 31 

Aclion Stations 32 

Altered Destiny 34 

Ancient Art of Wsr 31 

Ancient Art of War at Sea 31 

Andretti's Racing Chatenge 33 

AntfrUp 27 

Aractinop^Dbia 22 

Arachnophobla w/Sojnd Source32 

Aie We There Yet? 33 

Armada 2525 33 

Armor Alley 29 





AdLib 



The Sound 

Card That 

Makes Youi 

PC Come 

Alive! I 



Music Syntheslier Card $79 
Pereonal Music System S129 



BAT 19 

Bad Blood 32 

Banflii Kings of Ancient Ctiina....37 

Bane of the Cosmic Forge 37 

Bard's Tale III 31 

Battle Cness 32 

Battle Chess II 32 

Battle Command .....33 

Battle Isle 34 

BattleHwlis 1942 22 

BstleStotm 32 

Battletech II 31 

Berlin 1948 32 

Bill fl: Ted's Adtenture- - 24 

Bill Bliol's FJascar Cfialtenp 32 

Billy the Kid 24 

Black Gold 32 

Blteltrisg 32 

BlochOut 28 

Blue Mai 17 

Gresch 2 20 

BndEeS.O 26 

Bucl^ Rogers 33 

Budolian 21 

Cslifomra Games II 27 

Captain Comic H 17 

Cardinal of ti>e Kremlin 27 

Carmen in America's Past 37 

Carmen USA/Wofld/Tme 32 

Camien World Delwe 48 

Carriers at Waf 33 

Casino Master „ 59 

Castles 37 

Chamber Sci Mutant Priestess ..17 

Champions of Krynn 33 

Checkmate... 34 

Chessmaster 2100 33 



, /|Wi7k^ ....... ...... 

Posso Media Box imported 

win Swizerland! 5.25 or 3.5 

S29.95 



Chessmaster 2400 33 

Chessmaster 2400 Windows ....39 

Chuck Veager's Air Combat 40 

Circuit's Edge 28 

Civil War 39 

Civilization 43 

Clue Master Detective 27 

Command HQ 37 

Conan the Clmnieiiar^ 32 

Conflict:Mrt)die East 37 

Con S[^ racy: Trie Deadlock Rles . .35 

Continjum. 33 

CofOOration ...32 

Coontdown ...36 

Covert Action 37 

Crime Does Not Pay 32 

Crime Wave 36 

Curse of the Azure Bords 33 



Cybergenic Ranger 32 

Das Boot Submarine ...19 

Days ol Thunder 27 

Death Knighls of Krynn 33 

Dick Tracy 32 

Dick Tracy Print Kit 17 

Dragon Strike 33 

Dragon Wars 32 

Dragon's Lair 111 Timewarp 43 

Drakirnen 37 

Dream Team 32 

Duck Tale5:(5uesl for Gold 22 

E. Thcrp's Reai Blacidack 32 

Eagle's Rider 32 

Earl Weaver Baseball 2 33 

Earthnse 22| 

Elite Plus 29 

Elvira 34] 

Emoire 33 

Escape From Hell „ 21 

Eye of the Behomer 2 39 

Eye of the Beholder 33 

F14 Tomcal 27 

F 15 II Scenario Disk 20 

F15 Strike Eagle II 34 

F19 Stealth Fighter 43 

F.29 Retaliaior 33 

F-117A Stealth VGA 47 

Falcon 3.0 43 

FircKing 25 

Right of the Intruder 37 

Freakpn' Funky FyzztrallS 23 

Full Meiai Planet 31 

Future Wars 32 

Game Pack 1 33 

Games Peoole Play 29 

Gateway to Savage Frontier 33 




Flight Ifoke by .^.^ 

With Foot Pedals $109 



Genghis Khan 37 

Gettysburg: TJie Turning Point 39 

Gold of the Ameracas ,....- 26 

Gold of the Aaec 33 

Gunship 2000 VGA 41 

Halls ot Monteiuma 25 

Hard Nova 19 

HardBalHI 31 

Hare Raising HsiitK 32 

Harpoon 39 

Harpoon Battle Set 1 2/3 21 

Harpoon Scenario Editor 28 

Heart of China 37 

Herpes of Ihe Lance 33 

Hockey League Simulator 26 

HoverForce ..32 

Hoyle's Games l/ll 25 

Hunt for Red October 23 

Hyper Speed 2.0 37 

Iron Lord 34 

Ishido 34 

J. Nicklaus Course Disk #4/S....17 
Jack Nicklaus Unlimited Crse ....37 

James Bond 007 35 

Jet Fighter II 42 

John Madden Football 33 

Jones in the Fast Lane 26 

Kampfgruppe — ..,,39 

King's Quest V 38 

Kings Bounty 24 

Knight! ol the Sky 37 

L" Empereur 37 

Legend of Faergttail 32 

Leisure Larry I VGA 37 

Leisure Lariy III 37 

Lemmngs 34 

LexicroSS ..30 

LHX Attack Chopper 28 

Liberty or Deatfi 37 



Life 4 Death 24 

Life 4 Death lliThe Brain 33 

Lin'fis Hayhill.Bountrful.FirestonelB 

Linksi The Challenge of Golf 37 

loom,.... 23 

Lord otthe Rings... 34 

Lord ot the Rings II 37 

Lost Patrol 33 

Ml Tank Platoon 41 

Mac Arthur's War 29 

Magic Candle2 39 

Martian Dreams 37 

Martian Memorandum 36 

Mean Streets ,.36 

MechWanrior 32 

Medffival Lords ,39 

Medieval Warriors 25 

MegaForVessi Flight ol Old Dog.40 
MegaTravellei II 37 



sosfiVQ 



$139.95 

with purchase olany2tla«s 



Mickey d Minnie's Pnnl Kit 17 

Mii;roLeague Basketball 27 

MicroLeague Football 29 

Might 1 Magic 1 & 2 33 

Might & Magic 111 39 

Missions Disk 2 22 

Monday Night Football w/ Video 37 

Monopoly 27 

MoonBase ,.,.„,..27 

WCAA: Fioad to Ihe Final Four 34 

NigW Breed 14 

Nig« Hunter 19 

Night Shift 19 

No Greater Glory , 37 

Nobunaga'5 Aiabillpn II 37 

Nuclear War 34 

Obitus 39 

Operation COM'BAT 25 

Overlord 32 

Penthouse Jigsa* (Adultl 25 

Personal Pro Golf 32 

PGA Tour Golf (Limited Edition! ..46 

PGA Tour Golf 33 

Pick N' Pile 28 

Planet's Edge 39 

Playroom 29 

Pool of Radiance 33 

Pools ot Darkness..., 39 

Populous 19 

Prince of Persia 27 

Pro Football Analyst 37 

Pro Tennis Tour 2 33 

Quest for Clues II! 19 

Railroad Tycoon , 34 

Beach (of the Stars ....2S 

fled Baron 37 

Renegade Legion Interceptor 39 

Rise of the Dragon . , 37 

Road 4 Cars 1 for Test Drive 3 ..19 
Romance of Three Kingdoms 2 ..43 

Rommel .,..,„., 25 

RolM 28 

Rules of Engagement 37 

Savage Empire,,,,. 37 

Scenery Disks 22 

Scrabble Deluie 32 



Search fo< the King 36 

Secret ot Monkey Island II 40 

Secret of Monkey Island VGA 39 

Secret of the Silver Blades 33 

Secret Weapons of LLttwaffe.,...44 

Shadow of the Sorcerer ..33 

Shangtiai 11: Dragon's Eye 31 

Shuttle Space Flight Simulaot ..37 

Siege 39 

Silent Service II 37 

Sim City 30 

Sim City Graphic Set 1/2 23 

Sim Earth .41 

Sliders 32 

Space Ace .37 

Space Quest IV 37 

Spciicasting 101 37 

Spellcastiiig 201 42 

Spirit of Excatibur 32 

Stanford Wong's Video Poker ....32 

Star Control 31 

Star Trek:25th Anniversary 37 

Starflightll 22 

Storm Across Europe , 38 

Strate^c Forcss 25 

Stratego 32 

Street Rod II 29 

SirioPoker3 33 

Stunt Driver 32 

Stunts 33 

Super Car Pak 37 

Super Off-Road , 26 

i,',ap 32 

V&3m Yankee 37 

Teenage NinjaTurtJes 26 

Terminator 34 

Test On« ill 35 

Tetris 24 



The Immortal 28 

The Manager's Challenge 31 

Tbe Sound Source 25 

TTieir Finesi Hour,,,, 38 

TlmeQuest 37 

Tony LaRussa Baseball 33 

Traconll 43 



COMXfUNL 






Treasure Trap 

TnpJe Action Pah.., r., 

Trivia! Pursuit 

Tfuinp Castle II 



Call us and use your Mastercard or Visa 

800-999-7995 

In NY State 212-962-7168 

Fax 212-962-7263 

Hours: Sam w 7pm Monday • Friday ISaturday lOam - 5pmJ 
Methods of Payment: We accept Visa, M/C, certified checlts 
& Money orders. Personal checlts allow 14 days to dear. COD 
add $4.00 . School, Stale & City putchase orrters accepted. 
Shipping: UPS |$4 min). APO/FPOI S5 min,) 2 Day Air ($7 
min.) CANADA, HI. AK & PR ($9 min). Overseas minimum 
$20 (piease fax orders if possible), 
NY residents add 8.25% Sales Tax. 
Send money orders or clTec;<s to; IVIiSSIOI^ CONTflOL, 
170 Broadway. Suite 201. New York, NY 10038 
Demo Disks and Catalogue with « ' 



Tunnels & Trials 17 

Tunnels of ArmagediJon ....29 

Twiligni 2000 VGA 37 

Typhoon of Steel 39 

U.S.Atlas 38 

Ultima VI 40 

UMSIIiNaionsatWar 37 

Uncharted Waters 43 

Valine 28 

VengeantK of Dtcalibur 32 

Vette 33 

Viilco Poller 32 

War ol the Lance 33 

Wfltlofds 29 

Wayne Grelzhy Hockey II 34 

Western Front 37 

While Oeatn 32 

wing CommancJer 2 49 

Wing Commander 2 Speech Pakl7 

Wing Commander. 39 

rt^ngs of Fury 27 

Wizardry Tnlogy ..,.,32 

WiardryV 32 

WollPack 27 

Wonderland 38 

WorU Champion Backgammon ..25 

World Cfiampion Crbbage ...25 

Worlds at War 32 

Wrath of tfie Demon 32 

Zac VcKracken 17 

AU LiC Cartt iMicra Channei} ....139 

CMSC^ips 30 

Sound Blaster Midi Inlerface 79 

Sound Blaster Voice Editor 59 

Afl Lib Software In Stock' 



ACCESSORIES 



DiskHolOcr for 5.25 or 3.5 9 

DuBlGameport 22 

Gameport (IvIicroChannel) byCH4S 
Hi res Senal mouse w/sotlwa'e.32 
Senius 4500 Scanner ,132 



JOYSTICKS 



Sunccm IcontroEler PC , 49 

Analogous 27 

ErgoSlick 27 

rent Slick by CH 42 

Tacit 24 

Macn III by CH Products 33 

Manx Flight Pedals 49 

Maxi Right Yoke 70 

Thunderstick by Kraft 35 

Wico Analogue , , 12 



EDUCATIONAL 



Algeblaster Plus ...32 

Berenstaln Bears: Counting IS 

Berenslain Bears: Letters 18 

Berenstaln Bears:Junior Jigsaw .18 

Challenge of Ancient Empire 32 

Designasaurus II 28 

Donald's Alphatiet Chase 14 

Goofys Railway Express 14 

Geo Jigsa* 27 

Grammar Gremlins 32 

Main and Me 22 

Math Blaster Mystery 32 

Maih Blaster Plus 32 

MalhRatjbit 27 

Mickey's Runaway Zoo 14 

Mickey's 123 27 

MIckey'sABC 27 

Mickey's ABC/Sound Source 37 

Mickey's Colors & Snapes ........37 

Mickey's Crossvrard Pu22le 22 

Mickey's Jigsaw Puizle 32 

MidniEW Rescue 32 

Ouinunbered 32 

PC Globe V4 ...41 

PC U.S.A. 2.0 41 

Read i Roll 32 

Reader Rabbit 32 

Super Speliicopter 27 

Think Quick 32 

Treasure Mountain 32 



PRODUCTIVITY 



Wnier Rabbit >., .....32 

|| Wntmg/Pualrshing Center A2 

11 

if 

Vi mation Studio 79 

Bs^nermaniia... 25 

I' Copy II PC..,, 2B 

: DeljAePBi/it Animation...,, ..87 

\ Del jxe Parrl II Enhar^ced ,..,87 

Dream House Professional 48 

Dvorak on Typing 32 

ErgfitEnDr,e 37 

RoorPlan , 32 

Home Wdeo Producer 32 

Lottery Trend Analysis...,,. IS 

Mavis Beacon Typing 33 

Mavis Beacon for Wmdoift-s 39 




MyAdvar«;etl WtfiiLiit.... ^....32 

PacLoJi2000 40 

PrintshopNew 38 

VCR Companion 34 

Weflding Planner... 33 



VIDEOS 



DOS Leiel 1. II or 111 

Intra to Dbase IV 

Intro to DOS 

Intro to Lotus 1-2-3 

Intro to Microsoft Wottt 5.0 




°noll"i-'^''i"''"3stw.Ufe& 
Death. Airplane Factory S32 



IntiD to Word Perlecl 5.0 

lotus Level I. II or 111 

antimore $24 



BUDGET 



Advance to Boardwalk ......14 

Big Boggle 14 

Dick Tracy Print Kit 17 

Duck Taies.Quest tor Gold.... 17 




Eipert Astronomer 14 

Expert Calendar 14 

Eifsl Checkwnler 14 

E^pen DOS Tutor.., ,.„ 14 

Ejperl Fax Forms 14 

Dpen Home Design 14 

Expert Lat}els..,, 14 

Expert Landscape 14 

Expert Lottery Expert..,. .14 

Expert Maus- 14 

Expert Resume Writer 14 

Expert Utilities 14 

ExpertPertectTypJng.,,.,. 14 

Jeopsrdy25th ,14 

SL;perPassv.-ord 14 

^VTio Framed Roger Rabbit 14 

WTieelofFoTiLneGoid .14 

IF YOU DON'T SEE IT. GIVE us A HUJ 



C[rcl« Reader Service Number 153 



REVIEWS 



with the extension OLD rath- 
er than overwrite them. 

