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tv   Newscast  BBC News  June 24, 2022 1:30am-2:01am BST

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this is bbc news. we will have the headlines and all the main news stories at the top of the hour, straight after this programme. hello, it's adam in the studio. it's victoria in the studio. and mark, i would say celebrate, because some people are commiserating. six years since the vote to leave the eu, it's nigel farage. they're good to be here. i don't think anyone is celebrating. even ou? anyone is celebrating. even you? we — anyone is celebrating. even you? we celebrate -
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anyone is celebrating. even you? we celebrate the - anyone is celebrating. even you? we celebrate the fact| anyone is celebrating. even i you? we celebrate the fact we it happened, we celebrate the fact that — it happened, we celebrate the fact that we beat the global establishment, we celebrate the fact that — establishment, we celebrate the fact that after years of trying to stop — fact that after years of trying to stop it, we got there but now— to stop it, we got there but now there is a growing sense of frustration _ now there is a growing sense of frustration amongst exit supporters, it's not how they imagined _ supporters, it's not how they imagined it. supporters, it's not how they imagined it— imagined it. what are you frustrated _ imagined it. what are you frustrated about? - imagined it. what are you i frustrated about? frustrated the government _ frustrated about? frustrated the government has - frustrated about? frustrated the government has not - frustrated about? frustrated | the government has not done enough. _ the government has not done enough, frustrated there is a 5% vat— enough, frustrated there is a 5% vat on fuel. it's terrible that— 5% vat on fuel. it's terrible that you've seen no simple furcation— that you've seen no simple furcation of business rules and regulations. any in the financial services are tearing their— financial services are tearing their hair— financial services are tearing their hair out. it wasn't appropriate for the city at all, — appropriate for the city at all. it— appropriate for the city at all, it hasn't been addressed. ithink— all, it hasn't been addressed. i think on— all, it hasn't been addressed. i think on the really big one, which — i think on the really big one, which was _ i think on the really big one, which was immigration, and like it or— which was immigration, and like it or not. — which was immigration, and like it or not, that is what put the turnout — it or not, that is what put the turnout up _ it or not, that is what put the turnout up on this day six years— turnout up on this day six years ago, and we see notjust iegal— years ago, and we see notjust legal immigration heading to record — legal immigration heading to
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record numbers but the illegal immigration which of course to anyone — immigration which of course to anyone that thinks we should take — anyone that thinks we should take back control, what's happening in dover is not that. there — happening in dover is not that. there is— happening in dover is not that. there is frustration. i don't there is frustration. idon't think— there is frustration. i don't think brexiteers feel that was a mistake with what they are increasingly saying is what the hell is — increasingly saying is what the hell is borisjohnson's government been doing? hell is boris johnson's government been doing? there is loads to unpack _ government been doing? there is loads to unpack there. _ government been doing? there is loads to unpack there. we - loads to unpack there. we will unpack but what will you do to harness that feeling ofjob undone, because it's almost like brexit party 2.0 territory? i like brexit party 2.0 territory?— like brexit party 2.0 territo ? ,, , territory? i did you keep, i did the brexit _ territory? i did you keep, i did the brexit party, - territory? i did you keep, i did the brexit party, i'm i territory? i did you keep, i. did the brexit party, i'm not talking _ did the brexit party, i'm not talking about coming back into frontiine — talking about coming back into frontline politics but what i'm quite — frontline politics but what i'm quite good at, i can still influence where the debate goes. — influence where the debate goes, particularly within the conservative party, particularly within backbench mps — particularly within backbench mps. i'm pretty good at mobilising quite large numbers of people to stand up and say what — of people to stand up and say what they think and we are approaching that time again when yes, i'm going to have to do something.— do something. which one of those many _ do something. which one of those many issues - do something. which one of those many issues you - do something. which one of| those many issues you listed will you pick because you put it's probably easy to pick one?
