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ANTIC DISK $5.95: SUPER BONUS FOR BOTH 8-BIT & STI 



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The ATARI Resource 



MARCH 1988 VOLUME 6, NUMBER II 



SHOOTOUT! 

2nd~generatSon 
videogame maehines 

' Atari XE Game System — 
vs. Nintendo & SegW'""^'^ 




.-'N 



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1 986 - Flight Simulator II for the 68000 
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1985- High-performance Jet flight 
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IBM® is the registered trademark of International Business Machines, Inc. 



15 Pay Home Trial • 90 Pay Imrnediate Replacement Pol icy 

f ^^ AAOI ITHP ^kl RECT ' "''"°" '"<>'"'" ""Id <i'/i* "la l«x. All orders must be in U.S. Dollnri. We ship to all points in the U.S.. CANADA, PUERTO RICO. * APO-FPO. 
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OOOQO k| PonnAr RH Rrtrrinrt^nn It ATVlin '« "^ days for phone orders and 1 day express mail. Prices and availability subjea to change without notice. Shipping and handlini charges are not refundable. 

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providing quality service. Many companies have come and gone trying to imitate our quality and 
service. If by some oversight we do not have the lowest prices advertised on the products you 
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The ATARI Resource 



FEATURES 




MARCH 1988, VOLUME 6, NUMBER 11 



'type-In Software I 




Atari XE Game System, Nintendo, 
or Sega — which is the best one? 
Video Game Shootoid: page 36. 



33 ROMAN NUMERAL TRANSLATOR by David Stone 
Ix),sin' those MCMXXIV blues 

34 MR. SMOOTHY by Kenneth Kuye 

Deluxe text serolling subroutine 7)>pe-In Softwarel 

36 SHOOTOUT OF THE VIDEO GAME SYSTEMS by David Plotkin 
Atari XK Came System vs. Nintendo and Sega 

8-BIT REVIEWS 

10 WARGAMES: Borodino, Battle Cruiser, Guderian, Mech Brigade 

n TOOLS: Hxpander, Fleet System 2 

13 FEATURE PRODUCTS: Colleen Musie Maker, Rainy Day Games 

19 GAMES: I'awn, Dropzone, Tomahawk, Solar Star, 2 Infocoms 

DEPARTMENTS 



SUPER DISK BONLIS 
7 ENTREPRENEUR JUNGLE by William Austin 

GAME OF THE MONTH 
15 ADVENTURE CREATION KIT by Stephen Stout 

ONLINE 
22 INSIDE GENIE by Gregg Pearlman 

FEATLIRF. APPLICATION 
30 BIG LETTERS! by (icrald Vanden Bosch 



type-fn Software I 



type-In Software I 



SOFTWARE LIBRARY 



61 TYPE-IN LISTINGS SEaiON 



ST RESOURCE 


41 MAZE MASTER by Stephen Everman and Paul Pratt 
Random ST BASIC mazes forever 


type-In Softuaremk 


42 PASCAL TOWERS b)' Stephen E\'erman anti Paul Pratt 
ST Disk Bonus 




44 TIMEWORKS PARTNER by Heidi Brumbaugh 
Better than the PC's "Sidekick"? 




47 ST GAMES GALLERY 

Emjjire, Super Huey, Breach 
50 ST MIDI REVIEWS by James Pierson-Perry 
CZ-Android, CZ-Patch 




51 RICK'S GAMES CAFE by Rick Tcverbaugh 
Six ST entertainments reviewed 




55 ST TOOLBOX 

Monitor Master, Uninterruptible Power Supply 
58 REGENT WORD 11 by Martin Brown 

Eas)', et'fecti\'e word processor 
75 STNEWPRODUaS 






Rick's Games Cafe Page 51 



6 MASTHEAD 

6 I/O BOARD 

8 NEW PRODUCTS 

65 THE CATALOG 



77 SHOPPERS MARKET 

78 CLASSIFIED ADS 

79 ADVERTISERS LIST 
76 TECH TIPS 




ATARI' Resource 



Publisher 
James (.'apparcll 

Hditorial 
Nat Friedland, F.diior; Charles Jackson, Tech- 
nical and OnHnc Hditor; Gregg Pcarlman, 
Assistant liditor; Heidi Brumbaugh, Program 
Editor; Carolyn Cushman. Hditorial Clerk. 

Contributing Editors 
Ian Chadwick. David Plotkin, David Small. 

Art 

Claudia Stcenberg-Majewski, Art Director; 
Gregory Silva, Assistant Art Director; Jim 
Warner, Design/Production Assistant; Kather- 
ine Murphy, Ad Production Coordinator; Juli- 
anneOsoske, Collateral Printing (xxjrdinator; 
Terrific Graphics, Typesetting. 

Cover Photography: Tony Carlson 
Model: John Sutter 

Circulation 
Les Torok, Director; Dixie Nicholas, Subscrip- 
tion Coordinator; Dennis Swan, Distribution 
Coordinator. 

Antic Publishing, Inc. 
James Capparell, President and (Ihairman of 
the Board; Donald F. Richard and Richard D. 
Capparella, Directors; Lee Isgur, Advisor to 
the Board; John Cady, Controller; John Tag- 
gart. Advertising Sales; Gary Yost, Marketing; 
Jack Powell, Product Development; Lisa 
Wehrer, Cat:ilog Sales; Tom Chandler, Ken 
Warner, Retail Sales; Scot Tumlin, Technical 
Support; Pamela Grady, Customer Service; 
Lorene Kaatz, Credit and Collections 
Manager; Evelyn Heinzman, Accounts, Pay- 
able; Brenda Oliver, Accounts Receivable. 

Advertising Sales 

John Taggart, Director 

Susie AUison, Advertising Sales Coordinator 

(For Area Sales Representatives, see page 79.) 

General Offices 

& Catalog Customer Service 

(415)957-0886 

Antic, 544 Second Street 

San Francisco, CA 94107 

Credit Card Subscriptions & Catalog Orders 

(800) 234-7001 

All 50 states. Monday to Friday, 

6 a.ni.-6 p.m. Pacific Time. 

Visa or MasterCard only.' 

Subscription Customer Service 

(614)383-3141 

Antic. P.O. Box 1919, Marion, OH 43306 

March. 1988. Volume 6. Number U 
Antic— The Atari Resource is published monthly by 
Antic Publishing. Editorial offices are located at 544 
Second Street, San Francisco, CA 94107. ISSN 0745- 
2527. Second Class Postage paid at San Francisco, 
California and additional mailing offices. POST- 
MASTFR: Send address change to Antic, The Atari 
Resource. PO. Box 1919, Marion, OH 43306. 
Subscriptions: One year (12 issues) S28. Canada and 
Mexico add S8, other foreign add SI2. Di.sk Edition 
(12 issues with disks) S79.95, all foreign add S25. 
(California residents add 6 '/: % sales Uix for disk sub- 
scriptions. 

Editorial submis.sions should include text and pro- 
gram listings on disk and paper. Submissions will be 
irtumed if stamped, self-addressed mailer is supplied. 
Antic assumes no responsibility for unsolicited 
editorial material. 

No part of thus publication may be reproduced, stored 
in a retrieval system, or transmitted, in :ui\' Ibrm or 
by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, 
recording, or otherwise, without the prior written 
permission of the publisher. 

Antic is an independent periodical not affiliated in 
any way with Auiri Corp. Atari is a trademark of Atari 
Corp. All references to Atari pnxlucts are trademarked 
and should be so noted. 

Antic is a registered trademark 

of Antic Publishing. Inc. 

An Information Technology Company 

Copyright ©1988 by Antic Publishing. 

All Rights Reserved. Printed in USA. 



lO Board 



PROMPTER PRAISE 



I'm :i one-man broadcasting department 
with the taslc of teaching college students 
"real world" radio and television produc- 
tion. Antic Prompter (October 1987) helps 
me improve this level of instruction with- 
out raising costs. As a result, I have been 
able to convince my department that an 
Atari 130XE, a 1050 disk drive and a 
printer would be a valuable yet inexpen- 
sive asset to our department — even thougli 
it's not made by IBM. 

Do you know of any other Atari 8-bit 
programs useful for cable television or 
other broadcasting? And are there any 
educational grants to institutions utilizing 
Atari computers? 

Paul Sumraitt 

Alderson Broaddus 

College 

Philippi, WV 26416 



MORSE MAYHEM 



Our thanks to lawyer David Rogers of St. 
Maries, Idaljo and physician Marc Mug- 
mon of Columbia, Maryland for spotting 
inaccuracies in Morse Code Trainer 
(Antic, December 1987). These two am- 
ateur radio operators point out that re- 
cent changes in t/je Federal Communi- 
cations Commission Novice license 
DON'T include dropping the requirement 
that Novice operators must be able to 
send and receive Morse code at five words 
per minute. 

Also, it seems that Antic misspelled 
Atari in Morse code. It shoidd read 
•'•— — •— •— ■ •■ "-ANTIC ED 



XL RAMDISK WARNING 

Another XL RAMdisk (Antic Tech Tips, 
November 1987) can totiilly destroy a pro- 
gram you have in memory. 'Worse, using 
a program can destroy the files on the so- 
called RAMdisk. 

■What that set of instructions really ac- 
complishes is an override of the normal 
protection mechanisms of the RAM- 
DISK.COM program. That is, it forces DOS 
2.5 to believe tht it is running on a 130XE. 



In fact, I think step 4 (the L-load of RAM- 
DISK.COM) can be accomplished more 
simply by pressing [RESET]. When RAM- 
DISK.COM loads and runs, it discovers 
that the machine is not a 130XE and quits, 
but it quits via a call to DOSINIT, the same 
routine that is called when you press 
[RESET]. 

The important point here: DOS 2.5 be- 
lieves it is using a 130XE and proceeds to 
use the extra banks (located from S4000 
to «7FFF) as the RAMdisk. Ummmm. . . 
wait a minute, this is actually an 800XL. 
What "extra banks "? 'Well, DOS doesn't 
care. It is cjuite happy using that memory 
fi«m S4000 to 87FFF as its liAMdisk. Now 
let's run a moderately big BASIC program. 
Or let's use any program that uses Graphics 
8 or 15 plus Player/Missile graphics. Or. . . 
well, you get the idea. 

If ycui have saved some data in a "file" 
in the supposed 80()XL RAMdisk, then 
when the program uses any part of S40()0 
to $7FFF, it wipes out part of the RAM- 
disk. Or if you go to DOS after writing a 
program that uses that memory area, you 
can save a file and wipe out your program. 

We're grateful for this warning (from a 
ivell-knoivn softivare developer who re- 
quested anonymity) about potential 
data-loss problems when the 101-sector 
XL RAMdisk is used with larger BASIC 
programs or P/M graphics. The method 
does ivork fine with smaller programs. 
This RAMdisk is intended mainly as a 
temporary expedient tloat miglM be use- 
fid during BASIC programming sessions, 
since the RAMdisk set-up must be typed 
in every time it is ;«erf.— ANTIC ED 



MIDI IN BASIC 

Please help me find information on pro- 
gramming MIDI in ST, True or GFA BASIC. 
I've tried to access the MIDI ports in ST 
BASIC, but have had no luck. I want to 
send and receive sequence data (from the 
onboard sequencer of my Ensoniq ESQ- 
1 digital wave synthesizer) and patch 
system-exclusive data to the 1040's inter- 
nal disk drive. 

Jeff Jewson 
Minneapolis, MN 



ANTIC, The Atari Resource 



lO Board 



TWO FOR EA 



I recently received a response from Elec- 
tronic Arts President Trip Hawkins regard- 
ing the deplorable shortage of Atari 8-bit 
software. He told me how EA couldn't 
make any money on Atari software, cit- 
ing poor sales among other reasons. How- 
ever, if you look at the programs that EA 
released for the Atari, you'll see that 
they're low-quality. Products such as Mail 
Order Monsters, Financial Cookbook and 
Racing Destruction Set aren't worth 
spending the postage on, let alone S20. 
Come on EA, give us Skyfox and your 
other great programs that will be worth 
the cost to you and us. 

Jeff Yonker 

Chicago 

Trip Hawkins, I understand that you're 
reluctant to give us more Atari software 
because nobody buys your current EA 
products. However, what do you expect 
when you port over mundane, boring and 
low-grade software to the Atari? It's just 
not worth the money. Don't expect to win 
over Atari users until you provide Atari ver- 
sions of your best software. 
Eric Jensen 
Barksdale AFB, LA 



MICROTHANX 



I wish to express my appreciation to Antic 
for publishing Steve Roquemore's review 
of Turbobase in the December 1987 issue. 
MicroMiser will continue to fully support 
the Atari 8-bit, due largely to the impetus 
generated by this excellent review. 
Steve Bolduc 
MicroMiser Software 
Orlando, PL 



Antic welcomes your feedback, but 
we regret that the large volume of mail 
makes it impossible for the Editors to 
reply to everyone. Although we do 
respond to as much reader correspon- 
dence as time permits, our highest pri- 
ority must be to publish I/O answers 
to questions that are meaningful to a 
substantial number of readers. 

Send letters to: Antic I/O Board, 
544 Second Street, San Francisco, 
CA 94107. 



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tures. Programmer William 


neur as well as every pro- 


Austin's game has been 


gram in this issue — will be 


thoroughly play-tested by 


shipped to you within 24 


business students at East- 


hours after receiving your 


ern Michigan University. 


order. Just phone Toll-Free 


This vast (256 sectors!) 


to the Antic Disk Desk at 


BASIC program works on 


(800) 234-7001. The 


Atari 8-bit computers with 


monthly disk is only $5.95 


at least 48K memory and 


(plus $2 for shipping and 


a disk drive. 


handling) on your Visa or 


Your goal in Entrepre- 


MasterCard. Or mail a 


neur Jungle is to achieve a 


$5.95 check (plus $2 ship- 


personal net worth of a 


ping and handling) to 


billion dollars before en- 


Antic Disk Desk, 544 Sec- 


forced retirement. Your 


ond Street, San Francisco, 


Atari is your broker and at 


CA 94107. 


first you only have enough 


Programmers: Antic 


money to buy shares in 


wants to see your most 


relatively small firms. 


ambitious programs, even 


However, as your net 


those too large or complex 


worth, skills and political 


for printing as a type-in 


influence grow, you'll have 


listing. High-quality pro- 


many more options. 


grams in any language 


The classic economic 


that has a runtime version 


strategy of "buy low, sell 


are now eligible for con- 


high" takes you only part- 


sideration as a Super Disk 


way along the route to 


Bonus. ■ 


success. To achieve truly 




Now only $5.95- 


-Antic Monthly Disk! 



March 1988 



New Products 



New Products notices are compiled by 
the Antic staff from information 
provided by t/je products' manufac- 
turers Antic welcomes such submis- 
sions, but assumes no responsibility 
for the accuracy of these notices or the 
perfonnance of the products listed. 



VOICE MASTER JUNIOR ^ 

(sound digitizer) 
Covox Inc. 
675 Conger Street 
Eugene, OR 97402 
(503) 342-1271 
$39. 95, 48K disk 

CIRCIE 260 ON READER SERVICE CARD 

Voice Master Junior, a lower-cost 
version of the original Covox Voice 
Master, is a self-contained, compact 
speech digitizer and voice recognition 
device that plugs into your 8-bit Atari's 
jo)'sticlc port. Speech and other sounds 
are translated into computer memory 



P^BHi 


"^ ^H^^^^^^^^^^l 




r*****—*.,!^ ® i'«>v «. 


^H 


•.^a 


F 



which can be saved to disk — and in- 
corporated into BASIC programs for 
playback without the Voice Master Jun- 
ior attached. Up to 32 words or 
phrases can be used at once, with 
others accessible from disk. 




BACKUP PROTECTED 
SOFTWARE FAST. 

From the team who brought you 
COPY II for the Apple, the Macintosh 
and the IBM comes a revolutionary 
new copy program for the Atari 520 
and 1040 ST computers. 

COPY II ST copies many protected 
programs automatically 

• Supports single and double sided 
drives. 

• Includes a sector-based copier for 
fast, reliable copies of unprotected 
disks. 

• Includes a bit copy mode for 
protected disks. 



Requires an Atari 520 or 1040 ST 
computer with one or two drives. 

Call 503/244-5782, M-F, 8:5 
(West Coast time) with your 
in hand. Or send a check 
for $39.95 U.S. plus $3 s/h, $8 
overseas. 

$39.95 



Central Point Software, Inc. 
9700 S.W. Capitol Hwy. #100 
Portland, OR 97219 

CentmlFbint 
Software 



Backup utilities also available for the IBM, Apple II, Macintosh and Commodore 64. 

This product is provided for ttie purpose of enabiing you to mai<e arciiivai copies orjiy. 



CIRCli 002 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



SONS OF LIBERTY 

(entertainment software) 
Strategic Simulations, Inc. 
1046 N. Rengstorff Avenue 
Mountain View, CA 94043 
(415) 964-1353 
S39.95, 48K disk 

CIRCEE 261 ON READER SERVICE CARD 

Using the award-winning game system 
from Gettysburg: The Turning Point, 
Sons of Liberty re-creates the Ameri- 
can Revolution battles of Bunker Hill, 
Saratoga and Monmouth. Changes to 
the system include more emphasis be- 
ing placed on line and column move- 
ment, with 100-yard map squares 
used because of the limited firing 
range of muskets. 

FIREBIRD MID-RANGE ^^ 

(entertainment software) 

Firebird Licensees 

71 North Franklin Turnpike 

Waldwick, NJ 07463 

(201) 444-5700 

$24.95, 48K disk 

CIRCEE 262 ON READER SERVICE CARD 

Firebird Licensees, best known for The 
Pawn, are now shipping high-Cjuality 
recreational software with broad ap- 
peal for computer gamers of all ages. 
Atari 8-bit titles so far are Silicon 
Dreams and Jewels of Darkness. 
Both cost S24.95 — a price that belies 
the lavishly illustrated packaging. 




SUPRAMODEM 2400 

(modem) 

Supra Corp. 

1133 Commercial Way 

Albany, OR 97321 

(503) 967-9075 

$179.95 

$219. 95 including cables and software 

CIRCEE 264 ON READER SERVICE CARD 

The com]5letely Hayes-compatible 
SupraModem 2400 modem supports 
continued on page 21 



ANTIC, The Atari Resource 




*9m 





Feel like a Fat Cat 
online with GEnie!. 



MBM M W M WWHMgi W a Wfe tWW 



'M 



«GEnie changed my mind about what an online service can 
do for me! I always knew that GEnie offered enough Special 
Interest Groups to last me through all nine lives, with 
thousands of software files, dynamic bulletin boards, lively 
discussions and "tips" from the experts. But now I'm lapping 
up valuable information with sei-vices like Gonip-u-store 
OnLine® shopping service, USA Today Decisionlines, 
American Express® ADVANCE and access to Dow Jones News/ 
Retrieval® And with GEnie's LiveWire'" CB Simulator and 
GE Mail,'*' I stay in touch with others who share my interests. 
I'm a regular guy who feels like a fat cat— making new friends 
and more informed decisions with GEnie. 

You don't need to be on the fence _ a . f^O/^ 

about which service to choose, because ^ r! lA*^^ 
only GEnie offers you sc^ much online, )n • ' 
for less." ^ 



Services Available 


Compare 

& 

Save 


Pricing 


ElecmmicMail'CB 

• SIGs/User Groups 

• Travel • Shopping 
• Finance • Reterence 
Professional • Leisure 

• Games* News 


Registmlion 
Fee 


Monthly 
Minimum 


Non-prime Time Rales j 


300 baud 


1200 baud 


GEniet 


$29.95 


None 


$5.00 


$5.00 


ClompuServe 


$39.9.T 


None 


$6.00 


$12.50 


Olher 


$49.95 


.$10.00 


$8.40 


$10.80 



^"^■Get 2 Free Hours with Sign-Up. 

Just $5 per hour. Get online today! 

1. Have your major credit card or checking account number ready. 

2. Set your modem lor local echo (half duplex)— 300 or 1200 baud. 

3. Dial l-800-(538-83fi9.When connected, enter HHH 

4. At the U#= prompt enter XJM11815,GEnie then RETURN. 

Need help or more information? No modem yet? We can help. 
In U.S. or C;anada call 1-800-638-9636 or write GEnie, 401 N. 
Washington St., Rockville, MD 20850. 



We bring good things to life. 




•Bask rates ;md services in effea 9/87 apply i 
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1 US. only. tNnn-prinic lime raiL-s apply Mcm.-Fn. (i [*M-8 AM liM'al liiiif and all 
rviff awiilabilhy. S<.me services offered on GEnie may include addiiional chaiyes. 



Call to Wnrgames 

Reviews: Borodino, Battle Cruiser, Guderian and Mech Brigade 

Reviewed by RICH MOORE 



GUDERIAN 

Guderian is a challenging simula- 
tion of the German Blitz across west- 
ern Russia in 1941. The German 
player must capture several key loca- 
tions, fighting the Soviet player and 
the clock, just as General Heinz 
Guderian did 46 years ago. The huge, 
untrained Soviet army requires con- 
stant leadership in order to perform. 

The game runs for 12 turns cover- 
ing two days each. The simple graph- 
ics do a good job of representing 
Soviet key positions — clear areas, 
forests, rivers, lakes, railroads, etc. — 
which the Soviet player can use to 
move forces. The German player can- 
not use the railroads, but can cut them 
to slow Soviet reinforcements tem- 
porarily. 

Guderian plays well despite some 
rough edges. Your thumb gets a good 
workout on the joystick button, and 
the symbols on the map are the same 
whether or not the units there are all 
the same type, so you must keep track 
manually. Games are all saved under 
the same filename, so you'll need 
several disks. However, other quirks 
actually seem to contribute to the 
simulation of the chaotic problems 
faced by the Germans and the Soviets. 

$30, 48K disk. Avalon Hill, 4517 Harford 
Road, Baltimore, MD 21214. (800) 
638-9292. 

CIRCLE 193 ON READER SERVICE 0\RD 



BAHLECRUISER 

Battlecruiser, featuring surface 
naval combat in the European thea- 
ter, actually contains two complete 
gaming systems, each with a 79-ship 
database and four historical scenarios. 
For World War I, British and German 
ships square off in your customized 



scenarios, or you can replay three 
historical battles. The World War II 
disk pits the British and French 
against the German and Italian navies. 
Historical scenarios include the en- 
gagement off Cape Teulada and the 
daring transit of the Scharnhorst, 
Gneisenau and Prinz Eugen with their 
escorts up the English Channel from 
France. 

Battlecruiser's two command 
modes are a good simulation of the 
way naval forces are actually con- 
trolled. The OTC (Officer in Tactical 
Command) deploys his ships in divi- 
sions according to the expected 





^ 
-i 




1 

1 


i 
^ 

1- 


1 




•&TIS 




L-! 


(SIMt SlU tiU. 






. ■ * 


fN OnCNT CSIKU 1 


^■-UiiZlLdKijJj 


CJ 


u 



threat, then maneuvers these, groups 
of ships as the situation develops. 
While the group and ship com- 
manders are responsible for execut- 
ing the OTC's general plan, the Ad- 
miral usually directs the actions of 
individual units when things get hot. 

You can build a game from scratch 
— thus extending Battlecruiser well 
beyond the eight games in the pack- 
age — and overhaul any of your ships 
into juggernauts that would dwarf the 
largest real battleships. However, you 
can't have more than 20 ships on each 
side and you can't modify a saved 
game. Custom maps, on grids of 
60x60 1,000-yard squares can be 
saved separately and used later. 

The graphics aren't great, but this 
quickly becomes secondary to the 



combat situation, which the com- 
mander actually tracks and assesses in 
his mind. 

$59.95, 48K disk. Strategic Simulations, 
Inc., 1046 N. Rengstorff Avenue, Moun- 
tain View, CA 94043. (415) 964-1353. 

CIRCLE 194 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



BORODINO 

Borodino is a real challenge, un- 
less you stack all the options against 
the Russians. As Napoleon, you must 
do everything right, or you'll see what 
appears to be certain victory turn into 
a rout of the French forces — not un- 
like history. 

In the village of Borodino, about 60 
miles west of Moscow, the battle- 
ground is fairly small, roughly five- 
and-a-half miles square. Eight 
scenarios are provided, ranging from 
single engagements between elements 
of the two armies to the complete 
three-day battle. Six choices have the 
historical orders of battle and deploy- 
ment of forces. Two others are varia- 
tions on history, with the benefit of 
hindsight. 

The unprotected software works 
with virtually any DOS and density. 
Games can be restarted or restored 
any time without rebooting. The map 
is a smooth-scrolling, 36 x 37 grid of 
275-yard squares. Forces begin as di- 
visions, but can be divided into regi- 
ments and battalions. Infantry can be 
stacked in "divisional" units up to 
6,300 men, but French stacks are 
limited to units belonging to the same 
corps. 

There's plenty of clear ground, but 
most of the terrain slows down the 
Grand Atmee. Units can "chaise" the 
enemy if the terrain is favorable. 
Borodino requires planning and the 
continued on page 14 



10 



ANTIC, The Atari Resource 



Empowering the 8-Bit 

Reviews: The Expander, Fleet System 2 



EXPANDER 

The Expander is a replacement 
operating system for expanded- 
memory 800XL and 130XE com- 
puters. It supports 512K upgrades, 
and future versions are slated to sup- 
port 1Mb upgrades. It's a 27128 
EPROM chip that replaces the OS 
ROM chip in your computer If your 
OS ROM is in a socket, first take the 



normal precautions against static elec- 
tricity, then unplug the old and plug 
in the new. If it's soldered in, you'd 
better leave it to a professional. 

The Expander sets up the extra 
memory as RAMdisks which can be 
used with almost any DOS and most 
programs. A 256K upgrade gets you 
one or two single-density drives, or 
one double-density drive; 512K dou- 
bles that. You can't set up drives with 



Switchable XE 



By Charles Cherry 



Now that there are some interest- 
ing alternative operating system 
chips for the Atari XL and XE com- 
puters, it's handy to be able to 
switch between them. Fortunately 
that's not hard to do. All you need 
is a double pole — double throw 
switch and a couple of feet of thin 
wire, about #30. 

{Unless you are skilled and ex- 
perienced at soldering electronics 
components, you might find it ad- 
visable to have this sort of modi- 
fication done for you by profes- 
sionals. You could damage your 
computer if you mishandle the 
job. And of course you are void- 
ing whatever warranty you may 
have left on your Atari when you 
open it up for a hardware modi- 
fication.— kH^\C ED) 
Bend up pin 20 on both OS chips. 
Piggyback one on top of the other, 
soldering together all the pins ex- 
cept 20. Plug the chips into the 
motherboard. Run a wire from pin 
20 of one chip to one of the poles 



Pin 20 Pin 22 Pin 1 




Figure I 



(center connectors) of the switch. 
Run a wire from the pin 20 on the 
other chip to the other pole of the 
switch. Run a wire from pins 22 
(which are soldered together) to 
one of the corner connectors on 
the switch and then continue it to 
the opposite corner 

Run a final wire from pins 28 
(which are also soldered together) 
to the two remaining corners of 
the switch. Drill a hole in the case 
near the SIO plug and mount the 
switch. Route the wires around the 
metal RF shield and tape over sharp 
edges and corners. ■ 



more than 707 sectors available. There 
are routines to format the RAMdisks 
and copy whole disks to them. 

The real power of Expander is its 
ability to renumber drives and boot 
from any drive. Those few programs 
that benefit from this ability do great. 
However, I had no luck with Info- 
com's Hitchhiker's Guide to the Uni- 
verse, which comes on two un- 
protected, single-density disks. In fact, 
none of the combinations I tried with 
different Infocom games worked, but 
older, single-disk games like Zork 
worked fine. It's a pleasure to go ad- 
venturing without waiting for the disk 
to spin. Saves wear and tear on the 
drive, too. 

There were, of course, compatibil- 
ity problems with other programs — 
enough for you to install this with a 
switch to restore your original oper- 
ating system. Synergy Concepts pro- 
vides no instructions for this. In fact, 
the kit has no installation instructions 
at all. I didn't know which chip to re- 
place until I noticed there was only 
one 28-pin chip on the board. 

Overall, the Expander is a great idea 
in need of fine-tuning. The user in- 
terface is a bit rough, the manual is 
truly terrible, and the Expander 
seemed confused by more than one 
physical disk drive. Nevertheless, I 
recommend the product. It does 
work, it can do things that DOS can't, 
and it lets you reboot without eras- 
ing your RAMdisks.-CHARLES CHERRY 

$49.95. Synergy Concepts, P.O. Box 
421370, Sacramento, CA 95841. 

CIRCLE 256 ON DEADER SERVICE CARD 



FLEET SYSTEM 2 

Fleet System 2 is a powerful word 
processor that's easy to use and has 

continued on page 14 



March 15 



American Techna- Vision 



For Orders Only - 1-800-551-9995 
CA. Orders / Information 415-352-3787 



"Providing 8 Bit support with one of the Worlds 
largest inventories of Atari replacement parts" 

• No surcharge for VISA/MasterCard 

• Your card is not charged until we ship 



800 4 PIECE BOARD SET 

Includes Main Board, Power Supply 
Assembly, CPU Module and 10K 
Revision B Operating System Module. 
All boards are new, tested and complete 
with all components. « /^ 050 



=28^ 



1050 MECHANISM 

Factory fresh TANDON mechs. 
make difficult repairs a snap. Units 
are complete with Head, Stepper, 
Spindle motor etc. Just plug in, no 
difficult alignments or adjustments 
required. $^y50 



PILOT PROGRAMMING 
LANGUAGE PACKAGE 

Includes PILOT cart, with "Turtle 
Graphics", Pitot Primer and Student 
Pitot manuals. PILOT Is an excellent 
learning or teaching tod. 
Works wilhaUAIairs $Q"7^'^ 

axceplST. C. I 



POWER PACKS 

Exact replacement transformer 
for 800/400, 1050, 810, 1200XL, 
850 and 1020 units. Replaces 
older "weaker" units. Atari part 
#C017945. ^ 50 



400 3 PIECE BOARD SET 

Includes Main Board, Power Supply 
Assembly and CPU Module. All 
boards are new, tested and complete 
with all components. ^ , f^cr\ 



19^ 



810 DISK DRIVE 

Standard 810 assembled on 
Aluminum base. No exterior case. 
Includes I/O Cable and Power 
Supply. Works with all 8 bit Atari's 
with more than 32K memory. 

$0000 



'99 



ATARIWRITER 
CARTRIDGE 

Popular cartridge version turns 
any 8 bit Atari into a powerful 
word processor. Written by 
Atari. Disk drive supported but 
not required. <l:r»o95 

FaallAlarrsexcaplST^ J c l^j 



'29^ 



600XL 64K UPGRADE 

Easy to install internal 
modification allows you to hook 
up a disk drive and run all 
800XL software. Kit includes all 
parts and detailed instructions. 
Soldering required to install 3 
jumpers. $0095 



800 10K "B" O.S. Module 

Older 800 units need the revision "B" 
Operating system to run newer 
software. Type the following peek in 
BASIC to see which revision you 
have. PRir^ PEEK(58383). g 

If the result is 56 order nowl i3 



Atari 850 Interface Bare 
Printed Circuit Board 

With parts list, crystal ^^^^ 

With all plug in IC's....^. 3 9 



PADDLE CONTROLLERS 

(Pair). Required for numerous 8 bit 
programs and applications. Use 
these to add two changeable 
variables to your BASIC or 
machine language programs. 

$050 



SERIAL I/O CABLE 

High quality 13 pin cable 
used to connect 8 bit Atari's 
to disk drives, interfaces, etc. 

$ C95 
New low price ,J 



800/400 MODULES 

NEW PARTS COMPLETE WITH IC'S 

• 800 Main Board 

« ^>50' 800/400 CPU viflthGTIA 
^ VJ • 800 10K "B" O.S. Ivbdule 

^/ • 400 fulain Board 
CAnu • 800 Power Supply Board 
tAOn . 400 Power Supply Board 

16K Ram Module $14.50 
INTEGRATED CIRCUITS 

■ CPU CO14806 

• POKEY C012294 

<t .J en 'PIA C014795 

^/ISU.GTiA CO14805 

*+ • ANTIC C012296 

' • CPU CO10745 

[z Ari_| • PIA CO10750 

CMUn . Qpu C014377 

• DEUY CO60472 

MORE ICS 

CO60302 XL BASIC ROM . $13.50 

1050 O.S. ROM $13.50 

2793 1050 FDC $19.50 

CO10444 2600 TIA $4.50 

1771 810 FDC $10.00 

1050 5713 STEP DRIVER . . $5.25 



REPAIR MANUALS 

SAMS Service Manuals for the 
following units contain 
schematics, parts lists, labelled 
photographs showing the 
location of checkpoints and 
morel A special section gives 
oscilloscope and logic probe 
readings allowing you to narrow 
the malfunction down to a 
specific chip or transistorl 
800, 800XL, 130XE, 400, and 

1050 $19.50 each. 

520ST Service Manual. $37.50 

MISC. HARDWARE 

1050 Track Sensor . . . $6.50 
1050 Stepper Motor . . . $14.50 

1030 Power Pack $12.50 

Fastchip for 800/400 . . $15.50 

Atari Joystick $7.00 

850 or PR Modem Cable $14.50 
850 or PR Printer Cable $12.50 

P;R: Connection $65.00 

Printer Interface $39.50 

1050 Happy Mod $139.50 

LOGO cart, only $20.00 

I/O 13 Pin PC mount . . . $4.50 

I/O 13 Pin Plug Kit $4.50 

ST 6' Drive Cable $14.00 

820 Printer Mechanics. . $14.50 

ATARI XM301 MODEM 

Direct connect 300 BAUD modem 
works with all 8 bit Atari's. No 
seperale interface required. $44.95 



GORF SPACE GAME 

Well done cart. vers, of famous 
arcarde game. 800/400 only. $4.00 

COMPUTER BOOKS 

Inside Atari Basic $5.00 

Atari Basic Ref. manual. $5.00 
Mapping the Atari $18.50 

CARTRIDGE MAKING 

SUPPLIES 

16K Eprom Board with case, uses 

tW0 2764's $5.95 

10 or more $4.95 ea 

16K Eprom Board with case, uses 

one 27128 $6.95 

10 or more $5.95 ea. 

PROBURNER EPROM 
PROGRAMMER 
Eprom burner in a cartridge, 
works with 800/400 & XL/XE 
computers. Programs 2716, 
2732, 2732A, 2764, 27128, 2532 
+ EEPROMS 2816A, 52B13, 

52B33 $145.00 

2764 EPROM $3.95 

BASIC CARTRIDGE 

Basic Rev. "A" Cart, works with 
all Atari Computers except ST. 
800XL Owners Note! Use this 
cartridge while programming to 
eliminate the severe errors in the 
built in "B" Basic $10.00 



ADDITIONAL SOFTWARE 

Pac-Man cartridge $4.00 

Deluxe Invaders Cart. . $4.00 
Journey to the Planets . $4.00 
Miner 2049er cart. . . $10.00 

Q'bert cartridge $10.00 

Donkey Kong cart. . . . $5.00 
Wizard of War carL . . $7.50 

Crossfire cart $5.00 

Hard Hat Ma:k disk . . $10.00 
D-Bugchildwaredisk. $10.00 
Word Flyer chiWware. $10.00 
Home filirig manager . . $7.50 
Springer Cartridge .... $5.00 

O.S.S. Action $47.50 

O.S.S. Mac-65 $47.50 

O.S.S. Basic XE $47.50 

O.S.S. Basic XL $37.50 

SERVICE RATES 

Flat Service Rates below 
include Parts & Labor, 60 
Day Warranty. 

800 Computer $39.50 

850 Interface $39.50 

810 Disk Drive $69.50 

1050 Disk Drive . . . $75.00 

400 Computer $39.50 

800 Keyboard only. $25.00 

Include $7.00 return 
shipping and insurance. 
Include $4.00 shipping for 
800 keyboard repair only. 



CALL TOLL FREE 
1-800-551-9995 

IN CALIF. OR OUTSIDE U.S. 
CALL 415-352-3787 



AMERICAN TECHNA-VISION 

(Formerly American T.V.) 

Mail Order: 15338 Inverness St., San Leandro, Ca. 94579 
Repair Center: 2098 Pike Ave., San Leandro, Ca. 94577 

Terms: NO MINIMUM ORDER. We accept money orders, personal checks or 
C.O.D.s. VISA, Master/Card okay. Credit cards restricted to orders over $20.00. 
No personal checks on C.O.D. - Shipping: $4.00 shipping and handling on orders 
under $150.00. Add $2.00 for C.O.D. orders. In Canada total $6.00 for shipping and 
handling. Foreign shipping extra. Calif, residents include 7% sales tax. All items 
guaranteed 30 days from date of delivery. No refunds or exchanges. 

Prices *jbj«:l to change wlhoul nollce. Send SASE fa Iree prk:» tM. Al»l is a reg. trsdeniwk o* Atari Corp. 



[iRCu 003 Oil tma service uro 



Product Reviews 



RAINY DAY 
GAMES 

Baudville 

5380 52nd Street S.E. 
Grand Rapids, MI 49508 
(616) 957-3036 
S29.95, 48K disk 

CIRCIE 272 ON READER SERVICE CARO 

Reviewed by Paul Waxman 

Rainy Day Games presents three ac- 
curate simulations of children's card 
game classics — Concentration, Old 
Maid and Go Fish. The onscreen cards 
have pictures and names of animals 
and objects. Graphics are clean and 
professional, yet not overwhelming. 
When a match is made, the pictures 
on the cards are animated — the dog 
barks and wags its tail, the box springs 
open, etc. 




The Options choice on the main 
menu lets you elect to use either the 
keyboard or a joystick. Next, you 
choose Beginner, Smart or Genius 
levels — these levels seem to affect the 
computer's ability to remember ex- 
posed cards in each game. You can 
also turn the sound on or off. And 
Concentration lets you play against 
the computer, or one or two other 
people plus the computer. Also, you 
can have the computer deal out nine, 
15 or 25 pairs of cards. 

My only suggested improvement 
would be to give the player one more 
option — have the matches in Go Fish 
and Old Maid found either automati- 
cally or by the player, instead of just 
automatically. 



I was pleased with my daughter's 
continued interest in the Rainy Day 
Games — all three teach the child that 
both winning and losing are part of 
playing. However, I found only Con- 
centration to have traditional educa- 
tional value. Go Fish has some educa- 
tional value if the child keeps track 
of which cards the computer exposes 
during its turn. But the child can still 
win at the beginner level using a hit- 
or-miss approach. At the genius level 
of play, keeping track of the cards is 
necessary. But ovenill, we ail found 
Rainy Day Games well done. 



COLLEEN MUSIC 
CREATOR ^^^^ 

Colleen Limited 
Hallwood 1 
7535 S.W. Hall Blvd. 
Beaverton, OR 97005 
(503) 641-6538 
$29.95, 48K disk 

CIRCLE 192 ON READER SERVICE CARD 

Reviewed by James Pierson-Perry 
Compose music for your BASIC pro- 
grams with the Colleen Music 
Creator. When called via a USR com- 
mand, the music will play continu- 
ously during the vertical blank inter- 
rupts (VBI). You can also use it as a 
song player, and the Combiner option 
lets you merge up to four music files 
into a composite file and merge sound 
effects into BASIC programs. 

The Colleen Music Creator is the 
first of several music-oriented pro- 
grams from Colleen, Limited of Wales. 
Subsequent programs will include 
keyboard and guitar tutors and a drum 
synthesizer It's essentially an upgrade 
of Pokey Player, but while the im- 
plementation is better, the documen- 
tation isn't. 

But the program is easy to use. All 
controls needed to create music are 
on one screen. You enter notes by 
marking keys on a piano keyboard 
representation — which is tough if you 



don't play keyboards. I prefer the ap- 
proach where notes are selected and 
placed onto a score, which lets you 
literally copy notes from sheet music. 

After booting, press [START] to 
bring up the main menu with options 
to create, compile or combine previ- 
ously compiled music files, and to 
demonstrate the available sound ef- 
fects. The error-trapping is good — I 
couldn't crash the program despite 
my best efforts. 

Notes can have a normal square 
wave sound or mimic a drum part. 
Other options include slurs, detuning 
(to add a phasing effect) and control 
of the attack and release rates. Four 
independent voices can be sup- 
ported — you can have 600 notes per 
voice in a song. 

The editing options include insert- 
ing or deleting notes, copying a sec- 
tion and change volume — all for one 
voice at a time. You can also listen to 
the entered music at any time using 
any combination of the four voices. 
On playback, each voice wUl loop in- 
dependently after the last note en- 
tered for it. This can create interest- 
ing effects: for example, if Voice 1 had 
a 12-note pattern while Voice 2 had 
only eight notes, the initial pattern 
would only repeat every 24 notes. 