PC-IQ acts as an interface 
between DOS and the com- 
puter user, translating a vari- 
ety of naturaf-language in- 
structions into conventional 
DOS commands. When it op- 
erates in natural-language 
mode, it shows users how it 
translates "English" instruc- 
tions into DOS, thus provid- 
ing an opportunity for interest- 
ed parties to learn DOS as 
they work. For example, in 
natural-language mode, indi- 
viduals who want to view all 
directories on a particular 
disk simply type TREE C 
(where C is the name of the 
desired disk). PC-/0 also ac- 
cepts SHOW, GET, and 
LIST as TREE synonyms. 

Once you're in a directo- 
ry, you can obtain a listing of 
all files simply by typing 
SHOW ALL FILES. To open 
a new directory, type 
SWITCH X {where x is the ac- 
tual directory name). PC-IQ 
also accepts GOTO, GO, 
CHANGE, ACCESS, and 
even CD, the actual DOS 
command. Novices who pre- 
fer a menu-driven interface 
over natural-language typing 
can switch to the program's 
point-and-click mode. This di- 
rects PC-IQ to display pro- 
gram options from pop-up 
menus, f^enu choices in- 
clude directory- and file-lev- 
el operations and several util- 
ities. Each option, in turn, 
calls up a submenu of addi- 
tional choices. 

PC-/0 offers a convenient 
alternative to typing and pro- 
vides a great way to avoid 
the DOS command line. Re- 
grettably, PC-/0 doesn't sup- 
port all DOS commands, 
and it doesn't always recog- 
nize backslashes. You can't 
issue batch commands or 
use strict DOS syntax. The 
program does let you create 
or remove a directory, recov- 
er a deleted file, and view or 

138 COMPUTE OCTOBER 1991 



change the contents of an AS- 
Cll file, however Supported 
file operations include copy, 
find, move, rename, create, 
and print, while disk-levei 
commands consist of check 
disk, format disk, and 
diskcopy. The Autoload func- 
tion makes it possible to run 
a designated application 
from a pop-up menu. The 
Set command enables you 
to configure your system 
with the correct time and 
date. A simple text editor 
lets you create and save AS- 
CII files up to 64K in length. 

PC-IQ has some nifty fea- 
tures. It comes with a built-in 
screen saver. Its database 
manager allows you to add 
new programs to the 
Autoioad list or customize PC- 
IQ's vocabulary so it recog- 
nizes alternate command syn- 
onyms. Entertainment files 
offer you a chance to play a 
game like Trivial Pursuit or 
read a series of famous quo- 
tations and interesting facts. 

Primarily for computer nov- 
ices, PC-IO will benefit indi- 
viduals who want to learn 
something about DOS with- 
out having to grapple with un- 
wieldy commands. However, 
if the DOS prompt does not 
seem intimidating, you may 
find the program limiting. It 
supports relatively few DOS 
commands, it may run out of 
memory when other memory- 
resident programs run simul- 
taneously, and its interface 
might slow you down. In the 
final analysis, it might be bet- 
ter to improve your PC IQ 
with a primer on DOS in- 
stead of using PC'IQ. 

CAROL HOLZBERG 



IBM PC or compatible, 640K RAtuI, 
hard drive— $99.95 

AT SOLUTIONS 
53 Creekview Dr 
West Seneca, NY 14224 
(800) 677-6670 
(716)675-5311 

Circle Reader Service Number 328 



EYE OF THE 
BEHOLDER 

On the fifth day of fVlarpe- 
noth in the year of the Shad- 
ows Piergeiron, the chief 
lord of Waterdeep sum- 
moned me to a most solemn 
meeting. There was trouble 
in Waterdeep, and the 
source lay deep within the 
city itself. It would be my du- 



character generation, and 
general gameplay. More im- 
portantly, however, the 
game represents a dramatic 
advance in sound and graph- 
ic quality for the Advanced 
Dungeons & Dragons line. 
For instance, as you search 
through the many labyrinths 
beneath Waterdeep, you 
hear the distinct sound of drip- 
ping water and the muffled 
footsteps of undead crea- 




Eye of the Beholder takes you and your party deep into deadly, 
labyrinthine sewers. 



ty to uncover this evil and de- 
stroy it before it destroyed Wa- 
terdeep, With a Letter of 
Marque in hand, I quickly as- 
sembled a small band of 
hearty adventurers and set 
out to face the unknown 
source of evil. Unfortunately, 
the most logical place to be- 
gin my search was also the 
least hospitable — the sewers 
beneath the city. 

Eye of tlie Beliolder joins 
Strategic Simulations' Ad- 
vanced Dungeons & Drag- 
ons line of fantasy role-play- 
ing games, and it's the first 
title in the groundbreaking 
new Legend Series. Eye of 
tfie Betiolder. like all games 
in the new series, utilizes Ad- 
vanced Dungeons & Drag- 
ons Second Edition game 
rules for combat resolution, 



tures. During combat, you 
hear the metallic clang of 
heavy weapons on armor 
and the ghastly cries and hiss- 
es of your dying foes as your 
party battles with bizarre mon- 
sters. The sewers are inhab- 
ited by a variety of creatures 
ranging from Giant Spiders 
and Zombies to Kobolds 
and Mantis Warriors. All mon- 
sters are carefully drawn and 
animated. 

You can begin the game 
either by creating your own 
characters from scratch or, 
if you want to dive right in, by 
using a prebuilt party. Eye of 
the Beliolder can be played 
entirely with keyboard input, 
or you can point and click 
your way through the adven- 
ture with a mouse or other 
pointing device. 



As you explore the sewers 
below Walerdeep, the area 
directly in front of your party 
is visible tfirough a large 3-D 
view window. To the right are 
character portraits of the 
four player characters and 
up to two nonplayer charac- 
ters (NPCs) who may join 
your group during the adven- 
ture. Hand-held items such 
as weapons and spell books 
are shown alongside each 
portrait, and both combat 
and spel! casting are accom- 
plished by clicking on the ap- 
propriate icons. Below each 
portrait, characters' hit 
points are displayed either 
as a bar graph or, if you pre- 
fer, a numeric value. By click- 
ing on a specific character's 
portrait, you access an equip- 
ment screen that graphically 
displays all of the character's 
belongings. Here, you can 
easily outfit a character by 
dragging weapons and ar- 
mor from backpack to body. 
To feed your fearless warrior, 
you simply drag food from 
his or her backpack over to 
a small table setting and 
drop it on the plate. 

A separate character 
screen supplies all the vital 
statistics on each character 
such as class, alignment, 
race, sex, ability scores, ex- 
perience, and character lev- 
els. Convenient Next and Pre- 
vious buttons on both the 
equipment and character 
screens let you access simi- 
lar information on other mem- 
bers of your party without 
your having to first return to 
the main screen. 

Eye of the Beholder is not 
without a couple of annoying 
faults. First, each time you 
load the game, you must 
specify the graphic mode 
and sound board you wish to 
use and indicate whether or 
not you want to use your 
mouse. Second, unlike many 
games that allow you to 
save multiple games by as- 



signing each a unique 
name. Eye of ttie Beholder 
makes every game that you 
save automatically replace 
the previous one. Even with 
these glitches. Eye of the Be- 
holder remains one of the 
most engaging fantasy role- 
playing games I've seen in a 
long time and one that no Ad- 
vanced Dungeons & Drag- 
ons fan should be without, 

BOB GUERRA 

!BM PC and compatibles, 640K 
RAM, CGA, EGA, MCGA, VGA, or Tan- 
dy 16-color; supports Ad Lib and 
Sound Blaster, requires hard drive or 
two floppy drives— $49.95 

Also available for Amiga — $59.95 

STRATEGIC SIMULATIONS 

Distributed by Electronic Arts 

1820 Gateway Dr. 

San lylateo, CA 94404 

(800) 245-4525 

Circle Reader Senrlce Number 329 

MAPVIEWER 

Have you ever looked at a 
map and wanted to see the 
information displayed differ- 
ently? Perhaps a job presen- 
tation or sales close could 
have benefited from a jazzi- 
er visual aid than an unin- 
spired photocopy from an 
old sales manual? 

MapViewer. from Golden 
Software, could be your an- 
swer. It allows you to use 
standard maps or create 
your own and customize 
them any way you want. 
This Windows 3.0 program 
helps you create great pres- 
entations and is a terrific aid 
to schoolwork. 

Any discussion of techni- 
cal software should start 
with a review of its most im- 
portant and often most ne- 
glected component — the 
documentation. MapViewer 
comes with an intimidating 
312 pages plus appendices 
to sift through. The manual 
contains an introduction, 
start-up procedures, a tuto- 
rial, an advanced features 



"Enter Another WorU 
"Where the Living 

are 
!Among the Jew 

CRUSADERS 

of the 
DARK SAVANT 

The Sequel \o Bane of the Cosmic Forge 

CIrefe Reader Service Number 13S 



section, and a handy refer- 
ence section. 

Although the sheer vol- 
ume of documentation may 
at first seem a bit over- 
whelming, it took me only 
about two hours to work 



readable; even the index 
appeared complete and 
dependable. 

tvlost people will first expe- 
rience MapViewer by run- 
ning through the tutorial. 
When you first boot the pro- 



MapVICYfcr - ICHTYPOPH.GSMI 



tie edit ViEw Qtbw gaHcfV gdundqry Scl VVhidow 



Help 




tvlapViewer p\j[s useful geographical data at your disposal. 



through the tutorial and two 
hours to read the rest of the 
manual, Then I was ready 
to use l\4apViewer. I found 
the manual to be well writ- 
ten, concise, and generally 



gram, a standard Windows 
screen with icons for map 
customization greets you. 
The tutorial then instructs 
you to import a data file of 
the fifty American states and 

OCTOBER 1991 COMPUTE 139 



REVIEWS 



a data file detailing tl^e pop- 
ulations of each! state. 
Then, using a simple spread- 
sheet, the tutorial reshapes 
the information into a variety 
of maps that display popula- 
tion ranges. For instance, a 
hatch map color-codes the 
country according to popula- 
tion density. A symbol map 
places appropriately sized 
human figures in each 
state. The bigger the per- 
son, the bigger the popula- 
tion. Choosing a prism map 
gives you three-dimensional 
states with the height of the 
state corresponding to the' 
size of the population. A dot- 
density map fills each state 
with dots in proportion to the 
population. For incorporat- 
ing more than one variable, 
a pie map inserts a pie 



chart into each state and al- 
lows for popuiation break- 
downs into categories such 
as male and female. 

Next, you may print your 
data, Finally, the tutorial 
runs through the help 
screens and index. A tutori- 
al in any manual is an indis- 
pensable tool in learning 
how a program works. You 
learn best by doing, and 
Golden Software deserves 
applause for including such 
a complete and usable tuto- 
rial in the manual. 