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there is the easy call. a country— there is the easy call. a country that is taken back control— country that is taken back control and become sovereign again. — control and become sovereign again, that means of course we can do— again, that means of course we can do things better than being in the _ can do things better than being inthe eu— can do things better than being in the eu or worse, that we are in the eu or worse, that we are in controi~ _ in the eu or worse, that we are in controi~ i_ in the eu or worse, that we are in control. i think for a judge, a _ in control. i think for a judge, a judge whose name we still don't — judge, a judge whose name we still don't even know, to effectively stop a piece of government policy from taking place. — government policy from taking place, namely the plane going to rwanda. it's a kick in the teeth — to rwanda. it's a kick in the teeth. whether big mass motion iihation— teeth. whether big mass motion libation needs to come. that teeth. whether big mass motion libation needs to come.- libation needs to come. that is the eur0pean _ libation needs to come. that is the european court _ libation needs to come. that is the european court of - libation needs to come. that is the european court of human i the european court of human rights. the european court of human richts. ~ .., the european court of human richts.~ _, i. the european court of human richts.~ ., rights. welcome you say that. it's 'ust rights. welcome you say that. it's just amazing. _ rights. welcome you say that. it'sjust amazing. i— rights. welcome you say that. it'sjust amazing. i can - rights. welcome you say that. it'sjust amazing. i can walk. it's just amazing. i can walk down through this corridor. you wouldn't get through that security. wouldn't get through that securi . . . wouldn't get through that security-— security. can i be really specific _ security. can i be really
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specific about - security. can i be really specific about what - security. can i be really| specific about what that security. can i be really- specific about what that judge did? — specific about what that judge did? he — specific about what that 'udge did? ., ., ~ ., . did? he looked at the evidence with regards — did? he looked at the evidence with regards to _ did? he looked at the evidence with regards to one _ did? he looked at the evidence with regards to one iraqi - did? he looked at the evidence with regards to one iraqi man. | with regards to one iraqi man. he decided that if this man was sent to wanda, there was a risk of irreversible harm. i want is to be sovereign. when it comes to be sovereign. when it comes to looking after the protection of pupils their rights, i think we got a much better record than the rest of europe so no. i also think something like the human rights act was what tony blair used in 98. to human rights act was what tony blair used in 98.— blair used in 98. to bring the eur0pean _ blair used in 98. to bring the european convention - blair used in 98. to bring the european convention of - european convention of human rights — european convention of human rights into uk law. we have seen — rights into uk law. we have seen other frustrations, deporting foreign criminals, the right to life being used and — the right to life being used and abused. i think this is exit — and abused. i think this is exit 20. _ and abused. i think this is exit 2.0, actually, it's us being _ exit 2.0, actually, it's us being sovereign.- exit 2.0, actually, it's us being sovereign. does it need another referendum? - being sovereign. does it need another referendum? i- being sovereign. does it need another referendum? i don't. another referendum? i don't know, i don't _ another referendum? i don't know, i don't know. - another referendum? i don't know, i don't know. but- another referendum? i don't know, i don't know. but the| know, i don't know. but the deu know, i don't know. but the deputy prime _ know, i don't know. but the deputy prime minister- know, i don't know. but the deputy prime minister has i
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deputy prime minister has already said, we are staying in it even if he publishes the british bill of rights. they alwa s british bill of rights. they always say _ british bill of rights. they always say that _ british bill of rights. they always say that until - british bill of rights. they always say that until it - always say that until it becomes political impossible. the conservative party with the most _ the conservative party with the most ardent supporters of eec and eu — most ardent supporters of eec and eu membership fora long time — and eu membership fora long time i— and eu membership fora long time. ithink and eu membership fora long time. i think this is the biggest _ time. i think this is the biggest political battleground coming up in the country. the good friday — coming up in the country. tie: good friday agreement has reference to human rights in it. ., reference to human rights in it. . , , ., reference to human rights in it. that is the bladder poison ill. it it. that is the bladder poison pill- it isn't _ it. that is the bladder poison pill. it isn'tjust _ it. that is the bladder poison pill. it isn'tjust on _ it. that is the bladder poison pill. it isn'tjust on the - it. that is the bladder poison pill. it isn'tjust on the good | pill. it isn'tjust on the good friday— pill. it isn'tjust on the good friday agreement. tony blair's tasting — friday agreement. tony blair's lasting legacy is there. yes, i'm lasting legacy is there. yes, i'm not— lasting legacy is there. yes, i'm not pretending this is easy. _ i'm not pretending this is easy, there is a lot of work to do to— easy, there is a lot of work to do to get— easy, there is a lot of work to do to get this right but ijust feei— do to get this right but ijust feet that _ do to get this right but ijust feel that court has gone so far away— feel that court has gone so far away from its original founding purpose — away from its original founding purpose. and i think brexiteers, whatever the dos and don'ts of what happened the other— and don'ts of what happened the other evening, it's clear to brexit— other evening, it's clear to brexit voters this is not what they— brexit voters this is not what they voted for six years ago.
