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NOVEMBER 1st 1986 

























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NERVE - November 1986 - pg.2 



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Every Thursday Girls Night Out 

Ladies pay no cover. Treats, Gifts, Men, Lights, Action, Dance, Romance. 


MEN use this as your pass 

The Four Storey Funhouse with the double decker DJ’s 
on the hard edge of the Queen W. Village in the part of the City thatnever_sleeps. 


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651 Queen St. W. 366-6699 


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/ 




NERVE - November 1986 - pg.3 


STAFF 


EDITOR/PUBLISHERS 
Nancy Lanthier 
Dave Macintosh 

ASSISTANT EDITOR 
Denis Seguin 

LAYOUT/DESIGN 
Dave Macintosh 

PHOTO EDITOR 
Chris Buck 

WRITERS 
Phillip Dellio 
Rick McGinnis 
Dave Bidini 
Tim Powis 
Helen Lee 
B.F. Mowat 
Scott Woods 
Sonja K 
Slug 


Kyle Swanson 
King Rick Rock 
Phillip Bull 
Steve Good 
Denis Seguin 
Nancy Lanthier 
Dave Rave 

PHOTOGRAPHERS 
Chris Buck 
Steve Ralph 
Rick McGinnis 
Mike Dyer 
Heather Blurton 
Steve Good 
Hugh Beaton 
Candy 

REGIONAL CO-ORDINATOR 
Michael Sarazen 

GRAPHICS 
Noxious Art 
Swinghammer 


published by 
Nerve Publishing 
296 Brunswick Ave. 
Toronto, Ont. M5S 2M7 
(416)925-3611 


Nerve is published once a month on or around 
the first day of the month, with a circulation of 
20,000 free copies. We are not sponsored by any 
Government agency or arts council. Advertising 
information can be obtained by calling 925-361 1 
during business hours. All artwork done specifical- 
ly by Nerve for advertising remains the property of 
Nerve and the artists' permission must be obtain- 
ed before being reprinted elsewhere. Submissions 
and letters to the editor are welcome, but please 
enclose SSAE for return. Second Class Postage per- 
mit pending. 



09 






November 9 et The Concert Hall 
IGGY POP, FORGOTTEN REBELS 

Nov. 18 atR.P.M. 

HUNTERS & COLLECTORS 
Nov. 28 et R.P.M. 

DEJA VOODOO, SHADOWY MEN, 
DUNDRELLS, 10 COMMANDMENTS 
DIK VAN DYKES * free 
Nov. 26 & 27 at Massey Hall 
NEW ORDER, BODINES 
Nov. 28 at The Concert Hall 
SLAYER 

Nov. 30 at The Diamond 
BILLY BRAGG, SAX PISTOLS 
Jan , 29 

JOHN CALE, CHRIS SPEDDINQ: DUO 
Coming soon: PETER MURPHY 


- AMI JZi'JZ! 

= national Velvet 


new 4 song ep 




RecoRfc Release paRty 

Diamond: Wednesday, novemBeR 19 


availaBle at: 

• peten Dunn's Vinyl museum — BIoor w. 
VoRtex — Queen w. & Dundas e. 
Cheapies —599 yonqe 
R.O.W. —621 yonqe 


NOW OPEN DURING THE DAY 



80’s British Dance 
Music, Rockabilly, 
and more!! 


TUESDAYS 

IMPORT 

ffns TBMJL) NIGHT 


^ORPtC) 


■ S> KNO^j 


SPONSORED BY 
DIE 

RECORD 
PEDDLER 


WEDNESDAYS 

FORWARD 

MOTION 


THURSDAYS 

BALLROOM 

BLITZ 

TIL 3 A.M. 


FRI-SAT 

WEEKEND 

MELTDOWN 

HOT DANCE ACTION 
Til 4 A.M. 


N U T S MSTS 


DANCING 7 DAYS A WEEK 

ONE 1UOCK EAST Of YONGE ON DUNDAS 


277 VICTORIA STREET. TORONTO, CANADA. (416)977-1356 







NERVE - November 1986 - pg.4 


532-7383 
529 RIoor St W 



1 : GO HOUR 3 (ZULU recording artists) 


RED LIFE 

2nd: NO COVER, ALL DAVn 
Super Blues Jam 2-6pm 
STEVEN C. & RED ROCKETS 
—TALENT SHOWCASE 7-1 1pm 
with WOMEN & CHILDREN 
as the hosting band 
3rd: DELTA DEVILS 

LARRY GOODHAND, DAVID 
OWEN 

4th: BOCHE LEAGUE, D.V.P. 

PARALLEL FIFTH 
5th: SADDLE TRAMPS 
ZEBRA PEOPLE 
CHINA & GUNS 
6th: CKLN presents 

record release party for 
PARTS FOUND IN SEA 
with BORY GROVE 
7th: MONDO COMBO 
8th: VITAL SINES 

FRINGE recording artists 

9th: same as last week 
10th: DANCING COUNTS 
HUMAN INTEREST 
BOOKMEN 

1 1th: MONUMENTS GALORE 
THE REPUBLIC 

13th: PHANTOMS live video shoot 
14th- 15th: HOPPING PENGUINS 
1 6th: (same as last Sunday, except 
Women & Children will be replaced) 

1 7th: THE RAVE 
CRAWLING K1NGSNAKES 
PORNOGRAPHIC SHAKESPEARE 
18th: REDLIFE 

ALL THE RAGE, BOP TOTEM 
19th: THE FATALES 
THE BLOW, ONE FREE FALL 
20th: CALLING RAIN 
MANNEQUIN PARTY 
21th: BRATTY 
(record release party) 

22nd: Elliot Lefko presents 

THE CHESTERFIELD KINGS 

(tickets $8 in advance) 

23rd: (same as last Sunday) 

24th: THOUGHT ROCKETS 
CERAFIM, THE RISK . 

25th: t.b.af. 

26th: EUGENE RIPPER 
27th: BUNCHOFUCKINGOOFS 
(record release partyi) 

28th— 29th: BREEDING GROUND 
(live video shooti) 

30th: (same as last Sunday) 

EVERY TUESDAY: 8-9pm 
A WEDGE OF NIGHT' 

Up stairs 

to November 23rd: 

BUDDIES IN 
BAD TIMES 
Theatre 

and SKY GILBERT 
presents 

"Drag Queens In Outer Space” 
showtimes: Tues-Sat: 8.30pm 
Sun. 2.30pm 

Admission: Tues.-Thurs. $9 
Fri. c Sat. $10 
Sun. pay what you can 
call 593-0653 for reservations 



EVERY MONDAY at 10pm 
The Illustrated Men 

(Comedy Improv.) 
admission only $2 
(starting Nov. 3rd) 

Starting Mon. Nov. 24th, there will be 
ONE cover charge for LEE’S PALACE 
seven days a week, upstairs and 
downstairs. 

(this will not apply for very special 
events) 


CASUAL 

CASUALTY 

I've never been able to warm up to a com- 
puter terminal, but Peter Dako sure can. The 
latest issue of Casual Casual , his graphic/comic 
magazine cum cultural diatribe, is a tribute to 
user friendliness. In between the usual assort- 
ment of graphic stories and exhaustive reviews 
of the current Graphix scene, Dako plugs his 


new toy with prosletyzing zeal. It is an im- 
provement, there's no doubt. Type is clean and 
easy to read, and the computer treated 
graphics are quite novel, this first time around. 

As for the contributions, Dako is turning his 
once private scrawl into a world-class scrawl. 
Most welcome of all are the thick, brutal draw- 
ings of the aptly named Savage Pencil, a British 
cartoonist whose view of the world is equal 
parts "Big Daddy" Roth, Herschell Gordon 
Lewis and Jackson Pollack. Henriette Valium 
and Y5P5 commit some fairly disturbing no- 
tions to paper, while the linguistic cross-section 
of contributors, and their purposeful mi sin ter-" 


preting of the English language can make one a 
bit ill at ease with one's o\%n native tongue. 

Imagine Archie, overcome with a digestive 
problem and an acute case of weltschmerz, 
caving in Juggie's skull for no particular 
reason, taking off from Riverdale with 
Veronica in tow, and ending up scrubbing 
floors in a eunuch whorehouse in Tangiers, 
and you have the kind of world where con- 
teporary underground, or alternative comix 
finds solace. It's a rad trip, but one that Dako 
and Casual Casual will take you on anytime 
you're so inclined. $3.50 at most good 
bookstores downtown. 

Rick McGinnis 



some like it hot: Jazz at the BamBoo 

Here's your chance to get WITH IT, kids. From Nov. 1 7-22 at the Bamboo, 
our starving little hamlet gets a solid “week of New Jazz," with the hippest 
NYC and local sounds that our malnourished minds will have a chance to 
digest for God-knows-how-long, surpassing even last summer’s DuMaurier 
affair for sheer, ‘out-there’ thrills. 

Monday 17. Bill Smith opens for The Cecil Taylor Unit with his 
Bauhause Cabaret Orchestra. Personnel in the Great Piano Mutilator's Unit 
is still unannounced, but he’s been playing NY with a wailin’ 8-piecer. 

Tuesday, T.O.'s recently returned prodigal sons, The Shuffle Demons 
open for altoist Arthur Blythe. Fest promoter Serge Sloimovits admits Art 
could be the week’s weak draw, which is ironic considering he's the only act 
of the lot signed to a big label (Columbia). Local sex god Bill Grove’s new- 
ly formed Not King Fudge will attempt to blow drummer Ronald Shan- 
non Jackson's Decoding Society into the harmolodic hereafter Wed. 
nite. A thankless job, but best of luck to all contestants. 

The World Saxophone Quartet (Oliver Lake, Julius Hemphill, 
David Murray and Hamlet Blulett) is Thursday’s headliner. Just four sax- 
es — but you won’t miss the rhythm section. The WSQ just put out a whole 
LP of beautifully arranged Duke Ellington tunes, so don’t stay away because 
you’re scared of cacaphony (although there'll likely be a good dose of that, 
too). Toronto tenor terror Paul Cram opens with his Orchestra. 

The weekend will be shoo-ins for big attendance, with Joe Bowie's 
Defunkt and James Blood Ulmer's trio the respective showstoppers. 
Blood will supposedly have a different line-up than he did for his last two gigs 
here. Gotham City and Whltenoise (another Bill Grove production) kick 
things off respectively and respectfully. 

Tickets prices are exceedingly reasonable, either $1 0 or $12. A great op- 
portunity for jaded jazz buffs and wet-eared novices alike. 


#Recommended gig 
things this month: 
Richard Berry will try to 
avoid playing 'Louie 
Louie' at Albert’s Hall all 
week from Nov. 3rd. 
'Louie' will 

win. . .American-type 
human person Uncle 
Bonsai In at RPM Nov. 
5th, with Raving Mojo 
Blair Martin and his Group 
as part of the 
bill. ..Violence & The 
Sacred play polka hits 
with a vengeance Nov. 


6th at lldikos (Bloor 
West), with Varoshl Fame 
on cosmic ukelele . . . Parts 
Found In Sea celebrate 
the discovery of a crate of 
records with their name 
on It with a gig at Lee's 
Palace on Nov. 6th... How 
far can too far get? 
Metalllca pay tribute to 
the contents of their 
trousers at Concert Hall 
Nov. 7th...lggy Pop does 
his best Sinatra and Dave 
Lee Roth routines at the 
Concert Hall Nov . 9th . 
Few are expected to sur- 


COMFORT 

& 

JOY 


The last lew stragglers 
join the Hock, souvenir 
albums and ashtrays in 
hand. A very clean 
gentleman with his own hair 
assures us that He will be 
with us shortly. In the 
meantime, a small “dona- 
tion'’ given to the usher 
breathing down your neck 
will get you a nifty 15-page 
pamphlet and a lifetime of 
His blessing. Hell, what's a 
couple of bucks for a little 
salvation, right? 

He is really here! The 
World Famous Reverend 
Earnest Angley T r avelli n * 
Miracle Show is under way. 
Now, Mr. Angley is without 
a doubt the most evil- 
looking person ever to grace 
a television screen. He has a 
voice to turn even the 
strongest stomach. Bin this 
man sure knows how to win 
over an audience. 

For 20 minutes, the In- 
temtional Centre is the 
scene of the most fearsome, 
relentless, sales pitch in 
marketing history. There is 
a Hell. There is a devil and 
ghe has us all by the balls. 
The world will end. There is 
no way to stop it. UNLESS, 
unless we all onen our 


hearts (pronounced wol'et) 
and give HIM our ...help 
(prounouned $$$). 

The ushers appear again 
with plastic buckets large 
enough to empty the deepest 
pockets. Elderly widows, 
crippled children, ethnics in 
bad suits, all rush to the 
stage to be the first to ex- 
change their $500 "gifts” 
for a handshake and HIS 
blessing. When the flow 
slows down, Earnest himself 
travels throughout the hall, 
rustlin' up $200 and $100 
donations. Those who find 
themselves a little short are 
quickly given pre-addressed 
envelopes for future use. 

When every last offering 
has been collected, the ser- 
mon continues. And once 
again the wallets open. As 
hundreds of people rush 
forward , Earnest lies down 
on the stage and reads the 
denomination of each bill 
aloud as it is handed to 
him. Five Ten, Twenty. Fif- 
ty. "Some of these higher 
denominations are so 





pretty." 

For a full two and a half 
hours, Toronto's less for- 
tunate give till it hurts in 
hopes of a miracle. The 
glint in his eye shows that 
Earnest has seen a miracle. 
Seven hundred sets of hands 
raise towards the ceiling 
while TOD pockets are emp- 
tied is indeed a miracle. The 
■■miracle called AMERICAN 
CAPITALISM* 

Stag 


vlve... Whltenoise will De 
pursuaded to remove 
most of their clothing 
when they share the Dia- 
mond stage with the 
seventeenth best band In 
the world, Fishbone, Nov. 
13. ..How far out can 'out 
there' get? Motorhead 
pay tribute to the con- 
tents of Metalllca 's 
trousers , shortly after 
Razor scrutinize their own 
trousers for guidance In 
these troubled times, 
Nov. 1 5th at Concert 
Hall... Skinny Puppy 
return to torment the 
city’s children with their 
mean metal machine 
music for an all-ages 
matinee show at RPM 
Nov. 16th. Hey, kids, why 
not bring your 
parents— this Is your 
chance to really get them 
back for making you eat 
those cold mash 
potatoes... Australian 
post-punk existentialist 
milkmen Hunters A Col- 
lectors abuse their dlg- 
gerldoos Nov. 1 8th at 
RPM. . .a good, cheap 
triple-bill at RPM Nov. 19 
with Go Four 3, Groovy 
Religion and Stuurrm 
Grooop...Blg Twist & The 
Mellow Fellows play three 
nights at the Horseshoe 
Nov. 20-21-22, so that 
makes it 'nine hundred 
pounds of heavenly 
joy’... New Order and The 
Bodlnes explain Life and 
explore the magnificent 
beauty of the PolyGram 
promo machine Nov. 
26th at Massey 
Hall... since Peter Gabriel 
plays the Gardens the 
same night, let's see If he 
boots over and Involves 
himself In a gratuitous 
'jam' with New Order, 
thus demonstrating to the 
audience that boredom Is 
infinite. . .The Dick Van 
Dykes, The Dundrells, 
Ten Commandments and 


The Shadowy Men From 
UNCLE try to 'out-cool 1 
the splendid Deja Voodoo 
at RPM Nov. 29th, and as 
the great Humphrey 
quoth on recent World 
Series commercials, 
' that' s living . ’ Yas yas 
yas. Keep sending in 
those bubble gum wrap- 
pers. 

0 Sturm Group is to be In- 
cluded on a compilation 
set for November release 
on the Scottish label 
Cathexls Records, 
distributed by the Rough 
Trade/Cartel network. 
The Sturms will share 
vinyl space with Psychic 
TV, Band Of Holy Joy, At- 
trition, Legendary Pink 
Dots, Rubella Ballet, 
Dead Can Dance, 
Wolfgang Press, Death In 
June, and The Leather 
Nun. We're wondering 
just what exactly will be 
on the snack tray at the 
release party... 

0Yas, yas, yas, It’s true. 
The Slgue Slgue Sci Fi 
Sputnik Sex Farce will be 
showing up at the Dia- 
mond Club Nov. 4th to 
show slides of their vaca- 
tion and do everything 
possible to promote their 
debut masterpiece pop 
record, Flog It. It's 
almost certain there will 
be weeping in the aisles. 
The Spoons are 
rumoured to be actually 
playing some music later 
in the night. It’s almost 
certain that at one point, 
Gord Deppe will en- 
counter Slgue Sigue 
Schlep Tony James and 
blurt out: ' ' r ve always 
admired you and your art. 
Will you produce our next 
record?" It's highly likely 
he will later Insist it was a 
joke. Don’t miss this 
once-ln-a-llfe.tlme 
ultimate rock party. 




NERVE - November 1986 - pg.5 




Grab yourself a guitar and sit 
down; while you’re at it, grab 
one of those remedial instruc- 
tion manuals., Play the A-chord 
you see diagrammed on page 2. 
Hit it three times, then switch 
to a D. Two hits, then over to 
an E. Three times there, then 
retrace your steps. Pretty easy, 
right?: 1-2-3 , 1-2, 1-2-3, 1-2, 
1-2-3 , 1-2... You can go on for 
three minutes, 12 minutes, 
however long you want — this 
month’s NERVE cover-boy has 
even advocated 55 minutes of 
this bizarre ritual. Feel free to 
jump around the room for ef- 
fect. Now you’ve got it: You’re 
rockin’! You’re wailin’! You’re 



With or without systematic 
appraisal, most rock’n’roll fans 
should have an intuitive 
understanding of ‘Louie’s’ 
mythological stature. Three - 
thousand cover versions later, 
you begin to suspect 
something’s up. As might be 
expected from such a maze of 
obscuration, the original 
‘Louie’ — written and recorded 
by Richard Berry in 1956 — has 
been either forgotten or 
overlooked altogether. Likewise 
for Berry, a seminal figure for 
reasons that extend beyond 
‘Louie.’ 


For starters, there’s the 
Flairs’ incredibly primitive ‘She 
Wants to Rock, 1 the first single 
Berry ever cut (1953); his guest 
shot on the Robins’ ‘Riot in 
Cell Block No. 9,’ Leiber and 
Stoller’s masterpiece (1955); the 
Dreamers’ ‘Next Time’ and 
‘The Big Break,’ the latter a 
wild sequel to ‘Riot’ (1955). 
Berry’s brutally nasal baritone 
carries each of those records, 
makes them sound as 
dangerous today as the day 
they were recorded. 

Strange, because Berry’s real 
strength,was the beauty of his 
voice: tfie doo-wop purity of 
‘Together,’ the ethereal 
dreaminess of ‘Pretty Brown 
Eyes.’ Speaking over the phone 
from L.A., Berry recalled tys * 
reluctance to participate on 
‘Riot.’ 

“Mike (Leiber) and Jerry 
(Stoller) wanted me to do ‘Riot’ 
because they wanted that 
(nasalizes) na-na-na-na-na. I 
was honored, but I rjeally didn’t 
like the song. I was used to 
doo-woppin’, and when you y 
doo-wop you’re always singing 
to the chicks — this was going to 
take me completely away. Bift 
since they said my name was 
going to be on the record, I 
said OK, great.” 

‘Riot’ ostensibly documents 
an aborted prison break, but in 
intervening years it has been ac- 
cepted as a white man’s 


who! 


maniit^LO lor exploding black 
consciousness: “pass the 
dynamite, ’cause the fuse is 
lit.” Berry’s self-penned follow- 
uj), ‘The Big Break,’ was more 
comically grounded, 
but — thanks to lines like “now 
run, run real fast” — sounds 
just as sinister today. 

