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tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  August 10, 2017 2:07am-3:59am EDT

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peninsula could lead to a refugee crisis along the 49-mile border it shares with north korea. next week, north korea celebrates its liberation day holiday. which some analysts believe could lead kim jung-un, to launch a missile or conduct a sixth underground nuclear test. now, north korea just released a new statement, in it they say that president trump, "let out a load of nonsense about fire and fury." and that dialogue is not possible with such a guy, bereft of reason. north korea not yet ready to talk. >> been tracy in beijing. thank you, ben. >> and we're back in just a moment.
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>> announcer: this is the cbs "overnight news." we turn now to veteran diplomat bill richardson, former u.s. ambassador to the united nations, and an expert on north korea. mr. ambassador, where do we go after fire and fury? what's the best option for the u.s. now? >> the best option is di policemdiplomacy. continued sanctions see if they work, continue to pressure china, continue the military exercises. but find a way to talk to the north koreans. >> kim jung-un, hasn't shown a lot of interest in diplomacy to this point. >> we don't know what he wants. he is an unpredictable character. we don't know what his intentions are. he wants to stay in powe
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knows that he can hit the united states with a missile, he can start negotiating. that's what, the way his father was. but i think keeping -- keeping the talk about preemptive military strikes, and the president's very incendiary statement which was not helpful its not the way to go. >> what do you make of north korea's threat toward guam? >> this is part of their foreign policy. however, the intensity of at take, the specificity bothers me. the fact that the foreign minister himself, reasonable guy. i have dealt with. foreign minister ri was so intense, just a little worried that that intensity is a little too strong. what you don't want to have is a miscalculation. >> what's the risk here that we can start a war by accident? >> the risk is strong. a fishing boat is shot by the north koreans. airspace is invaded. and north koreans react.
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everybody is trying to out-macho each other. >> lastly, mr. ambassador, u.s. intelligence seem to be surprise by the technical advances in north korea. does that worry you? >> that worries me. we should have been on this long ago. we should consider finding ways to put more intelligence overflights, more spies, because we were caughtoff guard. that is a massive intelligence failure that should never have pep again. >> ambassador bill richardson. thank you for joining us. >> thank you. thank you. >> now to the special counsel investigation of russian meddling in the u.s. election and whether any one in the trump administration was involved. we learned today that the fbi paid a visit two weeks ago to a home of paul manafort, former trump campaign chairman in alexandria, virginia. >> reporter: armed with a search warrant, federal agents showed
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through paul manafort's home an aggressive move in an escalating investigation. paul manafort spokesman, jason maloni confirmed the search and emfa si emfa si em emphasized he cooperated. special counsel robert mueller doesn't trust paul manafort. >> they are concerned about possible evidence destruction. >> reporter: a former justice department prosecutor. >> i think that the takeaway is that they felt they weren't getting -- full cooperation. because if they did, they wouldn't feel the need to, to take the step of getting a search warrant. >> the day before his home was searched, paul manafort met with senate investigators to discuss the june 2016 meeting at trump power organized by donald trump jr. to meet a russian attorney who apparently had damaging information
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the special counsel is looking into paul manafort's business dealings. in criminal investigations, prosecutors try to flip witnesses in exchange for their cooperation, they lessen their legal liabilities. mueller could be trying to do that now to pressure paul manafort. >> if they think he has information about the campaign, they would undoubtedly squeeze him for that. he would be in position from a prosecutor standpoint to tell you, what is going on. who was doing what. who knew what, when? >> paul manafort was officially part of the trump campaign, five months. campaign chairman for three. this development another sign of how close this investigation is hitting to the president's inner circle. the special counsel's office declined to comment. anthony. >> thank you. in pittsburgh today, 18 members of a swat team were rushed to a hospital after a drug raid that exposed them to a chemical, possibly, fentanyl. an opioid, at least
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more potent than heroin. officers reported feeling dizzy, numb. were medically cleared. four people arrested in connect, with the raid. this could be the most active hurricane season in the atlantic since 2010. scientists at noa, predict as many as 19 named storms end of november. so far, six. the latest hurricane, franklin, expected to hit the gulf coast of mexico tonight. with heavy rain and gusts up to 90 miles an hour. the devastating floods that swamped new orleans last weekend cost a number of officials their jobs. the demarco morgan is there. >> reporter: as heavy rains saturday created flooding scenes reminiscent of hurricane katrina, 20e of the city's 121 drainage pumps were out of commission. joe becker initially told us monday the pumping stations were working at full ka ps tee. >> no problems
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operating. but the following day, at a city council meeting he was forced to backtrack. >> we fried to say, was trying to say, that, that, that we used the available pumping capacity to fullest extent. >> reporter: with nearly ten inches of rain, three hours, becker said the pumps wefr overwhelmed. some were offline due to maintenance. one pump station operated at 52% capacity. now two officials in charge of the pumping and drainage systems are out. the mayor asked for more resignations. >> when you have credibility issued auz around anything. you have to do that. >> this is unacceptable on every level. >> reporter: frustrated presidents like these two, demanded answers. >> if we blood like this in a new orleans summer rain storm. what's going to happen in the hurricane. >> dewayne
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the mess left in his groeshy store. >> filthy water. all under the shelves. it got in some of the coolers. anything that touched, got to throw it away. >> reporter: it could take months to scum pleemonth s complete repairs. if thefulps were working full capacity they were no match for the pasttok -- historic storm. >> thanks, demarco. coming up next, why dr. jon lapook says stroke rates are dropping for men, but not women.
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a study out today finds the stroke rate for men is falling. but rate for women is staying the same. we asked dr. jon lapook to look night. >> reporter: in 2013, diana hardiman was 30 years old, a vegetarian, a nonspoker, a surfer and the picture of health. until, she had a stroke. >> the paralysis ended up seeping down from my arm to my leg. leaving the whole right side of my body, basically immobile. i thought, maybe i am becoming pair liesed. or, potentially, seeing death. >> reporter: that had to be terrifying for you? >> it was terrifying. >> reporter: hardiman is an example of a troubling fund. from 1999 to 2005, the
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from 2005 to 2010, while the rates among men continued to drop, they stayed the same for women. and women's hospital, says risk factors for stroke, obesity, high blood pressure and irregular heartbeat and diabetes may for some reason affect women differently than men. >> diabetes is a strong risk factor for stroke in both men and women. but in women, the risk is 26% higher than in men with diabetes. >> hardiman recovered and went back to her gourmet ice cream business in brooklyn. last june she had a second stroke. >> i had to stop being ceo of my ice cream business, start being ceo of my health. and put that as my priority. which i did. >> this time, doctors found the cause. a small hole in her heart, and repaired it. >> when i was told that i had a stroke, i have always
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it with the elderly. something that your grandmother has, but never thought, it would be something that would happen to me. >> reporter: you can remember symptoms of a stroke using the word fast. if you get to the hospital, quickly enough, doctors may be able to limit permanent damage by using medicine to dissolve a blood clot in the brain. >> knowing the symptoms can literally save your life. jon, thank you. coming up. a jersey boy on broadway. ♪ ♪ how your clothes smell can say at lot about you. that's why new downy protect and refresh conditions fibers to lock out odors. so clothing odors don't do the talking for you. lock out odors with new downy protect and refresh. clearasil rapid action begins working fast for clearly visible results in as little as 12 hours.
