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tv   BBC News at Ten  BBC News  June 28, 2022 10:00pm-10:31pm BST

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tonight at ten — a date is formally proposed for a new referendum on scottish independence. the scottish government wants it to take place on the 19th of october next year — subject to legal consent. my determination is to secure a process that allows the people of scotland, whetheryes, no, or yet to be decided, to express their views in a legal, constitutional referendum. eight years after the last referendum — the prime minister says there are more important priorities for government. our plan for a stronger economy certainly means that we think we are stronger working together. we'll be looking at the likelihood of a referendum being held within 16 months.
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also tonight... the campaigner dame deborahjames — host of the bbc�*s you, me and the big c — has died at the age of a0. in ukraine, the aftermath of russia's attack on a shopping centre — at least 20 people were killed and dozens injured. in new york, ghislaine maxwell is sentenced to 20 years for helping jeffrey epstein abuse young girls. and at wimbledon, rafa nadal is through to the second round on the hunt for a new grand slam singles record. and coming up on the bbc news channel... england's women pile on the runs in taunton against south africa. test centuries for sciver and davidson—richards have given them a first innings lead.
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welcome to bbc news at ten. on the 19th of october next year the voters of scotland should be given another opportunity to vote on the question of independence. that's the declared intention of the first minister nicola sturgeon — and she's written to prime minister borisjohnson to ask for formal consent for the vote to be held. the referendum question being proposed is exactly the same as the one rejected in 2014 — "should scotland be an independent country?" borisjohnson is likely to refuse to endorse the plan for october 2023 — so nicola sturgeon has asked the uk supreme court to decide if the referendum can go ahead without approval from westminster. eight years ago — in september 2014 — the voters of scotland rejected independence by 55% to 45%. most opinion polls suggest the gap has narrowed over the past two years or so.
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we start with our scotland editorjames cook who reports from edinburgh. chanting: yes, yes, yes! no, no, no, no! scotland 2014 — when politics came alive. how dare they say that this country is not capable of running its own affairs? cheering this is everyone's flag, everyone's country, everyone's culture, and everyone's streets. this is the vision we've got for our country. - but should we do this all over again? how does the nation feel about the idea of a second referendum? yeah, i think if there's a public call for it then we should definitely have one and just see what the public thinks. i don't think it's the best idea. yes, go for it, yeah, another one. oh, my god, again? presiding officer... well, yes, if nicola sturgeon has her way. now is the time for independence. the plan is to ask voters, should scotland be an independent country?
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to which they said "no" eight years ago. i can announce that the scottish government is proposing that the independence referendum be held on the 19th of october 2023. these are... applause but does this parliament have the power to hold that vote? the first minister now says she wants the supreme court to decide sooner rather than later. the fact is, neither legal opinions nor political arguments will resolve this point. we must establish legal fact. that is why, in my view, we must seek now to accelerate to the point when we have legal clarity, legal fact. last time, that wasn't needed. david cameron agreed to hand over the power to hold a vote in 2014. his successor has no such plans. we think the number one priority for the country i is the economic pressures, - the spikes in the cost of energy.
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our plan for a stronger economy i certainly means that we think that we're stronger working together. the senior civil servant who helped negotiate the terms of the last referendum says, in the end, it won't bejudges who settle the matter. the supreme court can absolutely say there's no mechanism to consult the scottish people on independence without westminster�*s consent and plenty of people, plenty of experts, expect that will be their verdict. ultimately, there is some law to come first, and then there's some pretty raw politics about the nature of the country we live in, the nature of scotland's position within the uk, the nature of its right to choose its own constitutional future. music: god save the queen just across the road from the parliament, the british state was putting on a show this afternoon. nicola sturgeon may want to keep the monarchy, but she's trying again to end the 300—year—old political project which is the united kingdom.