“ ‘The Big Break’ was i 
naturally imitative. Modern 
Records knew that was me on 
‘Riot,’ and they prevailed upon 
me to do something like that 
for them. But ‘Riot’ had died 
down, so they missed the op- 
portunity for a hit by waiting 
so long.” 

Caught short on my 
homework, it comes as a sur- 
prise to find out that Richard 
was Etta James’ sparring part- 
ner on ‘Roll With Me Henry.’ 
The two still keep in touch, a 
friendship that set into motion 
Berry’s upcoming visit to 
Albert’s Hall this month. 

“Yeah, I’m Henry— I’m hop- 
ing I can find a girl up in 
Toronto to sing that with me. I 
also wrote those awful answer 
songs Etta had: ‘Hey Henry,’ 
‘You’re Doin’ All Right 
Henry.’ And I wrote ‘Good 
Rockin’ Daddy,’ which was a 
pretty big song for her.” 

History charted, we now ar- 
rive at /that song . First, a per- 
sonal pantheon of ‘Louie 
Louie’ paraphenelia: covers, 
references, cheats. 



cskslini 

Every year CKLN asks its listeners to help keep the station on the 
air. This year is no different. Your help is needed to buy records, 
headphones, microphones, expand the library, repair broken 
equipment and pay for all the other little things that keep CKLN 
operating on a daily basis. 

ALL pledges over $35 receive a 100% cotton CKLN T-Shirt. A 
pledge of $50 earns you a CKLN Sweatshirt. Get yours now and 
show the world that you support alternative radio in Toronto. 
Listen to CKLN 88.1 FM between October 24th and November 3rd 
for our annual FUNdraising Drive and win more fab prizes. Phone 
595-1478 for more information on how you can help out. 


Name_ = z — 

Address. - = 

City, Prnv L_ 

Postcode — Amount pledged _ 

Prizes must be picked up at CKLN in person 


□ Kingsmen (1963): The ver- 
sion that overshadowed (and 
simultaneously secured) Berry’s 
place in history. Infamous for 
the singer’s botched lyric, this 
hit No. 2 on Billboard and re- 
mains the best version 
available. 

□ Black Flag (1981): Recross- 
ing ‘Louie’ with the frightening 
undertow of ‘Riot,’ Rollins and 
company captured hatred in 
just over a minute: “who needs 
love/when you’ve got a gun?” 

□ Iggy Pop (1973): It wasn’t 
55 minutes, as promised, but it 
was what the bottle-throwing 
burnouts at Michigan Palace 
deserved. Iggy’s disbelieving “I 
never thought it would come to 
this” is my favorite line of 
rock’n’roll criticism never writ- 
ten. 

□ Sandpipers (1966): Following 
their unofficial cover (‘Guan- 
tanamera’), this beautiful ver- 
sion proved how adaptable 
Berry’s opus is. 

□ Joy Division {Si ill, 1981): 
After a sloppy cover of ‘Sister 
Ray’ (the avant-garde ‘Louie 
Louie’), Ian Curtis deadpans, 
“you should hear our version 
of'‘Louie Louie’— wow.” Real- 
ly spooky. 

□ Johnny Thunders (1982): An 
admittedly sentimental choice, 
but a fine version nonetheless. 

□ Dropouts (1981): This was 
my band, in our first (and last) 
public performance. If there’s 
only one way to play ‘Louie 
Louie’ wrong, we must have 
lucked onto it. 

□ Toots & the Maytals (1975): 
Probably the cheeriest version 
around, the antithesis of Black 
Flag. 

□ Greil Marcus (“Presliad,” 
1975): The centrepiece of 
Mystery Train , this epic ac- 
count of Elvis takes a quick 
detour into the chronology of 
‘Louie’ from Berry to the 
Stories. 


□ Soup Greens (‘Like a Roll- 
ing Stone,’ 1966): From the 
liner notes to Pebbles , Vol. 1: 
“It’s been said that the punk 
bands of the 60’s could 
transform any song into ‘Louie 
Louie,’ and this record is cer- 
tainly one of the more amusing 
proofs.’ ; 

You’ll notice the omission 
of the Dreamer’s own version: 
my attachment to ‘Louie Louie’ 
has been irrevocably shaped by 
the Kingsmen’s interpretaton, 
leaving Berry’s radically dif- 
ferent original as little more 
than a historical curio. Besides 
the Beach Boys, who recorded 
a Dreamer-derived version in 
1964, I ask Berry if anyone else 
retained the spirit of the 
original. Brace yourself, 
because this gets surreal. 

“There’s one version that’s 
exactly mine, but ten or 15 
years later, Barry White did 
‘Louie Louie’ off his Beware t 
album. Barry and I sound 
alike, and everybody’s always 
telling me that Barry copped 
my style. He did a 12-minute 
version with a Gene Paige ar- 
rangement, horns, the whole 
bit. It was really great. 

“Matter of fact, Barry went 
to Carver Junior High School, 
which was not too far from the 
school I went to. Barry says he 


used to see me driving down 
the street, and he’d say, ‘there 
goes Richard Berry, and one of 
these days I’m gonna be singing 
just like Richard Berry.’ I was 
really flattered, because Barry’s 
a tremendous vocalist. He’s got 
a heck of a version of ‘Louie 
Louie.’ 

Berry also speaks with 
amazement of a 13-minute ver- 
sion by the 'Hell’s Angels, 
played for him during a 1983 
“Maximum ‘Louie Louie’” 
festival in Los Altos, Califor- 
nia. Richard had the pleasure 
(?) of hearing some 800 ver- 
sions of his song during the 
festival. Fearing the man must 
be perpetually on the brink of 
nervous breakdown, I skip for- 
ward to the present. 

“Believe it or not, I just 
recorded a gospel album. It 
might not be the best piece of 
work I’ve done, but it was the 
easiest. I didn’t have to worry 
about gimmicks and things, it 
was just straight-out soul sing- 
ing.” 

Don’t miss your chance to 
see the Patron Saint of three- 
chord bliss in person; until 
then— you guessed it— we gotta 
go now. 


Phillip Dellio 




NERVE - November 1986 - pg.6 



Typesetting 


• Laywri ft Bttlgn 

MrimumChErgt 


Ont Cotour 
Two Colour 


Handbooks Pamphlets Catalogues 


Flyers Posters Books Manuals 
7 

1 1H3 1 1 1 


50% off everything 
Cards tor Ryersor j 


The Eyeopener distributes 10 000 copies on the 


Eyeopener is a tabloid measuring 10 * t? 75 

$ operates on *f|S 

b and 2 inches. -restively) 


Deadrsng'f'ar 


EYEOPENER 


The 

EYEOPENER 

Located on 

Ryerson Polytechnical institute campus 
Room A54, Jorgenson Hail 
380 Victoria Street , Toronto 
(416) 595-1490 


Ryerson Polytechnical 

Institute's 

largest independent 
campus newspaper 


1/2 
1 page 


73 
69 
0 65 
0 62 
0 59 



Meet 
La BEEF 


“TORE UP!” 

The mighty baritone howls and 
his big jowels shakes as the big boss 
man with the old Gibson guitar 
tears into his 1959 hit. 

Yeah, it’s for real, a veritable 
slice of music history last month at 
the Horseshoe. 

The big man is Sleepy LaBeef, a 
6’6” 260-pound mentor of rockabil- 
ly with a voice to match. 

He’s in a good mood tonight before 
the show, mingling with fans, chatting, 
shaking hands and signing autographs. 

Before the night is out, he’ll play 
nearly 100 songs in two sets, randomly 
choosing songs off the top of his head, 
ranging from Hank Williams to the 
Blasters. This is to be expected from a 
guy who remembers Elvis as a pimply 
blonde teenager. 

At his hotel room in the Waldorf 
Astoria, the man behind the voice is 
watching the local newcast. On the cof- 
fee table in front of him, looking almost 
shrine, is Sleepy’s cool black cowboy 
hat. Against the stark wall sits a pair of 
patent leather cowboy boots. Sleepy is 
relaxing in his battered black leather 
jacket and biker cap. 

Born in Smackover, Arkansas, in 
1935, Sleepy got his first guitar at 14 
when he traded a .22 calibre rifle to his 
brother-in-law. After messing around 
with that guitar, the young Sleepy pur- 
chased a mail order Gene Autry cowboy 
guitar. That piece hung around until he 


finally got his Gibson ES-150. By this 
time, Thomas Paulsley 'Sleepy’ LaBeef 
(so-named because of his heavy eyelids) 
was an 18-year-old land surveyor living 
in Houston about to start a lifetime 
career touting the soon to be discovered 
sounds of rock & roll. 

“I don’t want to sound immodest, but 
I think the good Lord blessed me with 
the ability to play music. I learned 
rhythm guitar in a week, and lead guitar 
two weeks later. Now, there are those 
who might say I never did learn to play 
lead...” 

If he was blessed, it was with the 
ability to learn songs. His repetoire has 
been estimated at 6,000. 

“It’s been estimated at 6,000, it could 
be more or less. I’ll tell you one thing, 
it’s probably easier to sit down and 
count my money than my songs.” 

Much of his drive comes from his 
faith. He is a deeply religious man, but 
will only elaborate by admitting his 
musical disipline is rooted in southern 
religious upbringing. 

It takes a hell of a lot of believing to 
be on the road for 30 years, 300 nights a 
year, and still love doing it. 

You can be certain that at any given 
moment, in some faraway club. Sleepy 
LaBeef will be mingling about in his silk 
suit, tipping his black cowboy hat. 

When he plugs in that old Gibson and 
cranks the volume, you’ll know that 
young Memphis truck driver meant it in 
1955 when he yelled, "I heard the news, 
there’s good rocking tonight!” 

Steve Good 



GET ON THE RIGHT TRACK 



True Stories 
directed by David Byrne 

True Stories is David Byrne's 
answer to your next question: 
what's next? Byrne’s careers, as 
top Head, as a solo artist, as a 
collaborator, with Eno, with Twyla 
Tharp, as designer (see the cover 
of TIME) and now as filmmaker 
(see this film!), have seen innova- 
tion follow innovation, success 
follow success. Frankly, that the 
man is a success does this socie- 
ty credit; we tend to admire im- 
beciles and imbue dogs with a 
god-like status. 

Innovator is an overused noun. 
In fact I won’t use it to describe 
David Byrne because it isn't good 
enough for him but oh, what a 
movie! It's so good, Ron Base 
didn't get it! Shit, I didn’t get half 
of it— but then again I didn't get 
half of 8V2\ so either way I was 
left with four and a quarter's 
worth of mental dynamite. 

Byrne is the great com- 
municator, a benevolent om- 
nipresence who guides viewers in 
the theatre and characters in the 
film on a tour of American pop 
mythology. 

From the opening lesson on the 
history of Texas, through a living 
museum of American hyperbole, 
to the last shot of a highway 
dividing two fields— one furrow- 
ed, the other wild— Bryne takes 
no sides, makes no judgements, 
draws no great moralistic conclu- 
sions. Like some latter-day Rod 
Serling, he presents for our con- 
sideration a benign Twilight Zone. 

The characters are portraits in 
one dimension, living 'still lifes' 
who provide for the satire of 
songs like 'Wild Wild Life.' The 
people of the make-believe town 
of Virgil, Texas are about as wild 


as a weekend in Don Mills— but 
they are special They were born 
on the covers of supermarket 
tabloids along with osmotic diet 
plans and Marie Osmond; they 
are the kind of 'everyday people' 
who would advertise for a wife or 
claim to have written ‘Billy Jean’ 
for Michael Jackson. 

But they are the last to 
recognize weirdness in their 
neighbours and least of all 
themselves; what makes them 
special is unknown to them. So 
they celebrate it by declaring a 
Celebration of Specialness. 

Weaving through out this, like 
Theseus in the Labyrinth, Byrne 
is there with his thread. It gets 
frayed here and there, what with 
disturbing diversions into the 
merits of prefabricated steel 
buildings, but it’s all part of the 
deal. You pay for every second of 
True Stories . 

As far as the Talking Heads are 
concerned True Stories is an 
album with the Talking Heads 
playing the music from the film. 
The next Talking Heads album 
will be the soundtrack music 
from the film with the characters 
from the film playing the music. 
It’s a different story entirely: 
especially a beautiful falsetto of 
‘People Like Us’ by one half of 
the happy couple who haven’t 
spoken in years. The entire 
nature of the song changes and 
this is true for all nine; each one 
enhances the visual media. 

The film is indescribable. But 
then again, I usually enjoy films 
that critics have the most difficul- 
ty reviewing. Go see the movie or 
stop breathing for 20 minutes; 
either way we all gotta go 
sometime. 


Denis Seguin 





NERVE - November 1986 - pg.7 


i ■ 




Rescued from 

jazz hell 


a NANCY LANTHIER 
sees MOLLY JOHNSON 
debut at The Imperial 
Room, and finds the 
local girl a reluctant 
chanteuse. RICK 
McGINNIS catches Mol- 
ly in mid-flight. 


Molly Johnson isn't in a 
good mood today. 

"Erica-fucking-Ehm's 
around the corner interview- 
ing some stupid band. Police 
Academy Part-fucking-Four is 
shooting on the street. This 
morning is not going well...® 

You'd think someone 
who'd just spent the past 
week headlining at the 
prestigious Imperial Room 
wouldn't have to put up with 
all the crap. But then they 
don't usually live above the 
notorious Cameron House, 
either. 

Cheer up, Molly, there must be 
some memorable highlights. 

''Yeah, the fact that it's over. It 
was a nightmare from start to 
finish. I certainly wasn't doing it 
for the exposure, and certainly 
not for the money," she says col- 
dly. "I walked away with less 
than $200 after paying for 
everything. It was very 
expensive." 

"Like I said to CBS when they 
came to see me: 'You're the guys 
who're going to rescue me from 
Jazz Hell.' I mean it. I'll do this 
again when I'm 50, or something: 

I didn't set out to be a jazz 
singer." 

She could have fooled me, and 
the adoring capacity crowd on 
opening night. Molly was as 
brilliant. Songs by Gershwin, 
Monk, Ellington, Holiday, and 
the rambling beauty, 'Neon Blue' 
by Aaron Davis were superbly 
performed. She has a powerful, 

I confident vocal range, swinging 


from a sultry, slurred scat to a 
beefy Etta James growl. The 
grooves laid down by the band 
were as warm and sweet as a li- 
queur (which would have cost 
about $9 at the Imperial Room) 
and every so often they'd really 
kick, and the audience either 
howled or tapped their glasses, 
depending on which contingent 
they were coming from: the 
regular I.P. set or Queen St. W. 
way removed (like the Bun- 
chofuckingoofs at the table 
behind ours). 

For the most part silent bet- 
ween songs, she merely hinted at 
the vivacity which she usually 
lets fly at her Cameron gigs. Of 
course she was nervous. 

"And not just the first night, 
but every fuckin' night!" Molly 
affirms. "You never completely 
overcome that when you're play- 
ing in a big room. You have to 
shift that energy from one thing 
to another. It makes you stronger 
in a way." 

While the steamy intimacy of 
those splendid Blue Monday gigs 
was impossible to conjure here 
because of the largenss of this 
venue, the music still managed to 
bring one back to the laidback, 
smoke-filled clubs of the 40's, to 
Billie Holiday and Bessie Smith. 

"I'm a bit irritated when peo- 
ple gush about this, because it's 
Duke Ellington and George Ger- 
shwin. This is not Molly 
Johnson." Understandable. While 
she's constantly involved with the 
writing process for Alta Moda 
■(recently signed to CBS in New 
York and Molly's "main 
’priority"), she hasn't written at all 
|for this jazz thing. Have all the 
ibest jazz songs been written? 

"No, But Yes. I can't answer ” 
that. Because Aaron turns out 
'Neon Blue'— but that's one in a 
million. Sade— there's a couple of 
good tunes there. It's not dead; 
jazz is on the up swing. People 
wanna hear real instruments 
again, real piano, a real voice." 

But some critics, it seems, are 


more interested in the facade. 

'The Globe missed the expensive 
'demeanour, a suggestion of some| 
'diamond fife. He complained 
about Molly's preference to sit 
during most of the performance 
[(how ridiculously trite), and The 
Sun expected Aunt Jemtmah. 

* "How can you do a review 
and not talk about (bassist) Dave 
‘Piltch? How can you not talk 
about Aaron Davis?" asks the 
‘frustrated singer. "Then there's 
'Liz Braun asking 'Where's my 
pigfoot and my bottle of gin?' 

'Like, let me shuffle and jive on 
over to you with your fuckin' 

‘mint julep, you cunt. Let's set the| 
black race right on back. What's 
the matter, are all black people 
heroin addicts/musicians/basket- 
ball player fuck-ups? I was totally j 
insulted." 

Backstage on opening night, 
Molly signs her autograph for a 
grinning waiter, and receives big 
hugs and mumbled congratula- 
tions from Salome Bey. Mom 
assures her she was extraordinary! 
and tells me she'd known all 
along Molly would get this far. "l| 
thought she was going to be a 
gym teacher for a while. She was 3 
accepted at the National Ballet 
School, but refused to go 
because she wouldn't wear a 
uniform." Fucking typical. 

There's definitely an air of ac- 
complishment; the whole band is | 
smiling at one another. For themj 
doing well tonight could mean 
more prestigious gigs and maybe 
a record for CBS. For Molly, a 
remarkable singer and aspiring 
philanthropist, it means 
something more. 

"A few other local acts could 
be booked in there and that's 
due to my incredible pushing and 
shoving of (agent) Gino Empry. 

He's going to look around T.O. 
for other acts and that was my 
main reason for doing this date. 

It's a great room— it should be 
opened up to other performers. 

That battle has been won." 


Molly Johnson —Rick McGinnis 


lu- 

LU 

O 

rryn 

m 

■ 

p“ 

O L 

PTj 

N O 

"w i 


E.P. AVAILABLE AT MOST STORES 
OR BY MAIL: S.L.U.R. 

P.0. BOX 1059 ST. F 
TORONTO, ONT. M4Y 2T7 




. ’ ■' i 

h ” - * r ; 


Tour Dates 

| -NOV 2 ^'OTTAWA, 

CARLTON U. w/ LOVE & ROCKETS 

-NOV 4 - MONTREAL. 

j .' j 3 ■ f - -*■** -ji • 

SPECTRUM w/ LOVE & ROCKETS 
-NOV 5 - KINGSTON, QUEEN’S UNIVERSITY 
•NOV 6 - CBC BRAVE NEW WAVES 
■NOV 7 - MONTREAL, CLUB SODA 
■NOV 14 & 15 - LONDON, CALL THE OFFICE : 
■NOV 21 - TORONTO, RIVOLI 







NERVE - Novemoer 1986 - pq.8 



mme 

of 


“I hope it hasn’t been 
unsatisfactory,” said Iggy 
Pop apologetically, after 
warning me we could only 
talk for another couple of 
minutes. “Sometimes it’s 
just so fucking hard to talk 
on the fucking telephone.” 

That’s the “new” Iggy 
for you, a man of humility, 
consideration, and blah 
blah blah. 

The “old” Iggy led a 
band called the Stooges, 
took a lot of drugs (even- 
tually settling into the 
placid world of junk) and, 
in his music, spewed out 
many twisted variations on 
a single, simple theme: 
Life’s boring, so let’s fuck. 

This seemed like a real cool 
attitude when I bought Raw 
Power 1 3 years ago. It was the 
Stooges third (and last) album, 
but it was the first time I took the 
plunge with Iggy. For months, 
the line "I'm a streetwalkin’ 
cheetah with a heart fulla’ 
napalm” ricocheted around my 
skull; soon I bought the first two 
LPs and became attuned to the 
Pop way of thinking. 

