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tv   BBC News  BBC News  September 24, 2022 2:00pm-2:31pm BST

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this is bbc news. i'm annita mcveigh, and these are the latest headlines: the chancellor defends his tax cuts aimed at boosting economic growth, saying they're fair for all — but kwasi kwarteng's mini budget is receiving a mixed reaction from the public. i think it probably will help, yes, to a degree, but depends what bracket you're in of course in terms of income. i mean, does that even touch the sides? i don't know. world powers condemn the self—styled referendums being held in parts of ukraine on whether tojoin russia. britain's most successful gymnast of all time, max whitlock, speaks exclusively to the bbc about how his fear of failure almost forced him out of the sport after last year's tokyo games. and, meet the parky blinders —
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who are using the power of boxing to help improve the lives of people with parkinson's. good afternoon. the government has defended its sweeping range of tax cuts from criticism that they favour the better—off. the chancellor kwasi kwarteng's package of measures include scrapping the top rate of income tax for the highest earners and reducing the basic rate by a penny — moves the government says will promote growth. the institute for fiscal studies says the richest — who pay the most tax — will benefit most from a cut. our political correspondent, helen catt, reports.
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it's an all—out attempt to grow the economy with the biggest tax cuts in four decades. at spitalfields market, in east london, they are taking stock of a mini—budget that's signalled a massive shift in political direction. what do you make of moves like reversing the national insurance rise? will that help, do you think? i think it probably will help, yes, to a degree, but it depends what bracket you are in in terms of income. yeah, i think it will help. i mean, does that even touch the sides? i don't know. we'll see. there is a lot to take in. the treasury is cutting the basic rate of income tax from 20p to 19p from april next year. it is abolishing the 45p top tax rate for people who earn over £150,000, as well as reversing the national insurance rise from november, and cancelling a corporation tax rise planned for next year. stamp duty will be scrapped below £250,000.
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the government will borrow £231; billion this year to fund the spending. there is criticism from opposition politicians that those with the most are getting the most. or as labour puts it, rewarding the already wealthy. when you are lifting bankers�* bonuses at the same time as saying that postal workers and rail workers can't have a decent pay rise, people can see that and see that as grossly unfair. and it looks like the conservatives are looking after people at the top and are not really channelling that long—term investment which is what our proposal is around long—term investment and around skills for the future. labour is about to start its annual conference in liverpool. and it is likely to face calls to spell out what it would do. it says it will back reducing the basic rate of income tax, but oppose scrapping the 45p top rate. ministers see the tax cuts as a tool to grow the economy for everyone. we are not into the politics of envy, where we want to deliberately penalise people who have been working hard. we want to cut taxes for everybody. and the danger, by the way, if you have tax rates that are too high,
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for either companies or for individuals, you drive them away. companies have a choice often about where they locate. we want them to choose to locate here in the united kingdom. in the financial markets, the cost of borrowing for the uk government went up after the statement yesterday, and the pound fell to a 37—year low against the dollar. the new direction has been welcomed by some conservative mps, but others remain sceptical. it is now up to ministers to show they can deliver the goods. our business correspondent, marc ashdown, is with me. there marc ashdown, is with me. is a pretty wide consen that there is a pretty wide consensus that the most obvious and immediate winners from this are the people who are already well fee. but the government says this is about fairness for all. so how exactly is it saying that this mini budget is going to help people who are on lower incomes?—
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lower incomes? quite a difficult balancinu lower incomes? quite a difficult balancing act- — lower incomes? quite a difficult balancing act. they _ lower incomes? quite a difficult balancing act. they do - lower incomes? quite a difficult balancing act. they do is - lower incomes? quite a difficult balancing act. they do is all- lower incomes? quite a difficult l balancing act. they do is all about analysts crunching the figures, trying to work are all out. the broad consensus is that higher earners will be better off, the institute for fiscal studies saying that only people earning over £150,000 will actually be better off. the resolution foundation saying looking at income brackets, the top 5% of earners will be about £2500 better off. the poorest fifth of households about £90 better off. but the middle will actually be £780 worse off. they also found a regional split, worse off. they also found a regionalsplit, people worse off. they also found a regional split, people living in london and the south—east will be better off. taxpayers in those regions do tend to be higher earners. to give some context, and economists formally advising the prime minister says that the progressive tax system means that you people let more. a tax cut for