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we will be talking to james and chris mason in a moment. the only thing that's clear at the moment is that several important questions need to be answered before the path to a referendum can open up. the most straightforward way for the referendum to happen would be for borisjohnson to approve the request and for the westminster parliament to give the scottish parliament the powers to hold a referendum — under section 30 of the scotland act. borisjohnson has boris johnson has got borisjohnson has got to be part of that process. given that borisjohnson is unlikely to give his approval, nicola sturgeon is trying another route — a big gamble, according to some. she has asked the uk supreme court to rule on the legality
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of holding a new referendum without westminster�*s permission. that is the question. if the uk supreme court ruled against the first minister, nicola sturgeon says the scottish national party would make independence its only policy at the next uk general election, in an attempt to force the issue. kind of holding a referendum within the general election campaign which would pose challenges all around, it is fair to say. we can now speak to chris mason first of all. is borisjohnson going to be concerned about the tactics that nicola sturgeon is clearly developing? the that nicola sturgeon is clearly develoin: ? ~ , .,, developing? the prime minister was on his plane — developing? the prime minister was on his plane to _ developing? the prime minister was on his plane to madrid _ developing? the prime minister was on his plane to madrid to _ developing? the prime minister was on his plane to madrid to the - developing? the prime minister was on his plane to madrid to the nato l on his plane to madrid to the nato summit as nicola sturgeon was on her feet and i asked him about this and
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he said he would study it carefully and respond properly. take a step back, the uk government does not want another referendum any time soon and put yourself in the shoes of the prime minister or any uk prime minister, the idea of the family of nations they govern are breaking apart as they would see it is a horrible prospect. but for how long can they stand in the way of another referendum if the snp continue to make the case that they have a democratic mandate for one? that is where the politics lies at the moment. the outcome matters one way or another in time, but the process matters as well because the process matters as well because the process shapes our politics now, look what happened the last referendum, the snp skyrocketed as a party at westminster and that makes it harder for labour to win a general election and it may mean that the next general election is fought with the constitutional question of the uk at the heart of it. that is why tonight, what
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happens today it matters you are watching in the uk, in scotland, yes, but everywhere else, as well. james is in edinburgh. some political experts say this involvement of the uk supreme court at such an early stage is a big gamble by the first minister, what did you make of it?— did you make of it? there is something in _ did you make of it? there is something in that _ did you make of it? there is something in that up - did you make of it? there is something in that up to - did you make of it? there is something in that up to a i did you make of it? there is - something in that up to a point, in the sense — something in that up to a point, in the sense that nicola sturgeon clearly — the sense that nicola sturgeon clearly wants to get on with it, and arguably— clearly wants to get on with it, and arguably perhaps even get it over with, _ arguably perhaps even get it over with. and — arguably perhaps even get it over with, and as we have heard there are plenty— with, and as we have heard there are plenty of— with, and as we have heard there are plenty of legal experts who suggest that the _ plenty of legal experts who suggest that the scottish government doesn't have a _ that the scottish government doesn't have a case _ that the scottish government doesn't have a case in the supreme court, that the _ have a case in the supreme court, that the union is quite clearly a matter— that the union is quite clearly a matter reserved to westminster, and there are _ matter reserved to westminster, and there are some who disagree with that, _ there are some who disagree with that, of— there are some who disagree with that, of course, and it may yet be that, of course, and it may yet be that the _ that, of course, and it may yet be that the scottish government wins that the scottish government wins that case — that the scottish government wins that case but nicola sturgeon is clearly — that case but nicola sturgeon is clearly preparing to act she loses and what is she going to do? she is
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going to _ and what is she going to do? she is going to move on to the next general election— going to move on to the next general election campaign with this alternative idea of fighting that campaign on the single issue, effectively saying to the voters in scotland. — effectively saying to the voters in scotland, there is no other way to secure _ scotland, there is no other way to secure independence for this country. _ secure independence for this country, so if you vote for the snp and if— country, so if you vote for the snp and if a _ country, so if you vote for the snp and if a majority of snp mps are returned — and if a majority of snp mps are returned to westminster in that general— returned to westminster in that general election, then that means, essentially, we can begin negotiations for independence, but opponents will have a different view _ opponents will have a different view it — opponents will have a different view it is _ opponents will have a different view. it is a gamble for both sides and nicola — view. it is a gamble for both sides and nicola sturgeon is hoping to trade _ and nicola sturgeon is hoping to trade on — and nicola sturgeon is hoping to trade on the idea that the democratic will of the scottish people — democratic will of the scottish people is being thwarted and that will increase support for independence and the uk government hopes— independence and the uk government hopes hy— independence and the uk government hopes by focusing on the record of the scottish government it will fall. , . , the scottish government it will fall, , ., , ., , the scottish government it will fall. g ., , ., , ., the scottish government it will fall. , ., ., fall. james and chris, thanks for “oininu fall. james and chris, thanks for joining us- _ and there's more analysis from james cook on the independence question and what could happen next, on bbc iplayer.