Compilation is chosen from the 
main menu. Wlien requested, type in 
the name of the song, and the pro- 
gram takes it from there. You can 
merge up to four song files into a com- 
posite file with the Combiner option 
— useful if you want several songs in 
your BASIC program, as each can still 
be selected and played separately. 

The included sound effects, rang- 
ing from alarms to rocket engines, can 
be tweaked by specifying the pitch, 
duration, volume, distortion, etc. for 
each time the effect is used. 

If you're simply looking for a juke- 
box to play songs, you'd be better off 
with Music Construction Set or Ad- 
vanced Music System. But if you want 
to include music in your BASIC pro- 
grams. Colleen is the best way. ■ 



March 1988 



13 



CALL TO WARGAMES 

continued from page 10 

proper balance of aggressiveness and 
patience to let your forces do their 
job. The enemy must be worn down, 
with minimal losses on your side. The 
well-written manual provides useful 
hints regarding the strengths and 
weaknesses of each type of unit. 
Forces are so easy to control with the 
joystick that you can forget that this 
is a war game. 

$59.95, 48K disk. KRENTEK Software, 
P.O. Box 720081, McAllen, TX 78502- 
9990. (512) 682-9598. 

CIRCIE 195 ON HEADER SERVICE CARD 



MECH BRIGADE 

Mech Brigade simulates a future 
conventional NATO and Soviet Bloc 
conflict in Central Europe. One or 
two players can control either the 
NATO or Soviet forces. Each unit is ap- 



proximately a platoon, and each turn 
simulates two minutes of real time. 
The game map measures 60x40 
squares, but only a 20 x 10 portion can 
be seen at any time. The multicolor 
terrain features rivers, towns, woods 
and slopes. Unlike many other com- 
puter wargames, Mech Brigade lets 
you stack units in a single square. 

You can play any of the four "his- 
toric" scenarios or build your own, 
in which case you must detennine the 
nationality and relative strength of 
each force, and terrain and battle 
types. The battle types are pursuit, as- 
sault and meeting engagement, with 
the choice of either side being the at- 
tacker or defender. 

Units are controlled by issuing 
commands for each during the orders 
phase. Units can entrench, change 
facing and set the maximum firing 
range at which they will select a tar- 
get. Most importantly, with the View 
command, the computer designates 



each square in a unit's line of sight, 
which helps you choose optimum 
"fire lanes" for each unit. Combat, 
handled automatically by the com- 
puter after the orders phase, is divided 
into four 30-second phases in which 
each unit accesses a target and fires. 
This is certainly not a game for be- 
ginners. Each turn can easily take 15- 
30 minutes. However, the complex- 
ity of the game does not lie within the 
mechanics, but rather in the number 
of choices a player must make in or- 
der to win. Compounding this is the 
number of units each player can com- 
mand. And each type of unit de- 
mands its own set of unique tactics 
in order to be used most effec- 
tively.-DR. JOHN STANOCH ■ 

$59.95, 48K disk. Strategic Simulations, 
Inc., 883 Stierlin Road, BIdg A-200, 
Mountain View, CA 94043. (415) 
964-1353. 

CIRCLE 252 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



EMPOWERING THE 8-BIT 

continued from page 11 

a 70,000-word spell-checker. This 
Atari version of a successful Commo- 
dore product supports 19 different 
printers, including the Epson MX, FX, 
and RX series, and lets you choose 40, 
80 or 120-column display formats and 
the colors for the center and border 
of your screen. 

Formats with more than 40 col- 
umns require horizontal scrolling, but 
make it easy to do columnar tables 
and special layouts. If you try that 
with AtariWriter, with its wordwrap 
and 40-column-only display, your 
eyes will go on strike. {Fleet System 
2 doesn't have ivordwrap at all, un- 
like most ivord processors for the 
Atari 8-bit computer The First XLEnt 
Word Processor has a wordwrap 
on/off option.-/\H\\C ED) 



Fleet System 2 is command-driven 
and most commands start with the 
[ATARI] or [\] keys. The commands 
are divided into four groups — general, 
function, format and output. 

General commands include limited 
DOS functions, text file load and save, 
line insert/delete, output mode and 
setting/clearing tab stops. The nu- 
meric tab stop function lets you align 
columns of numbers easily. In fact, 
this word processor also sums up 
columns of numbers for your report. 

The function commands consist of 
print control (underline, superscript, 
etc.) and block functions (copy, move, 
delete). There's also a delete function 
which lets you highlight words or 
sentences to be removed. The format 
commands let you set page sizes, mar- 
gins, centering, justification, head- 
ings, page numbers, etc. There's also 



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Now only $79.95 



a command for chaining multiple files 
for global operations. Output com- 
mands include printing to paper or 
screen, and allow page and copy 
coimt options as well. 

The program has a useful help file 
which can be loaded into auxiliary 
memory or "extra text" area. It's then 
easy to flip to the extra text area and 
look up the function you need. The 
spell-checker lets you add about 
10,000 words. 

Unfortunately the Fleet System 2 
disk is copy-protected. Also it does 
not contain a DOS, which means you 
must first boot from a disk with Atari 
DOS 2.5 or another DOS that has en- 
hanced density. Then you insert the 
Fleet disk and type RUN"D:BOOT" 
from BASIC. The manual, though well 
written, is not Atari-specific — Atari 
commands are summarized in an ap- 
pendix. I'd also like to see extra mem- 
ory support for the 130XE as well a 
[BACKSPACE] key that can also 
quickly delete characters under the 
cursor. -WILLIAM COLBURN ■ 

$59.95. Professional Software, Inc., 51 
Frennont Street, Needhom, MA 02194. 
(617) 444-5224. 

CIRCLE 257 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



14 



ANTIC, The Atari Resource 



Game of the Month 



"type-In Software I 



By STEPHEN STOUT 

Adventure Creation Kit 

Do-it-yourself fantasy worlds 

If you ever wanted to design and play an endless 
choice of Ultima-type scrolling graphics role- 
playing adventures, Adventure Creation Kit gives 
you that power. This BASIC program works on all 
8-bit Atari computers with at least 48 K memory 
and a disk drive. 

You're in for an exciting and dangerous time on your 
job as a medieval knight in the domain of King Tom. 
Some villain stole the magic diamond which gives 
your kingdom's wizard his power. Without the diamond 
the kingdom is defenseless against Prince Ozzy, King Tom's 
evil twin brother who always wanted to take over the king- 
dom and write it off on his taxes. King Tom has entrusted 
you with the difficult challenge of finding another magic 
diamond! 

GETTING STARTED 

Type in Listing 1, CREATION.BAS, check it with TYPO 
II and SAVE a copy before you RUN it. 

If you have trouble typing in the special characters in 
lines 1130, 1150 and 1480, don't type them in. Listing 2 
will create them for you. Type Listing 2, checking it with 
TYPO II, and SAVE a copy to disk. When RUN, Listing 
2 creates these hard-to-type lines, and stores them in a 
disk file called D: LINES. LST. To merge the two programs, 
LOAD "D:CREATION.BAS" then ENTER "D:LINES.LST" 
and remember to SAVE the completed program before you 
RUN it. 



■-5P" 



\ 



*■»■* iH'* ■•« A <-*^ +44 A 

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• Up to 8000 sectors available as a Ramdisk 

• MYDOS™ Ramdisk software included 

• XL/XE/ST upgrades available also — call 



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Ramchargeri uie custom 
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Terms: Check, Money Order, COD 

Add $4.50 shipping & handling. 

New York State Residents odd local sales tax 

MAIL TO: 

MAGNA SYSTEMS 

147-05 Sandford Ave., Suite 4E 

Flushing, N.Y. 11355 

Phone: 718-939-0908 

Bulletin Board 24 hrs. 212-828-7658 



When you see the title screen, press the joystick but- 
ton to bring up the main Creation screen. To play a game, 
first you must load an adventure map from disk or make 
up a new map of your own. Owners of this month's Antic 
Disk can start with the full-length sample adventure, 
DEMO. ADV. Press [P] to start playing. Press the [ESC] key 
any time you want to exit the game. 

The map of your game is in standard Graphics 2 and 
the options are in the blue Graphics text window. You 
see only a small piece of the total map and you can scroll 
around using the joystick. But you can't cross the solid 
blue border around the edges of the map. And you can't 
move diagonally when playing the game, only while 
you're creating a new map. 

The object of the game, of course, is to find a white 
diamond. There may be more than one diamond in a 
game, so there's more than one way to win. 

You start the game with 25 Hit Points (you're dead if 
this drops to zero) and 5 Strike Points (your strength to 
attack a monster). Your Hit and Strike Points, the number 
of keys you have, and any other possessions are displayed 
at the bottom of the screen. 

At the start of the game, your knight has no equipment 
and can only travel over blank green areas. Here are some 
things you might encounter while playing a map made 
with the Adventure Creation Kit; 

• Red bricks that you can't pass through 

continued on page 17 



March 1988 



15 



Maik)^^]lianis Raises 
C Pngraniming Tb A New Level 



New source level debugger, csd, 
cuts development time 
in half! 



c 




Now, on top of the 
world's best C compiler, 
Mark Williams brings you 
csd, the world's only 
source level debugger for 
the Atari ST! 

With csd, you actually 
debug in C. Forget about 
trying to find bugs in clunky 
assembler and strugghng 
with long dumps, csd gives 
you the interactive advan- 
tages of an interpreter plus 
the speed of a compUer An 
indispensable companion for Mark Wilhams C. 

Reviewers have been raving about the IBM version 
of CSC? for years: 

"csd is close to the ideal debugging environment. . . a 
definite aid to learning C and an indispensable tool for pro- 
gram development." _^^^ ^ ^^^^^ ^^^ 

"This is a powerful and sophisticated debugger built on 
a well-designed, 'serious' compiler." 

-Jonathan Sachs, Micro/Systems Journal 




FEATURES 



Mark Williams C For the Atari ST 

* New! Resource Editor includes compiler/ 

decompiler for direct access to 
resource text 

* New! Peephole optimization-faster com- 

pile times and faster code 

• Full access to AES/VDI libraries 
witti complete documentation 
and examples 

• Source and object code for RAM 
disk cuts compile time in half 

• Integrated edit/compile cycle: 
editor automatically points to 
errors. 

• MicroEMACS full-screen editor 
with commented source code 

• Full K & R plus ANSI extensions 

• Microshell Command Processor 
a powerful UNIX style shell 

• Complete symbolic debugger 
and assembler 



Is 



m. 



• Powerful utilities: make 
linker, archiver egrep. sort 
diff and more 

• Over 600 pages of documentation 
with more than 100 sample 
programs 

New! csd C SOURCE DEBUGGER: 

• Guts development time in half! 

• Debug in C source code not 
assembler 

• Provides separate source, evalua- 
tion, program and history windov^s 

• Ability to set trace points and 
monitor variables 

• Can interactively evaluate any C 
expression 

• Can execute any C function in your 
program 

• Trace back function 

• On-line help screens 



<?/ 



MASK WILLIAMS C FOR THE ATARI ST: $179.95 
csd C SOURCE DEBUGGER: $69.95* 
60 DAY MONEY BACK GUARANTEE 

'Introductory price-good ttirough May 31, 1988 




WE'VE UPPED COMPILER 
PERFORMANCE, TOO! 






Our new Resource Editor 

makes creating window 
driven interfaces with icons, 
alerts, puU down menus and 
dialogue boxes a snap. And its 
exclusive compUer/decompiler 
lets you directly access 
resources, making changes 
quick and easy while simplifying project management. 
Unparalleled compiler speed, fast, compact code, 
complete utihties and outstanding documentation 
have made Mark WUhams C the preferred compiler 
for the Atari ST. Reviewers enthusiastically agree: 

"Mark Williams C may be the best implementation ofC 
on the Atari ST to date. . . not only for the experienced, profes- 
sional developer, but also for the weekend programmer " 
-George Miller, COMPUTE! 'S Atari ST Disk and Magazine 

"... the all-around best choice for serious software 
development on the ST" 

-Douglas Weir, Analog Computing 

COMT ON M UPSTANDING REPUTATION. 

Mark Williams has been producing and improving 
quality programming tools since 1976. A good reason 
why the Mark WUliams C compiler is the one chosen by 
Atari. And just one more reason you should choose Mark 
WUliams, too. 

SPECIAL UPDATE OFFER AVAILABLE NOW! 

If you already own Mark Williams C, a special 
update offer is available for version 3.0 and csd by caUuig 
Mark Wilhams. If not, there's never been a better time 
to ask your Atari dealer about Mark Williams C and csd. 
Or you can order by calhng 1-800-MWC-1700. 

(In Illinois, 1-312-472-66591 

Mark 

Williams 

Company 

1430 W. Wrightwood, Chicago, IL 60614 

© 1988 Mark Williams Company 

CIRQE 021 ON READEB SERVICE URD 




ADVENTURE CREATION KIT 

continued from page 15 

• Red mountains that you can't traverse 

• Green trees and forests that you need an ax to get 
through 

• Blue water that you need a boat to cross 

• Green, heavy terrain that you need a horse to travel 
over 

• Locked blue doors with keyholes that you need 
keys to unlock. 

• White keys that can be used only once 

• White axes to chop down trees 

• White boats needed to sail on water 

• White horses needed to travel over heavy terrain 

A key can unlock only one door and then it disappears. 
But if you pick up an ax, a boat or a horse, you will keep 
those objects for the rest of the game. When you need 
to cross water, for instance, you'll automatically be given 
use of your boat. 

ATTACK 

Watch out for the following dangerous creatures! 

• Green snakes which have 15 Hit Points and 5 Strike 







TWTTTTWWn 




Points 



• Red blobs that have 30 Hit Points and 10 Strike 
Points 

• Blue bats with 5 Hit Points and 2 Strike Points 

To fight snakes, blobs, or bats )'ou must first cross their 
paths. Usually they will be blocking the entrance to 
something. 

When fighting a monster, the lower part of the screen 
will say either ATTACK or DEFENSE. If it says ATTACK, 
it will also show the monster's Hit Points ^nd your Strike 
Points. At the bottom of the screen is a randomly chang- 
ing number between 1 and your remaining Strike Points. 
Pressing the joystick trigger subtracts that random 

continued on next page 



"Your best bets." 




Experience four of your 
favorite casino games 
with Vegas Gambler. 




BACKG AMMON 

mmimn 




Challenge a friend or 
the best computer 

opponent with 
Club Backgammon. 




Place your bets and roll 
the dice with Vegas Craps. 



Available for the Atari ST in color and mono for $34.95 and the Commodore 64/128 for S29.95 (shipping not included). 
California Dreams.TM All rights reserved. ©Logical Design Works. Inc., 780 Montague Expwy.. *403, San Jose, CA 95131. (408) 435-1445 



CALIFORNIA 



[IRCl[014 0NREAD[(5E«VICEC*[ID 



March 1988 



Adventure Creation Contest 



Enter Antic's contest for the best games made 
with Adventure Creation Kit. The judge is Kit 
author Stephen Stout. All winning adventures 
will appear as a bonus on the Antic August 1988 
disk. Winners will receive a copy of that disk is- 
sue. In addition, the Grand Prize winner gets any 
single Antic Software product from The Catalog. 
Mail your Creation map entries on a standard, 
single density disk that's compatible with 
DOS 2. Send entries to: Creation Contest, 
Antic Magazine, 544 Second Street, 
San Francisco, CA 94107. All entries must be 

received by May 2, 1988. 
On your disk label, please neatly print: Crea- 
tion Contest, )'our name, address, phone num- 
ber and the filename of the adventure(s) on 
that disk. Contest entries become the 
property of Antic Publishing, Inc. and the disks 
cannot be returned. 



number from the monster's Hit Points. 

The screen will then say DEFENSE and display your 
Hit Points and the monster's Strike Points. There will again 
be a randomly changing number at the bottom of the 
screen. When you press the trigger, that number will be 
subtracted from your Hit Points. 

You'll continue alternating between ATTACK and DE- 
FENSE screens until the Hit Points of either you or the 
monster reaches zero. If your Hit Points reach zero, then 
the game is over and you have lost. 

But if the monster's Hit Points reach zero, then it dies 
and disappears. You'll receive extra Hit and Strike Points, 
depending on how strong the monster was. 

If you can't figure out how to win a game, you could 
cheat by making a printout of the entire map or by look- 
ing at it with the editor module. But of course you would 
only do that as your absolutely last resort. 

When you complete a game or quit by pressing the 



L 












i : • ^ ; e I ■ I I I I I 5 e t |-:*l 




[ESC] key, all the objects you picked up, all the monsters 
you killed, etc., will be restored to their original positions 
from before you played the game. 

CREATING NEW MAPS 

You can make really challenging adventures with the 
Adventure Creation Kit, but it takes time, debugging — 
playing the game over and over — and imagination. 

The shape that you're currently using as the cursor — 
bricks, water, snakes, etc. — is in the center of the main 
screen. The cursor is always white, so you can see it on- 
screen easily. To use the current cursor for drawing, hold 
down the joystick button while moving the joystick. To 
switch the cursor to a new character, use the [SELECT] 
or [OPTION] keys. 

The 15 cursor characters that you can draw with are: 



Bricks 


Trees 


Mountains 


Water 


Boats 


Locked Doors 


Keys 


Axes 


Heavy Terrain 


Snakes 


Horses 


Diamonds 


Bats 


Blobs 


Blank Green Spaces 



Your available options are listed at the bottom of the 
main screen. To choose one, press the key that has the 
character shown inside brackets [ ]. 

[S]ave — Enter a filename. The program automatically 
inserts .ADV as the extender. Save the to a standard, DOS 
2.0-compatible disk. 

[L]oad from disk — Enter a filename — ^which must have 
that .ADV extender. 

[D]isk directory — Gives a complete directory of the disk 
in drive 1. Press any key to return to the main screen. 

[P]lay the adventure currently in memory — Press [ESC] 
to exit the game and return to the main screen. 

[R]estart the program — Clear the adventure in memory 
and go to the title screen. Press [Y] at the 'Are you sure 
(Y/N)?" prompt to restart the game; if not, press any other 
key. 

[?] — Print a map of the entire adventure map currently 
in memory. The printing routine should work with most 
Epson-compatible printers. The printout takes up a whole 
page. Press any key to start. I recommend turning your 
printer off and back on before and after making a prin- 
tout. If you know how to program, you could adjust the 
print routine in lines 1330-1450 to work with your own 
printer 

CREATION TIPS 

There must be at least one diamond in the game in or- 
der to win. For every locked door there should be a key. 
If there is water there must be a boat somewhere, etc. 
When placing monsters, start with bats and snakes first, 
so the player can build up strength before fighting a blob. 
Place the monsters so that the player must fight to get past 
them. Listing on page 66 ■ 

Stephen Stout, 19, lives in Everett, Washington and is the 
author of Diamond Dave (Antic, August 1987). 



ANTIC, The Atari Resource 



Games Galore for 8-Bit 

Pawn, Dropzone, Tomahawk, Solar Star, Stationfall, Lurking Horror 



DROPZONE, 
SOLAR STAR 

Dropzone is a scrolling shoot-out 
in Defender style. You control a well- 
armed spaceman flying back and 
forth over a planet surface. Below are 
structures, mountains and small, mov- 
ing crystals which are the inhabitants 
of the planet. A radar screen shows 
the location of any approaching 
enemies. 

Suddenly, aliens appear from the air 
and you must defend the planet by 
blasting invaders with your ray gun, 
while at the same time picking up the 
inhabitants and conveying them to a 
safe structure, one at a time. 

There are a multitude of aliens, of 




many different types. Some will try 
to pick up the planet's inhabitants, 
turning them into fast deadly mutants 
which come for you unerringly. 
Other aliens unleash bolts of energy, 
killing off the inhabitants, while still 
others release a series of tracking mis- 
siles when you destroy them. These 
missiles are very hard to hit and will 
chase you till either you get them or 
they get you. 

Contact with an alien or a missile 
will cause you to explode in a spec- 
tacular blast. You have three lives, and 
get a new one with each wave of 
aliens you survive. In addition to your 
ray gun, tiipping the space bar will un- 
leash a bomb which destroys every- 



thing on the screen, and other key- 
board commands will temporarily 
make you invisible to the enemy. Each 
wave you survive also adds one to 
your store of special bombs and more 
time to your "cloak." 

Dropzone is very tough. The aliens 
come fast, and you must keep a sharp 
eye on the radar screen. The screen 
can get very crowded with things try- 
ing to kill you. You are also a pretty 
big target for the aliens to hit. The 
graphics are very good and the sound 
is full and effective. 

In Solar Star, you pilot a fighter 
through a power grid, trying to re- 
cover the crystals which Earth needs 
for energy. The grid is a maze, and the 
walls come up with startling rapidity, 
so you need to be careful and keep 
an eye on your scanners. 

Running into a wall or into a white, 
moving disrupter costs you energy. 
When all the energy is gone the game 
is over If you manage to shoot a dis- 
rupter the required number of times 
(this increases in the higher levels), it 




turns into a moving green crystiil. You 
must then chase it down and run over 
it to capture it. If you manage to cap- 
ture 10, you can try to blast the cen- 
tral controller for that section of the 
grid. 

The central controller is sur- 
rounded by a revolving wall of energy 
which has a small hole in it. You must 



fire through this hole. If you are suc- 
cessful in destroying the controller, 
then you move on to the next, 
tougher wave of grids. 

The graphics of Solar Star are only 
fair, with a rather coarse blue grid be- 
ing the main view out of the cockpit. 
This is also a really tough game. Avoid- 
ing disrupters turns out to be quite a 
trick, and all too soon your energy is 
drained by collisions and the game is 
over It will challenge arcaders with 
even the most seasoned reflexes.— 
DAVID PLOTKIN 

$24.95 each, 48K disk. MicroDaft, 19 
Harbor Drive, Lake Hopatcong, NJ 
07849. (201) 663-0202. 

CIRCLE 254 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



THE PAWN 

The 8-bit version of the early ST ad- 
venture hit. The Pawn, features stun- 
ning graphics and the capability of 
understanding full-sentence com- 
mands. Pawn graphics are actually the 
best I've seen for the 8-bit. Caverns 
and bridges seem real enough to 
touch and you can almost feel the 
cold as you approach the ice tower. 
At any time, the graphics can be 
turned off to speed up the game, or 
turned back on. 

In The Pawn, commands can be 
combined to form creative sentences, 
such as, "Sit down at the table, pick 
up the fork and eat the shoe." Com- 
munication is almost conversational. 
Characters are cryptic, mysterious, 
even dangerous, but talking with 
them is vital. Only a specific charac- 
ter might be able to provide the 
knowledge or object you need. 

The game package contains two 
disks which you should copy before 
playing. Instructions include a book- 
continued on next page 



March 19 



let called "A Tale of Kerovnia" which 
contains hints for some of the stick- 
ier puzzles as well as giving you the 
flavor of the adventure plus a general 
idea of the theme. Wlien you're stuck, 
you can consult the coded clue sec- 
tion in the back of the booklet. 

The Pawn's copy-protection is a 
password system that interferes with 
the illusion of the game. Occasionally 
you'll have to type a word from "A 




Tale of Kerovnia" in order to continue 
playing — three strikes and you're out. 
Aside from its superior graphics, 
The Pawn is actually much like other 
adventure games. But it's still fun and 
a step ahead of the rest.— JOHN 
MANOR 

$39.95, 48K disk. Firebird Licensees Inc., 
71 Franklin Turnpike, Waldwick, NJ 
07463. (201) 444-5700. 

CIRCLE 253 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



TOMAHAWK 

Tomahawk is a sensational 
helicopter battle simulator featuring 
3-D realtime graphics. You get to fly 
the AH-64A Apache attack helicopter, 
an awesome fighting machine armed 
with guided missile, rockets and twin 
machine guns. You can choose from 
four missions at four difficulty levels. 

The missions consist of various 
strategic strikes against enemies at- 
tacking Allied positions. You can 
switch to a map view at any time and 
see the locations of enemy forces. The 
map is divided into a grid, and each 
section has eight enemy targets, in- 
cluding tanks, anti-aircraft guns and 
choppers. Careful strategy is needed 
to defeat the enemy without running 
out of fuel and ammunition. 

The AH-64A is very well equipped 



with systems to ensure survivability. 
Besides engine instruments, there is 
target location radar, weapons system 
status, damage monitors, turn and 
bank indicators, an airspeed indicator, 
and an altimeter The target radar can 
show you the heading and distance 
to targets, beacons (for navigation) 
and the nearest friendly heliport. A 
miniature screen will lock onto tar- 
gets, identify them and show the 
decreasing range as you close in on 
them. In the upper levels, these tar- 
gets are busily firing at you. 

Controlling the helicopter takes 
some getting used to. Unlike a fixed- 
wing airplane, a helicopter has a "col- 
lective" stick which controls how 
much lift the rotors are providing. A 
helicopter can hover, and even turn 
while standing still! These unusual 
flight characteristics take some getting 
used to, but the excellent manual not 
only gives background material, but 
step-by-step instructions on how to 
take off and land, hover, and fly this 
nimble aircraft. 

The graphics view is out-the-cock- 
pit in smooth, wireframe 3-D. Many 
landmarks — buildings, trees, bushes — 
can be seen on the ground below. 
Night and cloud-cover missions are 
available as well as the standard day- 
light/clear combat conditions. 

Tomahawk is a tough game to play 
because you are attempting to shoot 
at a target which is on the ground. So 
you have the tendency to fly into the 
ground when diving on the target. 
The trick is not to be too zealous and 
break off the attiick while you can still 
pull up. If you do crash, the wind- 
shield cracks and you wind up back 
at the base, if you have remaining 
choppers (you start with three). 

The joystick banks, climbs and 
descends, while the keyboard con- 
trols the rudder, throttle, collective, 
weapons system choice and target ra- 
dar choice. This is not as bad as it 
sounds, since most of the systems 
controlled by the keyboard are "set 
and forget" during combat. You fly 
the Apache with a joystick plugged 
into port 2. Although not noted in the 
documentation, a joystick plugged 
into port 1 can also control the col- 
lective, so you don't have to use the 



keyboard for that. 

Overall, I was quite impressed by 
the smooth graphics, playability, and 
ease of control of Tomahawk. The 
missions were somewhat simplistic, 
but still fun to play.-DAVID PLOTKIN 

$29.95, 48K disk. Intellicreations 
(Datasoft), 19808 Nordhoff Place, Chat- 
sworth, CA 91311. (818) 886-5922. 

CIRCIE 255 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



LURKING HORROR, 
STATION FALL 

In Infocom's first horror-fiction ad- 
venture, it's all too easy to be pulled 
into the game play — which can keep 
you up at night, looking nervously 
over your shoulder In Lurking Hor- 
ror you're a student at the George Un- 
derwood Edwards Institute of Tech- 
nology — sort of a cross between MIT 
and Miskatonic University (for you 
H.P. Lovecraft readers). 

In the beginning, you're at the com- 
puter center the night before a major 
paper is due. Trapped inside the build- 
ings by a raging blizzard, you settle 
down to finish your paper with an 
overzealous computer hacker as your 
only (human) companioti. Slowly but 
inexorably you'll head toward con- 
frontation with nightmarish forces 
that could cost you both your life and 
your soul. 

Your searches will take you from 
the tallest buildings down into the 
bowels of long abandoned tunnels 
and hidden rooms which lie festering 
under the campus. Without revealing 
too much, suffice it to say that you'll 
encounter a malevolent maintenance 
man, have a terminal religious exper- 
ience, practice your culinary skills and 
discourse with a doctor of demonol- 
ogy — until all hell breaks loose. 

You can play several different story 
branches, rather than having to go di- 
rectly from start to finish. Thus, if a 
puzzle stumps you, you can go off on 
a different tangent and continue — of- 
ten finding something to help with 
the original puzzle. Though there's far 
more searching and puzzle-solving 
than conversing with other charac- 
ters, it's often more helpful to show 
them something than to speak and 



20 



ANTIC, The Atari Resource 



New Products 



continued from page 8 
asynchronous operation at 300, 1200 
and 2400 baud and is about one-third 
the size of the Hayes SmartModem 
2400. Simple commands let you create 
user configurations that can be stored 
in the modem's memory — and are 
loaded every time the modem is 
turned on or reset. Features include 
automatic answer/dial, two modular 
phone jacks for data line and tele- 
phone and a speaker 

ALPHA BOOKS & DISKS ^ 

(programming utilities) 
Alpha Systems 
1012 Skyland Drive 
Macedonia, OH 44506 
(216) 467-5665 
S24.95 each, 48K disk 

CIRCLE 263 ON HEADER SERVICE CARD 

With the Basic Tlirbocharger book 
and disk, even a beginning program- 
mer can put the speed, power and 
flexibility of machine language into 
BASIC programs. This book and disk 
package has 167 ready-to-run machine 
language routines, including scrolling, 
Player/Missile control, sorting and 



GAMES GALORE 

continued from previous page 

provoke a reaction. 

The first half of the adventure is 
fairly easy, but the puzzles become 
more complex and interesting toward 
the end. The story itself is tight and 
well-crafted. It's easy — too easy — to 
visualize the scenes while cautiously 
prowling through moldering sub-base- 
ments. Overall, I enjoyed the game 
and would recommend it, particular- 
ly for someone new to text adventures . 

Stationfall, Infocom's first text ad- 
venture sequel, continues the saga be- 
gun in Planetfall, a fast-moving cross 
between Larry Niven and National 
Lampoon that gave us very memor- 
able Floyd the Droid — the endearing 
Gomer Pyle of robots. In Stationfall, 
we return to the future time of the 
Third Galactic Union. Our hero has 
found fleeting fame, a promotion to 
Lieutenant First Class in the Stellar Pa- 



searching. Optional source codes disks 
cost $10 if purchased with the pack- 
age, S15 if bought separately. Your 
Atari Comes AJive is a book of com- 
plete instructions, diagrams and con- 
trol programs for such electronic 
devices as light pens, LED signs, alarm 
systems and environmentiil sensors. 
Grapiiics Transformer software lets 
you use almost any graphics screen 
with almost any graphics program. 
Combine pictures from different pro- 
grams on one screen. For example, put 
Print Shop images into your Micro Il- 
lustrator drawings. 

BASIC TUTORIAL ^^^hi 

(language tutorial) 
RAMX Software Co. 
1647 Lilac Road 
Ramona, CA 92065 
BO, 48K disk 

CIRCLE 199 ON READER SERVICE CARD 

This two-disk package is for anyone 
who wants to learn all about Atari BA- 
SIC. The easy-to-use BASIC Ibtorial 
has more than 30 screens of help and 
covers each BASIC function. Only four 
keys are pressed to run the program. 



UNIVERSAL RS-232 
CONNECTOR ^^^^^^ 

(serial interface) 
Trans-M Corp. 
28 Blacksmith Drive 
Medfield, MA 02052 
(617) 359-5144 
S24.95 

CIRCLE 162 ON READER SERVICE CARD 

The Universal RS232-RJ12 Connec- 
tor is a simple, flexible solution for 
finding the right RS-232 serial connec- 
tion between a printer and computer 
Trans-M's RS-232 connection tester 
comes with enough different configu- 
rations to assure compatibility with at 
least 90% percent of available printers. 



Return the favor. When you call a 
manufacturer or supplier about a 
product you've seen advertised or 
othenvise mentioned in ANTIC, please 
tell them so. This will help us to con- 
tinue to bring you the latest informa- 
tion about products that will make 
your Atari computer an even more 
valuable investment in the future. 
—ANTIC ED 



trol, and the numbing realization of 
facing nothing more than shuffling 
paperwork for the rest of his career — 
a case in point being an assignment 
to pick up a multi-ton load of forms 
at a local space station printing press. 

Strange things happen as soon as 
you dock at the space station. The 
place is a virtual ghost town. What 
has happened here? What about the 
alien space craft, its dead pilot and 
mysterious cargo that you find? As 
you conunue probing, you recognize 
signs of an unknown malevolent force 
that has overtaken the space station. 

Fortunately, at your side is Floyd 
the Droid, rebuilt from circuit board 
heaven and ready to boogie. Between 
bouts of flnder-seeker and paddleball, 
your little buddy is along to help solve 
the mystery and (maybe) save your ba- 
con again. You will also encounter 
Plato (the only sur\iving space station 
robot), an ostrich, an abandoned Arc- 



turan balloon creature and an auto- 
mated welder that seems to disagree 
with your continued existence. 

Stationfall has plenty of puzzles to 
solve and rooms to explore. The puz- 
zles are good: hard enough to make 
you think, but logical, at least in 
hindsight. 

This sequel is, if anything, better 
than the original story. The plot line 
is crisp and full of humor — to go 
along with the straight science fiction. 
The mood, pacing and characters, 
right down to the scatology, are a 
faithful re-creation of the original.— 
JIM PIERSON-PERRY 
{The ST versions of these text adven- 
tures were reviewed in Antic, Febru- 
ary 1988.-AtAl\C ED) ■ 

$34.95 each, 48K disk. Infocom, 125 
CambridgePark Drive, Cambridge, MA 
02140. (617) 492-6000. 

CIRCLE 256 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



March 1988 



21 



A 

ATARI 

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The new SUPER ARCHIVER, obsoletes all copying devices currently available 
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Hardware, etc Copies are exact duplicates of originals and will run on any 
drive; without exaggeration, the SUPER ARCHIVER is the most powerful 
PROGRAMI\^ING/COPYiNG device available for the 1050! Installation consists 
of a plug-in chip and 6 simple solder connections. Softwares included 
Features are: 



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• FULLY AUTOtHATIC COPYING 

• SUPPORTS EXTRA MEMORY 

• SCREEN DUMP to printer 

• TOGGLE HEX/DEC DISPLAY 

• SECTOR or TRACK TRACING 

• AUTOMATIC DIAGNOSTICS 

• DISPLAYS HIDDEN PROTECTION 

• ADJUSTABLE/CUSTOM SKEW/ING 

• AUTOMATIC SPEED 
COMPENSATION 

• AUTOMATICffROGRAMMABLE 
PHANTOM SECTOR MAKER 



ARCHIVER/HAPPY ARCHIVER 

COMPATIBLE 

BUILT-IN EDITOR-reads, writes, 

displays upio 35 sectors/track 

(short) 

BUILT-IN CUSTOM FORMATTOR - upto 

40 sectors/track 

BUILT-IN DISASSEMBLER 

BUILT-IN MAPPER - upto 42 sectors/ 

track 

DISPLAYS/COPIES Double Density 

HEADERS 

AUTOMATIC FORMAT LENGTH 

CORRECTION 

SIMPLE INSTALLATION 



The SUPER ARCHIVER is so POWERFUL that the only programs we know of that 
cant be copied are the newer ELECTRONIC ARTS and SYNFILE/SYNCALC (34 
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THE SUPER ARCHIVER 

$79.95 "BIT-WRITER"! $79.95 

The Super Archiver "BIT-WRITER"! is capable of duplicating even the 
"uncopyable" EA and SYN series which employ 34 FULL sectors/track. "BIT- 
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of all non physically damaged disks, PLUG-IN circuit board and 4 simple 
solder connections. The SUPER ARCHIVER with "BIT-WRITER"! is the ultimole 
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DEALER/DISTRIBUTOR/USER GROUP Discounts available Coil for infol 



Master Card - Visa phone orders 
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SAVE YOUR 
COPIES OF ANTIC 



hese custom-made titled cases and 
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ANTIC 

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Add $1 per case/binder for postage & handling. Outside USA $2.50 
per case/binder (US funds only). PA residents add 6% sales tax. 



Print 
Name _ 



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No, PO, Box Numbers Please 



City. 



State/Zip 

CHARGE ORDERS (Minimum $15): AmEx, Visa, MC, DC accepted. 

Send name, number, exp. date. 

CALL TOLL FREE 7 Days, 24 Hours 1-800-972-5858 



, SATISFACTION GUARANTEED . 



,__J 



Onii 



ne 



By GREGG PEARLMAN, Antic Assistant Editor 



Inside GEnie 

Personal and affordable online sendee 



GEnie, the General Electric Network for Information 
Exchange, has become increasingly popular with 
Atiiri users since first going online on October 1, 1985. 
GEnie's first Atari RoundTable started on December 11, 
1985. What CompuServe calls SIGS (Special Interest 
Groups such as SIG*Atari) are called RoundTables (RTs) 
on GEnie. 

In fact, GEnie is now the official commercial online car- 
rier of Atari Corp. BBS information. Atari Corporation On- 
line sections are active on the GEnie RTs for Atari 8-bit 
and ST computers. About eight Atari Corp. employees are 
involved in maintaining these two sections as well as an 
RT for Atiiri Developers. 

GEnie also has an RT for MichTron's ST software tech- 
nical support. All four of the Atari-related RTs provide 
bulletin boards, software libraries, news sections and Help 
files. An real-time online conference on some Atari topic 
is held on GEnie every week, with Atari Corp. employees 
always present. 

Atiiri users ciin get a free GEnie sign-up — saving the usu:il 
S29.95 fee— by dialing (800) 638-8369 with a modem, 
waiting for a connection, typing HHH and pressing the 
[RETURN] key then typing in XJM11887, ATARI at the U# = 
prompt. 

Most GEnie personal users log on during evenings and 
weekends, when the hourly rate takes a breathtaking drop 
from $35 to S5— even for 1200 biiud modems. (It's 810 
for 2400 baud modems after business hours.) Other serv- 
ices online include shopping, finance, reference, leisure, 
games and news. 

According to Atari 8-bit sysop Marty Albert, there are 
roughly 2,200 8-bit RoundTable members. Between 75 
iind 150 new weekly messages is typical, but there were 
about 475 new messages per week during the month we 
were preparing this story. 

Chief Atari RT sysop Darlah Hudson counts 6,215 ST 
RoundTiible members. She says that about 1,400 messages 
per week were posted in the ST RoundTable during the 
month we were working on this story. This doesn't even 
include deleted messages, which adds about 10% to the 
total. 

(By Way of Comparison: Mike Schoenbach, sysop of 
the Atari 8-bit Forum on CompuServe, says that the 8-bit, 
ST and Developers forums total around 35,000 members, 
with around 1,500 to 2,000 messiiges per week. Compu- 
Serve hourly rates — anytime — are $6 for 300 baud and 
S12.50 for 1200 or 2400 baud, with a $39.95 sign-up fee. 
Upload time is free both CompuServe and GEnie. ANTIC 



22 



ANTIC, The Atari Resource 



f » Tbinli 9«o (w dmm Sm « 

I Ikt tmantt Infiitiwtiot S»f»u» 
I' fron fieuefii EUttnc 

I townjM 10, im 

u'i Xtm it: IJiJS ESI m: tUlK 
i nm HUE Ijtf in Efftct !SJ5/hrl ! 
» GfMalegs BfC «ii!i EiJit&r of « 

Sffl (SI, Ifflf "OEHESto" 
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til m « (MMtibiK, ts« "ssiftr 



f« kw 3 lEHEHS MltlUG, 



ONLINE is available on CompuServe without any extra 
charges, just type GO ANTIC when you log on.) 

TOPIC LISTS 

"On our bulletin boards we have individual topics that 
are easy to find," says Darlah. "Just look at the list of topics 
and decide which one you'd like to explore. Lately the 
ST bulletin board has received more detailed messages 
about WordPerfect than anything else. The same was once 
true of Publishing Partner It depends on what's hot." 

On the 8-bit board, the SX212 modem generated the 
most excitement recently, but much is said about the 
XEP80 80-column box and the upcoming XF551 drive 
also. "Users are writing programs for the XEP80," says 
Marty, "and recently someone uploaded a driver to use 
it with the BASIC XE cartridge. 



"In the 8-bit area we're organizing a group project for 
a program that probably will combine ACTION! and com- 
piled BASIC. We're considering either a MacPaint picture 
viewer or a terminal program. We want to use a language 
like ACTION!, which lends itself to the modular approach, 
and by using machine language subroutines written in 
BASIC and compiled, we can go from module to module. 

"But if I restrict it to just ACTION! or just C, I'll exclude 
the largest part of our users, the BASIC-only programmers. 
Interpreted BASIC is too slow for this kind of program, 
but compiling it will take care of that. Keeping everyone 
together will be a nightmare, but I'm willing to put in the 
extra work. Since the 8-bit isn't getting the commercial 
support that it used to, we have to generate support our- 
selves." 

INVOLVED SYSOPS 

Darlah and Marty both were avid CompuServe users 
who tried GEnie one day — Darlah at the suggestion of 
a friend, and Marty upon seeing an ad in Antic. Neither 
was enthralled at first. There were as few as two or three 
new messages a day. 