After running the tutorial, 
you're ready to explore 
MapVlewer on your own. 
The features included allow 
you to make your map three- 
dimensional, display two da- 
ta variables for each geo- 
graphical area, put several 



IMPORTANT NOTICE 

FOR 

COMPUTE DISK 

SUBSCRIBERS 



COMPUTE offers two different disk 
products for PC readers; tine SharePak 
dis[< and PC Disk. SharePok is monthly 
and has a subscription price of $59,95 for 
5V4-inch disks and $64.95 for 3V2-inch 
disks. A subscription to ShorePak does 
not include a subscription to the maga- 
zine. PC Disk appears in even-numbered 
months and has a subscription price of 
$49.95, which includes a subscription to 
the PC edition of COMPUTE. You can 
subscribe to either disk or to both, but a 
subscription to one does not include a 
subscription to the other. 



maps on one page, cover 
up parts of the map, or use 
the clipboard. In order to 
test the usefulness of the pro- 
gram. I constructed a map 
representing the spread of 
my personal business. This 
was an adequate test of the 
agility of the program, since 
my client base spans a 
large geographical area but 
is concentrated in very 
small groupings. I expand- 
ed the four counties sur- 
rounding me into an en- 
larged area and showed the 
remainder of the United 
States in a secondary map. 
For good measure and aes- 
thetics. I then made the 
map three-dimensional and 
added color. Altogether, it 
took about four hours — one 
hour to enter the information 
into the spreadsheet and 
three hours to use the man- 
ual to figure out what I want- 
ed to do. 

The quality of printing was 
fine on my HP laser printer at 
work, but the legibility on my 
inexpensive dot-matrix printer 
at home was quite poor; dis- 
tinguishing the different 
shades in each map area 
proved difficult. A represen- 
tation in the manual of how 
the different colors will show 
up in blac)<-and-white print- 
ing would've been handy 
and certainly saved time. An- 
other problem is the defini- 
tion of the geographical rep- 
resentations. Blowing up the 
area in and around Kuwait 
(which we've all become famil- 
iar with) revealed a very sim- 
plistic rendering of the bor- 
ders. Honestly, though, these 
quibbles with an otherwise 
unique and useful program 
don't begin to undermine its 
strength. 

When I first received 
MapViewer. I struggled to jus- 
tify its utility. Though undeni- 
ably well made, MapViewer 
made me wonder, "What can 
I use it for?" I found my an- 



swers. While other graphic 
business programs might sit 
on my shelf after reviews are 
written, MapViewer will stay 
on my hard disk. My son and 
I discovered (in my case re- 
discovered) the versatility 
and usefulness of maps. I 
know of no other tool as 
handy for supplementing a 
child's geographical educa- 
tion. In addition, its useful- 
ness in supplementing busi- 
ness proposals recently be- 
came apparent — and since 
then, indispensable. I incor- 
porated MapViewer into two 
presentations, and the results 
pleased me tremendously; 
my presentations were sim- 
ply more impressive. For a 
program that on first glance 
appeared all but useless, a 
trip through the workings of 
MapViewer soon convinced 
me that its appeal should, 
geographically speaking, 
reach far and wide. 

ADAM STARKWEATHER 



IBM PC and compatibles, Windows 
3.0— $249 

GOLDEN SOFTWARE 

8Q9 Klh St. 

Golden, CO 80402 

(303) 279-1021 

Circle Reader Service Number 330 

PERSONAL LAW 
FIRM 

Save a bundle on profession- 
al attorney's fees by minimiz- 
ing time spent in a lawyer's 
office. Personal Law Firm, 
BLOC Publishing's electron- 
ic do-it-yourself legal advis- 
er, can help you do just that. 
You can generate 30 legal 
documents to take care of im- 
portant personal, family, and 
business affairs. Menu driv- 
en and easy to use, this elec- 
tronic law firm will have even 
computer novices more sure 
of their legal footing after 
even a minimal effort. 

Personal Law Firm in- 
cludes forms for a last will 



140 COMPUTE OCTOBER 1991 



and testament, living wiil, 
and residential lease. You 
can set up or revoke a pow- 
er of attorney; create prenup- 
tial, postnuptial, or marital set- 
tlement agreements; and au- 
thorize a temporary guardian 
for your children. Other 
forms help you put together 
a commercial real estate 
lease, agreements that safe- 
guard trade secrets or intel- 
lectual property, work-for- 
hire contracts, promissory 
notes, and personal guaran- 
tees. Draw up a bill of sale, 
make a formal offer to pur- 
chase, issue demand letters, 
and more. 

Once the program has 
been installed, just push a 
few buttons, answer some 
questions, and out pops a 
customized form. The pro- 
gram allows individuals to cre- 
ate a new document, revise 
an existing document, or 
print a hardcopy of a complet- 
ed document- Onscreen 
prompts give directions eve- 
ry step of the way, and you 
can expect online help for 
any question you might 
have. 

Our family lawyer, a prac- 
ticing attorney in the state of 
Massachusetts, says that Per- 
sonal Law Firm has potential. 
Ordinary folks shouldn't 
have to run to a legal profes- 
sional for routine paper proc- 
essing, especially when it 
comes to documents like a 
power of attorney, promisso- 
ry note, or bill of sale. While 
the laws of different states 
may vary, these basic forms 
often prove legally valid in 
most jurisdictions. 

On the other hand, our law- 
yer points out that blind faith 
in some Personal Law Firm 
documents could spell dan- 
ger. For example, in the mat- 
ter of a commercial real es- 
tate lease, virtually no such 
thing as consumer protec- 
tion exists. If you execute a 
commercial lease without go- 



ing to a lawyer, you can in- 
advertently leave out impor- 
tant provisions that protect 
your interests. 

Your unease may height- 
en when you consider that 
Personal Law Firm docu- 
ments were created by a 
member of the California 
bar. Laws tend to differ from 
state to state. For example, 
if landlords use the standard 
form for a residential lease 
{designed for nationwide ap- 
plication) in Massachusetts, 
they could get into serious 
trouble by overlooking specif- 
ic state requirements con- 
cerning move in/move out in- 
spections, escrow accounts 
(or damage deposits, maxi- 
mum limit for damage depos- 
its and last month's rent, and 
other landlord obligations. 
These landlords could be 
forced to return tenant dam- 
age and security deposits be- 
fore the end of the lease. 
They could even end up pay- 
ing their tenants up to triple 
damages and attorney's 
fees. 

A step in the right direc- 
tion, Personal Law Firm 
could benefit people prepar- 
ing a document for legal re- 
view. Clients might not save 
any money in attorney's 
fees, however, because law- 
yers often charge a set fee 
for completing particular doc- 
uments, regardless of wheth- 
er or not the client prepares 
an outline. 

Probably best suited for a 
typing service run by a 
skilled independent parale- 
gal. Personal Law Firm's 
forms require the attention of 
someone who knows when 
it's appropriate to fill in the 
blanks and when it's neces- 
sary to approach a lawyer. 
Our lawyer cautions that a lit- 
tle bit of knowledge, posing 
as expert advice, can be as 
dangerous as an outdated 
law book. 

The whole thrust of Person- 



Sind the visions 

Appeared 

as they never had 

before 

CRUSADERS 

of the 
DARK SAVANT 

Now with 256-color VGA Graphics 

circle Reader Service Number 136 



a/ Law Firm seems to sug- 
gest that individuals do not 
need a lawyer for certain doc- 
uments, The packaging 
states that the software "cre- 
ates documents that are val- 
id in 49 states and the Dis- 
trict of Columbia," Yet a tiny 
note at the bottom of the box 
says, "BLOC Publishing of- 
fers no warranty, express or 
implied, as to the legality of 
these documents in your par- 
ticular state." This disclaim- 
er appears intended to ab- 
solve BLOC Publishing of 
any liability. With the possi- 
ble pitfalls in mind, exercise 
caution when creating your 
legal documents. Ultimately, 
the price of mistakes will be 
paid by you. 

In future versions of Person- 
al Law Firm, I'd like to see 
documents tailored to the 
laws of specific states. I'd al- 
so like BLOC Publishing to 
have its attorneys include 
the citations which specify 
the legal basis for the docu- 
ments included. If nothing 
else, the program provides 
some insights into the legal 
system that laymen mfght oth- 



erwise never investigate. Ci- 
tations would add to the ed- 
ucational value. For safety's 
sake, though, don't rule out 
an attorney or a typing serv- 
ice run by an independent 
paralegal. In law, as with the 
medical profession, it's some- 
times wise to seek second 
opinions. 

CAROL HOLZBERG 

IBM PC and compatibles, 256K 
RAM, hard drive, 80-character dis- 
play (color or monochrome); sup- 
ports virtually any printer, includes 
both 3'/2- and SVi-inch disks— 
S99 95 

BLOC PUBLISHING 

800 SW 37th Ave. 

Coral Gables. FL 33134 

(305) 445-0903 

Circle Reader Service Number 331 

STUDYMATE— 
THE GRADE 
BOOSTER 

One commonly held educa- 
tional theory states that a crit- 
ical aspect of learning is the 
development and strengthen- 
ing of study skills. Capitaliz- 
ing on this notion is Compu- 

OCTOBER 1991 COMPUTE 141 



REVIEWS 



Teach 's Study mate — The 
Grade Booster 2.2. 

Studymate does not pre- 
tend to be a program ttiat 
teaches study skills. It 
leaves that multifaceted task 
to David H. Griswold's How 
to Study, a 148-page paper- 
back enclosed as a bonus. 
Essentially a test-construc- 
tion kit, Studymate provides 
a tool to help students organ- 
ize (heir learning, review it in 
many different formats, and 
absorb it through repetition. 

The main program con- 
sists of two parts — Editing 
Functions and Taking a 
Test — both accessed via a se- 
ries of keyboard-controlled 
menus. From the Editor 
menu, you may create, edit, 
review, print, delete, or copy 
a test. In addition, you can 



call up a disk directory that 
contains not only each file- 
name but also a brief descrip- 
tion of all exams on the disk, 
the style of questions they 
use, and who wrote them. 

Taking for granted that 
you already know how to 
write a test, the documenta- 
tion offers only a few tips on 
how to go about doing so. For- 
tunately viewing some of the 
75 different 20-question quiz- 
zes included on the Vocab- 
ulary Power Disk will give 
you ideas for framing ques- 
tions, as well as help you im- 
prove your word usage. 

Teachers using software 
for their pupils or parents gen- 
erating quizzes for their chil- 
dren should have no trouble 
manipulating the Create func- 
tion or thinking of ideas for 



tests, Likewise, bright stu- 
dents who need review in cer- 
tain subjects will find the pro- 
gram easy to handle- 
Slower learners, however, 
will be hard-pressed to lo- 
cate the relevant facts and 
ideas and to formulate them 
into nneaningful questions. Al- 
though the program is best 
employed for teaching knowl- 
edge- and comprehension- 
based material, to construct 
items for it requires higher lev- 
els of learning, such as anal- 
ysis and synthesis. This 
might make the Create func- 
tion of Studymate inaccessi- 
ble to many of the very peo- 
ple it is trying to help. 

In the right hands, the Cre- 
ate module may be used to 
produce a wide variety of 
tests: true/false, multiple 



choice, fill in the blanks, 
spell scrambles, missing let- 
ters, and combinations of 
the above. Noticeably ab- 
sent are matching columns, 
a test format commonly 
used by teachers of all 
grades. 

Each test type has its own 
unique options and tem- 
plate. For instance, from the 
fVlultiple Choice menu you 
may determine the total num- 
ber of responses and enter 
your own incorrect choices 
or have the program random- 
ly assign them. After making 
your selections, you move to 
the template and till in your 
first question, the correct re- 
ply, and the incorrect an- 
swers (unless randomly cho- 
sen) in the spaces provided. 
In this way you may create 



I Available exdusivefy by subscription! 

COMPUTES Amiga Resource edition 

Your authoritative source for Amiga information 

Amiga owners: Each month, the Amiga Resource edition of COMPUTE 

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Amiga. Whether you use 

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Amiga Resource edition. 



PREVIEWS OF NEW AMIGA SOFTWARE 
INDUSTRY NEWS AND RUMORS 

AMIGA ART GALLERY 

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HARDWARE AND SOFTWARE REVIEWS 

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as many items as disk 
space allows. 

After completing your ex- 
am, you may administer it ei- 
ther on screen or via 
hardcopy. If you clioose the 
former, access the Take a 
Test module and then load in 
the file, and you're ready to 
go. As a test giver, the com- 
puter flags mistakes and will 
usually offer you a second 
chance. If you're still in the 
dark, the program supplies 
the correct answer. When 
you're done, you're told the 
number and pefcentage of 
correct replies and the time 
it took to complete your 
work, Then you may decide 
to print the results, to be re- 
tested on the items an- 
swered incorrectly, or to re- 
take the entire examination. 

If you're preparing to take 
a test, Studymate provides 
solid value at a reasonable 
price, It won't study for you, 
but it will help when you de- 
cide to crack the books. 

LEN POGGIALI 

IBM PC and compatibles, 384K 
RAM— S49.95 

Also available tor Apple II Series— 
$49.95 and Macinlosh— S49.95 

COMPU-TEACH 

78 Olive Si. 

New Haven, CT 06511 

(800) 44-TEACH 

Circle Reader Service Number 332 

CENTRAL POINT 
ANTI-VIRUS 

You know that feeling you 
get when, after a complete 
physical examination, the 
doctor shakes your hand 
and tells you you're as fit as 
a fiddle? Well, that's how I 
feel since installing Central 
Point Anti-Virus on my hard 
drive.The program assures 
me that my system is free of 
computer viruses. Central 
Point Anti-Virus not only 
checks your entire system 



for any signs of viruses but 
also can remove viruses 
from infected files and pro- 
vide continuous protection 
from infection. That supplies 
invaluable peace of mind. 