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what — they voted for six years ago. what has been the best thing about brexit so far? written's standin: about brexit so far? written's standing in — about brexit so far? written's standing in the _ about brexit so far? written's standing in the world - about brexit so far? written's standing in the world which i about brexit so far? written's l standing in the world which was different— standing in the world which was different to what it was before. ,., , different to what it was before. , . , before. does that help us? where we _ before. does that help us? where we go _ before. does that help us? where we go to _ before. does that help us? where we go to australia, | where we go to australia, australia had a long—term submarine deal with the french, completely outdated. as eu members. we wouldn't been allowed _ members. we wouldn't been allowed to get in the way of that — allowed to get in the way of that. but we came together with the americans. going to provide nuclear submarines for the australians, and that matters because a diesel submarine has the surface once every 2a hours. eight nuclear sub can stay submerged for six months at a time. so, in terms of counter chinese communist party intelligence, that is a big plus. that was one example. i am just wondering, when you say we would not have been able to replace the french as their suppliers if we had been in the eu, how would that have stopped us? the point of the foreign policy was that we had to act in the spirit
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the point of the eu foreign policy was that we had to act in the spirit of mutual cooperation. so, cutting out the french would absolutely... but it was the australians decided to have a different contractual relationship. australia are not in the eu. they can do whatever they wanted. maybe america could have done that deal. we couldn't have done that deal without being in breach of our promises. ukraine is perhaps more contemporary and even stronger example and i think it is clear to everybody. and again, you could agree with what we're doing or disagree with what we're doing but borisjohnson has very much taken the lead on this — the lead, way ahead of the rest of the european union. they have come up with strict sanctions. they have bnned that pipeline, the germans binned that, didn't they? they are still paying i billion euros a day to putin so i would not be sure about how strict on sanctions they have been. in terms of our standing in the world, we are in a different place because of brexit and i think
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that is a good thing. i think the vaccine rollout was a good example again of us acting quickly as eu members. but you know he could have done exactly the same if we had been in the eu. but he would not have done. how do you know that? the european commission and at the time, we broke out on our own, all the other eu countries were still honouring it. now, you can argue of course... you can argue that we should be members of clubs and break the rules. that is not how we do things. i was not suggesting that. we know that the vaccine progress could have been made as a member of the eu. it is just a fact. it would have been a breach of our obligations and it is not what we do — we don't behave like that. apart from the withdrawal agreement and the northern ireland protocol? well, this was the deal that was sold to the public in 2019 and i was sceptical about it at the time. and, yeah, there are one or two —
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how can i put it — dishonestiues that are coming home to roost for the prime minister. what do you mean by that? i think in terms of northern ireland it was clear to any of us who read that document, and were there that night in october in brussels when he came out with the oven—ready deal, it is pretty clear that what he said to northern island just was not true. do you think he knew that or he hadn't read it properly? it is tough because you are asking me how he read the document and does he do detail. i think he must have known it wasn't true. just to rewind back to some of the things you said at the start that we are going to unpack — although we are running out of time to unpack them all now. you talk about the small boats crossing the channel. what is the solution to the channel? it is the australian solution. they faced the same in 2010, ii and 12. they started off by taking people
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to an island called naru. they towed the boat back to indonesia and the world done, but it was interesting because what happened was that the boat stopped coming and the drowning stopped as well, and that is the kind of action we are going to have to take. so, the british navy are lassooing the dinghies and towing them into french waters? i don't think that towing inflatables would be a good idea and taking back to french ports are something we have to do. if you do that for two or three weeks it will stop. but doesn't france have to say,", sure," for that to work? the indonesians never said yes. so you can deposit these people back? sort of like reversed people trafficking? it is what we will have to do. we could go for offshore processing and that is what priti patel was trying to do, and to be fair, that would have been a big disincentive but we have to do something and at the moment we are completely tired. can i ask which — i am just changing the subject. that is the way the programme works.
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you told us the best things about brexit so far although you have expressed your frustration. i did not know we ditched any. whenever i ask this question — not know we ditched any. whenever i ask this question —, it is the pandemic, nigel — we have been busy. i don't buy that. my biggest worry with all of this — i remember a week after the referendum when theresa may became prime minister, thinking, "we have really worked hard here to cause a political are the same people we have been fighting for over 20 years." now you have borisjohnson. what is your message to him? ijust want to really know that he and his colleagues actually believed in this and did notjust use it purely for political opportunism and the fact that so little, so few of the potential benefits of being equipped makes me wonder whether they ever had the vision.