There were other things about GEnie that Darlah wasn't 
sure she liked, so she stuck with CompuServe, occasion- 
ally calling GEnie and posting messages. 

The 8-bit and ST groups then were all part of one 
RoundTable. ST users began heading in a different direc- 

confinued on page 26 



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March 1988 



23 



WHEN YOU'VE SOLD 
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No Brag, Just Fact! 

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PARTNER ST 

Twelve instantly accessible, 
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accessories. 

Accessories At Your 
Command: 

» Instant Thesaurus: 
Immediate access to over 
60,000 synonyms-while 
you use your word pro- 
cessor, spreadsheet, or 
any other program. 

• Appointment Calendar and Datebook: Keeps 
track of important dates and deadlines. View entire 
month on screen— marked with your messages— or 
produce handy calendar printouts. 

• Memo Pad and Mini-Word Processor 

• Phone List and Auto Dialer* 

• Expense Account Manager 

• Vital Statistics: Instant access to statistical data 
such as metric equivalents, mileage between cities, 
toll-free numbers, and area codes. 

• Time Keeper: Record how your time Is spent for 
a particular day, week, month or year. 

• Full-Function and Financial Calculators 

• Typewriter: Use your computer like a traditional 
typewriter Perfect for typing envelopes. 

• SwiftDOS: Easy access to important DOS commands. 

PARTNER ST also includes: 

• "Escape!": A stress-relieving arcade game. 

• A Quick-Start Mini Manual: Designed to get you 
up and running in less than 40 minutes. 



WORD WRITER ST, 
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The 

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a typesetter, designer, 
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Includes everything 
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Features: 

• Automatic Page Style Fbrmatting: Set up a page 
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inserting rules, headers, and footers. 

• A Full-Featured Word Processor 

• A Wide Variety of Font Styies-in multiple sizes. 

• A Built-in Text Editor that allows you to write 
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• An Integrated Thesaurus with over 60,000 
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• On-Screen Underlining , italics and Boldface, 
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• An Outline Processor that quickly organizes 
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• Form Letter Printout (Mail Merge): Prints 
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SwiftCalc ST 

A powerful, easy-to-use 
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• Super Graphics: 

Graphically displays and 
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• Formatting: Choice of formats-decimal (up to 1 5 
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commas. Plus, eight user-defined formats. 

CIRCLE 029 ON REAOER SERVICE CARD 



Data Manager 
ST 

A complete general infor- 
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System with report writing, 
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Features: 

« Flexibility that allows 
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any time. 

• A Complete Report Writer that generates custom- 
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sequence of each column. 

• An Extensive Business Graphics Package with 
pie charts, bar charts, line plots, point plots, hi-lo- 
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INSIDE GENIE 

continued from page 23 

tion from the 8-bit people, and that's when Darlah was 
asked to get involved. She became a sysop in late 1986. 
"I wasn't sure if I'd have the time," she says, "but I finally 
decided I'd enjoy it, because I enjoy customer service. 

"One thing I hadn't seen in other online services was 
personalized customer service — little things that bring 
users back," she says. "For instance, though uploading is 
free, it's time-consuming, so we write thank-you notes. 
And we're more personalized within the system. Users can 
notify us online any time by asking us to meet them in 
a particular room." GEnie "rooms" have simulated 
"doors" you can lock for privacy. 

Marty had also seen things on GEnie he wasn't cnizy 
about. So on his first visit he dropped a note to the Round- 
Table, then logged back onto CompuServe. "When I re- 
turned to GEnie three hours later," he says, "my questions 
had been answered. This really impressed me." Marty went 
online as a sysop in December 1986. "I was rather floored 
when 1 was asked, because I wasn't actively seeking a 
sysop position." 

"We needed someone active in the 8-bit area," says 
Darlah. "Marty was the right person for the job. I'm very 
happy with the way he creates excitement in the 8-bit 
area." 

Marty and Darlah do their GEnie work at their 
homes — in St. Louis and San Diego, respectively. Usually 



Marty spends four or five hours a day with GEnie, but 
lately it's been six to eight. Darlah used to spend only 
about two hours a day online, but now she spends eight 
to 10. "It goes in cycles," she says. 

And it's not as though they have nothing to do outside 
GEnie. Marty is a registered nurse and a Ph.D. in 
psychology — and he owns a tobacco and pipe store. "I 
keep pretty busy," he says. "I'd have to call myself a work- 
aholic." 

Darlah used to have a plumbing business. "1 did that 
and GEnie at the same time, working 20 hours a day," 
she says. "It was chaotic, so I gave up the plumbing busi- 
ness, which was round the ck)ck. I'm also a workaholic — I 
need to be heavily involved in my work." 

Marty says that the public domain Express! is the ter- 
minal program for 8-bit GEnie users. He uses it for about 
90% of his terminal work, switching to BackTalk for soft- 
ware library maintenance. The most heavily used ST ter- 
minal software is a toss-up between Flash and Interlink, 
Darlah says. "All our ST Help files for text uploading and 
offline messages are built around Flash — of course, it so 
happens that I use Flash. But Interlink has slowly gained 
interest. People still want an 'everything' program, but 
there just isn't one yet." 

WHO'S ON GENIE 

Marty finds GEnie users very different from those on 
CompuServe, although to Darlah, it's not the users that 



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26 



ANTIC, The Atari Resource 



are so different — it's the services. "Heavy CompuServe 
users point out things on GEnie that aren't like they're 
accustomed to on CompuServe," she says. "I used to feel 
the same way. It's hard to compare the two services be- 
cause each has benefits the other lacks. 

On the 8-bit bulletin board, Marty tends to be "very, 
very lenient," though he wants to keep it clean. "But I 
won't let anyone post explicit hints for adventure games. 
I figure that if I paid $50 for one and saw this hint — 
without knowing it would be there — I'd be very upset. 
I tell people to feel free to ask for hints, but to give hints 
via private messages." Darlah does the same thing in the 
ST area. 

In both the ST and 8-bit areas, users are highly mixed. 
"We have topics set up where there are technical areas 
as well as game discussions, modem discussions, what- 
ever," says Darlah. 

"Some users know just enough about their new 130XEs 
to set them up, boot the terminal program and call GE- 
nie," says Marty. "Other users are well vereed in both hard- 
ware and software." 

On GEnie, past messages are always available, either on 
the bulletin board or in an archive. They never disappear 
"Periodically we go through the topics within each cate- 
gory and delete irrelevant messages," says Marty, "and I'm 
as guilty as anyone else of chit-chat. We put all the re- 
maining messages in order and download all the messages 
older than, say, 60 days. Then we compress that file and 



upload it to the library. That way the information is still 
available, but we've made the bulletin board easier to use." 

GENIE MAIL 

Darlah says that GEnie Mail is used more on GEnie than 
Easyplex on CompuServe because GEnie doesn't have an 
addressable message base. But Marty feels that one big ad- 
vantJige to GEnie Mail is its ability to quickly send an XMO- 
DEM file. "Several users who have written 8-bit programs 
that they want to market have asked me to do informal 
beta testing for them," he says. "Instead of uploading files 
to a library, where it wouldn't be 'for my eyes only,' they 
just send them to me via GEnie Mail." 

"We have a service," says Darlah, "in which a developer 
can send a finished product to a place like MichTron 
through GEnie. Then MichTron can download it and test 
it. It's quicker and easier than mail." 

Darlah 's and Marty's Help files let users learn the sys- 
tem enough to feel comfortable with it. "There are files 
for navigating through the bulletin board, file transfer, ex- 
planation of appropriate settings, how to use mail, etc.," 
says Darlah. "I'hey're very detailed. Just capture a Help 
file, print it, and go through it step by step. 

"GEnie customer service is excellent. If they can't solve 
a user's problem, they contact me, and I work with that 
user online. One of our services is to give a public do- 
main terminal program to users who don't have one. Serv- 
ice is the key." Online Sources on page 40. 



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27 



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CIRCLE 004 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



Featured Application 



lype-ln Softwtiiv 




Text for your programs or videotapes 



BY JERRY VANDEN BOSCH 



VOU CAN HAVE LARGE 
TEKT IN 

GRAPHICS NODES 

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MOM 
irH3CS IXOI> 



THIS IS GRAPHICS 
MODE 2 OR 18 TEKT 
TYPE "2" N 
TO NORK IN THIS HOD 




ig Letters is a user-friendly display program that makes 
it easy to create flashy text screens in large-character 
Graphics Modes 1 and 2. You can even create title 
screens for your videotapes with this BASIC program, 
which works with Atari 8-bit computers of any mem- 
ory size, disk or cassette. 



30 



ANTIC, The Atari Resource 



One reason 1 bought my trusty Atari 800 back in 1982 
was the ease of using large letters in Graphics Modes 1 
and 2. My daughter is visually impaired, and I've used 
these modes in many successful math and spelling tutor 
programs for her. 

Over the years, I tinkered with my Big letters program 
until it did everything I want for this kind of specialized 
text editing. Big Letters quickly creates large, clear HELP 
pages, title screens and menus for your BASIC programs. 
And you'll never need to type a single PRINT #6 or POSI- 
TION statement because Big Letters creates all the sub- 
routines! 

When m\- family bought our first VCR, we discovered 
a bonus — Big Letters is also great for titling our videotapes. 

For newer Atari users, these are the large-text graphics 
modes used in Big Letters: Graphics 1 is double-width with 
20 lines on the screen. It has 20 characters per line in- 
stead of the 38 per line in Graphics 0, which is the mode 
that goes on automatically when you turn on your Atari. 
Graphics 2 is double-width, double-height, still 20 charac- 
ters per line but only 10 lines fitting on the screen. 

Ciraphics 17 is simply Graphics 1 with four extra lines 
at the bottom of the screen gained by removing the 
(Iraphics text window. Graphics 18 is Graphics 2 with 
an extra 2 lines gained by closing the text window. 

To put the power of Big Letters at your command, type 
in Listing 1, BIGTEXT.BAS, check it with TYPO II and 
SAVE a copy before you RUN it. 

USING BIG LETTERS 

Each Big Letters text screen is created on a Graphics 
editing screen. Your editing commands are listed on the 
left half of the screen. The right half of the screen con- 
tains )'Our editing window. The size of this window is de- 
termined by the Graphics Mode your Big Letters will use. 

Editing your text is easy. Individual characters or whole 
lines of text can be inserted or deleted with the same fa- 
miliar keystrokes used for programming and word 
processing. 

You can also use [CONTROL] [ARROW] ke)' combina- 
tions to move the cursor one space at a time. 

Try to avoid using the ["] character, though, because 
it will appear in a different color than the rest of your text. 

You can preview your work anytime by pressing [CON- 



GRAPHICS 
MODE 


ROWS 


COLUMNS 


1 


20 


20 


2 


10 


20 


17 


24 


20 


18 


12 


20 



TO (;i-:t T'fiis 

TYPi; THIS 


LARCiE LETTER CHARACTER COLOR 


ORANGE 


AQUA 


BLUE 


RED 


CAPITAL LKTTERS 
.small letters 
INVIiRSl! CAPITALS 
inivrse small letters 


X 


X 


X 


X 


NUMBERS, 

PUNCTUATION, 
.MATH SYMBOLS 


X 








INVF.RSE NUMBERS 
PUNCTUATION, 
MATH SYMBOLS 




X 







Figure 1 



Figure 2 

TROL] [G], then answering a prompt to select a Big let- 
ters display with or without a Graphics text window. 

And here's the best part: You can move between the 
editing window and the Big Letters display at will, with- 
out losing your work. If you're working in Ciraphics 2, 
for example, and want to see your work in Clraphics 1, 
press [CONTROL] [C]. Press [CONTROL] [G] to return to 
your original Graphics Mode. 

You can use combinations of lowercase and inverse- 
video characters to create Big letters in four different 
colors. Figure 2 shows the available colors and how to 
get them. The background color is black. If you don't like 
these colors, feel free to alter the SETCOLC^R statements 
located throughout the program. 

VCR CONNECTION 

When you're satisfied with the large text displays >'ou'\'e 
created, you can record them with your VCR. 

The following method assumes that you own at least 
two video monitors or TVs — one for your Atari and one 
attached to a VCR. If you only own one TV, make sure 
it's connected to your VCR before proceeding. 

First, unscrew your Atari's switchbox from the back of 
your television set. Next, pack up your computer, disk 
drive and power supplies and carefulh' carr\- them over 
to your VCR. Set up your Atari next to your VCR and con- 
nect your Atari's switchbox to the VHF INPLIT terminals 
of the VCR. 

Next, tune your VCR to the same TV channel that you 
use for your computer (channel 2 or 3). 

Finally, RUN Big Letters and create your display. 

If you have several different Big Letters displays to rec- 
ord, you can create them one at a time, starting and stop- 
ping the VCR for each one. This is the method recom- 
mended for beginners. 

Once you feel comfortable using Big Letters, you should 
try this advanced technique. Using this method, all of the 

continued on page 40 



March 1988 



31 



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Roman 
Numeral 

Translator 



Losin' those MCMXXIV blues 



type-Ill Software I 



By David Stone 



Erected MDCCCXCVII. Copyright MCMLXXIV. See Chap- 
ter XLIX. Aarrghh! 

Yeah, now you know you got them Roman Numeral 
Blues! You look up a date or some other numeric infor- 
mation, and you find it coded in this antiquated format 
that's indecipherable to any self-respecting member of the 
computer age. Why couldn't they put those numbers into 
some easier form, such as reverse Polish hexadecimal 
bytes? 

If you're like me, you don't appreciate being burdened 
with needless trivia just to determine that the building 
was erected in 1897, the book was published in 1974, or 
you should see Chapter 49. It's been a long time since 
I learned Roman numerals in school and I don't find it 
easy to remember information that I might actually need 
to use once every two or three years. 

But now you have Roman Numeral Translator to take 
all those cryptic M's and X's and display their equivalent 
in good old standard Arabic l,00()'s and lO's. Or, if you're 
strange enough to want to express your own numeric data 
in Roman numerals (Yechh!), my program will also con- 
vert from Arabic back to Roman. 

ABOUT THE PROGRAM 

Type in Listing I, ROMAN. BAS, check it with TYPO II 
and SAVE a copy before you RUN it. 

At the prompt, simply type in either a Roman or an 
Arabic numeral, then press the [RETURN] key Whichever 
type of number you entered, the value will now be dis- 
played in both its Roman and Arabic forms. 

continued on page 40 



R 



kOMAN NUMERAL TRANSLATOR 

is a brief program that simplifies 

your life by converting mysterious 

MCMLXXIV into good old Arabic 

numerals 1974, etc. This BASIC 

program works on all 8-bit Atari 

computers of any memory size, 

with disk or cassette. 




HGM.HXKUIXX 



Cl*rt?ss any hey ?.» -. ^uiftnueS 




March 



33 




lype-Iit Software 




'R. SMOOTHY 
is a powerful subroutine that lets 
you add a one-line smooth scrolling 
text window to your BASIC programs. 

Mr. Smoothy works in any Atari 
graphics mode and displays messages 
as long as 120 characters. To successfully 
use Mr. Smoothy with your own 
programs, you should be an inter- 
mediate BASIC programmer. This BASIC 
program works with Atari 8-bit 
computers having at least 32K 
and a disk drive. 




Text scrolling 



deluxe with a 



powerhouse subroutine 



by Kenneth K a y e 

Mr. Smoothy is a machine language routine that lets you 
add a one-line smooth scrolling text window to your BA- 
SIC programs. Mr Smoothy works in all bit-mapped 
graphics modes (Graphics 3-11). XL and XE owners can 
also use Graphics 14 and 15. 

After loading a picture or drawing a screen, your BASIC 
program starts Mr Smoothy with a USR command. Once 
started, Mr Smoothy determines what part of the screen 
will be blocked-out by the text window, and copies this 
part into a safe buffer. 

Next, it opens the text window and scrolls your mes- 
sage through it. This window is eight mode lines high and 
can be between one and 40 bytes wide. (A mode line is 
a set of TV scan lines. A single mode line may contain 
as few as one scan line, as in Graphics 8; or as many as 
l6 scan lines, as in Graphics 2.) 

Your message cannot be longer than 120 characters and 
it may not use any inverse-video characters. All other 
characters, including control characters and punctuation 
marks, can be used. Mr Smoothy may also be used in pro- 
grams which use redefined character sets, so long as the 
above two rules are observed. 

The SMOOTHY demonstration needs two listings: a 
BASIC program and a data file containing Mr Smoothy 's 
machine language routines. Listing 1 is the main program, 
Listing 2 is a BASIC program which will create the data file. 

Type in Listing 1, SMOOTHYBAS, check it with TYPO 
II and SAVE a copy to disk. Once you have SAVEd 
SMOOTHYBAS, type NEW. Do not RUN the program yet. 

Next, type in Listing 2, SMOOTH2.BAS, check it with 
TYPO II and SAVE a copy to disk. When RUN, Listing 2 
creates SMOOTHY's data fUe, SMOOTHY.DAT. Be sure that 
SMOOTHY.DAT and SMOOTHYBAS are on the same disk. 
Antic Disk users will find SMOOTHY.DAT on their 
monthly disk. 

Now, RUN Listing 1, SMOOTHYBAS. When RUN, the 
program loads the SMOOTHY.DAT file, displays a flashy 
scrolling title screen, then presents the Mr Smoothy menu. 

USING THE DEMO 

SMOOTHYBAS is a menu-driven program which lets 
you create almost any type of scrolling text window. Mr 
Smoothy's menu offers seven choices: 

Choice 1 sets the graphics mode. You may use any bit- 



34 



ANTIC, The Atari Resource 



mapped mode (Graphics 3-11). XL and XE owners may 
also use Graphics 14 and 15. 

Choice 2 sets the scrolling speed. Speed values range 
from (fastest) to 15 (slowest). 

Choices 3 and 4 determine the position of the upper 
left hand corner of the text window. Legal values are dis- 
played next to each choice. 

Choice 5 sets the width of the text window, expressed 
in bytes. Legal values are displayed next to this item. 

Choice 6 lets you set the color of the scrolling mes- 
sage. In a two-color mode (such as Graphics 4, 6, 8 and 
14) you don't have a choice. However, you must still en- 
ter a value between 1 and 4. 

In the four-color modes, you can color the text with 
any foreground color, or alternate the color of each char- 
acter between the three. Numbers 1-3 refer to the same 
color registers as BASIC'S COLOR command. A value of 
4 will mai<e each character an alternate color 

Choice 7 lets you type in your message. 

For example, let's create a slowly scroUing window in 
Graphics 9. We want our window to be 20 bytes long, 
centered and displayed in alternating colors. 

First, type a 9 at the GRAPHICS MODE prompt. As soon 
as we do this, Mr Smoothy determines the proper screen 
dimensions and expresses these as legal values which we 
may use in positioning our window. 

Now, set the speed of the scroll. A 15 will give produce 
slow scroll. 

Next, position the window. Since the screen extends 
from column to 39, the center column would be near 
column 19. Since half of our 20-byte text window wUl 
be to the left of this position, the text window must be- 
gin at column 19-10, in other words, at column 9. Using 
an out-of-range value here will probably crash the pro- 
gram or at least open your window in the wrong place. 

Similarly, if we have 184 rows available, the center one 
would be row 92, which is what we enter for choice 4. 
Keep in mind that your window wUl extend seven rows 
below this point. 

Next, enter 20 as the window length, and choose 4 to 
select alternating colors. 

Finally, type your message, press [RETURN] , and watch 
it scroll. 

SCROLL-YOUR-OWN PROGRAMS 

Mr Smoothy isn't hard to include in your own BASIC 
programs as long as you follow a few guidelines. First, 
you must have a copy of the SMOOTHY.DAT file on your 
disk. Mr Smoothy will not work without tliis file, so if 
you use Mr. Smoothy in your own BASIC program, be sure 
SMOOTHY.DAT is on the same disk. 

Next, make sure you use both Mr. Smoothy subroutines. 
They are contained in lines 31000-31550 of the demon- 
stration program. 

Mr Smoothy is initialized in the subroutine in lines 
31000-31045. Call this subroutine once at the beginning 
of your program with a GOSUB 31000 statement. This 
subroutine DIMensions two string variables, lowers RAM- 



TOP and loads SMOOTHY.DAT. 

The second subroutine, beginning at line 31500, is the 
heart of Mr Smoothy, and contains the USR call which 
stjirts the scroll. 

Note that the first two lines of this subroutine begin 
with REM statements. The jobs that these statements per- 
form are handled in the main program. However, if you're 
using this routine in your own program, remove the REMs 
and insert your own values, as explained in the following 
take-apart. 

Line 31500 places the message to be scrolled into MS$ . 
Stores tiie graphics mode number in MODE. 

Line 31510 places the values for scrolling speed, column 
and row number, and window length into SPEED, COL, 
ROW and WLEN. 

Line 31520 is the USR call which starts the Mr Smoo- 
thy routine. 

ABOUT THE PROGRAM 

To make Mr. Smoothy as efficient as possible, the rou- 
tine uses direct addressing commands and is NOT 
relocatable. 

The SMOOTHY.DAT program must be put into RAM 
beginning at address 38912 (S9800, the first byte of page 
152). This is eight pages under the normal value of the 
RAMTOP pointer (memory location 106, S006A). 

Although SMOOTHY.DAT is only 1,012 bytes long, it 
uses an additional 845 bytes to store screen RAM and other 
data, so you must reserve at least eight pages above your 
starting address. 

It's best to leave another eight-page buffer under page 
152 if you're using one of the higher-resolution modes. 
This occurs in line 31000. 

Mr Smoothy uses Zero Page bytes 203-214 (SOOCB- 
S00D6) when scrolling. If your main program stores data 
in any of these locations, be sure to copy the data to an- 
other area of memory before entering Mr Smoothy 's USR 
call (line 31520). 

Mr Smoothy also installs a vertical blank interrupt, us- 
ing the immediate mode vectors at VVBLKI, memory lo- 
cations 546 and 547 (S0222 and S0223). The entire ver- 
tical blank interval is used, so no other processing can 
happen until the scroll is completed. 

There are six error trapping routines in the code. If Mr. 
Smoothy won't scroll, it will usually display a USR 
ERROR# message. The number of this error message cor- 
responds to the errors listed below: 

1. Incorrect number of arguments. 

2. String length exceeds 120 characters. 

3. Window length exceeds 40 bytes. 

4. Incorrect color value. 

5. Illegal character in the string. 

6. Not a map mode. Listing on page 68 ■ 

Kenneth Kaye is a 3 7-year-old press brake operator from 
Garfield Heights, Ohio. He has been programming in 
BASIC and assembler for four years and this is his first 
appearance in Antic. 



March 1988 



35 




S:^to^(}^/'a^if/ 6y ^afi^ 0ar/son' 



Shootout 

of the 

Video Game Systems 



Atari vs. Nintendo and Sega 



By DAVID PLOTKIN, Antic Contributing Editor 



36 



ANTIC, The Atari Resoun 




I'm going to let you in on a secret: Even though I'm a 
grown-up engineer for a Fortune 500 corporation — I 
I,OVE to play video games. 

This is quite well known around the Antic offices and 
causes much kidding by the more "serious" computer 
users there. So I was understandably delighted when the 
editor of Antic called to ask Lf I wanted to review the three 
premier video game systems currently available — the Atari 
XE Video Game System, Nintendo Entertainment System 
and Sega Master Game System. 

Today's game systems bear little resemblance to the pi- 
oneer models such as the still-available Atari 2600. They 
are far more powerful, with more colors, more anima- 
tion, more complexity overall — providing a far superior 
gaming experience. 



I: SEGA MASTER SYSTEM 

$150. Sega of America, Inc., 573 Forbes Blvd., South Son Fran- 
cisco, CA 94080. (800) USA SEGA (National). (415) 742-9300 
(California). Includes: 2 Controllers, Adapters, Light Gun, Sa- 
fari Hunt/Hang On cartridge. 

CIKIE 280 ON READER SERVICE CARD 

Sega, now distributed in the U.S. by Tonka Toys, sent 
us their standard Power Base with two control pads, 
a light gun called the Laser and a superior game car- 
tridge with two games built in. The control pads consist 
of a handheld box with a tiny nub of a toggle-stick and 
two buttons. Personally, I prefer a real joystick. 

But Sega's optional Control Stick, a heavy-duty, respon- 
sive joystick, was a joy to use. I also tried out the Sports 
Pad — which is a trackball, supposedly most suitable for 
sports games. Strangely, the switch had to be set to "Con- 
trol" rather than "Sports" for it to work correctly with 
the sports games I tried. 

The Sega system was easy to set up, and even included 
a special cable that hooks up to a computer monitor for 
clearer graphics than a TV set. The Sega light gun was 
the best one 1 tried. It was very accurate. 

The most unusual accessory was a set of 3-D glasses 



for simulated three dimensional games. While I found the 
3-D effect to be only moderately successful (there was 
some image separation), the game using the glasses 
benefited quite nicely from 3-D. 

Quite a variety of game cartridges is available for the 
Sega Master System and can be found easily at many local 
retailers. The system actually takes three different kinds 
of cartridges. The Sega Card looks like a credit card and 
uses a separate slot in the Power Base. Then there are the 
Mega Cartridges and the Two Mega Cartridges. 

Sega boasts that the card holds 256K of memory, while 
the Mega holds 1 MEG and the Two Mega cartridges hold 
2 MEG. Most reviewers are fooled into thinking that these 
numbers refer to the number of bytes of memory in the 
cartridges. In fact, they refer to the number of bits. So 
the three cartridges hold 32K, 128K and 256K. This is 
still pretty impressive, considering that the early computer 
games like Star Raiders were only 8K! 

The games for the Sega tend to be high quality, with 
a good variation of arcade, adventure, and sports. Safari 
Hunt and Hang On are together on the cartridge included 
with the system. Safari Hunt is a simple shooting game 
which uses the light gun to plug away at a variety of 
animals as they move through three different scenarios. 

Hang On is a very good motorcycle racing game. The 
view is from behind and slightly above your rider Your 
cycle has an accelerator and gear shift. 

The motorcycle races through an impressive landscape 
including deserts, night cities, and open country. The 
graphics are similar to Pole Position, but tend to have some 
flicker Obstacles include opposing riders, some nasty 
curves and poles/cactuses along the side of the road. 

Outrun is a car racing game on a Mega cartridge, but 
you wonder what they did with all that memory. The track 
has numerous splits, so you can race a different course 
each time. The graphics of your car are very sharp and 
realistic, especially when you flip over after hitting a curve 
too fast. Control is like steering on ice — the car slides 
around too much. The background graphics have con- 
siderable flicker, and the illusion of motion is poor. 

Atari owners will recognize the next title — Choplifter. 

coiiliiiiietl on iie.\l pcige 



March 1988 



37 



Again, you must rescue the hostages from their barracks 
by blowing the barracks open and landing your chopper, 
then transporting the hostages back to a safe haven. 

Enemies include other choppers, fighters, anti-aircraft 
guns (both fixed and mounted on trucks) and missile 
launchers. The ever-present tanks are more of a nuisance 
than a tlireat. The graphics are well-defined, but again tend 
to flicker Controlling the helicopter is easy because of 
the two buttons on the control pad. 

F-I6 Fighting Falcon is a Sega Card. It uses two con- 
trollers to operate the direction, speed and weapons of 
a flight/combat simulator A "Heads-Up Display" summa- 
rizes your weapons status (cannons, missiles), range, and 
warns of enemy missiles. Your fighter is equipped with 
electronic countermeasures, two kinds of radar, compass, 
altimeter and airspeed indicator The higher levels of dif- 
ficulty feature more enemy aircraft which dodge your ef- 
forts to shoot them down more adeptly. 

Missile Defense 3-D uses the 3-D glasses mentioned 
above, along with the light gun. Each side launches mis- 
siles at the other You have three different scenarios for 
attempting to shoot the missiles down. If any get through 
and hit their destination (the other side's capital city) the 
game is over Firing your light gun at the screen causes 
a small explosion to appear on the screen which will de- 
stroy a missile if it hits it. Though I find the concept of 
the game pretty chilling, the gameplay is good and fun. 

Great Baseball is a one-or-two player baseball game. 
You can choose your team and pitcher characteristics QDre- 
ferred pitch and stamina). You use the controller pad to 
select a pitch. In Level 1, your fielders move to get the 
ball automatically, in Level 2 you must control the fielder 
closest to the ball. 

Once the fielder has the ball, you can select which base 
to throw to. "When it is your turn to bat, you press one 
of the buttons to swing at the ball. 



II: NINTENDO ENTERTAINMENT SYSTEM 

$99. Nintendo of America, Inc., 4820-150th Avenue N.E., Red- 
mond, WA 98052. (800) 422-2602 (National). (206) 422-2602 
(Washington), indudes: 2 Controllers, Adapters, Super Mario 
Brothers cartridge. 

CIRCLE 281 ON RaDfB SfHICE mO 

The smallest of the three systems is the Nintendo, but 
there is a lot of power in this box. Cartridges are 
loaded from the front via a lift-up door and seated 
by pressing down into the machine. This takes a little get- 
ting used to, but is not too difficult. The standard system 
comes with two controllers and the Super Mario 
Brothers cartridge. The controllers are similar to the those 
supplied with the Sega, and I again did not care much 
for them. 

Optional hardware is available for the Nintendo. Sent 
with our system was a joystick called the Nintendo Ad- 
vantage. It has a large base and is very responsive. In ad- 



dition to the two fire buttons and the Start and Select but- 
tons, this device features a turbo button for each fire 
button. When this turbo feature is engaged, the fire but- 
tons shoot continuously when held down. The rate of 
firing is adjustable. There is also a switch which allows 
the single joystick to control either player 1 or player 2. 

The graphics of the Nintendo games were impressive. 
Although most of the games did not seem as complex as 
the Sega offerings, the graphics were generally of higher 
quality and much more flicker-free. The Super Mario 
Brothers cartridge included with the system was a lot of 
fun and could keep you entertained for many hours. 

You guide Mario through scenery which scrolls to the 
right. He can jump over a multitude of enemies (turtles 
and a few other things I couldn't begin to identify), or 
try to jump on them, squashing them for extra points. 
Blocks with question marks appear overhead in many 
scenes. Jumping up to hit these with his head gets him 
extra points and sometimes frees items which can help 
him. The mushroom, for example, turns him into Super 
Mario, able to leap further, break bricks with his head, 
and survive one encounter with an enemy. 

Metroid is another game with superb animation. You 
guide an armed robot through an underground fortress. 
He can jump (turning over in midair — a very nice effect), 
shoot in three directions, and duck. Along his quest, he 
will encounter a variety of power objects which give him 
extra lives and more powerful weaponery. 

Kung Fu is one of the best martial arts games I have 
seen. Your hero moves through a five-floor fortress to res- 
cue his maiden Sylvia. On the way, he must fight thugs, 
ninjas, snakes, dragons, and some very mean sword- 
wielding characters. 

In Kid Icarus you guide an Angel, jumping from plat- 
form to platform, shooting enemies with your bow. Ene- 
mies turn into hearts when shot, and collecting the hearts 
allows you to use them in later stages to buy extra sup- 
plies. Touching an enemy robs the angel of some strength, 
and when it is all gone, you die. 

A large number of sports simulations are presently avail- 
able for the Nintendo. In Golf you use your joystick to 
control which club you use, then the force of your back- 
swing, foward swing, and the moment of impact. You can 
also choose the direction you want to aim your ball. 

If you misjudge the swing's force or use the wrong club, 
you may end up a long way from the hole. Misjudging 
when to hit the ball could also hook or slice your shot. 

Pro Wrestling is a gas to play. You choose who you 
want to be from a slate of wrestlers, each one with a spe- 
cialty for wreaking havoc on an opponent. You also se- 
lect an opponent to be controlled by the second player 
or the computer Quite a number of realistically animated 
moves are available using the joystick and two fire buttons. 

The Slalom ski racing game has a view from behind 
and above your skier You guide him down a large variety 
of runs. To continue the game you must make the qualify- 
ing time on each run. There are flags which you must ski 
through for maximum speed, and you can accelerate and 



38 



ANTIC, The Atari Resource 



slow down, steer, even jump. 

Baseball can be played against the game machine or 
another player. The screen switches between two views. 
The a closeup of the infield is used during batting and 
infield plays. If you manage to knock the ball into the out- 
field, the screen switches to a view of the whole ballpark. 

Tennis can also be played solo or against another player 
When played solo, you select the level you want the ma- 
chine to play at. You control your player as he runs around 
on the court. Pressing the fire button makes him swing 
(either forehand or backhand, depending on where the 
ball is). Rushing the net is good strategy in the lower levels. 

The Legend of Zelda adventure game is the flagship of 
the Nintendo line. Packaged in a gold cartridge, it even 
features a built-in five year battery to save games! The hero 
is named Link, and the object is to find the eight pieces of 
the Triforce, kill the evil Ganon, and rescue Princess Zelda. 

Link must negotiate the areas above-ground until he 
finds the entrances to eight different underground 
labrynths. A large variety of the oddest creatures to grace 
a video game are constantly trying to do poor Link in. 



Ill: ATARI XE VIDEO GAME SYSTEM 

$149.95. Atari Corp., 1196 Borregas Avenue, Sunnyvale, CA 
94086. (408) 745-2000. Includes: 1 Joystick, Light Gun, Adap- 
ters, Flight Simulator II cartridge, Bug Hunt cartridge. 

CIRCLE 282 ON READER SERVICE CARD 

The Atari XE Video Game system can be looked at as 
either the newest or the oldest product. It's the largest 
of the three units — about the size of a 65XE computer. 
And in fact, that's what it is. 

The XE Game System is a cosmetically redesigned two- 
piece 65XE. And in turn, of course, the 65XE is simply 
the newer version of the Atari 800XL, the computer model 
used by over 30% of Antic readers. The XE Game Sys- 
tem is very pretty, with large round pastel function keys 
on the Atari gray shell. The full keyboard is detachable 
and sits in front of the main unit. The XE Game System 
was premiered with elaborate fanfare at the June 1987 
Consumer Electronics Show in Chicago. Atari executives 
at CES made it clear that they thought repackaging a ver- 
sion of the 65XE/800XL as a "high-end game system" was 
Atari's best — and perhaps last — chance to move a lot of 
64k computers into homes via today's mass marketing 
outlets. 

The standard Atari cartridge slot is on the top of the 
main case. The two joystick ports are hidden underneath 
the top lip and are extremely inconvenient to get at. The 
system comes with a light gun and the standard Atari 
joystick. 

I found the light gun to be very inaccurate, even in a 
carefully darkened room. Unlike the Sega gun, the sights 
are useless. The point which is hit on the TV screen is 
off to the left of where the gun was aimed. 

If you own an eight-bit Atari computer, you have a pretty 



good idea of the excellent archive of games and the high 
quality of graphics available from the Atari XE Game Sys- 
tem. The system comes with two cartridges. Bug Hunt 
uses the light gun to shoot bugs and frogs on a grid. There 
is a satisfying sound if you fry a bug, and you get extra 
points for accuracy. 

The second cartridge is the best-selling Flight Simu- 
lator II. This is a complex game that can be used for seri- 
ous pilot training. It has decent graphics, virtually identi- 
cal to the computer version. I'm impressed that they could 
stuff all the program information into a 128K cartridge. 
Atari utilizes bank-switching to pack as much as 256K of 
memory into its new generation of cartridges. 

In Flight Simulator, you pilot a small Cessna airplane, 
with an out-the-cockpit view. The keyboard is necessary 
to control the plane, with throttle, trim, stabilizers and 
other controls at your command. The joystick is used for 
banks and turns, as well as climbing and descending. A 
full instrument panel is presented on the screen, with arti- 
ficial horizon, turn and bank indicator, airspeed and others . 

I only had Atari's two included cartridges to test with 
the XE Game System, although the literature boasts of a 
large number of games which are to be available. Most 
of these titles are familiar from 8-bit computer disk ver- 
sions, but many have never been released on cartridge 
before. 

I found that my existing Atari computer cartridges work 
fine on the XE Game System, which makes for a large base 
of software. Of course, avid gamers don't even have to 
wait for new cartridge releases. They could find Atari 1050 
disk drives selling for less than SlOO and use this "XE Video 
Game System" as a full-fledged 65XE-computer 

Here is the Atari Corporation's latest list of new car- 
tridge software adaptations that are on the way. Atari will 
be selling these titles for about S19.95 each. Just as this 
story went to press, Atari's Lode Runner cartridge arrived 
at Antic. 

For arrival by January 1988, Atari now expects: Star 
Raiders II, Blue Max, Battlezone, Ballblazer, Rescue on 
Fractalus, David's Midnight Magic, Hardball, Fight Night, 
Barnyard Blaster, Archon and One-on-One Basketball. 

By March 1988, Atari expects to release: Food Fight, 
Desert Falcon, Crossbow, Necromancer, Ace of Aces, Gato. 

SUMMARY 

AH three of the game systems examined here do a good 
job of entertaining. All three systems should have an ade- 
quate number of high quality game cartridges available 
by the time you read this. I thought the Nintendo had es- 
pecially good graphics, but the Sega's games were per- 
haps a bit more sophisticated. 

Any one of the three would be a good choice, if you are 
positive that the only thing you will ever want to do with 
your equipment is play games. But of course — as the Atari 
Corp. is counting on to boost sales — the XE Video Game 
System is the only one that can be connected to a disk 
drive to function as an outst;inding 8-bit personal 
computer ■ 



March 1988 



39 



INSIDE GENIE 

continued from page 27 

ONLINE SOURCES 

GENIE 

401 N. Washington Street 
Rockville, MD 20850 
(800) 638-9636 

COMPUSERVE 

500 Arlington Center 

Box 20212 

Columbus, OH 43220 

(800) 848-8199 

In Ohio: (614) 457-8600 

EXPRESS! 
($10, PD0081), 

BACKTALK 
($19.95, AP0154), 

FLASH 

($29.95, ST0220), 

The Catalog 

544 Second Street 

San Francisco, CA 94107 

(800) 234-7001 



ROMAN NUMERAL TRANSLATOR 

continued from page 33 

To keep Roman Numeral Translator as short as possi- 
ble, the program is designed to handle the kind of data 
that is normally encountered in the Roman numeral sys- 
tem. This means it is not equipped to convert exceptional 
mathematical cases such as negative numbers, non- 
integers, or the little-used feature of placing a bar over 
a Roman digit to multiply its value by 1,000. 

Also, syntax-checking is beyond the scope of this small 
program, so if you enter a number that does not follow 
the legal structure of either the Roman or Arabic num- 
bers, you'll probably get an inaccurate or meaningless 
result. 

The Translator's main loop, lines 500-520, accepts in- 
put, calls the appropriate subroutine to do the conver- 
sion, and displays the result. The Roman-to-Arabic con- 
version tiikes place in the subroutine in lines 100-180, using 
the DATA line 600. (Line 600 contains both letters and 
numbers, so be sure to distinguish betv^'een the numeral 
1 and the letter I.) Lines 200-290, plus the subroutine on 
line 50 and the DATA line 610, do the conversion from 
Arabic to Roman. Listing on page 70 ■ 

This is the first Antic appearance by David Stone, a free- 
lance musician from St. Louis, Missouri. He has been 
enthusiastically programming his Atari 400 (now up- 
graded to 48K) since receiving it for Christmas in 1981. 



BIG LETTERS 

continued from page 31 

Big Letters displays are created beforehand. Then, Big Let- 
ters will display each one, one at a time, like a slide show. 

Begin by creating several display pages. As you com- 
plete each page, you must merge it into the program in 
memory by pressing [CONTROL] [M]. 

The [CONTROL] [M] function takes the current display 
from the editing screen, translates the display into a BASIC 
subroutine, and appends it to the end of the program in 
memory. 

When you have completed all required pages, press 
[CONTROL] [R] to start the review routine. This routine 
lets you display (and videotape) any or all pages in the 
large-character text modes. The [START] and [SELECT] 
keys control forward and reverse page-flipping, while the 
[OPTION] key returns you to the editing screen. 

When you're finished, press the [RESET] key. The 
subroutines that Big Letters created for you begin at line 
10000. To store these subroutines. Disk users should type 
LIST "D:FILENAME.LST",10000,32767. (Cassette users, 
type LIST "C:", 10000,32767). 

To use these display subroutines in your own BASIC 
programs, simply ENTER them into memory. Disk users 
should type ENTER "DiFILENAME.LST", Cassette users 
type ENTER "C:". (Remember, these display programs use 
line numbers above 9999, so make sure your original 
BASIC programs don't.) 

