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tv   The Papers  BBC News  June 25, 2022 11:30pm-11:46pm BST

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hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me are the political commentatorjo phillips and the political editor of the sunday people and the sunday mirror nigel nelson. welcome back. let's have a quick look at what those front pages are saying. the observer leads on reaction to comments by borisjohnson that he's planning for a third term — with senior conservatives apparently calling him "delusional. " according to the telegraph, the prime minister is planning to impose sweeping new steel tariffs as he tries to win back support in red wall seats. but the paper says he could be accused of breaking international law. the sunday mirror reports on a high court verdict that government plans to house asylum seekers were unlawful.
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the sunday times has further allegations about prince charles by the paper's investigations team. "crackdown on militant unions" is the lead for the express — with suggestions that the prime minister is being urged by the attorney general not give an inch to striking rail staff. so let's begin... we will start with the observer, the pms planned for a third term described as delusional, according to the observer. nigel, let's begin with you this time. take to the observer. nigel, let's begin with you this time.— to the observer. nigel, let's begin with you this time. take us through the sto . with you this time. take us through the story- yes. _ with you this time. take us through the story- yes. i — with you this time. take us through the story. yes, i think— with you this time. take us through the story. yes, i think delusional i the story. yes, i think delusional is the right word for this. what happened was, borisjohnson was giving some interviews to reporters where he is at the commonwealth summit and he was as quite simply, would you serve a full second term should you be reelected? at this point, the prime minister turns
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around and says, oh, i'm thinking about serving a third term. all the reporters were rather taken aback by this, as you can imagine. what this would mean is, if you go through the full electoral cycle so no general election till the end of 2024, that means that borisjohnson could actually be with us until 2034. it seems quite extraordinary the kind of reasoning for this is that leveling up is going to take longer than two terms and he wants to finish that particularjob. but still an extraordinary outburst on top of the ones that he had on radio four this morning where he said, i'm not can change, there's like you to be any cyclical transformation, i am away on. of course being who he is as got them into the mess he is in at the moment. is. as got them into the mess he is in at the moment.— as got them into the mess he is in at the moment. 10, i think number ten was suggesting _ at the moment. 10, i think number ten was suggesting later _ at the moment. 10, i think number ten was suggesting later that - at the moment. 10, i think number ten was suggesting later that he i at the moment. 10, i think number l ten was suggesting later that he was
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just joking, ten was suggesting later that he was justjoking, talking about a third term. nonetheless, their message or the vides giving is a pretty bullish one, isn't it? the vides giving is a pretty bullish one. isn't it?— the vides giving is a pretty bullish one, isn't it? yes, although it is a little bit reminiscent _ one, isn't it? yes, although it is a little bit reminiscent of— one, isn't it? yes, although it is a little bit reminiscent of the - little bit reminiscent of the dreadful peppa pig speech with the same _ dreadful peppa pig speech with the same sort of reaction that that was a joke, _ same sort of reaction that that was a joke, there was nobody laughing. this is_ a joke, there was nobody laughing. this is not— a joke, there was nobody laughing. this is not what the conservative party— this is not what the conservative party wants to hear at the moment. they need _ party wants to hear at the moment. they need to know either that he is going _ they need to know either that he is going to _ they need to know either that he is going to change, which he has said categorically, he's not. 0rthey need _ categorically, he's not. 0rthey need to— categorically, he's not. 0rthey need to know what the plan is. i think. _ need to know what the plan is. i think. it's — need to know what the plan is. i think, it's sad for the very many decent — think, it's sad for the very many decent people who work so hard in their iocai— decent people who work so hard in their local constituency branches and doing — their local constituency branches and doing the best for their constituents and counsellors with up but he's _ constituents and counsellors with up but he's trashing that conservative party— but he's trashing that conservative party along with everything else and he just— party along with everything else and he just seems to be either unwilling or unable _