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why did you send a dossier to donald trump about piers morgan?— donald trump about piers moraan? . , ., morgan? have you sent a dossier to us? no. _ morgan? have you sent a dossier to us? no. i— morgan? have you sent a dossier to us? no, i promise, _ morgan? have you sent a dossier to us? no, i promise, your- to us? no, i promise, your podcast — to us? no, i promise, your podcast is _ to us? no, i promise, your podcast is so _ to us? no, i promise, your podcast is so good, - to us? no, i promise, your podcast is so good, i - to us? no, i promise, your. podcast is so good, i wouldn't grieve — podcast is so good, i wouldn't grieve of— podcast is so good, i wouldn't grieve of doing it. when i was in mar—a—lago and i was chatting _ in mar—a—lago and i was chatting with the donald, we talked — chatting with the donald, we talked about gb news, the fact that talk— talked about gb news, the fact that talk tv was about to begin. _ that talk tv was about to begin, and he said piers rings my office _ begin, and he said piers rings my office three times a week, for this— my office three times a week, for this interview. he's been a friend — for this interview. he's been a friend of— for this interview. he's been a friend of mine for years. i said. _ friend of mine for years. i said, well, he may not be quite as good — said, well, he may not be quite as good a — said, well, he may not be quite as good a friend as you think. what — as good a friend as you think. what you _ as good a friend as you think. what you mean? i said, you can see what— what you mean? i said, you can see what he's been writing and saying — see what he's been writing and saying about you for last couple _ saying about you for last couple of years, he may not be that _ couple of years, he may not be that straightforward with you as a — that straightforward with you as a friend and that's where it came — as a friend and that's where it came from. as a friend and that's where it came from-— as a friend and that's where it came from. how is the donald feelin: , came from. how is the donald feeling. as _ came from. how is the donald feeling. as you _ came from. how is the donald feeling, as you call _ came from. how is the donald feeling, as you call him, i - feeling, as you call him, i should call him donald trump, about running again? is
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should call him donald trump, about running again? is looking ureat, about running again? is looking great. looking _ about running again? is looking great, looking great, _ about running again? is looking great, looking great, playing i great, looking great, playing lolf great, looking great, playing golf every day, his lost at least _ golf every day, his lost at least £20 since he was in office. _ least £20 since he was in office, he looks really well, he is — office, he looks really well, he is in _ office, he looks really well, he is in rio humour. you can see — he is in rio humour. you can see the _ he is in rio humour. you can see the burden of residential responsibilities of his shoulders, he is enjoying life, iguess— shoulders, he is enjoying life, i guess he _ shoulders, he is enjoying life, i guess he is enjoying biden's performance to a certain extent as well. — performance to a certain extent as well. i— performance to a certain extent as well, i am in no doubt that he intends _ as well, i am in no doubt that he intends to run again, no doubt— he intends to run again, no doubt at— he intends to run again, no doubt at all.— he intends to run again, no doubt at all. what would the slo . an doubt at all. what would the slogan "to — doubt at all. what would the slogan "to mark— doubt at all. what would the slogan "to mark go - doubt at all. what would the slogan "to mark go back - doubt at all. what would the slogan "to mark go back to l doubt at all. what would the - slogan "to mark go back to keep making america great again? make america greater? he would think it's gone backwards in the preceding four years. well, it miuht the preceding four years. well, it might be _ the preceding four years. well, it might be something - the preceding four years. well, it might be something like - it might be something like remake _ it might be something like remake america or rebuild... take — remake america or rebuild... take america back. none of this changes. — take america back. none of this changes, when reagan ran in 1980. — changes, when reagan ran in 1980. it — changes, when reagan ran in 1980, it was make america great. _ 1980, it was make america great, this goes around in circles _ great, this goes around in circles in— great, this goes around in circles. . great, this goes around in circles. , ., , circles. in terms of the news unfolding — circles. in terms of the news unfolding when _ circles. in terms of the news unfolding when people - circles. in terms of the news| unfolding when people listen circles. in terms of the news i unfolding when people listen to this, the result of the two by—elections in wakefield and tiverton and robertson, is borisjohnson finished
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tiverton and robertson, is boris johnson finished if tiverton and robertson, is borisjohnson finished if he loses those? boris johnson finished if he loses those?