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everyone, inevitably, it really does benefit them more. fix, everyone, inevitably, it really does benefit them more.— everyone, inevitably, it really does benefit them more. a lot of people are sa in: benefit them more. a lot of people are saying that _ benefit them more. a lot of people are saying that if— benefit them more. a lot of people are saying that if this _ benefit them more. a lot of people are saying that if this is _ benefit them more. a lot of people are saying that if this is a _ benefit them more. a lot of people are saying that if this is a mini - are saying that if this is a mini budget, what will a big budget look like. what suggestions are coming from the government that there could be more movement on taxes on economic policy?— be more movement on taxes on economic policy? when analysing these measures, _ economic policy? when analysing these measures, we _ economic policy? when analysing these measures, we have - economic policy? when analysing these measures, we have got - economic policy? when analysing these measures, we have got to| economic policy? when analysing - these measures, we have got to bear in mind the impact of policies of previous governments. when we talk about people being better or worse off, i don't think it's fair to say people are worse off because of these policies, but because of previous policies they are in the mix. yesterday was about giving more money back to businesses to hopefully invest in people, to spend, and overall the economy is busted out we get more grow. there is more to come. the previous government froze at the threshold at which we all pay basic income tax,
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but because inflation is going up thatis but because inflation is going up that is staying where it is, more people are being dragged into paying tax and we are all technically worse. the chief secretary to the treasury has indicated they might look at that. we have had pretty big tax cuts already, another budget could be living in the autumn, the chancellor might not be done yet. you call it the previous government, of course liz truss and kwasi kwarteng were a part of, but some diversions here in terms of what they are doing here in their new positions. let's look at labour reaction to all of this. clearly already diverging on economic policy between the conservatives and labour. but i think what we saw yesterday from kwasi kwarteng is opening that of even more. definitely. the shadow chancellor in the chamber yesterday saying it is an admission of 12 years of economic failure under successive
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conservative governments. labour have said they will support some of these measures, reducing basic rate tax from 20p to 19p, but they have said they will vote against scrapping the additional rate of income tax. now is over £150,000 income... the chancel has scrapped that, that is good to be a flat right now. pretty clear dividing lines between the two parties. labour saying a growth strategy which they say will be fairer and with very different priorities. the independent think tank, the resolution foundation, has been analysing yesterday's announcement — and its chief economist, mike brewer, joins me now. a little bit more time to really look into the detail of yesterday's announcement. i do want to move on in a second to looking at what this means depending on what region you
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live in. before you get to that, your broad thoughts of the day after? , ., , your broad thoughts of the day after? , . , ., , ., your broad thoughts of the day after? , . , ., , ., after? this really was a budget that trashed previous _ after? this really was a budget that trashed previous treasury - after? this really was a budget that i trashed previous treasury orthodoxy, i trashed previous treasury orthodoxy, iihink _ trashed previous treasury orthodoxy, iihink we _ trashed previous treasury orthodoxy, i think. we could tell yesterday that kwasi kwarteng was spending lar-e that kwasi kwarteng was spending large amounts of money, giving away so much _ large amounts of money, giving away so much money in tax cuts without really _ so much money in tax cuts without really thinking too much about what that does_ really thinking too much about what that does to public finances will stop it — that does to public finances will stop it is — that does to public finances will stop it is a _ that does to public finances will stop it is a growth or bus strategy, different_ stop it is a growth or bus strategy, different from what we have seen before, _ different from what we have seen before, and i think today it is clear— before, and i think today it is clear that _ before, and i think today it is clear that the distribution impacts are very— clear that the distribution impacts are very different, even from what we have _ are very different, even from what we have seen from previous conservative chancellors. rishi sunak — conservative chancellors. rishi sunak busted universal credit when he was _ sunak busted universal credit when he was in _ sunak busted universal credit when he was in charge, and the coalition government in the last decade was always— government in the last decade was always keen... this was a budget with the — always keen... this was a budget with the distributional impact was clearly— with the distributional impact was clearly where the biggest gains go to those _ clearly where the biggest gains go to those with higher incomes. the resolution to those with higher incomes. tie: resolution foundation has to those with higher incomes. ti9 resolution foundation has described this as a southern comfort money