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he just seems to be either unwilling or unable to take any advice or counsei — or unable to take any advice or counsei it _ or unable to take any advice or counsel. it was reported that all dowd _ counsel. it was reported that all dowd who — counsel. it was reported that all dowd who resigned as conservative party— dowd who resigned as conservative party chairman only on friday morning _ party chairman only on friday morning after the bye election was somebody to whom the prime minister looked _ somebody to whom the prime minister looked for— somebody to whom the prime minister looked for wise counsel clearly he's lucky _ looked for wise counsel clearly he's lucky to _ looked for wise counsel clearly he's lucky to he — looked for wise counsel clearly he's lucky to be getting that from that direction — lucky to be getting that from that direction anymore.— lucky to be getting that from that direction anymore. let's move onto the sunday — direction anymore. let's move onto the sunday telegraph _ direction anymore. let's move onto the sunday telegraph which - direction anymore. let's move onto the sunday telegraph which as - direction anymore. let's move onto the sunday telegraph which as the l the sunday telegraph which as the main story, pm imposes steel tariffs to win back wall. this does suggest concern within number ten that with those bye election defeats, of the bye election defeats that the conservatives have suffered. there is an issue with those voters who gave the conservatives their support in the last general election but perhaps are not feeling the law. yes, that's right. there are two things at play here, you got liberal facing seats from the tories where
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tories are still really angry, support is a really angry about party gate. they are giving protest voters to liberal democrats in places like waitsfield, the redwall seats, these people who have either lent their votes to the tories and now simply taking them back. boris johnson is got to come up with some eye—catching plans to deal with this. the unfortunate part about this. the unfortunate part about this one is, it could well, as the sun says break international law. what he wants to is to extend steel tariffs and that will hurt developing countries as well as china. —— sunday telegraph. also to impose some more. the wto is probably not you like this and of course there could then be a problem of a tit—for—tat for doing this. it may not be something that actually works terribly well for him.-
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works terribly well for him. we've had a department _ works terribly well for him. we've had a department for— works terribly well for him. we've| had a department for international trade response to this story in the telegraph. it says no decision has yet been made we are consulting with foreign counterparts on our proposals before making a final decision i had of the deadline the final decision will be made shortly and will balance our international obligations and the national interest. jo, what do you make of that response and the story in the telegraph? i that response and the story in the teleu-rah? ., �* ., ,, that response and the story in the telegraph?— that response and the story in the teleu-rah? ., �* .,~ ., , ., telegraph? i don't make anything of that resnonse _ telegraph? i don't make anything of that response because _ telegraph? i don't make anything of that response because it's _ telegraph? i don't make anything of that response because it's the - that response because it's the fairly— that response because it's the fairly standard response that you put fairly standard response that you out out — fairly standard response that you put out. nothing to see here, please move _ put out. nothing to see here, please move along — put out. nothing to see here, please move along-— put out. nothing to see here, please move along. there is that mention of international— move along. there is that mention of international obligations alongside i international obligations alongside the national interest, wearing them or more, are we? yes the national interest, wearing them or more, are we?— the national interest, wearing them or more, are we? yes but this is the reason it is — or more, are we? yes but this is the reason it is now _ or more, are we? yes but this is the reason it is now clear _ or more, are we? yes but this is the reason it is now clear that _ or more, are we? yes but this is the reason it is now clear that lord - reason it is now clear that lord geidt, — reason it is now clear that lord geidt, the _ reason it is now clear that lord geidt, the second ethics adviser to quit who _ geidt, the second ethics adviser to quit who quit earlier this month. when _ quit who quit earlier this month. when he — quit who quit earlier this month.