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tiger woods charged with reckless driving in florida agreed to a plea deal today. in may the former top golfer was found asleep in his mercedes, 15 miles from his home. he said he had taken painkillers and sleeping pills. no alcohol was found in his system. woods could have his record wiped clean after he gets counseling and performs community service. it was a tremendous discovery. largest dinosaur known to man. and now it has a sigh yn ticien name. it roamed the earth 100 million years ago. bones dug up in argentina. a fiberglass copy of the skeleton lives at the museum of natural history in new york. it was 120 feet long, 10 feet longer than a begonia 737, the plant-eating giant weighed 70 tons. heavier than 15 african
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the cbs
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another jersey boy headed to broadway. bruce springsteen announced he will play an eight week solo run. he said the show this fall will be, me, the guitar, the piano and word and music. springsteen said it loosely follows the arc of his life and work. got to get a ticket to that. up next, the story that may inspire you to change your passwords.
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finally tonight they test our patience and memories. computer password make them complicated and change them often we were told. now the man who said that is telling us he got it wrong. here is jim axelrod. >> reporter: formulating the strings of numbers, letters and symbols into pass words is a fact of modern day life. >> it is pretty annoying. >> pretty annoying. >> though not particularly popular one. >> super annoying because then i have to remember what the new password is going to be. >> count bill behr among the bothered. >> it frustrates everybody me included. >> you included. >> oh, sure. >> which is really something when you kid behr its the father of the modern day password. >> i have maybe 200 pass words. i can't remember all of those. obviously. >> 14 years ago, writing the official guidance for government employees,
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picking random combinations and changing them often. but it turns out, something like this, is a lot harder to hack than something like this. >> it is probably better to do fairly long pass words that are phrases or something like that. that you can remember. than to try to people to do lots of funny character. >> couple months back, the guidelines were rewritten to reflect this discovery. behr is now retired. but he helped out. >> do you have any regrets about the original guidance you furnished? >> yeah, i do. i think i, i could have done a better job of, figuring out some of the things that we now know or at least of guessing them. >> if only regret was easy to forget as password he helped create. jim axelrod, nbc news, new york. >> that's the "overnight news" for thursday. for some the news continues. for others check back
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the morning news and of course, cbs this morning. from the broadcast center in new york city,'m iho antny mason. thank you for joining us. welcome. i'm jericka duncan. the nuclear standoff with north korea is rattling capitals from washington to beijing and moscow to tokyo. so far, it's just a war of words between president trump and north korean president, kim kim, but the tiny pacific island of guam finds itself in the cross hairs and people there are taking this seriously. are we headed for a nuclear confrontation? david martin begins our coverage. >> reporter: defense secretary mattis, warned north korea to cease consideration of actions that would lead to the end of its regime and the destruction of its people. that doomsday warning came a day after north korea threatened to
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american air base on the pacific island of guam. the island is american territory and will be protected by the military. >> i reached out to the white house this morning. an attack or threat on guam is a threat or attack on the united states. >> i have reached out to the white house this morning. an attack or threat on guam is a threat or attack on the united states. >> north korea made the threat after b-1 bombers had flown from guam over the korean peninsula in what has become a standard show of force in response to north korea's missile tests. returning from asia, secretary of state tillerson was asked if americans should be worried. >> i think americans should sleep well at night. >> mattis issued his warning before touring the uss kentucky. a ballistic missile submarine which could annihilate north korea. last summer, 60 minutes went aboard the kentucky on patrol in the pacific. it can carry almost 200 nuclear warheads atop the missiles
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captain. >> warheads can be carried on the missiles are extremely powerful. >> compare them to the bomb that leveled hiroshima. >> much more powerful than that. much more powerful than hiroshima. >> reporter: on any given day, several of the submarines are hiding some where in the world's oceans. >> send the general alarm, sir. >> drilling to respond to a launch order from the president. pentagon official say no new military orders have been issued. despite the warlike rhetoric on both sides. but they warn, tensions are likely to remain high, since the u.s. is scheduled to conduct an annual military exercise in south korea. later this month. the current nuclear tension comes as japan marked solemn occasion. 72 years since an atomic bomb leveled nagasaki. ben tracy in beijing
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from asia. >> reporter: south korea's president says he will allow the u.s. to fully deploy the antiballistic missile system known as thad. in his country. it comes as he is calling for a complete overhaul of south korea's military. president trump's fire and fury comments led to a large protest march in north korea. orchestrated by the regime. in japan, trump's words came on the anniversary of the american atomic bomb in nagasaki, a reminder of what is at stake. japan's lawmakers are pushing for new weapons that could allow it to launch preemptive strike on north korea. china is warning both kim jung-un, regime, and the u.s. to ton down the rhetoric. in a statement to cbs news, china's foreign ministry called it highly sensitive and that all side should stop provoking each
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>> china does not want north korea to have nuclear weapons. but says the problem should be solved diplomatically. it fears a war in the korean peninsula could lead to a refugee crisis along the 49-mile border it shares with north korea. next week, north korea celebrates its liberation day holiday. which some analysts believe could lead kim jung-un, to launch a missile or conduct a sixth underground nuclear test. now, north korea just released a new statement, in it they say that president trump, "let out a load of nonsense about fire and fury." and that dialogue is not possible with such a guy, bereft of reason. it appears, north korea not yet ready to talk. >> a police officer in louisiana is suing ford for an accident involving her squad car. carbon monoxide has apparently been seeping into the cabins of many ford explorers and a federal investigation is now under way. chris van scleef has the latest from heso
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damage to this police interceptor. the officer driving said it had been on the road nine months before she says she apparently blacked out behind the wheel and crashed. her department asked for a special blood test. and it showed, car been monoxide. >> reporter: in april witnesses say this ford explorer slowly drifted off the road believer flipping on to its side. >> when you look at your cruiser, what's going through your moiind? >> i don't know how tie lived through that. i shouldn't be standing here today. >> reporter: officer brandy sickey doesn't remember the crash. the steering wheel is bent from where she hit it. her hair is in the windshield. >> i drove into town. i drove, had a bunch of people. and -- i, got on the highway. and, i don't rememberen off that. >> no recollection whatsoever. >> none. none. >> the national highway traffic safety adminiti
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investigating thousand of reports of exhaust, which contains carbon monoxide, seeping into the cabins of police interceptors and civilian explorers. while, they have received reports of three crashes in 41 injuries, investigators say so far, there is no actual evidence that they were the result of carbon monoxide poisoning. medical records show doctors diagnosed her with carbon monoxide poisoning. two hours after the crash her blood show poe p ted dangerous >> there is no source the car been monoxide got into her system other than the vehicle. and ntsa is aware of that. >> the medical records show presence of medication she's said were prescribed. doctors say they dent know if that could contribute to the crash. ford released images of what may be alug carbon monoxide to get into explorers. unsealed holes like this one. by a vehicle's
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spoiler. part of after purchase work done by third party contractors to install emergency equipment. but that does not explain the complaints of kpus in civilian explorers. >> what kind of patrol car do you drive now? >> 2017 ford explorer. >> back on the job and back behind the wheel of a police cruiser. >> make you nervous? >> yes, very. i have a carbon monoxide monitor. i want to get out. might be impacting my work. i never had to do that before. and i'm doing it now. >> reporter: ford maintains safety is its top priority. it is fixing police explorers, free of cost. and, maintains that, that civilian explorers, are safe to drive. ford declined comment on this case. in particular, because of the pending litigation. we asked them above the the injury reports. the agency said they would get back to us. >> the cbs "overnight news" will be right back.