Iggy really seemed to have a han- 
dle on things, especially women. He 
could be tender (“I’ll whip you/Baby, 
you whip me’’); affectionate (“Now I 
wanna/Be yer dawg”); sympathetic 
(“If you’re alone and ya got the 
shakes/So am I, baby, and I got 
what it takes’’); philosophical (“It’s 
another year for me ’n’ you/Another 
year with nuthin’ ta do’’); even self- 
analytical (“I been dirt/And I don’t 
care”). 

In those days, The World’s 
Forgotten Boy had no time to make 
apologies. Appropriately, the music 
was a 3-chord, ritualistic, Marshall- 
driven, primitive, urban-jungle thum- 
pasaurus party. 

Since the Stooges’ demise, the Ig's 
lyrics have become more oblique, and 
the music more conventionally melodic, 
although the basic issues appear to be 
the same. Blah Blah Blah, his first 
record since 1982’s Zombie Birdhouse, 
is his most sophisticated product to 
date, with David Bowie producing for the 
first time since he handled Lust for Life 
in '77. So, whatcha’ been doin’ for the 
last few years, Ig? 


"I wanted to get a clearer focus in my work. 
I felt my singing was losing a little connection 
with real life, probably because I was doing a 
whole lot of touring and putting out albums on 
a yearly basis. That's because in the first eight 
or nine years that I was singing, I couldn't get 
anybody to book me for a whole tour! 
Everybody was too afraid. So when I had the 
opportunity, I jumped in with both feet. 

"Anyway, what I’ve been doing is just some 
real living, I wanted to hang out in the world of 
theatre. I went to New York, got myself a SAG 
card, and started auditioning for a lot of acting 
roles, the first 40 of which I didn’t get. I even- 
tually got a couple of them (bit parts in Sid 
and Nancy and The Color of Money). I took 
classes with some hungry young actors, 
which was a good chance for me to interact 
with people in a performance situation without 
my armour on — you know, without a rock 
situation to back me up. 

"In the meantime, I was doing things like 
carrying on a steady relationship, having a fix- 
ed address, shopping for dinner and taking 
care to do it my way, travelling to some in- 
teresting parts of the world — reorganizing my 
life, basically," 


by 


Tim Powis 


I guess you’ve been getting quite a few 
royalties from Bowie covering 'China Girl' and 
’Tonight.’ 

"Not just his covers, although those have 
been good. Desperately Seeking Susan was 
good for me, because they used that bit of 
“Lust for Life,’ The Hunger, one film that Bowie 
was in, used ‘Funtime, ' I wrote the title track 
for Repo Man. And there was the Grace 
Jones cover of 'Nightclubbing' and my own 
catalogue; my own recordings have been 
consistent." 

Who's in the touring band, the same people 
as on the record? 

"Not exactly, but Kevin Armstrong, who 
played all the guitars on the record with the 
exception of ‘Cry for Love,' is the head of the 
touring band, and he is a motherfucker. He's 
terrific. The other members, they’re not stars, 
but they're awfully, awfully good players. It's 
just a little old band, four guys and me, Tm 
really lookin' forward to workin' live," 

How do you and Bowie collaborate as 
songwriters? 

"There are different ways. On this album, 
sometimes we took the most basic approach; 
we'd just go down to the basement after din- ’ 
ner and start knockin' around. He’ll play an in- 
strument and I'll start singing something. The 
most important thing to mo in that situation is 
to quickly come up with a title or a concept 
that lends itself to the imagination, which then 
hopefully spurs us on to complete a really 
neat song. 'Cause if you're bored, you don’t 
wanna carry on. Your thoughts can take a 
dull turn 

"A song like Isolation 1 would be basically 
music by both of us, words completely by 
me. ’Shades" is music completely by David, 
words by David and me. He noticed 
something about me. It was at a birthday par- 
ty, and he watched me taking pleasure in see- 
ing my wife opening some presents. He was 
moved by that to write a song about my ex- 
perience from my point of view. He had the 
concept and then came the next day and 
handed me a cassette and said "Listen to 
this*’’ And I said, "Well, it’s great, but„,*" Then 
I put my own twist on it*" 


cont. pg. 22 


Iggy Pop —Collins & Taylor Management 



Groovy Religion (r-l: William, Steve, Mike, Scott) —Rick 



NERVE - November 1986 - pg.9 


lin 9 groovy 


Rick McGinnis 



Over half a decade’s experience in 
Toronto bars have made survivors . 
out of Groovy Religion. Changes in 
the band’s sound, which began as a 
beat-box propelled specimen of what 
we call the dirge, are minor compared 
to the rise and fall of bands that have 
fallen by Groovy’s side. Yet only now 
have Groovy seen it fit to produce an 
album, Thin Gypsy Thief, due shortly 
on Montreal’s PsyGbe Industry 
records. This, however, mightn’t even 
have come to pass if Groovy Religion 
hadn’t gotten the blues. 

And what is the blues, boys? 


Scott: “It’s feeling something really 
strongly.” 

Mike: “It’s pouring out your emotions in 12 
bars.” 

, William: “It’s a man feeling bad because 
either his medicine or his woman ran out...” 

Scott and feeling better because he’s 
singing about it.” 

Of course, it’s not all that simple, as the 
band will attest. In the words of Groovy front- 
manJWilliam New... 

“My soul’s hurtin’, Rick, I want to sing the 
blues.” 

*** 

Groovy Religion starts with William New, 
one-time proprietor of the Bev’s Elvis Mondays 
and self-confessed musicologist, and guitarist 
Steve Mahabir. Groovy’s only surviving 
original members, they started the band nearly 


six years ago over a tape recorder in, of all 
places, Missisauga. “We were a drone band,” 
admits New, recalling the early 'days, when the 
band made demos before venturing onto a 
stage, and swamped their sound in a dense 
echo. Members came and went, until the ar- 
rival two and a half years ago of bassist Scott 
B. and drummer Glen Milchem (since replaced 
by a dude called Mike). This rhythm section 
came to define Groovy Religion’s sound, to the 
point where, today, that rhythm is the most 
distinctive facet of the band’s sound. 

Perhaps it’s a compliment to the band’s pro- 
fessionalism, but the first and foremost topic 
of discussion with Groovy Religion is, believe it 
or not, music. Ethics, trends, and philosophies 
trail far behind in matters of importance. 
Theatricality of character and forced 
outrageousness are not issues. More than 
anything else, the band are a well-spoken outfit 
that have seen their way through some severe 
times to the point where they can just live with 
their situation and the multitude of contradic- 
tions offered by this decidedly absurd circus 
known as rock and roll, Canadian division. 

*** 

William New will talk about the blues with 
you any old time. It makes sense that a man 
who would make a church from the cultural 
deterius of Elvis Presley would be able to take 
a comfortable verbal stroll through the often 
dingy halls of the rock and roll edifice. He ar- 
rived at the blues via the roots of rock, and 
found it a very nice place. So, it seems, does 
his band. 

“I think,” says Scott B., “we’re all kinda 
bluesy-type guys.” 

And why not, even for a bunch of 
boys from the suburbs? 

“We use blues,” Scott explains, “as a star- 
ting point for the sound.” 

Certainly it’s there. Live, the band chooses 
its covers carefully. Muddy Waters’ ‘Mannish 
Boy’ segues into John Lee Hooker’s ‘Mad.’ A 
Bo Diddley jam can extend for 20 minutes, in- 
corporating Eric Burdon into the process. Most 
tellingly, the group covers the Animals’ ‘We 
Gotta Get Outta This Place,’ taking it up to 
the chorus, where it drops neatly into their own 
‘Kitchen Boy.* Telling because Groovy Religion 
follow firmly in the tracks of people like Eric 
Burdon and Nick Cave — white musicians who 
have synthesized the blues with no small 
amount of reverence, into their own stew of 
cultural influences to create something decided- 
ly modern. 

Scott: “Anything I’ve ever written sounds 
like something else in the beginning.” 

William: “It’s all rock and roll, right?” 

And rock and roll, as the Groovies have 
discovered, lives in bars. ‘Mannish Boy,’ by 
now as hoary an old classic as ‘Gloria’ or 


‘Takin’ Care of Business’ for that matter, lives 
in bars. “We are playing in bars,” New shrugs, 
“so why not play that song?” 

It just gives people something to catch on 
to,” says Scott. 

“You have to kind of trick people into 
listening,” William continues. “Unless you’re 
preaching to the converted.” 

And that’s what an album’s for, right? Pro- 
sletysing? 

“I’d like to sell lots of records,” says 
William. “I’m in this for the duration. It might 
not happen for 10 years.” 

*** 

“On a good day. 

Take a walk to the corner store 
Buy yourself some six-packs of beer 
And spend the rest of the day in bed.” 

K “I think we’re all kinda bluesy type guys.” 
Scott says. 

“This band almost self-destructed a few 
years ago. I’m pretty proud of this band, 
which survived the personal problems of some 
of its members, namely myself.’’"" « 

William New had just finished saying this, 
and had started into his next sentence, when 
the band erupted into howls of laughter. 

“Now THAT’S a QUOTE!” 

Regardless, it’s also the truth. New isn’t at 
all bashful about referring to a time in his life 
when, two or three years ago, he was a junkie, 
and ended up spending time behind bars, on a 
drug-dealing charge, and picking up a love for 
basketball. Songs like ‘Kitchen Boy’ come out 
of that time. 

“My soul’s hurtin’ Rick. I want to sing the 
blues.” 

I have no problem with that. Still... 

“That’s one of the reasons I talk so much 
about the blues,” New explains. “I don’t want 
to be called a Goth-drone-Gloom-Doom 
band.” 

I have no problem with that, either. 

Neither do the band, who ring off, when 
asked about influences, a roll call of names 
from Joe Jackson to Lou Reed to Nick Cave to’ 
Woody Guthrie. As for the future, look no 
further than the last track of Thin Gypsy 
Thief. ‘Younger Calls,’ featuring Scott B. on 
acoustic guitars, is based loosely around 
Spanish folk music, and complemented by 
lyrics recalling some murkily viewed Moorish 
jihad. As a textural change, and a piece of pro- 
duction, it’s a remarkable way to end the 
record, and according to New, it’s a little 
preview of the next disc. 

“I’m in this for the duration,” New told me. 
“I don’t at all mind the thought of ending up 
in a bar band singing the blues, playing in Nor- 
thern Ontario bars for $200 a week.” 

But that’s the future. Then and now, it’s all 
pretty groovy. 


return of the 
Rocket men 

by Helen Lee 

“I think it’s very important to 
have an image.” 

Daniel Ash 
of Love and Rockets 

Bauhaus, despite the 
cumbersome baggage of a 
still rabid following (and in- 
terviewers who insist upon 
dredging up the name), 
spawned several distinct pop 
entities. Love and Rockets, 
its most commercially suc- 
cessful offspring, appear to 
be suffering, at least in Bri- 
tain, the symptoms of a 
slump. Says Daniel Ash, 
guitarist for both the former 
and the latter bands, “I don’t 
think the English are really 
into the sort of music we’re 
doing at the moment.” To 
wit: “we’re not in fashion 
there.” 

Although the abbreviated 
British tour was a disappoint- 
ment (the London gig ex- 
cepted), Ash remains op- 
timistic about the 42-date, 
two-and-a-half month tour 
which winds down in L.A. at 
year’s end. “We just seem to 


be connecting better with the 
Americans and Canadians at 
the moment” 

Having shifted your musical 
direction away from synth and 
even venturing into acoustic, do 
you have any comments a^out 

the roster of guitar-oriented 
bands (ie: potential playlist 
mates) who are currently gripp- 
ing the nerve of Worth American 
youth? 

"Like who?” 

You know.. REM, The ’ 
Replacements, Htisker Du,... 

“Who? (As Ash is quick to point 
out, Love an d Rockets do not par- 
take of any same per se.) We're real 
outsiders to everything.” 

Come now (let’s not talk about the 
advantages of hermetic, internalized 
musical inspiration). 

“Well. . .REM... they’re the real 
thing. (The shell is cracking... J I’m 
listening to Broken English and Iggy 
Pop'*, new record (revealing a yawn- 
ing chasm...) I like the Jesus and 
Mary Chain. I like the production. 
They sound really radical. The 
melody’* wonderful- ii \ really low 
in the mix , .Sophia Loren.” 

What? 

“You’re talking about a dream 
world, aren’t you? Who'd ) like to 
work witht Jh a dream world?" 

Um. yeah. 

For the very obvious reason that 
musician * are musicians rather than 
writers or lecturers* Ash seems mure 
comfortable talking about laves 
(Bowie, Beatles, Stranglers, Haysi 
Fantayzee) and potential producers 


(Eno, Tony Visconti, Nick Lowe) 
rather than their new album. Ex- 
press. 

“ItT very direct,” he points out 
(and continued to point out three 
more times during our conversation). 
“Essentially, it’s a rock'n'roll album. 
We had more fun recording it than 
we've had with anything else. But. 

I’d rather you listen to it than have 
me talk about it.” 

But talk we must. 

Just a llcw months before Love & 
Rockets, Simple Minds staked a 
claim to Springsteen country with 
‘Don’t You’— a song they didn't 
write, Jim Kerr rationalized that, no 
matter, it’s a song that sounds like 
one Lhey would have written. Having 
broken onto American market, 
or at least the dance floors, with a 
cover song, do you feel redemptive 
action is in order? 

“We tuok a lm of time rewriting 
and took a Few liberties with the 
lyrics. We wanted to sound like uu 
one else but ourselves. We were stir 
d at the success of ‘Ball of Con- 
fusion'- 'it was very encouraging.” 

You mention lyrics. You’re a 
cynical lot, 

“At times, though it crosses over 
to optimism, too,” 

Ca re to elaborate? 

"Well, it’s the whole opposition 
between good and evil, black and 
white, yin and ym$ “ 

Ah.,. 

The silence over the wire, across 
thousands of miles, infers that Ash 
docs noi care io elaborate. At this 
moment , a choice quote from Dame 
or some FeUimesque reference to the \ 
moral desecration of our times would 


make this writer’s job a lot easier in 
lefms of shoring up Love and 
Rockets’ lyrical philosophy. 

Let'i tty again. 

Despite repea! cd references to 
Christianity, you seem to view your 
spirituality in secular rather than 
religious terms. 

“Yes.” 

* 

We’re on belter ground with the 
image issue. After all, Bauhaus had 
the beM t-shirts; not to mention com- 
plete control over the packaging and 
marketing of the Best of double- 
album. 

How interested are you in ic ing 
promotional media to project an im- 
age? 

"It% funny, the image thing, 
because even with Bauhaus, it wasn't 
mU-rnionuE -iet’s alt wear thi ■’ -i ('■* 
not that situation. That's something 

that takes care of itself. We're not 
preoccupied with that. It happens 
naturally, " 

Hit the rewind — let's go back to 
Ash's Orsi quote And the glossy 
poster which comes with the album. 
And ibe promo picture that's 
stumped 'DO NOT USE AFTER 
APRIL 1987,' Bui musk's never had 
anything io do with logic (or some 
may naively >av, image). 

”1 think we're nmst inter cm rd iti 
melody.” 

Melody? (the abrupt change of 
subject befuddling my already 
enfeebled mind), 

“Yeah, musical melody." 

It becomes all too clear why some 
mdd the pen while others, the betiei 
Tor all, widd the guitar , 


T 


NERVE - November 1986 - pg.10 

MIX 

mm 

Who’s got the bigger prick? 

NICK CAVE or DAVE RAVE? 


the beginning, 
there was the Birthday 
Party: Five slck-looklng 
Individuals with obviously 
sick minds. Between / 
1982 and 1984, this 
Australian band made 
about seventy minutes 
worth of the most 
strategically unconven- 
tional 'punk* 'rock 1 ever 
heard, and became 
(arguably) reluctant 
messlahs for the massive 
cult of terminally 
miserable gothic-rockers. 

This Party music was a 
cross between Captain 
Beefheart's punctuated 
gasps and a bad quality 
Sex Pistols bootleg, and 
It was quite brilliant. I 
recall playing their 
Mutiny In Heaven EP to 
Impress my colleagues 
with the extent of my bud- 
ding psychosis. This was 
the first band In the 
history of 'the devil's 
music 1 to capture the 
sound of actual waves of 
nausea as they swim 
through your brain and 
body, and they recorded 
and performed these 
sounds In a way that 
resembled rock 'n roll, 
but not quite. 

When the Party was 
over, the rock world was 
left with another dope 
guru / angst-pickled vi- 
sionary, singer Nick 
Cave. A notorious, pro- 
fessional gutter-rat, he 
obviously despises his 
dual roles of bloodless 
rock caricature and major 
cult casualty, but he 
placidly maintains the 
steady Job of a highly 
skilled pop manlpulatlst. 

I had the pleasure of 
sharing a painful half hour 
with Cave In “a rather 
circular conversation. ’ 1 

“I'm frequently difficult 
to Interview. You 
should've been told 
that..." 

Here we go again. More 
rock bores. 

m 

Still, It *8 Impossible to 
Imagine a rock 
'underground' without the 
redoubtable contributions 
of Nick Cave. His deep, 
contemptuous voice 
bullies Its way through 
the dark, brooding music 
of his Bad Seeds (ex- 
Blrthday Party people, 
and one Elnsturzende 
Neubauten), menacing In 
Its singularity. ’ 

Hie devotion to resur- 
recting the spirit of blues 
music has enabled him to 


record Elvis Presley’s 'In 
The Ghetto' and Dylan's 
'Wanted Man' perfectly 
straight-faced. And his 
newest album, Kicking 
Against The Pricks, Is 
entirely made up of 
Cave's "bastardization" 
of songs that span most 
of this century. 

The album Is Incredible. s 
In true Who/Roxy 
Music/Clash style, 
sometime the biggest 
assholes make the best 
music. Prick* Is a major 
achievement, and the 
Bad Seeds are to be con- 
gratulated for staying 
sober long enough to cut 
one of the best albums of 
the decade. 

Uke Cave's other two 
post-Party albums 
Prick* Is only available 
as an Import on Mute 
records, home of 
Depeche Mode. 

• 

It must be very pleasant 
having Depeche Mode 
around the office to In- 
spire you to great pop 
success. 

"I'm all for Depeche 
Mode, y'know. As long 
as they keep doing well. 
Mute can keep spending 
money on us." 

English music Is In a ter- 
rible state, thanks to peo- 
ple like Depeche Mode. 

"I would have to agree 
with you. We're not 
English of course. English 
music never affected me 
one way or the other, 
even when I was In 
Australia and under the 
misconception that 
England Is the centre of 
modem music, which of 
course, It Isn't." 

You've Just released a 
limited edition single call- 
ed 'Scum' about the flab- 
by but welMntentloned 
NME critic Mat Snow. I 
take It these are the 
Prick* you're kicking 
around. 

"It seemed like an ap- 
propriate name. We did 
see the making of this 
record as, as, um, 
basically, um, ay, a, well 
a kind of a 'fuck you’ to 
the American... no... the 
English critics who had 
been, um, er, who had 
been fairly hard on the 
last record and had 
predictably spearheaded 
some sort of backlash 
against us. Which only 
meant we got our names 
In the Jbaper more often. 

"Being In the Birthday 
party gave us a very 



healthy sort of negative 
attitude. That’s always 
been the basic Inspira- 
tion." 

But an album of covers 
would seem to be an op- 
timistic gesture, at least a 
gesture of faith In music 
Itself.... 

"I don’t know If It's 
more optimistic. 1 ’ 

Less nihilistic? 