— boris johnson finished if he loses those? it loses those? -- competent. it was the end — loses those? -- competent. it was the end of _ loses those? -- competent. it was the end of 18 _ loses those? -- competent. it was the end of 18 years, - loses those? -- competent. it was the end of 18 years, they l was the end of 18 years, they looked — was the end of 18 years, they looked tired, it was always going _ looked tired, it was always going to be hard to replace archer— going to be hard to replace archer and going to be hard to replace archerand blairwas going to be hard to replace archer and blair was this charismatic leader, brilliant, oratory. _ charismatic leader, brilliant, oratory, phenomenal skills, things— oratory, phenomenal skills, things can only get better, the marketing, the pr. it's not like — marketing, the pr. it's not like that— marketing, the pr. it's not like that this time. this time it is— like that this time. this time it is different, this time it's people _ it is different, this time it's people in— it is different, this time it's people in the redwall who feel this levelling up agenda, which is part— this levelling up agenda, which is part of— this levelling up agenda, which is part of the brexit delivery, itjust — is part of the brexit delivery, itjust isn't happening. and then— itjust isn't happening. and then what you've got in the home _ then what you've got in the home counties, the gentler parts — home counties, the gentler parts of— home counties, the gentler parts of england, are a feeling the bloke is a liar, the bloke is untrustworthy, a feeling you wouldn't — is untrustworthy, a feeling you wouldn't want this chapter take your— wouldn't want this chapter take your daughter out. which adds up your daughter out. which adds up to ~~ — your daughter out. which adds up to ~~ it _ your daughter out. which adds up to... it means they are losing — up to... it means they are losing votes to labour in wakefield, to the liberal democrats on the south and south—west of england, and you took— south—west of england, and you took at — south—west of england, and you look at the local election results. _
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look at the local election results, they were down in scott. _ results, they were down in scott, they were down in wales, london — scott, they were down in wales, london they were down on the demographics of london are changing and i can see them losing — changing and i can see them losing seats all around the country _ losing seats all around the country. my own view is that if they— country. my own view is that if they stick— country. my own view is that if they stick withjohnson, country. my own view is that if they stick with johnson, they are doomed. they are doomed. unless — are doomed. they are doomed. unless he — are doomed. they are doomed. unless he has it within him to suddenly— unless he has it within him to suddenly mix —— makes a massive policy— suddenly mix —— makes a massive policy sifts — suddenly mix —— makes a massive policy sifts on the areas i talked _ policy sifts on the areas i talked about earlier, vat, echr. _ talked about earlier, vat, echr. to— talked about earlier, vat, echr, to retake the agenda. is someone who has just launched a new programme, i am launching the new programme on radio for friday lunchtime. any tips for a new be presented? you are hardly a new be present in. but you know what? what i've tried to do, keep it real, remember that most people listening don't read and study this all day and all night in the way that we do because we are hooked and obsessed with current affairs and news. just
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don't talk down to audiences. the great broadcasters over the years, be they in current affairs, politics or light entertainment, who was the best ever broadcaster? terry woken. why? because people thought he was actually talking to them and if broadcasters can do that, they've cracked it. thank ou, m that, they've cracked it. thank you. my show _ that, they've cracked it. thank you. my show is _ that, they've cracked it. thank you, my show is called - you, my show is called antisocial with adam fleming which is better than the other title, adam fleming's antisocial. is title, adam fleming's antisocial.— title, adam fleming's antisocial. , ., antisocial. is that why you have got _ antisocial. is that why you have got this _ antisocial. is that why you have got this new -? - antisocial. is that why you | have got this new -? what antisocial. is that why you - have got this new -? what do ou have got this new -? what do you think _ have got this new -? what do you think of — have got this new -? what do you think of a? _ have got this new -? what do you think of a? have - have got this new -? what do you think of a? have you - have got this new -? what do you think of a? have you ever had a moustache? _ you think of a? have you ever had a moustache? no. - you think of a? have you ever had a moustache? no. may . you think of a? have you ever| had a moustache? no. may be briefly one _ had a moustache? no. may be briefly one summer— had a moustache? no. may be briefly one summer i - had a moustache? no. may be briefly one summer i might. had a moustache? no. may be l briefly one summer i might have done. . ~ briefly one summer i might have done. . ,, i. briefly one summer i might have done. . ,, ., briefly one summer i might have done. . ., done. thank you for coming in. chris mason — done. thank you for coming in. chris mason is _ done. thank you for coming in. chris mason is in _ done. thank you for coming in. chris mason is in the _ done. thank you for coming in. chris mason is in the house - done. thank you for coming in. | chris mason is in the house and when a say the house i'm in edinburgh. when a say the house i'm in edinburgh-— when a say the house i'm in edinburgh.- what - when a say the house i'm in edinburgh.- what are| when a say the house i'm in - edinburgh.- what are you edinburgh. hello. what are you doin: edinburgh. hello. what are you doing their? — edinburgh. hello. what are you doing their? i _ edinburgh. hello. what are you doing their? i am _ edinburgh. hello. what are you doing their? i am on _ edinburgh. hello. what are you doing their? i am on my- edinburgh. hello. what are you doing their? i am on my final . doing their? i am on my final 'aunt doing their? i am on my final jaunt for— doing their? i am on my final jaunt for any _ doing their? i am on my final jaunt for any questions - doing their? i am on my final jaunt for any questions on . jaunt for any questions on radio for this weekend so i am on my way to the shetland islands and just stopping off in edinburghfora islands and just stopping off in edinburgh for a chat with you guys.