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president trump has drawn a red line over north korea's threats to attack the united states with a nuclear weapon. republican senator lindsay graham is on the armed services committee, he also served 33 years in the air force, the reserves, and the national guard. he discussed the possibility of war on cbs this morning. >> there are two scenarios where we would go to war with north korea. they attack guam, or some other american interest, or allies, or if they tried to keep developing an icbm with nuclear weapon on top to hit the homeland we would act. president trump has basically drawn a red line, saying that he will never allow north korea to have an icbm missile that can
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weapon on top. he is not going to let that happen. he is not going to contain the threat. he is going to stop the threat. >> when you say that, president trump says that, there is at issue the question of how many people might die from a retaliation on south korea. >> yeah, general mattis described it well. a horrific war, unfortunately. we are headed that way unless north korea stops. put yourself in president trump's shoes for a moment. where does your allegiance lie? isn't your primary purpose as president of the united states, to protect the american homeland, from a nuclear weapon attack by a guy like kim jung-un? my belief is that we are headed that way unless the world can stop north korea. he is going to pick homeland defense over regional stability and he has to. for 30 years, this has failed. this is not a language problem. this is a north korean regime, trying to get the capability to strike america, the ultimate insurance policy for
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survivability. no president should allow this to happen weecht failed for 30 years. it is time to try something new. >> senator, secretary of state rex tillerson just landed in guam, speaking to reporters there. he said our telephone lines remain open. he says this is not an escalation. he said president trump was simply trying to speak in language that kim jung-unwould understand in terms of the rhetoric. does it seem to you like there is diplomatic progress? >> well, we had sanctions passed by the u.n. that were very tough. nikki hamy did a great job. secretary timerson is telling north korea there will not be a war to change a radioshame. there will not be a war to reunify the korean peninsula. we're not trying to invade. >> does contra bucket what the cia director said out at aspen. he said regime change actually its a u.s. goal. >> don't think it is the goal ofment american president to change the regime. the goal of the american president to stop north korea from having an
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america with wep nonon top. war would be likely to occur if they continue to threaten the homeland. i hope diplomacy will work. sanctions haven't worked before. man now. china should have more than, we got two bad options. that is to let them get a missile to hit america. or go to war to stop them. china should have two bad options. deal with the nut job in your backyard or realize there will be a war in your backyard. >> you think this was a message to china as well as north korea. >> yes, yes. time for talk is running out. i want to know what south korea and japan think about the miniaturizing of a weapon. don't want to trust one intel report. we learned from iraq you need to be cautious i've do believe, donald trump will not allow, kim jung-un, to get a missile. hit america with nuclear wecht upon on top. matter of time until the capability exists. hope we can do diplomacy. sanctions. war would be terri
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the region not here in america. >> i've don't know the exact nature of their missile program. i don't think, we have, very good eyes and ears on how far along they are. we know they're trying. it is a matter of type. like to hear from south korea and japan. just a matter of time until they get the capability. when putin says, that, that, you know he didn't interfere in our election. he is lying. when the ayatollah says he is not trying to build a nuclear bochlt he is lying. when, assad says he didn't use chemical weapons. he is lying. this man, kim jung-un, is not lying, he says he will build icbm with a nook leer weapon to hit america. i don't want to live for 50 years under that threat. heave will have a bomb with missiles if we don't stop him now. everything before did not work. i don't want him to get stronger over time. thousands of americans with life threatening allergies rely on the
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attacks. but when the price is spiked congress held hearings and alternatives came on the market. >> this 'tis the new ovi -- >> things changed in the year since we first visited the household in indianapolis. two of the six children have severe allergies. last year at this time. the parents were unhappy about the prices for their epipens. $600 for a two pack. >> weren't anticipating it being $600,000. >> right. >> under increased milan was forced to explain the price hikes. >> think they were charging too much at $6700. >> sir, we believe it was tear, now lowered by half. >> mylan launched generic for $300. and boosted coupon program to cut patients cost. cvs pharmacy, offered generic
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then they got a letter from their in shoouer. they're no longer going to be covering epipens. only the generic version. they have taken these off their plan. >> at their farm see. generics were out of stock. that's when they looked at it. >> this is very personal for us. >> aaron and invented it after growing up allergies. >> carry it in our pockets every day. >> every day. >> you are sa petszed to carry two. right. i have that as well. >> smaller and comes with its own voice instructions. basically any body who picks up the device is able to have a voice guiding them. what do i do next? >> i think that's key. all about confidence. and, we saw hesitation. >> that one is a lot bigger. so, this one its a little easier to hold. >> lexi henniger liked the product not the
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the list for -- >> that was disappointing. called me before they filled my prescription if i wanted them to fill it. but drugmakerer, stepped in with its affordability program. and the families out of pock emt cost went to 0. how is that possible? the ceo spencer williamson. >> the pricing reimbursement system in the country is broken. and, we're committed to always putting patients and families first. >> you have a drug that has a $4,500 price. how do people get that for free? >> so it is an access model. built, built for patients. and so, the way our program works, is that any one with commercial insurance. covered or not. even, they'll get it for 0. >> richard evans, pharmaceutical analyst from ssr health its skrept cal. >> only insurer that will say yes to a claim in a urld world where you can buy them for 09
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yet. >> the game. to gain market share, a company can give away most prescription for free and hope the insurers who do pay the higher prices make up for it. >> insane system. no rationale designer would sit down with a clean sheet of paper and say let's do it this way. >> somebody in the system. some where, pays for that high price? >> so, many plans cover the product because it is the right thing for their patients and physicians and enthusiastic about it. where plans don't cover it, the entity that steps in and pays is caleo. >> patients like the hennigers say they will take any break they can get. uh. >> up until now. there weren't any options for auto injectors. coach it will level the playing field and bring down prices.