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just search for "independence, why scotland could vote again." the campaigner dame deborah james has died of bowel cancer at the age of 40. she had been receiving end—of—life care at home — and had raised millions to help others affected by cancer. dame deborah was host of the bbc�*s you, me and the big c podcast — and was honoured in recognition of her fundraising work. our correspondent rachel burden reports. my name is deborahjames. i'm a mum to two kids and a dog called winston. three years ago, at the age of 35, i was diagnosed with stage four bowel cancer and i have been living with cancer ever since. she was young, she was vibrant,
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with an infectious sense of fun. for deborahjames, cancer was a devastating blow. but she was determined to share her story, in the hope it would help others. i've had everything. surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, to enable me to live with cancer. on social media, the former teacher called herself bowel babe, detailing the endless rounds of treatment, but poking fun at her disease. having fun with her kids and making life's important milestones. i made my 40th birthday. that's huge, that's enormous, it's the birthday i never thought i would make. i like winding up my oncologist because he is very straitlaced! on her podcast, you, me and the big c, deborah was open... funny...
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i'm back on treatment and every single time, i don't want to be here. i don't want to be back on treatment. but never tried to hide her emotions. you just think, it's just not fair. in a final interview, she hoped new treatments would soon be found. cancer should become a chronic disease. i hope it will be in my kids' lifetime, i hope it will become a chronic disease. but i think... there are people doing amazing things and we need to support them and fund them. # and i'll rise up # i'll rise like the day...# the fund she set up to aid research has raised millions. foryears, dame deborah, as she became, fought to increase awareness of her disease. with social media posts
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like these inspiring thousands of fellow patients. in the words of one cancer charity, the lives her campaign saved and will continue to save was nothing short of incredible. the news which came in injust the last couple of hours or so, the loss of dame deborahjames, the campaigner and broadcaster, at the age of 40. our correspondent tim muffett is with me now. it is quite a job to keep track of the tributes that have been paid this evening. the tributes that have been paid this evening-— the tributes that have been paid this evenina. , , , _, this evening. many tributes coming in in recognition _ this evening. many tributes coming in in recognition of _ this evening. many tributes coming in in recognition of her _ this evening. many tributes coming in in recognition of her ability - this evening. many tributes coming in in recognition of her ability to . in in recognition of her ability to raise money and lots of it, more than £6 million but also to raise awareness and so encourage people to get over any embarrassment they might have about the potential symptoms. borisjohnson said the awareness she brought to bowel cancer and the research campaign that has been funded will be her legacy and because of her many lives will be saved. keir starmer said
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this is deeply sad news, wrote her charity work was inspirational, and she continued to raise awareness about bowel cancer and impacted so many lives, and herfamily have described deborah as an inspiration who raised awareness and break down barriers and challenged taboos and they also posted this message on instagram. words that are so much in keeping with the message and the tone of the message that she was keen to get across. she wished she had checked out her symptoms at an earlier stage and she urged others to do so. thanks forjoining us. the latest tributes thereto dame deborahjames. turkey has changed its mind and has now agreed to support the nato membership applications from finland and sweden.