Central Point Anti-Virus rec- 
ognizes more than 400 virus- 
es — nasty little bugs with 
names like Dark Avenger, 
Chaos, Disk Killer. Leprosy, 
Beast, and Friday the 13tli. 
Even more frightening than 
the names of viruses is the 
wide range of symptoms 
you're likely to encounter if 
the viruses manage to infect 
your system. Symptoms 
range from the annoying 
(files increase in size, your 
system slows down, music 
plays over your PC speaker, 
or mysterious messages ap- 
pear) to the disastrous (your 
hard drive reformats!). 

Two memory-resident util- 
ities, VSafeand VWatcli, pro- 
vide continuous protection. 
The highly configurable 
VSafe uses 22K of system 
memory and monitors your 
system at all times for suspi- 
cious activity. If free memo- 
ry's scarce on your system, 
substitute the 8K VWatcli in- 
stead. VWatcii checks for 
the presence of known virus- 
es each time a program exe- 
cutes or a disk is accessed. 

You can install either utili- 
ty as a COM file or as a driv- 
er. As COM files, the utilities 
can easily be removed from 
memory at any time with a 
couple of keystrokes. You 
can't disable the driver ver- 
sions of these utilities, but 
since they load into memory 
before C0rv1MAND.C0f\/l, 
they automatically check 
this file for viruses. 

Bootsafe, a utility run from 
your AUTOEXEC.BAT file, pro- 
tects your system against vi- 
ruses that try to infiltrate the 
boot sector on your hard 
drive. During installation, the 
program creates images of 
your boot sector and parti- 



CRUSADERS 

of the 
DARK SAVANT 

As rich a tale as ever told 

Circle Reader Service Number 13S 



tion table and stores them in 
a hidden image file in the 
root directory of your hard 
drive. Then each time you 
boot your system, the pro- 
gram looks for existing boot 
sector viruses by comparing 
the current boot sector and 
partition table with those in 
the image file. 

As with VSafe and 
VWatch, Bootsafe is complete- 
ly optional during installation. 
If you don't think you need con- 
tinuous protection, you can 
simply load Central Point Anti- 
Virus periodically to scan for 
viruses. If you choose to use 
the program in this manner, it 
will even remind you at regu- 
lar intervals (user-selectable 
from one week to three 
months) to scan your system. 
Despite the sophistication of 
Central Point Anti-Virus, the 
program remains very easy to 
use, with context-sensitive 
help available at all times and 
a clear and extremely thor- 
ough manual. Besides telling 
you everything you need to 
know to use the program, the 
manual explains how the pro- 
gram works and includes a 



43-page Virus Dictionary, 
which lists close to 200 virus- 
es and describes in some de- 
tail their symptoms and infec- 
tion nnechanisms. In addition, 
you can count on support 
from the Virus Protection Sen/- 
ice Plan, which provides reg- 
istered users with a virus hot- 
line, quarterly mailings, online 
support via Central Point's 
BBS (or CompuSen/e), and 
one free upgrade. Now, 
that's a comprehensive PC 
health package. 

BOB GUERRA 

IBM PC and compatibles, 512K 
RAM— $129, $30 for registered Own- 
ers of other Central Point products 

CENTRAL POINT SOFTWARE 
15220 NW Greenbrier Pkwy,, 

Ste. 200 
Beaverton, OR 97006 
(503) 690-8090 
Circle Reader Service Numljer 333 

WINDOWS 3 
POWER TOOLS 

If you're interested in becom- 
ing a Windows power user, 
this is the book for you. In- 
stead of concentrating on get- 

OCTOBER 1991 COMPUTE 143 



REVIEWS 



ting-started information or 
ttie basics of using Windows 
accessories, ttiis book-and- 
disk combination focuses on 
Windows itself, and it in- 
cludes solutions to lots of 
knotty problems that plague 
intermediate and advanced 
Windows users. 




Window, . _:.-er Tools works 
the l<inks out of Windows. 

Windows 3 Power Tools de- 
livers information on almost 
every aspect of running Win- 
dows. Early chapters deal 
with) mastering Program Man- 
ager. File Manager, fonts, 
and Recorder. More ad- 
vanced sections follow on 
Clipboard and DDE, memo- 
ry management, and custom- 
izing Windows. The final chap- 
ters concentrate on improv- 
ing the performance of Win- 
dows and us\ng Windows on 
a network. 

The section on Windows 
memory management is es- 
pecially noteworthy. It's the 
clearest discussion of Win- 
dows' three modes of opera- 
tion and how Windows uses 
expanded and extended 
memory I've read. There's al- 
so useful information on high- 
memory managers !ike Quar- 
ter Deck's OEMM. 

The chapter on improving 
Wndows' performance is ex- 
cellent as well. If you've won- 
dered what arguments you 
should really use to optimize 

144 COMPUTE OCTOBER 1991 



SMARTDhve's performance, 
this chapter will clear up the 
confusion. 

In addition to these tips 
and techniques, Windows 3 
Power Tools includes a disk 
full of some notable Win- 
dows software. Included are 
Oriel, a batch language for 
Windows; Command Post, 
Wilson Windoware's replace- 
ment for Program Manager; 
Aporia, a true object-orient- 
ed interface to Windows; 
and IconDraw, an icon edi- 
tor. All are worth a look. 

Since Windows 3.0 hit the 
scene, scores of Windows 
3.0 books have appeared. 
Windows 3 Power Tools is 
the best one yet. 

CLIFTON KARNES 

Authors: The LeBlond Group— 
Geolfrey T LeBlond, William 6. 
LeBlond, and Jennifer L. Palonus 
664 pages— $49,95 

BANTAM COMPUTER BOOKS 

666 Fifth Ave. 

New York, NY 10103 

Circle Reader Service Number 334 



MICROSOFT 

PRODUCTIVITY 

PACK 

If Professor Windows is for 
the computer-shy, Microsoft 
Productivity Pacl< is intended 
for the computer-literate. Its 
purpose is the same, teach- 
ing basic Windows skills to 
the new user, but it places 
greater confidence in that us- 
er's study habits and famili- 
arity with computers. 

The largest of the three 
modules included in Produc- 
tivity Pack. Learning Win- 
dows provides sections on 
Getting Started, Windows Es- 
sentials, Working with Appli- 
cations, Managing Your 
Files, Organizing Your Work, 
and A Day with Wndows. Gra- 
phical representations of his- 
torical and fictional charac- 



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:■ MAHVMIMIJ IPUi: 



i:fir*)icjh r.tit'H 



Microsoft Productivity Pack explains the lundamenta! differences 
between Windovi/s and DOS. 



ters lend each presentation 
a creative touch. Cleopatra, 
for instance, multitasks sev- 
eral Windows applications 
while designing the pyra- 
mids. 

Productivity Pacl< doesn't 
quiz you as lessons pro- 
ceed, so take notes like a 
good detective. You'll con- 
clude Learning Windows by 
using the environment to 
help Sherlock Holmes solve 
a case. This calls on all your 
recently developed skills, 
and while you can always 
tab through this section to 
get at Productivity Pack's an- 
swers, who wants to fail 
Sherlock Holmes? 

The other two Productivity 
Pack modules, Quick Trou- 
bleshooting and Working 
Smarter, are simply fancy ti- 
tles for problems and hints. 
Both topics offer Windows 
Help-style access to simple 
but effective information. 
These two areas give the im- 
pression of providing more 
material than they actually 
cover because many of the 
extensive help subbranches 
lead back to a relatively 
small number of answers. 

Productivity Pack is a re- 
freshing, hands-on ap- 
proach to learning about the 



GUI that conquered Ameri- 
ca. While you may find all the 
same Information in the Win- 
dows manual, you won't get 
all the fun pictures, 

BARRY BRENESAL 

BM PC and compatibles, Windows 
3.0 or laler— S59.95 

MICROSOFT 

1 Microsoft Way 

Redmond, WA 98052-6399 

(800) 426-9400 

Circle Reader Service Number 335 



OPTIONS 



Does the dreaded DOS com- 
mand line interface get you 
down? Do your typing skills 
give rise to a File Not Found 
response more frequently 
than you care to admit? Do 
you have difficulty remember- 
ing obscure nested directo- 
ry paths? Then replace the in- 
famous DOS prompt with Op- 
tions' po\nt-an6-cl'\ck inter- 
face, 

Opf/ons typically installs in 
the C drive and modifies 
your AUTOEXEC.BAT file to 
execute automatically at start- 
up. Alternatively, you could 
access the system by enter- 
ing MENU at the DOS 
prompt. Menu options exe- 
cute DOS commands. 






;^^^.^ 



l.-'3:^.fT51«V5ii;t;i:;r.W. 



mm 



A Fantasy Role-Playing Simulation by D.W. Bradley 



CRUSADERS 

i of the I 
DARK SAVANT 





-'^<^ 







Welcome to the sequel to Bane of the Cosmic Forge and the only game that could possibly follow its lead. 

It's everything Bane was...and more. 

256 Colors • Outdoor Campaigns • Full Musical Score & Sound Effects • Auto Mapping 
True Point & Click Mouse Interface • Unprecedented depth of story 



Circte Reader Service Number 13$ 



Ogdensburg Business Center, Suit 2E Ogdensburg, New York 13669 
To order or for a dealer nearest you call 

1-800-447-1230 



REVIEWS 



launch programs, or run 
batch files. 

The program features time- 
saving macro capabilities, 
password protection to limit 
access to designated users 
or particular directories, 
plus a screen saver that 
blanks the screen after a us- 
er-specified length of time. 
You also get Tracking Con- 
trol to keep records of com- 
puter usage, a Stopwatch 
function for time tracking 
(great for keeping time re- 
cords on client phone calls), 
and pop-up calendar, calcu- 
lator, and memory map ac- 
cessories. 

Options automatically 
loads functions into extend- 
ed memory in order to less- 
en the amount of convention- 
al memory required to run 
the application. Pull-down 
menus in the Edit mode and 
context-sensitive online help 
assist with program opera- 
tion. The package provides 
users with several conven- 
ient features in one handy lo- 
cation. Isn't it time you con- 
sidered your options to max- 
imize productivity, guarantee 
system security, and mini- 
mize operator error? 

CAROL H0L2BERG 

IBM PC and compatibles, 384K 
RAM, hard disk; mouse recommend- 
ed— S89.95 

APOGEE SYSTEMS 

717 630 Eighth Ave. SW 

Calgary, AB 

Canada T2P1G6 

(403) 265-0675 

Circle Reader Service Number 336 

PROKEY PLUS 

Popular with experienced 
computer users, macros 
sometimes perplex or intimi- 
date computer novices. 
Even a novice, however, can 
appreciate the advantages 
of macros. Substituting a sin- 
gle keystroke for a series of 
strokes, macros save time 
and prevent typing errors. 

146 COMPUTE OCTOBER 1991 



ABC naaufflcturln) CoKpaivy 1 
I Ptot <FI> for Help, <FI»> m Exit. Tie, Set IB/SB, 18:19:32 u 




Till Of Use Hill rtaHeri, 



Exercise your options and do away with ttie DOS prompt. 



Fur genera 1 opcrttloni cboose in Itca fru the Kmi. If you have 
aldltloMl riinctlDiu tg pcrfen, cboisli:; the SOS nenj ttei hUI exit 
jin to Ue MB Iiaft mi jemU pi to perfara ygar ta^s. tSC ID EXIT. 



Uord Frdcnilag 



SfrcadslKct 

CnmilcatiDiii 
HonUa 



to MS Bftri 



ist this itirit 

tjtiu mnt td c 

mm, sHt^s or 

lluf the uthcr sc. 



• 


lib prices Tricei 




58 






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-hfltig 


jorl UB the cuttwcr d^' 

c dpytJiiflti nther than llu: i.u-,tu-=^r . 

ng'mjiikr. yuu uilj uccd to use oac^. 




^^««. 



ProKey Plus tielps you write macros for every occasion. 



Like most shortcuts, mac- 
ros have some drawbacks. 
Creating macros so that Ctrl- 
E produces the closing lines 
of a letter and Ctrl-H writes let- 
ter headers only saves time 
if you can remember which 
key does what. ProKey Plus 
solves this problem. To help 
you write macros, ProKey 
Plus lets you annotate them. 
When you list your macros, 
you'll see a description of 
what a hot key does, rather 
than the usual litany of the 
component keystrokes. 
ProKey Plus, which occupies 
about 67K of RAM. interpos- 
es itself between your key- 



board and any application 
you may be running. This 
means that you can use the 
program to define or exe- 
cute macros from within 
your application programs. 
Modern word processors 
are notorious for the com- 
plex keystroke sequences 
necessary to invoke their com- 
mands. ProKey Plus pro- 
vides an alternative; I tested 
it with WordPerfect, arguably 
the word processor that 
puts you through the most rig- 
orous keyboard gymnastics, 
and it worked satisfactorily. 
ProKey Plus is quite rapid in 
its response. I fault it only on 



its documentation. The man- 
ual is not tutorial in nature 
and needs more explicit ex- 
amples. Even so, ProKey 
Plus in your library might go 
a long way toward easing 
the tension between you and 
your word processor! 