Note: After appending a page to the program in mem- 
ory, pressing [SHIFT] [CLEAR] erases your work from the 
string-handling part of the program by refilling all strings 
with blank spaces. You are then returned to the introduc- 
tory display, where you can select the mode to work with 
next. 

PROGRAM TAKE-APART 

Line 50 executes the introductory display routine start- 
ing at line 1570 where mode 1 or 2 is selected, then exe- 
cutes the appropriate editing window starting at line 520. 

Lines 60-530 accept and process all keyboard activity 
and displays the editing windows. 

Lines 540-560 initialize our strings. 

Lines 570-890 set up editing windows. 

Lines 1180-1185 changes all &"] characters to inverse 
video. 

Lines 1410-1570 append all text in the editing window 
to the end of the program in the form of program 
statements. 

Lines I58O-I6OO contain the error trapping routines. 

Lines 1610-1720 contains the introductory display 

routine. Listing on page 64 ■ 

Jerry Vanden Bosch is a lieutenant colonel in the U.S. 
Air Force working with NASA. This is his first publica- 
tion in Antic. 



40 



ANTIC, The Atari Resource 



All the latest news for the ST user 



March 1988 



WUi 


I HAS 


1 1: ' 


. wm 






— r 

+ 


^B 




o 


Bi ' 


^Mk<^ 


MCE M 1 


tl; 




■ma sHdH PATH RSETiwin 


fltiE; 53 SEC I Hlfl 


■ 

1 



Alcixie Aid 



Randanw ST B/kStC maixcs f^r^^er 

By PAUL PRATT and STEPHEN EVERMAN 



Like finding your way through 
mazes? Maze Master is here to 
give you an endless supply of 
randomly generated mystery 
paths. Written in ST BASIC, 
Maze Master creates maps rang- 
ing in size from 3x3 to 30 x 30 
squares. A color monitor is re- 
quired. 

TYPING IT IN 

Using ST BASIC, carefully 
type in the program and save a 
copy to disk. Next, run TYPO 
ST and ask it to proofread the 
program you just typed in. 
Compare the TYPO ST table it 
generates against the TYPO ST 
table printed in the listings sec- 



tion. If any of the values don't 
match, there may be a typing er- 
ror in that line Check it again, 
very carefully. 

Those of you with this 
month's Antic Disk will find a 
copy of Maze Master on Side B, 
under the name MAZE.BAS. 

PLAY MAZE MASTER 

The upper left side of the 
screen contains the box in 
which the maze will be gener- 
ated. The maze walls are yellow, 
as is the dot that represents you. 
To the right is a box with an ex- 
treme closeup of the particular 
sector you're occupying. You're 
wearing your favorite maze- 



Antic ivelcomes back to 
these pages the prolific 
BASIC ST game program- 
mers, Pratt and Everman. 
We have accepted a whole 
new batch of imaginative 
ST adaptations of classic 
games from the authors of 

Super Star Trek (Antic, 
January 1987), Deduction 
(December 1986) and 
Hangman (November 
1986). See Pascal Toivers, 
the special ST disk bonus 
by this team, in the cur- 
rent issue— AU1\C ED 



contiiuiecl on next page 



March 1988 



ST Resource 



solving costume — a dapper red suit and hat. Below that 
is the Direction Selector. Click on North (up), South 
(down), East (right) or West (left) to move in that direction. 

Immediately below the Direction Selector is the Trace 
Box. "Trace" is the option that shows you where you've 
been. Without it, all }'Ou can see is your immediate po- 
sition. 

And below the Trace Box is the Options Box, with the 
choices MAKE, SHOW, PATH, RESET and QUIT. 

When you RUN MAZE. HAS, the first thing you're asked 
is to click on MAKE. Then, with the pointer in the Maze 
Box, hold down the button and drag to the desired maze 
size. Click on the right mouse button to accept the dimen- 
sions, or the left button to resize. When the maze is ready, 
you'll see the small yellow dot and one or more walls. 
Now you're ready to go. 

If you want to see where you're headed, click on SHOW. 
This draws the whole maze onscreen — or prints it to a 
printer, in case you prefer solving mazes with a pencil. 
Clicking on PATH simply shows the correct path, in red, 
from the beginning of the maze to the end. You can click 
on either SHOW or PATH any time — before, during or af- 
ter solving the maze. 

If you're completely stuck and and don't want to spend 
time extricating yourself and finding unexplored areas, 
press RESET, which redraws the current maze and lets you 
start over. To quit, just click on QUIT, which puts you back 
into ST BASIC command mode. Listing on page 71 ■ 



ProCopy 



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ST Disk Bonus 



Pascal Towers 

Program by Paul Pratt and Stephen Everman 



Antic proudly presents one of our most unusual disk bo- 
nuses. Pascal Towers is a flashy, lightning-fast Personal 
Pascal version of the 4,000-year-old game that previously 
appeared in our May 1987 issue as Pratt and Everman's ST 
BASIC Antic Tbwers. 

The object of the Towers game is diabolically simple. 
You must transfer all the hoops you start with from the 
left pole to one of the other two poles — one hoop at a 
time and in the least number of moves. But you can't 
place a larger hoop on top of a smaller one! Three hoops 
shouldn't take much more than seven moves to transfer 
Eight hoops, however, won't require less than 255 moves. 

Pascal Towers is written in Personal Pascal, the smooth, 
powerful ST programming language from Optimized Sys- 
tems Software (reviewed in Antic, May 1986). Pratt and 
Everman adapted Antic Tbwers into Personal Pascal as a 
learning project to teach themselves the language. 

Unfortunately, we haven't yet found enough Personal 
Pascal programmers among Antic's readers to justif\' using 
our limited page space to publish listings in this outstand- 
ing language. However, this month's S5.95 Antic Disk in- 
cludes ttvo versions of Pascal Towers. For Pascal program- 
mers who want to see how this game is put together, or 
to compare the listing with the May 1987 BASIC version, 
the source code is on disk. 

And for those who want to enjoy playing the game, the 
monthly disk also includes a "runtime" version of Pascal 
Towers that can be used imthout the Personal Pascal lan- 
guage. For instructions on operating the game, choose 
selection 5 on the Main Menu of Side B, 

The ST Help File on Side B explains how to transfer 
Antic ST programs to a 3 1/2 inch ST disk. Or if you use 
ANTIC ONLINE on CompuServe, we plan to have both ver- 
sions of Pascal Towers available for no-surcharge down- 
loading from our Software Shelf later this spring. 

Phone toll-free to the Antic Disk Desk at (800) 234- 
7001 for fast shipment of your March 1988 monthly 
disk — only S5.95 (plus S2 for shipping and handling) on 
your Visa or MasterCard. Or mail a S5.95 check (plus S2) 
to Antic Disk Desk, 544 Second Street, San Francisco, CA 
94107. 

Programmers: Antic seeks high-quaUty Disk Bonus pro- 
grams for Atari ST or 8-bit — even programs too large or 
complex for printing as a type-in. Submissions in any lan- 
guage with a runtime version are eligible. ■ 



42 



ANTIC, The Atari Resource 



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OF America ..,„„„„„„„„„,.,. 



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Customer Service 412-361-5291 



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ABACUS BOOKS 

ST Disk Drives $19 

ST Gem Prog. Ref $15 

ST Graphics & Sound $T5 

ST Internals $15 

ST Midi Programming. . . .$15 

ST Peeks & Pokes $13 

ST 3-D Grapllics $19 

ST Tricks & Tips $15 

ACADEMY 

Typing Tutor ST $23 

ACCESS 

Leader Board Coif ST . . .$25 
LB. Tourn. Disk #1 ST. . .$14 
Leader Board Golf & 

Tourn. Disk (D) $9.88 

Lip Slik Plus $17 

Tenth Frame ST $25 

Triple Pack; BHl, BH2, Raid 

Over Moscow (D) $14 

ACCOLADE 

Ace of Aces (D) $19 

Fight Night (D) $19 

Hardball (D) $19 

Hardball ST (D) $25 

Mean IB Golf ST (D) $25 

Mean 18 Famous Course Disk 

#2 ST $14 

Pinball Wizard ST $23 

Test Drive ST $25 

ACTIVISION 
Cross Country 

Road Race (D) $9.88 

Ghostbusters (D) $9.88 

Hacker (D) $9.88 

Music Studio ST $33 

Music Studio (D) $23 

AEGIS 

Animator ST $49 

Art Pak#1 ST $19 

AMERICAN EDUCATION 

Biology (D) $12 

Grammar (D) $12 

U.S. Geography (D) $12 

U.S. History (D) $12 

Vocabulary (D) $12 

World History (D) $12 

ARTWORX 

Bridge 5.0 ST $23 

Centerfold Squares ST . . .Call 

Cycle Knight (D) $14 

Linkword French (D) $16 

Linkword French ST $19 

Linkword German (D). . . .$16 
Linkword Spanish (D) ... .$16 
Linkword Spanish ST ... .$19 

Strip Poker (D) $21 

Strip Poker ST $25 

Female Data Disk 1(D) . . .$14 

Male Data Disk 2(D) $14 

Female Data Disk 3(D) . . .$14 
Female Data Disk#4 ST . .$14 
Female Data Disk#5 ST . .$14 
AVALON HILL 

Spitfire '40 (D) $23 

Spitfire '40 ST Call 

AVANTAGE 

Spy vs. Spy 1 & 2 (D) . .$9.88 

AVANTE GARDE 

PC Ditto ST Call 

BATTERIES INCLUDED 

Degas Elite ST $39 

Thunder; Assist. ST $25 

BAUDVILLE 

Blazing Paddles (D) $23 

Rainy Day Games (D) $19 

Video Vegas ST $23 

Video Vegas (D) $19 



BRODERBUND 

Karateka (D) $9.88 

Loderunner (D) $9.88 

Print Shop (D) $26 

Print Shop Graphics 

Library#l, #2, #3 (D)$16. Ea. 
P.S. Companion 64K (D). .$23 
Super Bike Challenge ST. .$14 
CENTRAL POINT 

Copy 2 ST $23 

DATASOFT 

Alternate Reality: City ST .$26 

Alternate Reality: 

Dungeon (D) $26 

Tomahawk (D) $21 

DAVIDSON 

Math Blaster (D) $32 

Spell It (D) $32 

Word Attack (D) $32 

ELECTRONIC ARTS 
Software Classic Series; 
Age of Adventure (D) ..$9.88 
Archon 1 or 2 (D) . .$9.88 Ea. 
Financial Cookbook (D) .$9.88 
Lords of Conquest (D) . .$9.88 



EPYX 

Boulder Dash Const. Kit (D) 

or ST $16 

Champ Wrestling ST $14 

Dragonriders Pern (D) . .$6.88 
Gateway to Apshai (D) $6.88 

Pitstop 2(D) $6.88 

Rogue ST $23 

Spy vs. Spy 3; Arctic 

Antics (D) or ST $16 

Sub Battle Simulator ST . $23 

Summer Games (D) $14 

Super Cycle ST $14 

Temple of Apshai (D). . .$6.88 
Temple Apshai Trilogy (D) $14 
Temple Apshai Trilogy ST. $14 

Winter Games ST $14 

World Games ST $23 

FIREBIRD 

Golden Path ST $29 

Guild of Thieves ST $29 

Guild of Thieves 64K (D) .$25 
lewels of Darkness ST . . .$19 

Knight Ore ST $29 

MRCA Mach 2(D) $16 



ICD 

BBS Express ST $57 

MIO (256K) $179 

MID (1 meg) $299 

XE Adapter for MIO $19 

PR Connection $59 

Rambo XL $29 

US Doubler; 

with Sparta DOS $49 

without Sparta DOS . . . $29 
ILIAD 

Athena 2 ST $65 

INFOCOM 

Beyond Zork ST $33 

Hitchhiker's Guide (D) . . $19 
Hollywood Hijinx (D) . . . .$23 
Leather Goddesses (D) . . .$23 

Stalionfall (D) $23 

The Lurking Horror (D) . .$23 

Zork Trilogy (D) $39 

INTRACORP 

Bumper Slicker Maker ST. $39 

Business Card Maker ST . .$39 

LDW 

Basic Compiler 2.0 ST . . .$59 



Goldrunner ST $25 

International Soccer ST . .$25 

Karate Kid 2 ST $25 

Space Shuttle 2 ST $25 

Time Bandit ST $25 

MICROLEAGUE 

Baseball (D) $26 

Baseball 2 ST $39 

Box Score Stats (D) $16 

General Manager (D) or ST $19 
1986 Team Data (D) or ST$14 

WWF Wrestling ST $33 

MICROPROSE 

F15 Strike Eagle (D) $23 

F15 Strike Eagle ST $25 

Silent Service (D) $23 

Silent Service ST $25 

Top Gunner (D) $16 

MI-GRAPH 

Easy Draw ST $59 

Label Master Elite ST $29 

MILES COMPUTING 

Harrier Strike Mission ST .$25 

ST Wars $25 



Supra 1SOO ST Modenn 




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while they last! 



Supra 
Corporation 



Mail Order Monsters (D)$9.88 

Movie Maker (D) $9.88 

M.U.L.E. (D) $9.88 

Music Const. Set (D) . . .$9.88 

One-on-One (D) $9.88 

Pinball Const. Set (D) . .$9.88 
Racing Dest. Set (D) . . .$9.88 
Seven Cities of Cold (D) $9.88 
Super Boulder Dash (D).$9.88 
Touchdown Football (D) $9.88 
ELECTRONIC ARTS 

Arcticfox ST $29 

Bard's Tale ST $32 

Chessmaster 2000(D) $26 

Chessmaster 2000 ST $29 

Deluxe Print 2 ST Call 

Empire ST $32 

Financial Cookbook ST . . .$14 

Gone Fishin' ST $26 

Gridiron ST $26 

Marble Madness ST $26 

Musical Const. Set ST ... .$32 

Scrabble ST Call 

Star Fleet 2 ST Call 



The Pawn 64K(D) $25 

The Pawn ST $29 

Sentry ST $29 

Silicon Dreams ST $19 

Star Glider ST $29 

FIRST BYTE 

First Letters & Words ST .$33 

First Shapes ST $33 

Kid Talk ST $33 

Math Talk ST $33 

Math Talk Fractions ST . . . $33 

Smooth Talker ST $33 

Speller Bee ST $33 

•These Programs Talk! 
FTL 

Dungeonmaster ST $25 

Sundog ST $23 

CAMESTAR 

Champ. Baseball ST $25 

Champ. Basketball ST .... $25 

Champ. Football ST $25 

HIGH-TECH EXPRESSIONS 
Award Ware(D) $9.88 



Club Backgammon ST $23 MINDSCAPE 

Vegas Craps ST $23 

Vegas Gambler ST $23 

MASTERTRONIC 



Action Biker (D) $6.88 

Chopper X ST $14 

Ninja (D) $6.88 

Ninja Mission ST $14 

Renegade ST $14 

Speed King (D) $6.88 

The Last V8 (D) $6.88 

Vegas Poker & 

lackpot(D) $6.88 

MICHTRON 

Airball ST $25 

Airball Const. Set ST $16 

BBS ST $49 

Cashman ST $19 

CFA Basic Book ST $25 

CFA Basic Int. ST $39 

CFA Basic Compiler ST . .$39 

GFA Companion ST $33 

CFA Vector ST $33 



Balance of Power ST $33 

Bop & Wrestle 64K $19 

De)aVu ST $33 

Gauntlet ST $33 

Gauntlet 64K (D) $23 

High Roller ST $33 

Infiltrator 64K (D) $23 

Into the Eagle's Nest ST . .$25 

Paperboy ST $33 

Plutos ST $19 

Q-Ball ST $19 

Shadowgate ST $33 

Super Star Hockey ST. . . .$33 

Uninvited ST $33 

Uridium ST $25 

Xevious ST $19 

MINDSCAPE CINEMAWARE 
Defender of Crown ST . . .$33 

S.D.I. ST $33 

Sinbad ST Call 

OMNITREND 

Breach ST $25 



Universe (D) $33 

Universe 2 ST $33 

ORIGIN 

Autoduel (D) or ST $33 

Ultima 3 (D) or ST $25 

Ultima 4 (D) or ST $39 

PSYGNOSIS 

Barbarian ST $25 

Terrorpods ST $25 

QMI 

Desk Cart ST $69 

SIERRA 

Black Cauldron ST $25 

D. Duck's Playground ST .$16 
King's Quest 

1, 2, or 3 ST $33 Ea. 

Leisure Suit Larry ST $25 

Police Quest ST $33 

Space Quest 1 or 2 ST $33 Ea. 

Winnie the Pooh ST $16 

SIMON & SCHUSTER 

Star Trek ST $25 

SOFTLOGIC 

Font Disk »1 ST $19 

Partner Forms $19 

Publishing Partner ST $59 

SPRINGBOARD 

Certificate Maker ST $25 

CM. Library#l ST $19 

SSI 

Colonial Conquest ST. . . . $25 

Gettysburg (D) $37 

Phantasie 1 or 2 (D) . .$25 Ea. 
Phantasie 1, 2 or 3 ST . . .$25 

Rings of Zilfin ST $25 

Roadwar Europa ST $29 

Roadwar 2000 ST $25 

Shiloh: Grant's Trial (D) . .$25 
War Game Const. Set (D).$19 
War Game Const. Set ST .$23 
Wizard's Crown (D) or ST $25 
SUBLOGIC 

Flight Simulator 2 (D) $32 

Flight Simulator 2 ST $33 

F.S. Scenery Disks Call 

TIMEWORKS 

Data Manager ST $49 

Desktop Publisher ST . . . .$87 

Partner ST $44 

Swiflcalc ST $49 

Word Writer ST $49 

UNICORN 

Aesop's Fables ST $29 

All About America ST $39 

Animal Kingdom ST $23 

Decimal Dungeon ST . . . .$23 

Fraction Action ST $23 

Math Wizard ST $23 

UNISON WORLD 

Art Gallery: Fantasy ST. . .$19 

Art Gallery 1 or 2 ST .$19 Ea. 

Print Master Plus ST $25 

P.M. Fonts & Borders ST $23 
VIP TECHNOLOGIES 
VIP Professional ST VI. 2 $149 
WORD PERFECT 

WP Word Processor Call 

ACCESSORIES 

Bonus 5'/4 SS, DD . .$4.99 BX 
Bonus 5'/4 DS, DD. .$5.99 BX 
CompuServe Starter Kit . $19 

Disk Case (40-3yi) $6.99 

Disk Case (75-5%) $6.88 

Disk Drive Cleaner-3W .$6.88 
Disk Drive Cleaner-5y< .$6.88 

Epyx 500X1 loystick $14 

Supra 20 Meg Drive ST . Call 
Xetec Printer Int $39 



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replaced with the same merchandise only. Other returns subject to a 15% restocking charge! After 60 days from your purchase date, please refer to the warranty include with the product 
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10 AM-4 PM EASTERN TIME. Because this ad had to be written 2-3 mos. before it was published, prices & availability are subject to change! New titles are arriving daily! Please call for 
more information. 



tIRCl! 040 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



ST Resource 



Timeworks 

Partner 



ST desktop set beats "Sidekick" 




HE ATARI ST DESKTOP, with its file folder and trash can icons, 
is a good metaphor for a real desktop. Timeworks' Partner ST 
takes that metaphor even farther by giving your desktop an elec- 
tronic rolodex, memopad, calculator, alarm clock and appointment 
calendar — in short, just about every office tool you'd keep within 
reach except paperclips. 

Partner ST is a desk accessory — which means that it loads into 
memory when you turn on your ST and pops onto the screen any- 
time you click Partner ST on the Desk menu. It can be run either 
from the desktop or from inside any GEM-based program. 



By HEIDI BRUMBAUGH, 
Antic Programs Editor 



iiii. hit Qgticns ilstk Print [»t Ucr fe Ikllim JitLfJ 




Ciit Filf Options Slocii Print Inl Horas flutiiner HELf'' 



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44 



ANTIC, The Atari Resource 



ST Resource 



It has an intuitive interface. Experienced computer users 
probably won't even need documentation to get Partner 
ST up and running. Even computing novices won't need 
too much time learning to use these utilities. 

Partner has seven different features, which adds up to 
a lot of memory — so much, in fact, that some larger pro- 
grams will not run on a 520ST with Partner ST installed. 
In addition, at least 7K of extra memory must be reserved 
if you want to use the memopad. Fortunately, you can 
deactivate some of Partner's features and free the extra 
memor}'. If you really want to save memory, there is a mini- 
version of Partner ST which has four features permanently 
deactivated. 

Partner ST comes on two disks and includes Escape, 
a desk accessory similar to the arcade game Breakout, and 
a 60,000-word thesaurus, which is so easy to use that the 
manual devotes more space to the game. 

The calculator itself has enough features to be a solid 
standalone desk accessory. You can either click on the 
number keys with the mouse or use the ST's numeric key- 
pad. It offers Reverse Polish notation, trigonometric func- 
tions and 10 memory locations, and it allows data entry 
in radians or degrees. You can perform mathematical and 
logical operations on hexadecimal or binary numbers. A 
"tape button" sends output to the printer, turning your 
ST into a convenient adding machine. 

My favorite Partner ST feature is the Memopad, a text 
editor with powerful features such as insert and typeover 
modes, wordwrap, a bare-bones search function and cut- 
and-paste buttons that work on a line of text. You can 
use the mouse to change cursor position — a nice feature 
if you're used a GEM-based word processor already. 

Users of Timeworks' Word Writer ST should recognize 
the Memopad Setup adjustments of page size and top, bot- 
tom, left and right margins. You can print memo files, and 
there's also a typewriter mode that lets you send text 
directly to the printer, a line at a time. Memopad files can 
be saved to disk, but the current text also remains in com- 
puter memory, so each time you activate Partner, the same 
memo is restored. 

The editor formats text as you type, which is not neces- 
sarily good — if you make several corrections, the screen 
blinks constantly as it is redrawn. My only serious prob- 
lem with the memopad was that it is fairly slow — and gets 
slower as the file size increases. Fortunately, it has a good- 
sized type-ahead buffer 

The package includes some vital statistics that load into 
the Memopad. These files contain information such as area 
codes, automobile mileage between cities, weights and 
measures and a metric conversion list, as well as a list of 
toll-free numbers for airlines, rental car agencies, hotels, 
etc. 

The Partner ST Calendar/Plamier displays a calendar for 
the current month. Click on an individual day to enter 
appointments, key tasks or a to-do list. You can also enter 
a one-line memo for that day, which will be displayed on 



the monthly calendar You can print information for in- 
dividual days or the entire month, or you can move 
through the calendar by month and year 

The Calendar/Planner includes a project planner that 
keeps track of time spent on special projects. You can then 
print time totals for the specified period. 

There's also an Alarm Clock, Address File and Expense 
Manager, which share the same kind of interface and are 
easy to master. You can set an alarm to repeat daily, weekly, 
monthly or yearly. The address file works like a simple 
database. You can sort records by last name, index entries 
by category (such as family and business) and search a rec- 
ord on any field. A predefined function lets you create 
mailing labels, and you can print mailing label informa- 
tion to disk. If you have a modem. Partner ST will auto- 
matically dial a phone number 

Each record in Partner's Expense Manager contains the 
date, item and amount of the expense. Expenses can be 
indexed on a main category or two sub-categories. Part- 
ner ST prints reports to disk or paper and includes totals 
for a given time period. 

The real convenience of these programs is the way they 
work together and with other GEM programs. Calendar/ 
Planner information can be used automatically by the 
Alarm Clock or Expense Manager Addresses can be 
printed to disk for your own word processor or database, 
or even Partner's own Memopad. And Memopad files can 
be used with other word processors. 

Partner ST also gives you access to operating systems 
commands. Clicking the Disk Commands function but- 
ton presents a menu that lets you copy, rename, move, 
delete, show, print and examine information on files. 

You can also send printer commands directly to the 
printer, format disks and create or remove folders. These 
commands can be indispensable while you're inside an- 
other program. For example, you may need to delete files 
to create disk space — some tasks are performed more eas- 
ily this way than by dragging things around the desktop. 

However, you can perform only one operation at a time. 
For example, you must select the COPY option for each 
file, rather than copying several at once. 

The manual is excellent — good for beginners and ex- 
perienced users alike. It has a short start-up section, as 
well as detailed chapters for each accessory. It has lots 
of screen shots, so it's easy to follow. But though Partner 
ST is so easy to pick up, I'd still recommend reading the 
manual thoroughly. Otherwise, yOu might miss out on 
some vital little features. ■ 



PARTNER ST 

Timeworks Inc. 

444 Lake Cook Road 

Deerfield, IL 60015 

(312) 948-9202 

$69.95, color and monochrome 

CIRCIE 279 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



March 1988 



45 



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ST Resource 



ST Games Gallery 

Reviews: Empire, Super Huey, Breach 




SUPER HUEY 

Super Huey is to helicopters what 
Flight Simulator II is to airplanes — a 
true simulation. But don't panic! A 
built-in "school" mission teaches the 
basics of flying a helicopter. 

While the manual isn't as compre- 
hensive as Flight Simulator's, it dis- 
cusses the conventions of helicopter 
control and explains the main control 
systems. Flight controls are simulated 
with the mouse, while computer, 
navigation and weapons control com- 
mands are entered via the keyboard. 
Because of the different motions and 
button combinations required to fly 
Super Huey with a mouse, practice 
can be frustrating. But practice makes 
perfect. 

This first-person simulator has a 
detailed control panel and makes ex- 
cellent use of the ST's graphics. Some 
33 functioning instruments, mostly 
analog or digital gauges, are displayed. 
The views from the large front wind- 
shield and smaller side windshields 
near the floor are excellent. 

Most of the graphics detail, how- 
ever, is concentrated in the cockpit 
display. Hostile aircraft and structures 
below the helicopter are far less 
detailed, but it's still unnerving to 
watch an enemy craft fire upon you 
during the rescue, exploration and 
combat missions, which you can en- 
ter at any time via the on-board 
computer: 



Rescue Mission— You must find 
stranded military personnel with a 
limited homing device and carefully 
established air search techniques. 
They'll fire signal flares when they 
hear your engines. A careful landing 
lets these grateful men climb aboard 
to head back to base. 

Exploration Mission — Map the ter- 
rain surrounding your base camp. The 
area is quite large and might best be 
explored in stages. Your on-board 
navigational tools will help, but a cer- 
tain amount of dead-reckoning and 
compass savvy won't hurt, either 

Combat Mission — Eliminate the 32- 
ship enemy force — but with only 20 
rockets and 2,000 machine gun 
rounds. The enemy only attacks from 
the front, but skillful flying is neces- 
sary to avoid their experienced 
marksmanship. 

Despite any gamelike ambience in 
Super Huey, remember that you must 
fly your aircraft, rather than simply 
steering in a given direction. This in- 
creases the challenge and adds to the 
realism.-JOHN KINTZ 

$39.95. Cosmi, 415 N. Figueroa Street, 
Wilmington, CA 90744. (213) 835-9687. 

CIRCLE 250 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



EMPIRE 

I rarely play a game that's so good 
and so addictive that I find myself 
starting a game in the late afternoon, 
and the next time I look at my watch 
it's 2 a.m. Credit Empire's magnetism 
to a captivating, complex scenario 
and a simple, intelligently designed 
user interface. 

The evil Krellan Empire, aiming to- 
ward galactic control, has taken 
several low-technology planets. Your 
mission is to stop this onslaught. 




planet by planet, by transporting a 
landing party into a city and using it 
as a base for planetary control. 

As you take control of each metro- 
polis, you direct it to produce war 
machines. It's usually wise to start 
with armies, which take five turns to 
produce (six for the first unit, though: 
more time is needed to retool facto- 
ries). After the first dozen armies start 
moving over the land, you'll need 
transports to move them to other con- 
tinents, planes to scout ahead, and 
ships to control the seas. 

Two or three can play, with the 
computer controlling any or all sides. 
You can handicap players by giving 
them less production and worse ac- 
curacy in battle, while the computer 
has two skill settings. 

Generate a random planet or load 
one from the disk, then begin your 
campaign. On a planetary scale, you 
need not concern yourself with in- 
dividual troops: you issue commands 
to units, directing them to move to a 
particular place, attack a given city 
and, later, engage the enemy. This 
sounds simple, but remember that the 
screen quickly fills with hundreds of 
units. Fortunately, the program makes 
the most of the ST's superior menu 
and windowing capabilities, making 
Empire surprisingly easy to play. 

You can establish flight paths be- 
tween cities to bring your planes to 
continued on page 49 



Marcli 



47 




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Every Issue Includes: 


START 


— MIDI and Music 


■-^t; 


—Online 




—Entertainment 
— New Owners 


«««. '-:--,-; 'c:.-.::^. 


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ST Resource 



the front. The escort command 
moves ships in formation, and a 
group command mode lets yoii ex- 
pand a box around a number of units 
and give them all the same order. With 
port cities generating mighty battle- 
ships, )'OLi soon command the oceans 
as well — but keep your eyes peeled 
for the enem}'. 

The program provides a status re- 
port showing how much of the world 
has been concjuercd, while the ship 
report shows the names and locations 
of your boats. A production map 
shows what each city is producing, 
atid the world map gives an overview 
of the entire planet. Survey mode lets 
you check the orders given to any 
unit, and a status line at the top of the 
screen displays unit name, damage 
and current objective. The manual 
and reference card are thorough and 
concise. 

My only complaint is that a little of 
the command logic design could be 
better. For instance, when you start to 
transport loading armies, you're not 
alerted when loading is complete, so 
vital resources are idle for several 
turns. Also, ships often get hung up 
on shorelines waiting for orders, 
rather than using the shortest route to 
their destination.— STEVE PANAK 

$54.95. Interstel (Electronic Arts), 1820 
Gateway Drive, San Mateo, CA 94404. 
(415)571-7991. 

CIRCIE 252 ON READER SERVICE CARD 

BREACH 

Breach puts you in the distant fu- 
ture on some unnamed planet where 
you command a squadron of interstel- 
lar marines. (Any similarity to the 
movie 'Aliens" is not purely coin- 
cidental.) The fighting scenarios be- 
come progressively tougher and each 



WordPerfect ST Fixes Coming 



Coming soon in Antic will be an in-depth review of WordPerfect, 
the eager!)' anticipated ST version of the number-one bestselling 
word processor for IBM PCs. WordPerfect ST (S395) comes on six 
disks crammed with advanced features. It boasts a 600-page manual, 
a 115,000-word dictionary, a 10,000-word thesaurus, a disk tutorial 
and drivers for over 250 printers. 

Antic has been testing WordPerfect ST's debut version 4.1 and an 
update that arrived within a month of the first release. Unfor- 
tunately, both of these versions have glitches. Among the problems 
are onscreen garbage characters after certain operations and a suscep- 
tibility to crashes. 

WordPerfect Corp. is already aware of the bugs and is rushing an 
even newer fixed-up version which we'll be reviewing. Meanwhile, 
WordPerfect Corp. will keep replacing purchasers' early defecti^'e 
versions until all bugs are exterminated. 

$395, color or monochrome. WordPerfect Corp., 288 West Center Street, 
Orem, UT 84057. (801) 225-5000. (800) 321-5906— customer tech support 
only. 



has a specific goal. 

Breach also contains elements of 
role-playing games. The ultimate goal 
is sur\-ival and the advancement of 
your squad leader. One squad leader 
comes on the disk, but you can cre- 
ate others. The leader's death in bat- 
tle deletes him from the disk. 

lndi\idual control of each marine 
is gi\'en in turn. Your options are 
limited to moving, firing weapons, 
and retrieving or using objects. When 
a marine's allotted mcnement points 
reach zero, )'Ou take control of the 
next marine down the line until the 
turn ends. The grenades, demolition 
charges, rocket launchers, etc. found 
by }'Oiir troops are \'ital to successfully 
completing the assignments. The 
computer controls enem)' forces and 



Atari in your closet? 

Convert it into quick cash. 
Antic classified ads sell your unused Atari equipment fast! 



there are no provisions for a two- 
pla)'er game. 

The graphics in Breach are nothing 
special. The marines lack detail and 
animation is limited. Fortunately, the 
rich \'ariet)' of terrain somewhat com- 
pensates for this — dirt, grass, beds, ta- 
bles, computers and ele\'ators. Com- 
mands are mouse/icon based. 

The best element of Breach is the 
scenario builder — just as powerful as 
other "game construction kits" — 
which lets )'Ou create scenarios and 
missions far more exciting than those 
on the game disk. You can design as 
many as five levels of playfield with 
objects and characters, as well as set 
mission objectives. You can also de- 
sign an entire in\'asion force from 
scratch and determine individual 
strengths and weaknesses. 

Hardcore wargamers will probabh' 
find Breach's variations on old themes 
intriguing, but for the rest of us this 
ST game just isn't much fun.— HARVEY 
BERNSTEIN ■ 

$39.95. Omnitrend Software, P.O. Box 
733, West Simsbury, CT 06092. (203) 
685-6917. 

CIRCLE 251 OB READER SERVICE CARD 



March 1988 



49 



ST Resource 

ST MIDI 

Reviews: CZ-Android, CZ-Patch 

By JAMES PIERSON-PERRY 



CZ-ANDROID 

The CZ-Android is a "must-have" 
ST program for users of the popular 
and affordable Casio synthesizers. 
This patch editor features the innova- 
tive "Droid" function, which brings 
artificial intelligence to automated 
patch creation. (A "patch" is the in- 
strument control setting used for a 
particular sounds.) As of this writing, 
all Casio synthesizers up through the 
CZ-1 are supported. One single-sided 
disk can hold 146 banks (2,336 
sounds). 

The GEM-based CZ-Android is easy 
to use. In fact, it's almost a shame that 
the manual is so clear and informa- 
tive, because you'll rarely need it. 

Two patch banks can be kept in 
memory at once. You can customize 
patch banks easily, select an entire 
bank for copying or send it to the syn- 
thesizer. You can specify MIDI chan- 
nel, synthesizer model and degree of 
"safety" to keep you from perform- 
ing an operation you don't really want 
to perform. Unfortunately, MIDI- 
through with rechannelization is not 
supported. 

The real meat of the program is in 
the patch editor module. The editor 
screen shows all patch parameters in 
a logical and tidy fashion. The graphic 
representations of the DCO and vi- 
brato are handy for visualizing the 
patch elements. All parameters can be 
altered with the mouse, but the edi- 
tor doesn't permit illegal parameter 
values or settings. 

Any of the six patch envelopes can 
be selected and shown as a graph of 
level versus time, but only a single 
envelope can be displayed at a time — 
showing at least the three envelopes 
per line would be better, as it is their 
interaction that provides the overall 
sound. And only trial and error will 



help you adjust the playing time of the 
patch. 

Tired of synthesizing? Put the 
Droid to work. This routine either 
tries to distort your current patch data 
or creates an entirely new patch. Ei- 
ther way, artificial intelligence proce- 
dures gear the results toward useful 
sounds rather than random noise. It's 
great fun to turn the Droid loose and 
see what emerges, but it's no substi- 
tute for intelligent patch pro- 
gramming. 

CZ-Android can be copied to an- 
other floppy or hard disk, but the 
original disk must be in Drive A for 
it to load. 

$99.95, color or monochrome. Hybrid 
Arts, Inc., 11920 West Olympic Blvd., Los 
Angeles, CA 90064. (213) 826-3777. 

CIRCLE m ON READER SERVICE CARD 



CZ PATCH 

I have used Dn T's CZ Patch heav- 
ily for over a year and can recom- 
mend it. Its main strengths are multi- 
ple graphic displays of line envelopes 
and advanced editing features. Against 
these must be balanced the lack of 
graphical editing and automated 
patch creation. It supports the Casio 
CZ-101, 1000, 3000, 5000, but doesn't 
work with newer models such as the 
CZ-1 or 230S. 

CZ Patch, the first ST Patch editor 
program for Casio synthesizers, 
comes on a heavily copy-protected 
disk (backups cost 110). The manual 
is fair, but terse to the extreme. It has 
no screen pictures, and the photo- 
reduced text is hard on the eyes. The 
synthesizer must be directly con- 
nected to the ST— you can't use a mas- 
ter keyboard with MIDI data rechan- 
nelization. 



Typical of Dr. T software, this 
program doesn't follow standard 
GEM usage, thus violating a per- 
ceived standard ST user interface. 
More importantly, it doesn't allow 
desk accessories either. But despite 
these drawbacks, the program does 
work extremely well. 

There are two basic functions: 
Patch Librarian and Patch Creation/ 
Editing. All operations can be done 
by both mouse or keyboard control. 
Up to four banks of patches can be 
kept in memory at once. Creating a 
custom patch bank is as simple as 
clicking on and dragging a patch from 
a displayed bank and moving it to its 
new location. The patch file format 
comes straight from the MIDI system- 
exclusive dump, meaning that the data 
is received and stored exactly accord- 
ing to the published Casio MIDI im- 
plementation guide. About 87 patch 
banks (almost 1,400 Patches) can be 
stored on a single-sided disk. 

The main interest, however, prob- 
ably lies in the patch editing func- 
tions. All patch parameter data can be 
modified and tested immediately 
from the edit screen for effect on 
sound timbre. Any changes made to 
the patch can be tested immediately 
by pressing the right mouse button, 
which sounds middle C on the 
keyboard. 

When first shown, all envelope data 
is given in a time-based format rather 
than the Casio standard rate/level for- 
mat, but you can toggle between the 
two. The use of a time axis is helpful, 
particularly when dealing with 
sounds that have a delay or echo 
effect. 

Specialized patch-editing options 
include: insert and delete an envelope 
segment, copy an entire voice or sin- 
gle envelope from any patch currently 
continued on page 52 



50 



ANTIC, The Atari Resource 



8T Resource 



Rick's Games Cafe 

Six ST entertainments reviewed 

By RICK TEVERBAUGH 



TRACKER, SENTRY, 
KNIGHT ORG 

Firebird's Tracker is a shoot-em-up 

that's a bit reminiscent of the classic 
8-bit space game, Star Raiders. Except 
that Tracker is played over a huge 
maze of lines which take you from 
place to place, and junctions where 
most of the combat takes place. 

You control up to eight skimmers 
in each game. A skimmer starts in one 
of the safe areas outside the grid. The 
object is to reach the center of the grid 
and destroy the centerpoint sector. 
Along the way you'll find defenders 
and scouts to destroy. Plasma balls, 
your main weapon, are fired by press- 
ing the left mouse button. The mouse 
is used to guide your craft, but it's best 
to use the automatic pilot when the 




ship isn't threatened. Your time is bet- 
ter spent monitoring the enemy po- 
sitions on the numerous map displays 
at your command. The program will 
sound yellow alert when trouble is 
approaching, and red alert when 
you're already in dutch. 

Each maze is different, so a strategy 
that works well on one won't always 
work on the next. But it is the mix 
of strategy and arcade features that 
keeps the game fresh and keeps you 
in the game long after you've forgot- 
ten where you've put your other 
games. 

Another new Firebird game that is 



just forgettable is Knight Ore. I've 
only been playing computer games 
for about eight years, but it took me 
two hours just to figure out how to 
get out of a garbage dump and com- 
municate with the first inliabitant I en- 
countered. 

Of the 36 pages in the manual, only 
nine are devoted to game mechanics 
and features. The other 27 pages are 
a novella. You're an ore in a place 
similar to medieval England. The 
graphics are entertaining but not as 
good as some past efforts. 

Finally, there's The Sentry, possi- 
bly the most difficult program I've 




ever had to describe. Most other 
games are similar enough in form or 
playing style to draw some familiar 
comparisons, but when the game sys- 
tem and object are so completely new 
and original, my job becomes much 
harder — but the overall enjoyment of 
the game grows. The Sentry's game 
system is unusual, but still solid in 
thought and design. 

You must avoid The Sentry while 
absorbing energy on any of the thou- 
sands of landscapes included on the 
disk. Some of the energy is picked up 
from objects already on the surface 
when you land. Others can be created 
once you land, then absorbed. 

Despite being played on a two- 
dimensional screen, the game is 
played in three dimensions. It is vital 



to climb higher on each landscape, 
not only to better see what can be ab- 
sorbed, but also to have a chance to 
destroy The Sentry before its hateful 
eye-beam catches you and steals your 
life. 

The amount of energy you pick up 
on one landscape before destroying 
The Sentry will decide which land- 
scape is next. If the next screen is too 
difficult, you can go back and replay 
the previous landscape, absorb more 
or less enei^y and then be transported 
to a different site for your next 
challenge. 

$44.95 each. Firebird Licensees, Inc., 
71 North Franklin Turnpike, Waldwick, NJ 
07463. (201) 444-5700. 

