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tv   BBC News  BBC News  June 28, 2022 8:00pm-9:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. the headlines at 9pm... ——the headlines at 8pm... the british socialite ghislaine maxwell has been sentenced to 20 years in prison for luring young girls to massage rooms for disgraced financier jeffrey epstein to sexually abuse. speaking for the first time in the case ghislaine maxwell said that meeting jeffrey epstein was the "greatest regret" of her life . a break through at the start of the nato summit as turkey lifts its opposition to sweden and finland joining the alliance scotland's first minister nicola sturgeon sets out her plans to hold a second referendum on independence in october next year, arguing the country is being held back by westminster. now is the time at this critical moment in history to debate and
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decide the future of our country. now is the time to get scotland on the right path, the path chosen by those who live here. the committee investigating the washington riots last january has heard evidence about donald trump's behaviour on the day. the president reached up towards the front of the vehicle to grab at the steering wheel. mr engel grabbed his arm and said, "sir, you need to take your hand out the steering wheel." we are going back to the west wing, we are not going to the capital. the met police has been put in special measures after a series of failures.
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ghislaine maxwell has been sentenced to 20 years in a us prison for helping paedophile jeffrey epstein abuse young girls. maxwell was convicted last december of five charges of recruiting and trafficking four teenage girls for abuse by epstein, her then boyfriend. wearing navy prison overalls and ankle shackles, ghislaine maxwell said it was her "greatest regret" to have ever metjeffrey epstein, and that she empathises deeply with all the victims in this case. for their unfailing support of her. and we think all the people who have expressed outrage by her situation and, and that is all i have to say, so thank you. do and, and that is all i have to say, so thank vom— and, and that is all i have to say, so thank you. do you have anything on building's— so thank you. do you have anything on building's decision _ so thank you. do you have anything on building's decision to _ so thank you. do you have anything on building's decision to speak - so thank you. do you have anything on building's decision to speak in i on building's decision to speak in court? _ on building's decision to speak in court? i — on building's decision to speak in court? ., , ., ., , court? i thought her statement was movin: court? i thought her statement was moving and — court? i thought her statement was moving and on _ court? i thought her statement was moving and on planes, _ court? i thought her statement was moving and on planes, and - court? i thought her statement was moving and on planes, and as - moving and on planes, and as everyone should now, that anybody who is appealing they sentence has
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the right to maintain the record and theissues the right to maintain the record and the issues on appeal. thank you. that was the lane next to the's layer, let'sjust listen that was the lane next to the's layer, let's just listen in that was the lane next to the's layer, let'sjust listen in to that was the lane next to the's layer, let's just listen in to the man speaking now, some reaction to that sentence. man speaking now, some reaction to that sentence-— that sentence. nothing to add to the commons that _ that sentence. nothing to add to the commons that she _ that sentence. nothing to add to the commons that she made _ that sentence. nothing to add to the commons that she made about - that sentence. nothing to add to the commons that she made about the l commons that she made about the victims and her sincere hope that the trial, her conviction... this victims and her sincere hope that the trial, her conviction. . .- the trial, her conviction... this is kevin maxwell, _ the trial, her conviction... this is kevin maxwell, ghislaine - the trial, her conviction... this is i kevin maxwell, ghislaine maxwell's brother. just kevin maxwell, ghislaine maxwell's brother. , , ., kevin maxwell, ghislaine maxwell's brother. , ., . ., ., brother. just to echo what bobby has died, ghislaine _ brother. just to echo what bobby has died, ghislaine maxwell— brother. just to echo what bobby has died, ghislaine maxwell will - brother. just to echo what bobby has died, ghislaine maxwell will be - died, ghislaine maxwell will be exercising her right to appeal, her conviction and sentence and we the family will be solidly behind her all the way, thank you very much. that was her brother, ghislaine
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maxwell, who hasjust been that was her brother, ghislaine maxwell, who has just been sentenced to years in prison for the trafficking of young girls dashed 20 years in prison, a lengthy case, ghislaine maxwell is 60 years old will take her to 80 years, normally parole in america can be granted after ten years in california it's after ten years in california it's after seven, after ten years in california it's afterseven, but after ten years in california it's after seven, but there is no indication whether that would be the case. her lawyer interestingly talking about ghislaine maxwell's statement in court because for the first time, ghislaine maxwell addressed the judge first time, ghislaine maxwell addressed thejudge and first time, ghislaine maxwell addressed the judge and a hearing today before the victim statements were given. she apologised for the pain and hoped that her incarceration would bring peace and finality to the victims. she said thatjeffrey epstein should have been appearing in court. he died three years ago, took his own life in a penitentiary in the united
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states, she said that meeting jeffrey epstein was the biggest regret that she has ever made and it was the biggest regret that she had ever made in her life. we will now speak to rachel, —— here with me now is rachel fiset, defence lawyer and co—founder of the legal firm zweiback, fizay & coleman. she's not involved in any aspects of the case but is an expert in the legal process. 20 years, thejudge earlier on had said that she was going to act to the guidelines of between 1519 that i have, she's gone slightly over that. is not a surprise? it’s i have, she's gone slightly over that. is not a surprise?- i have, she's gone slightly over that. is not a surprise? it's not a surrise that. is not a surprise? it's not a surprise given — that. is not a surprise? it's not a surprise given the _ that. is not a surprise? it's not a surprise given the position - that. is not a surprise? it's not a surprise given the position that i that. is not a surprise? it's not a i surprise given the position that the probation officer took in this sentencing. what happened for the judge is that the prosecution made a recommendation of 50—65 years. and ghislaine maxwell's attorneys made a recommendation of four to five