CHARLES IDOL 

IBM PC and compatibles— $129 

ROSESOFT 

RO. Box 70337 

Bellevue, WA 98007 

(206) 562-0225 

Circle Reader Service Number 337 



PC USA 



How many outdated atlases, 
dictionaries, and encyclope- 
dias do you have gathering 
dust? Well, for the atlas at 
least, the days are num- 
bered. PC USA, a computer 
atlas program available from 
PC Globe, offers both a 
graphic representation of the 
United States and a compre- 
hensive database of all sorts 
of useful and trivial facts. 
Now you need never miss a 
question in the geography 
section of your favorite trivia 
game. 

In order to access all this 
great information, you use a 
standard imitation Windows 
interface. Commands lined 
all along the top of the 
United States map allow you 
to determine which data- 
base you want to enter and 
the level of detail involved. 
You'll also find mighty help- 
ful the small insert that de- 
scribes how to run PC USA 
through Windows 3.0. 

The manual itselfadequate- 
ly describes installation and 
all the various databases, 
though I ran the program ef- 
fectively without much prep- 
aration. You also get a com- 
plete bibliography, which 
proves vital when determin- 
ing the accuracy and current- 
ness of the abundant informa- 
tion utilized in the program. 



GET THE 

OinCIAL CLUES TO THE 

HOTTEST GAMES! 



\^ THE OFFICIAL BOOK OF 

KING'S 




Donald B.Trivrtte 
FotewoTd by Roberu WIJUjow 

CMtUifu %tai hlnls and j4r3t*gi« for (olviog 

Ki^'t Qarst hV And the \xitn on Sitrrs'^ 

CD-ROM dcFdopititnl 



THE OFFICIAL BOOK OP 

KING'S QUEST, 

SEfaiNOEUITION 

Here's the source for hints, 
tips, and background for the newest 

adventure, King's Quest V. 

This new volume includes more dues, 

maps, and inside details, 

along with more ways to add even 

more fun to all five of the 

best-selling King's Quest games. 

Covers King's Quest I - V. 



THE OPnCIAL GUIDE TO 

SID MEIER'S 

RAILROAD TYCOON 

This is the book that makes 
railroading and (he game come alive. 

Inside players will find interviews 

with Sid fvleier. the designer of Railroad 

Tycoon, along with facts 

on how the product was conceived 

and developed. Also 

includes formulas the program uses to 

determine income and expense. 



THE OFFICIAL QUIDE TO 

ROGER WILCOX 

SPACE ADVENTURES 

For the first time, 

Space Questers can learn what goes 

on in the mind of the most 
legendary janitor in the universe. Inside, 

you'll find complete maps for every 
Space Quest scenario, point values for 

every reaction, and Roger's 

walk-through to the finish of all the games. 

Covers Space Quest I - IV. 



ri 



YES! 



[ I I want more hinls and tips! Please 

send me the books checked below. 

D The Official Book at King's Qjest, Second Edition <24S2) $12,95 
D Thie Oftlcial Guide to Roger Wllco's Space Adventures (237) S'I4.9S 
a The Ofrrciai Guide to Sid Meier's Railroad Tycoon (2443) S12.95 



Total Number of Boolis 
Total Cost of Boolis Ordered 



LT 



Sales Tax (Residents o( I^V; NC, and NJ add appropriate sales tax for 
your area. Canadian orders add 7% goods and services tax.) 

Shipping and Handling: S2 per book U.S.: $4 Canada; 
$B foreign. 

Total Enclosed 



D Check or Money Ofder 
Signatuie 



DMC DVISA 



tecl. No. 



Name, 



Exp. Date . 



Pfease Print 



Street Address . 
City 



-Stale. 



Zip. 

All orders must be paid in U.S. funds drawn on a U.S. bank. 

Mail this entire coupon to; 

COMPUTE Books 
c/o CCC 

2500 McClellan Ave. 
Pennsauken, NJ OS109 



Offer good while supplies last. 



10H91C 



n 




'WW^ 



REVIEWS 



PC USA's database con- 
tains a staggering number of 
facts about every state in tfie 
U.S. The information ranges 
from age distribution, popu- 
lation, ethnic groups, and ed- 
ucation statistics to annual 
pay by industry, taxes, 
gross state products, and 
(my personal favorite) state 
songs, There are dozens 
more information categories 
accessible. Search and en- 
joy; the information appears 
to be as current as possible. 

The rather lackluster relief 
maps of the various states dis- 
appointed me a bit. Whether 
the Rockies or the Appalachi- 
ans, all mountains resemble 
anthills, and w\th the excep- 
tion of rivers, no real terrain 
differentiation shows. Also, 
even though PC USA utilizes 
music, no sound boards are 
supported. Finally, technical 
support calls aren't toll-free. 

The abovementioned mi- 
nor problems hardly mar the 
mostcomprehensiveand use- 
ful geographical database I 
have seen. PC USA's appli- 
cations seem as numerous 
and varied as the people 
who will use them, and I 
can't recommend this pro- 
gram more highly. Now, if I 
could just find something to 
replace those clunky vol- 
umes of encyclopedias. 

ADAM STARKWEATHER 

IBM PC and compatibles, 640K 
RAM, CGA, EGA, MCGA, VGA. Tan- 
dy 16-color, or Hercules— $69.95, 
annual update — $25.00 

PC GLOBE 

4700 S. McClintock 

Tempe. AZ 85282 

(602) 730-9000 

Circle Reader Service Number 338 

NVELOPE PLUS 

Designed to make envelope 
printing a snap, Nvelope 
Plus offers several features 
which account for the Plus in 
the title; the ability to print ad- 
dresses easily in different 

148 COMPUTE OCTOBER 1991 



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PC USA puis all manner of intriguing statisUcal and geographical 
data at your fingertips. 




Lick envelope-addressing problems with Nvelope Plus. 



fonts, to choose one of many 
envelope and label types of- 
fered or customize your own, 
to add ZIP codes from a com- 
prehensive ZIP code data- 
base, and to create a thor- 
ough persona! database of 
addresses. 

As a memory-resident pro- 
gram with readily modified 
hot keys, Nvelope Plus pops 
up easily in an existing ad- 
dress database, in a word 
processing program, or any- 
where else you might have 
addresses tucked away. 
Once summoned, Nvelope 
Plus makes grabbing an ad- 
dress for printing onto an en- 



velope or address label mar- 
velously simple. You can eas- 
ily specify the size and type 
of envelopes and address la- 
bels, as well as whether they 
have a preprinted return 
address. 

Nvelope Plus has a clear, 
effective user's manual, 
though once the program 
has been loaded, it needs lit- 
tle explanation. The enve- 
lope screens clearly display 
how the end product will 
look. If you place an enve- 
lope properly in your printer, 
you get what you expect. 

Nvelope Plus performs its 
primary task quite well, with 



enough extras to elevate it 
above the status of a typewrit- 
er substitute. Finding a ZIP 
code for any city in America 
with the built-in ZIP code di- 
rectory, for instance, can 
save quite a bit of time. With- 
out Nvelope Plus, the simple 
task of priming an envelope 
isn't as simple as it seems. 
With it, there's one less has- 
sle to slow you down. 

EDDIE HUFFMAN 

IBM PC and compatibles, 256K 
RAM, LaserJet, PostScript-compati- 
ble, or Epson-compatible impact print- 
er; hard disk recommended— $49.95 

CAJUN EDGE 

117 S. Oak St., Ste. C 

PO, Sox 2457 

Hammond, \J\ 70403 

(800) 448-2970 (outside Louisiana) 

(504) 542-0410 

Circle Reader Service Number 339 

CONTACT 
MANAGEMENT 

Success in a sales office hing- 
es on productivity. Beacon's 
Contact Management pro- 
vides an individual salesper- 
son or networked sales of- 
fice a way to manage daily 
sales calls more productive- 
ly. Contact Management pro- 
vides reams of useful infor- 
mation to salespeople and 
managers. 

With a simple, one-line 
menu across the bottom of 
the screen. Contact Manage- 
ment proves simple to use. 
If you need to see additional 
program options, a simple 
touch of the F1 key brings up 
a full-blown menu/help 
screen, showing the soft- 
ware's options. As sales 
calls come in or go out, 
salespeople will have com- 
plete information about pros- 
pects or customers nght at 
their fingertips, 

Having this information 
readily available is much 
more important when you 
have incoming calls and 



THE OFFICIAL 

GUIDE 
TO MEGA MAN 

Defeat the power-mad 

scientist, Dr. Wily! 
IVlake your way through 

IVlonsteropolis! 
Defend all of Mankind! 

Finally, here it 
is-the complete playing 

guide to all 

three of the best-sellin;- 

Mega Man games, 

144 pages, $7,95 



COMPUTE'S 

NINTENDO 

SECRETS 

More strategies, 
hints, tips, reviews, and 

ratings for 

dozens of the newest, 

most popular 

Nintendo games. 

Maxout 

scores on Super Mario 

Bros. 3, 

Batman, Ninja Gaiden II, 

and more. 

198 + 8 color pages, 

$8.95 



WITH THESE BOOKS FROM COMPUTE 



CONQUERING 

ZELDA 



THE OFFICIAI. GUIDE TO 



T?ie Unauthorized GiJde 



DOWWB McCrary 



-■^is>' 



If iiG' 



COMPUTE'! 



NINTENDO^ 

SECRETS 



STEVEN SCHWARTZ 




COMPUTEi's 



CONQUERING 

ZELDA: 

THE UNAUTHORIZED 

GUIDE 

Final!y-the hints and 

techniques you 

need to conquer two 

of the most 

popular Nintendo 

games. 

The Legend ofZelda^ and 

The Adventure of Link". 

Step-by-step 

instructions to rescue 

the princess! 

128 pages, $7.95 



COMPUTE'S 

GUIDE TO NINTENDO 

GAMES 

Packed with hints 

and tips 
for better play and 

dozens 



I 



Oi 



GUIDE TO dozens 

NINTENDO of reviews of available 

GAMES ^"Vrt*" 

Nintendo Entertainment 
I System. 

?•' 272 pages, $9,95 



STEVEN 
SCHWARTZ 



ri 



^F HT^Z I I I I want more 

B Mm uM • liints and tips. 
Please send me the books checked below. 

D COMPUTERS Guide to Nintendo Games 
(2214) $3.95 

D COMPUTE'S Nintendo Secrets (2346) S8.9S 

D Conquering Zelda: The Unautliorized Guide 

(2397) $7.95 
D The Odlclal Guide to Mega Man 

(2417)S7.a5 

SuMotal 



. Sales lix (Residems ol HC. NY. & NJ add 
appropnate sales tax Canadian odeji add 
7* joods and Siraces lax.) 

. Shipping and Hanflli^; S2 per book US: S4 
Canada; S6 (oresn 



D Check or money order D MC D VISA 
Signature 



n 





iRecurrt) 


ArrI rm 


Firp njlB 


Warr« 




SIfWl A/1rtF»« 




INoPO Bones (*ist] 


C*y 


."italp 7IP 



All orders misl be paid in US. lunds itravm on a U.S. bank. 
Ofdeis will be stupoel via UPS Gnjjnd Service. Otter good 
while supplies las! 

MAIL TO Compute Books 
c/o CCC 

2500 McCEellan Avenue 
Pennsaulien, NJ 0S109 

Nmlendo and TTie Legend al Ism are regisieied trademarks 
of Nimenflo o( America. Inc. Jhs Mvenlae d 
Ltnk IS a trademark ol Nintendo of America. Inc 

10G91C 




▼ BACK RELIEF BY POLLENEX 



A 



re vou one of the millions of 
Americans who suffers from low back 
pain? Do hours of prolonged sitting leave 
you aching or numb? If so, then the Pollenex 
Back Relief is just what the doctor ordered. 
Back Relief's unique design cradles your 
back in comfort and features multiple com- 
binations of massage and heat. The in- 
flatable lumbar cushion conforms to the 
shape of your back. Dual massaging 
elements can be used separately or 
together for full back massage. Handy 
remote control lets you select upper/lower 
massage, low and high intensity as well as 
heat control.And the 
soothing massager 
works 2 ways -adapter 

#1 plugs into any indoor electrical outlet while adapter #2 plugs ^ 

into car, van, or truck cigarette lighter So Back Relief is perfect for 

car, home, or office. Plush, durable fabric cover adds extra com 

fort $119.98(56.75) M2001 



▼ THE BEST RECEPTION EVER!! 