CIRCLE 272 ON READER SERVICE CARD 




RINGS OF ZILFIN 

Another graphic adventure of this 
ilk is Rings of Zilfln. The object here 
is to find the famous rings and con- 
quer Lord Dragos. The classes of your 
band of characters are also different 
and include humans, halflings, 
dwarves, elves and zilfins. But the big- 
gest difference is in the variety and 
number of foes (or minions of dark- 
ness, as they're called). 

$39.95. Strategic Simulations, 1046 N. 
Rengstorff Ave., Mountain View, CA 
94043. (415) 964-1200. 

CIRCIE 275 ON READER SERVICE CARD 

continued on next page 



March 



51 



ST Resource 



THE BARD'S TALE 

The Bard's Tale is out for the ST 
and it's about time. This game has 
long been a staple for other machines 
and now that it finall)' has made an 
appearance, I can only say that the 
wait has been worth it The Bard's Tale 
is a graphics role-playing adventure. 
You create your own band of charac- 
ters in classes such as Warrior, Pala- 
din ("Have Mace, Will Travel"), Rogue, 
Bard, Hunter, Monk, Conjurer, Magi- 
cian, Sorcerer and Wizard. 1 always 
lean toward being the Bard, because 
my favorite line from the manual is: 
"When the going gets tough, the Bard 
goes drinking." 

Movement and most input is han- 
dled \'ia the mouse. Equip your band 
well and then go out to release the 
city of Skara Brae from the evil in- 
fluence of Mangar. 

Of the two games, I'd say The 
Bard's Tale is a bit more atti~active, but 
Rings is a bit easier to get into. Both 
are attractive packages. 



$49.95. Electronic Arts, 1820 Gateway 
Drive, San Mateo, CA 94404. (415) 
571-7991. 



CIRCIE 274 ON READER SERVICE CARD 




BOULDER DASH 
CONSTRUCTION 

Boulder Dash Construction Set 

is part of a new line called Maxx Out, 
from the Epyx stable of games. I'd 
mostly recommend it for Boulder 
Dash fanatics who know the game in- 
side and out and want new horizons 
and challenges. They certainly can be 
created here. 



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for ANTIC IVlagazine. 

n Enclosed is$ . 



. cases; 



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Six 



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D Charge my: (IVIinimum $15) 
D American Express D Visa 
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Add $1 per case/binder postage 
and handling. Outside USA $2.50 
percase/binder.(U.S. Fundsonly.) 



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PA residents add 6% sales tax 

SATISFACTION GUARANTEED . 



A major problem with the package 
is its scant documentation. What 
there is assuines an intricate know- 
ledge of the game system. ■ 

$24.95. Epyx, 600 Galveston Drive, 
P.O. Box 8020, Redwood City, CA 94063. 
(415) 366-0606. 

CIRCLE 276 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



Rick Teverhaiigh of Indiana is one 
of the most active game reviewers in 
t/je U.S. Tloe title for tijese collected 
reviews comes from the film "Casa- 
blanca" where Bogart ran "Rick's 
Cafe Americain." 



ST MIDI REVIEW 

continued from page 50 

in memory, swap voices within the 
patch, and compare the edited patch 
with its original version. Individual 
envelopes can also be saved to disk. 
An extremely useful feature not 
found in any other CZ patch editor to 
date is em^elope scaling, which can be 
done with respect to time (rate) or 
level. You can stretch or compress the 
patch sound to a desired time, or bal- 
ance the relative voluines (DCA levels) 
of patches used when the CZ is played 
in iTiulti-tiinbral mode. Since there is 
only one output jack on the syn- 
thesizer, this lets you adjust the sound 
mix to prevent voices from being lost 
in the background. ■ 

$129, color or monochrome. Dr. T's Mu- 
sic Software, 220 Boylston Street, Suite 
306, Chestnut Hill, MA 02167. (617) 
244-6954. 

CIRCLE 278 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



Antic 
Monthly Disk 

^pnly $5.95> 



52 



ANTIC, The Atari Resource 



THE HARD & SOFT OF IT. 



-M 











•III" WA ^^. 



MUSIC EXPO 'aflP 

^PRIL29^^^M^ 1,1988 

LONG BEACH CONVENTION GENTEF 

Long Beach, Galiforrtia 



BRAND NEW ATARI 520ST FM MONO SYSTEM only $299 

with trade-In of 1050 drive or $159 with 800XL computer. Add $145 for color systems. 



BRAND NEW ATARI ST 20MB HARD DRIVE 
ONLY $499 with trade-la of SF314 drive. 

BRAND NEW ATARI SX551 360K DRIVE 

ONLY $119 witti trade-In of 
1050 drive or $159 with 800XL computer. 

FREE BRAND NEW AVATEX 1200 HC or 

AVATEX 2400HC for $89 w/ltti 

trade-In of working Atari BOOXL computer 

and 1050 drive. 

We carry the full line of Atari products. 



NEW PRODUCTS 



ST, PC, MORE 

Alari 520ST FM Mono Syslem $679 1 Meg RAM Upgrade COMPLETE ... $119 

Alan 520ST FM Color Syslem ....... $825 Alaci SF314 Drive $229 

.SH204 20MB ST drive $C25 SM124 Mono Monilor $149 

SC1324 Color Monitor $299 AnrJ much. rnur:h morell! 

DRIVES a MORE 

IndubGT 180K $185 SX551 360K $199 

MODEMS 

Avalex 1200 $ 86 Avalex 2400hc $189 

Avatex 1200I1C $ 109 AlariSX212 $109 



. $189 



SmarlLink 2400hc . 
XM301 MorJem... . 



. $189 

. $ 45 



PRINTERS 

Star NX-10 $169 Sar NP-10 $149 

Star NB-15. 300cps. 100 cps LQ. IBM/EPSON Compalible . . 
Slar NB-2410. 216cps. 72 cps LO, IBM/EPSON Compalible . 
Slar ND-10. ISOcps, 45 cps NLO. IBM/EPSON Compalible . . 

UPGRADES 

256K XL RAM UG . . . . $ 56 
Printer Connection ... $ 45 

ICDMI0 256K $169 

P;R. Connection $ 59 

ICD MIO 1 MEG $289 



Happy Rev 7.1 w/cont. . $99 
320K XERAM UG . . . . $ 49 

US Doubter $ 29 

576K XE RAM UG . . . . $ 79 
R-Time 8 Cart $ 49 



Full lineol STAR! 

$799 

$475 

$349 

256K 800 RAM UG 

100% Axlon $119 

UP Doubter w/DOS . . $ 49 

ICD DOS X $ 59 

Call for details 



PC COMPATIBLES 

PC XT Compatible — Dual mono Hercules & Color (CGA) compatible graphics card. 

4 77/10 Mnz Phoenix BIOS. More than 3x as last as the IBM XT. 640 K Ram. 360K drive. 

Printer/Modem/Game pons. Clock/calendar. AT Style keyboard and case Only $619" 

'Add $89 (or monochrome monitor, add $269 (or RGB Color monitor. 

Hard drives Miniscriba 3Q(v1B w/conl J369. 20 MB v^/conl $339 installed 



We buy/sell/trade Atari, IBM Compatible, 
Commodore hardware - software - accessories 

Quantities of USED products vary. Call before ordering. 
Prices are subject to change withOLit notice. 

We pay cash for used equipment and accessories 

CALL for an instant price quote on your equipment. 

Noltiing is too old or obsolete! 

CALL to place your order and for price quotes on your equipment. 
SHIPPING/HANDLING: Charges based on actual weight o( order. 



We want lo trade lor YOUR EQUIPIMENTI 
If your equipment is not mentioned, then call us now for an Instant quote. 



We pay cash for damaged equipment! 
All used products are guaranteed to be in good working condition. 



USED PRODUCTS 



520ST Color Sys $659 SMI24 Mono Mon. 

SF364 Drive $ 99 800XL Computer . . 

Indus GT Drive $145 Atari 1025 Primer . 

Primers from $39 Joysticks from .' 



..$119 SC1224 Color Mon . S239 
. . $ 64 400-16k Computer ... $ 29 
..$79 Color Monilors Irom S129 
$2 Hundreds of Software Tales! 



'All references to trade-ins in our ad assume equipment to be in 

good working condition. Shipping/handling will be added lo all prices 

Call for shipping and handling. 



2017 13th St., Suite A 
Boulder, CO 80302 



Computer Repeats, Inc. ^ 



MAIL-ORDER DIVISION 
VOICE: (303) 939-8144 MODEM (303) 939-8174 



MASTERCARD/VISA/CHOICE/C.O.D 



CIKLtOIl Oi: SfADER SEW£ CARD 




SERIOUS SOFTWARE FOR THE SERIOUS MUSICIAN 



220 Boylston Street, Suite 306 • Chestnut Hlli, MA 02167 • (617) 244-6954 



DnTs 



MUSIC 
SOFTWARE 



3 



ATARI ST KEYBOARD CONTROLLED SEQUENCER WITH PVG 

TRACK-MODE RECORD/PLAY OPEN-MODE EDIT 




COPYIST VI .4 



DX-HEAVEN 



ROLAND D-50 



MULTI-PROGRAMMING ENVIRONMENT (MPE)" 

Your personal computer is now a digital workstation with Dr. T's Atari Mulll Programming Environment (MPE)'". Load the Keyboard Controlled Sequencer with PVG 
option into your 1040 or Mega ST. Ihen load Fingers, any of your Caged Artist Editors, or The Copyist scoring program; up to four additional programs. 
SIMULTANEOUSLY! Flip between each program and access features of the KCS from the others. This is the integrated system that you wanted when you bought your 
computer. Once you try it you will never want to work any other way! 



(IRClt 017 ON REAOfR SERVICE CARD 



ST Resource 



ST Toolbox 



Reviews: Monitor Master, Uninterruptible Power Supply 




MONITOR MASTER 

ST owners who use both color and 
monochrome monitors will recognize 
this ritual: Turn off monitor A, unplug 
its cable from the ST, connect the 
other cable, turn on monitor B and 
reboot the ST. The phrase "royal pain" 
seems to come to mind. 

Enter the Monitor Master, a palm- 
sized plastic interface box. Both mo- 
nitors plug into it and an output ca- 
ble connects it to the ST video port. 
It draws power from the monitors, so 
you don't need a separate power sup- 
ply. A knob toggles between the two 
monitors. 

Though switching monitors will 
make the ST reboot anyway — there's 
no other way for the ST to change 
resolution — there are a couple of pub- 
lic domain programs that ease the 
pain: Eternal, a RAMdisk that survives 
system reset and holds files while 
switching monitors; and Megaboot, 
which maintains separate DESK- 
TOP. INF files for medium and high 
resolution, choosing the appropriate 
one for the monitor you're using. 

If your ST has an RF modulator, 
Monitor Master can pull a composite 
video signal from a second video out- 
put and send it to a composite moni- 
tor or VCR. Connect it with a stan- 
dard RCA phone jack cable. Another 
auxiliary output provides the mono- 
phonic audio-out from the monitors 
and can be hooked into your stereo 
system, greatly improving the sound 



quality for music programs and games 
with sound effects. 

The only problem is that if both 
monitors are turned on while close to- 
gether, the screen image will shake 
slightly. The monitors are the cause, 
not the interface. You can put two feet 
or a thick metal barrier between the 
monitors, or simply turn off the one 
you're not using. 

The bottom line is that if you use 
both monitors, you need the Monitor 
Master I'd even suggest buying it solely 
for musical applications. It's much 
easier than installing an audio-out jack 
in your monitor, and it won't void 
your warranty-JIM PIERSON-PERRY 

$49.99. Practical Solutions, Inc., 1930 
East Grant Road, Tucson, AZ 85719. 
(602) 884-9612. 

CIRCLE 258 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



UNINTERRUPTIBLE POWER 
SUPPLY 

Where I live, about every two 
months the power blinks out for a 
second or two. That's all it takes: my 
computer forgets its program and re- 
boots; my VCR forgets its program- 
ming and blinks like a traffic light at 
2 a.m. And you don't know misery 
till your wife finds out that her TV 
programs weren't recorded. 

The solution is the Sendon Unin- 
terruptible Power Supply (UPS). 
Just plug an appliance (typically your 
computer) into the UPS, then plug the 



UPS into a wall socket. While power 
is normal, it's business as usual, but 
when the power goes out, the UPS 
takes over from the line current and 
powers whatever is plugged into it. If 
the power is off for a while, the UPS 
gives you time to save your work and 
shut down your equipment. 

The 300-watt UPS should power 
one monitor, the computer and flop- 
pies for about 15 minutes — plenty of 
time to save your work. You should 
not overload the UPS (by plugging in 
items requiring more than 300 
watts — like a hair dryer). While the 
computer itself takes little power, the 
monitor and hard drive use a lot — 
remember, a hard drive runs cons- 
tantly, whether or not you're saving 
or loading anything. 

The front panel has switches to 
turn the unit on and to activate the 
alarm mode. When the alarm mode 
is on, it beeps if the power fails. (This 
is sort of superflous, as you usually 
know when the power fails.) A red 
light on the front also indicates the 
level of battery charge. As the battery 
drains, the light flashes faster, until it 
stays on constantly and the battery is 
drained. The UPS has an automatic 
surge suppressor and noise attenua- 
tor, and it's also available in 400 watts 
with four plugs, and 500 watts with 
six plugs. -DAVID PLOTKIN ■ 

$239.95. Computer Parts Galore Inc., 56 
Harvester Avenue, Botavia, NY 14020 
(716) 343-6133. 

CIRCLE 255 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



Antic Online for instant Atari news! 

log onto CompuServe 
and type GO ANTIC 



March 1988 



55 



c 



Since 1981 



Lyco Computer 

Marketing & Consultants 



Order processed within 24 liours. 



Lyco Means Total Service. 



SOFTWARE 



ACCESSORIES 




AATARr 



A ATARI' Sr m Diskettes 



Access: 

^KB- ^^^^^^^^ ^^^^^^^ Broderbund: 

j^ii^., IfljI^^^^^H^^^^^H 

^ ^^^. \\^^B^^^^^^Bi^^^^^^V Print Shop Compan $22.95 

Graphic Lib. I, II. Ill $13.49 

Bank St. Writer $27.95 

MIcroleague: 

.^^^ ^^ Microleag, Baseball $22.95 

^^^^^ ^B General Manager $16.95 

^ ,^^__ Stat Disk $13.95 

Mark 'Mac" Bowser, Sales Manager Strategic Simulations: 

I would personally like to thank all of our past customers for helping to ^att'^ of Antetiem $28,95 

make Lyco Computer one of the largest mall order companies and a Battlecrulser $33.95 

leader In the Industry. Also, I would like to extend my personal invitation to ^^^^ j22 95 

all computer enthusiasts who have not experienced the services that we pro- *"*'. too a ■ 

vide. Please call our trained sales staff at our toll-free number to inquire Phantasie $22.95 

about our diverse product line and weekly specials. Wargame Construe $16.95 

First and foremost our philosophy is to keep abreast of the changing Warship $33.95 

market so that we can provide you with not only factory-fresh merchandise Wizards Crown $22,95 

but also the newest models offered by the manufacturers at the absolute best 

possible prices. We offer the widest selection of computer hardware, software rt-.i_i j o . 

and accessories. Optimized Systems: 

Fee! free to call Lyco If you want to know more about a particular Item. I t 1 1^- 

can't stress enough that our toll-free number is not just for orders. Many Action Tool Kit $16,95 

companies have a toll-free number for ordering, but if you just want to ask a Basic XE $44.95 

question about a product, you have to make a toll call. Not at Lyco. Our Basic XL $33 95 

trained sales staff is knowledgeable about all the products we stock and is r yp -r i ur't 

happy to answer any questions you may have. We will do our best to make tJasic XL tool Kit $16.95 

sure that the product you select will fit your application. We also haveSatur- Personal Pascal 2 $64.95 

day hours — one more reason to call us for all your computer needs. 

Once you've placed your order with Lyco, we don't forget about you. , 

Our friendly, professional customer service representatives will find answers 
to your questions about the status of an order, warranties, product availabili- 
ty, or prices. 

Lyco Computar stocks a mulllmillon dollar Inventory of factory-frosh 

merchsndlss. Chances are we have exactly what you want right in our ware- Th^rvio/^M" 

house. And that means you'll get H fast. In fact, orders are normally shipped I nOmSOn- 

within 24 hours. Free shipping on prepaid orders over $50, and there Is no 230 Amber 

deposit required on C.O.D. orders. Air freight or UPS Blue/Red Label shipplnfi TTL/1 2" S85 

is available, too. ArKl all products carry the full manufacturers' warranlles. Ar-r^ J i. 

450 Amber 

I can't see why anyone would shop anywhere else. Selection from our huge TTL/1 5" $11 9.95 

in-stock inventory, best price, service that can't be beat— we've got it all here 41 20 CGA .... $1 99.95 
at Lyco Computer. a h en pp A *RP*SQ QR 

TO ORDER, CALL TOLL-FREE: 1-800-233-8760 4450 EGA ' S^l q q^ 

New PA Wats: 1-800-233-8760 4375 3.01 a.yb 

Outside Continental .US Call: 1-717-494-1030 Ultra Scan. S459 95 

Hours: 9AM to 8PM, Mon. - Thurs. GB 1 00 
9AM to 8PM, Friday — 10AM to 6PM, Saturday EGA Card ... $1 29.95 

. . For Customer Service, call 1-717-494-1670, GB 200 Super 

reW 9AM to 5PM, Mon. - Fri. ((...a^v ^ard $219.9S 

I^HH Or write: Lyco Computer, Inc. I '■■' ' I Blue Chip: 

P.O. Box 5088, Jersey Shore, PA 17740 BCM 12" 
Risk-Free Policy: • full manulacturers' warranties • no sales tax outside PA Green TTL $79 

• prices show 4% cash discount; add 4% for credit cards • APO, FPO, BCM 1 2" 
international: add $5 plus 3% for priority • 4-weei< clearance on personal checks , , __. 

• we chacl< for credit card theft • compatability not guaranteed • return AmiDer I i L $89 

authorization required • price/avaiiabiiity subject to change • Prepaid BCM 1 4" 

orders under $50 in con., U.S. add $3.00. ' Color $259 95 

1-800-255-8760 



Actlvlslon: 

Champion. Baseball .,,, $22.95 
Champion. Basisetball , $22.95 

Championship Goif $New 

GFL Football $22.95 

Leather Goddesses $22.95 , 

Music Studio $27.95 

Paint Worl<s $22.95 

Shanghai $22.95 

Bureaucracy $22.95 

Top Fuel $19.95 

Firebird: 

Pawn $25.95 

Starglider $25.95 

Golden Path $25.95 

Guild oi Thieves $26.95 

Traci<er $25.95 

Epyx: 

Sub Battle Simulator ... $22.95 

World Games $22.95 

Wrestling $22.95 

Winter Games $22.95 

MIcroprose: 

Silent Service $22.95 

F-15Strii<e Eagle $24.95 

Sublogic: 

Flight Simulator li $31.49 

Scenery Disi< $14.95 



Monitors 



NEC: 

Multisync II. 



.$559 



Save $1 00 over NEC 

M ultisync with Thomson 

4375 Ultra Scan 

$459.95 

THOMSON 

4120 Monitor 

• 14" RGBI/Video 
Composit Analog 

• Compatible with IBM 

and C-64 

• RGB Data Cable in- 

cluded 

$199.95 



5-1/4 



Maxell: 

SSDD $7.95 

DSDD $8.95 

Bonus: 

SSDD $5.95 

DSDD $6.95 

SKC: 

DSDD $6.95 

DSHD $13.95 

Generic DSDD $4.95 

Verbatim: 

SSDD $8.99 

DSDD $11.50 

3.5 

Maxell: 

SSDD $11.50 

DSDD $17.95 

Verbatim: 

SSDD $14.50 

DSDD $20.95 

SKC: 

SSDD $11.95 

DSDD $13.99 

Generic SSDD $11.50 

Generic DSDD $12.95 



Modems 



Avatex: 

1200e $75.00 

12001 PC Card $75.00 

1200hc Modem $95.00 

2400 $179.95 

24001 PC Card $169.95 

Hayes: 

Smartmodem 300 $149.95 

Smartmodem 1200 $285.95 

Smartmodem 2400 $425.95 



Smarteam 

1200 Baud Modem 

$89.^^ 

(Hayes Compatible) 



/ 



^ 




.IL 



M 




• 100 cps draft 

• 25 NLQ 



Panasonic 

NP-10 1 091 i Mode/// 






SEIKOSHA 

SP 180Ai 

• 1 00 cps draft 

• 20 cps NLQ 



$129 



95 




$185 



PRINTERS 



!k/savit^^ 



NP-10 $134.95 

NX-10 $149.95 

NX-10C w/inlertace $165.95 

NL-10 w/0 Cart $169.95 

NX-1000 $165.95 

NX-1000C $175.95 

NX-1000 Color $225.95 

NX-1000C Color $229.95 

NX-15 $295.95 

ND-10 $265.95 

ND-15 $379.95 

NR-16 $425.95 

NB-15 24 Pin $699.95 

NB24-10 24 Pin $425.95 

NB24-15 24 Pin $559.95 

BROTHER 

M1109 $195 

M1409 $299 

M1509 $365 

M1709 $475 

Twinwriter 6 Dot & Daisy $899 

M1724L $CALL 

HR20 $339 

HR40 $569 

HR60 $709.95 



EPSON 

LXBOO $175.95 

FX86E $289.95 

FX286E $429.95 

EX800 $374.95 

EX1000 $509.95 

LQ500 $CALL 

LQ800 $369.95 

LQ1000 $549.95 

LQ2500 $849.95 

GQ3500 $LOW 

LQ850 $499.95 

LQ1050 $679.95 

#CITIZEN 

120 D $149.95 

180 D $169.95 

MSP-10 $259.95 

MSP-40 $289.95 

MSP-15 S324.95 

MSP-50 $389.95 

MSP-45 $425.95 

MSP-55 $489.95 

Premiere 35 $464.95 

Tribute 224 $624.95 



Panasonic 

10801 Model II $165.95 

10911 Model II $185.95 

10921 $295.95 

1592 $399.96 

1595 $449.95 

3131 $269.95 

3151 $419.95 

KXP 4450 Laser $CALL 

1524 24 Pin $559.95 



Okimate 20 $11& 

Okimate 20 w/cart $179.95 

120 $189.95 

180 $219.95 

182 $199.95 

192+ $309.95 

193+ $449.95 

292 w/interface $449.95 

293 w/intertace $585.95 

294 w/inlerface $819,95 

393 $955.95 



SEIKOSHA 

SP 180AI $129.95 

SP 180VC $129.95 

SP 1000VC $139.95 

SP 1200VC $155.95 

SP 1200AI $165.95 

SP 1200AS RS232 $165.95 

SL80AI $299.95 

MPISOOAI $269.95 

MP5300Ai $375.95 

MP5420Ai $879.95 

SP Series Ribi»n $7.95 

SK3000 Ai $349.95 

SK3005 Ai $429.95 

800 CPS $CALL! 

Toshiba 

321SL $489 

341 SL $659 

P351 Model II $899 

DIABLO 

D25 $499,95 

635 $779.95 



Call About ATARI PC Availability! 



AATARr 

520 ST-FM 
Color System 

$799 



AATARI 

520 ST-FM 

Monochrome 

System 




AATARI—- AATARI' 

520 ST FM Mono $499.95 ' 040 ST 

520 ST FM Color $799.95 Qolor Svstem 

1040 ST Mono $779.95 ' 

1040 ST Color $889.95 

130XE Computer $135.95 QQ QQ95 

SX551 Drive $CALL ^00 W 

SF 314 Disk Drive $199.95 ^ 

Indus GT Atari Drive $175.95 

SHD 204 20 MEG Drive $559.95 - __- — - -„ 

XM301 Modem $42.95 III ATA PI 

SX212 Modem $89.95 .•|VAAI#»I\I 

GTS 100 (3.5" DSDD ST) $195.95 ^ nAt) 

ATTENTION Monochrome 

Educational Instutitions System 

If you are not currently 

using our educational 

service program, please ^•yy(\QK 

call our representatives 3)f /y 

for details. 



Join the thousands who shop Lyco and Save! 










CIRCIE 020 Oil READER SERVICE CARD 




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D I am also a STart subscriber. 

New Address: « 

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ST Resource 

ST Product Reviews 



REGENT WORD II 

Regent Software 

7131 Owensmouth, #45 A 

Canoga Park, CA 91303 

(818) 882-2800 

$79.95 

CIRCLE 2n ON READER SERVICE CARD 

Reviewed by Martin Brown 

Regent Word II is a relatively sim- 
ple WYSIWYG word processor for 
creating and printing large docu- 
ments. In many respects it's an im- 
proved version of 1st Word, but, un- 
like 1st Word, certain features, such 
as right margin justification are not 
shown onscreen. 

The GEM-based program has fully 
usable desk accessories and pull- 
down menus for file, edit, search, 
style, special and print commands. 
And it's fast — documents that take 
several seconds to load into 1st Word 
appear almost instantly in Regent 
Word II. Top-to-bottom scrolling oc- 
curs in the wink of an eye, and you 
need not close your document in or- 
der to print it, or fill up disk space 
with annoying backup files. 

But because Regent Word II files are 
not saved in an ASCII format, they 
can't be read in their natural state. 
However, you can save in ASCII for- 
mat, which means you can import 
text files from other word processors. 

Creating a document is a snap. To 
alter the margins and page format in- 
formation on the work screen, just 
click on the appropriate setting and 
follow the prompts at the top of the 
page. Also, reformatting is done auto- 
matically at print time. (Somehow, I 
could never quite get the hang of 
reformatting 1st Word documents.) 
Other formatting requests, like bold 
or italics, occur right on the screen 
and almost instantly. 

Regent Word II is slow at selecting 
the block to format, however With 
1st Word, you can point at the begin- 
ning of the block and drag it to the 
end, if it is all on the same screen. 



With Regent Word II, you must use 
the function keys or puU-down menus . 

Special features of Regent Word II 
include a 30,000-word speUing 
checker, a calculator, mail merge and 
an alphabetizer. The spell checker is 
fast and compact. Because of a unique 
compression scheme, words can be 
added without clogging up memory 
and slowing down the spelling access . 

The four-function calculator lets 
you enter numbers directly, with the 
results appearing at the top of the 
screen in the command line area. Un- 
fortunately, the math cannot be "built- 
in" to your document for automatic 
column tabulation. The alphabetizer 
lets you create a list and have Regent 
Word II reorder all the lines. 

Regent Word II has 15 built-in 
printer drivers and the easiest printer 
driver creation program I've ever 
seen. It took me less than five minutes 
to set up a new driver for my printer, 
and it worked flawlessly on the first 
try. 

On the negative side. Regent Word 
II is copy-protected. I understand the 
point of protecting "simple-to-use 
software that really requires no man- 
ual." But it always scares me to de- 
pend too much on a program that 
could be knocked out by inadvertent 
contact with the increasing number 
of magnetic devices in my life. Still, 
you can install Regent Word II onto 
your hard disk. 

Regent Word II also only lets you 
display one document at a time. This 
doesn't prevent merging documents or 
swapping portions of documents. But 
you can't, for instance, view a draft 
that you want to preserve on disk as 
a blueprint for another document. 
The spelling checker, while profi- 
cient, is not quite state-of-the-art. Un- 
like Thunder!, it displays words end- 
ing in -ed or -ing as possible mistakes. 
But the documentation, while skimpy, 
is well-written, and Regent Software 
supports its customers with an excel- 
lent technical service phone line and 
reasonable upgrade policies. ■ 



58 



ANTIC, The Atari Resource 



¥]ute looking at a 
idiabilitation center for 
the mental^ letaided 




A few blocks south of Market 
Street in San Francisco, there is 
a restaurant. 

The interior was designed 
by some of the hottest names in 
the business, but it is nothing rev- 
olutionary. 

The food is all well prepared, 
but, again, is nothing you can't 
find someplace else. 

What does make this restau- 
rant different from any other res- 
taurant is something that you'd 
probably never notice: it is staffed 
by people with mental retardation. 

The restaurant is called 
Esther's Ironworks Cafe. And, 



aside from turning out some pretty 
tasty Mufaletta sandwiches, it 
acts as a training ground for peo- 
ple with mental retardation. 

Helping them learn skills in 
all aspects of food service from 
washing the radicchio to cleaning 
the dishes. 

To date, over 20 Esther's 
employees have quit. To go on to 
other jobs throughout the Bay 
Area. 

Esther's is just one of the in- 
novative programs run by the 
Association for Retarded Citizens 
designed to help people with men - 
tal retardation hold jobs and live 



on their own. In short, to become 
productive, self-sufficient mem- 
bers of the community. 

But we can't do it alone: 
your help is desperately needed. 
Please write to us, or call us at 
415-931-3330 for more informa- 
tion. 

Because we can do a lot for 
people with mental retardation. 

For about what you'd spend 
on a dinner for two. 

The Association 
for Retarded Citizens. 

3110 California St., S.E, 94115 




Nickel City Electronics 

P.O. Box 1025 • Buffalo, NY 14225 • 1-800-634-1870 
In New York State and Tech Support Call 1-716-684-7350 




cronies 






NX1000 

^^^ NLQ-36CPS 
T^ DRAFT -1 44 CPS 



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NLQ - 72 CPS DRflFT - 21 6 CPS 

24 PIN Heno 

Character Font Cartridges 
l6M-€pson Compatible 



n69 

NXl noinboui Color Printer - Coll For Price 




399 



Atari ST Software 

Leader Biiard Golf 26.0') 

Leader Board - Tournament 1 :l.();t 

A-Cak MAS 

Flash! 2(>.l)<> 

Hard Disk Toolkit \1Sh 

Hard Disk Actelerato 26.0') 

Chessmaster 2000 :10.44 

Autoduel :!:i.71 

Gridiron Football :!:).71 

Zork Trilogy 4.5.611 

GFA Draft M.'K 

GFA Basil SO.K 

GFA Vector ii?."),? 

GFA Compiler 50.').'; 

ST Replay 1i:i.'),S 

Karate Kid II IB.'IS 

Intro to ST Loro 18.<).5 

Mdisk Plus 2 2,5.').'') 

DOS Shell 2S.')5 

Trivia Challenge 23M5 

Mithtron BBS .^O.').? 

Miihlron Utilities ;i7.').'; 

Realiti/er 14.S.').'; 

Major Motion 2.5 .').S 

Mission Mouse 18.').') 

Airhall 2.S.').'; 

Michtron Alt f».')5 

Digi Drum 2.';.').'') 

Miihlron Stuff 2.S.'),'; 

Time Bandits 2.'").').S 

Easy Record .50.').i 

Make It Move :!7.').^> 

Goldrunner 2.').').') 

Trimbase 6.1. ').S 

Pinball Factory 2.';.<).'; 

Cards 2.';.'),=; 

(Cornerman ill.*).') 

Business Tools ill .').') 

Mi-Term 111.').'; 

Animator 2.S.').'; 

M-Cache 2.';.').^ 

Store Writer 23Mr> 

Mudpies 12.').^) 

Miihlron Back-up 2.S.')S 

Lands of Havoc 12.').^) 

Miihlron Echo 2.';.').'; 

Kissed 111.').'; 

Flip Side 1(1.'),S 

ll-Ball 111.').'; 

X-IO Powerhouse 411.').'; 

Miihlron DFT it.').^ 

Mighty Mail :11 .')5 

Perfeit Matih 2.';.').? 

Mi-Print 18.').^) 

Miihlron Calendar 18.').') 

Super Conductor .SO.').S 

Match Point ISMS 

Shuttle II 25.')^ 

Super Directory . 2.';.*).S 

Techmate 2.S.').'; 

Miihlron 220ST :n.').^ 

St Wars 26.0') 

Nava. Sound Digitizer 11;1.9.^ 

Nava. Video Digitizer 1 1 :!.').'; 

Nava Time Keeper ;r2.9.'; 

Pholopro St 2,S.').'; 

Partner Fonts 1 ')..';6 

Barbarian 26.0') 

Max Pax 2').9.S 

Flight Simulator II ... :).';. :i4 

True Basic .';i.').'; 

T. B. Sorting & Scarih :i2.').i 

T. B. Math Toolkit :i2.').-> 



Modems 

2400 Baud External 139.95 

2400 Baud Internal 139.95 

1200 Baud External 79.95 

1200 Baud Internal 49.95 

lOU'; Hayes Compatibility 
Iliivos Is it Rfi^lstfivcl Tnidfmnrk o/'Have.s 



Cables & Acco. 

A/B Parallel Switch Box 22.9.S 

A/B Serin! Switch Box 22.9.'5 

A/B/C/D Parallel Switch Box :!9,9.'5 

A/B/C/D Serial Swikli Box :i9.9.S 

6 Oullel AC Surge Pr 9.9."; 

B-1()9 Parallel Card 29.9.'; 

B-10() Serial Card 26.9.S 

Male/Male Gender Clig .5.9.'5 

Feml/FemI Gender Clig .5.9.5 

IBM Parallel Cable b' .5.49 

IBM Parallel Cable 10' 7.49 

M-M RS2:t2 Cable b' 7.95 

M-M RS2:!2 Cable 1(1' 8.49 

M-F RS2:r2 Cable h' 7.95 

M-F RS2:i2 Cable 10' 8.49 

IBM Modem Cable h' 5.99 

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IBM at Modem Cable 5.99 

M-M Centronics (V 1 1 .95 

M-F Centronics 1 1 .95 

M-M Centronics 1 ()' 1 2,9.5 

IBM Keyboard Extension 4.99 

Monitor Exlension-DB9 M-F 1 1 .95 

Monitor Cable-DB9 M-M 1 1 ,95 

IBM Color RGB Cable-DB9 Cable lo 

« Pin Din 7.99 

Mac ' to Imagewriter 9.99 

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A/B DB9 Switch Box .12.95 

ABCD DB9 Switch Box 49,95 

A/B Telephone Switch Box R|l 1 :!4,95 

Serial Cross-Over Swilch Box :t9,95 

Parallel Cross-Over Switch Box ,i9.95 

M-M DB9 Gender Changer 5.95 

F-F DB9 Gender Changer 5.95 



A ATARI 

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Call for Pricing 

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• COD accepted. 

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3'r priority. 
No sales tax outside N.Y. 
Prices/availability subject to change. 



OKIE 016 ON DEADER SERVICE CARD 



$' 



5.95 



All this software without typing — yours for only $5.95. Your double-sided Antic 
Monthly Disk has every type-in program from this issue, plus this month's Super Disk 
Bonus and other extras. Shipment within 24 hours is guaranteed when you phone 
your MasterCard or Visa order to the Disk Desk: (800) 234-7001. Now Toll-Free! 



SOFTWARE 
LIBRARY 



► TEXT FOR YOUR PROGRAMS OR VIDEOTAPES 

BIG LETTERS! 64 



► GAME OF THE MONTH 

ADVENTURE CREATION KIT 66 



► TEXT SCROLLING DELUXE WITH A POWERHOUSE SUBROUTINE 

MR. SMOOTHY 68 



► LOSIN' THOSE MCMXXIV BLUES 

ROMAN NUMERAL TRANSLATOR 70 



ST RESOURCE 



► RANDOM ST BASIC MAZES FOREVER! 

MAZE MASTER 71 



TYPING SPECIAL ATARI CHARACTERS 62 

HOW TO USE TYPO ST . 63 

HOW TO USE TYPO II 64 

DISK SUBSCRIBERS: Programs for 8-bii Atari computers can be used immcdialch. just follow instructions in the accompanying 
magazine articles. ST Owners: See monthly disk's S'f Help File for instructions on how to transfer programs to 3-1/2 inch disk. 

DOS COMPATIBILITY: All 8-bil programs published by Antic are tested to work with Atari Disk Operating System (DOS) 2. OS and 
2.=i— lint with the incompatible DOS 3.0. DOS 2. OS is available on each Antic Monthly Disk. c;opy the DOS.S^'S and Dl.'RS^'S files. 

No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted, in an\' form or by any means, electron- 
ic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise, without the prior written permission of the publisher 

MARCH 1988 ANTIC SOFTWARE LIBRARY * 61 



TYPING SPECIAL 
ATARI CHARACTERS 



Antic printed program listings leave a small space between each Atari Special Character for easier reading. Im- 
mediately below you will see the way Antic prints all the standard Atari letters and numbers, in upper and lower 
case, in normal and inverse video. 

ABCDEFGHIJKLnNOPORSTUUHXVZ 

omiicioiMBmaiitaafiimmQimmsDaMBiaEaa 

abcdefghi JKinnopqrstuvwxyz 

(iimiimsnmmBBiafnsmmQmiBsamigiBBisEi 
8123456789 mmmsms^mwi 

The Atari Special Characters and the keys you must type in order to get them are shown in the two boxes below. 



NORMAL VIDEO | 


FOR TYPE 


FOR TYPE 


THfS THIS 


THIS THIS 


SCTRL , 


S CTRL S 


[BCTRL A 


n CTRL T 


□ CTRL B 


B CTRL U 


fflCTRL C 


D CTRL V 


91 CTRL D 


ffl CTRL W 


fflCTRL E 


B CTRL X 


0CTRL F 


E CTRL Y 


S CTRL G 


ffl CTRL Z 


a CTRL H 


B ESC ESC 


a CTRL I 


ffi ESC CTRL - 


B CTRL J 


ffi ESC CTRL = 


a CTRL K 


ffl ESC CTRL + 


B CTRL L 


ffl ESC CTRL * 


n CTRL M 


m CTRL . 


□ CTRL N 


m CTRL ; 


B CTRL 


H SHIFT = 


ffl CTRL P 


H ESC SHIFT 


ffl CTRL Q 


CLEAR 


e CTRL R 


SI ESC DELETE 




[B ESC TAB 



INVERSE VIDEO 



FOR 
THIS 



□ 

o 

n 
a 
a 
a 

Q 
O 

B 
E 
H 
G 

a 

B 
B 

a 

B 

D 
Q 

n 

B 

n 

B 



TYPE 
THIS 

CTRL , 
CTRL A 
CTRL B 
CTRL C 
CTRL D 
CTRL 
CTRL 
CTRL 
CTRL H 
1^ CTRL I 
CTRL 
CTRL 
CTRL 
CTRL 
CTRL 
CTRL O 
CTRL P 
CTRL Q 
CTRL 
CTRL 
CTRL T 
CTRL U 
CTRL V 
CTRL W 



FOR 

THIS 



TYPE 
THIS 



E 
F 
G 



J 

K 

L 

M 

N 



R 
S 



a CTRL X 
a CTRL Y 
D CTRL Z 

□ ESC 

SHIFT 
DELETE 

□ ESC 

SHIFT 
INSERT 
D ESC 
CTRL 
TAB 

□ ESC 

SHIFT 
TAB 
n A CTRL . 

□ A CTRL ; 
O A SHI FT = 

□ ESC CTRL 2 

□ ESC 

CTRL 
DELETE 
D ESC 
CTRL 
INSERT 



Whenever the CONTROL key (CTRL on the 400/800) or SHIFT key is used, hold it down while you press the 
next key. Whenever the ESC key is pressed, release it before you type the next key. 

Turn on inverse video by pressing the Reverse Video Mode Key [^ . Turn it off by pressing it a second time. 
(On the 400/800, use the Atari Logo Key JH^ instead.) 

Among the most common program typing mistakes are switching certain capital letters with their lower-case 
counterparts — you need to look especially carefully at P, X, O and (zero). 

Some of Atari Special Chai'acters are not easy to tell apart from standard alpha-numeric characters. Usually the 
Special Characters will be boxed. Compare the two sets of characters below: 





SPECIAL 




STANDARD 


21 


O CTRL F 


• 


B 


S 


O CTRL G 


s 


B SHIFT + 


□ 


H CTRL N 


__ 


■ SHIFT - 


e 


D CTRL R 


- 


B - 


m 


O CTRL S 


+ 


□ + 



62 * ANTIC SOFTWARE LIBRARY 



MARCH 1988 



HOW TO USE TYPO ST 

TYPO ST is the automatic proofreading program for checking Antic's ST BASIC type-in listings. It finds any pro- 
gram line where you made a typing mistake. 

Type in TYPO ST and SAVE a copy to disk before you RUN it. Now type RUN in the command window and 
press the [RETURN] key or click on RUN from the RUN menu. 

TYPO ST first asks for the name of the file to check. Type the desired filename and press [RETURN] . (TYPO 
ST will proofread itself if you type TYPOST.BAS as the filename.) Next, TYPO ST asks where you want the TYPO 
table printed. Type [S] [RETURN] for Screen, or [P] [RETURN] for Printer. 