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clearasil rapid action begins working fast for clearly visible results in as little as 12 hours. but will it stop this teen from chugging hot sauce? ...oh jeremy. so let's be clear: clearasil works fast on teen acne, not so much on other teen things. for years the kitkat one of the best selling candies in america. kids love them. adults maybe not so much. in japan, the kitkat is an obsession. mo rocca went abroad for a taste. >> reporter: at a stop in the bustling ginza district. luxury kitkats on full display. that's right. the mastermind behind the $5
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kitkat convections is this chef. in general, says the chef, the japanese prefer mild flavors rather than aggressive flavors. that hit you over the head. the chef's concocted kitkats with flavors like, matcha green tea, butter and strawberry maple. said rick lecorix is kit cat's man in japan. >> how big is kitkat in japan? >> up to 5 million kitkats a day in japan. it may be a case of kitkat, kitto-katto, sound like kitto-katsu in japanese means you surely will win. which explains why, for japanese students, during the high pressure exam season, the kitto-katto has become a kind of
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edible talisman. >> when it was discovered that the name meant surely you will win, then the company, shrewdly decided to capitalize on that. >> absolutely. absolutely. it became part of the company mission, to, to play this lucky charm. so kitkat mission in japan is really to, to, encourage people. >> and to sell some not so mildly flavored kitkats to tourists. anyone in the mood for a purple sweet potato kitkat. or bite of a refreshing apple kitkat. >> say a kitkat a day keeps the doctor away. ooh. >> or perhaps you would look to spice things up with a wasabi kitkat, go easy on the sake kitkat. >> we appeal more and more to foreigners. they have read on facebook. social media, the japanese kitkat was fantastic. they've come here. >> kitkat
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bringing it right? >> united color of kitkat. >> reporter: back in the kitchen, the chef indulged me as we went about creating a new premium kitkat. >> i know it sound crazy, could we mix the pistachio with the raspberry? >> ah. >> reporter: shall we give that a try? >> yes, yes, yes, yes, yes, yes. >> the color will probably be ghastly. but it smells good doesn't it? the color its awful, isn't it? try a taste. it's very good. it's very good. try it. >> mm. very good. [ speaking japanese ] >> that means delicious. behold, the
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uh went to a guide dog training center in new jersey to find out. >> reporter: at over seven weeks old, the golden retrievers and chocolate, black and yellow labs are in training as future guide dogs for the blind. here they learn to interact with others. adapt to new surroundings and remain calm under stress. skills that researchers have linked to how the puppies were raised. the new study finds more intense mothering was associated with programmed failure. and mothers whose nursing style required greater effort, were more likely to produce successful offspring. dr. dolores holly director of canine medicine and surgery at the seeing eye. >> one of the finding was that pup whose were
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overly mothered, their moms were, overly attentive to them. spending a lot of time with them. licking them. copiously. that those pups were not as likely to be selected as guides. >> researchers followed 98 puppies from bitter to adulthood. >> good boy. nice job, buddy. watching more than 115 hours of puppy cam individually to track different types of ma tern behavior. for example here the more attentive mom is lying down. along side her sleeping pups. while in this one, the mom taking a more tough love approach. gives her puppies space. to move around. the ability to overcome bstacles, whether to be find food or navigate a street curb is a key factor in the success of a seeing eye dog. instructors, joan marky says dogs who exhibit a fear of the unknown don't make the cut. >> if they're afraid of the
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world. they're not going to be a good guide. if they get worried, by loud traffic, people making loud noises, anything, that makes them afraid, to the point where they want to bolt and run. that would get them out of the program. >> but while the personality traits may not be desirable for guide dogs leading the blind. experts say, they could be well suited to other canine callings. clive winn is a dog behavior scientist. >> guide dogs have to be, very, very calm. whereas military working dogs have to be alert. very on the ball. very energetic. so, different, patterns of rearing, produce different outcomes in dogs. around 70% of dogs who enter guide dog training programs look this one, are successful. that number could go up. should less attentive parenting styles be encouraged by trainers, and adopted by dogs themselves. >> that's the overnight news for this thursday. for some of you, the news continues. for others, check back with us later for the morning
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of course, cbs this morning. from the broadcast center in new york city. i'm jericka duncan. turning up the heat. defense secretary mattis warns north korea against any action that could lead to the destruction of its people. north koreans take to the streets with anti-american protests. but calming word from secretary of state tillerson. >> the american people should sleellp weig tonht. >> also tonight the fbi raids the home of former trump campaign chairman paul manafort. >> suggests that they are concerned about possible evidence destruction. >> dr. jon lapook on why stroke
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rates are falling for men, but not women. >> never thought it would be something that would happen to me. >> and the man who said, make your passwords complicated, now says, he was simply wrong. ♪ ♪ >> announcer: this is the cbs "overnight news." the united states and north korea exchanged new warnings, the north threatening again to attack guam. the u.s. warning of a response that would knock out the communist regime and destroy its people. at the same time, the secretary of state tried to reassure americans, and the world, that we are not on the brink of nuclear war. it all b
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statement from the president that caught everyone including his advisers off-guard. here is chief white house correspondent major garrett. >> reporter: faced with new evidence of north korea's nuclear progress and knowing the president had grown weary of diplomatic nicities, they agreed on a tough statement. they didn't expect this. >> north korea, best not make any more threats to the united states. they will be met with fire and fury like the world has never seen. >> today, white house press secretary, sarah sanders said, advisers were aware of the president's tone beforehand, but the word were his own. it was left to secretary of state rex tillerson to explain the comments speaking while flying to guam for a refueling stop. tillerson said mr. trump was trying to get the attention of the north korean dictator who threatened the american territory. >> what the president was doing was send a strong message to north korea. in language that kim jung-un, would understand. he doesn't seem to understand diplomatic language. >> congressional reaction was critical of the president's fire and fury language. but supportive voices emerged to day. including republican senator, marco rubio. >> i don't think the rhetoric is a problem. the problem is there is a lunatic in north kor w
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>> the president ordered modern nation of the u.s. arsenal and touted its unmatched power. in fact, president obama who directed billions over many years to improve aging nuclear weapons and delivery and targeting systems. the president did order an overall review of u.s. nuclear strategy, earlier this year, advisers say the point of his rhetoric was to shift the conversation away from the u.s. being vulnerable to the stark military risks north korea faces if it doesn't change course. anthony. >> major garrett with the president in new jersey. thanks. >> the defense secretary reinforced the warning. >> reporter: defense secretary mattis, warned north korea to