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budget. has levelling up gone out the window? given the value of property in the south and south—east compare to other areas, it seems to me this would benefit people more because of property prices because of the south—east. because of property prices because of the south-east.— because of property prices because of the south-east. ultimately if the government — of the south-east. ultimately if the government does _ of the south-east. ultimately if the government does get _ of the south-east. ultimately if the government does get stronger - government does get stronger economic growth, that could have cost benefit all regions of the uk. but yes, — cost benefit all regions of the uk. but yes, that stamp duty move, first-time — but yes, that stamp duty move, first—time buyers in many poorer parts _ first—time buyers in many poorer parts of— first—time buyers in many poorer parts of the country don't pay any stamp _ parts of the country don't pay any stamp duty already, so it does nothing — stamp duty already, so it does nothing to increase the threshold they are, — nothing to increase the threshold they are, where is the gain for a typical— they are, where is the gain for a typical first—time buyer in london is about— typical first—time buyer in london is about £6,000. even more striking is about £6,000. even more striking is getting _ is about £6,000. even more striking is getting rid of the additional 45% tax rate. _ is getting rid of the additional 45% tax rate, currently paid by about 600.000 — tax rate, currently paid by about 600,000 people, and over half of those _ 600,000 people, and over half of those are — 600,000 people, and over half of those are in london and the south—east. 0ne those are in london and the south—east. one look at the regional winners _ south—east. one look at the regional winners and — south—east. one look at the regional winners and losers, it is very clear
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that the _ winners and losers, it is very clear that the average gain for a household in london and the south—east is three times as high as the gain— south—east is three times as high as the gain for— south—east is three times as high as the gain for households and, say, yorkshire, — the gain for households and, say, yorkshire, wales. it is an incredibly stark regional divide. you said — incredibly stark regional divide. you said to me this is a growth or bust mini budget. what are your thoughts on the government's thinking behind all of this, and how much of a gamble this is? given both the economic conditions domestically and internationally, when many other countries are looking at a situation without significant growth in the short or medium term. we without significant growth in the short or medium term.- without significant growth in the short or medium term. we do need more faster— short or medium term. we do need more faster growth. _ short or medium term. we do need more faster growth. we _ short or medium term. we do need more faster growth. we have - short or medium term. we do need more faster growth. we have been | short or medium term. we do need i more faster growth. we have been on a low— more faster growth. we have been on a low growth doldrums for about 15 years— a low growth doldrums for about 15 years now — a low growth doldrums for about 15 years now and that is reflected in lower— years now and that is reflected in lower living standards was that we applaud _ lower living standards was that we applaud the government was natural desire _ applaud the government was natural desire to _ applaud the government was natural desire to try to grow the economy at a faster— desire to try to grow the economy at a faster rate — desire to try to grow the economy at a faster rate. what the gamble is,
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looking _ a faster rate. what the gamble is, looking at— a faster rate. what the gamble is, looking at lower taxes as they mainly— looking at lower taxes as they mainly to _ looking at lower taxes as they mainly to get higher growth, meaning it rules _ mainly to get higher growth, meaning it rules out _ mainly to get higher growth, meaning it rules out things like investing in our— it rules out things like investing in our infrastructure, investing in skills— in our infrastructure, investing in skills and — in our infrastructure, investing in skills and productivity, our physical— skills and productivity, our physical infrastructure. it is all about— physical infrastructure. it is all about tax— physical infrastructure. it is all about tax cuts to try to incentivise companies — about tax cuts to try to incentivise companies to strive harder. there are other— companies to strive harder. there are other ways in which growth can be increased. byjust relying on tax cuts, _ be increased. byjust relying on tax cuts, the _ be increased. byjust relying on tax cuts, the gamble is with the nation's _ cuts, the gamble is with the nation's public finances. we saw yesterday— nation's public finances. we saw yesterday market is beginning to react— yesterday market is beginning to react against this, saying, hang on, you can't— react against this, saying, hang on, you can't borrow your way to prosperity — you can't borrow your way to prosperity forever.— you can't borrow your way to prosperity forever. you to get your thou . hts prosperity forever. you to get your thoughts on _ prosperity forever. you to get your thoughts on the _ prosperity forever. you to get your thoughts on the day _ prosperity forever. you to get your thoughts on the day after - prosperity forever. you to get your thoughts on the day after this - prosperity forever. you to get your thoughts on the day after this mini budget. ukrainians have reported armed soldiers going door—to—door in occupied parts of the country to collect votes for self—styled "referendums" on joining russia. the group of seven wealthiest nations has condemned what it says are sham referendums in those regions on whether they want to join russia.