TYPO ST now reads your ST BASIC program and prints out a table of four-number codes — and the line number 
for each code. Compare your printed TYPO ST table with the Antic TYPO ST table published at the end of the 
program you are checking. If any of your four-number codes don't match the magazine's codes, you have made 
a typing mistake somewhere in that line. Carefully recheck your line against the published version. 

Antic uses a word processor to format ST BASIC listings for publication, so we can indent lines and make the 
program structure more understandable. ST BASIC doesn't allow indentation and will strip off any spaces between 
the line number and the first BASIC instruction. Therefore, TYPO ST ignores space characters and does not care 
how far instructions are spaced apart. 

TYPO ST cannot determine if two different characters have been switched within a line. For example, PRINT 
and PRNIT will look the same to TYPO ST. However, ST BASIC itself catches this error and points it out to you. 

leeo » TYP0/5T, CC3 1986 ftnliic Publishins, b&i Bill Marquardl: 

1818 DISK=l: OUTPUT=2 : TRUE=C-13: FftL5E=8 : CHECKSUnMING=TRUE 

1828 TV=FftLSE: PHINTER=FftL5E 

1838 print "File to Check:": input FILENAMES: print "Output on:" 

1848 print "CSJcreen or ": print "CPJrinter ": input DEVICES 

1858 ifC DEVICES="P" 3 or C DEWICES="P" 3 then PRINTER=TRUE else TU=TRUE 

1868 if TU then print "Checksum for file: ": print FILENAMES: print 

1878 if PRINTER then iprint "Checksum for file: ";FILENAMES: iprint 

1888 open "I", «DISK, FILENAMES 

1898 While CHECKSUMMING 

1188 LINENUMBER=8: CHECK5UM=e: 30sub GETALINE 

1118 DECIMAL=CHECKSUM: gosub DECTOHEK 

1128 OUTPUTS=strSC LINENUMBER 3 +" : "+HI5+LOS 

1138 if PRINTER then iprint OUTPUTS else print OUTPUTS 

1148 wend 

1158 Close DISK 

1168 end 

1178 GETALINE: 

1188 BLINES="": on error goto 1158 

1198 GOTALINE=FALSE 

1288 While not GOTALINE 

1218 line inputttDISK^ BLINES : if lenC BLINES 3>1 then GOTALINE=TRUE 

1228 wend 

1230 LINENUMBER=ual C BLINES 3 

1248 for CHAR=1 to lent BLINES 3 

1258 0K=TRUE: CHARACTERS=nidS C BLINES, CHAR, 1 3 

1268 if CHARACTERS=" " then OK=FALSE 

1278 if OK then CHECKSUM=CHECKSUN+asc C CHARACTERS+chrS C 8 33 

1288 next CHAR 

1298 return 

1388 DECTOHEK: 

1318 DECIMAL=absC DECIMAL 3 

1328 HI=intC DECIMAL/^256 3: L0= t DECIMAL- C HI**256 3 3 

1338 HH=intC HI/'16 3: HL= C HI- C HH»16 3 3 

1348 LH^intC LO/16 3: LL=C LO- C LH*tl6 33 

1358 HIS=chrSt 48+HH-C 7»C HH>9 333+chrSC 48+HL- C 7*C HL>9 333 

1368 LOS=chrSC 48+LH- C 7»C LH>9 333+chrSC 48+LL- C 7* C LL>9 333 

1378 return 



1000 
1010 
1020 
1030 
1040 
1050 



:110B 
:0EA2 
:071B 
:12D2 
:10E6 
:11A2 



1060 :13E7 
1070 :140E 



1080 
1090 
1100 
1110 



:0713 
:0661 
:OBBD 
:09F0 



1120 :0A48 
1130 :1000 
1140 :0274 
1150 :0408 
1160 :01FF 
1170 :034C 



1180 
1190 
1200 
1210 
1220 
1230 



089A 
04C6 
0680 
11B9 
0273 
0716 



1240 
1250 
1260 
1270 
1280 
1290 



;079B 
:OAEB 
:08BB 
;0F36 
:03A8 
:036C 



1300 :0352 
1310 :0667 
1320 :0B13 
1330 :07E3 
1340 :0804 
1350 :0C0E 



1360 :0C29 
1370 :036B 



MARCH 1988 



ANTIC SOFTWARE LIBRARY * 63 



HOW TO USE TYPO II (8-BIT) 



TYPO II automatically proofreads Antic's type-in BASIC listings for 8-bit Atari computers. It finds the exact line 
where you made a program typing mistake. 

Type in TYPO II and SAVE a copy to disk or cassette. Now type GOTO 32000. When you see the instruction on 
the screen, type in a single program line without the two-letter TYPO II code at the left of the line number 
Press the [RETURN] key. 

Your line will reappear at the bottom of the screen with a two-letter TYPO II code on the left. If this code is not 
exactly the same as the line code printed in the magazine, )'Ou mistyped something in that line. 

To call back any line previously typed, type an asterisk [ * ] followed (without in-between spaces) by the line number, 
then press [RETURN] . When the complete line appears at the top of the screen, press [RETURN] again. This is also 
the way you use TYPO II to proofread itself. 

To LIST your program, press [BREAK] and type LIST. To return to TYPO II, type GOTO 32000. 

To remove TYPO II from your program, type LIST "D;FILENAME",0,31999 [RETURN] (Cassette owners LIST "C:). 
Type NEW, then ENTER "D:FILENAME"[RETURN](Cassette— ENTER "C:). Your program is now in memor}' without 
TYPO II and you can SAVE or LIST it to disk or cassette. 



t^ 



Don't type the 
TYPO II Codes! 



UM 
H5 

BN 
YC 

EM 

H5 

XH 



TH 
MF 



32880 HEM TYPO II BY ANDY BORTON 

32010 REM UER. 1.8 FDR fiNTIC MfiGfiZINE 

32020 CLR :DIM LINES C120 3 : C L05 E n2:CLD 
5E »3 

32838 OPEN «2 , 4 , 8 , ■■E" : OPEN a3,5,8-"E" 

32048 ? "IS-: POSITION 11,1 = ? ■•SinUdlBniriB" 

32050 TRfiP 32848 : POSITION 2,3:? "Type 
in a progran line" 

32868 POSITION 1,4:? INPUT o2;LINE 

S:IF LINES="" THEN POSITION 2,4:LIST B 

:GOTO 32868 

32070 IF LINEScl, 1J="«" THEN B=UOLcLIN 

ES C2,LENCLINES> J J : POSITION 2,4:LI5T B: 

GOTO 32068 

32080 POSITION 2,18:? "CONT" 

32090 B=UflL CLINESJ :POSITION 1,3:? " "; 



NY 
CN 

ET 

CE 

QR 



1)1) 

UJ 
JU 
EH 
BH 
HO 
IE 

UG 



2180 

2110 

2120 

; POST 

2130 

2148 

INES = 

TO 32 

2158 

N5+ tC 

2168 

2178 

2188 

2190 

2280 

2210 

LCODE 

2228 

Mate 
owe . " 



POKE 
POKE 

? "IS" 

TION 
C = 0:O 
POSIT 
.... TH 

050 
FOR D 
»ftSC t 
CODE = 
CODE = 
HCODE 
LCODE 
HCODE 
POSIT 
J 

POSIT 
h pre 
: GOTO 



842, 13 : STOP 

842, 12 

: POSITION 11,1:? "■|jn[-l[i]H|lilia 

2,15:LI5T B 

NS = C 

ION 2,16:INPUT »3;LINES:IF 

EN ? "LINE ";B;" DELETED":G 

=1 TO LEN CLINESJ : C=C+1 : ONS= 

LINES CD, D>> J : NEXT D 

INT cfiNS^676> 

flNS- CC0DE»»676J 

= INT CC0DE^26J 

= C0DE-cHC0DE»»2 6>+65 

=HC0DE+65 

ION 0,16:? CHR$cHC0DE} ;CHR$ 



ION 2,13:? 

5 5 ■lll[S(U[ll[l<i;il 

32858 



■If CODE does no 
and edit line a 



text for your programs or videotapes 



BIG LETTERS! 



Article on page 30 



LISTING 1 



Don't type the 
TYPO II Codes! 



C^ 



MG 

FY 
PT 
GZ 

KH 

KM 
UG 
LF 

TI 
ML 

HK 
IF 



OJ 



IB HEM LOHGE-LETTER SCREEN TITLES 

28 REM BY JERRY URNDEN BOSCH 

38 REM CCJ1987, RNTIC P0BLI5HING 

35 REM too NOT RENUMBER THIS PROGRAM!} 

4 BRK= CPEEKC53279><>5> :L = 18B00: CLOSE 

<<l:OPEN «l,4.e,"K:" 

50 GOSUB 1290:GOSUB 538 

60 GOSUB 90 

78 ROU=ROU+l:COL=n+l :IF R0U>29-MD»6 TH 

EN R0U=MDKe-6 

88 GOTO 60 

90 LINES=TEXT«ci+20»cROW+6-6»MD> ,2 0»cR 

OH+7- cb»MDJ> J :N=B 

lee POKE 752, 1 : POSITION COL.ROU 

110 GOSUB 1480:IF flSC t LINES t COL - M, COL - 

M>>>127 THEN ? CHRS (fiSC CLINES cCOL -M , CO 

L-M>> -1281 ; :GOTO 138 

120 ? CHRS cfiSC tLINES CCOL-M, C0L-n>>+128 

> ; 



IH 
ZG 
CU 
OE 



XC 
JR 



DU 
BD 



PR 
HC 



FT 



130 

140 

150 

160 

LINE 

L = CO 

170 

180 

LINE 

OL = C 

198 

200 

LINE 

«MD- 

218 



POKE 
IF LT 
IF LT 
IF LT 
S CCOL 
L-l:G 
IF LT 
IF LT 

5 CCOL 
OL + l: 
IF LT 
IF LT 
SCCOL 

6 THE 
IF LT 



764,2 
R>31 
R>159 
R = 30 
-M-CO 
OTO 1 
R = 30 
R = 31 
-M, CD 
GOTO 
R = 31 
R = 28 
-M, CO 
N ROU 
H = 28 



55 :G 
AND 

AND 
THEN 
L-M> 
00 

THEN 
THEN 
L-M> 
180 
THEN 
THEN 
L-M> 

ROU 
THEN 



ET «1,LTR 

LTR<125 THEN 410 
LTR<253 THEN 410 
POSITION COL, ROU:? 
:IF CDL>M*1 THEN CO 

COL=M+20:GOTD 108 
POSITION COL, ROU:? 
: IF CDL<M+20 THEN C 

CDL=M+l:GOTO 100 
POSITION COL, ROU:? 
:GOSUB 518:IF ROU>e 
l:GOTO 98 
R0U=29-e»M0:G0Ta 90 



228 IF LTR=29 THEN POSITION COL, ROU:? 
LINES CCOL-n, COL-Ml ;: GOSUB 518 i IF R0U<2 
9-MD»»6 THEN R0U = R0U + 1 > GOTO 98 
238 IF LTR=29 THEN R0U=MD«6- 6 : GOTO 98 



M • ANTIC SOFTWARE UliRARY 



.MARCH lySS 



24a IF LTR=126 AND C0L>M+1 THEN POSITI 
ON COL. ROM:? LINES cCOL-M, COL-m ;> COL=C 

OL-l'LIME«cCOL-M.COL-ri»=" "iSOTO 186 
258 IF LTR=155 THEN POSITION C0L,R0U>7 

LINE«cCOL-n.COL-M> ] : T=T+1 i GOSUB 518 >R 
ETURN 

268 IF LTR=254 AND C0L<n+2e THEN TnPS= 
LINEStCOL- CM-IJ .2B> ' LINE* cCOL-M. 19> =Tri 
P«!LINE*c28.2eJ=" •• 

278 IF LTR = 255 AND C0L<M*2e THEN TriP« = 
LINE«cC0L-M,19» :LINE*cCOL- CM-1»,28>=TM 
P«:LINE*cC0L-t1.C0L-M>=" " 
288 IF LTR>253 AND C0L<M*28 THEN POSIT 
ION COL.ROU:? LINES cCOL-n, 28* i > GOTO 18 
8 

298 GOSUB 518 
388 IF LTR = 156 AND R0H*6-I1D«6<T-1 THEN 

T = T-1 
318 IF LTR=156 THEN 458 

328 IF LTR=157 AND R0U<29-nDM6 THEN T= 
T+l!GOT0 458 

338 IF LTRM28 THEN LTR = LTR-128 
348 IF LTR=:125 THEN N = esGOSUB 1296iG05 
UB 548:G0T0 98 

358 IF LTR=3 AND MD^l THEN nD=2:n=15iN 
=8>G0T0 558 

368 IF LTR = 3 AND rtD = 2 THEN nD = l>n=ia:N 
=8:G0T0 558 
378 IF LTR=7 THEN 988 
388 IF LTR=13 THEN 1128 

398 IF LTR=18 THEN Q=998esG0SUB 14ie>G 
OSUB 558:G0T0 68 
488 GOTO 188 

418 LINE$(C0L-l1.CaL-n>=CHR«CLTR> >POSIT 
ION COL.ROU:? CHRSCLTRl; 

428 IF C0L=M«28 THEN GOSUB 5ie>T=T«l:R 
ETURN 

438 C0L = C0L4^1!G0T0 188 

448 REM INSERT^DELETE LINE AT CURSOR R 
OUTINE 

458 I=H0H*6-MD»6 

468 IF LTR = 157 THEN TMP«=:TEXT* cl + I»2e, 
468> ! TEXT* t21 + I«»28, 4881 =TMP« I TEXT* Cl + I 
«2e.28+I»2e>=Z*ci.2e> iGOTO 498 
478 IF 1=23 THEN TEXT* C461 . 4881 =Z* cl . 2 
e> :GOTO 498 

488 TMP* = TEXT*C21*I«»28.488» iTEXT*cl»I» 
28.468>=TnP*iTEXT*c461,4ae>=Z«cl,2ei 
498 GOSUB 52e+nD»148iC0L=n+liG0T0 98 
588 REn INCORPORATE INPUT^'REUISION INT 
APPROPRIATE STRING 
518 IF R0U+6-nD»6>=T THEN T=RaU*7-nD«6 

528 TEXT*cl+28McR0U+6-6«nD>.28«cR0U+7- 

6»MD>>=LINE*: RETURN 

538 Din LINE$c2ei ,Z*<88> .TEXT*C4B8> ,Tn 

P«t488J !Z* = Z*ce8>=Z*:ZS C2>=Z« 

648 TEXT* = " ■•:TEXT*c48e>=TEXT«!TEXT«c2 

>=TEXT* 

558 GRAPHICS e>GOSUB 1468!P0KE 718. 8:P 

OKE 752.1:R0U=6«nD-6!lF riD = 2 THEN 728 

568 REM INPUT^EDIT UINDOU DISPLAY FOR 

nODES 1 & 17 

578 col=i9:rou=8:7 -mmiimMmmammmaam" 

588 POSITION 3,2!? ■•CAP5 = 0RANBE" : POSIT 
ION 4,3!? '•iower = AQUn":P05ITI0N 3,4:? 

■■asian[ii[-i[^@=BLUE" 

598 POSITION 4,5!? ■■Bm[!]BDi5[a=RED" : POSIT 

ION 1,8:? "gGinBasQ^CLEAR"! POSITION 1,1 

8!? •■MnHH«(fl=REUIEU" 

688 POSITION 1,12!? ■■SD[:lIB&[§=nODE 2"!P0 

siTiON 1,14 = ? ■■Bniiiasiij=nEnoRv 

618 POSITION 7,16!? "SGR . 1 ,•■: POSITION 
1,17>? ■•HOBB«IB91 GH. 17"! POSITION 7,18!? 

"fflDISPLAV" 
628 POSITION 15.28!? "B" ! PBSITION 1,21 

s? ■■■a[^aDB[!]U[ii[gm[!)HS9i" 

638 POKE 752.1!P0SITI0N 1,22; 
IUBKnaCSgBaSl" : POSITION 15,23!? ' 
648 FOR 1 = 8 TO 9:P0SITI0N 17, l!? I;"lll 

■•;!NEXT l!FOR 1 = 18 TO 23:P0SITI0N 16, 
I!? I;"[Il"; !NEXT I 

658 COLOR 124:PL0T 39.8:DRAUT0 39,23 
668 IF T<23 THEN FOR I=ROU TO T ! GOTO 6 
80 

678 FOR I=ROU TO 23 

688 POSITION 19.1!? TEXT* Cl+2e»l . 28« cl 
+I>J;!NEXT I!IF LTR=156 OR LTR=157 THE 
N RETURN 

698 IF LTR=3 THEN 98 
\7ee RETURN 
718 REM INPUT/EDIT UINDOU DISPLAV FOR 
MODES 2 « 18 

728 C0L = 16!R0U = 6!? " ■majfuiBfiiDseHsiro 

msBigBGiiBQiaaiin" 

738 POSITION 2.3!? ■■CAPS = " ! POSITION 26 

.3!? ••1111111111"!P0SITI0N 4.4!? "ORAN 

GE" 

748 POSITION 16.4!? "81234567898123456 

789" 



? "amuiBrara 

'ffl"; 



ON 



lU 
KZ 
XP 
JG 



UD 



IT 
SH 



UB 
DP 



XC 



E5 

RZ 
ZU 
FU 

UU 

JB 

zn 



BU 

JJ 

FN 

RG 

UC 

PF 

RU 
VF 

HU 
MH 

HO 
UZ 

JH 

AU 

EO 

XU 

5P 

OQ 
IC 
MT 
IF 
RV 

RP 



FH 
CV 

KJ 
GJ 



ZI 
SH 
UE 



LN 
BX 



758 POSITION 2.6!? "1 ower=" ! POSITION 4 

.7!? "ABUA"! POSITION 1.9!? "□DlHffl«lBB[B=" 

iPOSITION 4.18!? "BLUE" 

768 POSITION 1.12 1? "[]BIII[!Hai!9[l=" ! POSITI 

ON 4.13'? "RED" 

778 POSITION 15.5:? "BBBBHBaDDDOBBHBHH 

BHHeO" 

788 FOR 1=8 TO 9:P0SITI0N 14.6*1:? I;" 

II]"!POSITION 36.6*1!? "[II"!NEXT I 

798 FOR 1=18 TO 11:P0SITI0N 13.6*1:? I 

; "HI"! POSITION 36.6*1:? "ir":NEXT I : IF C 

0L<16 THEN 838 

888 IF T<11 THEN FOR I=R0U-6 TO T:GOTO 

B20 
818 FOR I=R0U-6 TO 11 

828 POSITION 16.1*6:7 TEXT* cl*28»I . 28» 
cl*Ill:NEXT I:IF LTR=156 OR LTR=157 TH 
EN RE TURN 

838 POSITION 2.16:? "oaiaaBfflniffliamEi" : posi 
TioN 3.17:? "■auimamciiBgB" 

848 POSITION 15,18:? "BBeHBHBBBeBaeSHH 
BBBBBffl"! POSITION 5,19:? "tltgnSBtD* UBDFO 
R GRAPHICS DISPLAV" 

858 POSITION 6,28:? "[JBDraanaUBUlFOR UOR 
K TO nEMORV" :POSITION 3.21:7 "Bnaa&fa T 

REUiEU, eniDa&rK for mode i" 

868 POSITION 4,22:? "dHIQKJaBI lORaHGinaDnaiJ 

HITO START OUEH" 

878 IF LTR=3 THEN 98 

888 RETURN 

898 REM UIEU UORK IN GRAPHICS MODE 1. 

2, 17 OR 18 DISPLAV 

988 IF N>48 AND N<51 THEN GRAPHICS MD : 

GOTO 1888 

918 IF N>54 AND N<57 THEN GRAPHICS 16* 

MD:GOTO 1828 

928 7 "B": POSITION 3,6:? "FOR GRAPHICS 

";MD;" tUITH TEXT UINDOU> ,": POSITION 
6,7:? "TYPE " ; CHR* cMD+176» ; " NOU" 
938 POSITION 3.9:? "FOR GRAPHICS 
16;" (NO TEXT UINDOU) .":POSITION 6, 
7 "TYPE ";CHR* C182+MD> ;" NOU" 
948 POSITION 4.13:? "AFTER UIEMING GRA 
PHICS ";MD;" OR "; MD*16 : POSITION 6.14: 
? "DISPLAY. PRESSIJtaiaiaflraSQLlTO" 
958 POSITION 5,15:? "RETURN TO INPUT^E 
DIT UINDOU"!POSITION 15, 16:? "DISPLAY" 



iMD* 
,18: 



968 POKE 764.255:GET ttl,NiIF N>176 THE 

N N^N~1_2H 

978 IF nD=l AND cN=49 OR N=55> THEN 98 

8 

988 IF nD=2 AND CN=58 OR N=56> THEN 98 

8 

998 GOTO 968 

1888 IF (nD = 2 AND TEXT* (281 . 2481 =Z* cl . 

48>> OR (nD = l AND TEXT* (481 . 488i =Z*> T 

HEN 1828 

1818 GRAPHICS MD*16:N=N*6 

1828 GOSUB 14881? <t6; TEXT* (1. 288> ; : IF 

MD=2 THEN 1858 

1838 7 Me>TEXT*c281,488> ; 

1848 IF N = 55 AND MD = 1 THEN 7 «t6,-TEXT*( 

481.4881 J :GOTO 1878 

1858 IF N = 56 AND MD = 2 THEN 7 t*6;TEXT*( 

281.2481 ; :GOTO 1878 

1868 POKE 752.1!? :? 

APHICS ";M0+16;" (NO TEXT UIN 

DOU) . TVPEOSCiasnDa ";CHR*(MD*182l 

1878 POKE 752,l:GET l»l.LTR:IF LTR>166 

THEN LTR=LTR-128 

1888 IF LTR=39 AND N=49 THEN N=55:GRAP 

HICS 17:G0Ta 1828 

1898 IF LTR=64 AND N=58 THEN N=56:GRAP 

HICS 18:G0T0 1828 

1188 GOSUB 558:G0T0 68 

1181 REM 

1118 REM FORCED READ ROUTINE 

1111 REM 

!? L;" GRAPHICS ";:IF N>5 



TO CHANGE TO GR 



AND TEXT$(281.248)=Z«(1. 
AND TEXT*(4ei.4B8i=Z*) T 



1128 7 "»"!? 

8 THEN 1148 

1138 IF (MD=2 

4811 OR (MD=1 

HEN 7 MD; !GaTO 1145 

1148 7 MD*16; 

1145 7 ":SE.8.2,8:SE.l,12,ie:SE.2.9.4: 

SE .3,4, 6: SE.4,8,e" 

1158 GOSUB 1198:F0R R0U=8 TO 36-MD»12 

1168 IF R0U=3e-nDM12 THEN 7 "K" : 7 :? L 

*R+1;" RETURN"iR=e:GOSUB 1198 i L=L*188 : 

GOSUB 558:60T0 68 

1178 GOSUB 1228 

1188 IF LEN(LINE*i=8 THEN 1185 

1181 FOR CJ=1 TO LEN(LINE*i :IF LINE*(C 
J.CJ}=CHR$(34l THEN LINE* (CJ . C Jl =CHR* ( 
1621 

1182 NEXT CJ 

1185 R=R*1!7 "■"!? !? L*R;" POSITION " 
; Y;".";ROU;"! PRINT «>6 ; "; CHR* (34i ;LINE$ 
;CHR*(34i ;";" 

continued on next page 



MARCH 1988 



ANTIC SOFTWARE UBRARY • 65 



UT 
VO 
KQ 

an 

KV 
EJ 

an 

TI 

TC 
Tfl 

UH 

SI 

ou 

OR 
CE 

LT 



1190 ? I? !? "COMT-sPOSITION e.e:POKE 

842,13:ST0P 

1288 POKE 842,12:? "B" > POSITION 16,18: 

7 ■•UORKING":IF R = 8 THEN RETORN 

1218 NEXT ROU 

1228 X=2e!Y=e:LINES=TEXTScl+2e»R0M,2B» 

CR0U+1X> 

1236 IF nSCcLINE*cX.X>> 032 AND ASCcLI 

NE«CX,Xll Oiee THEN 1268 

1248 X=X-l!lF X>8 THEN LINE$=LINE« cl. X 

1 :GOTO 1238 

1258 POP sNEXT ROM 

1268 IF nSCcLINE«cl,l>i<>32 AND ASCcLI 

NEScl,l>i<>ie8 THEN RETURN 

1278 LINES=LINESC2> : V=V*liGOTO 1268 

1288 REM INTRO DISPLAV^MODE SELECT ROU 

TINE 

1298 GRAPHICS 8:G0SUB 1488:T=l:IF PEEK 

<1536>=112 THEN 1328 

1388 DATA 112,112,112,78,64.156,6,6.6, 

6,6,6,6,6,6.6.6.7.7.7,7,7,7.65.8.6 

1318 FOR L0C=1536 TO 1561:READ X:POKE 

LOC.X:NEXT LOC 

1328 POKE 559,8:P0KE 568.8:PaKE 561,6: 

POKE 559,34:P0KE 87,1 

1338 POSITION 2,3:? >t6;"THIS IS GRRPHI 

CS":POSITION 1,4:? >t6:"M0DES 1 OR 17 T 

EXT" 

1348 POSITION 3.6:7 l»6;"TVPE ":CHR$c34 

J ;"n";CHRSC34J ;•• NOU" : POSITION 8.7:? tt 

e;"TO UORK IN THIS HODE" 



an 



uu 



EJ 
VD 

BZ 
SS 
IG 
EF 



VF 
QX 



TI 



LU 

UJ 
RN 
JU 

01 



135 
ICS 

TE 
136 
> ; •■ 
N T 
136 
137 
= 18 
138 
139 
148 
141 

UO 
T V 
142 

143 

AGE 

IT 

144 

EN 

I 

145 


146 
147 
148 
:P0 
149 



8 P05ITI 
":POSITI 
XT": POSI 
8 7 «»6;" 

N0U":PO 
HIS nODE 
5 GOSUB 
8 GET Ml 

RETURN 
e IF MD 
e GOTO 1 
8 REM RE 
e ? "B": 
RK IN SE 
OUR OUN 
8 ? :? : 
SQQdia AG 
8 7 :? 
? :? 
UINDOU 
8 IF PEE 
0=0+188 



ON 2.13:7 «»6;"THIS 

ON 1,14:7 »6;"nODE 

TION 3,15 

TVPE ";CHR*t34> ;"B 

SITION 8.16:? «6 ; ' 

":PaKE e94.8:P0KE 

1488 

.nD:nD=nD-48:IF MD=1 THEM H 



IS GRAPH 
S 2 OR IB 

";CHRSC34 
■TO UORK I 
782,64 



2 THEN n=15:RETURN 

378 

UIEU ROUTINE 

POSITION 4.5:7 "RE 

OUENCE.":POSITION 

PACE" 

7 :? " gQiniija TO BE 

AIN TO ADUANCE" 

esnsaa to see pre 
miiinnsiis returns to 



K(53279>=e AND 0+1 
GOSUB 0:F0R 1=8 TO 



UIEU VOUR 
18.6:? "A 

GIN":? I? 

CEEDING P 
INPUTTED 

e8<L+R TH 
25:NEXT 



8 IF PEEKC53279>=5 AND a>18888 THEN 

a-188:G0SUB a:FOR 1=8 TO 2S:NEXT I 

8 IF PEEKt53279>=3 THEN RETURN 

e GOTO 1448 

8 POKE 77,8:IF BRK THEN POKE 16,112 

KE 53774,112 

e RETURN 



do-it-yourself fantasy worlds Article on page 15 

ADVENTURE CREATION KIT 



LISTING 1 



Don't type the 
TYPO II Codes 



t& 



DN 


1 


HB 


2 


Ot 


3 


VZ 


18 




KE 


CN 


28 


CB 


38 


EU 


48 




T = 


UU 


58 


GV 


68 


DE 


78 




32 




OT 


SO 


88 




V: 


NT 


98 




+ T 


VK 


18 




V + 


UN 


11 




GO 




2 


lA 


12 




*I 


nn 


13 




GO 


CR 


14 




:G 


JN 


15 




V: 


UN 


16 


AP 


17 




N 


DC 


18 




MS 


JR 


19 


OH 


28 


EH 


21 




VO 


Bn 


22 



8, 



REM CREATION 
REM BV STEPHEN STOUT 
REM CC119B7, ANTIC PUBLISHI 
GRAPHICS 8:P0KE 559.8:P0KE 
53774. 64:CLR : GOTO 1188 
A=USRCADRCSCS1 . ADRcM2«>+Vm 
SOUND 8,e,e.l5:S0UND 8.8.8 
5T=STICKce>:IX=fST=7>-cST= 
13>- C5T=14J 
IF PEEKt764J=28 THEN 678 
IF IX=e AND IV=e THEN 48 
P=PEEKt4e678+IX*2e»IV> : IF 
THEN X=X+IX: V=V+IV:SC*C53, 
28 

IF P=35 AND fiXE=l THEN X=X 
SCSc53,53>=CHR$c184> : GOTO 2 
IF P=164 AND B0AT=1 THEN X 
Y:SCSc53.53J=CHRStlB5> :GOT0 
8 IF P=37 AND H0R5E=1 THEN 
IV:SCSc53.53>=CHR$Cieei :G0T 
8 IF P=166 AND KEV>8 THEN K 
SUB 438:X=X*IX: V=V+IV:GOSUB 
8 

8 IF P=183 THEN KEV=KEV+1:X 
Y:GOSUB 5ee:G0SUB 438:G0T0 
8 IF P=ie4 THEN AXE=l!X=X+I 
SUB 5ee:G0SUB 43e:G0T0 28 
8 IF P=ie5 THEN BOAT=l!X=X* 
OSUB 5ee:G0SUB 43e:G0T0 28 
8 IF P=106 THEN H0RSE=1 : X=X 
GOSUB 588:eBSUB 438:0010 28 
8 IF P=96 THEN 378 
8 IF P044 AND P0237 AND P 
48 

8 MHP=3e:MSP=18:IF P=44 THE 
P = 5 

8 IF P=174 THEN MHP=5:M5P=2 
8 7 "BBtcaaraaiBHBHi HIT TRIGGE 
8 7 "MONSTER'S HIT POINTS: 
UR STRIKE POINTS: ",SP 
8 A = INTCRNDce>><SP>+l:7 " 

";A;" ai":SOUND 8,8,8,15 
e,e:IF STRIGC8>=1 THEN 228 



NG 
16,64:P0 

78*X> 

,8 

IIJ :IV=C5 



P=B OR P= 
53>="k":G 

*IX:V=V*I 

8 

= X + IX: V = V 

28 
X=X+1X: V= 
28 
EY=KEY-l: 

588:G0T0 

=X+IX! V=V 

28 

X: V=V+IY! 

IX:V=V+IV 

*IX: V=V*I 



0174 THE 
N MHP=15: 



";MHP:? " 
:S0UND 8, 



PB 



IG 
DH 



II 



RC 

5K 
JT 

BN 

UB 
OJ 
KU 

IG 
DU 
MN 

XS 



PU 

KM 
T6 
CP 
PM 

CA 

XA 



UH 
RD 
CU 
ZU 



238 

:S0 

IF 

248 

258 

R-S 

268 

.8. 
278 
,18 
288 
298 
ER" 
388 
18, 
318 
328 
338 
5P = 
348 
358 
360 
GBT 
378 
FBR 
:SB 
388 
:B0 
390 
488 
410 
420 
18 
438 
PO 
448 



nHP=MHP-A:FOR 1=288 TO 188 STEP -1 
UND 8,I,18.15:NEXT I:SOUND 8.e.8,e< 
nHP<l THEN 338 

7 "BiiBtisiKsasBaa hit trigger" 

7 "VOUR HIT POINTS: ";HP:? "M0N5TE 

STRIKE POINTS: ";M5P 

A=INTcRNDt8>»MSPJ*l:? " 

";A:" BB":SOUND 8. 8. 8. 15 : SOUND 8 
8.8:IF STRIGC0>=1 THEN 268 

HP=HP-A:FOR 1=188 TO 288 : SOUND 8.1 
.15:NEXT I : SOUND 8.8.8.8 

IF HP>8 THEN 288 

7 "B":7 "■QBKDBIflQSnaSQQWIH HIT TRIGG 



FOR 1=258 TO 58 STEP -1:S0UND 8,1, 
15:NEXT I : SOUND 8,8,8.8 

IF STRIGce>=l THEN 318 

GOTO 678 

MHP=2e:MSP=5:IF P=44 THEN nHP=15:M 
3 

IF P=174 THEN MHP=6:MSP=1 

HP=HP+MHP :SP=SP+MSP 

X=X+IX: V=V+IV:GOSUB 588 : GOSUB 438: 
28 

7 "Hi":? -msimmmmmaim hit trigger": 

1=58 TO 25e:S0UND 8, I . 18, 15 : NEXT I 
UND e,8.8,e:G0T0 318 

n2S=Ml$:X=8:V=8:HP=25:SP=5:H0RSE=8 
AT=8: AXE=8:KEV=8 

SCSc53,53>="k" 

GOSUB 438 

A=USRcnDRtSC«> , ADRCM2$>+Vw78+Xi 

FOR 1=258 TO 58 STEP -1:S0UND 8.1, 
15:NEXT I:SOUND 8.8.8,8:6010 28 

7 "B HIT PBINTS:";HP;" STRIKE 
INTS:";SP 

7 " KEVS:";KEV:? " 

".•:IF H0RSE = 1 THEN ? "HORSE 



458 IF AXE=1 THEN ? "AXE 
460 IF B0AT=1 THEN 7 "BOAT 
470 7 



480 7 



TO aUITX" 



66 • ANTIC SOFTWARE LIBRARY 



MARCH 1988 



498 RETURN 

see 0=USRCADRCSC«> . ADRcn2«>*Vw7e+X> 

Sie L = 7e»V + X + 7e»»5 + ll!M2ScL.L>=CHR»ce> ! 

SOUND e,15e.ie.l5:F0R D=l TO 2e:NEXT D 

:SOUND e<e,e,8:RETURN 

520 DOTA 225.97 

53e DATA 226,98 

54e DATA 35,99 

558 DATA 164,100 

568 DATA 37,181 

578 DATA 166,182 

5B8 DATA 183,183 

598 DATA 184.184 

688 DATA 185,185 

618 DATA 106,186 

628 DATA 44,108 

638 DATA 237,189 

648 DATA 174,118 

668 DATA 96,96 

668 DATA 8,47 

678 POKE 752,l:P0KE 559,34:? "S S=5AU 

E L=LOAD 0=DISK DIRECTORY":? " P=PL 

AV GAME R=RE-START ?=PRINT" 

688 ? ■■ OPTION^SELECT TO CHANGE CHARAC 

TERS-:? •■ tlOUE WITH JOVSTICK^TRIGGER T 

DRAUEfl": POKE 764,255 

690 SOUND 8,28e,ie.l2:IF CR<8 THEN CR= 

14 

788 FOR D=l TO ie:NEXT D:SOUND 8.8.8,0 

:IF CR>14 THEN CR=e 

718 BR=ASCtBRScCR+l,CH+lJ> :DR=A5CcDR2S 

CCR*1,CR+1J> :SC9C53,53>=CHR*CDR> 

728 A=USRCADRCSC$] . ADR CMIS J +7e»V+X> 

738 POKE 77,e:P=PEEKc764> 

748 IF PEEKt53279J=3 THEN CR=CR-1:G0T0 

6 9 
750 IF PEEKC53279>=5 THEN CR=CR+1:G0T0 

G 9 8 
768 P=PEEK<764> :IF PEEK C764> =255 THEN 
848 

778 IF PEEKC764>=S8 THEN 890 
788 IF PEEKc764>=ie2 THEN 1338 
798 IF PEEKc764>=ie THEN 388 
888 IF PEEKC764>=62 OR PEEKc764>=e THE 
N P=PEEKC764> :60TO 918 
818 IF PEEKC764l<>4e THEN 848 
828 ? •■»••:? "ARE VOU SURE cV/N>?"!POKE 

764,255:GET »2,I:IF 1=89 THEN RUN 
830 GOTO 678 

840 5T=5TICKteJ :IX=t5T=6 OR ST=7 OR ST 
=5J-t5T=ll OR 5T=9 OR ST=18> 
850 IV=C5T=9 OR 5T=13 OR ST=5>-CST=18 
OR ST=14 OR ST=6J 

860 IF STRIGce>=e THEN SOUND 0,100,10, 
15:L = 70«V + X + 70»»5 + ll : MIS CL . L> =CHR* cBRJ : 

SOUND e,e,e,e 

878 IF IX=e AND IV=e OR PEEK c4e670+IX* 
20»IY>=175 THEN 730 

880 SOUND 0,e,e,15:X = X-i^IX: Y = V + IV:S0UND 
e.8,8.e:G0T0 728 

898 GOSUB 1248 
980 GOTO 1210 

918 7 "HH[llI]iHlfEB(iaB[iJSB" •7 " " : PO 

KE 752.8:7 "7" ; : 1=8 : POKE 7( 
D:' 



64.255!FL«= 

928 GET tt2,A:IF A<65 OR A>9e AND A015 

5 AND A0126 THEN 920 

936 IF A=155 THEN POKE 752 



948 IF A=155 AND 1=8 THEN 

958 IF A=12e AND I>8 THEN 

<A> ! 

968 IF A=155 THEN 998 

978 IF A>e4 AND A<91 AND I 

I+3,I+3>=CHR* CA» :I=I*1 : 7 C 

988 GOTO 928 

998 FLSCI+3J=". ADU 

leee md=4:if poa then md= 

leie Ml$c7e8e>=CHR$ C0> :M2S 

DRtniSJ :BYTES=LENCM1SJ :I0 

1028 TRAP 187e:CL0SE >*1:0P 

LS 

1830 IF MD=8 THEN FLS="CRE 

FLS 

1848 IF MD = 4 then FL» = I 

IF FLS<>"CREATION" THEN 10 

1858 GOSUB 1988:G0T0 1068 

1868 CLOSE ttl:TRAP 5eeee:A 

> , ADRcM1SJ*70»V+XJ :POKE 55 



1078 M1S=M2S:CL0SE nl : TRAP 

:? "□■QDgcwiicaarasHB press a 

764,255 

leae get «>2.a 

1898 GOTO 678 
1180 DIM DM»C125> .Ml«c70e0 
FL» tl5> .SC*c61> ,FILE«C14> , 
1110 DIM BRSC15> . DR2«c15x : 
FOR 1=1 TO 15:READ BRsBRSc 

1120 READ DR!DR2SCI,II=CHR 



,l:? " "; 

670 

I=I-l:? CHRS 



<8 THEN FLSC 
HR«cA>; 



8 
:M1«: ADRES=A 

EN t*l,HD.8.F 

ATION":? ««lJ 

NPUT »1;FL»> 
78 

=USRCADR<SC« 
9.34:G0T0 67 

50000:7 "H" 
NV KEV":POKE 



J ,M2«C7000», 
DRSC20> 
RESTORE 520: 

I, i>=chr$ cor 

«<DR> :NEXT I 



DU 

JG 
SC 

JE 

EP 

AZ 

VU 

MR 
EN 

SD 

SO 
D5 

JK 

BV 

OX 

PZ 
NB 

CF 
AI 
DA 

OH 



RN 



BP 
UT 



GD 



ZO 

00 
UX 
DD 
PA 

MZ 
GU 

RU 
IX 



00 
ZU 



ID 
SU 

ZN 

NX 
SC 
TV 

BV 
TJ 
UC 

MX 
BF 
SZ 

KP 
MV 

UO 
FR 
OU 
KK 
QJ 
PV 
ZO 
UF 
OF 

MG 

EA 



1130 sc$ii,3e>="hhanha(mnBnaQapD0ic)Bn[a{!i 

SBimfaaBBi" 

1148 CLOSE l*2:0PEN ««2,4.0."K:" 

1150 5f:*t3i.6ii="mwm^mjsaiaaaiasiFaassa 
aKmaaamanm- 

1168 Ml«=CHR$ce> :MlS<78e8>=CHR«<ei :M1« 
C2J=M1*>M2»=M1« 

1170 ni«c282,350>="nnaniiBnnE 



BBOBiiiiiinannignnnnnB" 

1180 Ml$c6722, 67901: 
BBBBBBQDBQBDDBBQaeaiBBDeSIBBBBBBBOaBBBHBBB 

BBBBBDnnnnnnniniinnnii" 

1190 FOR 1=282+8 TO 6722+8 STEP 70:M1S 

CI,I>="B":M1«CI+52,I+52>="B":NEXT I 

1208 X=e: V=e:GOSUB 1480 

1210 GRAPHICS 2:P0KE 16,64:P0KE 53774, 

64 

1228 POKE 78B,198:P0KE 7e9,ie:P0KE 756 

,146:P0KE 752,1:? -R" 

1230 GOTO 670 

1240 GRAPHICS 0:POKE 16,64:P0KE 53774, 



64 

1250 POKE 709, 

POSITION 8,0: 



752,1! 