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that would lead to the end of its regime and destruction of its people. the doomsday warning came a day after north korea threat tuned rain nuclear missiles on the american air base on the pacific island of guam. the governor of guam tried to assure residents, the island is american territory, and will be protected by the american military. >> i have reached out to the white house this morning. an attack or threat on guam is a threat or attack on the united states. >> north korea made the threat after b-1 bombers had flown from guam over the korean peninsula in what has become a standard show of force in response to north korea's missile tests. returning from asia, secretary of state tillerson was asked if americans should be worried. >> i think americans should sleep well at night. >> mattis issued his warning before touring the uss kentucky. a ballistic missile submarine which could annihilate north korea. last summer, 60 minutes went aboard the kentucky on patrol in the pacific. it can carry almost 200 nuclear
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loaded beneath the hatches. commander brian frek was the captain. >> warheads can be carried on the missiles are extremely powerful. >> compare them to the bomb that leveled hiroshima. >> much more powerful than that. much more powerful than hiroshima. >> reporter: on any given day, several of the submarines are hiding some where in the world's oceans. >> send the general alarm, sir. >> drilling to respond to a launch order from the president. pentagon official say no new military orders have been issued. despite the warlike rhetoric on both sides. but they warn, tensions are likely to remain high, since the u.s. is scheduled to conduct an annual military exercise in south korea. plater this month. anthony. >> david martin at the pentagon. thank you, david. >> there was sharp reaction in asia to the growing tension between the u.s. and north korea. ben tracy has that. >> south korea's president says he will now allow the u.s. to fully deploy the a
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missile system known as thad in his country. it comes as he is calling for a complete overhaul of south korea's military. president trump's fire and fury comments led to a large protest march in north korea. orchestrated by the regime. in japan, trump's words came on the anniversary of the american atomic bomb in nagasaki, a reminder of what is at stake. japan's lawmakers are pushing for new weapons that could allow it to launch preemptive strike on north korea. china is warning both kim jung-un, regime, and the u.s. to ton down the rhetoric. in a statement to cbs news, china's foreign ministry called it highly sensitive and that all side should stop provoking each other. >> china does not want north korea to have nuclear weapons. but says the pbl
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solved diplomatically. it fears a war in the korean peninsula could lead to a 900-mile border it shares with north korea. next week, north korea celebrates its liberation day holiday. which some analysts believe could lead kim jung-un, to launch a missile or conduct a sixth underground nuclear test. now, north korea just released a new statement, in it they say that president trump, "let out a load of nonsense about fire and fury." and that dialogue is not possible with such a guy, bereft of reason. north korea not yet ready to talk. >> been tracy in beijing. thank you, ben. >> and we're back in just a moment.
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we turn now to veteran diplomat bill richardson, former u.s. ambassador to the united nations, and an expert on north korea. mr. ambassador, where do we go after fire and fury? what's the best option for the u.s. now? >> the best option is diplomacy. continued sanctions see if they work, continue to pressure china, continue the military exercises. but find a way to talk to the north koreans. >> kim jung-un, hasn't shown a lot of interest in diplomacy to this point. >> we don't know what he wants. he is an unpredictable character. we don't know what his intentions are. he wants to stay in power. but i think in the end, once he
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states with a missile, he can start negotiating. that's what, the way his father was. but i think keeping -- keeping the talk about preemptive military strikes, and the president's very incendiary statement which was not helpful its not the way to go. >> what do you make of north korea's threat toward guam? >> this is part of their foreign policy. however, the intensity of at take, the specificity bothers me. the fact that the foreign minister himself, reasonable guy. i have dealt with. foreign minister ri was so intense, just a little worried that that intensity is a little too strong. what you don't want to have is a miscalculation. >> what's the risk here that we can start a war by accident? >> the risk is strong. a fishing boat is shot by the north koreans. airspace is invaded. and north koreans react. south koreans react. everybody is trying to out-macho each other
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>> lastly, mr. ambassador, u.s. intelligence seem to be surprise by the technical advances in north korea. does that worry you? >> that worries me. we should have been on this long ago. we should consider finding ways to put more intelligence overflights, more spies, because we were caughtoff guard. that is a massive intelligence failure that should never have pep again. >> ambassador bill richardson. thank you for joining us. >> thank you. thank you. >> now to the special counsel investigation of russian meddling in the u.s. election and whether any one in the trump administration was involved. we learned today that the fbi paid a visit two weeks ago to a home of paul manafort, former trump campaign chairman in alexandria, virginia. >> reporter: armed with a search warrant, federal agents showed up early in the morning to go
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through paul manafort's home an aggressive move in an escalating investigation. paul manafort spokesman, jason maloni confirmed the search and emphasized he cooperated. special counsel robert mueller doesn't trust paul manafort. >> they are concerned about possible evidence destruction. >> reporter: a former justice department prosecutor. >> i think that the takeaway is that they felt they weren't getting -- full cooperation. because if they did, they wouldn't feel the need to, to take the step of getting a search warrant. >> the day before his home was searched, paul manafort met with senate investigators to discuss the june 2016 meeting at trump power organized by donald trump jr. to meet a russian attorney who apparently had damaging information about hillary clinton. the special counsel is looking into paul manafort's business dealings.
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in criminal investigations, prosecutors try to flip witnesses in exchange for their cooperation, they lessen their legal liabilities. mueller could be trying to do that now to pressure paul manafort. >> if they think he has information about the campaign, they would undoubtedly squeeze him for that. he would be in position from a prosecutor standpoint to tell you, what is going on. who was doing what. who knew what, when? >> paul manafort was officially part of the trump campaign, five months. campaign chairman for three. this development another sign of how close this investigation is hitting to the president's inner circle. the special counsel's office declined to comment. anthony. >> thank you. in pittsburgh today, 18 members of a swat team were rushed to a hospital after a drug raid that exposed them to a chemical, possibly, fentanyl. an opioid, at least 50 times more potent than heroin. officers reported feeling dizzy,
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were medically cleared. four people arrested in connect, with the raid. this could be the most active hurricane season in the atlantic since 2010. scientists at noa, predict as many as 19 named storms end of november. so far, six. the latest hurricane, franklin, expected to hit the gulf coast of mexico tonight. with heavy rain and gusts up to 90 miles an hour. demarco morgan is there. the devastating floods that swamped new orleans last weekend cost a number of officials their jobs. demarco morgan is there. >> reporter: as heavy rains saturday created flooding scenes reminiscent of hurricane katrina, 20e of the city's 121 drainage pumps were out of commission. joe becker initially told us monday the pumping stations were working at full capacity.