Eliminate radio sig- 
nal fade and ag- 
gravating cross over 
signals that garble the 
sound. The new LS4 
omni-directional anten- 
na IS the only indoor 
antenna that thinks for 
itself The micro chip 
brain receives signals 
and isolates them into 
individual clear fre- 
quencies. Features the 
Gallium Arsenide Field 
Effect Transistor. No 
need to redirect this 
antenna. Leave it where 
It IS and its 360 degree 
radius allows it to 
receive from any direc- 
tion This antenna will 
boost your radio sig- 
nals up to 24 decibels 
for the clearest recep- 
tion you have ever ex- 
perienced. Easy to in- 
stall, light weight. Plugs 
into any stereo model. 
UniQue modern design. 
Made in the USA. U.L, 
listed. 1 year warrantv^^ 
Dimensions: 3" 
X4.125" X 17,25". 
$58.98 (S5.25) #A1891. 





T EVERYTHING BAG 

People on the go always have so much 
to carry around. The Everything Bag 
makes it a snap. This oversized shoulder bag 
is constructed of tough, water-resistant 
canvas material and features nine roomy 
pockets. Plus, an unusual ztpper design 
enables the bag to expand to double its 
normal width— to a full eight Inches. Ad- 
justable 2" wide straps provides a real com- 
fort feature In 3 great colors. $24.98 
(54,00) M1955-Blue; /CAigss-Khaki, ifM957- 
Cray 



T FOOD FOR WOOD 

Most of the convenience waxes you buy actually dry out wood 
instead of nourishing it. What's the alternative? Our choice 
is Williamsville wax. it is made of beeswax and lemon oil, heat- 
blended with other natural oils It can be used on any type of wood, 
any type of finish, on paneling or kitchen cabinets as well as fine 
furniture Williamsville Wax is super for restoring neglected or mis- 
treated wood. Two 8-QZ. bottles cost $13.98 IS3.25) M14312. 




T INNOVATIVE IONIZER 

A sophisticated electronic device that 
uses nature's way of cleaning air — 
emitting trillions of negatively charged ions 
that act like magnets, attracting microscop- 
ic particles of dust, smoke and pollen. One 
belongs in every room, but sometimes a 
table-top ionizer just isn't practical or desira- 
ble for reasons of space or your decor This 
tiny unit (iy2"x5") provides an ingenious so- 
lution, plugging right into any wall outlet, 
where it will 
remain mcon- 
spicuous while 
performing its 
mighty task. 
With "on" indica- 
tor light and col- 
lector pad that 
can be rinsed 
and, eventually, 
replaced. By 
Pollenex, for 
fresher air in 
home or office 
$59.98 (S4.00I 
#A1867. 



T NIGHT TRACKERS" 

Light up your night! Night Tracker"' 
the cordless, rechargeable hand-held 
spotlight packs a 500,000 candlepower 
beam to give you a light whenever, wher- 
ever you need it. The beam is 10 times 
brighter than your automobile headlights 
and will carry over 1 mile. Operates on re- 
chargeable batteries or recharge it from 
110 volt AC outlet or from any 12 volt car 
or boat outlet. Perfect for home, travel, 
boating and camping. Made in the USA and 
comes with a 90 day warranty Now fea- 
tured with amber and red lens attach- 
ments $79.98 (S6.25) #A1975, 





CALL TOLL FREE 24 MRS. 7 DAYS 1 - 8 Q -7 2 2 - 9 9 9 9 

TO ORDER- Send check with item number for total amounts, plus shipping & handling shown in ( I payable to MAIL ORDER MALL, 
DEPTCP-loi RO. Box 3006 Lakewood NJ 08701, or call TOLL FREE 1-800-722-9999. NJ residents add 7% sales tax. We honor MasterCard, 
Visa and American Express Sorry, no Canadian, foreign, or CQD orders 30 day money back guarantee for exchange or refund. 



Magalog Marketing Croup Inc © 1991 



1905 Swartnmore Ave. Lakewood, HI 08701 




T CAR-THEFT PROTECTION — WITH NO INSTALLATION 

W ith Sonic Sent n/, the value of a car alarm brings vou peace of mind — without the 
expense and bother of installation, vou can switch it from one vehicle to another 
Just plug Sonic Sentry into the cigarette lighter; cord reaches 5 feet, so the unit can 
occupy dash or seat when vehicle is parked, where the flashing lights can make a 
browsing thief think twice The petite 4V2"x4%"x2" box is capable of emitting a truly 
ear-piercing alarm, concentrated inside the car, where it can most effectively repel an 
intruder Activated by the light 
that accompanies the opening of 
car door, hood or trunk, it also 
senses impact or "unnecessary 
roughness"; the shriek lasts for one 
minute and only the key stops it — 
unplugging the lighter activates a 
back-up battery Stuck on the road' 
Switch Sonic Sentry to its mode 
showing HELP in flashing red lights 
and put in the window to attract 
aid. It's protection vou can't afford 
not to have, at $74.98 (S7.00) 

fAigsg 



T STEP UP TO A HEALTHIER YOU 

Doctors, physical trainers, and athletes 
agree that stair climbing is one of the 
best forms of aerobic exercise You can 
achieve your fitness goals without the se- 
vere jarring or pounding associated with 
running or jogging. That's why the fdidaway 
ExerClimb '-' is the perfect piece of exer- 
cise equipment. The ExerClimb"-' improves 
cardiovascular function, increases endur- 
ance, burns body fat, and conditions major 
muscle groups to tighten and tone upper 
body, thighs, hips, buttocks, and calvea And 
results can be seen with a twenty minute 
workout three times a week. It is quiet 
enough to let you exercise while watching 
TV- or listening to your favorite music The 
hydraulic powered ExerClimb" features 
sturdy steel construction, magnum series 
shocks and individual tension adjustment 
to insure a high intensity, low impact work- 
out. Compact and lightweight (28 lbs.) this 
incredible machine fits in virtually any size 
room. When opened for use, it measures 
28"H X 27"L X 16"W Plus, its unique foid- 
away feature makes carrying and storage 
a snap. Perfect to take along to your office, 
trips, or almost anywhere Some assembly 
required, using only 
screwdriver and pliers 
For all these great fea- 
tures, one would ex 
■-' pect to pay much 
more but the Exer- 
I Climb" has a very 
a trim price tag. So now 
there is no reason not 
to "step" into better 
shape Ninety day 
warranty $119.98 
ISI 5.001 #A1998. 



SHARPEST OF THE 
SHARPENERS 






The classic knife sharpening tool is the 
butcher's steel, but most people find 
It intimidating. The Chantry Knife Shar- 
pener duplicates butcher steel action but 
makes it so simple anyone can sharpen and 
realign a blade edge perfectly in moments 
As the knife edge is drawn betv/een a pair 
of hard (Rockwell 64-65) Sheffield Steel rods, 
spring-loaded at just the proper angle both 
sides of the blade are aligned. Works on 
stainless or carbon steel knives, straight or 
serrated edges The Chantry is made of 
heavily enameled steel, can be countertop 
mounted. It is included in the permanent 
design collection of the Museum of Modern 
Art. $34.98 (S5.00) #A1878- 



• • • • • 

• * • • 



1 THE DAZER' 




Even the most dedicated canine affi- 
cionado can sometimes encounter un- 
friendly dogs. Dazer"' provides a humane 
way to repel their advance, emitting ultra- 
sonic sound waves inaudible to humans and 
totally safe for dogs (unlike mace and other 
common deterrents), FOcket size (4%" longi 
plastic case can also clip on belt takes 1-9V 
battery, included. For joggers, hikers, bikers, 
seniors and kids— plus the proverbial post- 
man. $29.98, (S3.00) #A1829X- 



CALL TOLL FREE 24 HRS. 7 DAYS 1-800-722-9999 

TO ORDER: Send check with item number for total amounts, plus shipping & handling shown in ( ) payable to MAIL ORDER MALL, 
DEPTCP-101; RQ Box 5006, Lakewood, N-i 08701, or call TOLL FREE 1-80O-722-9999. NJ residents add 7% sales tax We honor MasterCard, 
Visa, and American Express Sorry, no Canadian, foreign, or CO.D orders. 30 day money back guarantee for exchange or refund. 



Magaloa Marketing Group Int © 1391 



1905 Swarthmore Ave. LakeiAood. Nj 08701 



PENTHOUSE MAGAZINE 
COMES ALIVE ON YOUR COMPUTER! 




Try the New ONLINE SERVICE of 

PENTHOUSE MAGAZINE. It's 
incredible! You can finally use your 
computer for somethiing thiat you will 
truly enjoy. You'll be able to; 

•DOWNLOAD beautiful color Images 
of Penthouse Pets 
•Have UNINHIBITED CHAT with 
Penthouse Pets and special guests 
from around the world 
•Receive revealing ELECTRONIC 
MAIL from other members 
•Experience much more! 

We'll even provide the software to 
maximize your computer's graphic 
abilities! 

TD GET YOUR COPY OF OUR SOFIWARE, 




AND INFORMATION ON HOW TO ACCESS 1NE SYSHM IN YOUR AREA, USE YOUR MODEM TO DIAL 

1-900-463-8300 

Just 500 Per Minute. You Must Be 18 Years Of Age Or Older. 



don't have time to prepare 
your presentation. When a 
customer calls, there's no 
need to tell him to fiang on 
for a few minutes while you 
frantically fumble through a 
dozen legal pads, looking for 
what you last discussed on 
the telephone. Just pull the 
appropriate information up 
on Contact Management, 
and then, before taking an or- 
der from your customer and 
scheduling delivery or mak- 
ing an appointment, you can 
quickly key up your calendar 
to check for any conflicts on 
your end. 

Contact Management al- 
so provides you with precon- 
figured reports. You can use 
this information in a sales of- 
fice to analyze top salespeo- 
ple. Whom do they call? How 
many calls a day do they 
make? How often do they con- 
tact their customers? All this 
information makes this soft- 
ware an invaluable tool for 
the salesperson or sales of- 
fice and will likely boost pro- 
ductivity. Though priced a 
bit high for many home us- 

152 COMPUTE OCTOBER 1991 



ers, those with the capital 
and the need shouldn't miss 
this opportunity to improve ef- 
ficiency. 

PEER PLAUT 

IBM PC and compatibles. 512K 
RAM, hard drive — S349 single user; 
$695 multiuser, S75 per node 

BEACON SOFTWARE 
222 N. Huron Si. 
Toledo, OH 43604 
(419) 242-38B8 



SANTE 



Can't afford the services of a 
registered dietitian to put 
you and your menus in a 
healthful frame of mind? San- 
te puts one in your kitchen. 
The government's nutritional 
guidelines come built in and 
make eating for optimum 
health less troublesome. 

Developed by Hopkins 
Technology with the assis- 
tance of a registered dieti- 
tian. Sanfe describes the nu- 
tritional content of over 2000 
foods and analyzes how 
your meals measure up 
against the U.S. Recommend- 
ed Dietary Allowances 



(USRDA) for your age and 
gender. The program offers 
analyses of food, which 
check specifically for 29 nu- 
trients, compare saturated 
and unsaturated fats, and cal- 
culate the percentage of pro- 
tein, carbohydrates, and 
fats in your diet. 

Analyze a single food, rec- 
ipe, meal, day, or range of 
days; the results are dis- 
played or printed in easy-to- 
read reports and bar charts. 
Some discoveries prove un- 
pleasant: Your Sunday 
eggs, bacon, and biscuits 
give you double the maxi- 
mum USRDA for cholesterol. 

You say you want health- 
ful alternatives to your old 
standbys? Try the 12 includ- 
ed recipes and the hun- 
dreds you receive once 
you've registered as a Sante 
owner. All recipes are dieti- 
tian tested, and you can im- 
port them— and your own rec- 
ipes — with the touch of a 
key. 

Plan a week's worth of 
meals and make adjust- 
ments to reduce the fat or in- 



crease the calcium. See how 
you've done over a month's 
time — some days you may 
not do well, but over the 
long haul, Sante keeps you 
on track, nutritionally speak- 
ing. 

The program's friendly in- 
terface features pull-down 
menus you navigate with the 
arrow and Enter keys. Online 
help nearly makes the man- 
ual dispensable, explaining 
prog ram functions and provid- 
ing information about each 
nutrient. 

If you consume some- 
thing not in the database, 
you can personalize the 
food list. You can also enter 
ingredient prices; Sanfe cal- 
culates the cost of meals. 