,6,0, "D 
THEN 



POKE 82,13:P0KE 
B":POKE 789,18 
1268 TRAP 1328:CL0SE ««1 : OPEN »1 , 

:«.«■■:? "[gn@taBB[Bn[s!r5(ffln[iii)n" 

1270 INPUT ««l;DR«:IF DRSc2,2>=" " 

7 DRS C3> : GOTO 1278 
1288 ? :? DRS:CLOSE «tl:TRAP 58000 
1290 ? :? " B[I«l@@BCdQIQB[a[^n":POKE 82,2:? 

:POKE 764,255 
1300 GET M2,A 
1318 RETURN 

1328 TRAP 58088:? :? •■ [flllBBBaBmrniflllia" : 
CLOSE <<l:GOTO 1290 

1330 ? "Bi":? "BQmsBmmsBramnsininiiiB pres 

S ANV KEV":POKE 764.255:GET «2,P:TRAP 
1460:POKE 559,0 



1340 DM$ = "BnHnitsBnn 

, 0, "P :" : D=288 : ? wl 
1358 7 »l;CHRSt27> 
1368 7 »1;CHRSC27>; 



:CL05E «l:OPEN «1 , 8 
7 «1 

"A";CHRS C8J ; 
K";CHRSC288> ;CHRSc 



DM$="nnnnaBBB":7 »1;DMS;DMS; DMS;DM 



1=18 TO 62: A=A5CcM1«CI+D,I+D> 
A=32 THEN A=A«8+144m256 : GO 

A=96 THEN A=A«8+144m256 : GOTO 1 



IJ 

S ; 

1378 FOR 

> :IF A=8 OR 

TO 1420 

1380 IF 

420 

1390 IF A<97 THEN A=A+32:G0T0 1390 

1400 IF A>122 THEN A=A-32:G0T0 1400 

1410 A = A-32 : A = A*»8 + 144»256 

1428 ML = U5RcADRcM0UE$> . A, ADRcDMSi , 8i :? 

S<1;DM$; :NEXT I:D = D + 70 

1430 7 <*1,-CHR$C18> ; 

1440 IF = 6790 THEN 7 nl:CLOSE >>1:GOTO 

670 

1458 GOTO 1360 

1460 POKE 559,34:CL05E <>1:TRAP 50000:? 

? "BiiiiaasiasiDHiiiiiiiDDmaB press anv ke 



■H- 



READ D:POKE CHSET+Am 



1470 POKE 764,255:GET t«2,P:G0T0 670 
1488 DIM M0UE«c56> :M0UE« = "hhaaha[Sha9]ha 

BhamhaBmmmmatBBBBisiuaBaBmaaBmasiasiBDmaiiasBa 

1498 CHSET=144»256 

1588 IF PEEKH44»256 + 65»8»=234 THEN 15 

60 

1510 ML = USRCADRCM0UE$I , 57344 , CHSET . 102 

4> 

1520 RESTORE 1560 

1530 GOTO 1550 

1540 FOR 1=0 TO 7i 

8+I,D:NEXT I 

1558 READ A:IF AO-1 THEN GOTO 1540 

1560 DATA 64,0.0.0.0,0,0,0,8 

1570 DOTA 65,234,174,186,171.234.174.1 

86.171 

1588 DATA 66.1.7,31.127.255,63,15,3 

1598 DATA 67,2,18,42,127.42,10.2.8 

1600 DATA 68.204.153,51,182,284,153,51 

,102 

1618 DATA 69.72.178.16.76.33,72.41.18 

1628 DATA 78.255,231,239,231,239,199,1 

99,255 

1630 DATA 71,0,24,16,24,16.56,56,8 

1640 DATA 72,0,80.32.127,32,88,8,8 

1650 DATA 73,4,6,3.255.113.51,22,4 

1660 DATA 74,32,124,127.28.28,31,12,8 

1678 DATA 75,0.9.210.252.252,210.9.8 

1688 DATA 76.64.198.281.41,41,41,17,2 
77, 0,42,124.62.124.62,84, 8 
78. 16. 32, 32.24,24,32,32.16 

1718 DATA 79.255.255,255.255,255,255,2 

55,255 

1728 DATA 97.255.136,255.34.255,68,255 

.17 

1738 DATA 98.8,24.28.60,62,126,127,255 

continued on next page 



1698 DATA 
1708 DATA 



MARCH 1988 



ANTJC SOFTWARE LIBRARY • 67 



BK 
PU 

SJ 

NZ 

FM 
IR 
CJ 

PL 

AN 
GM 

OU 
NO 
FR 

FP 
OK 

XL 
TO 

»E 

FB 

ER 

ZI 
UM 

UP 

an 

CH 
IB 

OT 

XB 
EG 

HB 
BP 
AP 



749 
756 

162 
766 DATfl 



DATA 
DATA 



776 

55,2 

786 

796 

866 

816 
6 

826 
836 

846 

856 

866 

55,2 

876 

886 

4>P0 

896 

968 

:pas 

916 

+ 6.7 

926 

ION 

936 

in" 

946 

956 



DATA 

55 

DATA 

DATA 

DATA 



99,6,16,56.16,124,16,254,16 
166.264,153,51,162,264,153,5 

161.64,148,74,97,156,16,65,1 

162,255,255,249,129,169,255, 

163,6,6,6.126,86,6,6.8 

164,6,84,56.84,16.16.16.16 

165,16,24,28,36,16,211,118.6 



DATA 166,6,96,224,124,126,126,36, 

DATA 167,66,66,24,66,96,24,36,66 

DATA 168,96,224,28,2,66,64,65,62 

DATA 169,6,42,124,62,124,62,84,6 

DATA 116,6,6,162,153,24,6,6.6 

DATA 111.255,255,255.255.255,255, 

55 

DATA -1 

GRAPHICS 1+16:P0KE 559.esP0KE 16. 

KE 53774.64 

POKE 768.8:P0KE 769.196 

POSITION 3.6:7 •<6 ; -miiiaHIiBCllllBISIBBmBI 

ITION 6.1!? »6 : "[aiatiSSIIIDS" 

D=PEEKC568>+PEEKC561>»2 56+4:P0KE 

POKE D*8,7 
POSITION 6.5 = ? «»6;"CREATI0N"!P0SI 
2,7:? «6 } ■■[GQBSDdfiJmilQDBgQramn" 
POSITION 2,26:7 tte ; "-tr i 99er to be 

POKE 559,34 

POKE 77,6:IF STRIG(6i=e THEN 1976 



1966 GOTO 1956 

1976 RETURN 

1986 I0CB=832+I0»16 

1996 POKE I0CB+2.7+4»cPEEK<I0CB*16>=8> 

2666 AH = INT(ADRES-'25e> : AL = ADRES- AHM25e 

2616 POKE IOCB+4, AL :P0KE I0CB+5,AH 

2628 BH=INTtBYTE5^256> : BL=BVTES-BHM25e 

2636 POKE I0CB+8,BL :POKE I0CB+9,BH 

2646 nL:^USR(ADR('-hhhaLUE)">,I0«16> 

2656 RETURN 



LISTING 2 



HO 
OV 

FJ 
OU 



16 REM CREATION, LISTING TUO 
28 REM BV STEPHEN STOUT 

36 REM cc> 1985,1987 ANTIC PUBLISHING 
35 REM CCREATES LINES 1136,1158 S 1486 
FOR D:CREATION.BAS> 



EU 

IJ 
PR 

UO 

RD 

PV 

TH 
UB 

MV 
KB 
PU 

LU 

BB 
VC 

DM 

BK 

MM 



CM 

UB 

AR 
PU 
AL 



IC 
KF 



JL 
OJ 
IB 
HX 
AL 



4 
OTH 
56 
66 
EEK 
76 
AME 
86 
5 

96 
581 
166 
lie 
TIC 
126 
136 
146 
se 
156 
C = l 
166 
178 
2,2 
186 
wn - 
196 
l:N 
266 
MAN 
E! 
216 
LI 
226 
sse 
236 
246 
256 



REM CLINES 16-258 MAV BE USED UITH 
ER BASIC LOADERS IN THIS ISSUE. 
REM CHANGE LINE 76 AS NECESSARV.i 
DIM FN»C26> .TEMP«t26> . AR« c93> :DPL=P 
€165921 :POKE 16592.255 
FNS="D:LINES.L5T":REM THIS IS THE N 

OF THE DISK FILE TO BE CREATED 
7 "HaiisK or [Sassette?-; : POKE 764.25 

IF NOT CPEEK(?641=1B OR PEEKc7e4i= 

THEN 96 

IF PEEKC7641=18 THEN FNS="C:" 

POKE 764.255:GRAPHIC5 6:7 " AN 

S GENERIC BASIC LOADER" 

7 ,"BV CHARLES JACKSON" 

POKE 16592. DPL:TRAP 266 

7 !7 :7 "Creating ";FNS:? "...plea 
stand b!;." 

RESTORE :READ LN:LM=LN:DIM A« CLNl : 



ARS = READ ARS 

FOR X=l TO LEN(AR$i STEP 3:P0KE 75 
55 

LM=LM-l:POSITION 16.16:7 "CCountdo 
. .T-";INTcLM^18i ; "i 

A$CC,C1=CHR$ (UALcAR«cX,X+2lll :C = C + 
EXT X:G0T0 166 

IF PEEKC1951=5 THEN 7 :? •■7 "QTDO 
V DATA LINES!"!7 "CANNOT CREATE FIL 
■ END 

IF C<LN*1 THEN 7 •■ 7 "QTOO FEW DATA 
NES!"i7 "CANNOT CREATE FILE!":END 

IF FNS="C:" THEN 7 :? " Prepare ca 
tte, press tRETURNi" 

OPEN *tl,8,6,FN« 

POKE 766.1:7 ><liAS;:POKE 766,6 

CLOSE <tlt GRAPHICS 6:7 "■BQUMaBSaSCgfl 



leee da 

1616 DA 
4964465 
2631626 
1626 DA 
6566617 
6836676 
1638 DA 
8514466 
1442141 
1648 DA 
3266867 
6416586 
1656 DA 
6416413 
6161776 
1666 DA 
8516566 
2682246 



TA 182 

TA 8496496 

1648641661 

6816866617 

TA 1582322 

6224246246 

3664665164 

TA 6416616 

2236264165 

6916714122 

TA 1336776 

3677632677 

7767968666 

TA 1641641 

3663164133 

6114566323 

TA 2366622 

5261255268 

96634155 



51648632683 

63418416413 

7263157112 

66192626268 

63415564964 

9644654649 

34626234165 

26362416567 

215B169666 

96634155649 

67968686963 

9636861634 

33662164133 

66616413366 

6661268662 

36663268662 

23219868616 



6676366468 
3264164133 

2451386241 
9653648832 

2636242331 
6133263624 

8526566488 
6646653654 

6611641336 
5166668246 

2368641988 
5666261255 



text scrolling deluxe vt^ith a powerhouse subroutine 

MR. SMOOTHY 



Article on page 34 



LISTING 1 



Don't type the 
TYPO II Codes! 



<:^ 



ZR 
MM 
OH 
CU 
UT 

IR 

SU 

GJ 

JO 

YT 

00 



2 

4 

6 

16 

26 

h 

36 

RO 

46 

21 

45 

oo 

76 

X 

86 

X 

96 

X 



REM SMOOTHY DEMO 

REM BY KENNETH KAYE 

REM Ccil9e7, ANTIC PUBLISHING 
GOSUB 4ee:P0KE 186 , PEEK c74ei 
IF PEEKC1661 0166 THEN 7 "Not enau9 

RAM to cant inue ■": END 
GOSUB 31666:REM INITIALIZE SCROLLO 

UTINE 
DIM CL*c6i,PRStieil.TPC6tl2i.TPRScl 
P0SC141 ,INPC16i .SPTC141.AN5C111 
DIM A« C481 • AS = "»n«»«»»*»»»n»»»»«*n« Mr . Sn 

FOR X=l TO 14:READ A : POS cXl =A : NEXT 

FOR X=l TO 14:READ A : INP <Xl =A : NEXT 

FOR X=l TO 14:READ A : 5PT cXl = A : NEXT 



BZ 



SA 
JJ 



EP 



JT 
LC 



YC 



166 PRS="GRAPHICS MO 


151C0LUMNR0UUIND0U c 


S5AGE <DEFAULT-PRES5 


116 CL«=" 


136 MS«i = "MR. SMOOTHY 


TEXT UINDOUS IN ALL 


KAYE"!M0DE=3 


146 SPEED=16:C0L=8:R 


4:DC=39:DR=23:P0KE 5 


11 I GOTO 1616 


156 GRAPHICS 6:P0KE 


:POKE 752.l:MS»="" 


152 7 "B":FOR X=39 T 


ON X.6:7 ASC1,46-X1 : 


NEXT X 


166 FOR X=l TO 14 ST 


XI .POScX+li :7 PR«cSP 


T X 



DE C3-151SPEED ce- 
1-46»COLOR»C1-41ME 
RETURNl" 

» SMOOTH SCROLLING 
MAP MODES. BY KEN 

0U=8:ULEN=ie:C0LR= 
59.DMA:CRYS=STR«C1 

7e9.266:P0KE 716.4 

6 STEP -3:P0SITI 
SOUND 1,6«X,14,14: 

EP 2:P0SITI0N POS c 
T tXl ,5PT tX+lll :NEX 



68 • ANTIC SOFTWARE LIBRARY 



MARCH 1988 



nu 

CR 



GK 

RX 
OU 



FO 
YB 
PK 
CO 



AH 



AB 
VC 



ON 

MG 
VI 

YZ 
UJ 

NE 
OX 
NK 
OJ 



AU 

OZ 

PL 
BL 
CO 
OD 
TU 
KZ 
XL 

AC 

ZK 

GB 

JI 

US 

OU 
IV 
EJ 
5M 
NC 
SI 

SQ 



GI 
LL 
AP 
LD 

UG 



DU 



AL 

ao 



YR 



SD 

riu 

FF 
BT 



165 TRAP 150 
176 POSITION POS 
:POSITIGN INPCII 

UB see 

lae POSITION POS 

SITION P05e7i+4. 
198 TRAP 15e:P0S 
? CLS 

208 FOR X=3 TO 1 
XJ-6,P05CX + 1J :? 
> ,INPCX + 1J sINPOT 
218 POSITION POS 
212 IF X=5 OR X 
216 NEXT X:POKE 
228 POSITION POS 
[Sl":P05ITI0N INPC 
POKE 82.2 
238 IF M5SO"" T 
248 nSS="THIS IS 
EN«MS«>+l>=STRSc 
258 CUAL=UALCTPC 
268 IF CUAL<=e T 

TO 5ee:NEXT D:PO 
278 IF X=9 AND C 
=e>GOTO 260 
288 POSITION 15, 
298 POSITION 15, 
, . .., I, 

308 RETORN 

408 nODL=Bee:TRA 

IC5 15!|10DL = 138 

418 GRAPHICS e:P 

588 TRAP 535 

520 IF M0DE>15 T 

525 IF M0DL=B88 

? "HI 1 I eaal node 

FOR 0=1 TO 500:N 

530 ON MODE GOTO 

60,565,570,580,5 



tl>-6,P0SC2» 1 7 "aHlDaS" 
,INP<2> UNPUT nODEiGOS 

C5»+7.P0SC6» :? TPC*!PO 

POSCBI 1? TPR» 

ITION P0SC1>-6,P0SC2> •■ 

1 STEP 2:P05ITI0N POSc 
■■tlHJDaia-! POSITION INPCX 

A: ANS(X)=A 
CXJ-6.P0SCX+1J ■7 CLS 
9 THEN 60SUB 250 
82,0 

tx> -6.poscx+i> :? ■•[iiaaa 

X> ,INPCX+11 ilNPUT MSS: 

HEN 1000 

GRAPHICS MODE " : M5S cL 
MODE! :GOTO 1000 
*C4,5>> -AN5C5> 
HEN POSITION 0,18:? •■H 

[=ll3[l<S[^m [i]B»H":FOR D = l 
P :GOTO 150 
UAL+1<ANS(9> THEN CUAL 



12=? CLS 
12:? "tl- 



•; STRStCUAL+l 



P 410:POKE 559,0:GRAPH 

OKE 559,34:RET0RN 

HEN M0DE=M0DE-16 

AND M0DE>13 THEN POP : 

on 400^808 swstens.": 
EXT D:GOTO 150 

535,535,540,550,555,5 
90.600,535,535,610,620 



535 POP !? "H":? "ILLEGAL MODE":? :? " 

mmnr^B modes 12 t. 13 are text noDES":FO 

R D=l TO 500:NEXT D : GOTO 150 

54 TPCS="ce-09J":TPR*="ce-16l":DC=39: 

DR=23:CRYS="11": RETURN 

558 TPC«="ce-09>"iTPRS="C0-4O»":DC=79: 

DR=47:CRYS="11": RETURN 

555 TPCS = "ce-19J":TPRS = "ce-4e»"!DC=:79: 

DR=4 7!CRYS="11": RETURN 

560 TPC*="c0-19»"iTPR*="cO-BB»"iDC=159 

:DR=9 5 : CRYS="11" : RETURN 

565 TPC«="CO-3 9>":TPR«="C0-88l":DC=159 

:DR=95:CRV«="12": RETURN 

578 TPC*="C8-39»":TPR»="<e-lB4>"<DC=31 

9 !DR = 19l!CRV« = "2": RETURN 

568 TPC«="te-39>"!TPR*="<8-184>"!DC=79 

:DR=19HCRY9 = "35eei7"i RETURN 



590 TPC 
:DR=191 
608 TPC 
:DH=191 
618 TPC 
9:DR=19 
628 TPC 
9:0R=19 
1088 SP 
> :ULEN 
1010 GN 
1020 ON 
1030 60 
1040 FO 
2000 GR 
2010 FO 
> 1 

2020 CO 
AUTO DC 
X 

2030 A= 
2040 NE 
2050 RE 
2108 GR 
COLOR 2 
2118 FO 
DRAUTO 
:NEXT X 
2120 FO 
:DROUTO 
2130 RE 
2280 GR 
C2,3>» 
11 I A = e 
2218 FO 
DRAUTO 
X,DR-X: 
2220 A= 
2238 NE 
5020 DA 
,16 
5030 DA 



»="ce-39J":TPR*="<e-184>":0C=79 

CRYS="3ee60e": RETURN 
S="C0-39>":TPR*="CO-1B4>":DC=79 

CRYS="30e617": RETURN 
S=" t0-19>":TPR«="c0-184>"iDC=15 
1 :CRYS="11":RETURN 

»="C0-39>":TPR«="ce-184>"!DC=lS 
l:CRV«="12":RETURN 

EED=ANSC3> :C0L=ANSc5> iR0U=ANSC7 
ANSC9> :C0LR=ANScli> 
B=0ALCCRYSC1.1>J 

GNB GOSUB 2000,2100,2200 
SUB 31500 

R D=l TO 5e8:NEXT D:GOTO ISO 
APHICS H0DE«16:0=1 
R X=0 TO DR'2 STEP UAL(CRV«c2.2 

LOR A:PLOT X,X:DRAUT0 DC-X.X:DR 
-X,DR-X:DRAUTa X , DR-X : DRAUTO X, 

A+l:IF A=4 THEN A=l 

XT X 

TURN 

APHICS 8+ie:SETC0L0R l,e.l4:SET 

,e,e:caLaR i 

R X=0 TO 191 STEP 4:PL0T 159,0: 
319,X:PL0T 159,0:DRAUTO 0,191-X 

R X=319 TO e STEP -4:PL0T 159,0 

X.191tNEXT X 
TURN 

APHICS nODE:SETCOLOR 4,UALcCRV$ 
UALCCRV»C4,41> : UOR=UAL CCRY* C5 . 6 

R X=0 TO DC-l:COLOR A<PLOT X.Xi 

DC-X,X:DRAUTO DC-X , DR-X > DRAUTO 

DRAUTO X,X 

A*1>IF A=UAR THEN A=0 

XT X: RETURN 

TA 8, 4, B. 6. a, 8. B, 10.8,12.8,14,8 

TA 29.4,21.6.22,8.26.18.22.12.2 



MS 

TB 

DI 
UR 
TA 

YV 
LS 
NB 

UX 
RT 

LF 
DH 
EK 



1.14.8,18 

5848 DATA 1.28.21.32.33.38.39.41,42.54 
,55,65,66.95 

31088 B6N=152iP0KE 186. B6N-8 : GRAPHICS 
8 

31818 DIN ns*ci28i .CRY«C61 
31828 DnA=PEEKc559i >POKE 5S9.8 
31838 OPEN «1.4.8,"D<SM0DTHV.DAT"iP0KE 
8S8.7IP0KE 852.eiP0KE B53.152iP0KE 8S 
6.244IP0KE B57.3 

31848 a = USRcADRc"hhhC]LUm"> ,16> 'CLOSE <« 
1 
31845 RETURN : REM END OF INIT • ROUTINE 

31500 REM M5S="MR.SM00THY » SMOOTH SCR 

OLLING TEXT UINDOUS IN ALL MAP MODES- 

BY KEN KAYE":M0DE=7 

31510 REM SPEED=10:COL=0:ROU=44 :ULEN=4 

0:COLR=4:POKE 559, DMA : CRY$=STR$ (111 

31520 REM GRAPHICS 7+16'COLOR 2:PL0T 8 

,e:DRAUTO 159 , 95 : DRAUTO 159,0:DRAUTO 8 

,95!DRAUTa 0,8 

31530 0=USRc38912,ADRcnS»> . SPEED. LENiM 

S«> .COL.ROU.ULEN.COLRi 

31540 IF Boe THEN GRAPHICS 0:? "USR E 

RRORtt";B 

31550 RETURN 



LISTING 2 



EF 
PK 
FJ 
EU 

IJ 
PR 

LS 

RD 

PY 

TH 
UB 

MY 
KB 
PU 

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BO 
VC 

DM 

BK 

MM 



CM 

UO 

AR 
PU 
AL 

EU 
UU 



TR 
BY 
PG 
IR 
EL 
UU 
TK 



REM SMOOTHV. LISTING 2 

REM BY KENNETH KAYE 

REM CO 1985.1967 ANTIC PUBLISHING 

REM CLINES 10-250 MAY BE USED UITH 
HER BASIC LOADERS IN THIS ISSUE- 

REM CHANGE LINE 70 AS NECESSARY-) 

DIM FN«c2ei .TEMP«t20J. AR*C93> :DPL=P 
K(10S92> :POKE 10592,255 

FNS="D:SM0OTHY-DAT":REM THIS IS THE 
AME OF THE DISK FILE TO BE CREATED 

? "SmisK or Bassette?"; : POKE 764,25 



IF 
> TH 
IF 
PO 



PO 
? 

sta 
RE 
1 

AR 
FO 
255 
LM 
T 

A« 
NEXT 
IF 
NV D 

:EN 
8 IF 
INES 
8 IF 
ette 
8 OP 
PO 
CL 



NOT <P 
EN 90 

PEEKt? 
KE 764 
GENERIC 
,"BV CH 
KE 1059 
:? :? " 
nd b»-" 
STORE : 

S = RE 

R X = l T 

=LM-l:P 
-";INTC 
CC,C>=C 

XiGOTO 

PEEKcl 
ATA LIN 
D 

C<LN+1 
!":? "C 

FN«="C 
. press 
EN «1.8 
KE 766. 
OSE ni: 



EEKC764>=18 OR PEEK(7641= 

AN 



641=18 THEN FNS="C:" 
255:GRAPHICS 0:7 " 

BASIC LOADER" 
ARLES JACKSON" 
2.DPL:TRAP 200 
Creating ";FNS:7 ".--plea 

READ LN:LM=LN:DIM A« (LNl : 

AD AR» 

LENCAR«> STEP 3 : POKE 75 

OSITION 10.10:7 "(Countdo 

LM/10>;"> 

HR»CUALCAR*CX.X+2>>>:C=C+ 

160 
951=5 THEN 7 :? :? "BTOO 
ES!":7 "CANNOT CREATE FIL 

THEN 7 :7 "QTOO FEU DATA 
ANNOT CREATE FILE!":END 
" THEN 7 :7 " Prepare ca 
cRETURNi" 

l:? »1; A«J :POKE 766.8 

GRAPHICS 8:7 "WMsmmsiamsm 



1808 DATA 
1010 DATA 
921531841 
104104201 
1020 DATA 
412481551 
887162001 
1030 DATA 
001690040 
173244002 
1848 DATA 
050760921 
152201096 
1050 DATA 
241058081 
240174250 
1060 DATA 
570331562 
165088133 
1070 DATA 
690060760 
173247155 
1080 DATA 
652131058 
212024189 



1812 

1842810 
33213184 
12114488 

8828760 
04184141 
16988307 

2491551 
76892153 
13320816 

1772122 
53281832 
17688305 

2501551 
33287165 
15523020 

2081652 
32288284 
21216508 

0871681 
92153141 
24882516 

1551652 
08133213 
24815513 



07240 
13321 
71620 
92153 
24715 
60921 
04104 
14125 
90001 
01128 
17600 
62330 
70224 
20818 
72888 
87157 
24615 
91332 
85188 
25215 
20002 
12024 
23223 
32121 



08617 
21841 
04169 
14124 
51041 
53141 
20180 
11551 
33287 
14400 
60241 
32142 
00024 
50001 
02230 
03315 
52400 
13165 
15520 
50412 
38247 
10925 
62471 
33203 



01690818768 
04141827156 

61551041041 
84201041144 

51440071620 
60808162888 

71620001690 
05864876123 

80161652078 
33208282208 

62321652861 
83076084152 

80071620001 
54141250155 

01551332121 
55286236165 



continued on next page 



MARCH 1988 



ANTIC SOFTVi'ARE LIBRARY * 69 



RR 



DO 



fli 



OU 



UU 



GR 



IZ 



GL 



MK 



RP 



HA 



GH 



nu 



1096 DflTfl 1652131858881332131332041722 

4 91551486241561732581558241092 58155189 

25615518925615 516 92 58155189 

1186 DflTO 2561551416361562662491551696 

611332651691581332 0616268817224 9155177 

212145265169666145212136016 

1110 DftTA 2452622466521652126241692581 

5513321216521310500813 32131652 85824189 

62415613326516 52 86185 0133 

1128 DftTfl 2861722491550760441531682248 

6024 086518418426226 6251169666133213152 

13 321269616988114124415 517 3 

1138 DRTfl 2521550562372501551412531551 

6526 382416925615513328316 5284185660133 

2646 7616615317 3244155288616 

1146 DflTO 1668861850171571452832662848 

38156288245238244155876 698228173834882 

141631156173635862141632156 

1150 DOTft 1681421621531696668326922281 

666 8817 728315381715 726828403 8156288245 

169817133212141254155169157 

1166 DflTfl 1332131412551551628651686621 

6 5212624189258155133212153254155288165 

213105688133213153254155286 

1178 DATA 2622882311698331332121691561 

33213169888141626156141628156141829156 

141618156173253155208016169 

1188 DATA 8831412511551696881410281561 

73251155201664268668169681141251155141 

628156286251155173251155246 

1198 DATA 6112816612886851690160760581 

541690321412 51155160600177212133207200 

177212133208160088162611177 

1266 DATA 2671400231561412481558416156 

24169251155168185196155157611156282173 

2481558412488740 740 740 74024 

1210 DATA 1092511551681851961551570111 



IN 
PA 
XE 
AZ 
NO 
SR 
ZJ 
CJ 
PR 
ZB 
SH 
JI 



56172623156282266192 886266265162811166 

66014024 515514802515618 5254 

1220 DATA 1551332142661488231561852541 

5513 3215 82418981115664215 7811156262189 

81115 6842157 81115617224 9155 

1230 DATA 1772146421452141368162481722 

4 51551926 8126868367619515423223824 5155 

6761521542 38623156166668140 

1240 DATA 2451551720231562022380251561 

730251562010062081761690 06141244155173 

24415524 02 51173027156240011 

1250 DATA 1720271561622552022082531362 

0824 8238026156173026156201008208130238 

010156160006140026156162011 

1260 DATA 1730291562080621730101562052 

4615 52 08003076674155173 028156246638173 

251155288688169616141251155 

1276 DATA 0760581552010162080081690321 

41251155 076 5815516 9 000141251155165212 

024105802133212165213185666 

1280 DATA 1332130760611541730291562050 

2415601600 9238829156238 02 9156076127154 

169001133205169158133206165 

1290 DATA 2030562372501551332031652042 

3300 013 320416200016000017720514 5203208 

2040 241562 0624 616520 5024109 

1300 DATA 0241561332051652061050001332 

0616 52 03024169256155133263165284165860 

13 32 04160000232224008268211 

1310 DATA 1690061740321561720311560320 

9222 8169000133212133213096 000000006811 

616621826041040041041041000 

1320 DATA 0000200410000618040050160176 

20021064065068 06 9080081084 085000002088 

0100 32034 04 004212813 0136138 

1330 DATA 1601621681766000030120150480 

51060063192195264267246243252255 



losin' those MCMXXIV blues 



ROMAN NUMERAL 



TRANSLATOR 



Article on page 33 



LISTING 1 



Don't type the 
TYPO II Codes!' 



<:s. 



RP 
MR 
GI 
HG 

IC 

00 

5K 

TK 

LQ 
CG 

DL 

Hn 

XZ 
ID 
SD 
CK 

AS 

ZE 
lU 

UC 

UK 

PS 



2 REM ROMAN NUMERAL CONUERTER 

4 REH BV DAVID STONE 

6 REM Cc> 1987, ANTIC PUBLISHING 

10 DIM ORIG«c20> , ROnAN$C203 .MaRK$c20i , 

CHARStlJ.F9SC2>,F5SclJ,F4Sc2>.FlSciJ 

20 GRAPHICS e:POKE 710,12!P0KE 712,12: 

POKE 709,12:G0T0 500 

5 8 ROMANS cLENc ROMANS! +1>=U0RKS :N = N-MkF 
!X=INT tN^Fl :RETURN 

168 ROnAN$=ORIG« : ARABIC=e :DaNE=0:RESTa 

RE 6O0:FaR CHAR=1 TO 7 : READ CHARS, HIUA 

L.LOUAL 

110 FDR N = LENi:ORIGSl TO 1 STEP -1:IF 

RI6ScN,N> OCHARS THEN 160 

120 IF N=LENcORIG«> THEN DONE^l 

130 UORKS-aRIGScl,N> :IF N<LENcORIG$> T 

HEN aRIG$=ORIG$(N+l> : N=LEN cORlGSi 

140 FOR n=l TO LENCUORKSI :IF UORKScM,M 

lOCHARS THEN ARABIC = ARABIC + HIU AL - LOU A 

L:POP :GOTO 160 

150 ARABIC=ARABIC+HIUAL:NEXT M 

160 IF DONE THEN POP :GOTO 180 

170 NEXT N 

180 NEXT CHAR:RETURN 

200 N:::UALC0RIG$> :ARABIC = N:ROnANS = RE 

STORE 610 

210 N=N-100e:IF N>=0 THEN ROMANSCLENcR 

0MANS>+1J="M":G0T0 210 

220 N=N+1OOO:F=1OO0 

230 F = F''10tREAD F9S , F5S . F4S . Fl* i X = IMT c 

Nz-FJ :M-X 

240 IF X=9 THEN U0RKS=F9S : GOSUB 50:GOT 

280 

250 IF X>=5 THEN U0RK»=F5$ : M=5 : GOSUB 5 

O'GOTO 270 

260 IF X=4 THEN U0RKS=F4« : G05UB 50:601 

280 



LK 

UP 
ZO 
GJ 



NU 

ND 

TU 

AU 

FA 

LQ 

MF 

AC 

IF 

DV 
QD 

ZU 

ZV 

KB 

PY i 



270 IF X>=1 THEN UaRK«=Fl« > M=l > GGSUB 5 

0:GOTO 270 

280 IF F>1 THEN 230 

298 RETURN 

500 TRAP bOO'? "■••■POKE 752. ■ POSITION 

1.9'? ••Nunerai to convert: ?";:G05UB 
590 

505 INPUT >tl6;0RIGS:P0KE 752,1:? :GOSU 
B 580 
507 ON CASCCORIGSI <65>+l GOSUB 100,200 

510 ? "■••: POSITION 1,7:? ••ffleeBBBBeBHBB 
BBBBeBBHBBBBBBBeBBBBBBBaSJ^^ 

511 POSITION 1,8:? -m Ronan B) •■;ROMA 

512 POSITION 1,9:? "[BHHBBBHBBffieBBBeBBB 
BBBBHHHeeHHBBHBBBeai" 

513 POSITION 1,10:? "[11 Arabic D ";ARA 



BIC 

514 POSITION 1,11:7 "fflBBeBBBBBfflBBBBBBe 
eBBHBBBHBBBBBBHBBBBffl • ■ 

515 POSITION 37,8:? "H" : POSITION 37.10 
:? ••[I]":POKE 752,1 

516 POSITION 5.22:? " cPress anu keu to 
continue!"; :POKE 764 . 255 : GOSUB 590 

520 IF PEEKC764>=255 THEN 520 

530 POKE 764,255:60500 580:? "B" : GOTO 

588 

586 FOR 0=8 TO 12 : POKE 709.a:NEXT B : RE 

TURN 

590 FOR 0=12 TO STEP -0.5:POKE 709, B 

NEXT 0:RETURN 
600 DATA M. 1000. 100. 0.500,100.0. 100, 10 
.L,50.10.X,10.1,U.5.1.I.1.1 
610 DATA CM.O.CD.C.XC.L.XL.X.IX.U.IU.I 



70 * ANTIC SOFTWARE LIBRARY 



MARCH 1988 



ST RESOURCE 



Maze Master 



Article on page 41 



LISTING 1 



Checksum for file: 



' MAZE MASTER 

' BY STEPHEN EVERMAN & PAUL PRATT 

' (c)1987, ANTIC PUBLISHING INC. 

VIDE0RAM=PEEK(1 102 )*65536+ABS(PEEK( 1104) ) 

A$= CHR$ ( ) +CHR$ ( ) +CHRS ( ) +CHR$ { ) 

A=VARPTR(A$) :Al=INT(A/65536) :A2=A-(A1*65536) 'used in copyform as pointer 

C0= 1 : OFF=0 : 00N= 1 : NUM= 1 : MZ0N=0FF 

FULLW 2:CLEARW 2 : HANDLE=2 : A#=GB : CONTROL=PEEK( A#) 

GINT0UT=PEEK{A#+12 ) : GINTIN=PEEK( A#+8 ) 

RANDOMIZE : DIM MZSS ( 31 , 31 ) ,BKilS ( 700 , 2 ) , KOL* ( 16 ) , BK2ilI ( 400 , 2 ) 

RESTORE 5780:GOSUB KOLOR 

GOTOXY 5,15:? CHR${189);" 1987 PRATT & EVERMAN" ; CHR$ ( 7 ) ; 

COLOR 2, 0,0,0: FOR X=0 TO 30:G0SUB POLYLINE : NEXT 'hide output box 

RESTORE 5700:GOSUB PRSTRING 

COLOR 2:G0T0XY 49,10:?"W E":GOT0XY 52 , 9 : ?"N" : GOTOXY 52,11:?"S" 

COLOR 1: GOTOXY 48 , 13 :? "TRACE ON": GOTOXY 52,10 

GOTOXY 38, 15:? "MAKE SHOW PATH RSET QUIT" 

COLOR 1,1, 1,9: RESTORE 6780 

FOR X=0 TO 3: READ A, B , C , D : LINEF A,B,C,D:NEXT 

COLOR 1,3,3:F0R X=0 TO 27:READ A , B, C , D: LINEF A , B , C , D : NEXT 

FILL 462,93 

GOSUB DISPLAY. MAN 'poke top man into video ram 

GOTOXY 5,15:?"WELC0ME TO MAZE MASTER ";: COLOR 2:? CHR$ ( 3 ) 

COLOR 1:G0T0XY 6 , 16 : ?"PLEASE CLICK ON MAKE" 

MAIN: 



100 

140 

180 

190 

195 

197 

210 

220 

240 

260 

280 

285 

320 

340 

360 

380 

400 

420 

440 

460 

480 

500 

520 

540 

560 

580 WHILE FINI=OFF 

600 GOSUB RAT:TI=TI+1 

620 IF ABS{PEEK(1212) )> 198 THEN POKE 1212,1 :S=S+1:IF S=60 THEN S=0:M=M+1 

640 IF TIM=00N AND TI>20 THEN COLOR 3:G0T0XY 4,16:?" TIME :"; S ; "SEC ";M;"MIN " 

: GOSUB SHOW:TI=0 
660 IF M0U=1 AND N0T(MX>436 AND MX<506 AND MY>102 AND MY<132) THEN GOSUB MAIN 
2 

680 
700 
720 
740 
760 
780 
800 
820 



I *********************************************** 



IF MX>434 AND MX<461 AND MY>111 AND MY<121 AND M0U=1 
IF MX>461 AND MX<484 AND MY>102 AND MY<111 AND M0U=1 



THEN GOSUB MOV.W 
THEN GOSUB MOV.N 



IF MX>483 AND MX<506 AND MY>112 AND MY<121 AND M0U=1 THEN GOSUB MOV . E 



IF MX>460 AND MX<489 AND My>122 AND MY<132 AND M0U=1 THEN GOSUB MOV.S 

'GOTOXY 4,15:? MX,MY:G0SUB SHOW 

WEND • END ^ *********************************************** 

MAIN2: !*»*»»» used to unclutter main and speed up room movement 

IF MX>497 AND MX<552 AND MY>154 AND MY<169 AND M0U=1 AND MZON=00N THEN GOS 
UB RE. SET :COL=SCOL:ROW=SROW: GOSUB OUTPUT : NMOVE=0 : S=-l : M=0 : TI=33 
840 IF M0U=1 AND Fl=l AND MY>154 AND MY<169 AND MX>331 AND MX<387 THEN GOSUB 

MAKE . MAZE 
860 IF M0U=1 AND MY>154 AND MY<169 AND MX>387 AND MX<440 AND MZ0N=00N AND Fl=l 

THEN GOSUB ANSW 
880 IF M0U=1 AND MY>154 AND MY<169 AND MX>441 AND MX<497 AND MZ0N=00N AND Fl=l 

THEN GOSUB PATH 
900 IF M0U=1 AND Fl=l AND MY>137 AND MY<150 AND MX>410 AND MX<530 THEN COLOR 1 
: GOSUB TRAC 
920 IF M0U=1 AND MY>154 AND MY<170 AND MX>553 AND MX<670 THEN COLOR 1:FINI=00N 

RETURN I******************************* 

COPY : '********** 

Xl=278:Yl=96:X2=404:Y2=150:0FX=130:0FY=-65 

GOSUB VRO. COPYFORM 'copy empty screen over man 

RETURN 

MOV .W: ' ************ 

IF (MZ!«S(C0L,R0W-1)AND 2)<>2 OR MZ0N=OFF THEN RETURN 

GOSUB COPY :ROW= ROW- 1 : GOSUB OUTPUT 

Xl=300 : Y1=0 : X2=332 : Y2=18 : 0FX=208 : 0FY=50 

GOSUB VRO. COPYFORM 'copy top man down into direction window 

RETURN 

MOV .E: ' ************ 

IF (MZ*(C0L,R0W+1 )AND 8)<>8 OR MZON=OFF THEN RETURN 

GOSUB COPY :R0W=R0W+1: GOSUB OUTPUT 

Xl=300 : Y1=0 : X2=332 : Y2=18 : 0FX=1 12 : 0FY=50 : GOSUB VRO . COPYFORM 

RETURN 

MOV .N: ' ************ 

IF (MZ*(C0L-1,R0W)AND 4)<>4 OR MZON=OFF THEN RETURN 

GOSUB COPY : COL=COL- 1 : GOSUB OUTPUT 



940 

960 

980 

1000 

1020 

1040 

1060 

1100 

1120 

1140 

1150 

1180 

1200 

1240 

1260 

1300 

1320 

1340 

1380 



: maze . bas 


100 


:0380 


140 


:085F 


180 


:07E5 


190 


:OA2 9 


195 


:07CA 


197 


: 1493 


210 


:08D7 


220 


:0CA5 


240 


:09E2 


260 


:OCFC 


280 


:06D3 


285 


:0CD3 


320 


:11A0 


340 


:07BA 


360 


:0EE5 


380 


:0B4C 


400 


:0A45 


420 


:0698 


440 


:0AAD 


460 


:0D8D 


480 


:02F7 


500 


:OEAB 


520 


:0DD1 


540 


:OACE 


560 


:09D7 


580 


:0454 


600 


:050A 


620 


:0F7F 


640 


: 1550 


660 


: 1109 


680 


:0FE5 


700 


:0FD9 


720 


:0FD3 


740 


:0FEB 


760 


:085F 


780 


:OABB 


800 


:14BC 


820 


:21DF 


840 


:12B3 


860 


:14B6 


880 


:14AF 


900 


:1336 


920 


:1133 


940 


:07BA 


960 


:03DF 


980 


:0A9E 


1000 


:0F5E 


1020 


:02A3 


1040 


:0495 


1060 


:0CE1 


1100 


:09ED 


1120 


:0A1A 


1140 


:1416 


1160 


:02A8 


1180 


:0488 


1200 


:0CE7 


1240 


:09F0 


1260 


:0F67 


1300 


:02A4 


1320 


:048D 


1340 


:0CE6 


1380 


: 09C3 



MARCH 1988 



continued on next page 
ANTIC SOFTWARE LIBRARY • 7/ 



1400 
1440 
1460 
1480 
1520 
1540 
1580 
1600 
1620 
1660 
1680 
1700 
1720 
1740 
1760 
1780 
1820 
1840 