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the breakthrough came after the three countries signed a joint memorandum "to extend theirfull support against threats to each other�*s security." they met at the nato summit in madrid, where again the war in ukraine dominated the discussions, as well as the likelihood of russian aggression against other nations. our europe editor katya adler reports from madrid. it has taken weeks of negotiations but sweden and finland are now well on their way to becoming nato members after they signed an agreement with turkey to counter threats to each other�*s security. nato hoped to present this united front tonight to send a clear message to vladimir putin. welcoming finland and sweden into the alliance will make them safer, nato stronger, and the mid—atlantic area more secure. this is vital as we face the biggest security crisis in decades.
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ukraine, of course, is on everyone's minds here. but so is the wider security threat from russia. nato is ramping up its rapid reaction forces, from 40,000 to 300,000. like these french paratroopers preparing to support nato countries close to russia, now feeling very exposed. we can't defend ourselves alone. we will never be alone strong. so we have to have, like, friends and allies. finland and sweden agree. just look at finland's long border with russia. hello. thank you so much for taking the time. moscow's aggression has shocked them. we realised that we have to make a change. - well, it appeared that russia is ready to try to invade - a neighbouring sovereign country. are you worried, though? because president putin told you directly, he warned
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you not tojoin nato, or there would be repercussions. yes, we are not afraid, not at all. but today, russia's foreign minister, sergey lavrov, warned the west beefing up its defences and supporting ukraine would only prolong kyiv�*s agony. and that is the delicate balancing act here. all nato countries agree russia is the aggressor, ukraine must be helped militarily, but to what extent? that's where there's disagreement. should russia be given such a bloody nose, it thinks twice in the future about acts of aggression? or, if vladimir putin feels pushed in a corner, is there a risk that he'll escalate, even making good on a threat to use nuclear weapons? trying to keep nato allies together isjoe biden, arguably the star guest at tonight's gala dinner hosted by
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spain's king and queen. europe's security has been thrown upside down by vladimir putin, but one thing hasn't changed — when this continent is in crisis, it still relies heavily on washington. not long ago, emmanuel macron of france dismissed nato as brain—dead, pretty much obsolete but no one is saying that now and it backed the prime minister described the alliance today as the indisputable guarantor of european security. defence spending, he says, will go up defence spending, he says, will go up in the uk and we have heard similar promises from other european leaders in order to help safeguard all of our futures, they say. katya adler with the latest in madrid, many thanks again. in ukraine, the authorities say more than 20 people were killed yesterday in the packed shopping centre struck by a russian and around 40 people are still missing. dozens more have been injured.
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forensic experts are struggling to identify the dead after the huge blaze that swept through the complex in kremenchuk. our europe correspondent nick beake sent this report. it's hard to tell that this was a shopping centre, but when you get closer, there are signs. russia admits it fired missiles yesterday but says they only landed nearby and then a fire spread here, to what it claims was an empty building. everyone we met today said all that is lies. i saw the fire and a lot of people from here, from here, just running. danny was in his coffee shop opposite. run into safety place and listen childrens, girls... a lot of screams.
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sirens. as we finished talking, another warning. the sirens are blaring once again. the emergency services are continuing their work but everyone else is now trying to take shelter wherever they can. there is a bunker close by. inside we find the man responsible for the security of ukraine. your country has had four months of russian attack. we are talking in an underground bunker, there is another alert at this moment. when does this stop? how can this stop? i think it should be putin death. by our efforts or by efforts of russian people. do you think putin's death will be soon? i hope it. a short drive away, they were treating the injured from yesterday's attack.
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sales assistant maxim tells us there were about 100 customers in his store but he doesn't remember anything after the strike, but his wife viktoria can recall everything. she explains she called her husband who said he was trapped in the fire and smoke and couldn't escape, but somehow he did. russia claims its missiles actually hit this nearby factory, because it was storing american and european military supplies. so we asked the ukrainian emergency services if we could visit. russia says that there were weapons and ammunition from western countries in this factory. is that true? translation: absolutely not. it is a place for making road equipment. machines for road construction. there is also a greenhouse nearby
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where the workers grow cucumbers. back at the shopping centre, we were invited inside to witness the destruction. we have just been told that this area was home to a number of different shops, a pet shop, a pharmacy over there, a toy shop, and it was in this place, just around here, that they found the greatest number of bodies. they say they recovered 11 people. g7 leaders say the attack on this shopping centre was a war crime. ukraine says it is terrorism. and russia continues to claim that it doesn't target civilians. nick beake, bbc news, kremenchuk. ghislaine maxwell, a former girlfriend of the sex offenderjeffrey epstein, has been sentenced to 20 years in prison by a court in new york.