"I don't know about 
that either. There's a lot 
more freedom for me as 
leader of the group to ex- 
press myself without hav- 
ing It watered down by 
the lyrical Ideas, and so 
forth, of other members 
of the group, as It used to 
be." 

Well, you're breathing 
new life Into these an- 
cient songs, which In- 
dicates that at least you 
LIKE music. 

' 'That record was done 
for fairly simple reasons. 
I’d been writing a novel, 
and It's Impossible to 
write lyrics and write a 
novel at the same time, 
so that afforded us the 
opportunity to make a 
record of covers. ' ' 

Great, obscure, darkly 
hilarious covers of The 
Velvet Underground, 

John Lee Hooker, The 
Alabama Singers, Johnny 
Cash, The Band, all 
delivered with deadpan 
grace by "this year’s Ig- 
gy Pop," Mr. Nick Cave. 

Does he like the album? 

"A lot. Our version of 
‘Muddy Water’ Is so dif- 
ferent from the original, 
which Is reasonably 
throw-away up-tempo 


Country & Western. 

We've turned It Into 
something a lot more 
substantial, with a lot 
more meaning. And per- 
sonally, I really like our 
version of 'Hey Joe. ' The 
song has been abused for 
a long time, and 
nobody's ever been able 
to pull It out of the hands 
of Jlml Hendrix. I don't 
think he ever did It 
Justice. It's a potentially 
great song— the lyrics are 
brilliant." 

• 

I was curious to hear 
Cave’s thoughts on-the 
current 'real blues' revi- 
sionism creeping Into the 
music underground, and 
some Insight Into this 
most curious music he In- 
terprets so remarkably. 

"I don't know. I don't 
care. We have been 
branded with the blues on 
Pricks, but we can 
wash It off with another 
record of different soun- 
ding material— which this 
next record Is: Your 
Funeral, My Trial." 

It sounds entertaining. 
Does your audience have 
the attention span to ap- 
preciate your whims? 

"1 sometimes doubt It, 
but I give them the benefit 
of the doubt. I try to 
disregard the audience as 
much as possible. I've 
lost too much sleep In the 
past to worry about that 
now." 

To them, you’re a 
classically Wasted Poet. 

' 'Wasted poet? 
Um...the things people 
think of me are quite 


ludicrous, really. I don't 
make any attempt to be a 
wasted poet." 

Do you live your life like 
that? 

"I don't know what you 
mean. 1 don't know how 
a a wasted poet Is sup- 
posed to live his life." 

They tend to make de- 
cent art. 

"I don't know. I don't 
know. I don't know which 
poets were wasted and 
which ones weren’t. 1 
don’t know what you're 
talking about." 

Nick, you're a fun guy. 

• 

You once pronounced 
that records were Inade- 
quate manifestations of 
your Ideas. 

"Did 1? They’re ade- 
quate enough to be a 
vehicle for certain 
thoughts and certain 
things, but they're not the 
ultimate mode of expres- 
sion. I’m writing a book, 
and that gives me a lot 
more freedom. But that 
also has Its limitations." 

Like playing music to an 
audience? 

. ' 'That depends on all 
sorts of boring things like 
the size of the P.A. 
Whether or not I enjoy a 
concert depends on how 
powerful It sounds to me 
onstage. That's what I'm 
more concerned about, 
rather than how powerful 
It sounds to somebody 
else." l , 

By this time, It's agreed 
we're dealing with a ma- 
jor ego here. Does Cave 
feel like a spectacle? 

"Yes. I am one." 


Does the news affect 
you much? 

"Not really. I live In 
Berlin, and I don't 
understand German at 
all, so the world Just goes 
on around me and I don't 
really know what hap- 
pens In It. World events 
never had much effect on 
my 'art'— for want of a 
better word— which 
makes for a fairly one- 
sided view of things. I’m 
hopelessly one-eyed 
about things. I'm afriad." 

Read The Book For Fur- 
ther Details, right? 

"Yeah, um, I guess 
so." 

Would a Nick Cave 
biography make for ab- 
sorbing reading? 

"Fascinating reading, 
yes. Totally engrossing." 

And I’ll bet your acting 
career Is In the formative 
stages. 

"I'd make a brilliant ac- 
tor. If anyone's Interested 
In me acting In their next 
film... where Is this? Is 
this L.A.?" 

Canada. Sorry! 

"Ah, shit. I mean: Ah, 
hell. I thought I might 
have reached the ears of 
Hollywood through you." 

• 

4 'Life Is a process of 
stepping on people." 

—Nick Cave, SPIN 

"I said that?" 

It's a quote attributed to 
you. 

"Well, that's 

amusing." 




NERVE - November 1986 - pg.11 



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Mon 3 ** Maniac Mondays, 
Tues 4 ** Granny’s Gums 
Wed 5 ** The Black Donnellys 
Thur 6 ** October Crisis 
Fri 7 ** Flying Squad 
Sat 8 ** U.I.C., Legend Killers 
Sun 9 ** Eric Stach Free 
Music Unit ' 

Mon 10 ** Maniac Monday 
Tues 11** House of Xenon 
Eugene Chadbourne 
Wed 12 ** Go Four 3 
Thur 13 ** No Life 
Fri 14 ** Itsa Skitsa 
Sat 15 ** Itsa Skitsa 
Sun 16 ** Edna & Edna 



Mon 17 ** Maniac Monday 
Tues 18 ** Blooze Bandits 
Wed 19 ** Cowboy Junkies 
Thur 20 ** Maggot Fodder 
Fri 21 ** Ukase, Altogether 
Morris 

Sat 22 ** Fundementals 
Granny’s Gums 
Sun 23 ** The Fundamentals 

Mon 24 ** Maniac Mondays 
Tues 25 ** Metal for Health 
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HAMMER 

HAPPPENIN’S 

On Oct. 2A. the firg of two benefit concert* 
were held m Hamilton's Rockpile East Tor the 
“Music From the Armpit of 'Canada'- compila- 
tion LP. Local bands which appeared include 
Thrash & the Bag!* Hamilton Rip Band (their 
big hit being 4 Delta Dawn*!?)* the ever-present 
Moon Crickets (garage gods of Canada) and 
Dunnville’s Problem Children* who have a new 
LP, The Future of the World is Up To You and 
Me, that should be out by the Lime you read this. 
Also appearing at this venue were London's 
Condo Christ. 

The second of these two benefits will take 
place Nov. 7 and will feature the Dtk Van Dykes 
who have a live cassette ready for release { Live 
At the Ground Gravel) gud who will be opening 
for Deja Voodoo in T.O« on the 27th. Also ap- 
pearing will be The Throte, AKS (a re-surgem 
local hardcore group), Brantford's Social Suicide 
and the Diffrints. Proceeds from the sate of the 
LP will go to the St. Mai thews House, 

Oddly enough, I don't seem to think of 
anything about either the Trouble Boys fee pi 
they*re one of my fave groups) or the Florida 
Razors (aside from guitarist Jasoa Avery's slur- 
red, unprintable yaks of slander). I will mention 
that Teenage Head has a newWfctimmer , Jack 
Peddlar, and may be touring under antgher 
name (hint: check your Flamin Groovfe L P's) 
and the Forgotten Rebels have a new 45* 'Bomb 
Khadahaffy Now* (sic), and are opening for Iggy 
Pop in Toronto on Nov. 9th. 

The Hot Pussys (sic, again) have been pester- 
ing me to plant some of their obnoxious jmd of- 
fensive prepared “statements* * to the press. In a 
nutshell— influences : Bopcats, Stray Can . 
Alleycats, Kitten With A Whip, and Hot Tuna 
(you figure it out...). They are not afraid of the 
possible backlash from either the SPCA or mili- 
tant femminists, and they do boss covers ('Louie 
Louie* ‘Money’ and ‘Heroin’). I think that's 
enough from us... Until next time remember! tIh 
the Hammer We Trust” 

B.F. ‘Mole’ Mowat 


Windsor Report 

Well, it's time to.scrounge up every bit of info about 
things happening in Canada's Sunbelt. Passing our 
way of late: the punk rock of the Jazz Butcher and that 
Skinny Puppy/Severed Heads thang. Not to mention 
CJAM’s Community Pledge Drive '86 which collected 
over $17,000. Hopefully CJAM will have a power in- 
crease from 50 to 230 watts by January. 

As for those groovy flat pieces of vinyl: It Came 
From The Garage features many Detroit bands such as 
Elvis Hitler, Hysteric Narcotics, 3-D, Invisibles, and 
Snake Out (whose drummer Dino left to become one 
of the new Monkees in the TV sitcom), and from Wind- 
sor, The Prehistoric Cavestrokers. A few weeks back, 
the Dominion House Tavern was sufficiently filled for 
the record release party of Windsor’s Lost Patrol (Ali 
Records). Also performing were The Oreos, who only 
played one song (for 35 minutes), and Do Or Diatribe. 

Showing up in the winner's circle of the 1986 Detroit 
Metro Times Awards were CJAM for best alternative 
radio station and Windsor’s own ex-Butthole Surfer 
Trevor Malcolm for best instrumentlist. 


london eksistenz 

This month’s album nbase is First Date , a 
compilation of London and area folk/blues ar- 
tists. It features original material by Tom Bums, 
of Dirty Ernie fame; Paul Campbell, of Camp- 
bell's Coffee House, Hamilton; and Paul 
Langille, the vocalist who calls “for the Blue." 
Mark Wellman, producer and principal 
organizer, is to be credited with the concept 
which encompasses everything from ballad to 
reggae sounds. This album is a nostalgia-must 
for those of us who have watched the scene 
change and develop over the past few years. 

This month’s record review. ..Ukase’s single 
The Rain'/'Runaway.’ The Rain’ provides Roze 
White’s voice an expressive avenue in which to 
show her emotional range rather than merely 
emphasize vocal gymnastics. The lyrics are 
beautiful without being overly sentimental. The 
music is gentle and yet still allows the swell and 
fade of her vocal strength, which is her trade 
mark. The mix is good; her voice is an in- 
strument-mingling with the guitar chorus like 
the wind. The verse is clear, even when layered 
over the shimmering drums— yes drums can 
shimmer. The B-side, ’Runaway,’ is a more 
energetic 60's sound, showcasing the band's 
aggressive style. 

Recorded at two different studios, SRS and 
107, the single is available for promo only and 
will soon be heard on CBC’s 'Brave New 
Waves.’ Apparently, their Montreal tour sent 
sparks flying— just who were they discussing 
futures with? Come down to Key West on 
November 21st and maybe they will tell all... 

The Waiting is touring Northern Ontario for a 
month and when they return they go back into 
EMAC to remix The Key of Love’ and 'Givin It 
Up' with producer Blaine Selkirk... 

Lifeless Currents travel to home-town Guelph 
to play the Albion on November 9th. I have a 
particular fondness for their lyrics: "Armeged- 
don comes so swift/don't you know we en- 
courage it?" I can only describe it as religiously 
political or politically religious but neither has a 
Jesus crisis. With a sparse smattering of covers 
they focus primarily on originals like ‘Walk 
On,"Forgotten’ and The Believers.’ Catch them 
at Key West on November 27th... 

Music trivia question... which local native band 
was/is featured in a M Plus M video about native 
cultures?... stay tuned for the answer in next 
month's /Verve.. .sorry, no prizes... 

If you feel like spending your loose change, 
buy the Deprogram album by Suffer Machine. 
There are good reasons why everyone is raving 
about it. Pete Tangredi’s vocals remind me of 
Tom Waits via sledge hammer. The best cuts 
are ‘Purge,’ 'Jazz Blood Fusion,’ and ‘Suffer 
Machine.’ The only weak spot is The Idealist’ 
Although it comes off well live; it’s a bit maudlin 
on the album. But, hey, that’s like saying 
Marilyn had a blemish. 

Sonja K. 


Stepping into our nuclear-powered DeLorean, we 
can see what the future holds: death, destruction, 
World War III, and the shelter from the storm, CJAM’s 
3rd Anniversary party, featuring a homecoming for 
Chris Houston... Elvis Hitler with Lost Cause will be 
releasing an album on Metro America called Dis- 
Graceiand. 

Well, that’s the deal, folks. We’ll be back (hopefully) 
next month with more news tidbits, gossip, stock ex- 
change closes and the real answer to the question, “Is 
Bobby Ewing really alive or will this season be one of 
Larry ‘Bad’ Mellman’s twisted nightmares?” 

David Petro 
CJAM-FM Windsor 



OF THE CLOSET 

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NERVE - November 1986 - pg.12 


A k HP 

ALTERNATIVE 
IO 




CRUCIAL CASSETTES 

THE UPANEY BOTTOMS Upaney Bottoms 

DARREN COPELAND The Three Faces 

ABSTRACT GALLERY Titles of Contrast 

MOLLY JOHNSON Molly Johnson 

ONE FREE FALL Where Did Ricky Work 

THE HIP TYPE Let Me In Glass Pussy 

THE SQUARES The Squares 

VARIOUS Random Thought 

VARIOUS Matrax 

OEDIPUS REX Oedipus Rex 

BRYAN RURYK Life and Big Noises 

LAUGHING APPLES Laughing Apples 

DOA Expo Hurts Everyone 

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PHIL_AJYIN _ 


CFRC I \t Kingston 
613-547 66 * 

( Hugh hie:! tigton) 

It Caim- Fmni Canada II 
PETER GABRIEL 
GRUESOMES 
TALKING IEADS 
DAVID i VAIN 
REM 

PAUI mm >N 
54:40 

ou r Ol E BLUE 
C AMPLE \N 
BEET HO\ r \ 


CRSC-Seneca 
491-5050 
Gav Oz 

REM 

GRUESOMES 

54:40 

IGGY POP 

MOTORHEAD 

L’ETRANGER 

It Came From Canada 2 

4TH FLOOR 

JAZZ BUTCHER 

ELVIS COSTELLO 


CJAM-FM: Windsor 
519 - 258-6397 
Andrew Altman 

DISAPPOINTED A FEW 
PEOPLE 

COWBOV JUNKES 
ELVIS COSTELLO 
; FIFTH COLUMN 
SHREIKBACK 
IGGY POP 
WOODENTOPS 
TALKING HEADS 
PAUL SIMON 
It Came From Canada 


CFVV-FM Victoria 
604 - 721-8702 
Tim Chan 

BEAT HAPPENING 
BILLY BRAGG 
RUN D.M.C. 

EXPLODING WHITE MICE 
Lovedolls Superstar Soundtr. 
REM 

EUTHANASIA 
ALEX CHILTON 
Random' Thought 

TH AT PO ROE J£MOXI0 N 



5 44 0 


54:40 is at the leading edge of Vancouver’s renaissance as a city that produces original, pertinent, exciting 
music. It’s taken 54:40 years, but now Neil Osborne, Phil Comparelli, Brad Merritt and Matt Johnson have won 
themselves a record contract with Warner Brothers (on the Reprise label, in honour of Neil Young’s first record 
company affiliation). And, like so many active, concerned and involved Canadian musicians, all the members of 
54:40 are members of CAPAC. 

If you— or people you know— write, perform, or record original music,' you should know more about CAPAC. 
Discovering more about how to earn royalties for your music is easy: you can start by calling Roy Windhager at 
CAPAC (416-924-4427) or Richard Flohil (416-925-3154). 


Composers Authors and Publishers Association of Canada. 



1240 Bay Street, Toronto, Ont. M5R 2C2 (416) 924-4427 



NERVE - November 1986 - pg.13 


CAMPUS COUNTDOWN 





45 

46 

47 

48 



52 

53 

54 

55 

56 

57 

58 

59 

60 


THE WEB Alternative Radio Top 60 information is based on playlists from reporting Canadian Campus radio stations. 

Statistics are compiled from point totals tabulated on playlist positions of artists, then multiplied by station classification factor 

2 4 0 denotes rapid chart movement 0 denotes Canadian recording 

wks ago whs ago ARTIST TITLE LABEL PEAK 


1 

2 

4 

5 
9 
3 

7 

6 

8 
21 
19 
11 
10 
49 
12 

24 

13 

15 

23 

17 

16 

14 

18 
30 
28 
42 
22 
27 
26 
32 

25 

35 
41 

36 

57 

40 


20 

38 

37 

45 


50 

29 

31 

59 

43 


54 


1 REM 

57® BGRUES0MES 

-• TALKING HEADS 

12 BILLY BRAGG 

-•■SKINNY PUPPY 
11 BVARI0US 

3 ■L’ETRANGEF 

2 ■54:40.... 

10 RUN DMC 

-• ELVIS COSTELLO 

5 HFIFTH COLUMN 

4 JAZZ BUTCHER . 

8 BCOTTAGE INDUSTRY 

- ■ COWBOY JUNKIES 

DAVID SYLVIAN ... 

41 W00DENT0PS . 

7 NICK CAVE . 

29 BVARI0US 

. ■DISSAP0INTED A FEW PEOPLE 
HUNTERS & COLLECTORS ... 

26 HSHEEP LOOK UP 

PAUL SIMON 

IGGY POP 

6 CAMPER VAN BEETH0VAN 

- WOLFGANG PRESS 

24 LOST DURANGOS . . . 

1* BTHROBS 

- ■ PURSUIT OF HAPPINESS . 

58 ■DUNDRELLS 

14 PHIL ALVIN 

28 raunch hand's 

B-52s 

- HMOEV 

9 SCREAMING BLUE MESSIAHS 

16 ■CHAIN OF FUN .. 

48 EVERYTHING BUT THE GIRL . . 

. BSUFFER MACHINE ... 

. fSHAUF HUMAN 

IT BITES 

BEAT HAPPENING 

EASTERHOUSE 

- BJELLYFISH BABIES . . . 

SPIRIT OF THE WEST 

22 PUSHTWANGERS 

37 SHOCK CULTURE 

DAGMAR KRAUSE 

THINKMAN 

SHOP ASSISTANTS 

TIMBUK3 

- ^NATIONAL VELVET 

46 THIS MORTAL COIL 

19 BPSYCHE.. 

SHREIKBACK 

47 BEUTHANASIA 

FLUX 

TUXEDO MOON 

23 SKIDOO 

YELLO 

THE THE 

51 FRA LIPPO LIPI 


Lifes Rich Pageant —IRS/MCA 

Tyrants of Teen Trash — Og 

True Stories — WEA 

Levi Stubbs Tears —Polygram 

Mind: The Perpetual Intercourse —Nettwerk 

It Came From Canada Vol II —Og 

Sticks & Stones —L ’Etranger 

54:40 -WEA 

Raising Hell —Polygram 

Blood & Chocolate —CBS 

To Sir With Hate —Hide 

Bloody Nonsense —Polygram 

The Winters Tale —Idon/Polution 

Whites off Earth Now —Latent 

Gone To Heart — Virgin 

Giant —CBS 

. . . Kicking Against the Pricks —Homestead 

London Underground —CHRW 

Dead In Love —Psyche Industry 

Human Frailty —MCA 

— Sheep Look Up —SLUR 

Graceland —WEA 

Blah Blah Blah — A&M 

II and III —Rough Trade 

Standing Up Straight —Polygram 

Evil Town —Armadillo 

Proud To Be Loud —Precision 

I’m An Adult Now -P.O.H. 

, Nothing On T.V. — Nasty 

Un'Sung’ Stories -Slash/WEA 

Learn to Whap-A-Dang —Relativity 

Bouncing Off The Satallites —WEA 

Dusk & Desire —Nettwerk 

Gun Shy —WEA 

Chain Of Fun —C.O.F. 