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in edinburgh for a chat with you guys-— you guys. there is another chris here _ you guys. there is another chris here too, _ you guys. there is another chris here too, chris - you guys. there is anotherj chris here too, chris curtis from the polling company. so chris, oh, this is going to get tricky, isn't it? chris mason, as we are recording this episode of newscast on thursday evening we don't have the result of the two by—elections yet. what will you be looking for in the results when we get? we have two sound wise, don't we. recording on half past six and you might be watching a quarter to midnight or listening to us tomorrow when the result is already known. ultimately we are looking to see do the conservatives lose both of the seats that they are contesting in qwest field and —— wakefield and west yorkshire. they are kind of a microcosm of the pincer movement the conservative sphere at the next election. losing seats that for yonks have been rocksolid, wakefield being one of them and the return of the lib dems potentially in the south—west of england which is not that long ago was something of a
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powerhouse for the lib dems, particularly cornwall, and if those two things happen in the conservatives lose both of those seats which plenty of conservative think they very well might do then there will be plenty of tories thinking blimey, what could happen to me at the next election? and that will be interesting to how that shapes kind of dynamic, the culture, the conversation at west and start.— west and start. and other chris, i hope _ west and start. and other chris, i hope you - west and start. and other chris, i hope you don't . west and start. and other. chris, i hope you don't mind west and start. and other- chris, i hope you don't mind me calling you that. the really helpful thing about by—elections just like local elections is it is a real genuine test of public opinion in the real world rather than a guess doubly what will you be able to tell from these results or is it as simple as win or lose? �* ~' ., or is it as simple as win or lose? �* ~ ., _ or is it as simple as win or lose? �* ~' ., . lose? i'd like to say that i think opinion _ lose? i'd like to say that i think opinion polls - lose? i'd like to say that i think opinion polls are . lose? i'd like to say that i i think opinion polls are pretty good test of what public opinion is, so i think we have a fairly good idea of where public opinion stands but by—elections are real people walking into real polling stations and putting real crosses in real boxes and that is also an important and to do.
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when i interpret by—elections, what i do as a look at what the polling is showing the national picture is and a look at how thatis picture is and a look at how that is playing out at a local level. and what is interesting about these two by—elections is just how differently things are going to play out on a local level even though what we are seeing in the national. so if you take wakefield for example, i think almost everyone is expect labour to win wakefield. if you don't think labour is going to win wakefield, you should go into a bookmaker�*s website right now because you could win a lot of money. and the reason we are so confident is that what we are expecting to play out there is that national picture stopping a small but noticeable chunk of conservative voters from the last election have switched over to the labor party. if that happens in wakefield, labour gains wakefield. when you add in to the fact that government normally end up doing worse in by—elections than they would do otherwise, that will move the dial even further. and when you consider
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that people are so upset with the conservatives right now, a lot of conservative voters might stay at home, it means we can be fairly confident that thatis can be fairly confident that that is the way it is going to play out. that is very different to how it is playing out in hoppitt and. it is worth noting just how safe a conservative seat it is. you think there are only a0 conservative think in the country that have majorities going into this larger. if the lib dems managed to win tonight and again i think that is the likely outcome. i may end up being proven wrong and if few hours time. being proven wrong and if few hours time-— hours time. can't wait to play the new- _ hours time. can't wait to play the new. but _ hours time. can't wait to play the new. but if— hours time. can't wait to play the new. but if the _ hours time. can't wait to play the new. but if the lib- hours time. can't wait to play the new. but if the lib dems| the new. but if the lib dems end u- the new. but if the lib dems end up winning _ the new. but if the lib dems end up winning there - the new. but if the lib dems end up winning there it i the new. but if the lib dems end up winning there it is i end up winning there it is worth noting just the kind of majority they have ended up overcoming. it majority they have ended up overcoming.— overcoming. it was 24,900, wasn't it? — overcoming. it was 24,900, wasn't it? the _ overcoming. it was 24,900, wasn't it? the kind - overcoming. it was 24,900, wasn't it? the kind of i overcoming. it was 24,900, l wasn't it? the kind of majority wasn't it? the kind of ma'ority ou wasn't it? the kind of ma'ority you am i wasn't it? the kind of ma'ority you don't normally i wasn't it? the kind of majority you don't normally overcome i you don't normally overcome even given the craziness of by—elections and the way that they will end up doing it is basically by, there's lots of conservative voters at the moment who are very difficult, very upset. they don't really