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years, but the probation officer is made a recommendation and they are considered more neutral, more of an allied to a neutral court, and their recommendation was 20 years, and the judgejust went with recommendation was 20 years, and the judge just went with that. what judge 'ust went with that. what about judge just went with that. what about the decision _ judge just went with that. what about the decision by _ judge just went with that. what about the decision by the - judge just went with that. what about the decision by the judge to hear other victims ofjeffrey epstein, including virginia dupree who had made that out—of—court settlement with prince andrea and another british girl. was that unusual, bearing in mind they hadn't taken part in the original trial? it's not unusual. i think what the judge was doing here, given the allegations and the conviction of what is such a serious crime was she was allowing the victims to have their day in court to seek some kind of closure in other ways they may not be able to speak about the impact that the sex abuse had on then, and i think she wanted miss
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maxwell to hear those statements, evenif maxwell to hear those statements, even if they were not heard throughout the trial. ghislaine maxwell speaking _ throughout the trial. ghislaine maxwell speaking for - throughout the trial. ghislaine maxwell speaking for the - throughout the trial. ghislaine maxwell speaking for the first | throughout the trial. ghislaine - maxwell speaking for the first time to the quiet, talking about her regret, about a meeting jeffrey epstein, hoping that her incarceration would lead to peace and finality for the victims. at that have any sway at all on the judge, do you think? i that have any sway at all on the judge, do you think?— that have any sway at all on the judge, do you think? i think that the 'udue judge, do you think? i think that the judge probably _ judge, do you think? i think that the judge probably came - judge, do you think? i think that the judge probably came in - thejudge probably came in knowing what she would do. generally speaking it that you are generally remorseful of the actions of which have been convicted as good in the courts eyes. it's part of the process, it's recommended by attorneys that those that are accused and those that are being sentenced to make those statements so i think she probably could've only gotten herself more harm had
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she not spoken today. what happens now? back to prison, a longer—term prison, but the chances of an appeal? she says she's going to appeal. she said she is going to appeal. she said she is going to appeal both the conviction and the sentence. that will be difficult for her, the conviction appeal is likely a little bit easier than appealing a sentence in this instance because once you are convicted of these crimes, it is hard to appeal the sentence that a judge has the discretion to implement, so i believe there will be more court documents filed, but it is likely to stick based on this 20 years. based on the question _ stick based on this 20 years. based on the question of— stick based on this 20 years. based on the question of parole, - stick based on this 20 years. based on the question of parole, what - on the question of parole, what would the normal procedure be for a sentence like this with somebody age 60? ., ., ., sentence like this with somebody age 60? a, g, g, g, a, , sentence like this with somebody age 60? ._, g, g, a, sentence like this with somebody age 60? 6,6, 6, g, a, , 60? parole would normally have been after about 8096 _ 60? parole would normally have been after about 8096 of _ 60? parole would normally have been
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after about 8096 of the _ 60? parole would normally have been after about 8096 of the sentence - 60? parole would normally have been after about 8096 of the sentence if - after about 80% of the sentence if she is eligible for parole. approximately after 16 years of being in prison, she will likely be eligible for parole if everything is going as planned throughout her sentence and she is behaving... she might be eligible for earlier parole if she were to develop some sort of illness and it would become necessary that she be on home confinement or something like that, my guess is that her lawyers well make all of these arguments again, she is likely to serve the majority of the sentence. she is likely to serve the ma'ority of the sentencefi of the sentence. what sort of institution _ of the sentence. what sort of institution will _ of the sentence. what sort of institution will she _ of the sentence. what sort of institution will she be - of the sentence. what sort of institution will she be sent i of the sentence. what sort of. institution will she be sent to? of the sentence. what sort of - institution will she be sent to? she will be sent — institution will she be sent to? she will be sent to _ institution will she be sent to? sis: will be sent to what institution will she be sent to? ’iia: will be sent to what i institution will she be sent to? 6“ia: will be sent to what i would guess is a maximum security prison, perhaps one notch lower than inside of the us, a lot of prisons have different levels security, they will make an argument that she should be
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sentenced to a prison where she is kept safe from the outside public because there have been death threats, questions of her mental health and if she is on suicide watch, so those kinds of issues will come into play as she is sent and stand where she eventually ends up. could that mean that she will be keptin could that mean that she will be kept in isolation? it’s could that mean that she will be kept in isolation?— kept in isolation? it's unlikely that she will _ kept in isolation? it's unlikely that she will want _ kept in isolation? it's unlikely that she will want to - kept in isolation? it's unlikely that she will want to be - kept in isolation? it's unlikely that she will want to be in - that she will want to be in isolation for that amount of time, but what they will want is for her not to be in the general population because of the death threats, then the bureau has come along with potentially the judge of their attorneys in the probation officer is where she would end up and what the threat assessment to her actually is. the threat assessment to her actually is— the threat assessment to her actually is. the threat assessment to her actuall is. ., ~ , i, , actually is. rachel, thank you very much indeed _ actually is. rachel, thank you very much indeed for _ actually is. rachel, thank you very much indeed for giving _ actually is. rachel, thank you very much indeed for giving us - actually is. rachel, thank you very much indeed for giving us your - much indeed for giving us your analysis of that sentence in the last half hour or so. ghislaine
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maxwell's sentenced to 20 years for trafficking of underage girls. in the last half hour, the secretary general of nato, jens stoltenberg, has said that turkey has agreed to support sweden and finland's membership of the organisation. iam i am pleased to announce that we have an agreement that paves the way for finland and sweden to join have an agreement that paves the way for finland and sweden tojoin nato. turkey, finland and sweden have signed a memorandum that addresses cherokee's concerns. including around arms exports and the fight against terrorism. no ally has suffered more brutal terrorist attacks than to key off. including from the terrorist group pkk. the
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government of turkey, finland and sweden have agreed to enhance their cooperation on counterterrorism. as nato allies, finland and sweden commit fully to support turkey against threats to its national security. this includes further amending the domestic legislation, cracking down on pkk activities and entering into an agreement with turkey on extradition. in light of the progress we have made together, turkey has agreed to support finland and swedenjoining nato. i want to thank the president for the collective spirit of today's talks.