Xl=300 : Y1=0 : X2=332 : Y2=18 : 0FX=160 : 0FY=68 : QOSUB VRO . COPYFORM 
RETURN 

MOV .S: ' •****•*«»*»» 

IF (MZ*(C0L+1,R0W)AND 1)01 OR MZON=OFF THEN RETURN 
GOSUB C0PY:C0L=C0L+1:G0SUB OUTPUT 

Xl=300 : Y1=0 : X2=332 : Y2=18 : 0FX=160 : OFY=32 : GOSUB VRO . COPYFORM 
RETURN 

MAKE . MAZE : i*«*»***«**»*»** 

GOSUB COPY:GOSUB CLEAN:GOSUB RE.SET:GOSUB GETSI2E :MZON=OON: GOSUB WORK 
FOR X=0 TO 31:F0R Y=0 TO 31 : M2S5 ( X, Y) = 16 : NEXT : NEXT ' out of bounds detector 
R0W=INT(RND*WID)+l:C0L=l:SROW=ROW:SC0L=C0L ' maze entrance 

BK*{NUM,1)=C0L:BK%(NUM,2)=R0W ' bk* used as map of direct way through maze 
FOR X=l TO HEIrFOR Y=l TO WID : MZ* {X, Y)=0 : NEXT : NEXT ' clean out array 
MZSS (COL, ROW) = 1' open entrance top wall 

WHILE COL<HEI ' loop one. find single way through maze array 
GOSUB DIRECT 'pick random direction 
BKS; { NUM , 1 ) =COL : BK* ( NUM , 2 ) =ROW 

IF M2S!(COL-1,ROW)<>0 AND MZ* (COL+1 , ROW) <>0 AND MZ* (COL, ROW-1 ) <>0 AND 
MZ*(C0L,R0W+1)<>0 THEN GOSUB RETRACE 'If traped back up & find new path 
1860 WEND ' end loop one. now single path through maze contained in bk* 
' ecol & erow = maze exit:opnum= optimum # of moves from start to exit 
ECOL=COL : EROW=R0W : TNUM=0 : OPNUM=NUM : QN=NUM-1 
MZa(;(C0L,R0W)=MZiK{C0L,R0W)+4' open botton wall of exit 



1880 
1900 
1920 
1922 
1925 
1930 
1940 
1945 
1950 
1955 
1960 



' fill in all open space with dead end hallways 

WHILE TNUM<QN:TNUM=TNUM+l'raove down main path looking for open areas 

C0L=BK*(TNUM,1):R0W=BK*(TNUM,2) :NUM=1:G0T0XY 2,15:7 CHR$ ( 7 ) 

0NCE=1 'used to prime while loops so done at least once 



WHILE NUM>1 OR 0NCE=1 

WHILE MZa!(COL-l,ROW)=0 OR MZ* ( COL+1 , R0W)=0 OR MZSB (COL , ROW-1 ) = OR MZSB(C0L, 
R0W+1)=0 ' keep filling untel dead end ' 2 
1970 GOSUB DIRECT:BK2%(NUM,l)=COL:BK2SK(NUM,2)=ROW 
1980 WEND 'reached dead end. back up again looking for openings 
2300 WHILE NUMM AND (MZ* ( COL-1 , ROW) <>0 AND MZ% (COL+1 , ROW) <>0 AND 

MZ*(COL,ROW-1)<>0 AND MZ* ( COL , ROW+1 ) <>0 ) 
2310 NUM=NUM-l:C0L=BK2as(NUM,l) : R0W=BK2* (NUM, 2 ) 

WEND:ONCE=0 

WEND 

WEND 



2340 
2350 
2360 
2380 
2480 
2500 
2520 
2540 
2560 
2580 
2600 



C0L=SC0L:R0W=SR0W' reset array to entrance 

GOSUB OUTPUT: GOSUB CLEAN 

TIM=O0N : S=0 : M=0 : NMOVE=0 

X1=300:Y1=0:X2=322:Y2=18:0FX=162 :0FY=34 

GOSUB VRO. COPYFORM : RETURN 'copy man from above into box 

DIRECT : ' ******«***«*»***«»«**««*««***«*«««*»»«**«*«* 

ON INT(RND*16)+1 GOSUB RIS ,FALL , LFT , RHT ,LFT ,RHT , LFT , RHT ,RIS , RIS , RHT , LFT ,RI 
S,RIS,FALL,RIS 

2620 RETURN 

2640 LFT: ' »**««*•* 

2660 IF ROW<=0 OR MZ* (COL ,R0W-1 ) <> THEN RETURN 

2680 MZ* ( COL , ROW ) =MZ% ( COL , ROW ) +8 : R0W=R0W- 1 : NUM=NUM+ 1 

2700 MZ*(C0L,ROW)=MZ*;(COL,R0W)+2 

2720 RETURN 

2740 RHT:'********* 

2760 IF R0W>=WID OR MZ* (COL ,R0W+1 ) <> THEN RETURN 

2780 MZ*(C0L,R0W)=MZ*(C0L,R0W)+2 :R0W=R0W+1 :NUM=NUM+1 

2800 MZ%{C0L,R0W)=MZai(C0L,ROW)+8 

2820 RETURN 

2840 FALL:'******** 

2860 IF COL>=HEI OR MZ* (COL+1 , ROW) <> THEN RETURN 

2 88 MZSS ( COL , ROW ) =MZ!B ( COL , ROW ) +4 : C0L=C0L+1 : NUM=NUM+1 

2900 MZSS(COL,ROW)=MZ9S(COL,ROW) + 1 

292 RETURN 

2940 RIS: ' ******** 

2960 IF C0L<=1 OR MZ* ( COL-1 , ROW ) <> THEN RETURN 

2980 MZ*(COL,ROW)=MZ*(COL,ROW)+1:COL=COL-1:NUM=NUM+1 

3000 MZS!(COL,ROW)=MZS5(COL,ROW)+4 

3020 RETURN 

3040 RETRACE:'********** 

3060 GOTOXY 44,2:? CHR$ ( 7 ) 

3080 NUM=NUM+1: 'FX=0 

3100 WHILE MZ%(COL+1,ROW)<>0' while space below isn't empty 

312 NUM=NUM-1 

3140 C0L=BK«(NUM,1) :R0W=BKSS(NUM,2) 'back up one step 

3160 WEND 

3180 RETURN 

3200 GET SIZE : '********«********** 

3210 GOSUB CLEAN: COLOR 1 

3220 GOTOXY 0,15:? " WITH POINTER IN BOX ";: COLOR 2: 

3230 COLOR 1:?" HOLD BUTTON" 

3240 GOTOXY 2, 16:7 "AND PULL TO DESIRED MAZE SIZE"; 

3260 GOSUB RAT 



1400 


:0F6F 


1440 


:02A9 


1460 


:0497 


1480 


:0CE3 


1520 


:09BD 


1540 


:0F6B 


1580 


:02AE 


1600 


:0617 


1620 


:1385 


1660 


:1471 


1680 


:1178 


1700 


:161E 


1720 


:1293 


1740 


:0C85 


1760 


:13C9 


1780 


:0C1B 


1820 


:07F6 


1840 


:20C9 


1860 


:1634 


1880 


:1774 


1900 


:0CF9 


1920 


:1054 


1922 


:00F5 


1925 


:1053 


1930 


:16A0 


1940 


:0F23 


1945 


:129F 


1950 


: 00F6 


1955 


:05E0 


1960 


: 1DC7 


1970 


:0BD5 


1980 


: 13F9 


2300 


:17D2 


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CHR$(1); 



72 • ANTIC SOFTWARE LIBRARY 



MARCH 1988 



3280 WHILE MOUOl OR F1=0:GOSUB RAT : WEND : GOSUB CLEAN 

3300 WHILE M00O2 

3320 GOSUB RAT 

3340 IF M0U=1 AND MY>23 THEN GOSUB RUBBERBOX : GOSUB CLEAN 

3360 WID=INT(PEEK(GINT0UT+2)/8) : HEI=INT ( PEEK(GINT0UT+4 ) /4 ) 

3370 IF WID<3 THEN WID=3 

3380 IF HEK3 THEN HEI = 3 

3400 IF WID>30 THEN WID=30 

3420 IF HEI>30 THEN HEI=30 

3460 GOTOXY 2,15:? WID; "X" ; HEI ; " CLICK MOUSE 2 IF OK" 

3480 GOTOXY 4,16:? "OR RESIZE USING MOUSE 1"; 

3500 MOU=0: WHILE MOU=0 : GOSUB RAT : WEND 

3520 WEND 

3540 CLEAN: ' ************* 

3560 FOR X=15 TO 16 

3580 GOTOXY 0,X:?" " : NEXT 

3600 RETURN 

3604 WORK: ' ******** 

3606 GOSUB CLEAN:COLOR 2 : GOTOXY 8,16:?"W O R K I N G";:RETURN 

3 62 PATH: i*««*«*****t* 

3640 GOTOXY 5,15:? CHRS ( 7 ) : CL=SCOL : RW=SROW: PX=RW*8+12 : PY=CL*4+6 

3680 FOR X=l TO OPNUM: CL=BK* (X , 1 ) : RW=BK* ( X, 2 ) : OPX=PX: OPY=PY 

3740 PX=RW*8+12:PY=CL*4+6: COLOR 1,0,2:LINEF OPX , OPY, PX.PY 

3760 NEXT: RETURN 

3780 TRAC: ' *»»*»*** **«» 

3800 IF C0=1 THEN C0=0 ; GOTOXY 54 , 13 : ?"OFF" ; CHRS ( 7 ) : RETURN 

3820 IF C0=0 THEN C0=1;G0T0XY 54,13:?"0N "; CHR$ ( 7 ): RETURN 

3640 OUTPUT : '************************* 

3880 GOTOXY 5,15:? CHR$ ( 7 ) ; : NM0VE=NM0VE+1 : P0INTX=R0W*8+12 : P0INTY=C0L*4+6 

3900 COLOR 1,0,0:LINEF OPOINTX, 0P0INTY,0P0INTX, OPOINTY 

3920 OPOINTX=POINTX:OP0INTY=POINTY 

3940 COLOR 1,0,CO:LINEF POINTX , POINTY, POINTX, POINTY 

3960 ' north door 

3980 IF ( {MZ*(COL,ROW) AND 1)=1) THEN C=0 ELSE C=l 

4000 COLOR 1,0,C,0:LINEF 413,7,528,7 

4020 IF C0=1 THEN LINEF R0W*8+8 ,C0L*4+4 , ROW*8+16 , C0L*4+4 

4040 ' east door 

4060 IF ( (MZ*{COL,ROW) AND 2)=2) THEN C=0 ELSE C=l 

4080 COLOR 1 ,0,C,0:LINEF 538,12,538,62 

4100 IF C0=1 THEN LINEF R0W*8+16 , COL*4+5-C , R0W*8+16 , C0L*4+7+C 

4120 ' south door 

4140 IF ( ( MZSS ( COL , ROW ) AND 4)=4) THEN C=0 ELSE C=l 

4160 COLOR 1,0,C,0:LINEF 413,67,528,67 

4180 IF C0=1 THEN LINEF R0W*8+8 , C0L*4+8 , R0W*8+15+C ,C0L*4+8 

4200 ' west door 

4220 IF ( ( MZ* ( COL , ROW ) AND 8)=8) THEN C=0 ELSE C=l 

4240 COLOR 1 , , C , : LINEF 403,12,403,62 

4260 IF 00=1 THEN LINEF R0W*8+8 , C0L»4+5-C , R0W*8+8 , COL*4+7+C 

4280 IF COL=ECOL AND ROW=EROW AND FSTOP=OFF THEN GOSUB YOUDIDIT 

4300 RETURN 

4320 RE. SET: ' ************** 

4340 GOTOXY 2,15:? CHRS ( 7 ): GOSUB WORK 

4360 FOR Y^O TO HEI*4+1 ' erase maze map directly from Video ram 

4380 FOR X=4644 TO 4704 STEP 4 

4400 POKE VIDEORAM+X+Y* 160,0 'screen memory plane one 

4420 POKE VIDEORAM+2+X+Y*160,0 'screen memory plane two. 

4440 NEXT; NEXT :TIM=0ON: RETURN 

4460 YOUDIDIT:'************ 

4540 GOSUB CLEAN: RESTORE 6780:F0R X=0 TO 15:G0SUB KOLOR:? CHRS ( 7 ) ; 

4560 FOR D=0 TO 100 : NEXT : NEXT 

4565 COLOR 1 : GOTOXY 1 , 15 :? "OPTIMUM # OF MOVES" ; OPNUM ; "YOU' RE #"NMOVE 

4570 GOTOXY 3 , 16 : ? " YOU' RE TIME WAS";M;"MIN ";S;"SEC" 

4580 RESTORE 5780:G0SUB KOLOR: TIM=OFF : RETURN 

4600 ANSW * ' ************************ 

4620 GOSUB CLEAN: GOTOXY 2,15:?"M0USE BUTTON 1 FOR SCREEN" 

4640 GOTOXY 2, 16:? "MOUSE BUTTON 2 FOR PRINTER" : GOSUB RAT 

4660 WHILE (MOUOl AND M0UO2 ) OR F1 = 0:GOSUB RAT:WEND 

4680 IF M0U=1 THEN GOSUB ANSW2SCR 

4700 IF M0U=2 THEN GOSUB ANSW2PTR 

4720 GOSUB CLEAN: RETURN 

4740 ANSW2PTR: ' ******** 

4760 GOSUB CLEAN:G0T0XY 6 , 15 :? "PLEASE TURN ON PRINTER" 

4780 GOTOXY 3,16:?"AND CLICK EITHER MOUSE BUTTON" 

4800 GOSUB RAT: WHILE MOU=0 OR F1=0: GOSUB RAT : WEND 

4820 ' Subroutine for Epson-compatible printers 

4860 ESC=27 'escape key 

4880 C0MPRES=15 'compressed character mode 

4900 SUB=83 'subscript mode 

4920 LSPC=51 'set line spacing 

4940 N216=14 '# of line spacings of 12/216" each 

4960 LPRINT CHRS { COMPRS ) : LPRINT CHRS ( ESC ); CHRS ( SUB ) 

4980 LPRINT CHRS ( ESC ) ;CHR$ (LSPC ); CHRS (N2 16 );: LPRINT 

5000 FOR C0L=1 TO HEI : AS="-" : B$=" I " ; FOR R0W=1 TO WID 

5020 IF ( (MZ%{COL,ROW) AND 1)=1) THEN A$=A$+" -" ELSE AS=A$+" — " 



continued on next page 



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MARCH 1988 



ANTIC SOFTWARE LIBRARY • 7J 



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ELSE BS=B$+" I" 



ELSE A$=A$+"- 



IF ( (MZ*(C0L,R0W) AND 2)=2) THEN BS=B$+" 

NEXT:LPRINT A$:LPRINT B$ : NEXT 

A$="-":C0L=HEI:F0R R0W=1 TO WID 

IF ( ( MZS! ( COL , ROW ) AND 4)=4) THEN AS=A$ + " 

NEXT: LPRINT A$ 

RETURN 

ANSW2SCR: '«*****»* 

AC0L=C0L : C0L=SC0L : AR0W=R0W : R0W=SR0W 

COLOR 1,1,1:F0R C=l TO HEI : FOR R=l TO WID:'GOSUB 352 : NEXT : NEXT 

IF ((MZ%(C,R) AND 1)01) THEN LINEF R*8+8 , C*4+4 , R*8+16 , C*4+4 

IF ((MZ*(C,R) AND 2)<>2) THEN LINEF R*8+16 , C *4+5 , R*8+16 , C*4+8 

IF ((MZ*(C,R) AND 4)<>4) THEN LINEF R*8+8 ,C*4+8 , R*8+16 , C*4+8 

IF ((MZ»!(C,R) AND 8)<>8) THEN LINEF R*8+8 , 0*4 + 5 , R*8 + 8 , C*4 + 8 

NEXT : NEXT 

C0L=AC0L : R0W=AR0W : FST0P=00N : GOSUB OUTPUT : FST0P=0FF 

RETURN 

' %96%%%9696?6X%i6%%%%% VDI & GEM %%96%%96XXi6%%X%%%%%%96%X 

RAT : ' * » * 

GINT0UT=PEEK(A#+12) :GEMSyS(79) 

MX=PEEK(GINT0UT+2) : MY=PEEK(GINT0UT+4 ) : MOU=PEEK( GINTOUT+6 ) 

IF OLDMOUOMOU THEN Fl=l ELSE F1=0 'stops fall-through of mouse button 

OLDMOU=MOU : RETURN 

POLYLINE:'****** cover basic output window in background color 

POKE C0NTRL,6:P0KE CONTRL+2 , 6 : POKE CONTRL+4 , : POKE CONTRL+12 HANDLE 

POKE PTSIN,0+X:POKE PTSIN+2 , 0+X: POKE PTSIN+4 , 639-X: POKE PTSIN+6 0+X 

POKE PTSIN+8,639-X:P0KE PTSIN+10 , 199-X: POKE PTSIN+12,0+X 

POKE PTSIN+14, 199-X: POKE PTSIN+1 6 , O+X: POKE PTSIN+18 O+X 

VDISYS(O) : RETURN 

PRSTRING: ' **** print outside output window ***»»»»»*«*» 

READ ST,XST,YST 

POKE CONTRL , 8 : POKE CONTRL+2 , 1 : POKE CONTRL+6 , ST : POKE CONTRL+12 .HANDLE 

FOR X=0 TO ST*2-1 STEP 2 : READ CH : POKE INTIN+X, CH : NEXT 

POKE PTSIN,XST:POKE PTSIN+2 , YST :VDISYS ( ): RETURN 

DATA 28,210,13,77,0,65,0,90,0,69,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 

DATA 77,0,65,0,83,0,84,0,69,0,82 

KOLOR : '*****««********««***«* 

FOR A=0 TO 3: READ B : KOL* ( A) =B : NEXT 

DATA 33,1808,85,1907 

DEFDBL K:K = 11 14: POKE K , VARPTR( K0L% ( ) ) 

RETURN 

SHOW : ' ********** 

POKE CONTRL, 122: POKE CONTRL+2 , : POKE CONTRL+6 , 1 

POKE C0NTRL+ 12, HANDLE: POKE INTIN,0 

VDISYS(O) iRETURN 

RUBBERBOX : i«****«***««»*«t 

COLOR 1,1,1 

POKE CONTRL, 70: POKE CONTRL+2 , 4 : POKE CONTRL+4 , 3 : POKE CONTRL+6 , 

POKE CONTRL+8,0:P0KE CONTRL+12, 2 

POKE GINTIN,16:P0KE GINTIN+2 , 29 : POKE GINTIN+4 , 30 : POKE GINTIN+6 15 

GEMSYS(70) 

RETURN 

DISPLAY. MAN: ' ***** 

VIDRAM=VIDEORAM+236: RESTORE 6380 

FOR Y=0 TO 15: READ A,B 

POKE VIDRAM+Y*160,A 

POKE VIDRAM+2+Y*160,B 

NEXT 

DATA 1984,0,16376,0,0,4064,12312,1984,15480,8 96,65278,256,65534 

DATA 57334,0,5733 4,0,32764,0,7920,0,7920,0,7920,0,7920,0 

DATA 7920,0,16120,0,0 

RETURN 

VRO . COPYFORM : '******* 

POKE CONTRL, 109: POKE CONTRL+2 , 4 : POKE CONTRL+6 , 1 : POKE CONTRL+12 HANDLE 

POKE C0NTRL+14,A1:P0KE CONTRL+16 , A2 : POKE CONTRL+18 , Al : POKE CONTRL+20 A2 

POKE INTIN,3 

POKE PTSIN,X1 ' X TOP SOURSE 

POKE PTSIN+2, Yl ' Y TOP SOURSE 

POKE PTSIN+4, X2 ' X BOT SOURSE 

POKE PTSIN+6, Y2 ' Y BOT SOURSE 

POKE PTSIN+8,X1+0FX'X TOP DESTINATION 

POKE PTSIN+10, Yl+OFY 'Y TOP DESTINATION 

POKE PTSIN+12,X2+OFX' X BOT DESTINATION 

POKE PTSIN+14, Y2+0FY ' Y BOT DESTINATION 

VDISYS(O) 

RETURN 

DATA 393,7,548,7,393,67,548,67,538,2,538,72,403, 

DATA 393,2,548,2,548,2,548,72,393 ,72,548,72,393, 

DATA 4,2,271,2,271,2,271,133,271,133,4,133,4,133,4,2 

DATA 330,132,606,132,606,132,606,148,606,148,330,148,330,148,330,132 

DATA 386,132,386,148,440,132,440,148,496,132,496,148,552,132,552,148 

DATA 410,115,530,115,530,115,530,12 8,530,128,410,128,410,128,410 115 

DATA 435,90,505,90,505,90,505,100,505,100,435,100,435,100,435,90 

DATA 460,80,482,80,482,80,482,110,482,110,460,110,460,110,460 80 



403,72 
393,72 



74 • ANTIC SOFTWARE LIBRARY 



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:0D47 


MARCH 1988 



ST Resource 

ST New Products 



By GREGG PEARLMAN, Antic Assistant Editor 



MICHTRON UPDATE 

If you have a working knowledge of BA- 
SIC and want to understand the more 
complicated aspects of ST programming, 
The GFA-BASIC Book ($39-95) could be 
just what y<ni're looking for This inter- 
mediate tutorial for the GFA BASIC Inter- 
preter guides you step by step through the 
intricate facets of BASIC and GEM pro- 
gramming. A disk containing more than 
75 programs and files helps you along fur- 
ther. Topics include optimization, 
graphics, GEMDOS, BIOS, XBIOS and us- 
ing windows. 

And if you need a break from heavy- 
duty programming and you've done all 
you can with Microdeal's Airball, grab the 
Airball Construction Kit (S24.95), a 
GEM-b;ised room-design utility. The Menu 
Bar lets you quickly create, load, save and 
delete room files as well as position the 
objects you need in the game (such as 
crates). The Room Infonnation section lets 
you edit rooms quickly. 

MichTron, 576 S. Telegraph, Pontiac, Ml 
48053. (313) 334-5700. Both FINAL. 

CIHIE 266 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



COMMEDIA DELL' UNIX 

Craft, an advanced program development 
environment, consists of two powerful 
tools: Craft shell, a general purpose com- 
mand interpreter that provides a Unix en- 
vironment, and Craft editor, a fast, com- 
plete and versatile editor that works 
integrally with the Craft shell. 

The shell lets you run GEM tasks and 
features more than 50 built-in commands, 
input/output redirection, pipes, aliasing, 
history, command line editing, batch 
processing facilities, user-definable func- 
tion keys and a built-in RAMdisk and print 
spooler 

Written completely in assembly lan- 
guage, the editor has over 100 commands 
and lets you edit up to 100,000 lines of 
text. Other features include extremely fast 
search-and-replace algorithms, 10 editable 
buffers, almost infinitely nestable folds, 
optional wordwrap and auto-indent, and 
editable binary files. 

About $180 in Dutch gilders. ComMedia, le 
Looiersdwarsstraat 12, 1016 VM Amsterdam, 
Netherlands. 020-231740. PRESS. 

CIKIE 269 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



SALES & OFFICE HELP 

Super Sales-Pro, a full-featured Point-of- 
Sale and inventory control package, ac- 
comodates medium to large wholesale, re- 
tail or mail order businesses. The price is 
not set yet, but it will probably be around 
8400. Office-Pro (8199) is an office 
management package that provides exten- 
sive time scheduling and billing for up to 
999 staff members. Office-Pro also has 
mail merge and includes free technical 
support, as do all HiTech Advisers soft- 
ware systems. 

Hi-Tech Advisers, P.O. Box 7524, Winter Ha- 
ven, FL 33883-7524. (813) 294-1885 or (813) 
293-3986. PRESS. 

CIRCEE 265 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



BEYOND ZORK 

It's Great Underground Empire year 966 
and the Age of Magick is ending — 
plunging the once peaceful region of 
Quendor into total chaos. The sorcerers 
will never see magic reign again in the 
land, but they do have a plan. In Beyond 
Zork, you're the lucky camper who's sent 
to find — and then hide — the Coconut of 
Quendor, which holds the essence of the 
sorcerers' wisdom. You'll have to solve 
fantastic new puzzles involving wondrous 
objects and unforgettable characters. Keep 
your eyes peeled, however, for an insidi- 
ous monkey grinder and a pair of knights 
with flaming eyes. 

And you'll really tnive to keep your eyes 
peeled. Beyond Zork sports scrollable 
windows, graphic status screens and on- 
screen mapping. 

$49.95. Infocom Inc., 125 CambridgePark 
Drive, Cambridge, MA 02140. (617) 492- 
6000. FINAL. 

CIRCIE 268 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



3-D FIRE 

Alien Fires— 2199 A.D. is a science- 
fiction role-playing adventure game in 
which you're a Time Lord who's sent to 
Galaxy's End, a small planet at the edge 
of the universe. Your mission is to find the 
missing Samuel Kurtz and destroy his time 
machine, which threatens the very fabric 
of time. Alien Fires features smooth- 



scrolling, 3-D color graphics, digitized mu- 
sic and sound effects, sophisticated char- 
acter interaction and an in-depth story. 
Also, you can define your own character- 
istics such as fighting ability, diplomacy, 
dexterity and quickness. 

$39.95. Paragon Software Corp., 600 Rugh 
Street, Greensburg, PA 15601. (412) 838- 
1166. PRESS. 

CIRCEE 267 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



ULTIMA AND MOEBIUS 

From Broderbund Software comes Origin 
Systems' Ultima IV: Quest of the Ava- 
tar and Moebius: The Orb of Celestial 
Harmony. In Ultima IV, you explore Lord 
British's newest graphics role-playing 
challenges. Instead of designing the char- 
acteristics of your party, it takes on your 
characteristics — based on your responses 
to a series of ethical dilemmas. So don't 
blow it, the difficulty of your quest is in- 
fluenced by your own personality. Ultima 
IV has a complete, original musical score 
and 16 colors. 

Moebius combines Eastern adventure 
and arcade-style martial arts action with 
fantasy role-playing. Impeding )'our pro- 
gress as you seek the Orb of Celestial Har- 
mony are such inconveniences as hand- 
to-hand and sword combat with people 
much bigger than you, as well as tigers and 
giant beetles. And watch out for typhoons 
and earthquakes. 

$59.95 each. Distributed by Broderbund Soft- 
ware, 17 Paul Drive, San Rafael, CA 94903. 
(415) 492-3200. Both FINAL. 

CIRCEE 270 ON READER SERVICE CABD 



New ST product notices are com- 
plied from information provided by 
the products' manufacturers. Antic 
assumes no responsibility for tloe 
accuracy oftkiese notices or the per- 
formance of the product. Each men- 
tion is followed by a code word 
indicating that, at press time, Antic 
had seen a FINAL tnarleetable ver- 
sion, near-final BETA, earlier 
ALPHA, incomplete DEMO, or 
PRESS release 



March 1988 



75 



Tech Tips 



SINGLE-STEPPING 

The following advanced tip comes 
from a well-known independent 
Atari software developer who 
prefers to remain anonymous. 
This single-step routine works 
with the version of DDT (Dunion's 
Debugging Tool) built into the 
MAC/65 assembler-editor from Op- 
timized Systems Software. Our 
technical staff was unable to fully 
test the technique prior to 
deadline: 

Let's say you're using the [OP- 
TION] key to single-step through a 
program that you're revising, and 
you reach a code block that in- 
cludes a tight loop which is ex- 
ecuted many times. For example: 

LDX #117 
LP LDA BUF.X 
STA OUT.X 
DEX 
BPL LP 
JSR SOMEPLACE 



HIGH SCORE SAVE 

This tip comes from an article by Ion Finlayson in Page 6, Britain's biggest Atari magazine: 

BASIC'S Forced Read mode lets a program modify itself by automatically writing program lines onscreen ond 
then reading them as if they were typed in manually. Adding this subroutine to a BASIC game lets you save 
a high score to disk or cassette. 

31210 TT7=0 

31220 HIGHSC0RE=TT7:RETURN 

31225 REM 

31229 REM THIS REWRITES LINE 31210 

31230 IF HIGHSC0RE<=TT7 THEN RETURN 

31240 GRAPHICS 0:? :? -.1 "31210 TT7=";HIGHSC0RE 

31250 ? :? :? "CONT" 

31260 POSITION 2,0:P0KE B42,13:STOP 

31270 POKE 842,12:SAVE "D:GAME":RETURN 

31280 POKE 842,12 :GRAPHiCS 0:? :? :? "Rewind tope":? :? 

"Push RECORD and PUY, then press [RETURN]" 
31290 CSAVE :RETURN 

This is actually two routines in one. The first routine (lines 31210-31220) places the current high score into 
variables TT7 and HIGHSCORE. The line GDSUB 31210 calls this routine. You only need to call this subraurine 
once, at the beginning of your program. 

During your game, remember that the variable HIGHSCORE refers to the highest score achieved during the 
current game, while the variable TT7 refers to the all-time high score. 

Before your gome ends, you should update the all-time high score with a GOSUB 31230. This is the second 
half of the routine. It checks to see if the current high score is greater than the all-time high score. If so, line 
31210 is updated with the new all-time high score, and the program is re-SAVEd. 

If your program is on cassette, you should remove line 31270. if your program is on disk, put its filename 
in line 31270. 



Now, you know that loop will 
work okay, but using [OPTION] to 
go through it will take forever. So 
instead, use the [OPTION] key to 
single-step down to the first oc- 
currence of the BPL (or any simi- 
lar branch instruction). Then 
press [N] — the loop will execute 
and the program will stop on the 
next instruction, ready for an 
[OPTION]. 

Normally, N means to skip the 
Next instruction. DDT executes it 
by placing a temporary break- 
point on the instruction past the 
next one and then doing a GO (or 
START). So with a branch instruc- 
tion, N puts the break right after 
the branch. Only when the branch 
is not taken is the break activated. 

Caution: Don't use this tech- 
nique on a branch that might 
never "fall through." Since DDT 
does a GO, your program may run 
away too quickly to recover. 



PROWRITER PATCH 

Ervin Zimmerman of Mt. Clemens, Mich., offers the following 
modification \o Aniic Publisher (December 1987), which al- 
lows the program to print on a Prowriter printer. Antic doesn't 
hove a Prowriter to verify this tip on. 

1. Edit line 12010 as follows: 
Find the part of the line which reads: 

? «l;"S3ffl" 

and change it to: 

? nii-STiescSNtl" 

2. Edit line 32050 as follows: 
Find the part of the line which reads: 

GRAFS C5> : GR AF$ = "HMa]ac]" 

and chonge if to: 
GROFScG* : GRnF$="ese648" 

3. Change the 48th and 51st characters of DUMPS in line 
32130 from "8," (ampersand) to "f" (lowercase f). 



WASHINGTON SHUFFLE 

Mark Brown of Current Notes, the magazine 
of the Washington Area Atari Computer En- 
thusiasts, created this two-line routine that 
shuffles a set of items. Here, it shuffles upper- 
and lowercase letters, but what if you were 
working with playing cards instead? 

10DIMCS(52),TS(1).CS= 'ABCDEPGHIJKIJm 
OPQRSTUW(0(YZabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwx 
yz":? CHRS(125); "In order:":? CS:? :? 
20FORA=1 TO 52:B=INT(52*RND(0)+1) 
:TS=CS(A,A):CS(A,A)=CS(B,B):CS(B,B)=TS 
:NEXTA:? ''Shuffled":":? CS 



If you have a Tech Tip that you would like to share with other readers, 
send it along to Antic Tech Tips, 544 Second Street, San Francisco, CA94107. 
You might get your name in print We always welcome very short programs 
that demonstrate the Atari 's powers, simple hardware modifications, or use- 
ful macros for popular software. 



76 



ANTIC, The Atari Resource 



ATTENTION 
RETAILERS! 



Starting with our March 1988 issue, 
Antic — The Antic Resource introduces 

The 
Retail Directory 

*e can now deliver to I'Oh, our valued 

retailer, the over 100,000 Atari 
enthusiasts who read Antic every month. 



Where: In every issue of Antic. 

How: Send us the name of your store, 
address, city, slate, zip code, and 
telephone number. Your listing 
will appear under your state in 
our Retail Directory pages. 

Cost: S.^0.00 per issue (three issue 
minimum order — S90.00) or 
S.WO.OO per year (a savings of 
20%, or S60.00 per year). 

Listing Deadline for March 1988 Issue: 
December 1, 1987 

Send To: Retail Listings 

Antic Publisliing, Inc. 
544 Second Street 
San Francisco, CA 94107 
(415)957-0886 

Please Note: 

• Listings can include name of store, 
address and telephone number only. All 
other copy will be deleted for publication. 

• All listing copy nmsl he typewritten. 

• If you already have terms with our 
retail department and sign up for listing 
in twelve issues, we will extend credit. 
Terms are as follow: 

• Upon our receipt of your listing, you 
will be billed for S30O.OO. You may pay 
this total at once, or pay SIOO.OO every 
30 days until the S30O.OO is paid in full. 

• Month-to-month listings must he 
prepaid by the listing deadline date for 
each issue (3 months prior to cover 
date, eg., April 1988 issue deadline is 
January 1, 1988). Just mail in your pay- 
ment, and if the listing is the same as a 
previous issue, include a note saying 
"repeat listing from (issue date)." 

• If you need to correct or change your 
listing for any reason, please allow three 
months from the date you submit your 
change for the change to appear in the 
magazine 



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In minutes, you easily convert your 
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Your quiz becomes a colorful computer- 
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CIRCEE 061 ON READER SERVICE CARO 



March 



77 



Antic Classifieds 



SOFTWARE 



ATARI ST Public Domain Disks $4.00 
eacii. Over 350 ST disks. 800/XI./XE disks 
S3. 00. Specify Computer. Fast Service. Send 
SASE to: Brad Roitgen Em, 719 E. Minarets, 
Fresno. CA 93710 (209) 432-2159 (3/88) 

Missing back issues of ANTIC? Write us at 
ANTIC, 544 Second Street, S.F., CA 94107, or 
sec THE CATALOG in this issue. 

AMAZING ATARI 8-BIT SOFTWARE!!! 

Choose from over 200 Public Domain Theme 
Disks or pick individual programs. Large Cata- 
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* • * 'PUBLIC DOMAIN SOFTWARE* ' * * 

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P.O. Box 893, Clinton, OK 73601. (3/88) 



GET ALL THE PROGRAMS, NOW MORE 
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THE NEW TESTAMENTS OF THE HOLY 
BIBLE igv 8-bit and ST Send SASE for info to: 
Computers as Tutors, 325 May Court, Mt. Zion, 
IL 62549. 8-bit DemoDisk $2.00 (3/88) 

BEST PD DISKS/PRICES-FASTEST 
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ANTIC SEEKS AUTHORS for SOFTWARE 
MAGAZINE ARTICLES. For Details, send self 
addressed stamped envelope to: AUTHOR 
INFO, c/o ANTIC, 544 Second Street, San Fran- 
cisco, CA 94107. 

Atari Public Domain Disks: 8-bit & ST. 

Large selection. Low prices. Specify computer. 
Send a SASE to: WYOSOFT, PO Box 30981, 
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25 HIGH QUALITY 5 1/4 " DISKETTES, 
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order to ANTIC PUBLISHING 544 2nd ST., 
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DESK. At this low price disks are .sold "as is". 



Advertising Deadlines 



AprU 1988 



May 1988 



June 1988 



Insertion Orders: January 4 
Artwork: January 11 

On Sale: Last week of February 



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On Sale: Last week of March 



Insertion Orders: March 2 
Artwork: March 9 

On Sale: Last week of April 



An Ad In Antic 

Reaches 

More Than 

100,000 

Serious 

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Classifieds 



BUY-SELL- 

TRADE-SWAP 

IN THE CLA SSIES 



Antic Classifieds 

Classified Manager, Antic-The Atari Resource 

544 Second Street, San Francisco, CA 94107 

Telephone (415) 957-0886 



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TERMS: Prepayment is required. Check, Money Order, Visa or MasterCard is accepted. 

Make check payable to Antic Publishing. 

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Clip this coupon, attach to typewritten copy and send with remittance to address above. 
HANDWRITTEN COPY WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. 



78 



ANTIC, The Atari Resource 



Advertisers List 



Be sure to mention ANTIC when contacting these advertisers — all of whom support the Atari computer. 



READER SERVICE NO. PAGE NO. 

ALPHA SYSTEM 001 26 

AMERICAN TECHNAVISION 003 12 

ANTIC 32,48 

ADVANCED LANG DESIGN .005 77 

B&C COMPUTERVISION ... 006 23 

C.S.S 015 22 

CENTRAL POINT 002 8 

COMPUTER DIRECT 037 2,3 

COMPUTER MAIL ORDER . . 004 28,29 

COMPUSERVE 007 IBC 



READER SERVICE NO. PAGE NO. 

COMPUTER REPEAT Oil 54 

GEISCO 9 

HOWARD MEDICAL 012 80 

JESSE JONES 22,52 

LYCO 020 .. . A,5b,57 

MAGNA SYSTEMS 15 

MICROTYME 031 27 

SOFTWARE DISCOUNTERS .040 43 

SPENCER 022 77 

SUBLOGIC 041 1 



ST Advertisers List 



This list is provided as a courtesy to our advertisers. ANTIC does not guarantee accuracy or comprehensiveness. 



READER SERVICE NO. 

DR.T'S 017. 

LCD 056. 

LOGICAL DESIGN WORKS . 014. 

MAD SCIENTIST 061 77 

MARK WILLIAMS 021 16 

MUSIC EXPO 53 



PAGE NO. 
... 54 

... 46 
. . . 17 



READER SERVICE NO. 

MINDSCAPE 019. 

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TIMEWORKS 029. 

SOFTLOGIK 065, 

WASATCH 033 . 



PAGE NO. 
. .. EC 

... 60 
... 42 
. 24,25 
. . .IPC 
. . .77 



Advertising Sales 



Phoebe Thompson Associates 

Phoebe Thompson 
408-356-4994 



The Pattis Group 

Michael Mooney 
312-679-1100 




Advertising Sales Director 

John Taggart 
Antic Magazine 

544 Second Street 

San Francisco, CA 94107 

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Garland Associates 

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Phoebe Thompson Associates 

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Address all advertising materials to: 

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544 Second Street 

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March 1988 



79 



MAGNAVOX 8CM 505 $220 

13" Color Monitor 390 x 240 resolution 



MONITORS 






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color 
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3 inputs offer maximum versitil- 
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Clones. The 640 x 240 resolu- 
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colors and a green screen 
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RGB cable $19.95 with monitor 
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SONY 

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The Ultimate 13" color monitor 
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ZENITH 

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This new release froni Zenith 
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$98 



PRINTERS 



$155 



STAR 

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Gemini's restyled printer offers a 
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An Attari printer cable is available 
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Can you handle the excitement of 
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Visil your retailer or call 1-800-221-9884 lor VISA or MasterCard orders. To purchase by mail, send 
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or $49,95 (Alan ST, Paperboy only) plus $3,00 lor handling to Mindscape, Inc., RO. Box 1 1 67 



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Mindscape is a trademark of Mindscape, Inc Paperboy™ e 1984 Atari Games All rights reserved 
Gauntlet™ © 1985 Atari Games, All rights reserved. 



CIKtE 019 OH REAM SERVICE CARD