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like any party particularly but they are wanting to put in place a protest vote, so if you look at it, somewhere around fourin look at it, somewhere around four in ten people who voted conservative at the last election don't tell us pollsters that they would vote conservative in the general election tomorrow. they don't necessarily have a good idea of where else they are going, many of us tell us they are completely undecided on what the lib dems are hoping to do is come in at that local level and go to those voters who are disaffected and go well, locally you can vote for the liberal democrats here. it's not going to change the government but you get a good abril democrat mp and you get to stick it to the tory party that you don't like. and we are expecting tonight that that is going to be enough for the liberal democrats to overcome that massive conservative majority. it is interesting speaking to conservative mps because these by—election results, they are kind of expecting to do badly. they are expecting to do badly. they are expecting to do badly. they are expecting to lose both of them and therefore to an extent part of that is baked into their reaction, to a degree is baked in. i don't think, if it
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happens for them and they lose the vote they will be glum and worried but has chris said a0 of them will be looking at their majorities and thinking blimey, mine is a lot smaller than the one in heaven. what could happen _ than the one in heaven. what could happen to _ than the one in heaven. what could happen to me? - than the one in heaven. what could happen to me? so i than the one in heaven. what could happen to me? so that| could happen to me? so that will happen but whether that actually prompts in the short term any movement to think is it time for a new leader again, i would doubted this stage but you can never tell. you can never measure mood until you can elect and you can only feel it when something has happened as opposed to predicted to happen. as opposed to predicted to ha en. �* , as opposed to predicted to ha en. . , , happen. and chris curtis, there's been _ happen. and chris curtis, there's been lots - happen. and chris curtis, there's been lots of- happen. and chris curtis, j there's been lots of other things this week, people not going to rwanda, rail strikes, is there a better polling you have done that revealed where the country is around one of those things more than anything else? i those things more than anything else? . �* , ,., those things more than anything else? . �*, ., else? i mean, it's sort of doesn't _ else? i mean, it's sort of doesn't matter _ else? i mean, it's sort of doesn't matter what i else? i mean, it's sort of i doesn't matter what question you ask right now. this is part of the difficulty for the conservatives. it doesn't matter what question you ask right now, what issue you asked about, it's quite clear the answer you get back on the public is that they don't trust
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the government. they don't trust the prime minister. normally what you have is here is labor's areas, here is the conservatives�* areas. is labor�*s areas, here is the conservatives�* areas. and it is a fight between the two. increasingly there are not many conservative areas left with i have a lead on those kind of westerns. you normally have midterm blues with governments, david cameron must call become he won the general election in 2015, that is a really good example of that. but he had a strategy to do so. he used his long—term economic plan and he thought on the polling that party were ahead on the economy in order to turn that around in the difficulty i am right now is trying to work out what the conservative party plan is. as you say it is probably use rwanda and trade these different wedge issues and see what sticks. have a go at the strikers, for example. but when people are getting a lot poorer, when the economy might be about to go into a recession, i am just not sure that focusing on these issues that focusing on these issues that are far down people�*s priority list is going to be
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the kind of thing that can turn this around. 50 the kind of thing that can turn this around.— this around. so are they not caettin this around. so are they not getting credit _ this around. so are they not getting credit for _ this around. so are they not getting credit for the - this around. so are they not getting credit for the 37 i getting credit for the 37 lrillion— getting credit for the 37 billion which is going to help some — billion which is going to help some of— billion which is going to help some of the lowest income families— some of the lowest income families in the country? they don't seem — families in the country? they don't seem to _ families in the country? they don't seem to have _ families in the country? they don't seem to have got i families in the country? they don't seem to have got much don�*t seem to have got much credit. don't seem to have got much credit. , ., , credit. they will win the money starts arriving. _ credit. they will win the money starts arriving. may _ credit. they will win the money starts arriving. may be - credit. they will win the money starts arriving. may be so, i starts arriving. may be so, think the _ starts arriving. may be so, think the issue _ starts arriving. may be so, think the issue as - starts arriving. may be so, think the issue as they i starts arriving. may be so, think the issue as they are j think the issue as they are putting a lot of money into this but it is still not going to be enough lots of people stopping it basicallyjust means that the most important issue to voters as one where they sort of instinctively don�*t trust the conservative party to have their back as opposed to, if the last general election was fought on brexit, that was an issue where more people trusted the conservatives to get it done. the next 12 months is going to be focused on the cost of living, energy prices, putting more money in pockets and most people tend to think that the labor party is more on their side in the area and fundamentally that is the issue that the conservatives have. chrises, thank you very much. victoria, it has been lovely having you in the studio. so