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in nato, we have always shown that whatever our differences, we can always sit down, find common ground and resolve any issues. nato's open—door policy has been a historic success, welcoming finland and sweden into the alliance will make than stronger and the euro atlantic area more secure. let's get the latest from our correspondent mark lowen, who's in madrid. quite a break there, he originally wanted 45 of these extradited, i'm not quite sure if that is going to happen. what other hard bargains did he drive which are perhaps not being discussed? ~ .. ., , he drive which are perhaps not being discussed? ~ ., , ., discussed? well, i actually asked the nato secretary _ discussed? well, i actually asked the nato secretary what - discussed? well, i actually asked the nato secretary what it - discussed? well, i actually asked| the nato secretary what it meant, this extradition agreement, for the kurdish journalists this extradition agreement, for the kurdishjournalists in this extradition agreement, for the kurdish journalists in the this extradition agreement, for the kurdishjournalists in the kurdish
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opposition figures who have asylum in finland and sweden, having been in finland and sweden, having been in many cases chased out of turkey, and he responded to me that all extradition will happen within human rights laws, then human rights norms, and under international law, so it looks like it's been slightly kicked into the long grass for the finnish and swedish governments to look at with turkey, but there has been an agreement that the extradition process i suppose we'll be looked into. he was also asked whether there was any agreement about, for example, more american arms exports are whether they would be given to turkey in response to turkey lifting its detail and finland and sweden. he is not specific about that. he talked much more about general cooperation, this memorandum of understanding signed by finland, sweden and turkey to unblock the future membership. it is a major break there, as a second it's actually unexpected that it came today. we all thought that this
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was going to be kicked into the weeks and months ahead, but clearly there was a lot of pressure on the president to give ground. nato very keen to bolster its northern flank and to admit these two new members. now, apart from finland and sweden, this is a summit discussing, of course, above all, support for ukraine and a massive enhancement of manpower and firepower i need a's eastern flank and the our baltic nations that you very much in the line of fire from russia, but in terms of the support from a military support from a military support, political support to ukraine, well thatis political support to ukraine, well that is absolutely at the top of this agenda, this nato summit coming for the first time that europe has faced were since the 1990s and potentially the most fatal war in europe since the second world war. earlier, there was a scram here, as the mayor of kyiv came round to the press centre and managed to get one questionjim and i asked him whether he is satisfied by the expression of support from nato members so far. i thank them for the support of
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ukraine — i thank them for the support of ukraine. it's very important, without— ukraine. it's very important, without the support, without economic and political support, without— economic and political support, without weapons delivered, we cannot survive. _ without weapons delivered, we cannot survive. and _ without weapons delivered, we cannot survive, and that is why, for us, it is a prioritv — survive, and that is why, for us, it is a priority. it's a priority, and unity— is a priority. it's a priority, and unity around _ is a priority. it's a priority, and unity around ukraine of democratic countries is — unity around ukraine of democratic countries is the key for peace back in europe — countries is the key for peace back in europe. it's the key for peace in europe _ mark, well done for getting the word with him, i can see quite a scram there. in terms of nato objectives on this and we have heard from the g7, the closing of the g7, what is the position now that russia should be driven out? of the whole of ukraine? watch are leaders saying there? ., ., ~ ukraine? watch are leaders saying there? ., ., ,, ., there? if we are talking about whether russia _ there? if we are talking about whether russia should - there? if we are talking about whether russia should leave l there? if we are talking about i whether russia should leave the crimean peninsula and lands that it entered in terms of its troop in eastern ukraine in 2014, you know, the position from ukraine certainly
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is that that should be the case, and clearly there is a desire from the more hawkish members of nato that, yes, russian needs to leave the entire territory recognised by the international community as ukrainian, you know, ithink there will be perhaps disagreement over whether russia should be pushed back to post 2014 territory that is after eastern ukraine, that is all to be discussed in the weeks and months as this war progresses, but at the moment i think what we are seeing is clearly a huge expression of support for ukraine and a readiness from nato to bolster its troops to those baltic countries, estonia, latvia, the rapid reaction force from nato is going to be increased from 40,000 to more than 300,000 troops ready to spring into action at the last minute in order to protect those vulnerable eastern members of the nato alliance. that is very much the centre of this summit. i think really, ten, in terms of what's happened today but that unblocking of finland and sweden, but if you think vladimir putin has got up i
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said the exact opposite of what he wanted, he wanted an end to nato expansion, he's now got to members joining the nato alliance and at a stroke the border between russia and nato has doubled, will have doubled when finland and sweden willjoin. just one other issue as well, china and the threat it poses, what is nato saying about that?- and the threat it poses, what is nato saying about that? well, that is very much _ nato saying about that? well, that is very much also _ nato saying about that? well, that is very much also part _ nato saying about that? well, that is very much also part of _ is very much also part of discussions here in terms of china's military expansionism into the south china sea, in terms of china's that's to taiwan in the one of the members, lithuania has been borne the brunt of chinese anger, opened a de facto embassy in taiwan which meant that china then basically imposed in effect a kind of trade embargo on lithuania, so that, you know, the start of tension between the nato alliance and china very much also part of these discussions. china's military presence in africa, cybersecurity, migration, lots more to discuss beyond ukraine from the
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eastern flank and finland and sweden for this very, very attacked three day nato summit.— for this very, very attacked three day nato summit. mark with the very latest in madrid, _ day nato summit. mark with the very latest in madrid, thank _ day nato summit. mark with the very latest in madrid, thank you _ day nato summit. mark with the very latest in madrid, thank you so - day nato summit. mark with the very latest in madrid, thank you so much. j the first minister —— the first minister of scotland, nicola sturgeon, has outlined her plans for a second referendum on independence from the rest of the uk. she told the scottish parliament that a bill would set out how a vote could be held in october next year. the question would be the same as that posed in the last referendum in 2014. "should scotland be an independent country?". ms sturgeon has written to the prime minister to inform him of her plans. speaking to reporters as he flew to the nato summit in spain, borisjohnson said. "we'll study it very carefully and respond properly." addding that he thinks that "we'll have a stronger economy and a stronger country together." 0ur scotland editorjames cook reports from edinburgh. chanting: yes, yes, yes! no, no, no! scotland 2014, when
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politics came alive. how dare they say that this country is not capable of running its own affairs? this is everyone's flag, everyone's country, everyone's culture, and everyone's streets. this is the vision we've got for your country. i but should we do this all over again? how does the nation feel about the idea of a second referendum? yeah, i think if there's a public call for it then we should definitely have one and just see what the public thinks. i don't think it's the best idea. yes, go for it, yeah, another one. oh, my god, again? presiding officer... well, yes, if nicola sturgeon has her way. now is the time for independence. the plan is to ask voters, should scotland be an independent country? to which they said no eight years ago. i can announce that the scottish government is proposing that the independent referendum be held on the 19th of october 2023. these are... applause. but does this parliament have the power to hold that vote?