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0ur ukraine correspondent, hugo bachega, is in kyiv. western officials have dismissed this as a propaganda exercise, they say that the result has already been decided by moscow, and that this is going to be used by russia as an excuse to annex parts of ukraine. the fear here is that russia is going to say that these areas are now part of russia and that any attacks on those regions will be seen as an attack on russian territory. now, it's hard to get independent information from those areas, some residents say that soldiers are going door—to—door forcing people to vote, and in some towns ukraine as say that residents have been banned from leaving. now, speaking to the bbc, the eu foreign policy chief said the threats being made by the russian president should be taken seriously. i don't want to spread alarm,
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but certainly it's a dangerous moment, because the russian army has been pushed into a corner, and knowing putin, his reaction, threatening using nuclear arms. yes, it's very much worrisome. yesterday president biden said any annexation of territory would be a flagrant violation of international law, and he said russia would pay a severe cost. russians are continuing to leave the country in their thousands following president putin's announcement of mobilisation of at least 300,000 extra troops last week. there's a queue more than six miles long at the border between georgia and russia, as men attempt to avoid being called up. officials in finland say the number of russians arriving there has more than doubled in the past week.
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the headlines on bbc news: britain's chancellor defends his tax cuts aimed at boosting economic growth — saying they're fair for all, but his measures are receiving mixed reactions from the public. world powers condemn the self—styled referendums being held in parts of ukraine on whether tojoin russia. he's the most successful british gymnast of all time — with six 0lympic medals and multiple world championship titles to his name — but max whitlock has revealed that a fear of failure almost forced him out of the sport after last year's tokyo games. in an exclusive interview with the bbc�*s graham satchell, he's opened up about his mental struggles, and how his daughter helped him refocus on the challenge ahead. can you get the it ff?
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max whitlock at home with his daughter, willow. he is britain's most successful gymnast with a string of olympic medals, the most recent in tokyo last year. so, what lies in wait for max whitlock throughout this men's pommel horse olympic final? can he retain the olympic title? for me, looking back, the memories are incredible. this is excellent work. he needs to up into the dismount with the pirouette. _ well, max whitlock, - you could not have performed that routine any better! and i remember literally, just even before my feet hit the floor, landing that dismount on pommel, ijust genuinely couldn't believe i'd done it. but this was confident and fluent right to the end.
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celebrating back home, his wife, leah, and the rest of the family. ladies and gentlemen, - the anthem of great britain. but as max stood on the podium, he knew he had a big decision to make about his future. i'd retained my world titles. i'd retained my 0lympic title now, and it was more than i ever dreamt of doing, more than i ever expected to outdo my gymnastics career. i do it because i love it. and there was a moment where i felt, you know, i'm content. and i think that's me done. and ifelt if i finished here, then i would finish on a high. it would definitely be a high. it got to a point i had conversations. i chatted with leah, i chatted with my my whole and said i made a decision to stop.