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she was convicted last december of helping epstein abuse teenage girls. our north america correspondent nada tawfik is in new york. nada. ghislaine maxwell showed little emotion as the sentence was read. thejudge said the emotion as the sentence was read. the judge said the 20 years reflected her venus and predatory crimes for which she has taken no responsibility. it was less than prosecutors wanted but nevertheless, they said it showed no one was above they said it showed no one was above the law —— her heinous crimes. a long fought victory for annie farmer and all of ghislaine maxwell's victims. justice was slow. she was one of the earliest to report maxwell and the paedophile jeffrey epstein to police, in 1996. but today, annie said it was never too late for accountability. maxwell and epstein were predators who were able to use their power and privilege to harm countless individuals and for far too long, the institutions that should be protecting the public
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were instead protecting them. and i still hope that we find out more about how that was allowed to occur. maxwell did not look at her victims, but she did address them. she said she was sorry for the pain they had experienced. she also said her association with epstein, who she described as a manipulative, cunning man, was the greatest regret of her life. her statement felt like a very hollow apology to me. she did not take responsibility for the crimes that she committed and it felt like, once more, her trying to do something to benefit her and not at all about the harm that she had caused. the court allowed others who were not a part of the trial to also confront maxwell. the pain and anguish she caused was plain to see, as several accusers emotionally spoke about the lasting impact of her crimes, such as liz stein. she had a wonderful, full, beautiful life. and so many of usjust didn't have a chance to have that.
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i think that the closure part of her sentencing is maybe the beginning for a lot of us to start having the life that we anticipated we might have if we had never met ghislaine maxwell and jeffrey epstein. the british daughter of the disgraced media tycoon robert maxwell ran in the most influential circles, rubbing elbows with presidents and princes. but in court, as she waited to hear her fate, she was supported byjust three members of her family. the judge rejected the defence's claim that maxwell was being punished in epstein's place and said her sentencing had to reflect the seriousness of her role in the horrific scheme. today is a major step towards justice and perhaps healing for the victims. nada tawfik, bbc news, new york. now a look at some other stories making the news today. in texas, at least 50 people have been found dead
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in an abandoned truck on the outskirts of san antonio. the authorities say 16 people, including four children, have been taken to hospital with heat exhaustion. the truck was found around 100 miles from the us—mexico border. the mexican president has blamed trafficking and a lack of control at the border. president biden described the incident as heartbreaking and said his administration was working to crack down on criminal gangs. the uk's biggest police force, the metropolitan police, has been put in special measures after a series of major failures. the force has been heavily criticised over the way it handled high—profile cases such as the murder of sarah everard and the investigation into the rapist and murderer stephen port. a 101—year—old former guard at a nazi concentration camp, identified asjosef s, has been given a five—yearjail term for assisting in the murder of thousands of prisoners at sachsenhausen near berlin. he's the oldest nazi criminal ever
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to stand trial in a german court, though he'd always claimed he worked as a farm labourer during the three years he was a camp guard. donald trump knew that his supporters had weapons when he urged them to storm the us capitol in january last year, according to a former white house aide. cassidy hutchinson told the official inquiry into the riots that senior officials had warned repeatedly that mr trump's rally on that day to try to overturnjoe biden's victory could spiral out of control. and at one stage, president trump was demanding that he be allowed to join the march on the capitol. our north america editor sarah smith reports. meet a surprise witness. her appearance, kept secret until today, delivered explosive testimony. describing how trump had been informed that many in the crowd on the 6th of january were carrying weapons.

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