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the first minister now says she wants the supreme court to decide sooner rather than later. the fact is neither legal opinions nor political arguments will resolve this point. we must establish legal fact. that is why, in my view, we must seek now to accelerate to the point when we have legal clarity, legal fact. last time, that wasn't needed. david cameron agreed to hand over the power to hold a vote in 2014. his successor has no such plans. we think the number one priority for the country is the economic pressures, the spikes in the cost of energy. our plan for a stronger economy certainly means that we think that we're stronger working together. the senior civil servant who helped negotiate the terms of the last referendum says in the end, it won't bejudges who settle the matter. the supreme court can absolutely say there's no mechanism to consult- the scottish people on independence without westminster's consent - and plenty of people, - plenty of experts expect that
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will be their verdict. ultimately, there is some law- to come first, and then there's some pretty raw politics about the nature of the country we live in, _ the nature of scotland's position within the uk, i the nature of its right to choose its own constitutional future. i just across the road from the parliament, the british state was putting on a show this afternoon. nicola sturgeon may want to keep the monarchy, but she's trying again to end the 300—year—old political project which is the united kingdom. james cook, bbc news. let's speak to akash paun, who's a constitutional expert from the institute for government. a legal route from the lord advocate seeking a ruling from the supreme court to the supreme court say we
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are not getting a legal ruling on this? he are not getting a legal ruling on this? ., , ., ., , this? he wants to hold this referendum _ this? he wants to hold this referendum on _ this? he wants to hold this referendum on a _ this? he wants to hold this referendum on a legal- this? he wants to hold this i referendum on a legal basis, this? he wants to hold this - referendum on a legal basis, and as we have just heard, referendum on a legal basis, and as we havejust heard, their approach to that i think has become is a bit of a surprise to some people and to decide whether it is within legislative competence. whether to accept that reference. they will announce the process will be followed shortly, my expectation is that there will now be an assessment by the court in the usual way of whether the scottish parliament has this power and then as indicated in your previous package, my own view is quite an uphill battle that the scottish government will face in arguing that it will have the power
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to do this without uk agreement. nicola sturgeon would argue that they have a mandate because they have msps plus the greens, so they have msps plus the greens, so they have a majority who want this, but in terms of going to westminster, there is no suggestion from boris johnson that he would allow article 30 scenario as david cameron did backin 30 scenario as david cameron did back in 2014. so what happens then? itjust back in 2014. so what happens then? it just goes back in 2014. so what happens then? itjust goes on and on until the next election and then becomes i meme campaigning issue for the snp? that's certainly what nicola sturgeon said would be the next step. if this case is taken to the supreme court and the supreme court rules against her, the referendum cannot happen on a timetable around the terms that she announced today. the plan is for the next uk general election to be fought on this single
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question and the aspiration is presumably that her pretty well in a landslide majority to enable her to argue that, look, we have a clear mandate the legal position will not have changed and it will still be a decision of westminster. the point is presumably _ decision of westminster. the point is presumably that _ decision of westminster. the point is presumably that the _ decision of westminster. the point is presumably that the uk - decision of westminster. the point is presumably that the uk is - decision of westminster. the point is presumably that the uk is basedj is presumably that the uk is based on that voluntary union of its members. and if we can prove it's not a voluntary union then it should see. �* . not a voluntary union then it should see. . ., ., not a voluntary union then it should see. ~ ., ., ., ., ., see. and i have an argument to that on the basic— see. and i have an argument to that on the basic point _ see. and i have an argument to that on the basic point of— see. and i have an argument to that on the basic point of democratic - on the basic point of democratic principle will work very well
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basically clearly wants to leave and we see a succession of majority giving a support to an snp, the feeling will grow being held against its well, and in that case in the end, the referendum would have to be held, but we are not at that point yet. we will see what happens with the legislation and the legal pace and will return to the political and electoral battlefield dashed battlefields in the run up to 2024. i was just looking to him actually, sincejune last year, i think it is, that in 23 poles by the media organisations seeking to find out whether people were proud only three
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narrowly showed those in favour. is that reflected in your view about where things stand at the moment going back to the original, it was 55-45, going back to the original, it was 55—45, or things tighter now? thea;r 55-45, or things tighter now? they seem to be — 55-45, or things tighter now? they seem to be a _ 55-45, or things tighter now? they seem to be a bit _ 55-45, or things tighter now? they seem to be a bit tighter, _ 55—45, or things tighter now? t“ie: seem to be a bit tighter, but it's been pretty static, that's true, there is a period in 2020 and 22021 when the yes side seem to be ahead in the polls consistently ahead for about a year or so as i recall, that is a time when first brexit was in its final phase and that's very unpopular in scotland, and then in the early period of coronavirus, pandemic, there was a perception that the scottish government was doing a much betterjob than they uk government, and that seemed to be doing too much support for independence. but it didn't last, and by the time the last scottish parliament election in may 2021, the
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no side had by then edged ahead and essentially since then, so for the last year or so, exactly as you say, there has not been any clearer or a consistent evidence that the scottish people were either want another referendum or, if there were to be one that they would vote yes. 0k, to be one that they would vote yes. ok, thank you very much indeed. let's return to our main story this hour, the news that ghislaine maxwell, convicted of sex trafficking forjeffrey epstein has been sentenced to 20 years in jail by a court in new york. let's go to our north american correspondent. i don't thank you were in court for the actual sentencing, but have we heard what her reaction was after that statement from her to the court and thejudge? that statement from her to the court and the judge?— and the 'udge? yes, i don't think there and the judge? yes, i don't think there was an _ and the judge? yes, i don't think there was an expectation - and the judge? yes, i don't think there was an expectation that. there was an expectation that ghislaine maxwell would address the