Baby The Stars Shine Bright — WEA 

Deprogram —Burning Buffalo 

... Human ’86 —Graven Image 

The Big Lad in The Windmill —Virgin 

Beat Happening -K-US 

Contenders — CBS 

Jellyfish Babies —Plot 

Tripping Up the Stairs —Stoney Plain 

Here We Go Again —Relativity 

Shock Culture —Gryphon 

Supply & Demand —Hannibal 

The Formula —Island 

Safety Net -SAR 

Greetings From Timbuk 3 —MCA 

National Velvet —N. V.R. 

The Other Side Of You —4AD 

........ Contorting the Image —New Rose 

Big Night Music —Island 

Living Heck —Rubber 

Uncarved Block —One Little Indian 

Ship Of Fools —Crammed 

The Assassins With Soul —Illuminated 

Goldrush —Polygram 

Heartland —Some Bizarre 

Sones —Virgin 


1 

2 

3 

4 

5 
3 
3 
2 
8 

10 

5 

2 

8 

14 
12 
16 

7 

15 

19 

20 

17 

23 
5 

18 

24 

13 
28 
22 

14 
26 
32 

25 
1 

35 

36 

37 

38 

39 

40 

41 

42 
20 
22 

46 

45 

48 

49 

50 

46 
19 
53 
17 

55 

56 

43 

58 

59 

51 


WEEKS 

8 

4 

2 

4 

2 

6 

8 

14 

8 

2 

4 

12 

4 

2 

2 

6 

6 

6 

2 

6 


16 

2 

4 

6 

2 

4 

6 

4 

2 

2 

16 

4 

6 

2 

2 


2 

6 

2 


4 

4 

10 


4 


NIGHT 


C.B.C LATE 

CBC Night Lines 
204-774-9733 
Ross Porter 

TALKING HEADS 

B-52s 

OMD 

MARTIN STEPHENSON 
COWBOY JUNKIES 
TAU CETI 
GENERAL PUBLIC 
PARACHUTE CLUB 
EVERYTHING BUT THE 
GIRL 

DAYIDSYLYAIN 


CBC Brave New Waves 
Kevin Komoda 

LEATHER NUN 
NEW ORDER 
ELVIS COSTELLO 
LISEN 2 

LONDON UNDERGROUND 
SHEEP LOOK UP 
PSYCHIC TV 
THE THE 
KRAFTWERK 
KRONOS QUARTET 


DANCE 


i i 


Cam Gaivn 
( BIG BOP) 

NEW ORDER 
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IGGY POP 
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TALKING HEADS 
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KRAFTWERK 
WOODENTOPS 
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PURSUIT OF HAPPINESS 
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NERVE - November 1986 - pg.14 









6-8 PRAIRIE OYSTER 


17-22 CROWBAR 

No Cover Mon to Wed 


24-29 PAUL JAMES 

No Cover Mon to Wed 


West (Christie subway) 
call 535-9541 


Jb In 


NOV. 10-15 
CKLN presents 
CHARLIE MUSSELWHITE 


NOV. 24-29 
CFNY presents 
MARGIE EVANS 


NOV. 3-8 

CFNY presents NOV. 17-22 

RICHARD BERRY CAMEO BLUES BAND 


DEC. 1-6 

PAUL JAMES BAND 


DEC. 15-20 

JEFF HEALEY 


DEC. 29-JAN. 10 
for two weeks 
including New Year's Eve 

PAUL JAMES BAND 


Upstairs in the Brunswick House -481 Bloor Street West- 964-2242 


to entertain the student body. 
Ironically, after years of telling 
you to ‘turn that damn noise 
down,’ mom’s now asking for 
your educated advice: what 
songs should we play? what 
should we wear? how will your 
father look in spandex tights? 

An easy challenge, right? 
Lock the folks in your 
bedroom with your fave 
records (Alice, Bowie, Gary 
Glitter, Sabbath— anything 
loud, cheap and flashy), back 
issues of Circus magazine, and 
force them to stay up past their 
bedtime to watch Don Kir- 
shner’s Rock Concert. 


Iggy never set out to be a punk, 
he only wanted to be a 
man — his failure made him the 
supreme punk. 

The Doctor (Clive Jackson) 
doesn’t want to be a man, he 
wants to be Alice Cooper. 
What he ends up being is 
stupid— and very much a part 
of rock’n’roll. 

This was the most (un)ge- 
nuinely funny show I’ve 
witnessed since seeing a group 
of 10-year-old kids performing 
‘Jump* in a recreation park a 
couple summers ago. Funny, 
that is, for about ten seconds of 
each song — just enough time to 


where the guitar riffs 
were lifted from (was that, 
‘Bang-A-Gong’ or ‘Suffragette 
City?’) enough time to get a 
glance at the guitarists’ seven- 
inch silver platform shoes, 
enough time to catch the smirks 
on the vampire backing singers’ 
faces. 

Then, the fantasy would end; 
relief becomes ritual, mom and 
dad start to wonder what the 
hell they’re doing up there and 
you pray for the night to end, 
anxious to get home to make 
sure mom hasn’t ruined your 
only copy of Gary G!itter*s 
Greatest Hits . 

ScoU Woods 


Margie knocked them out 
at the recent 
Harbourfront Blues 
Festival. Her high-energy 
melding of R&B and 
gospel is “keeping the 
blues alive" and making 
her a star on the blues 
circuit. A trail of 
successful appearances 
and recognition from 
critics has justly earned 

* her the title "Ambassador 
of the Blues" 




REM 

Concert Hall 

After seizing that modicum of rational percep- 
tion with which one should be equipped when at- 
tempting to document what is pretty well an an- 
nual rock event, it happened — the rains fell. 

“Sorreee,” Michael Stipe croons, his voice 
straining over faded arches and chandeliers of 
Massey Hall, flushing the culturally pre-washed 
with his emotional outburst. 

Surmounting sound problems which persist 
throughout the show, REM glean the bounty of 
their poetic harvest, even playing about half of 
Reckoning . For a full house full of friendly faces 
eager to inhale any offering (musical or verbal) 
which the band exhales, it is a night of kept pro- 
mises. 

Onstage with his bandmates. Stipe himself is a 
fascinating study. He recalls the quirky spon- 
taneity of The Lawn’s Gord Cummings and 
David Byrne’s defiance of the conventions of 
stage performance: when Stipe is shadow- 
boxing, the shadow slugs him back, reeling. 
Boyish insolence (he’s been thrown out of Sun- 
day school class, but just once, I bet) stares down 
outreached hands; looking up with fist tightly 
clencehed, he wildly thumps his heart. Thrashing 
about and tugging at his clothes, he’s just as 
enigmatic as Morrissey, but (maybe) a little more 
comfortable with his neuroses. 

Stipe’s fop hat and jacket recall the 19th cen- 
tury medicine man or the travelling show barker. 
And he’s selling more than songs. For REM, 
Stipe is saying to the crowd, it’s the “here and 
now.” They’re pitching the Moment. If you 
can’t get to Walden Pond from here, that’s okay, 
because REM’s a lot more fun than Thoreau 


and, I’m prepared to say you get the same 

Those moments of transcendence, including 
the refrain of ‘Fall On Me’ and ‘I Believe’, move 
an emotional block of thousands toward a 
spiritual communion challenged in only two 
other historical instances: the first public screen- 
ing of Eisenstein’s Potemkin and Spain’s 
repossession of Picasso’s Guernica. Further pro- 
pagating the rock god as cultural icon myth in an 
attempt to- transform musicians into artists (in- 
fallible, aren’t they)? Some call it secular 
reverence — misplaced . 

All right, let’s not be too hasty (rational 
perception, remember) — there’s always ‘Super- 
man.’ Hearing it live affirms both the imense 
likeability and the absurdity of the song. 
However, Mike Mills’ Opie charm kicks it in the 
bucket. The tune even rivals the fun quotient of 
‘I’m a Believer,’ which the openers, The Feelies 
performed raucously (as Neil Diamond had 
always meant it to be performed). 

“America has a policy,” Stipe says. “It’s call- 
ed genocide.” As both shameful and proud in- 
heritors of the American legacy, they well realize 
that it’s not just rocks, streams, trees, and sky. It 
also means povery, racism, illiteracy, and im- 
perialism. Almost whispering the first phrases of 
‘The Flowers of Guatemala, ’The register shifts. 
Michael Stipe’s emotional clarity surges with the 
rolling crescendo of Peter Buck’s guitar, Mike 
Mills’ bass, and Bill Berry’s drums — perfectly ar- 
ticulate, each articulated but fully integrated 
toward that magical communion, as REM draws 
a vital thread through rock’s rich tapestry. 

Helen Lee 


10-15 JEFF HEALEY 

No Cover Mon to Wed 


Harmonica wizard Charlie 
Musselwhite grew up in 
the musically fertile 
setting of Memphis and 
developed his skills for 
25 years in the Chicago 
blues cricible. He recently 
fused his blues harpistry 
with Robert Cray, John 
Lee Hooker and the 
Nighthawks at a special 
Carnegie Hall concert. 
Musselwhite is a major 
figure in modern blues 
history and a dynamic 
live performei 


Doc & the Medics —Hugh Beaton 


Dr. & The Medics 
RPM 

“Then I woke up, moni and 
dad were rolling on the 
couch/Rolling numbers , rock 
and rolling , got my Kiss 
records out. 39 

Imagine: it’s 1973, you’re a 
junior high kid, strung out (like 
everyone else your age) on bad 
weed and rock’n’roll. One day, 
mom informs you of the up- 
coming P.T.A. Variety Night, 
and the skit she and your father 
have in have in the works — five 
or six teachers and parents will 







NERVE - November 1986 - pg.15 


Camper Van Beethoven 
RPM 

Can the music match the exotic name? Yup. 
And then some. For about thirty seconds this 
tooks like a cowpunk band of airwave pirates, 
but its their lob-sided version of hillbilly music 
which gets your undivided attention. 

This band pretty well defines 'hip' right now in 
North America and, in alfdue respect, they had 
to be excellent in order to sustain any kind of 
belief in the underground hype system. The way 
I see it, Camper Van Beethoven are a very good 
Bar Band with intelligence and versitality, from 
their home brew of 'Border Ska,' to a version of 
Black flag's '.I'm Wasted' that left no room for 
dispute, to a convincing, touching display of 
Pink Floyd cosmic overload, confirming their 
allegiance to current psuedo-narcotic chic. No 
band without a working knowledge of the outer 
perimeters of taste in rock music would dare to 
resurrect Carl Douglas' 'Kung Fu Fighting,' but 
Camper Van know you can't go wrong with a 
bad attitude, slide guitar, violin, and songs about 
Lassie, terrorists, and bowling. They cover so 
many bases, bouncing back and forth like elastic 
men between different eras in music history, that 
it gets quite scattered and unfocussed, but its 
some sort of an achievement in the sheer 
misdirection of energy. 

The audience is impressed— they like the 
sound of the changing shapes before them. Who 
kndws, maybe pot-heads can save the world 
after all. 

Jack Slack 


Andrew Cyrille with Bill Grove, Rich Ban- 
nard, John Lennard and Ambrose Pottie. 

Music Gallery 

This was basically an evening of fun and 
games with percussion instruments. Bannard, 
Lennard and Pottie are three very talented local 
drummers (although Pottie played xylophone 
and marimba exclusively on this occasion). An- 
drew Cyrille is a heavy-weight jazz drummer 
from New York, who’s best known for a ten-year 
stint with Cecil Taylor. He’s also played with Il- 
linois Jacquet, Carla Bley, David Murray and his 
own band, Maono. Bill Grove is leader and sax 
man of Whitenoise and, as he demonstrated 
tonight, a pretty good pianist. 

Lennard played like a maniac on a dinky kit 
that looked like the one his parents might have 
given him for his twelfth birthday. Bannard was 
composed and thoughtful. Cyrille was 
somewhere in between and— he’s a veteran, after 
all — more of a virtuoso than the other two drum- 
mers. 

When the three of them unwound together in a 
tribal throb, they sounded ferocious. Grove’s 
piano work tended either toward Paul Bley’s 
atonal lyricism or Cecil Taylor’s percussive aban- 
don, and Pottie’s mallet work added a com- 
plementary, bubbly texture to the dark, ensemble 
sound. 

Humourous highlight and grande finale: while 
the others clapped out the rhythm, Pottie played 
Dizzy Gillespie’s ‘A Night in Tunisia’ on his 
(facial) cheeks; of course, Grove got to scat-sing 
Charlie Parker’s ‘Famous Alto Break’ while he 
boogied across the stage. Wotta ham. 

TIMPOWIS 



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November at the CABANA ROOM 


2864 


□1st: KEN HANNAN BAND 
□4th: CABANA CAFE: TIMOTHY J. ROBERT 
□5th: TROUSER SNAKE, THE REBELLERS 
□6th: LIVING IN FRANCE, THIRD MAN IN 
["□7th: THE LAWN 
□8th: L.M.O.T.V, KENSINGTONES 
□11th: CABANA CAFE: IAN WHITE 
□12th: ZOO STORY, PINK SHIPS 
□13th: SADDLE TRAMPS, RANG TANGO 
□14th: ONE OF ONE, THOUGHT ROCKETS 
□18th: CABANA CAFE: GUNNERS 
□19th: ROCK N REAL, PHANTOM BUFFALOES 
□20th: THE GOOD THING, THE MANICS 
□21st: SHADOWY MEN... 

□22nd: ...ON A SHADOWY PLANET 

□25th: CABANA CAFE: LISTENI 

□26th: DITHER, PRAY FOR RAIN, PIGFARM 

□27th: STRANGER THAN FICTION, CHESHYRES 

□28th: THE STILL LIFE, BAKKA P0 

□29th: PERSUIT OF HAPPINESS, STICKLEBACKS 



Music by JAMES STEWART on THURSDAY, FRIDAY & SATURDAY 

No Cover Wednesday & Thursday 


25 RICHMOND ST W 868-1532 OPEN AT 9 PM 



CAMEO LOUNGE 
1 : Romaniac Brothers 
3-4: Still Life 

5- 8: Jack DeKeyser 
1 1 : The Nationals 

12-15: Jack DeKeyser 
1 7: Sticklebacks . 

1 8: Absolute Whores 
19-22: Morgan Davis 
24-25: Danny Marks 
and the Group 
26-29: Johnnie Lovesin 
and the Grand Slam Band 

LOWER EAST SIDE 
open Thurs. thru Sat. 

1 : PIECE OF MY HEART' 
Janis Joplin Tribute 
with MIDDLEBROOK 
as Joe Cocker 

6- 7: JUSTICE reggae 

6: LAUREL 

and THE BLUE ROCKETS 
13-14: DELTA KICKERS 
15: YOUNG DRUNKS 
20: MICHAEL PICKETT 
2 1 : NORTHERN STAR 
22: I WANT (from N.S.) 

27: GUNNER 
28: ABSOLUTE WHORES 
29: BOP TOTEM 


■556 Sher bourne Ave., Toronto | 
(concert update: 921-4167 

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NERVE - November 1986 - pg. 16 




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New Model Army 
The Ghost of Cain 

Capitol Import 
Billy Bragg 
Talking With the 
Taxman About Poetry 

Polydor/Co! Discs 
When fast we saw them, Britain's most 
dramatically political band. New Model Army, had 
secured North American release for their second 
album, No Rest For The Wicked , but found 
themselves barred from appearing here personally, 
having been deemed "artistically suspect" by both 
Canadian and American authorities. An auditing of 
their album led me to believe that the authorities 
could be up to no good; New Model Army are 
among the most competent instrumentalists play- 
ing in the shadow of what was once called 
"punk." Political, yes, but they carry their politics 
the same way they probably carry their in- 
struments; low on their hips, with menace, like an 
imaginary weapon. New Model Army's politics are 
too generally anti -establish mem to be a specific 
threat, while asserted too firmly to be just a pose. 
The C host of Cain shows them to be still fighting 
the good fight, although the strain is showing. Vir- 
tually trapped in, the country that seems intent on 
ignoring them, barely taken seriously, let alone 
acknowledged, their sound has slowed from the 
jagged attack of No Rest. The sound is padded, 
even a bit bleary, and wails of melancholy har- 
monica sigh from time to time. Their rage is less 
focused, and their threat even more vague. Stay 
tuned. 


Billy Bragg, on the other hand, is a committed 
socialist whose outspoken views still haven't 
prevented him from obtaining a visa, but then Bil- 
ly is much more the romantic, and far less 
threatening in his Perry shirts than the spiky, 
leather-dad Army. In self-conscious anticipation of 
his audience and critics; Bragg has inscribed the 
cover of his latest release with the legend: "The 
Difficult Third Album." Does this mean Swans-like 
noise elegies? A full-fledged back-up band of New 
York jazzbb session men? On the contrary; liiEly 
gives in to pop music, which was always what 
made his taully strummed little rants so appealing 
in the first place. There's no back-up band yet, but 
folks such as KErsty MacColl, Johnny Mart and 
(Who drummer) Kenny Jones join Billy in the 
studio lo fill out a few of the spaces that he's ig* 
nored up until now. Ironically, these 
embellishments are treated as intently as Billy has 
treated' his journeyman guiiar^pfaying up until 
now. 

Apart from that, nothing else has changed. 
There's an even mix of songs about the polities of 
romance, and romantic songs about polities. What 
comes through best is Bragg s earnest yob charm, 
the honesty of a slight I y-smarter-than -average chap 
who finds the average much more comfortable. 

It's no one-dimentiona! image, the evidence seems 
to say, and again, as I said about New Model Ar- 
my nearly a yea?' ago, he means it, maaaaan 

Rick McGinnis 


Shreikback 

Big Night Music 
Island 

What’s going down in the machinery? Has 
Bryan Ferry seized control of the machinery? 

This album sounds so good it almost defeats 
the purpose of Shreikback. They have existed 
to illuminate the lighter side of human 
psychology with wildly refracting music and a 
cartoonish theatricality that’s fun for the whole 
family. 

Although the rude burst of brass that jolts 
the album awake suggests that this might be 
the same hungry band that made last year’s 
brilliant Oil & Gold , and annoyed thousands of 
Simple Minds fans, this album is actually a 
supreme bummer. 

For a band that’s earned a loyal following of 
young intellectuals in this particular section of 
the machinery, with their beatific, solid, 
sinister funk, they’re sounding very placid and 
disinterested. Thus, Big Night Music isn’t a 
hard album to like but it’s impossible to get 
close to. Especially when lead egghead Barry 
Andrews loses his tenuous grasp on cbm- 
municable thoughts: how, for example, does 
one go about “gunning for the buddah?” 

What exactly is an “underwaterboy” (and what 
do Island Records’ other ‘cool band’ know 
about them)? How do you wash “sticky jazz” 
off your pants? More importantly, will this 
album reach its crucial third rotation on my 
machinery? 

Probably, because everybody loves a profes- 
sional smartass. Even when they make music as 
worthless and empty as ‘Exquisite’ or ‘The 
Shining Path’ or ‘The Reptiles and I’. Pale 
Englishmen who croon French should be shot 
on sight. Joke or no joke. 

Shreikback are capable of mechanically pro- 
found music. This is perfunctory. This is 
average , and that doesn’t fit into the 
machinery. OK, the economics of Andrews’ 
reasoning is admirable: why waste valuable 


riffs and precious words in these desparate 
times? But music this sparse just defies pur- 
pose. 

I hate to leave Shreikback at the mercy of 
the machinery, because they’ve been responsi- 
ble for some gut-wrenching music in the past, 
and they’re one of few ‘underground’ groups 
to ‘break’ the machinery. But Andrews’ stated 
interest in disorder and incongruity has not in- 
formed the mechanics of Big Night Music . And 
that’s a drag. 