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many stories in that podcast. is there one that is lodged in the front of your brain? there reall is the front of your brain? there really is a _ the front of your brain? there really is a stoppage _ the front of your brain? there really is a stoppage is - the front of your brain? there really is a stoppage is a i the front of your brain? there i really is a stoppage is a woman we spoke to called victoria who is a mum and she was trying to flee with her husband and 12—year—old daughter veronica and one—year—old daughter and her husband and 12—year—old were killed in front of her as a shell hit their car and she had to survive to look after her one—year—old. she was abducted did by russian soldiers, she was taken to a basement where there were lots of other ukrainian. they were held there for three weeks. she begged the russian soldiers, please can you bring me the bodies of my daughter and my husband because they want to bury them. and so she persuaded them to do that and she did manage to give a respectful burial, and she has been waiting to come to the uk for 56 days. that is how long she has been waiting for a visa,
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and it is a searing experience and it is a searing experience and we are following her story. just another example of the amazing connection you are forging with people who have been going through all of this. thanks so much for being on with us tonight. that�*s it for this episode of newscast, we will be back with another one very soon. —— newscast. hello there. showers have been making their way northwards through the night accompanied by the odd rumble of thunder. not as warm for the day ahead, and there will be some sunshine around certainly, but equally a rash of showers will develop as the day goes, that�*s because we got low pressure moving into the west now and throwing bands of rain or showers our way.
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we�*re are also seeing some misty, low cloud and fog coming into eastern scotland, and it will be a much warmer start to friday, quite a close night and end to the night. that mist and fog could hang around, cloudy for the northern isles, showers developing quite quickly turning heavy and thundery, and then more persistent rain pushes into the southwest of england, western wales and more notably northern ireland later in the day. it turns quite wet and breezy, increasingly breezy, particularly in the west, so it will feel fresher here. we could still see 25—26 in the east, but not as warm for northern england, north wales or scotland as it was during the day on thursday. but still some very high levels of pollen despite a scattering of showers around across parts of the midlands, east anglia, up into lincolnshire in the southeast. we do see that band of rain turning more showery, pushing northwards during the evening and overnight. that low pressure centred, as you can see, to the west of us, and it�*s going to stay there. it�*s going to become stalled, slow—moving, and it�*s going to continue throw showers across the united kingdom, and because it�*s low pressure, it makes the air conducive to seeing showers anyway, so some of them will be heavy,
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the odd rumble of thunder, but as the breeze increases later today and through the weekend, certainly unusually windy for the time of year. it will push those showers through quite quickly and freshen the air up. temperatures around about where they should be for the time of year, but some lengthier spells of rain certainly close to that area of low pressure across parts of northern ireland and scotland. we could easily see some lengthier spells of thundery rain pushing into the eastern side of england saturday night into sunday and then brushing close by to the east of scotland. but otherwise, the onus on the frequency of the showers, intensity of the showers, will be in northern and western areas. really quite a brisk wind, gusts of 30—a0 mph. so that�*s something to bear in mind if you�*re out and about through the weekend, otherwise temperatures once again into the low 20s. that low pressure system sat to the west will stay with us into the start of the new week, as you can see. still some showers around, more prevalent in the west, temperature staying in the low 20s at best.
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you get welcome to bbc news — i�*m david eades. our top stories: the us supreme court strikes down restrictions on carrying guns in new york, signaling a shift that will reverberate nationwide. we cannot idly stand by and just watch our streets be flooded with guns due to more people being permitted to legally carry firearms in public. counting is underway in two key uk by—elections, in the first test of voters opinions since the partygate scandal and the prime minister�*s confidence vote. the taliban says the main search for survivors from the afghanistan earthquake is over — more than 1,000 people are thought to have been killed. translation: i ran towards my
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family but everything was under|

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