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court, she addressed the victims directly, so they where those who wear part of the trial itself, four women who would testify to the be is that they suffered at the hands of jeffrey epstein and ghislaine maxwell. but they also heard from when they knew who weren't part of the trial, but at the hands of the couple as well, the last 17 years, six schools of women have come out to accuse the pair. and when glen maxwell, ghislaine maxwell, i will let you know what she said, she addressed the victim saying i'm sorry for the pain you experience. she called jeffrey epstein a cunning man who has fooled in all his orbits. she didn't take any responsibility for anything that she has been charged with and convicted with, and thejudge mentioned that in her statement and said that ghislaine maxwell has not taken any responsibility. a short while ago, i spoke to the lawyer of any farmer, any farmer was one of the four women who testified in the trial six
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months ago. here is what they had to say. this was reallyjust a wonderful day forjustice. i mean, we saw ghislaine maxwell getting sentenced to 20 years in prison, so she will be in prison essentially for the rest of her life. share she will be in prison essentially for the rest of her life.- for the rest of her life. are you hoping for _ for the rest of her life. are you hoping for more? _ for the rest of her life. are you hoping for more? 0r— for the rest of her life. are you hoping for more? or as - for the rest of her life. are you hoping for more? or as the - for the rest of her life. are you - hoping for more? or as the sentence enoughin hoping for more? or as the sentence enough in your eyes? i hoping for more? or as the sentence enough in your eyes?— enough in your eyes? i think this is a treat enough in your eyes? i think this is a great sentence. _ enough in your eyes? i think this is a great sentence. this _ enough in your eyes? i think this is a great sentence. this is _ enough in your eyes? i think this is a great sentence. this is the - a great sentence. this is thejudge pushing the boundaries of the sentencing guidelines to say i'm going to send a message that anybody who harms young children will be held accountable.— who harms young children will be held accountable. what did you make a fair statement? _ held accountable. what did you make a fair statement? were _ held accountable. what did you make a fair statement? were you _ held accountable. what did you make | a fair statement? were you expecting her to address the court is met when she did, what did you think of it? i wasn't sure if she would make a statement or not. it was disappointing. again, infront statement or not. it was disappointing. again, in front of the courtroom and didn't take responsibility for the crimes that she committed. she talked about empathy to others but never said, "i'm so sorry that i did these things to these young girls." and that was missing from this. she should've done that today. ghislaine maxwell, 60 — should've done that today. ghislaine maxwell, 60 years _ should've done that today. ghislaine maxwell, 60 years old, _ should've done that today. ghislaine maxwell, 60 years old, sentenced i should've done that today. ghislaine| maxwell, 60 years old, sentenced to 20 years, may be some chance to parole at some stage, but an appeal
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from her team. they have said she was a proxy. basically they believe the only reason the government went after her is because jeffrey reason the government went after her is becausejeffrey epstein is dead. it killed himself in a jail cell three years ago whilst awaiting his own sex trafficking trial so she is going to appeal. just to also add that, in terms of her sentence, it is 20 years but she will be eligible for supervised released potentially after 15 years. she has also been fined $750,000. after15 years. she has also been fined $750,000.— after15 years. she has also been fined $750,000. ., ~ _, y . fined $750,000. thank you very much indeed. fined $750,000. thank you very much indeed- let's — fined $750,000. thank you very much indeed. let's stay _ fined $750,000. thank you very much indeed. let's stay with _ fined $750,000. thank you very much indeed. let's stay with events - fined $750,000. thank you very much indeed. let's stay with events in - indeed. let's stay with events in the united states. the congressional committee investigating an attack by donald tom supporters on the capitol building injanuary last year donald tom supporters on the capitol building in january last year has been hearing more building injanuary last year has been hearing more evidence,
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explosive evidence, this time from cassidy hutchinson who at the time as a senior aide to the president's chief of staff mark meadows. she said donald trump grabbed the wheel of a car to try to make it had to the capital but was forced back. the president the capital but was forced back. t“ie: president said something to the effect of, i am the effing president, take me up to the capital now. to which he responded, sir, you have to go back to the west wing. the president reached up towards the front of the vehicle to grab the steering wheel. mr engel grabbed his arm and said, sir, you need to take your hand off the steering wheel, we are going back to the west wing. going to the capital. mr trump then used his free hand to lunge towards bobby angle and when the story was recounted to me emotion towards his clavicles. ~ . , ~ recounted to me emotion towards his
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clavicles. ~ ., , ~ clavicles. was mr engel in the room? he was. clavicles. was mr engel in the room? he was- did — clavicles. was mr engel in the room? he was- did he _ clavicles. was mr engel in the room? he was. did he correct _ clavicles. was mr engel in the room? he was. did he correct or disagree i he was. did he correct or disagree with any part _ he was. did he correct or disagree with any part of — he was. did he correct or disagree with any part of the _ he was. did he correct or disagree with any part of the story? - he was. did he correct or disagree with any part of the story? he - he was. did he correct or disagree with any part of the story? he did| with any part of the story? he did not correct _ with any part of the story? he did not correct or— with any part of the story? he did not correct or disagree _ with any part of the story? he did not correct or disagree with - with any part of the story? he did not correct or disagree with any l not correct or disagree with any part of the story. she not correct or disagree with any part of the story.— part of the story. she also was backstage _ part of the story. she also was backstage with _ part of the story. she also was backstage with donald - part of the story. she also was backstage with donald trump. part of the story. she also was i backstage with donald trump on part of the story. she also was - backstage with donald trump on the day itself, january six, before he gave the speech to reporters were he urge them to converge on the capital. this is what she said about what happened then. i capital. this is what she said about what happened then.— what happened then. i was in the vicini of what happened then. i was in the vicinity of the _ what happened then. i was in the vicinity of the conversation - what happened then. i was in the vicinity of the conversation ray i vicinity of the conversation ray overheard the president say something to the effect of, i think they have weapons. they are not here to hurt me. let my people in. they can match from here. let the people in. to can match from here. let the people in. ., , . ., , can match from here. let the people in. . ., , in. to be clear, is it your understanding _ in. to be clear, is it your understanding that - in. to be clear, is it your understanding that the l in. to be clear, is it your- understanding that the president