Dave Rave 


1 Selection per person per coupon 
Good until November 30 1986 


1 Selection per person per coupon 
Good until Itovember 30 1 9B6 


NERVE - November 1986 - pg.17 



Elvis Costello 
Blood and Chocolate 

CBS 

“Although some critics have defined Blood and 
Chocolate as an intentionally murky and disturbing 
album, I can only find beauty and precision in this 
relentless pop masterpiece.” 

Shit. So I go out of my way to sit at my typewriter 
between baseball games, trying to bash out some 
lunkhead’s critical invective so that all of Toronto 
will drop what they’re holding to rush out and buy 
this damned album. No luck, huh? A fellow scribe is 
pointing at me, laughing fiendishly, and throwing 
UB40 records at me. I could have reviewed this? 

“Costello has recorded two of the best albums of 
the decade: King of America and Blood and 
Chocolate, both of which have been released in 
1986. is this man human?” 


I ain't got no Illusions of being a pop-scene man of 
letters but sometimes— usually when I’m riding in 
my car alone— I fancy myself to be a pretty decent 
hack. So how can I live up to my self-confessed 
criteria by writing a review of an album that I have 
nothing to say about? Hell, I can’t. So there. 

“While other iconoclastic New Wavers suffer from 
dry-rot and guest appearances on 'Solid Gold’, 
Costello has flowered into a forever Hall of Famer, a 
musician so gifted that even his ugliest records 
glimmer with grace and compassion.” 

Sorry to let you all down. I just can’t get this slab 
of black vinyl out of my head. 

Dave Bidini 


7 Seconds 
New Wind 

Positive Force/Better 
Youth 

7 Seconds’ vocalist Kevin 
and I have something in com- 
mon: we both think the world 
of Ian MacKaye. 

MacKaye was the heart, 
soul and mind behind Minor 
Threat, avatars of hardcore 
and arguably the one 
legitimately great band the 
genre has ever produced. 
Threat called it a day in 1983, 
MacKaye going on to operate 
Dischord Records and pro- 
duce bands. 7 Seconds were 
one of his first projects, 
and — even though MacKaye 
only has a hand in four of 13 
songs here — his stamp is all 
over New Wind. 

‘Mind’ is the key, because 
MacKaye’s calling card was 
the clarity of his thinking 
(Henry Rollins tries to 
measure up, but his thoughts 
are too muddled by bad 
poetry and old Black Sabbath 
riffs). MacKaye’s ‘message;’ 
such as it was, didn’t stop at 
“think for yourself,” which 
would reduce a complex body 
of- work to a cliche; it was 
more “here’s what I 
think — you can do what you 
want.” He never wrote 
around a subject, and there 
was a take-it-or-leave-it direct- 
ness to everything Minor 
Threat did. 

New Wind is very much a 
Minor Threat record s for 1986, 
the best hardcore-related 


John Anderson 

Countrified 

WEA 

John Anderson is a decent 
singer. And he writes pretty 
good songs too. If that sounds 
like faint praise, remember, 
this is modern country music 
we're talking about; a form of 
pop music whose biggest hit of 
the past year has Dan Seals, of 
Seals and Crofts, singing "I 
wanna boogy with you, baby, 
all night long.") 

Folks like Anderson are rare 
these days. Like those city- 
slickers, the Ramones, Ander- 
son exploits his environment to 
his own advantage. If Joey 
Ramone can get away with 
singing "I met her at the 
7-11/now I'm in - seventh 
heaven," you can give- thisC 
Tennessee boy the same 
benefit of the doubt in the title 
track: "Well, I love my grits, I 
love my greens/country motels 
and those sweet Southern 
belles/I like fried chicken like a 
country boy should/and 
everything that's finger-lickin' 
good." 

The city allures 
Anderson— "I'm into 

caviar/and shiny cars"— but in 
the end, he goes back home. 
For critical purposes, this can 
be seen as a metaphor for 


Anderson's career conflict (and 
that of a handful of other coun- 
try musicians): the choice bet- 
ween the country— where the 
fun and the critical attention 
are; and the city— where the 
money is. Anderson's choice 
seems obvious. The 'proud to 
be countrified' theme is 
repeated on 'Honky Tonk 
Crowd' and the album closes 
with 'Peace In The Valley,' 
which has meant something 
traditional ever since Elvis sang 
it. (What that something is I'm 
not sure.) 

Beneath the orthodox 
posturing are hints that Ander- 
son wants the best of both 
worlds. Countrified's best 
songs combine country at- 
titude with accessible, almost- 
pop melodies, lyrics, and 
vocals. Unlike the self- 
consciously reverential Dwight 
Yoakam, Anderson sings it 
straight, with nary a 'yeehaw.' 
Fans of the Jimmie Rodgers' 
School of Yodelling might just 
call this boring— too 
citified?— but it sounds a hell of 
a lot more honest that Dan 
Seals and Dwight Yoakam. 
Anderson's approach suggests 
a middle ground that could 
open up the possibility of 
crossover appeal without 
damaging his integrity. 

Scott Woods 


music I’ve heard in a while. 
The virtues documented above 
are retained, and new territory 
is sought out: in a bid to em- 
brace rather than distance, 7 
Seconds temper MacKaye’s in- 
sularity with tenative steps 
towards a worldview. A 
secondary influence comes in- 
to play here, one that clearly 
announces itself in the list of 
credits. “U2 for inspiration” 
may look strange within this 
context, but it’s a sensible 
hybrid: take the emotion U2 
invests in well-meaning but 
bombastic arena posturing, 
and graft in onto the forward 
thrust of hardcore. The result 
is provocative, melodic, 
and — where 7 Seconds leave 
U2 behind — not at all flabby. 

The overriding concern of 
New Wind is defiance in the 
face of dissolution; in 7 
Seconds’ case the alledged 
death of ‘straight-edge’ punk, 
but it’s an all-purpose theme 
adaptable to individual in- 
terests. ‘Still Believe’ is the 
most pointed accusation 
directed towards those deemed 
as having abandoned ship, 
and it contains the album’s 
most startling moment: 
background vocalist MacKaye 
seizing the line “and now 
they’re rockin’ out,” as 
authoritative and as scabrous 
as he was 5 years ago. On a 
more modest scale, “Man 
Enough to Care,’ advice for a 
gay friend to come out, must 
be a landmark in hardcore 
tolerance. 

New Wind has all the ear- 
marks of a major band asser- 
ting itself for the first time. 
Husker Du’s breakthrough on 
Metal Circus comes to 
mind — that’s how highly I 
regard this record: 

Phillip Dellio 


‘‘Proud...’ has lots to recommend 
itself.’ 

—Phillip Dellio, NERVE Sept ’86. 

‘It operates on a level of crank and 
thrust that only a few groups even 
attempt to aspire to, never mind 

QChlGVG' 

— B.F. Mowat, STYLE Sept ’86. 


NOW AVAILABLE AT COOLER 
DISC SHOPS OR MAIL 
THE THROBS, 200 Aberdeen Ave 

Unit 1 
Hamilton Ont. 
L8P 2P9 
Send $7, inc. P&P 


* Distributed by Record Peddler ZULU 
Records and Systematic Records in the 
USA 

LIVE THROBS!, in Toronto 

R&R Heaven, Nov. 26th 




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ANDY CASH -STICKS AND STONES (FPE 3033) 

References to Bruce Cockburn Jr. are completely out of the line here. 1 mean it’s just a coincidence that much 
music played ‘Rocket Launcher’ back to back with the video for 'Trail of Tears' isn’t it? fringe Product is issu- 
ing 'Sticks and Stones’ in late November in a new four-colour jacket and it'll be on cassette as well. 


m We still don’t have a name for this stupid dog logo. Thanks to those who wrote 
in with suggestions, however the search continues. Name the Subcanus Dog and 
you’ll win all three of these releases. Send your suggestions to: 

SUBCANUS 43 BEACONSFIELD AVE. TORONTO , ONT. M6J 3J1. 


CHANGE OF HEART -50 FT. UP 

Okay, so I exaggerated a bit in the last ad. 
The Volvo's fixed but the band's not going 
anywhere with it. Okay, okay no more moan- 
ing. This is a great record. No, I can’t fust 
say that I've got to give you some tangible 
incentive to rush out and buy it. Okay, how’s 
this? If you don't buy this record* Change Of 
Heart will beat my head to mush. I think 
that's a good enough reason. That, and they 
write great songs and man, they fuckin’ 
bleed for their art on this record. Like, 
they'd hack their ears off and send them to 
you just like Van Gogh but then they’d be 
even more out-of-tune than they already are. 
Get the record or cassette and watch for the 
video of TEN MILES. 


COWBOY JUNKIES -WHITES OFF EARTH 
NOWII 

The title could easily apply to some people I 
know but, that’s another story. This is the 
Cowboy Junkies' debut record. We're talk- 
ing a particular market segment here— really 
powerful, eerie music. So they call me from 
a hotel in Banff, and it’s always weird talking 
with these guys. It’s like they're hiding 
something from you. Hi, Scratch. Hi, 
Junkies. Why are you so fuckin’ strange all 
the time? I mean all these old blues stan- 
dards on your record and a cut from The 
Boss? Don’t you want mainstream success? 
What gives? On Record (Latex 4) and 
Cassette (Latex 4c) 


ftoJORos Revisited 


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NERVE - November 1986 - pg.18 

ATLANTIC 

SOUL 

Looking at today's music 
scene from the perspective of 
the Soul renaissance ot the 60s, 
it's hard to believe that, with 
records like Run-DMC's 'Walk 
This Way/ the crossover of 
Black music into White- 
dominated mainstream culture 
is still an issue. It's a matter of 
fact that many of Rock and 
Roll's earliest hits were just 
scrubbed up covers of R&B 
hits* This is proven on the first 
three volumes of Atlantic 
Records' seven volume 
retrospective released to much 
acdcilm last year. Elaborating 
on this point , Atlantic has 
undertaken to re-release," in 
original Jackets, some of f he 
albums that made that record 
company one of the two major 
forces in the world of 60s SPul. 
While Motown no doubt were 
the catalysts for the widespread 
invasion of radio by black ar- 
tists tn the early sixties, Atlantic 
took the torch back from them 
and proceeded to place the 
blackest music, that coming 
from Memphis' Stax-Volt 
records, on the turntables of 
white, teen-age America, 
without any of Motown's 
necessary, even inspired, but 
ultimately formulaic and 
diluting trappings. The vision 
of men like Ahmet Ertegun and 
Jerry Wexlef is still being exer- 
cised today, and that's a good 

thing ' " Rick McGinnis 

Various Artists 
Apollo Saturday Night 

grand-daddy of them atf This 
album, due to its participants, 
due to its place in time, and 
due to its location, has reached 
something like mythic propor- 
tions for Soul record collectors. 
Standout performances include 
Otis Redding, in the earliest 
phase of his well-deserved rise 
to the very top of Soul's pan- 
theon: the Coasters— by 1964 a 
bit dated— exhibiting R&B's 
roots in minstrel shows: and 
Ben E. King, then at the nadir of 
his popularity. Also worth 
hearing is emcee King Col- 
eman, snapping back at a 
female heckler in the au- 
dience, "Woman, you got 
enough mouth for two more 
rows of teeth," 

RM 

William Bell 
The Soul Of A Bell 

From the liner notes of this 
album we see Atlantic 
marketing Bell as Soul's Perry 
Como. A "warm, sincere, pipe- 
smoking man" who enjoys 
"golf, swimming, bowling, and 
hunting," Bell was, like Eddie 
Floyd, a secondary figure in 
Atlantic's stable. While not as 
idiosyncratic a talent as Otis*;,, 
on the album's grittier tunes, 
he can sound surprisingly fike 
Sa m & Dave' s Dave Pra ter 
Years after this album, Bell 
would make more chameleon 
changes: in duets with Judy 
Clay, sounding more like Otis; 
and alone, taking on Al 
Green's urgency. 

RM 

The Stax/Volt Revue 
Live In London 
(Vo/. I) 

I kid you not when 1 say that 
Booker T. and The MG's ver- 
sion of 'Green Onions' here is 
the forerunner to Deep Purple, 
circa Machine Head, Made in 
Japan. Just listen to that 


keyboard intro— it's John Lord 
all the way, 

I kid you not also when I say 
that soul performers art 1 the on- 
ly performers — to my hear- 
ing— that excell on live recor 
dings. Whether that's because 
soul is intrinsically about com- 
municating, or just because the 
sound of a crowd responding 
in unison excites me, I'm not 
sure. 

If, as a whole, this disc is a lit- 
tle hodgepodge (seems just as 
the performers are warming 
up, they're making way for the 
next act) it's held up in I he end 
by Sam and Dave, whose three 
performances stand alongsrde 
entire live sets of Otis and Sam 
Cooke. There art* lew moments 
of crowd interaction anywhere 
as thrilling, sad, and funny as 
those in ‘Hold On. Tm Com- 
ing/ when Sam and Dave tease 
the audience about leaving. 
This is one crowd that could 
have spent the rest of theft live* 
in that sweaty auditorium. 

Scott Woods 

Otis Redding and Carla 
Thomas 

King and Queen 

Otis's music has always 
struck me as urgent* desjptoir* 
rng. quite serious. With Carla 
T homas by his side, HeVa dif- 
ferent man; easygoing and fun 
but with no loss of intensity. 
Carla's power isn't so much in 
her voice there are more 
thrilling singers in soul, tor 
sure— but rather* in her effect 
over the man. This is truly the 
first music of Otis’s (apart from 
some five moments) that's 
compelled me to dance in my 
bedroom 

On occasion, the 'fun' stuff 
sounds trite (minor 
embellishments like banjo and 
tuba), but the warm moments 
are worth waiting for: the 
joyous Motown-take, 'Let Me 
Be Good To You' ('Where Did 
Our Love Go' done Southern- 
style), the sappy-yet-sincere 
'Ooh Carla, Ooh Otis/ and 
especially 'Tramp/ which has a 
racial statement/ joke I'm still 
trying to figure out. 

Because this was such a dif- 
ferent Otis, King and Queen 
now seems like a relative 
obscurity. Obviously, Atlantic 
Records didn't think much of it 
back then; the finer notes, writ- 
ten by the then-senator ffom 
Tennessee, are the worst of this 
entire re-issue series— although 
Howard Baker is now a major 
presence in the Republican 
party 

SW 

Aretha Franklin 
Lady Soul 

During her prime— roughly 
'67 to '72— Aretha Franklin 
mastered soul's greatest trick: 
communicating subtle 
messages through the most 
direct and honest delivery. 
Aretha could have covered 
'How Much Is That Doggie In 
The Window?' and made it 
mean something. 

This re-issue is a blessing, 
and not merely because listen- 
ing to it is a religious ex- 
perience on its own. After 
Aretha's Cold (still in print, and 
stilt magnificent from start to 
finish) this is as good a place as 
any to delve into the greatest 
singer of our time. Backed by a 
band who can only try to 
catchajp— and as a result are 
astonishing— Aretha jumps 
from mellow to feverish 
without ever losing control of 
the material. 


Sonus! Those Atlantic releases are available at 
record stores for a 


Suffer Machine 
Deprogram 

Burning Buffalo 

Sheep Look Up 

SLUR 

These are debut records from (one assumes) 
two ot the leading lights of the burgeoning 
London (Ontario) underground. They're young! 
They're alienated! They're mean and moody! 
Who isn't. But wait, there's more! 

Suffer Machine sound rather like what the 
Rent Boys would have if they hadn't been such 
self-indulgent twerps. This is political funk by, 
and for, the inherently unfunky. The tunes are 
generally dominated by a thick, sludgy 
rhythmic bottom, overlaid with ttnkly 
keyboards and a clever sort of honking, disso- 
nant saxophone. The top layer of this par- 
ticular mud-pie is growling, howling, snortin', 
hootin' and holerin' vocals. Sort of like James 
Brown if he'd come from, uh, well, London, 
Ontario. 

Suffer Machine's great strength is the scary, 
riveting edginess this music provokes when 
they play at a frenetic speed. But this is a 
record best played one side at a time; what 
after one song has the toe tapping, will after 
five have the nerves jangling. Perhaps they are 


well advised to maintain this headlong pace, 
however— the one song where they relax a lit- 
tle sounds eerily like Springsteen. 

The lyrics are the usual sort of indie-band 
sloganeering, as the name of the record would 
indicate. But the music is so propulsive that it 
hardly matters. Suffer Machine is probably ter- 
rifying live. 

Sheep Look Up seem to be the standard kind 
of new age rock and roll band— a solid beat, 
occasionally anthemic guitars, excursions into 
ethno-musicology, solemn exhortations to "Be 
aware that these are changing times." Actually, 
due to a less didactic and more personal ap- 
proach, their lyrical pretensions are much 
easier to take than most (Suffer M., for one). 

This four-song EP divides neatly into two. 

'Big Heart' and 'Rapture' are rather charming 
evocations of better times to come if people 
"cry out in one strong voice;" it should glad- 
den hearts near and far to be reminded that 
change is still thought to be possible. 'Spaghet- 
ti Western' and 'Falasha' are effective mood 
pieces, particularly the latter, a nifty piece of 
agit-pop. 

Buy either or both of these records. You'd 
make some small town folks very happy and 
maybe yourself too. 

Philip Bull 


Various artists 
The New Originals 

Materials & Processes 

Novelists and filmmakers have it easy: sure it 
can be a monumental undertaking to see a 
piece of work through to its completion, but at 
a certain level of achievement, it forever 
belongs to you. No one can 'cover' The Great 
C atsby or To The Lighthouse ; while Late 
Autumn and Nashville will always be the pro- 
perty of their respective directors. 

Write a three-minute pop song, however, 
and no matter how masterful it may be* no 
matter how strongly it begs to be left untouch- 
ed, you're at the mercy of public domain. 
Chuck Berry's 'Back In The USA' and Smokey 
Robinson's 'Tracks of My Tears' are two of the 
more perfect singles I can think of, but when 
Linda Rondstadt needed a couple of sure-fire 
hits, Chuck and Smokey were there for the tak- 
ing, It's not fair. 

But it can be the doorway to inspirational ir- 
reverence, and that (or so I've read) is what 
rock'n'roll is all about! Chris Buck, a man with 
few heroes, fewer friends, and still fewer 
morals, also knows this, so he's taken it upon 
himself to compile The New Originals : 1 3 
covers by 13 bands, ranging from the sincere 
to the indefensible. 

Have you ever felt that lurking around the 
edges of the most innocuous late-60's pop lay 
genuinely psychotic impulses? That Bobby 
Sherman, Gary Puckett, and the Cowsills were 
really subterfuge conjured up by the White 
House to distract from their actions in Viet 
Nam? Or that Charles Manson's favourite 
record next to the White Album may have 
been 'Sugar Sugar'? No? Neither have 1. But 
that's the best explanation l can offer for 
Violence and The Sacred's attack on 'Windy/ 
the highlight of 7fte New Originate It's amaz- 
ing; they keep the melody and basic structure* 
but periodically break it up Butthole Surfer- 
style with found noise, speeches, and stock 
market reports. Firsttime l heard ft, 1 was Lying 
in bed deathly hungover. Every time the song 
seemed ready to end, that annoyingly familiar 
riff resurfaced to .prolong the agony. I honestly 
thought I was going to die. I mean that as a 
compliment, of course. 

Every version here is commendably unique, 
even when the choice of material isn't (Wall of 
Voodoo claimed 'Ring of Fire' long ago). The 
two relatively straightforward tracks, the 
Lawn's 'Disguises' and the Voca no Suns' 
'Polythene Pam,' are among the best— especial- 
ly the Lawn, thanks to Gord Cummmg's 
reminder of how emotional a singer Roger 
Da! trey was in 1968. Tub 'O Guts' rendition of 
Psychic TV's 'Godstar/ which shifts its gaze 
from Brian Jones to Jim Momson, is both 
touching and hilarious: "Where were you 
when Jim took the pledge/to always JiveTifeon 
the edge?" The only miss is Dob/t Try' This At 
Home's 'Louie Louie/ a one-jokeqoea (cover 
'Louie Louie' without really covering-jO that 
doesn't belong. 