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working at full ka ps tee. >> no problems with the bums. operating. but the following day, at a city council meeting he was forced to backtrack. >> we fried to say, was trying to say, that, that, that we used the available pumping capacity to fullest extent. >> reporter: with nearly ten inches of rain, three hours, becker said the pumps were overwhelmed. some were offline due to maintenance. one pump station operated at 52% capacity. now two officials in charge of the pumping and drainage systems are out. the mayor asked for more resignations. >> when you have credibility issues around anything. whether a big or small contributor, major event. you have to do that. >> this is unacceptable on every level. >> reporter: frustrated presidents like these two, demanded answers. >> if we blood like this in a new orleans summer rain storm. what's going to happen in the hurricane. >> dewayne budrea is cleaning
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store. >> filthy water. all under the shelves. it got in some of the coolers. anything that touched, got to throw it away. >> reporter: it could take month complete repairs. if thefulpres we working full capacity they were no match for the past weekend's hiss tok -- historic storm. >> thanks, demarco. coming up next, why dr. jon lapook says stroke rates are dropping for men, but not women. ♪ walter? hmm? is that the rest of our food? what? no. how come you have cheese in your beard? because switching to geico could save you 15% or more on car insurance. oh! ok. geico. because saving 15% or more on car insurance is always a great answer. whoa! gross!
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ter who was in there last. protection. new lysol power & fresh 6 goes to work flush after flush for a just-cleaned feeling that lasts up to 4 weeks. lysol. what it takes to protect. clearasil rapid action begins working fast for clearly visible results in as little as 12 hours. but can ot fix this teens skateboarding mishap? nope. so let's be clear: clearasil works fast on teen acne, not so much on other teen things.
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a study out today finds the stroke rate for men is falling. but rate for women is staying the same. we asked dr. jon lapook to look night. >> reporter: in 2013, diana hardiman was 30 years old, a vegetarian, a nonsmoker, a surfer and the picture of health. until, she had a stroke. >> the paralysis ended up seeping down from my arm to my leg. leaving the whole right side of my body, basically immobile. i thought, maybe i am becoming pair liesed. or, potentially, seeing death. >> reporter: that had to be terrifying for you? >> it was terrifying. >> reporter: hardiman is an example of a troubling fund. from 1999 to 2005, the incidence of stroke declined in men and women. from 200 2
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rates among men continued to drop, they stayed the same for women. dr. katherine rexroad of brigham and women's hospital, says risk factors for stroke, obesity, high blood pressure and irregular heartbeat and diabetes may for some reason affect women differently than men. >> diabetes is a strong risk factor for stroke in both men and women. but in women, the risk is 26% higher than in men with diabetes. >> hardiman recovered and went back to her gourmet ice cream business in brooklyn. last june she had a second stroke. >> i had to stop being ceo of my ice cream business, start being ceo of my health. and put that as my priority. which i did. >> this time, doctors found the cause. a small hole in her heart, and repaired it. >> when i was told that i had a stroke, i have always associated it with the elderly.
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has, but never thought, it would be something that would happen to me. >> reporter: you can remember symptoms of a stroke using the word fast. if you get to the hospital, quickly enough, doctors may be able to limit permanent damage by using medicine to dissolve a blood clot in the brain. >> knowing the symptoms can literally save your life. jon, thank you. coming up. a jersey boy on broadway. if you've got a life, you gotta swiffer clearasil rapid action begins working fast for clearly visible results in as little as 12 hours.
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by her parents? nope. so let's be clear: clearasil works fast on teen acne, not so much on other teen things. no matter who was in there last. protection. new lysol power & fresh 6 goes to work flush after flush for a just-cleaned feeling that lasts up to 4 weeks. lysol. what it takes to protect.
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♪ ♪ tiger woods charged with reckless driving in florida agreed to a plea deal today. in may the former top golfer was found asleep in his mercedes, 15 miles from his home. he said he had taken painkillers and sleeping pills. no alcohol was found in his system. woods could have his record wiped clean after he gets counseling and performs community service. it was a tremendous discovery. largest dinosaur known to man. and now it has a scientific name. it roamed the earth 100 million years ago. bones dug up in argentina. a fiberglass copy of the skeleton lives at the museum of natural history in new york. it was 120 feet long, 10 feet longer than a begonia 737, the plant-eating giant weighed 70 tons. heavier than 15 african
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will be right back. ♪ [electric guitar] caring - soft tone i just need a second. is your weight holding you back?
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another jersey boy headed to broadway. bruce springsteen announced he will play an eight week solo run. he said the show this fall will be, me, the guitar, the piano and word and music. springsteen said it loosely follows the arc of his life and work. got to get a ticket to that. up next, the story that may inspire you to change your passwords.
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finally tonight they test our patience and memories. computer password make them complicated and change them often we were told. now the man who said that is telling us he got it wrong. here is jim axelrod. >> reporter: formulating the strings of numbers, letters and symbols into pass words is a fact of modern day life. >> it is pretty annoying. >> pretty annoying. >> though not particularly popular one. >> super annoying because then i have to remember what the new password is going to be. >> count bill behr among the bothered. >> it frustrates everybody me included. >> you included. >> oh, sure. >> which is really something when you kid behr its the father of the modern day password. >> i have maybe 200 pass words. i can't remember all of those. obviously. >> 14 years ago, writing the official guidance for government employees, behr suggested picking random combinations and changing them often. but it turns out, something like this, is a lot harder to hack than something like this. >> it is probably better to do fairly long pass words that are phrases or something like that. that you can remember. than to try to people to do lots of funny character. >> couple months back, the guidelines were rewritten to reflect this discovery. behr is now retired. but he helped out. >> do you have any regrets about the original guidance you furnished? >> yeah, i do. i think i, i could have done a better job of, figuring out some he
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>> if only regret was easy to forget as password he helped create. jim axelrod, nbc news, new york. >> that's the "overnight news" for thursday. for some the morning news and o frs this morning. heom tad bro ccastenter in new york city, i'm anthony mason. thank you for joining us. welcome. i'm jericka duncan. the nuclear standoff with north korea is rattling capitals from washington to beijing and moscow to tokyo. so far, it's just a war of words between president trump and north korean president, kim kim, but the tiny pacific island of guam finds itself in the cross hairs and people there are taking this seriously. are we headed for a nuclear confrontation? david martin begins our coverage. >> reporter: defense secretary mattis, warned north korea to cease consideration of actions that would lead to the end of its regime and the destruction ts