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wanted to take them away and said that the armed individuals were not there to hurt him? that that the armed individuals were not there to hurt him?— there to hurt him? that is a fair assessment. _ there to hurt him? that is a fair assessment. let's _ there to hurt him? that is a fair assessment. let's get - there to hurt him? that is a fair assessment. let's get the - there to hurt him? that is a fair. assessment. let's get the latest. there to hurt him? that is a fair- assessment. let's get the latest. we were not due — assessment. let's get the latest. we were not due to _ assessment. let's get the latest. we were not due to have _ assessment. let's get the latest. we were not due to have hearing - assessment. let's get the latest. we were not due to have hearing untili were not due to have hearing until next month. it was evidence that people had to hear and it was pretty explosive. it people had to hear and it was pretty ex - losive. . , people had to hear and it was pretty ex - losive. ., , , people had to hear and it was pretty exlosive. ., , , ., , explosive. it was. this was the first time _ explosive. it was. this was the first time that _ explosive. it was. this was the first time that we _ explosive. it was. this was the first time that we had - explosive. it was. this was the first time that we had first - explosive. it was. this was the i first time that we had first person testimony of those hours before the attack on the capital and what it looked like within the white house and at the valley where donald trump was backstage. we were getting actual testimony. some of the episode she recounted were second—hand but her hearing in that tent, donald trump acknowledging
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that there are people in the crowd who were weapons and are being denied in his stood up on that stage minutes later and directed people to go to capitol hill. that was pretty compelling testimony. when she said the secret service informed white house officials that there was potential for violence on january six and mark meadows, her boss, said things could get very, very bad on january six and still, the white house continued with plans to hold the valley. did not apparently do anything to try to prevent the violence happening. i think that was very compelling and damning testimony. very compelling and damning testimony-— very compelling and damning testimon . ~ ., ., testimony. when he was asked about metal detectors, _ testimony. when he was asked about metal detectors, forget _ testimony. when he was asked about metal detectors, forget the - testimony. when he was asked about metal detectors, forget the names, | metal detectors, forget the names, he said, i don't want any of these there. let the men, let the men, interestingly, mark meadows, former chief of staff said originally he would testify and changed his view on that. what is the view now? he
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has on that. what is the view now? he: has been charged with contempt of congress by the house of representatives for not complying with a subpoena for documents and for in person testimony. we had from the justice department a few weeks ago that they were not planning on bringing an indictment against him or criminally prosecuting him, unlike some of the other people on donald trump's or a bit like steve bannon who are going to be facing trialfor refusing to bannon who are going to be facing trial for refusing to comply with subpoenas from this committee but i think that this is going to increase the pressure on mark meadows to repeat what is assistant is saying and there are other people, the senior lawyer within the white house he was also referenced by ms hutchinson on multiple occasions and pressure on him to come forward and either corroborate or say her accounts of donald trump's behaviour, these one is, these
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incidents up to january six, that that they are not accurate. intern; that they are not accurate. very busy evening — that they are not accurate. very busy evening here _ that they are not accurate. very busy evening here in _ that they are not accurate. very busy evening here in terms of news from the states. and indeed with the second referendum in scotland. i wonder what they're going to be covered and what order in the morning papers because we are looking ahead. ukraine's government says more than 20 people were killed in the packed shopping centre that was hit by a russian missile yesterday — and around 40 people are still missing. dozens more have been injured. the authorities are struggling to identify the dead after the huge blaze that swept through the shopping mall in kremenchuk. you can see how little is left of it. our europe correspondent nick beake is there. it's hard to tell that this was a shopping centre
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but when you get closer, there are signs. russia admits it fired missiles yesterday but says they only landed nearby and then a fire spread here, to what it claims was an empty building. everyone we met today said all of that is lies. i saw the fire and a lot of people from here, from here, just running. danny was in his coffee shop opposite. waiting two minutes, then run to safety place and listen to children, girls... a lot of screams. as we finished talking, another warning. the sirens are blaring again, the emergency services are continuing their work
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but everyone else is now trying to take shelter wherever they can. there is a bunker close by. inside we find the man responsible for the security of ukraine. your country has had four months of russian attack. we are talking in an underground bunker, there is another alert at this moment. when can the stop? how can it stop? i think it should be putin death. by our efforts or by the efforts of the russian people. do you think putin's death will be soon? i hope it. a short drive away they were treating the injured from yesterday's attack. sales assistant maxime tells us there were 100 customers in his door
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but he doesn't remember anything after the strike, but his wife victoria recalls everything. she explains her husband called her and said he was trapped in the fire and smoke and couldn't escape, but somehow he did. back at the shopping centre we are invited inside to witness the destruction. we have just been told that this area was home to wait number of different shops, a pet shop, a pharmacy over there, a toy shop and it was in this place, just around here, that they found the greatest number of bodies. they say they recovered 11 people. g7 leaders say the attack on the shopping centre was a war crime. ukraine says it is terrorism and russia continues to claim that it doesn't target civilians. nick beake, bbc news, kremenchuk.
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the new head of the british army — general sir patrick sanders — has warned that president putin's invasion of ukraine represents the greatest threat to european peace and democracy in decades. the defence secretary ben wallace has urged the prime minister to increase spending on the uk's armed forces. our political editor chris mason has been travelling with the prime minister to the nato summit in madrid. he said that nato was the indisputable guarantor of european security and it had never been more vital. that is at home with the defence of secretary saying it needs to rise. the defence secretary saying that historically over the last couple of generations it has been allowed to shrivel. the head of the armed forces making a comparison with 1947, the build—up to the second world war, so what did the prime minister tell us? is a defence
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spending will go up this year to 2.3% of national income. and plenty members of nato don't make that target but prices are rising, inflation soaring and the government has acknowledged it will break a manifesto commitment to increase defence spending by more than inflation every year. and though some are worried that there is smoke and mirrors going on in terms of how the government is defending its defence budget. as the summit gets under way there will be a central question and whether members are spending enough to face up to the threat of russia the metropolitan police has been put in special measures by the watchdog by the watchdog russia — her majesty's inspectorate of constabulary and fire and rescue services— in the wake of a series of failures. we'll be speaking to our home affairs correspondent shortly. the mayor of london is also the police and crime commissioner for the met poliec. he agrees the met needs to improve.