Along with all this wonderful iconoclasm, 
purchase of The New Originals nets you an 
elaborate booklet and a balloon. Let me be the 
first to declare publicly something we've all 
suspected tor a long time: Chris Buck is 
nothing short of a Shaman God. (Actually, I'm 
still not clear on what a Shaman God is, but 
anything to make the guy happy. Phillip Dellio 


Corey Hart 
Fields of Fire 
Capitol 

‘His 1 last album sold a 
million copies in Canada, and 
Fields of Fire , his third, is 
already triple platinum after 
seven weeks on the charts. 
When faced with statistics such 
as these, even we must sit up 
and take notice. 

I could start this review by 
making some cynical assump- 
tions about the taste of the 
Canadian record -buy ing 
public; but that would be too 
easy. Regardless of my assump- 
tions and with nearly 2,000,000 
records in Canadian homes, 
Corey Hart, love him or hate 
him, must be doing something 
right. 

Fields of Fire is pretty bland 
fare with the usual gluttony in 
the production that earmarks 
product for Top 40 airplay. 
And Corey Hart is Top 40 or he 
is nothing. His attempts at 
‘rocking-out’ sound like the 
rest of his music but with a 
forced frenelicism that bleeds 
out any potential for ‘soul.’ 
Which is why he’ll never be a 
rock star. 

Look at him. The saccharine 
portrait stares moislly out of an 
Eklachrome sweet shop begg- 
ing to be pinned to the pink 
sugar walls of little girls. The 
man looks good. But listen to 
him, listen to the sameness with 
which his marvelous voice 
rounds off the lyrics. Hart 
never chomps the bit, never 
challenges himself for fear of 
scratching the patina of his 
voice box. 

Hart mines American 
mythologies, populating his 
songs with the same archetypes 
that made Springsteen a 
household name: the loner, the 
embattled lover, the rebel who 
can never go home. Yet Hart is 
never as convincing. I hate to 
compare Corey to the Boss but 
“Baby, we were born to run” is 
powerful myth- 

making — whether or not you 
work on E-Street. 

On a cogitative level (if you 
can go that far), Hart lacks the 
evocative powers which paint 
landscapes; rather he daubs 
sepia on images that are as ob- 
vious as snapshots. The 
musical environment he dwells 
in is germ-free; the melodies 
are as derivative as a fruit fly’s 
gene structure. He just doesn’t 
have the same honest dirt under 
his nails. I’ll bet he cleans his 
nose with a guitar pick. 

So what is he doing right? 

Pop encompasses a vast 
spectrum, but what Corey Hart 
makes is popular music; it isn’t 
pop. In the great Canadian 
tradition, Hart is at his best 
when he sings ballads; he tells 
nice stories in song while com- 
plimenting the imagery with his 
music. Rock and Roll is about 
fucking, Pop is about thinking 
about getting fucked, and Cor- 
ey Hart is about 10,000,000 
times richer than I am, but he is 
a balladeer. 

So what’s wrong with that? 

Nothing. None of these 
observations should concern 
anyone who agrees with the 
conclusion. But if you want to 
believe that Corey is indeed a 
rock and roller then you better 
hope his present success spoils 
him. Success must jade and 
finally disgust him. Only then 
will he enter a renaissance and 
extract The Canadian Identity 
from beneath a slab of concrete 
at Yonge and Bloor. 

DENIS SEGUIN 


Love And Rockets 

Express 

Beggars Banquet /Polygram 
In typically bizarre fashion, 
the original Bauhaus sound 
has progressively evolved into 
an amalgam of the best trends 
in today’s music. Alternately 
lush and sparse. Express is 


driven by industrial strength 
guitars, psychedelic produc- 
tion, tight harmonies, and 
soars forth as a satisfying and 
cohesive vision. 

Flowing from the wellspring 
of last year’s tremendous 
Seventh Dream of Teenage 
Heaven , the trio has gradually 
penned more accessible song 
structures while retaining their 
traditionally sharp edge. The 


single ‘Yin And Yang The 
Flowerpot Man’ is indictative 
of the album, flying head-long 
into sudden, subtle breaks. 
Guitarist/vocalist Daniel Ash 
has ground his axe into a 
most lethal sonic weapon, 
caressing and slashing with 
equal ease. ‘Kundalini Ex- 
press’ could be Blue Cheer, 
yet its heaviness is offset by 
humourous fills— banjo, 


flocks of birds, monks 
urinating. 

They’re holding fast with 
eastern mysticism, but have 
grafted it onto urban sen- 
sibilities. Mantra for the 80s: 
“Alcohol is your yoga baby.” 

Above all, Ash, David J, 
and Kevin Haskins retain an 
aesthetic touch which gives 
their work more grace and 
substance I h an most of what's 


out there. Little thematic leit- 
motifs pop up in unexpected 
places — ‘An American Dream’ 
reshapes the central riff of 
Dream's ‘Saudade,’ then trips 
off in another direction entire- 
ly. Alienation remains the 
focus, yet in less nasty forms 
than Bauhaus, positive in- 
trospection prevailing. 

Love And Rockets definite- 


ly have their own sound now, 
with roots in many 
genres — soul, metal, funk, 
psychedelia. What emerges 
most intact is a distinct 
outlook, spiritual and not 
materialist, artistic and not 
crass. Intelligent music with 
energy — but what did you ex- 
pect? 

Kyle Swanson 



NERVE - November 1986 - pg.19 



Iron Maiden 

Somewhere in Time — Capitol 

Metallica 

Master of Puppets — Elektra 
Motorhead 
Orgasmatron — Viper 
Saxon 

Rock the Nations — Capitol 

Billy Squier 

Enough is Enough — Capitol 


Tim Powis finds the meaning of 


ARRG 


How better to begin a mass metal burial 
than by quoting the drama critic George 
Jean Nathan . Responding to theatre 
managers ' frequent complaints about 
critics who leave in disgust well before the 
end of a play , he writes: “ The critic who 
cannot accurately and finally judge the 
quality of a play after the curtain has been 
up twenty minutes is a rank 
incompetent . ” 

Were he still alive , Vm sure George 
would agree that “ the critic who cannot 
accurately and finally judge the quality of 
a heavy metal album after the needle has 
been in the groove 30 seconds is a rank 
dunderhead . ” 

Actually , sometimes all you gotta do is 
look at the sleeve . If a passing glance at 
the chintzy Blade Runner-w/i cover of 
Iron Maiden 's Somewhere in Time 
doesn V make your mind scream “ Caveat 
emptor, " check out some song titles: 
'Caught Somewhere In Time * * The 
Loneliness of the Long Distance Runner , ' 
'Stranger in a Strange Land ' (songs nam- 
ed after novels are invariably a bad 
sign — only women read). If you're still 
not convinced this is nothing but an ersatz 
sci-fi salami slam, you get one more 
chance . Slip off the shrink wrap . Look at 


the lyrics to ‘Alexander the Great': “Then 
Egypt fell to the Macedon King as 
wed/ And he founded the city called Alex- 
andria/By the Tigris River." Any 
bonehead will tell you that the Tigris 
River is in Mesopotamia (you know, the 
cradle of civilization. ) which is modern 
day Iran or Iraq or some damn place like 
that, but it sure as shit ain’t in Egypt. So 
fuck Iron Maiden . And what's with those 
futuristic golf carts in Death Valley, huh? 

This brings us to the Coca Col- 
a/Capitol Conspiracy Theory, and Billy 
Squier . Iron Maiden and Billy are both on 
Capitol, right? Okay, on the inner sleeve, 
in the pic with those futuristic golf carts, 
one of the Iron Maidenheads is wearing a 
sun-visor cap emblazoned with the words 
“ Coke is it. " That alone is not a par- 
ticularly big deal. BUT, on the back of 
Enough is Enough Bill, looking like the 
sensitive person's quasi-metal wimp that 
the album proves him to be, is playing his 
pale blue guitar seated on an amp in a 
bare, canvas-covered set. And the only 
other object in sight is a shiny red can of 
Coke sitting conspicuously on the floor. 
'Fess up, Capitol, before I ferret out the 
subliminal Coke plug on the cover of the 
Saxon album. 

At least Saxon is unpretentious, if 
thoroughly unoriginal. They favour the 
kind of mid-tempo pussy-grinding raunch 
that characterized metal 10 years ago, 
with lyrics like “ Let's take a ride, little 
backseat lover/ You taste so good, you're 
just like sugar. " And if you wonder what 
Elton John's been up to since attending 
Fergie & Randy's nuptial shindig, the 
liner notes thank him “for being a true 
rocker and piano" on ‘Party Til You 
Puke. '- 


Unlike Saxon, Metallica is no happy- 
go-lucky troupe of party gorillas. On 
Master of Puppets, they're plainly too 
cheesed off at the world to have any fun: 
“ Fuck it all and fucking no regrets" sings 
the ever lucid James Hetfield in ‘ Damage , 
Inc. ' In truth, Hetfield doesn 't sing; he 
forces bile up into his throat until his 
vocal cords are burning with the acidity, 
and durn-near blows the whole smolder 
ing, gunky wad through the mike and out 
your speakers, while the rest of the band 
batters away at death-defying speed; 
tightly wound riffs and chord chunks 
whip by and vanish so quickly the songs 
seem composed, of random shrapnel 
bursts . It's exhausting, but never ex- 
hilarating. It's like sex with a headache 
and a vial of Locker Room up each 
nostril. It hurts. 

Motorhead wins this month's metal 
blowout hands down. Their music swings 
powerfully where Metallica 's twitches 
noisily. Lemmy Kilmister is at least as 
angry as James Hetfield, and the bile pro- 
bably frazzled his larynx to a raw nub 
back when Metallica were shimmying to 
Uriah Heep. ‘ Orgasmatron ' isn ' t about a 
machine that gives instant sexual 
gratification, it's about “the outstretched 
grasping hand" of the corrupt Catholic 
church. But Lemmy 's more than a sour- 
puss. He gruffly confesses to being a 
basically fun-lovin' guy. (“See me runnin ' 
all around the world/Tryin ' to make some 
time/A million miles and a million 
girls/ A million real good times. ") Those 
pups in Metallica are just sore cuz Lem- 
mie wore out all the hottest metal mamas 
on his way to the top of the scrap heap. 

Tim ‘Iron Man* Powis 


RAVE : ENCORE 

B B 6 ® C3 E) § 


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Ave. 139 Dnndas St. East 

8 366-2046 


2822 Eghnton Ave East 
Vonge north of Dundas 
Vonge south of Eiloor 






NERVE - November 1986 - pg.20 


T 










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: Sat. Nov 1/ Popular Front 
Tues. 4 * Kids In The Hall 
Thurs. 6 * Martian Invasion 
Performs in A Bed World 
: Fri. 7 * Demi-Monde 
i Sat. 8 * Pursuit ol Happiness 
Mon. 10 * Disarmament Pub Crawl 
Fri. 14 * Change of Heart 
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Sat.22 * No Mind ^ 

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STILL LIFE: Isabella til Tues 
RICHARD BERRY: 

Albert's Hall til Sat 

DELTA DEVILS, LARRY GOODHAND 
DAVID OWEN: Lee's 
NANCY SIMMONDS: 

elMocambo til 17th 
PAUL JAMES: Clintons til Wed 
THE PHANTOMS: Horseshoe til Wed 
JEFFERY HATCHER: Cameron 
Fred's Bicycle Repair Shop: Rivoli 
MIKE MACDONALD: 

Grossman's til Sat 
JEFF HEALY: Bamboo 
Maniac Monday: Key West 
GRIZZLY BLUES JAM W/ THE HOCK: 
Pinetree every Monday 


Tuesday 4 

JOHN ROBERTS: Cabana Cafe 
Kids In The Hall; Rivoli 
BOCHE LEAGUE, D.V.P. 

PARALLEL FIFTH: Lee's 
THE BLOW, J,A. CONNECTION: 
lldiko's 

THE PHANTOMS: Horseshoe 
SIGUE SIGUE SPUTNIK 
THE SPOONS: Diamond 
GEORGE COLEMAN: Bamboo til Wed 
GRUMPS: Cameron 
GRANNY'S GUMS: Key West 
BERNARD ALLISON & 

BACKTALK: Pintree til Sat 

Wednesday 5 

GEORGE COLEMAN: Bamboo 
SCREAMING LIZARDS, 

CRUCIAL BONES 
SWEDISH FISH: lldikos 
SADDLE TRAMPS, ZEBRA PEOPLE 
CHINA & GUNS: Lee's 
PAUL JAMES: Clintons 
JACK DEKEYZER: Isabella til Sat 
TROUSERS SNAKE, 

FLYING RANDAZZO 
THE REBtiLERS: Cabana 
Audry Rose: Rivoli 
UNCLE BONSAI, DINO LEE 
WHITE TRASH REVIEW, 

AMEOBA QUICHE, 

BLAIR MARTIN: RPM 
ERROLL STARR, SCOTT MERRITT 
BILLY NEWTON-DAVIS: Copa 
DAVID WILCOX: Nags North 
CARBAGEMEN: Cameron 
BLACK DONNELLYS: Key West 

Thursday 6 

TIMEX SOCIAL CLUB: Spectrum 
CRAZY EIGHTS: Bamboo til Sat 
VIOLENCE & THE SACRED 
VAROSHI FAME: lldikos 
LIVING IN FRANCE 
3RD MAN IN: Cabana 
ROSI FAN TUTI: Cameron 
PRAIRIE OYSTER: Clintons til Sat 
Martian Invasion: Rivoli 
PARTS FOUND IN SEA 
BORY GROVE: Lee's 
EYE EYE, THE ARROWS: Copa 
BLUE RODEO: Horseshoe til Sat. 
MERCURY FESTIVAL: ElMocambo 
PAUL JAMES 

MONDO COMBO: Diamond 
CUB KODA: RnR Heaven 
OCTOBER CRISIS: Key West 


Friday 7 

DEMI MONDE: Rivoli 
THE LAWN: Cabana 
DIREKTIVE 17: ElMocambo 
NO MIND, CONDO CHRIST 
SAM F. HAIN: lldikos 
MONDO COMBO: Lee's 
PARTS FOUND IN SEA: Cameron 
METALLICA: Maple Leaf Gardens 
RICHARD BERRY: Albert's Hall 
JACK DEKEYZER: Isabella Cameo 
JUSTICE: Isabella Lower til Sat 
FLYING SQUAD: Key West 
U.I.C.: Level 21 

Saturday 8 

PURSUIT OF HAPPINESS: Rivoli 
IKONS, ITSA SKITSA: lldikos 
VITAL SINES: Lee's 
Paul James Band: ElMocambo 
CRAZY EIGHTS: Bamboo 
THE LAWN: Cameron 
LiM.O.TV, THE KENSINGTONS: 
Cabana 

THE EXTRAS(mat-) 

BLUE RODEO: Horseshoe 
JACK DEKEYZER: Isabella Cameo 
JUSTICE: Isabella Lower 
PRAIRIE OYSTER Clintons 
RICHARD BERRY: Albert's Hall 
U.I.C, LEGEND KILLERS: Key West 

Sunday 9 

Blues Jam, Talent Showcase: Lee's 
'Wiseblood': Rivoli 
PHANTOMS: Grossman's 
ERIC STACH FREE MUSIC UNIT; 
Key West 

IGCY POP: Concert Hall 

Monday 10 

JEFF HEALEY: Clinton's til Sat 
CASUAL CASUAL: Cameron 
METEORS: Grossman's til Wed 
CHARLIE MUSSELWHITE; 

Albert's Hall til Sat 
EUGENE CHADBORN: lldikos 
Disarmament Pub Crawl: 

Rivoli, Horseshoe 
DANCING COUNTS 
HUMAN INTEREST, BOOKMEN; 
Lee's 

SCOTT COSSU* Bamboo 
Maniac Mondays: Key West 






NERVE - November 1986 - pg.21 


Tuesday 11 

GOOD BROTHERS 
PRAIRIE OYSTER, 

JEFFREY HATCHER 
JACK DEKEYZER, HANDSOME 
NEDS 

KftJS WHITELY. 
_CATrDtfWANEQS^^ 

Times G^> 

MERCURYTFSTTVAL^Hof5esH6e^ 
GEOFF BAKER & 

THE HEADHUNTERS: Pinetree til Fhur 
Immaculate Perception: Rivoli 
ROLF KEMP: Cameron 
THE NATIONALS: Isabella 
BLUE RODEO: Bamboo 
ORCHESTRAL MANOEUVRES 
IN THE DARK: Maple Leaf Gardens 
PURPLE MOON VULTURES 
BRASS SOLDIER, 

NO REGRETS: lldikos 
IAN WHITE: Cabana Cafe 
MONUMENTS GALORE, 

THE REPUBLIC: Lee's 
HOUSE OF XENON 
EUGENE CHADBORNE: Key West 

Wednesday 12 

GARBAGEMEN: Cameron 
DIREKTIVE 17: Bamboo 
FIGGY DUFF: Horseshoe 
DARREN COPELAND 
GERRARD LECKIE 
TEA FOR TEN: lldikos 
FETCHIN BONES, THE PREACHERS 
MONUMENTS GALORE 
RHEOSTATICS: RPM 
SAVOY BROWN: RnR Heaven 
JACK DEKEYZER: Isabella til Sat 
ZOO STORY, PINK SHIPS: Cabana 
Poetry Sweatshop: Rivoli 

r,Q FOUR 1: * jffiMffl. 

rub Ttrfies Cate 


r 


Thursday 13 

VEKTOR: Cameron 
JUDY BROWN: Grossman's til Sat 
FISHBONE, WHITENOISE: Diamond 
JOHN DICKIES— Toronto Blues 
liety^Euadfi Jiser: H orseshoe 
uENE idVE llEZEBEL: 

5r JAMES: Bamboo^ 
PHANTOMS: Lee's 
KITTEN WITH A WHIP: lldikos . 
DELTA KICKERS: 

Isabella Lower til Fri 
SADDLE TRAMPS 
RANG TANGO: Cabana 
MONUMENTS GALORE 
THE REPBULIC: elMocambo 
NO LIFE- Key West 

Friday 14 

ONE OF ONE: Cameron 
20th CENTURY REBELS: 

Bamboo til Sat 
CHANGE OF HEART: Rivoli 
JOHN DICKIES: Hoseshoe 
PERFECT WORLD: ElMocambo 
JEFF HEALY: Clinton's 
HOPPING PENGUINS: Lee's til Sat 
CHARLIE MUSSELWHITE: Alberts Hall 
DELTA KICKERS: Isabella Lower 
JACK DEKEYZER: Isabella Cameo 
ONE OF ONE 

THOUGHT ROCKETS: Cabana 
NEON ROME: lldikos 
ITSA SKITSA: Key West til Sat 
WINDUP BAND: Pinetree til Sat 

Saturday 15 

FUNDAMENTALS: Cameron 
20TH CENTURY REBELS: Bamboo 
JEFF HEALY: Clintons 
PRAIRIE OYSER: Horseshoe 
SCOTT CAMPBELL, THE RAVE: Rivoli 
YOUNG DRUNKS: Isabella Lower 
JACK DEKEYZER: Isabella Cameo 
HOPPING PENGUINS: Lee's 
CEEDEES, RENOVATORS: Cabana 
CHARLIE MUSSELWHITE: 

Albert's Hall 

! |mmy 

IMACES IN VOGUE: Nags North 
ITSA SKITSA: Key West 


Sunday 16 

MANTECA, NANCY WHITE: 