Hopkins promises to pro- 
vide personal replies to all 
questions about the pro- 
gram and nutrition. Believe 
the promise. I found a bug, 
and tech support went to 
work, fixed it, and had a new 
version in the mail in no time. 
Sante is inspirational. I'm 
more conscientious about 
my diet, and I know I'm eat- 



Advertisers Index 



Reader Service Number/Aduerliser Page 

159 900 Software 158 

107 Abracadata. 155 

161 Access Software 113,119 

142 Action Management 154 

162 Bare Bones Software A-11 

112 BOBCO G-6 

207 CH Products 13 

IBB Citizen 7 

184 Commodore 69 

103 CompuServe 17 

118 Computer Business Services 157 

114 Computer Direct 42,43 

141 Computer Prodyctions 157 

137 Cqvox 158 

125 Creative Labs 2 

139 Creative Specialties G-21 

Damarl< 71 

165 Data East Ill 

148 Davidson 21 

120 DCS Industries 57 

180 Delphi 72 

131 DemaSource 156 

171 Digital Dynamics A-25 

Disk-Count Software 155 

General Car Rental 9 

197 6EniB 5 

148 GFXBasB A-15 

128 The Grapevine Group - G-14 

117 Holosoft Technologies A-28 

The Hunter Group 120 

17T IHT Software G-21 

190 I. Leonard Si Company 156 

134 Interplay IFC 

135 Interplay 1 

111 Lucastilms 85 

183 Lucky Computer 155 

127 LWS Software 157 



Reader Servi[;e Kumtier/Adverliser Page 

Magalog Marketing Group 150,151 

146 Meggido A-5 

MicroLogic 23 

138 MicroWliga A-28 

1S8 MicroProse 105 

157 MicroProse 27 

169 MicroProse 117 

153 Mission Cnntrol 137 

186 Montgomery Grant A-3 

187 Montgomery Grant G-5 

133 Motion Blur Publishing A-19 

176 My Storybook : 156 

National Videotex Nehvork 81 

153 New World Computing IBC 

119 Nordic Track 129 

122 fJRi/McGraw Hill 54,65 

196 NSI Computer Products...S8,89,90,91,92,9394,95,96 

104 Origin 11 

185 Poor Person Software A-19 

199 Power-Up 48 

157 Power-Up 49 

193 Professional Cassette 25 

151 Professor Jones 154 

168 Psygnosis 109 

116 SeXXy Software 158 

154 Sierra OnLine BC 

136 Sir-Tech 139,141,143,145 

1D9 Smart Luck Software 156 

121 Software of the Month Ctub 155 

126 SottShoppe, Inc 156 

SOGWAP G-15 

152 Spectrum Holobyle 15 

173 Spectrum Holobyte 131 

167 Spectrum Holobyte 129 

130 Starware Publishing 157 

191 Strictly Personal 133 

170 Tenex G-13 



Reader Service Number/Advertiser Page 

132 The Ottier Guys A-13 

195 Universal Memory 34, 35 

198 Villa Crespo 103 

178 Virgin Games 122,123 

179 Virgin Games 124,125 

105 Virgin Games 103 

172 Wedgvraod Computer 157 

118 WOL/Learning Adventure 53 



Amiga Disk Resource A-23 

Amiga Resource Subscription 142 

Best Amiga Utilities Disk A-29 

COMPUTE Books....60,115.131,135,147,14S,t56,G-9 

COMPUTE Subscription 1 13 

COMPUTE'S GEnie Online 55 

COMPUTE'S Quantum Q-Link ..G-7 

COMPUTE'S "The Hot Disk' 47 

Gazette Disk Library G-1 1 

Gazette Disk Subscription G-15 

Gazette Productivity Manager G-17 

Mean 18 Goh Course A-7 

PC Disk SuiDScription 51 

PC Power Disk Sjbscription 83 

PC Productivity Manager 77 

Penthouse 152 

SharePak Disk Subscription 29 

SpeedScript Disk G-21 



ing better now than before I 
installed Sante. After all, novy 
I have a dedicated dietitian 
looking over my shoulder. 

KAREN LEE SI EPA K 

IBM PC and compatibles, 512K 
RAiyt, hard drive with minimum 2M8 
available— S59 

HOPKINS TECHNOLOGY 

421 Hazei Ln. 

Hopkins, UN 55343 

(800)397-9211 

(612) 931-9376 

Circle Reader Service Number 341 



PROFESSOR 
WINDOWS 

A graphically oriented envi- 
ronment's bound to throw 
longtime DOS users a curve 
or two, but learning the ba- 
sics of Windows shouldn't 
cause any anguish. If you've 
been holding off installing 
Windows because you 
dread the climb up the learn- 
ing curve, look to Professor 
Windows for a lift. It's a friend- 
ly program that walks you 
through the sometimes con- 



fusing world of Windows. 

Using either the mouse or 
the keyboard, you can learn 
about such matters as sim- 
ple graphics objects, Win- 
dows accessories, getting 
help, and printing. Subjects 
are arranged in six areas 
(startup, basics, tasks, print- 
ing, accessories, and ad- 
vanced), and you can move 
ahead or back one screen, 
or jump completely out of a 
tutorial at any time. 

Though elementary, treat- 
ment of the material proves 
effective within its defined 
boundaries. Users answer 
simple multiple-choice ques- 
tions on newly learned facts. 
A bar display of continuing 
progress through each les- 
son sustains the sense of 
accomplishment. 

Ironically, in spite of Win- 
dows' mu\\.\\ask.\ng environ- 
ment. Professor Windows 
won't load when anything 
else remains open, exclud- 
ing Program t\Aanager. It will 
freeze if you run it under a 
Windows shell (like DC Win- 
dows Express or PubTecfi 



File Manager). 

Professor Windows won't 
help everyone; it's strictly 
for novice users and proba- 
bly not advanced enough 
for longtime PC users. Profes- 
sor Windows does assuage 
computer anxieties if you 
have them, and if you need 
a little assistance to jump- 
start your Windows career. 
Professor Windows could be 



just the patient tutor that 
you've been waiting for. 

BARRY BRENESAL 



IBM PC and compatibles, hard 
drive, Windows 3.0 or laler— $49.95 

INDIVIDUAL SOFTWARE 
5870 Stonerldge Dr., #1 
Pieasanlon. CA 94588 
(800) 822-3522 (sales) 
(415) 734-6767 

Circle Reader Service Number 342 



CREDITS 

Page 6: Grant Faint/Image Bank; pages 18-19: Uniphoto; 
page 30: Mark Wagoner: page 31: f\/1ark Wagoner; page 32: 
Mark Wagoner; page 37: Mark Wagoner; page 38: Mark Wag- 
oner; pages 44-45: Steven Hunt/Image Bank: page 54: 
Grant Faint/Image Bank; pages 74-75: Mark Wagoner; page 
76: Robert Tinney/The Stock Market: pages 78-79: Steven 
Hunt/Image Bank; page 80: Steven Hunt/Image Bank; page 
84: Jeanette Adams; page 86: Mark Wagoner: page 87: 
Mark Wagoner: page 97: Elle Schuster/lrmage Bank; pages 98- 
99: Mark Wagoner; page 106: Mark Wagoner: page 108: Pe- 
ter Simon/PliotoTake; page A-2: John Banagan/image Bank; 
pages A-8-9: Myron J. Dorf/Ttie Stock Market; page A-16: 
David Maenza/lmage Bank; page A-20; Lisa Pomerantz/ 
Image Bank; page A-32: Hans Welder/Image Bank; pages G- 
2-3: Elle Schuster/Image Bank. 



OCTOBER 1991 COMPUTE 153 



CX)MPUTE's 
Product Mart 

is a special advertising section 
designed to benefit you, the PC 
direct marketer, by letting you ad- 
vertise directly to the readers that 
buy. We offer: 



• Marketing Assistance 

Each ad receives a complementary 
reader service number tiiat generates 
a targeted sales lead mailing list. 

• Qualified Readers 

Our readers search the Product Mart 
for quality hardware, software, and 
peripheral products they can buy. 

• Guaranteed Audience 

Our rate base is guaranteed at 
275,000 per issue, with an actual 
monthly circulation of over 300,000. 

• Cost Effectiveness 

Ad sizes range from 1/9 (21/4 x 3V4) to 
1/2 page (vertical or horizontal), and 
you can request frequency rates of 
up to 12 times per year. Second color 
is available. 



Space closing: First day of the second 
month preceeding issue date (for example, 
November issue closes Sept. 1). Space 
limited to a first-reserved, first-served basis. 



For ad specifications 
or more information call 

East Coast & Midwest 
Caroline Hanlon • (919) 275-9809 

New England 
Jack Garland • (617) 749-5852 

West Coast 
Lucille Dennis • (707) 451-8209 



Call now to reserve your space! 



PRE-SCHOOL SOFTWARE 



NEW! TALKING SOFTWARE 
for Kids 0-4 Years Old 

(At Last! Software Designed to 
Make Your Child Smarter! ) 

Now! You can Easily give your Child a Learning 
Headstart with Kiddyware Pre-School Sodware. 
Developed by Elementary Teachers. Kiddyware is 
the most Complete & Easy To Use. Pre-School 
Software available Today. Here's Why: 



• Over 12 Fun Lessons that 
teach your child: 

Alphabets A Numbers 
'. Shapes, Colors 4 Direclions 
- People. Places & Things 
" Body Parts (Eyes. Nose. Etc.) 

• 137 Graphic Screens filled 
with Exciting Animation. 
Sound, Pictures. Colors and 
Music. 

■ AMAZrNG! 93 Word Built-in 
Speech & Sound Vocabulary 

■ TALKS THROUGH YOUR PC 
No Additional Hardware 
Required, 







■ NO SPECIFIC KEY-PRESSES 
REQUIRED! 

(Kids Press Any Key To 
Operate) 

• NO ADULT SUPERVISION 
REQUIRED! 

Start it. Adjust it & Leave. 

• Tested & Proven Effective 
with children Ages 0-4. 

Put your child ahead of the 
pack! Order Kiddyware Pre- 
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child's education today. 100% 
Money-Back Guarantee 
Act Now! <h/10 OE ■+'53 

Send ip^O.SO S&H To: 
Action Management^ Inc. 
915 S. Grand rraiersf , Suite B7 
Film, Ml 4H50Z 
I-800-9M-Kll)S 

MC/VtSA/COD/CHECK/MO 

COA, EGA, or VGA ReQd. 0«mD onty £5 

Dealer Inquiries Invited 



Circle Reader Service Number 142 



Stockmarket'Baseball'Basketb alI'Lottery 

>>\^ /Free 
^//Catalog 

"1991" 
ipFootball 

^J^S^aster $ 9955 

K«?^»)all 19955 

C.^|^%tef 14955 

D. ColiWd^Football 19955 

E Bullet|:S5^ 150.00 

1991 Football Spmh, 

items A, B, C, D, WL iB43% 

$499J95 

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1940 W. State St., Boise, ID 83702 





|Thoroughbred*Greyhouncl*Standardbred 



circle Render Service Number 151 




386-33MHZ 

O 85mb Sumk VGA 



Power Ststeh Features 

Q 4MB RAM em. to 16MB (32MB option) 
a 16 Bit VGA Card, 51 2K Video RAM 
ai4" Color Monitor, 1024x768 res. 
□ 85MB Hard Drive, 23ms access 
□1.2 MB and 1.44MB Floppy Drives 
□Desktop or MinlTower Case, 220W 
□101 Key Enhanced Keyboard 
a 1 Serial, 1 Parallel Port, 1 Game 

Non Interlaced SVGA add $200. 



Complete Systems 
1MB/Mono/4aMB 

286-12 S645.00 
3665X20 $895.00 
386-25 $995.00 
386-33 $1195.00 

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486-33 ISA 

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□SUPER VGA, 4MB RAM 
□120 MB Hard Drive, 18ms 
□128K Cache, exp. to 256K 

$2795.<» 



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Tukwili, WA 981B8 

1(800)367-5825 

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Addison, TX 73244 

1(800)966-7687 




HOURS Sam to 6nm 
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Since 1984 

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Circle Reader Service Number 183 



FREE -15 DISKS -FREE 
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IBMCvWK $59.95 



To order or receive a tree color catalog call: 
800-451-4871 or FAX: 503-683-1925 

Order by mail: Add S7 shipping first program pius $2 
ea additonal. Send VisaMC# (v* exp. date) of dieck. 