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one of the reasons why welcome the police inspectorate's decision today is because it is a recognition of some of the issues i have been raising, we have been raising for some time. raising, we have been raising for some time-— raising, we have been raising for some time. , ., _, . some time. trust and confidence in our policing — some time. trust and confidence in our policing is _ some time. trust and confidence in our policing is integral _ some time. trust and confidence in our policing is integral to _ some time. trust and confidence in our policing is integral to policing i our policing is integral to policing by consent and addressing some of the systemic issues raised today by the systemic issues raised today by the police inspectorate. it is with the police inspectorate. it is with the important now. the new commissioner needs to be a reforming commissioner. i know many, the home secretary, the premise and others were against the decision but i was clear in my mind we need a commissioner who understand the challenges, the complexities and the opportunity of police. tributes have been paid to 35 year—old zara aleena — who was killed while walking home in east london during the early hours of sunday. they described her as a "kind soul, who lit up a room". ayshea buksh sent this report. she was a young woman
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with her whole life ahead of her. 35—year—old zara aleena from gants hill in east london had been walking home in the early hours of sunday morning, but didn't make it. all day people have been coming here to lay flowers and put out tributes to zara aleena at the spot where she was murdered along the cranbrook road in gants hill. some who i've spoken to knew her and others who didn't. all have said they are deeply saddened about what's happened here. for amrit singh, zara was a kind and supportive friend. they'd known each other for over 20 years. she did bring joy to a lot of people, especially me, like we always... i know i could turn to her and talk about anything that was going on in my life, whether it be good or bad and vice versa. i was there for her, but she was just an amazing person. like she she did. like i said, she didn't she didn't like arguments. she didn't like anything like that. she just wanted a peaceful life. she wanted to get along with everyone. police say it was an opportunist
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attack by a stranger and women should not have to change their behaviour. april mehmet organises regular walks for local women to support them and listen to their safety concerns. after the sarah everard death, i felt like there was a need to start up my group. the walks has helped women to build relationships in the area with one another and also to build their confidence. we've helped women get back to work. we've helped women come out of domestic abuse situations. ramesh verma is a local resident who's lived in the area for years. she wants more to be done to help women and men feel safer. i'm angry. i'm sad. you can just put all feelings because i live just two doors away from where she was murdered, you know? and she was like my daughter and my granddaughter. and ifeel, what's going to happen to us women? how many more have to be murdered when something is done in london? redbridge council say they're working closely
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with the police and have invested in cctv and street lighting. a 29—year—old man has been arrested on suspicion of murder. ayesha bakhsh, bbc, london. a woman is suing a rape crisis centre in brighton forfailing to provide female—only support meetings. she's told the bbc she's fighting for women's rights and is bringing a case under the equality act. the charity which runs the service denies it's breaking the law. our home affairs correspondent, june kelly, reports. i think my case is about women's rights. i think women have sex—based rights and protections, and these are under threat at the moment from trans activism. the words of the woman bringing this legal case against her local rape crisis centre in brighton. she says she started going to group meetings here because she was sexually abused as a child, and then, when she was in her 20s, she was raped. how did you find those initial meetings? really, really supportive and helpful. it was all women. i had a support network, which is the first time i
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had felt that since the abuse happened and i was raped. legally, she has to remain anonymous, and so she is using the pseudonym sarah, and we've had her words re—voiced. you go to another session and, just talk us through what happened. there was someone in that group that appeared to be male. i assumed this person was trans. i was a bit taken aback. why was it so difficult for you to have somebody in that group who is a trans woman? i have been raped by a man. i have been sexually abused by men, and ijust don't necessarily trust that men are who they say they are. the charity survivors network, which runs the rape crisis centre in brighton, declined our request for an interview because it said it hadn't yet received details of the legal claim from sarah's lawyers. but in a statement, it told us: we wholeheartedly disagree with any
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suggestion that we haven't complied with equalities law for welcoming trans women into our women—only spaces. and we will be vigorously defending the anticipated allegations. the claimant was made aware of survivors network's trans—inclusive position prior to attending the group. sarah denies she is transphobic. i think it's brilliant that they are so openly supportive to the transgender community but, for me, personally, a mixed—sex space doesn't work. i think having one additional group for women who were born female would be the obvious solution. sarah says there are no other single—sex services in brighton. meanwhile, the rape crisis centre says it wants to reassure all survivors that it is still there for them. june kelly, bbc news. the population of england and wales has soared to a new high of almost 60 million in the past decade. the results of the 2021 census show the population has grown by more than 6%.
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the survey which is carried out every 10 years, asks people to answer questions about themselves, their household and their home to build a detailed snapshot of society. our home editor, mark easton, has been having a look at the results of the census, which began with asking where people were on march 21 last year the number of people who answer that question with england was... experts thought it would be higher. the official protection was 57 million to 500,000 below expectations. in wales the population was... also little lower—than—expected. and when you add in northern ireland which publish centres date a few weeks ago and the best estimate for scotland, their census results will be next year, you get a uk figure ofjust
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under 67 million. this map shows how much population has changed since 2011. the darker the blue, the bigger the increase. if it is yellow or orange the population has fallen and given how much money local councils get is based on the best population figures there will be some worried head scratching in a few places, notably, parts of wales in the north—east. but also, in the richest local authority area in the country. kensington and chelsea. it so it's population fell by 10% in ten years according to the senses. how come? one theory is that because
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it was conducted in the middle of a pandemic some of the wealthier residents had gone to their second or perhaps their third homes. look where population generally increased. you can see in our cup to dorset in the cotswolds through cambridge and peterborough. might that be evidence of a covid escape from the big cities? if it is then some cancers will be understanding the sensors is warped by the strange behaviours of the health emergency. more than 7000 delegates attending the conference in portugal. the bbc has this. all that is in jeopardy if global sea levels to rise with them. at the opening of the united nations oceans conference, the head of the un issued a stark warning urging the world to stop treating its waters like garbage dump. brute