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when he resigned, the stories about something to do is steal, i think were _ something to do is steal, i think were all— something to do is steal, i think were all slightly mystified and scratching our heads. that's now quite _ scratching our heads. that's now quite clear— scratching our heads. that's now quite clear that something the prime minister— quite clear that something the prime minister has been thinking about and there are _ minister has been thinking about and there are obviously, one can read between — there are obviously, one can read between the lines, concerns that it would _ between the lines, concerns that it would he _ between the lines, concerns that it would be breaking international law. having _ would be breaking international law. having a _ would be breaking international law. having a mind to or regard to international law in isn't necessarily saying were going to stick— necessarily saying were going to stick by— necessarily saying were going to stick by it — necessarily saying were going to stick by it. there could be tit—for—tat, there could be also increase — tit—for—tat, there could be also increase costs to british manufacturers who use imported steei~ _ manufacturers who use imported steei~ it — manufacturers who use imported steel. it might be eye—catching but the ramifications perhaps haven't been _ the ramifications perhaps haven't been fully thought through. the sunda been fully thought through. tie: sunday express has a crackdown on what it calls militant unions as its lead story. a small picture of the prime minister and the bottom right—hand corner, he's going nowhere, boris vows he will fight
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and win two elections. of course speaking of fights, there does seem to be a fight on between the government and the rmt union, possibly other unions if we are to believe the news that other sectors may strike into weeks months ahead. jo, what do you make of the story? i jo, what do you make of the story? i think it's lazyjournalism. the rmt is not _ think it's lazyjournalism. the rmt is not a _ think it's lazyjournalism. the rmt is not a militant union. there has been _ is not a militant union. there has been certainly in some sections of the press — been certainly in some sections of the press and fuelled by comments from government ministers the idea that we _ from government ministers the idea that we are — from government ministers the idea that we are going back to the 19705 of mass _ that we are going back to the 19705 of mass 5trike5 led by union baron5 and militant picket5 and all the rest of— and militant picket5 and all the rest of it — and militant picket5 and all the rest of it. on the one hand, the government has talked about leveling up and _ government has talked about leveling up and in _ government has talked about leveling up and in fact, has government has talked about leveling up and in fact, ha5ju5t been said, boris _ up and in fact, ha5ju5t been said, bori5johnson up and in fact, ha5ju5t been said, boris johnson apparently wants to stay on _ boris johnson apparently wants to stay on for— boris johnson apparently wants to stay on for a third term so he can complete — stay on for a third term so he can complete leveling up. how can you level up— complete leveling up. how can you level up when you got inflation
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running — level up when you got inflation running at nearly 11%? and you've -ot running at nearly 11%? and you've got people — running at nearly 11%? and you've got people in the public sector and many— got people in the public sector and many other sectors who are maybe if they're _ many other sectors who are maybe if they're lucky being offered 3%. the government has got the ability to intervene — government has got the ability to intervene in the rail 5trike government has got the ability to intervene in the rail strike and to remove — intervene in the rail strike and to remove the — intervene in the rail strike and to remove the restrictions that allow the remove the re5triction5 that allow the rail— remove the restrictions that allow the rail companies to negotiate with the rail companies to negotiate with the unions — the rail companies to negotiate with the unions. but they're not willing to do— the unions. but they're not willing to do that — the unions. but they're not willing to do that because it's much more convenient — to do that because it's much more convenient to have a fight and to put convenient to have a fight and to out this— convenient to have a fight and to put this into the for or against militant— put this into the for or against militant union5 put this into the for or against militant unions and paint people like matt— militant unions and paint people like matt lynch, secretary of the tuc as _ like matt lynch, secretary of the tuc a5 absolute militant bol5hevik5, if you _ tuc a5 absolute militant bol5hevik5, if you live _ tuc a5 absolute militant bol5hevik5, if you live. which is tuc a5 absolute militant bol5hevik5, if you live. which i5ju5t not true for the _ if you live. which i5ju5t not true for the people join union5 becau5e unions _ for the people join