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gymnastics hasn'tjust been a sport or a job for max whitlock, it's been everything. he's been part of the british gymnastic team since he was 17. it's almost been my identity. it's been what i've done for 22 years without stopping. gymnastics to me, it's what i know it's what i do. lots of give up. yeah. and leah kept saying, like so many times... i was obviously questioned on it, like, are you sure? blah, blah, blah. and i'd always say i'm done. max has never spoken about any of this publicly, never announced his retirement, and for the first few months away from the gym, he was content. but very quickly things began to fall apart. i fell into a place into like this rut, where ijust lost all motivation for everything. i felt sluggish every single day. i was in this place where ijust didn't do anything. i got to a point, i remember sitting on a sofa and i was just getting upset chatting to leah because i felt like a complete waste of space. like, i do try not to be too hard
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on myself, but even now i'm even annoyed at myself for falling in that gap and falling into that position. because the worst thing about it was... i was sitting there feeling useless, like waste of space, a failure. they even got a blood test because i was just feeling awful every single day. the blood test come back, i was absolutely fine. and i think what that proved to me was that it was all in my head. max whitlock has been the poster boy of british gymnastics — always positive, always smiling. but he began to realize that it was, in his words, a mask. i've always been the person just, ijust keep it in and just plod on through. that's what i've done for my whole career. i've almost put a mask up
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and made to try and seem everything's positive, so it's all good and just keep trooping on. and i think, i think this time ijust, ijust couldn't, i was in this rut, which i really struggled with. and i think as i started to talk to leah or start to talk to my parents more and the people around me, i started to actually realise how i was feeling, i was struggling. it become almost a bit more clear in my head. this is very impressive. spindle excellent, good extension. can he keep his legs tight? max started looking back at his career, opening up for the first time to his family, really examining how he felt. and the triple russian has gone well. now, then, into the handstand sequence. he's off, that is a beautiful routine! i think london i was 19 going in, i wasn't expected to produce anything. i was just there, just kind of giving it my best shot. minimal, minimal pressure and just kind of loving the experience.
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and then when you look at the four year cycle from london to rio, the pressure was crazy. it really, really was. can he get it up? yes, he can. max whitlock has done everything he can! - it's now down to the judges. when it went from that to then fast forward to the five year cycle to tokyo, with that on my shoulders, with the expectancy of producing gold because i did in rio, was really tough. and that's why i was in there feeling the most pressure that i've ever felt. i realised that i'd made a decision like that... ..in terms of what i felt for 22 years. i wanted to do it for as long as i can to change it to i'm done, because i was scared of failing.
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looking ahead and thinking about people saying, i want to try for four olympic games. i was adamant and i was strong and very quick to say, no, i'm done, because i was scared to go. make a mistake, not make a final decision to even make the olympic games. i was scared to be a failure, and that is crazy. in the last few weeks, max has returned to the gym after confronting what he calls his fear of failing. he's back in training. it's nice to be back. nice to be back on a pommel horse. nice to be back in a gym environment. whether it's good sessions, bad sessions, just enjoying the chance to be back. i've learnt so much, like, it's unbelievable. and i think for me the biggest thing was, ok,
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so if i did stop now, it wouldn't be retiring. it wouldn't be because i'm not doing what i believe in in terms of going until i want to kind of see where my potential is and kind of hit my limit. it wouldn't be retiring. it wouldn't be just stopping because of any reason like that. it would be quitting. like, if i stopped now, it would be me quitting. max has now made the decision to carry on. he will compete in a fourth olympic games, paris 202a. the reasons why i'm doing gymnastics now, in a way, in my head feel like they've slightly changed, because i want to prove to myself that i can do it. i'm excited to take on the challenge as one big thing. i've got my focuses, i've got my target. i want to prove something to willow. so, there's loads of massive, positive reasons, and i think that's
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what's helped me move forward without that fear of failure. 10, 20 years down the line, if i was explaining my career to willow, and i said that i'd done this, i'd done that, then i stopped after tokyo, then i think her next question would probably be, "well, why did you stop?" and i wouldn't want that to be because i'm scared of failing in paris four years down the line. so i think i would rather push on through, give it my absolute best shot, and give myself every opportunity that i could to to try and kind of reach where i want to go to. i think that's huge. 15 celebrities, fourjudges, one glitterball trophy — that's right, strictly�*s 20th season is officially upon us. contestants in the class of 2022 have been paired with their professional partners