Concert Hall 
gUtnc Ijiffl, reliant Showcase: Lee's 

(SKINNY PUP^- ^ 

VSEVERED HEADjL-KPM^ 

THE TEMPTATIONS: 

Roy Thomson Hall 
EDNA & EDNA: Key West 

Monday 17 

CECIL TAYLOR, BILL SMITH: Bamboo 
THE RAVE 

CRAWLING KINGSNAKES 
PORNOGRAPHIC SHAKESPEARE: 
Lee's 

JJANSLQ MRKS: Horsesho e til Tues 
V DU R U TTlCoT uMr^Jl^j ga^ 
FREoTbiCYCLEREPA I R SHOP: K\vo\\ 
THE BIG CHILL: elMocambo til Sat 
STICKLEBACKS: Isabella 
CAMEO BLUES BAND: 

Albert's Hall til Sat 
CASUAL CASUAL: Cameron 
MICHAEL PICKETT: 

Grossman's til Wed 
CROWBAR: Clintons til Sat 
Maniac Monday: Key West 

Tuesday 18 

HUNTERS & COLLECTORS: RPM 
SHERRY KEAN & THE KINGS: Copa 
ARTHUR BLYTHE 
SHUFFLE DEMONS: Bamboo 
REDLIFE, ALL THE RAGE 
BOP TOTEM: Lee's 
I WANT 

THOUGHT ROCKETS: lldikos 
Trinity Video: Rivoli 
ABSOLUTE WHORES: Isabella 
DANNY MARKS: Horseshoe 
THE GUNNERS: Cabana Cafe 
HUMAN INTEREST: Cameron 
BLOOZE BANDITS: Key West 

Wednesday 19 

MERCURY FESTIVAL: Horseshoe 
A night of Mystery: Rivoli 
THE FATALES, THE BLOW 
ONE FREE FALL: Lee's 
ROCK N REAL 

PHANTOM BUFFALOS: Bamboo 
MORGAN DAVIS BAND: 

Isabella til Sat 
HANDSOME NED: lldikos 
NATIONAL VELVET: Diamond 
RONALD SHANNON JACKSON 
NOT KING FUDGE; B am boo 
50F3? STURM GR 
CRQQKXRELIGION: RPM 
CKA5S: RnRTleHv^i 
COWBOY JUNKIES: Key West 

Thursday 20 

CALLING RAIN 
MANNIQUIN PARTY: Lee's 
WORLD SAXOPHONE QUARTET 
PAUL CRAM: Bamboo 
Trinity Video: Rivoli 
OCTOBER CRISIS, 63 MONROE: 
lldikos 

GOOD THING, THE MANIACS: 
Cabana 

WOMAN & CHILDREN: Cameron 
MICHEAL PICKETT: Isabella Lower 
- x APHANTOMS: Grossman's 
BIG TWIST: Horsehoe 
MAGGOT FODDER: Key West 
MONUU COMBO: Pinetree til Sat 

Friday 21 

PURSUIT OF HAPPINESS: Cameron 
SHEEP LOOK UP: Rivoli 
BRATTY: Lee's 

DEFUNKT, GOTHAM CITY: Bamboo 
NORTHERN STAR: Isabella (Lower) 

BIG TWIS T: Horsesho e 

g^AB^^YMENjjrabana tit SaD 

GO FOR THREE: Level 21 
UKASE, ALTOGETHER MORRIS: 

Key West 

Saturday 22 

NO MIND, NEON ROME: Rivoli 
HANDSOME NEDS: lldikos 
I WANT: Isabella Lower 
MORGAN DAVIS: Isabella Cameo 
SHADOWY MEN: Cabana 
CHESTERFIELD KINGS, I WANT 
GROOVY RELIGION: Lee's 
JAMES BLOOD ULMER 
WHITENOISE: Bamboo 
CEEDEES: Cameron 


SWING HA -> 

Toronto Pops Orchestra: Massey Hall 
PHANTOMS: Grossman's 
CAMEO BLUES BAND: Albert's Hall 
CROWBAR: Clinton's 
FUNDAMENTALS 
GRANNY'S GUMS: Key West 

Sunday 23 

ROLF KEMP: Grossman's 
Blues Jam, Talent Showcase: Lee's 
FUNDAMENTALS: Key West 

Monday 24 

DAVID GIBSON: Horseshoe 
FRED'S BICYCLE REPAIR SHOP: Rivoli 
PAUL JAMES: Clintons til Sat 
THOUGHT ROCKETS, CERAFIM 
THE RISK: Lee's 
DANNY MARKS: Isabella 
MARGIE EVANS: Albert's Hall 
COCADA: Bamboo 
BIG CHILL: Grossmans til Wed 
CASUAL CASUAL: Cameron 

Tuesday 25 

The Blue Wall: Rivoli 
FAST FORWARD, CIRCUIT BREAKER 
lldikos 

DANNY MARKS: Isabella 

DAVID & DAVID, PETER CASE: Copa 

DIXON HALL, SUNFORCE: Bamboo 

LISTEN: Cabana Cafe 

BaNANA BOAT: Pinetree til Thu 

Wednesday 26 

DOUG SAHM: Horseshoe til Fri 
THE THROBS, SUCSEX: RnR Heaven 
GARBAGEMEN: Cameron 
PETER GABRIEL: Maple Leaf Gardens 
NEW ORDER, BODINES: 

Massey Hall 

DITHER, PRAYING FOR RAIN 
PIG FARM-: Cabana 
OTTIS GAYLE: Bamboo 
■ UGENE RIPPER, THE PRESS: Lee's 
SUBTERRANIANS: lldikos 
JOHNNIE LOVESIN: Isabella til Sat 

Thursday 27 

PETER GABRIEL: Maple Leaf Gardens 
ROBERT CRAY 
ALBERT COLLINS: Diamond 
STRANGER THAN FICTION 
CHESHYRES: Cabana 
BERLIN, THE RAINMAKERS: Cabana 
BOFG: Lee's 

COMPANY TOWN: Cameron 
FLYING DEBRIS: Grossman's til Sat 
OTTIS GAYLE: Bamboo 
THE PHANTOMS: lldikos 
GUNNER: Isabella Lower 
GEORG t OLIVER & 

GANG BUSTER: Pinetree til Sat 

Friday 28 

HOPPING PENGUINS: 

Horseshoe til Sat 
BREEDING GROUND: Lee's 
SLAYER: Concert Hall 
GROOVY RELIGION: Cameron 
PRINCE CHARLES: Bamboo 
THE STEEL LIFE, BAKKA PO: Cabana 
SLAYER: Concert Hall 
FLESHTONES, SARIN VX 
MUSE: lldikos 
PAUL JAMES: Clintons 
MARGIE EVANS: Albert's Hall 
ABSOLUTE WHORES: Isabella Lower 
JOHNNIE LOVESIN: Isabella Cameo 

Saturday 29 

PRINCE CHARLES: Bamboo 
JEFFERY HATCHER: Cameron 
BREEDING GROUND: Lee's 
MARGIE EVANS: Albert's Hall 
PURSUIT OF HAPPINESS 
STICKLEBACKS: Cabana 
HOPPING PENGUINS: Horseshoe 
PAUL JAMES: Clintons 
DEMI MONDE: lldikos 
BOP TOTEM: Isabella Lower 
DEJA VOODOO, SHADOWY MEN 
DUNDRELLS, 

10 COMMANDMENTS 
DIK VAN DYKES: RPM 
JOHNNIE LOVESIN: Isabella 

Sunday 30 

Blues Jam, Talent Showcase: Lee's 
BILLY BRAGG 
SAX PISTOLS: Diamond 




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BAMBOO— 312 QUEEN W 593-5771 
BIG BOP— 651 QUEEN W. 366-6699 
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NERVE - November 1986 - pg.22 



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mum 

HHl 

RICK ROCK steps into an orgasmatron and gets Motorhead ^ 


while no commendation lor PTA 
approval, quite a bit tamer. But 
that’s real life, and it has very 
little to do with rock and roll. 

On the phone from New 
Orleans, Phil Campbell is 
recovering from the riot that 
ended the previous night's con* 
cert. Isn’t there, perhaps, some 
exaggeration involved In 
Motorhead 's olher worldly — or 
better yet — under-worldly im- 
age? 

“No, not really. It’s lire way 
we dre. it’s pretty natural, h 
don't know what image the kids 
have of us. They make the im- 
age what they want. Things that 
get wrote about and stuff, 
sometimes it’s over the top. 
Things are brought out more 
than they really are, but It’s not 
an impediment to us at all. We 
just go about like this. We enjoy 
It. There’s no problem.” 


What’s impressive about 
Motorhead is that, unlike 
numerous chain and hide swath- 
ed outfits proliferating like mu- 
tant rabbits In today’s stagnant 
metal scene, their records live 
up to the malevolent promise 
that Lemmy’s snarling, wart- 
cratered face holds. Their latest 
IP, the promisingly tilled 
Orgasmatron* Is every bit the 
pummeiing. blood-curdling 
experience that the name 
anticipates. 

From the opening track on- 
wards, everything seems to get 
louder, more Intense, denser, j 
Lemmy tips off his debt to the 
Beatles (his favorite band) by 
structuring the songs simply and 
classically, a far cry from the 
nearly formless thrash opuses of 
bands like Metallica and 
Mpgadeth. Underneath all that 
howling and roaring, there lurks 


actual melodies , and a loving 
devotion to good old pop music. 

“We haven’t changed for 
anyone,” Phil tells me, by way 
of explanation. “People think 
you've got to advance or 
whatever. But if you don’t do a 
good thing, then why advance? 
Some bands maybe try to ad- 
vance too much.” 

Just what I was thinking, Phil,, 

I don’t want Motorhead to 
change, noi one bit. Why, even 
employing Bill taswefl, a man 
whose credentials in hip hop, 
a fro beat and j an are impeccable 
and, shudder, even a bit artistic, 
only served to make 
Motorhead 's attack more over- 
powering, more insidious. An 
elegant melding of intellectualism 
and brute force, of aesthetic 
elitism and adolescent 
populism; the creation of the 
perfect Beastl 


“He’s just got this vision, 

Bill,” Campbell explains. “He 
can see music, like. Strange 
guy. Great bloke.” 

I hear you, Phil. But I keep 
thinking, is ft all too good to be 
true? More than mere riff-rakers 
like AC/DC, or peddlers of 
velocity like Metallica, 

Motorhead are the very embodi- 
ment of Rock and Roll's innate 
fury, shorn of specifics of time 
and age, pushing against the 
envelope into pure abstraction. 

But Lemmy, my man, he could 
be my lather! I’ll never forget 
my disappointment upon hearing 
!he band's cover of ’Louie 
Louie*' What could have been a 
shock to.the very fabric of the 
cosmos, a wholehearted em- 
brace of a song whose am- 
biguous threat has made it a 
universal symbol of that little bit 
of the uncivilized abyss in all of 
us, was merely a rote run- 
through, an uninspired regres- 
sion into the temporality of the 
garage. What I want to know, 

Phil, is could Motorhead, would 
Motorhead ever record a ballad? 

“ ’Ain’t My Crime,’ ” Phil 
says, referring to one of 
Orgasmatron’s most intense 
tracks. “If you listen to the 
lyrics on that, that’s a 
Motorhead love song, actually. I 
don’t know. If we were in the 
mood one day we’d write a 
ballad, see what came out, like. 
But we like something that kicks 
ass. That’s what we get off on, 
like. We just like playing fast.” 

Now I think we’re really 
rockin’l A Motorhead love song, . 
or is it a Motorhead Love song? 
Are we all capable of something 
as overwhelming, as furious as 
Motorhead Love? Not the sound 
of violins, but ot triple-tracked 
distortion, earth-fusing per- 
cussive bellows, and mutual 
shrieks of passion that would 
force cats to burrow into their 
Own navel? I know I’m ready; 
how about you? 

“We've started sellin’ 
earplus at the gigs now,” Phil 
Informs me. “Motorhead ear 
plugs." 

There it is! Can’t you see it? I 
was rightl I knew I was right all 
along! 

Motorhead loves you. You are 
saved. You can go now. 


“Last night the stage 
crew got drunk, and the 
kids just kept scrammin’ 
up on the stage, and we 
had to give ’em a warn- 
ing. They were spjttin’ 
and jumpin’ up and 
started to trash some of 
the monitors and lights 
and things and we walked 
off. And Lemmy came 
back on and said ‘Look, 
we’ll carry oh if you’ll 
just behave yourselves.’ 

“So then we came back 
on and started to play ‘Killed 
By Death' and then 
microphones started to hit 
Lemmy in the mouth and 
stuff-and we walked off and 
they started riotin’. These 
kids, they were screamin’ at' 
us, they were tryln’ to follow 
us back to the hotel. They 
were really wild, these kids. 
This has nothin’ to do with 
us. They started pinging the 
security guards with trun- 
cheons and stuff. They 
smashed up the road crew’s 
bus. All we wanted tohdo 
was play rock and roll here. 

I can’t understand it why 
kids do such things.” 

That’s Phil Campbell, 
Motorhead guitarist. 


I like Motorhead, and why 
not? I like rock and roll, and I 
like It loud. I regard Mutorhead 
as the must logical link In a 
chain of figures starting with 
Jerry Lee Lewis and Gene Vin- 
cent, screaming on through the 
Rolling Stones and the Stooges, 
and skidding to the present day 
with a band that lays claim to 
the greatest name and ugliest 
lead singer of the whole lot. 

All of these bands bear the 
whiff ot something unmistakably 
evil, and amongst their contem- 
poraries, they are Ihe ones most 
likely to piss oti, nauseate, or 
generally scare the shit out at 
the nearest authority figure. In 
short— the essence of Reck and 
Roll. No glass is too empty, no 
drug too mind-wrenching, no 
groupie too ugly, no speed other 
than full-tilt. And no one does It 
like Motorhead. 

Of course, this Is all image, 
and the truth often proves to be, 


twit 




In Blah Blah Blah, there's a line that goes 
“From napalm to nice guy." Does that refer to 
you? 

“A lot of people thought that. No, I took that 
line from an article about the public relations 
efforts of the Dow Chemical Company, to 
change their Image after the Vietnamese war. 
It was in Fortune or some sort of publication 
that covers the exciting world of corporate Im- 
age. 

"I thought: Christ, how dare they say that? 
“From Napalm to Nice Guy.” Gimme a break! 
The article wa9 about Dow running ads trying 
to entice talented college grads to come and 
work for this company that had a horrible im- 
age. So they were putting out these ads: 
“Dow. Doing wonderful things to make it a 
beautiful new wprld." So I threw that into the 
song. It's indicative of a trend right now; all 
the big corporations, as they become more 
powerful, become more concerned with 
public image. Basically, I think they're ner- 
vous-nervous with their power." - 

There have been complaints that your new 
album is over-produced. 

“You'd have to talk to the producer about 
that (laughs). It's not my job." 

I guess a lot of people miss the crazy spon- 
taneity of the Stooges. 

“It's not a Stooges' record." 


Are you still including Stooges songs in your 
live show? 

“Of course I am. Right now, we've been at it 
for eight days and we know about 26 songs. 
Obviously, a lot of those'll be Stooges songs." 

Since Raw Power, you seem to have been 
trying to wind down and make sense of those 
crazy days. It seems like the Stooges exert a 
gravitational pull you can't get away from. 

“I understand what you’re saying. That's 
kinda true, yeah. Once you have lived as 'full- 
tilt' as I have, if you can continue to live and 
still be in an expressive situation, a lot of what 
you express is gonna be coloured by that in- 
itial experience. For instance, I've worked 
very, very hard these last few months. Long 
days. I’m very proud of that, and there’s a lot 
of energy that I've put out. But I can't help but 
sometimes sit back and remember this other 
guy who I was. Y’know, you'd have to light a 
fire under the guy to get him to do any work 
(laughs). In a way, it was more like the fits and 
starts of a manic kind of genius. I dunno, it's 
actually hard to talk about myself in that way. 
But yeah, whatever the question 
was.. .(laughs)" 

You talk of that “other person." Don't you 
see a continuity between him and the person 
I’m talking to now? 

“There's a continuity, and the tFick has 
been this: when I started out, I was this guy, 
and I didn't want to sit in an office and be told 
what I was supposed to be good at. I saw 
music as something that dealt In feelings and 
that made me feel very alive when L did it, I 
didn't have any idea whether I would be good ' 
at it or not. I'd only played in a high school 
band, y’know. I was not a musical virtuoso or 
some child genius. But I knew I wanted to be 
a writer of some sort, anyway. 


“Ever since then it's been a struggle for me 
to write and perform the best possible work, 
and get away with it. Which means you’ve 
gotta go out, and hustle up a record company 
and get 'em to believe in you. You gotta find 
money to buy some amps or whatever it is 
you need to do yourjob. 

“Now it's on a much grander scale, but it's 
basically the same dilemma. It's like fighting 
to maintain the peculiar equilibrium that it 
takes to be dealing in what is basically a mass 
art, even at the underground level.” 

Would you still describe yourself as an “in- 
ternational garbageman"? 

“No, I wouldn't. But you can take a line from 
the album. There must be several. A “bull 
mongrel;" that's in Blah Blah Blah." 

What kind of music have you been listening 
to? 

“The Smiths, The Cure, Big Audio ' 
Dynamite, Siouxsie and the Banshees. Other 
than that, a lot of Mile Davis, new and old, and 
still a lot of free jazz from the '60s. 

You dedicated your autobiography l Need 
More to Keith Richards. What is it you like 
about him? sj 

“It was him, more than anything else, that 
pushed me into this way of life. It was what I 
heard in his guitar playing, and the song 
structures of the Rolling Stones early on. 
Those ( albums were like the bible to me. 

Those first four or five Stones albums and 
about the first five Dylan albums were played 
over and over until lo this day I know every 
word, every inflection, every note. Something 
in that music that just gave me the extra little 
force I needed to sort of break out of the sen- 
sible boundaries of my environment and take 
a chance on my imagination. I guess that's 


what I'm trying to say; if you want to find a 
connection between .the other guy and this 
guy, it's that I'm still making up my own life 
through the force of my own imagination and 
trying to manifest it strongly enough so that 
other people will accept it. 

You’re about to turn 40. Is that a traumatic 
turning point? 

“No, I sing better now than I did a couple of 
years ago, and I don't see any reason for the 
trend riot to continue. I think rock & roll has 
never been a particularly youth experience, 
the only ‘youth’ singers that have been push- 
ed have been all the crummy ones, like David 
Cassidy, Frankie Avalon, Fabian and all that 
shit. Otherwise, it’s really had nothing to do 
with that, except when it's exploited in a- 
mistaken fashion. I don't care if I'm young or 
old as long as I like myself." 

You’ve always admired Frank Sinatra. 

Could you see yourself doing a whole album 
of that kind of stuff? 

"Yeah, I could actually. That’s probably how 
I would approach it, as a separate album." 

I'm not trying to make a connection bet- 
ween that and getting old, by the way. 

“I don’t mind if- you do! It's all right with me. 
When I was 19 and planning to become a 
lead vocalist, there were three albums that ! 
chose and I would sing along with them in the 
halls trying to master the phrasing and the 
vocal inflections. The first Them album by Van 
Morrison and his band, there was the Rolling 
Stone's first album, and there was September 
Of My Years by Frank Sinatra. When I first 
heard Sinatra I was four years old, and I 
recognized it was great. 1 don't care about 
whether it’s young or old: Great is great. 
Anyway, I gotta go." 








NERVE - November 1986 7 pg.23 


/■ 





* 

* 



DiAlilOnD 






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They're back & hotter than ever... New LP: “Bridges Over Borders 

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