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that doomsday warning came a day after north korea threatened to rain nuclear missiles on the american air base on the pacific island of guam. the island is american territory and will be protected by the military. >> i reached out to the white house this morning. an attack or threat on guam is a threat or attack on the united states. >> i have reached out to the white house this morning. an attack or threat on guam is a threat or attack on the united states. >> north korea made the threat after b-1 bombers had flown from guam over the korean peninsula in what has become a standard show of force in response to north korea's missile tests. returning from asia, secretary of state tillerson was asked if americans should be worried. >> i think americans should sleep well at night. >> mattis issued his warning before touring the uss kentucky. a ballistic missile submarine which could annihilate north korea. last summer, 60 minutes went aboard the kentucky on patrol in the
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loaded beneath the hatches. commander brian frek was the captain. >> warheads can be carried on the missiles are extremely powerful. >> compare them to the bomb that leveled hiroshima. >> much more powerful than that. much more powerful than hiroshima. >> reporter: on any given day, several of the submarines are hiding some where in the world's oceans. >> send the general alarm, sir. >> drilling to respond to a launch order from the president. pentagon official say no new military orders have been issued. despite the warlike rhetoric on both sides. but they warn, tensions are likely to remain high, since the u.s. is scheduled to conduct an annual military exercise in south korea. later this month. the current nuclear tension comes as japan marked solemn occasion. 72 years since an atomic bomb leveled nagasaki. ben tracy in beijing with a view
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from asia. >> reporter: south korea's president says he will allow the u.s. to fully deploy the antiballistic missile system known as thad. in his country. it comes as he is calling for a complete overhaul of south korea's military. president trump's fire and fury comments led to a large protest march in north korea. orchestrated by the regime. in japan, trump's words came on the anniversary of the american atomic bomb in nagasaki, a reminder of what is at stake. japan's lawmakers are pushing for new weapons that could allow it to launch preemptive strike on north korea. china is warning both kim jung-un, regime, and the u.s. to ton down the rhetoric. in a statement to cbs news, china's foreign ministry called it highly sensitive and that all ide should stop provoking each other. >> china does not want north korea to have nuclear weapons. but says the problem should be
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it fears a war in the korean peninsula could lead to a refugee crisis along the 49-mile border it shares with north korea. next week, north korea celebrates its liberation day holiday. which some analysts believe could lead kim jung-un, to launch a missile or conduct a sixth underground nuclear test. now, north korea just released a new statement, in it they say that president trump, "let out a load of nonsense about fire and fury." and that dialogue is not possible with such a guy, bereft of reason. it appears, north korea not yet ready to talk. >> a police officer in louisiana is suing ford for an accident involving her squad car. carbon monoxide has apparently been seeping into the cabins of many ford explorers and a federal investigation is now under way. chris van scleef has the latest from henderson, louisiana. >> reporter: you can see the damage to this police interceptor. the officer driving said it had
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before she says she apparently blacked out behind the wheel and crashed. her department asked for a special blood test. and it showed carbon monoxide. >> reporter: in april witnesses say this ford explorer slowly drifted off the road believer flipping on to its side. >> when you look at your cruiser, what's going through your mind? >> i don't know how tie lived through that. i shouldn't be standing here today. >> reporter: officer brandy sickey doesn't remember the crash. the steering wheel is bent from where she hit it. her hair is in the windshield. >> i drove into town. i drove, had a bunch of people. and -- i, got on the highway. and, i don't rememberen off that. >> no recollection whatsoever. >> none. none. >> the national highway traffic safety administration, is investigating thousand of reports of exhaust, which contains cn
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seeping into the cabins of police interceptors and civilian explorers. while, they have received reports of three crashes in 41 injuries, investigators say so far, there is no actual evidence that they were the result of carbon monoxide poisoning. medical records show doctors diagnosed her with carbon monoxide poisoning. two hours after the crash her blood showed dangerous levels. >> there is no source the car been monoxide got into her system other than the vehicle. and ntsa is aware of that. >> the medical records show presence of medication she's said were prescribed. doctors say they dent know if that could contribute to the crash. ford released images of what may be alug carbon monoxide to get into explorers. unsealed holes like this one. by a vehicle's muffler, or rear spoiler. part of after purchase work done by third party contractors to install emergency equipment. but that does not explain the complaints of kpus in civilian explorers. >> what kind of patrol car do you drive now? >> 2017 ford explorer. >> back on the job and back behind the wheel of a polic cruiser.
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>> yes, very. i have a carbon monoxide monitor. i want to get out. might be impacting my work. i never had to do that before. and i'm doing it now. >> reporter: ford maintains safety is its top priority. it is fixing police explorers, free of cost. and, maintains that, that civilian explorers, are safe to drive. ford declined comment on this case. in particular, because of the pending litigation. we asked them above the the injury reports. the agency said they would get back to us. >> the cbs "overnight news" will be right back.
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clearasil rapid action begins working fast for clearly visible results in as little as 12 hours. but will it stop this teen from chugging hot sauce? ...oh jeremy. so let's be clear: clearasil works fast on teen acne, not so much on other teen things. it says you apply the blue one ok, letto me. this. here? no. have a little fun together, or a lot. k-y yours and mine. two sensations that work together, so you can play together.
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president trump has drawn a red line over north korea's threats to attack the united states with a nuclear weapon. republican senator lindsay graham is on the armed services committee, he also served 33 years in the air force, the reserves, and the national guard. he discussed the possibility of war on cbs this morning. >> there are two scenarios where we would go to war with north korea. they attack guam, or some other american interest, or allies, or if they tried to keep developing an icbm with nuclear weapon on top to hit the homeland we would act. president trump has basically drawn a red line, saying that he will never allow north korea to have an icbm missile that can hit america with a nuclear weapon on top. he is not going to let that happen.
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he is not going to contain the threat. he is going to stop the threat. >> when you say that, president trump says that, there is at issue the question of how many people might die from a retaliation on south korea. >> yeah, general mattis described it well. a horrific war, unfortunately. we are headed that way unless north korea stops. put yourself in president trump's shoes for a moment. where does your allegiance lie? isn't your primary purpose as president of the united states, to protect the american homeland, from a nuclear weapon attack by a guy like kim jung-un? my belief is that we are headed that way unless the world can stop north korea. he is going to pick homeland defense over regional stability and he has to. for 30 years, this has failed. this is not a language problem. this is a north korean regime, trying to get the capability to strike america, the ultimate insurance policy for regime survivability. no president should allow this to happen weecht failed for 30 years. it is time to try something new.