union5 becau5e union5 help to protect theirjob5 and help— union5 help to protect theirjob5 and help to keep their wages, or get better— and help to keep their wages, or get better wage5. and help to keep their wages, or get better wages-— better wages. before we move onto the next story. _ better wages. before we move onto the next story, your _ better wages. before we move onto the next story, your on _ better wages. before we move onto the next story, your on the - better wages. before we move onto the next story, your on the tone - better wages. before we move onto the next story, your on the tone ofl the next story, your on the tone of that sunday express page? i am the next story, your on the tone of that sunday express page? i am sure number ten — that sunday express page? i am sure number ten will _ that sunday express page? i am sure
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number ten will love _ that sunday express page? i am sure number ten will love it. _ that sunday express page? i am sure number ten will love it. the - that sunday express page? i am sure number ten will love it. the whole i number ten will love it. the whole point is the strikes are as far as number ten are concerned a real wedge issue well i'm not sure they are though opinion polls seem to be suggesting quite a bit of sympathy for the strikers. the idea it somehow politically motivated asjo is just setting go somehow politically motivated asjo isjust setting go back somehow politically motivated asjo is just setting go back to the 1970s or 80s is absolute nonsense. we are talking about pay rises, avoiding redundancy if the british airways checkin redundancy if the british airways check in staff go out, all they are asking for is a return of the 10% that was taken away from them during the pandemic. that was taken away from them during the pandemic-— the pandemic. let's go back to the front -a~e the pandemic. let's go back to the front page of _ the pandemic. let's go back to the front page of the _ the pandemic. let's go back to the front page of the telegraph - the pandemic. let's go back to the front page of the telegraph which i the pandemic. let's go back to the | front page of the telegraph which is a story, don't betray ukraine trust warned micron. liz truss warns such as emmanuel macron that the west cannot sell out ukraine for a quick end to the war as she called on g7 and nato countries to commit more arms and funding to the country.
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nigel, obviously liz truss has been talked about as a potential leadership contender although today she's been backing the prime minister also in rwanda. it seems that according to this article, she's trying to... what's the word? gain some traction over other countries, specifically france according to this article in terms of who is doing the most for ukraine. t of who is doing the most for ukraine. ., ., _ of who is doing the most for ukraine. ., ., ., ., ukraine. i have to say, although we've just _ ukraine. i have to say, although we've just been _ ukraine. i have to say, although we've just been bashing - ukraine. i have to say, although we've just been bashing boris i we'vejust been bashing boris johnson, i do think he's absolutely genuine about believing that we must stand for square with ukraine until russian troops have been removed from there. that is one thing i think he's absolutely passionate about. liz truss is carrying out that instruction and this article that instruction and this article that she's written with her ukrainian cargo part is quite
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clearly a warning to some european countries and particularly france and president macron that they mustn't actually wobble now. president micron has made no secret of the fact, he talks to vladimir putin quite a lot, he wants to try and end the war and the only way of doing that is to actually get some concessions from the ukrainians, which would mean giving up some of their land. borisjohnson will have none of that. i think that the european leaders will be in for quite a hard ride at the g7 next week for the of course the nato summit meeting after that. the article says _ summit meeting after that. the article says that _ summit meeting after that. the article says that liz tru55 and article says that liz truss and ukraine's foreign minister say we must it ignore the defeatist voices who insist people are beginning to tire. and the war is progressing,
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obviously with been talking today about the loss of severed on ask which russia now has gained after weeks of really intense fighting there. we are getting into the hard yards use that phrase, ukraine will want these expressions of support backing them still to the hilt. == backing them still to the hilt. » severodonetsk. 0f backing them still to the hilt. » severodonetsk. of course of all the people in the world it must be the people in the world it must be the people in the world it must be the people in ukraine who've had this going on now forfive months. and i think, it's absolutely true, everybody wants to see an end to it. and the ideal solution would be a diplomatic negotiation. but that's unlikel to diplomatic negotiation. but that's unlikely to happen _ diplomatic negotiation. but that's unlikely to happen with _ diplomatic negotiation. but that's unlikely to happen with putin. - diplomatic negotiation. but that's| unlikely to happen with putin. but diplomatic negotiation. but that's i unlikely to happen with putin. but i think— unlikely to happen with putin. but i think it's _ unlikely to happen with putin. but i think it's quite right to say, a quick and _ think it's quite right to say, a quick and isn't a good end. i think there _ quick and isn't a good end. i think there is— quick and isn't a good end. i think there is 5en5e quick and isn't a good end. i think there is sense that emmanuel macron who apparently 5pent 100