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and are ready to compete on the dancefloor. sophie van brugen has been speaking to three of the couples vying for their place in the strictly history books. five times paralympic gold medallist, _ five times paralympic gold medallist, ellie _ five times paralympic gold | medallist, ellie simmonds! five times paralympic gold - medallist, ellie simmonds! no five times paralympic gold medallist, ellie simmonds! no much anticiated medallist, ellie simmonds! no much anticipated return _ medallist, ellie simmonds! no much anticipated return of— medallist, ellie simmonds! no much anticipated return of the _ medallist, ellie simmonds! no much anticipated return of the show- medallist, ellie simmonds! no muchj anticipated return of the show meant fans were finally able to find out which of the celebrities and professionals had been paired together. the show was one of the most popular on television. last year's final was seen by 11 million people, who tuned in what rose ayling—ellis become the first death contestant to win the show. i ayling-ellis become the first death contestant to win the show.- contestant to win the show. i think it's amazing. _ contestant to win the show. i think it's amazing, and _ contestant to win the show. i think it's amazing, and it _ contestant to win the show. i think it's amazing, and it like _ contestant to win the show. i think it's amazing, and it like we - contestant to win the show. i think it's amazing, and it like we saw- it's amazing, and it like we saw with rows last year, it changes so much. there is now so much awareness about this. seeing that is actually quite beautiful. i'm all for all the
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changes, and i think is brilliant. it's just changes, and i think is brilliant. it'sjust being changes, and i think is brilliant. it's just being relatable, changes, and i think is brilliant. it'sjust being relatable, being able _ it'sjust being relatable, being able to— it'sjust being relatable, being able to look at the screen and a saying. — able to look at the screen and a saying, that somebody that looks and talks like _ saying, that somebody that looks and talks like me, whatever, ithink it's really— talks like me, whatever, ithink it's really inspiring as well. the atmo5phere — it's really inspiring as well. the atmosphere he _ it's really inspiring as well. ti9 atmosphere he had backstage is buzzing with nervous excitement, as the celebrity class of 2022 are very much hoping they can impress the judges and dance their way into the final. �* :, :, , judges and dance their way into the final. �* . , ., judges and dance their way into the final. �* ., , ., :, judges and dance their way into the final. �* . , ., :, ., final. i've always wanted to do strictly and — final. i've always wanted to do strictly and l _ final. i've always wanted to do strictly and i jumped - final. i've always wanted to do strictly and i jumped at - final. i've always wanted to do - strictly and i jumped at. chance. strictly and ijumped at the chance. they asked me once, yes please! straightaway. always wanted to do it, the hair, the clouds, the make up. the dancing... also, my mother is beside herself with excitement, absolutely delighted. i’m is beside herself with excitement, absolutely delighted.— absolutely delighted. i'm looking forward to being _ absolutely delighted. i'm looking forward to being part _ absolutely delighted. i'm looking forward to being part of- absolutely delighted. i'm looking forward to being part of the - absolutely delighted. i'm looking j forward to being part of the show and giving — forward to being part of the show and giving it all and just learning as i and giving it all and just learning as i go. — and giving it all and just learning as i go, and that's all i can do. also, — as i go, and that's all i can do. also, is—
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as i go, and that's all i can do. also, is an _ as i go, and that's all i can do. also, is an entertainment show, you have to _ also, is an entertainment show, you have to enjoy— also, is an entertainment show, you have to enjoy it. we are both high energy. _ have to enjoy it. we are both high energy. but— have to enjoy it. we are both high energy, but we are both very driven and we _ energy, but we are both very driven and we want — energy, but we are both very driven and we want to do this the best we can. and we want to do this the best we can don't — and we want to do this the best we can. don't take ourselves too seriously, _ can. don't take ourselves too seriously, we have a bit of fun. but when _ seriously, we have a bit of fun. but when it— seriously, we have a bit of fun. but when it comes to the rehearsal roomm — when it comes to the rehearsal room... : :, , when it comes to the rehearsal room... :, , ,, . , room... and of course, strictly still watch _ room... and of course, strictly still watch tess _ room... and of course, strictly still watch tess and _ room... and of course, strictly still watch tess and claudia - room... and of course, strictly| still watch tess and claudia are back. , :, , still watch tess and claudia are back. , . , .., still watch tess and claudia are back. , . , , :, , back. they really calm your nerves, when ou back. they really calm your nerves, when you have _ back. they really calm your nerves, when you have a — back. they really calm your nerves, when you have a chat _ back. they really calm your nerves, when you have a chat with - back. they really calm your nerves, when you have a chat with them, i back. they really calm your nerves, i when you have a chat with them, they always say you're doing great, don't worry about it. i remember tess was like, that was great afterwards, on the reveal show. they really calm your nerves and they are very warm. i'm tonder beck is now a permanent member of thejudging panel,