Applf II/Lascr 128, MK $49.95 

bracadata 



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Circle Reader Service Number 107 



E 



circle Readef Service Number 121 



DISK-COUNT SOFTWARE 



AlQQbraMade Easy 

Back to Bw Future II 

Bono Dl Cosmc faga 

Bards Tal« III 

[^ra9?tiQuVGAo[ll 

Bill BkiH NASCAR 

BuckRo99t$;Countdown 32 Lanrings 

Bus^bucfc.CiiaiTn&.Vitong 3t Lexcnxs 



Captain Cornell 



'M Rid M6(ks 

25 tang's Qu^BurxSe 

26 KJnosOijeslV(VGA) 
36 KinflsQu(HlV(£GAl 
32 LeggndolFawglhefl 

a) LeiSurBSuilLair¥l(VGA} 37 SimCity Giaphtc 1 or? 
31 LDisurfl SmlLany Bunda &4 Sim Earlh 

"'' SpacsAca 

Space Quasi Bundo 



^jTr"S3aer7reapoivG3HwSn3 33" 
37 SfisameSrBetTri-PacR 19 

SJmCitjf 



SOO-448-6658 908-541-8768 

Lowest Delivered Pric^ including Bhipping 
We will beat any advertis ed price 

^^^160 AdLiJ 80 



*! ActobaTypa Manager 

<» AH^ [>BiK tot Windows 

30 Anwr.MarHtoookBufi.Let 31 



AdLib 

Ad LibMJCfOChaivwi 

AdfjbPCMS 



*S 



25 Lite and [>«ath 2 32 Space Quflsl IV 

37 Lrto 37 SpflU-itPlus 

ChaBengeolAnoeniEmpSI Links -(>3urMifcsx 16 SpintotExcaJibuf 

Chiidt©nsWnlJn9iPubl.42 ManagefsChaflenge 26 Steflar7 

ChucJcYea9arAj(Cofncat3a Gsn-UgrJOwnersDisfc 19 SfckyOear Alphabet Taft 

Compete LoneryTracke[ 31 MarhoJo "' "-'-^ " 

Compui&rvaDOS 24 WarioAndiatli Racing 

Conan:Th*CinvTianan 31 MamaiiOroams 

ConflictiMitWieEasl 37 Martian MwTkOtantJum 

Conspiracy: O^aOtock FUe 33 Matn Bissier Mystery 

Corpomlion 31 MatnBlaslBfPlus 

Crossword MaSK:4.0 32 MatnHabbit 

DasBoQl 32 Maw Beacon Typtng 

Death Kr^ghls d1 Kj^nn 33 McGeo al the Fun Fair 

l^&luxePinlllEAhanced 68 MegaFortreBS 

DesiviasainfilE 23 Me>9atrBvele'r2 

DicK Tracy 31 MernoryLane 

DragonsLajrll 37 Mtdtey'sABConZS 

Dfaam Team NBA 31 McKay's Sound Source 

DiiCklaleiiQuastforGoJd 15 Micro CooUxk* 

Es/IWeavatll 33 MicrohiagueFootbal! 

EHtePus 31 MKlnghlHascue 

Enlertavvnenl Pak/WiTKL £6 Milliken SlofyteDef 

EyaatthABetK>kki/ 32 Ninji Turti« 

EZCosiTTKis 42 NiidearWa/ 

F-1SStnks£adell 34 NumberMufic*i*r 

F-ISIIScerrarioOtsk 19 CMegonTrail 

F1l7aSleamiF^hlerE 

F-29Ret&l^tor 

FaJcor3.0 

Firehaw^-Thaxdeill 
FiighiSimulalorATP- 

GalowaySavaoeFiDTtw 37 PGAGoJI 

Gaoj^M 25 PhondPlus 

GotdoiltiflAzloc 31 PicK'nPilfi 

Gur^ship2000 ■*2 Piayroom 

HardNova 32 Ptin'.Shop 

HaKJineHarryPapefRacea: PrmtShop&ltnparaon 

HeartorChtna 37 PrintS^op Graphic (ea,) 

Hole^n-Ofw Mini Gotf 20 P'o Tennis TwJr 

HoylasBookGanwslor2 22 QuesT tor Glory I Of II 

Iron Lord 27 Raf>*»mHouiaEnCyCkjp. 

JackNickiausUnlimriDd 37 HeactefRabbrt 

J.NtckfflusCourseDtsk 14 RodBarpn 

JamosBondSteaniAnaii 32 RiG« ol th« DrBQQn 

Jetfohtflfll 42 SayigeEjirpira 

Jis^MonbuiaFooSiAi 3t Soabbld Deluxe 

Khalaai 30 SectelofUofikeylsJand 



42 On£eUponaTimel,2,3ea.31 WaynaGretiky II 

32 OutnufnbefwJ — ... - 

42 OvBitord 

42 PCGIotMUMUSA 

21 PCSLudyBrbte 

37 PofMinafProGoll 



22 AmiPro 1.2 
41 Auto Mop 
30 AulomOnii 
34 Badce<Toolfi2.0 
'iT CalendarCroatc>r4.0 
i. Central PiMit Ann Vims 
•^ CerttealeMsiUH 
■^ C?i«*-H.' 

23 Copy II PC 
30 Coi-e! Draw 2.0 

31 SHidcybearOpposfEssTalK 30 Coriect Grammai/Wind. 

32 Stcitybear Reading Tutor 30 DacEasyAccounlmg 
37 SWfybearShapesTttk 30 DefinilionaPtus 
37 Su:a«tRod2 
31 SIkjnl Driver 

31 Sup«rMunii!iea 
25 Taf* 

32 TeQrnYank£« 

25 TeenageMutantWortd 
^ Tennis Cup 
37 Temiinatof 

26 TbenwPgiliMyatefy 
31 Treasure Mfjuniatn 
23 Tioika 
31 Trwrp Castfe II 
25 Twaighl2OT0 

31 Ultima VI 

32 UM.S.II 
25 U.S.Mas 
32 Vajcne 

30 VenoeariceorExcaJibui 
30 Vi^arfords 



2fts AdLbGokj CAa 

56 Ad Lib Software aval. CALL 



27 Dosqinowaa 

31 DRDOS&.0upQras^ 

vl Ovorak on Typing 

* FSflhilnOna' 

23 Form Tool Gold 

31 Geowortts Eftsambia 

35 GrammatktVor Wind. 

31 HarvardGraphics3.0 

31 hfjaak 

22 HiomoUawyw 

LabelPraLaiei/DolMaL 47 



35 SoundBlaalBT 

7S Sound BlBstei MCA 

42 Sound BlaslorPiDl. 

77 Voice Editor 

26 Sound Masterll 

^ Pro Audio Speclnm 

^g Thwlarboard 

62 Roland LAPC-1 



60 



145 

219 

CALL 

52 
to 
249 

99 
396 



MusKQuesfMiSiCHfd^M 



M M0X-I6 

^ BotandMPU^PC 

36 VoyQtnJr'22^ak 

05 VoyetrBS(-22/PaK 

&9 Cakwait 

55 CakowafcPro 

^ Copyist App. 2.0 

-5? MaslwTfBCKs Pro 

'^gl Music PTritBf Plus 



145 
135 
I2fl 
199 



95 
264 
419 



21 LalwiiUnimiteda.O 

;; LaplinklVPro 

37 Lotus Wofte 

3a MachType 

24 WicnMohGarneShop 



CRFb3IlE!3^^^44 



^ CHMacfilll 

310 EI>rnina1or33MF(zCaid 

04 GtiMSJoysDcK 

155 KratlKCa 

36 KranThuTKierslKk 



Wheie IS Camien in USA 31 

30 in America's Past 
37 in Europe 
90 in Time 

31 in Workl iDeLuu) 

32 Wing Commander !I 

26 WirKlowsEnt&rt.Pa)( „ - 

27 WtrKtowsPioductiviiyPak 40 PCTools70 

36 WofdMufKhe. 30 Jfl^^^S?^ 

22 WprtdOass Soccer 26 Pubbshll' 

30 Writer Rat>bi1 31 PubfehersPamCneh 

37 Wrath ol DarrxMi 3l Pyro Screen 5^«r 
6g X-Uanll 25 C^MM 
3! Your Personal Tra>nfl[ SAT 31 OuicKen4.0 
37 ^^vrrnrnnTTT^^^ QukicertOuickPay 

37 Koyboard Skins (spediy Tyr6pCad2.0 

3s maVa and model) 15 xtSeSy 

3S MoLEoPads 5 Xtree Gold 



^ Thrr^stmasler 

65 SPlayarGamBCafd 



30 WIcrowriQuik Basic or C 65 Quickshot Wa/rior 
32 MoneyCounts6.S ^ 
3t Money Matter 

MS DOS 5.0 Upgrade 
Norton UHbtias 6.0 
r' Pag6niekM4i) 

31 Pascal lofVYmrtows 
31 PCArwwhertflV 
49 PCDOS5.0Upgrada 
48 P C Kwk Powerpak 
29 PCPainttHUstiJv+ 



^^ CHRotler Mouse (unaJ) 85 

^ CM 200E Mouse 24 

^ Eiipan Mouse SanaJ OS 

114 MicrasonBusMousa 115 

105 UiciosonSenalMoyse ©5 

75 MotKomanCotdess 1^ 

75 Mousoma^Sofiai 69 

^^ TraciTnGnSend 

ei Frecom060no-Ljr>er 185 

36 MaxFaJCd624 135 

34 PM2400lnlamal 120 

55 Sportslej: 2400 Internal 120 

^ Spoftstef2400EJdanui 140 

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CONVERSATIONS 



Electronic devices 
like the new 
computer-graphics 
hardware allow 
you to express the 

panoramas ol 
your own brain. 



MfND EXPANSION 

Timothy Leary is the former 
Harvard psychology professor 
whose philosophy, "Tune in, 
turn on, drop out," changed 
the face of America in the 
1960s. Since then, his inter- 
ests have turned to computers 
and virtual reality. Periodically, 
Dr, Leary appears on America 
Online for informal interaction 
with subscribers. Here is the 
transcript of one of his recent 
appearances. 

Timothy Leary: Let me say 
a few words about what's go- 
ing on in my life these days. 
We're working on a newsletter 
which has a tentative publica- 
tion date of July 4fh. The 
name is tentatively "Timothy 
Leary's Animations." The news- 
letter will be very interactive, 
We'll be soliciting articles 
from our readers for future edi- 
tions. 

Question: Dr. Leary, what 
prompted you to get into soft- 
ware? Aiso, any electron- 
ics-related stories 
you can relate 
to us from ttie 
1960s? 
Leary: What 
prompted 
me to get in- 
volved with 
software is 
the interac- 
tion between 
computers 
and the human 
mind. The language 
of computers gave 
me the metaphor 
was search- 
ing for 




20 years ago. As [for] the 
1960s, that's a "whole nother 
lifetime." We're now in the 
1990s. Why look back? 

Q: Tell us about your soft- 
ware for mind expansion. 

Leary: The reasoning behind 
the mind expansion software is 
the empowerment of the individ- 
ual where everything that ap- 
pears on the screen is what 
you have put there, 

Q: What have you been do- 
ing in recent years, Dr. Leary? 

Leary: I'm the head of two 
very influential software devel- 
opment companies. One is 
called FUTIQUE, and the oth- 
er is TELELECTRONICS- We 
are developing 3-D electronic 
environments for the Mac, 
IBfvi, and the new 16-bit 
videogame appliances. Our 
company's aim is to load onto 
compact disc prefabricated ful- 
ly furnished homes, gardens, 
landscapes, and any environ- 
ment that the user would like 
to "boot up." 

0: What do you think about 
the Libertarian party? 

Leary: I am an enthusiastic 
member of the Libertarian Par- 
ty. I thinly that in politics the pol- 
iticians of both parties. Dem- 
ocratic [and] Republican, pan- 
der to the lowest common de- 
nominator. Therefore, New- 
ton's Law of Politics is true: "In 
politics the scum rises to the 
top." For this reason, I back the 
Libertarian Party. Our aim is to 
diminish, decrease, decimate 
the power of the state to inter- 
fere in the individual's life. 

O: Have you been doing 
any experiments with virtual re- 
ality? 

lleary: Yes, I am involved 
with several groups develop- 
ing TELEPRESENCE environ- 
ments and electronic environ- 
ments. I probably give more 
lectures and demonstrations 
about VR than anyone in the 
field. 

Q: When iv///Mind Mirror be 
available for Fvlacintosh? 

Leary: We are trying to get 



an update and revision of 
Mind Mirror for the Mac. With 
graphics, graphics, and more 
graphics! It is one of the two 
great sorrows of my life thai 
Mfnd Mirror, my wonderful 
head program, was never trans- 
lated for my Mac-using friends. 

Q: Do you have software 
[currently available] for the 
Macintosh? 

Leary: I do not have func- 
tioning Mac software. I can, 
however, strongly recommend 
four Mac products which con- 
vert the screen into a comfort- 
able, livable, 3-D environment. 
These programs are 1) Virtual 
Valerie, 2) Spaceship War- 
lock, 3) Manhole, and 4) Cos- 
mic Osmo. 

Q: What about the software 
you're currently wori<ing on? 

Leary: We are working, as 
I mentioned before, on devel- 
oping 3-D programs which 
will allow performers to select 
and move around in an elec- 
tronic environment. Our pro- 
grams are interactor theaters 
where a small group can as- 
semble for purposes of educa- 
tion, entertainment, and enlight- 
enment. The three E's of the 
electronic twenty-first century. 

Q:Dr. Leary, could you com- 
ment on the advent of virtual re- 
ality? Someone pointed out 
that it couldn 't compare to LSD. 
Do you see this new technolo- 
gy as a substitute for drugs? 

Leary: No. 'Virtual reality 
isn't a substitute for organic 
psychedelic plants and 
drugs. Psychedelic drugs al- 
low you to exit the repetitious 
word processes of your mind 
to boot up limitless programs, 
directories, and files in your 
brain. All of which, by the way, 
are technicolor, multimedia, 
and moving at the speed of 
light. On the other hand, elec- 
tronic devices like the new 
computer-graphics hardware 
allow you to select electronic 
patterns and multimedia envi- 
ronments to express the pan- 
oramas of your own brain, n 



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circle Ruder Sefvic* Numbar 154