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>> senator, secretary of state rex tillerson just landed in guam, speaking to reporters there. he said our telephone lines remain open. he says this is not an escalation. he said president trump was simply trying to speak in language that kim jung-unwould understand in terms of the rhetoric. does it seem to you like there is diplomatic progress? >> well, we had sanctions passed by the u.n. that were very tough. nikki hamy did a great job. secretary timerson is telling north korea there will not be a war to change a radioshame. there will not be a war to reunify the korean peninsula. we're not trying to invade. >> does contra bucket what the cia director said out at aspen. he said regime change actually its a u.s. goal. >> don't think it is the goal ofment american president to change the regime. the goal of the american president to stop north korea from having i
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america with wep nonon top. war would be likely to occur if they continue to threaten the homeland. i hope diplomacy will work. sanctions haven't worked before. man now. china should have more than, we got two bad options. that is to let them get a missile to hit america. or go to war to stop them. china should have two bad options. deal with the nut job in your backyard or realize there will be a war in your backyard. >> you think this was a message to china as well as north korea. >> yes, yes. time for talk is running out. i want to know what south korea and japan think about the miniaturizing of a weapon. don't want to trust one intel report. we learned from iraq you need to be cautious i've do believe, donald trump will not allow, kim jung-un, to get a missile. hit america with nuclear wecht upon on top. matter of time until the capability exists. hope we can do diplomacy. sanctions. war would be terrible. if there is going to be a war in the region not here in america.
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>> i've don't know the exact nature of their missile program. i don't think, we have, very good eyes and ears on how far along they are. we know they're trying. it is a matter of type. like to hear from south korea and japan. just a matter of time until they get the capability. when putin says, that, that, you know he didn't interfere in our election. he is lying. when the ayatollah says he is not trying to build a nuclear bochlt he is lying. when, assad says he didn't use chemical weapons. he is lying. this man, kim jung-un, is not lying, he says he will build icbm with a nook leer weapon to hit america. i don't want to live for 50 years under that threat. heave will have a bomb with missiles if we don't stop him now. everything before did not work. i don't want him to get stronger over time. thousands of americans with life threatening allergies rely on the epipen to control their
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but when the price is spiked congress held hearings and alternatives came on the market. >> this 'tis the new ovi -- >> things changed in the year since we first visited the household in indianapolis. two of the six children have severe allergies. last year at this time. the parents were unhappy about the prices for their epipens. $600 for a two pack. >> weren't anticipating it being $600,000. >> right. >> under increased milan was forced to explain he price hikes. >> think they were charging too much at $6700. >> sir, we believe it was tear, now lowered by half. >> mylan launched generic for $300. and boosted coupon program to cut patients cost. cvs pharmacy, offered generic injector for $109. then they got a letter from their in shoouer.
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they're no longer going to be covering epipens. only the generic version. they have taken these off their plan. a but at their pharmacy, generics were out of stock. that's when they looked at it. >> this is very personal for us. >> aaron and invented it after growing up allergies. >> carry it in our pockets every day. >> every day. >> you are supposed to carry two. i have that as well. >> smaller and comes with its own voice instructions. basically any body who picks up the device is able to have a voice guiding them. what do i do next? >> i think that's key. all about confidence. and, we saw hesitation. >> that one is a lot bigger. so, this one its a little easier to hold. >> lexi henniger liked the product not the price. the list for -- >> that was disappointing. called me before they filled my
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prescription if i wanted them to fill it. but drugmakerer, stepped in with its affordability program. and the family's out of pocket cost went to 0. how is that possible? the ceo spencer williamson. >> the pricing reimbursement system in the country is broken. and, we're committed to always putting patients and families first. >> you have a drug that has a $4,500 price. how do people get that for free? >> so it is an access model. built, built for patients. and so, the way our program works, is that any one with commercial insurance. covered or not. even, they'll get it for 0. >> richard evans, pharmaceutical analyst from ssr health its skrept cal. >> only insurer that will say yes to a $4,500 claim for a device, in a world where you can buy them for $109. one hasn't figured out the game yet. >> ror
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says, to gain market share, a company can give away most prescription for free and hope the insurers who do pay the higher prices make up for it. >> insane system. no rationale designer would sit down with a clean sheet of paper and say let's do it this way. >> somebody in the system. some where, pays for that high price? >> so, many plans cover the product because it is the right thing for their patients and physicians and enthusiastic about it. where plans don't cover it, the entity that steps in and pays is caleo. >> patients like the hennigers say they will take any break they can get. uh. >> up until now. there weren't any options for auto injectors. coach it will level the playing field and bring down prices. for years the kitkat one of the best selling candies in for a just-cleaned feeling that lasts up to 4 weeks.
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with motionsense technology... degree has redefined deodorant so that i can redefine... power... footwork... range... the more i move, the more it works. degree. it won't let you down. for years the kitkat one of the best selling candies in america. kids love them. adults maybe not so much. in japan, the kitkat is an obsession. mo rocca went abroad for a taste. >> reporter: at a stop in the bustling ginza district. luxury kitkats on full display. that's right. the mastermind behind the $5 kitkat convections is this chef. in general, says the chef, the japanese prefer mild flavors rather than aggressive flavors. that hit you over the head. the chef's concocted kitts
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with flavors like, matcha green tea, butter and strawberry maple. said rick lecorix is kit cat's man in japan. >> how big is kitkat in japan? >> up to 5 million kitkats a day in japan. it may be a case of kitkat, kitto-katto, sound like kitto-katsu in japanese means you surely will win. which explains why, for japanese students, during the high pressure exam season, the kitto-katto has become a kind of edible talisman. >> when it was discovered that the name meant surely you will win, then the company, shrewdly decided to capitalize on that. >> absolutely. absolutely.
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it became part of the company mission, to, to play this lucky charm. so kitkat mission in japan is really to, to, encourage people. >> and to sell some not so mildly flavored kitkats to tourists. anyone in the mood for a purple sweet potato kitkat. or bite of a refreshing apple kitkat. >> say a kitkat a day keeps the doctor away. ooh. >> or perhaps you would look to spice things up with a wasabi kitkat, go easy on the sake kitkat. >> we appeal more and more to foreigners. they have read on facebook. social media, the japanese kitkat was fantastic. they've come here. >> united color of kitkat. >> reporter: back in the kitchen, the chef indulged me as we went about creating a new premium kitkat.
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>> i know it sound crazy, could we mix the pistachio with the raspberry? >> ah. >> reporter: shall we give that a try? >> yes, yes, yes, yes, yes, yes. >> the color will probably be ghastly. but it smells good doesn't it? the color its awful, isn't it? try a taste. it's very good. it's very good. try it. >> mm. very good. [ speaking japanese ] >> that means delicious. behold, the raspachio kitkat. >> i believe i passed my exam. uh went to a guide dog
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training center in new jersey to
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captioning funded by cbs it's thursday, august 10th, 2017. this is the "cbs morning news." rising tensions. north korea unveils a detailed plan to fire missiles toward guam, dismissing president trump's threats. and the russia investigation intensifies with an fbi raid on the home of mr. trump's former campaign chairman. good morning from the studio 57 newsroom at cbs news headquarters here in new york. good to be with you. i'm anne-marie green.

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