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there is sense that emmanuel macron who apparently 5pent100 hour5 there is sense that emmanuel macron who apparently 5pent100 hours on the phone — who apparently 5pent100 hours on the phone with mr putin 5ince the phone with mr putin since december haven't sinned achieved very much — december haven't sinned achieved very much. it is notjust come of the g7 _ very much. it is notjust come of the 67 it's— very much. it is notjust come of the g7 it's gonna come up there and at the _ the g7 it's gonna come up there and at the nato — the g7 it's gonna come up there and at the nato conference it'5 at the nato conference it's important to remember that 2014 agreement to end the war in the ukraine— agreement to end the war in the ukraine in— agreement to end the war in the ukraine in ukraine's donbas region was mediated by france and germany. and in— was mediated by france and germany. and in this _ was mediated by france and germany. and in this article liz truss they say that— and in this article liz truss they say that the uk and the united 5ay that the uk and the united states— say that the uk and the united states should be closely involved in any peace _ states should be closely involved in any peace negotiations, or should we get to— any peace negotiations, or should we get to that _ any peace negotiations, or should we get to that stage rather than leave it to france and germany again. we have it to france and germany again. have time for it to france and germany again. - have time for a quick look at the front page of the independent and this photograph of sir paul mccartney. headlining in glastonbury tonight. another piece of history, just a quick thought on that photo for both of you. that just a quick thought on that photo for both of you.—
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for both of you. at 80 he is the oldest person _ for both of you. at 80 he is the oldest person to _ for both of you. at 80 he is the oldest person to headline - for both of you. at 80 he is the oldest person to headline at i oldest person to headline at glastonbury. gives us all hope. i hope that maybe in a few years time i can have thereto.— i can have thereto. fantastic. i would certainly _ i can have thereto. fantastic. i would certainly stay _ i can have thereto. fantastic. i would certainly stay up - i can have thereto. fantastic. i would certainly stay up to - i can have thereto. fantastic. 1. would certainly stay up to watch that _ would certainly stay up to watch that. ,, would certainly stay up to watch that. . ., would certainly stay up to watch that. ,, ., , ._ ., that. singing or playing an instrument, _ that. singing or playing an instrument, nigel? - that. singing or playing an instrument, nigel? i- that. singing or playing an instrument, nigel? i have| that. singing or playing an i instrument, nigel? i have to that. singing or playing an - instrument, nigel? i have to saying. perha -s instrument, nigel? i have to saying. perhaps will — instrument, nigel? i have to saying. perhaps willjust _ instrument, nigel? i have to saying. perhaps willjust do _ instrument, nigel? i have to saying. perhaps willjust do that _ instrument, nigel? i have to saying. perhaps willjust do that one - instrument, nigel? i have to saying. perhaps willjust do that one on - perhaps willjust do that one on vision _ perhaps willjust do that one on vision only, nigel. i would say that it's 55_ vision only, nigel. i would say that it's 55 years — vision only, nigel. i would say that it's 55 years to the day since the beatles — it's 55 years to the day since the beatles did their first ever tv broadcast and who would've thought that at the age of 80 paul mccartney is wowing them class and barry? _ mccartney is wowing them class and barry? i_ mccartney is wowing them class and barry? i think it's amazing. in the clip vou _ barry? i think it's amazing. in the clip you had — barry? i think it's amazing. in the clip you had before we came on down in somerset, — clip you had before we came on down in somerset, i thought neil galahad, his warm—up act was incredibly generous— his warm—up act was incredibly generous and that was rather lovely. cool fact _ generous and that was rather lovely. cool fact and on. thank you very much. thank you for reviewing the
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papers with me tonight. thank you for reviewing the papers with me tonight.

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