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member of the judging panel, replacing member of thejudging panel, replacing bruno. the professionals are hoping they won't put a foot wrong. mil are hoping they won't put a foot wronu. : :, ., , are hoping they won't put a foot wronu. : :, . , , wrong. all of them are very picky, but also nice. _ wrong. all of them are very picky, but also nice, you _ wrong. all of them are very picky, but also nice, you know. - wrong. all of them are very picky, but also nice, you know. if- wrong. all of them are very picky, but also nice, you know. if i - wrong. all of them are very picky, but also nice, you know. ifi need| but also nice, you know. ifi need surely happy. _ but also nice, you know. ifi need surely happy. i _ but also nice, you know. ifi need surely happy, i think— but also nice, you know. ifi need surely happy, i think i _ but also nice, you know. ifi need surely happy, i think i would - but also nice, you know. ifi need surely happy, i think i would die l but also nice, you know. ifi need i surely happy, i think i would die on the spot _ surely happy, i think i would die on the spot l— surely happy, i think i would die on the sot. :, ._ surely happy, i think i would die on the sot. :, ., surely happy, i think i would die on thesot. :, ., , , the spot. i would say craig, because in m six the spot. i would say craig, because in my six years _ the spot. i would say craig, because in my six years the _ the spot. i would say craig, because in my six years the only _ the spot. i would say craig, because in my six years the only issue - the spot. i would say craig, because in my six years the only issue i - in my six years the only issue i have never got a tender for all craig. have never got a tender for all craia. : , :, have never got a tender for all (rain: have never got a tender for all craia.: :, . have never got a tender for all crai~.: :, . | have never got a tender for all crair.�* :, : ilove craig. are you scared of cry? i love him, but i'm _ craig. are you scared of cry? i love him, but i'm scared _ craig. are you scared of cry? i love him, but i'm scared of— craig. are you scared of cry? i love him, but i'm scared of him. - craig. are you scared of cry? i love him, but i'm scared of him. i'm - craig. are you scared of cry? i love| him, but i'm scared of him. i'm not scared of them. _ him, but i'm scared of him. i'm not scared of them. it's _ him, but i'm scared of him. i'm not scared of them. it's simple, - him, but i'm scared of him. i'm not scared of them. it's simple, flit - scared of them. it's simple, flit with— scared of them. it's simple, flit with the — scared of them. it's simple, flit with the judges, get an extra point. you can watch the first strictly come dancing' live show tonight on bbc one at a quarter to seven. now it's time for a look at the weather with darren bett. good afternoon a mixture of sunshine and a scattering of showers through the rest of the afternoon, most of them across england and wales.
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showers coming into eastern england, then a few developing in linfield then a few developing in linfield the midlands in particular. for scotland and northern ireland, dry in northern ireland, that are a few showers in scotland, plenty of sunshine here, similar temperatures to yesterday. showers developing england and wales, they will tend to decay this evening, one or two getting blowing in off the north sea. generally dry overnight, but it is going to be cold, temperatures could slip away to 4 or 5 degrees. not quite so chilly in the north—west of scotland and perhaps, winds picking up year, they will freshen across parts of the country. sunny start for england and wales, a of cloud bubbling up, the odd shower for scotland and northern ireland, gail is a north—west and a spell of rain in the afternoon for northern scotland. hello. this is bbc news. i'm annita mcveigh and these
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are the headlines. the chancellor defends his tax cuts aimed at boosting economic growth, saying they're fair for all, but kwasi kwarteng's mini budget is receiving a mixed reaction from the public. world powers condemn the self—styled referendums being held in parts of ukraine on whether to join russia. britain's most successful gymnast of all time, max whitlock, speaks exclusively to the bbc about how his fear of failure almost twenty years ago, thejola, a government—owned senegalese ferry, capsized off the coast of the gambia. more than 1800 people died with just 64 survivors. it's recognised as the second—worst non—wartime maritime disaster in world history, taking the lives of many more
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than the infamous titanic.

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