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world to stop treating its waters like garbage dump.— world to stop treating its waters like garbage dump. we are facing what i like garbage dump. we are facing what i would _ like garbage dump. we are facing what i would call _ like garbage dump. we are facing what i would call an _ like garbage dump. we are facing what i would call an ocean - what i would call an ocean emergency. our what i would call an ocean emergency. 0ur oceans are what i would call an ocean emergency. our oceans are issuing what i would call an ocean emergency. 0ur oceans are issuing an sos. they are struggling, heating and acidifying. corals are dying. coastal ecosystems such as mangroves, sea grasses and wetlands are being degraded. fisheries are being depleted and the ocean is choking on plastic wastes. that messaue choking on plastic wastes. that message was — choking on plastic wastes. that message was echoed _ choking on plastic wastes. that message was echoed by thousands of guests who travelled to portugal along with environmental leaders like the us climate envoy as well as heads of state from 20 countries. they came from places like kenya, saudi arabia, napa california. canada, amsterdam. the star of the blockbuster film aqua man also made an appearance. by, blockbuster film aqua man also made an appearance-— an appearance. a try to be professional. _ an appearance. a try to be professional. as _
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an appearance. a try to be professional. as he - an appearance. a try to be professional. as he was i an appearance. a try to be i professional. as he was named an appearance. a try to be - professional. as he was named the an appearance. a try to be _ professional. as he was named the un uzzlement professional. as he was named the un puzzlement advocate _ professional. as he was named the un puzzlement advocate for _ professional. as he was named the un puzzlement advocate for life _ professional. as he was named the un puzzlement advocate for life below i puzzlement advocate for life below water. we puzzlement advocate for life below water. ~ , puzzlement advocate for life below water. , ., , ., water. we combine ambition, dedication. — water. we combine ambition, dedication, hope _ water. we combine ambition, dedication, hope that - water. we combine ambition, dedication, hope that we i water. we combine ambition, dedication, hope that we can | water. we combine ambition, - dedication, hope that we can change these outcomes.— dedication, hope that we can change these outcomes. current pledges said that the un chief — these outcomes. current pledges said that the un chief are _ these outcomes. current pledges said that the un chief are still— these outcomes. current pledges said that the un chief are still not - that the un chief are still not enough to turn the tide. the prime minister has announced the uk inquiry into covid—19 is now formally established. he has published its terms of reference which says the inquiry will examine, consider and report on the preparations and the response to the pandemic in england, wales, scotland and northern ireland. this includes listening to the experiences of bereaved families, and looking for any disparities in the impact the pandemic had on different groups of people. the aviation regulator has ordered heathrow airport to reduce passenger charges — which are paid by airlines then usually passed
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on to customers in air fares. the average charge per passenger — currently at £30.19 — should fall by nearly 4 pounds, come 2026. heathrow, which wanted the charges raised, said the move would undermine the delivery of key improvements. the water regulator, ofwat, has announced an investigation into south west water because of concerns about its environmental performance and sewage treatment practices. itjoins five other water companies in england and wales being scrutinised over wastewater concerns. raw sewage was discharged into waterways 375—thousand times last year, according to the environment agency.
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equipment has been confiscated by police. he became known for shouting stop breaks it outside parliament following the eu referendum. police, using new powers that came into force today removed his equipment and we switched on speakers in an area outside parliament by the using and provide equipment is banned. let her turn to another breaking story. turkey has dropped its opposition to the cession of finland and nato. he needs unanimity from nato states to allow and these two countries are crucial in terms of the landmass now that nato controls in terms of its allegiance in northern europe and in the baltic. let's speak to charlie who is a finnish defence analyst. a deal struck.
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who is a finnish defence analyst. a dealstruck. is who is a finnish defence analyst. a deal struck. is that a deal worth paying for nato membership? $5 deal struck. is that a deal worth paying for nato membership? as they understood from _ paying for nato membership? as they understood from the _ paying for nato membership? as they understood from the finnish - paying for nato membership? as they understood from the finnish side, i paying for nato membership? as they understood from the finnish side, of. understood from the finnish side, of course, finnish citizens have not committed a crime or anything like that and looking at the statement from the president's office it ultimately said these things will be discussed but ultimately i don't know how much was actually given. kicked into the long grass as we would say here. finland imposed an arms embargo on turkey. that muddy the water as well. what finland does
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do is each individual arms dealers looked out on a sewn on its political merits. it is quite clear in the authorities have said for weeks already that of course if you are with someone then it makes sense that you are more lenient in what you are willing to sell and that would make sense if your allies. still not members now. maybe that will happen in a few months. but what practical difference think it will mean. i mean, fundamentally it enables the re—conceptualisation of northern europe's defence and make it much easier for even current members to defend other current
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members to defend other current members and what i am specifically thinking but if you're looking at the uk is the uk has a number of forces in estonia and this is somewhere i think we will see finnish uk corporation deep in even further. of course as we speak, the uk f 35 beazer training in finland so i think a large ability to redo northern european defence and see deeper bilateral cooperation between finland and the uk. some sad breaking newsjust to finland and the uk. some sad breaking news just to leave you with now and that is that the podcast host and mother of two deborah james has died at the host and mother of two deborahjames has died at the age of 40 after being diagnosed with bowel cancer in december 2015. that is according to a statement from her family in the past couple of moments. shortly before her death she met prince william and she was honoured for her campaigning against bowel cancer.
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right. time to catch up with some weather. hello again. there's been some big contrasts weather—wise across the uk during the day today. we've had plenty of sunshine across central and eastern england, and with temperatures into the low—20s felt pleasantly warm. whereas in the west, we had a weather front bringing thicker cloud and outbreaks of rain — heavy rain, at that — for parts of western scotland. the rain tied in with this particularly slow—moving area of low pressure that'll be with us, really, through the rest of this week, with rain or showers in the forecast, well, pretty much every day. now overnight tonight, a band of rain will push eastwards across central and eastern england, eastern areas of scotland seeing some wet weather. a few showers in the west, temperatures staying into double figures, so a relatively mild start to the day for tomorrow. we start off with a band of rain, then, moving away quite quickly from eastern scotland, eastern england, and then, essentially, it's a day of sunshine and showers. the showers heavy with some thunderstorms in scotland, and some of the showers will tend
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to line up into a band across southwest england, so there could be some areas here that see lots of showers. fewer showers and the warmest weather in the east. hello, i'm christian fraser. you're watching the context on bbc news. was this the bombshell testimony we have been waiting for in the january sixth hearings? cassidy hutchinson — a trump loyalist — and former aide to the white hose chief of staff said the president had wanted to lead the march on the us capitol and didn't care his supporters were armed. i was iwas in i was in the vicinity of a conversation where i overheard the president say something to the effect of i don't effing care if they have weapons. they are not here to hurt me. tonight will dig deep into what this latest testimony means for the former president donald trump? and we'll be speaking to alex holder — the documentary maker — who had full access to the trump family in the days leading up to the january sixth riots.
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his footage now a key part of the evidence in these hearings. big news out of madrid tonight where turkey has given the green

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