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tv   BBC News at One  BBC News  June 20, 2022 1:00pm-1:31pm BST

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rail travellers face the first of three days of strikes in what's expected to be the biggest walkout on the railways in 30 years. last—minute talks between unions and industry bosses continue, but the government says industrial action is likely. industrial action is likely to proceed, and their four people to proceed, and therefore people should take sensible preparations now, because there's no point giving false hope, if you like, that these strikes can be avoided. the government has refused to intervene in talks, insisting they should be between unions and employers. we'll bring you all the latest. also on the programme... travel disruption in the skies, too. easyjet cuts more summer flights while baggage problems at heathrow mean 10% of flights at two terminals today could be cancelled. a report into grooming and sexual exploitation in oldham a decade ago
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says the local council and the police failed to protect some children. president macron�*s reform plans for france have been cast into doubt, after his ensemble group loses its majority in parliament. and after a huge conservation effort to save the mountain gorillas of rwanda, what does it teach us about saving other animals from extinction? and coming up on the bbc news channel... brilliance in brookline, matt fitzpatrick wins his first major at the us open, nine years after winning the amateur title at the same venue. good afternoon and welcome to the bbc news at one.
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britain is facing its biggest rail strike in 30 years this week, with a significant disruption to services across england, scotland and wales. last—minute talks between unions and rail bosses are continuing, but no breakthrough is currently in sight. the extent of the strikes�* likely impact is shown by this official map indicating the lines with limited services and reveals that many areas will have no services at all. the strike action is taking place tomorrow, tuesday 21stjune, as well as on thursday 23rd and saturday 25th, but a much—reduced service will be available in some areas. network rail says passengers should only travel by train if necessary. ben king has this report. a strike which will see just one train in five running tomorrow.
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there seems little prospect of avoiding the largest strike on the railways for a generation. i do railways for a generation. i do think it is _ railways for a generation. i do think it is important _ railways for a generation. i gr think it is important that we send out a message early this week that industrial action is likely to proceed in there for people should take sensible preparations now, because there is no point giving false hope if you like that these strikes can be avoided, i think at this stage it is likely that they will take place.— this stage it is likely that they will take place. timetables for strike days — will take place. timetables for strike days show _ will take place. timetables for strike days show half - will take place. timetables for strike days show half of - will take place. timetables for strike days show half of the i will take place. timetables for - strike days show half of the network closed completely with no service at all to parts of england and much of scotland and wales. even on non—strike days, many trains will be cancelled. the industry says don't travel if you can avoid it and if you must go, check yourjourney before you leave. i you must go, check your “ourney before you leavefi you must go, check your “ourney before you leave. i would 'ust have to net a before you leave. i would 'ust have to get a lift — before you leave. i would 'ust have to get a lift from h before you leave. i would just have to get a lift from someone, - before you leave. i would just have to get a lift from someone, which i before you leave. i would just have | to get a lift from someone, which is annoying because i live in chester, but it is what it is. it’s annoying because i live in chester, but it is what it is.— but it is what it is. it's 'ust the trains in general, _ but it is what it is. it's 'ust the trains in general, and h but it is what it is. it's just the l trains in general, and everybody else wants more money, and this is the only— else wants more money, and this is the only way— else wants more money, and this is the only way to do it, but they hurt the only way to do it, but they hurt the wrong — the only way to do it, but they hurt the wrong people, don't they? it is
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anno in: the wrong people, don't they? it is annoying but _ the wrong people, don't they? it is annoying but raise the wages if they need it. _ annoying but raise the wages if they need it, everything _ annoying but raise the wages if they need it, everything is— annoying but raise the wages if they need it, everything is going - annoying but raise the wages if they need it, everything is going up - annoying but raise the wages if they need it, everything is going up at i need it, everything is going up at the minute — need it, everything is going up at the minute. the— need it, everything is going up at the minute-— need it, everything is going up at the minute. , , , ., the minute. the dispute is about “ob losses, the minute. the dispute is about “ob losses. working fl the minute. the dispute is about “ob losses, working conditions i the minute. the dispute is about “ob losses, working conditions and h the minute. the dispute is about job losses, working conditions and pay, | losses, working conditions and pay, with the cost of living expected to rise at 11% this year, unions say any less than that will leave its members were soft. but any less than that will leave its members were soft.— any less than that will leave its members were soft. but the industry sa s it has members were soft. but the industry says it has accepted _ members were soft. but the industry says it has accepted 16 _ members were soft. but the industry says it has accepted 16 billion - members were soft. but the industry says it has accepted 16 billion from i says it has accepted 16 billion from the government to keep running during the pandemic and it needs to modernise and cut costs. indie during the pandemic and it needs to modernise and cut costs.— during the pandemic and it needs to modernise and cut costs. we want to cive modernise and cut costs. we want to give peeple — modernise and cut costs. we want to give peeple a — modernise and cut costs. we want to give peeple a pay _ modernise and cut costs. we want to give peeple a pay rise. _ modernise and cut costs. we want to give people a pay rise, we _ modernise and cut costs. we want to give people a pay rise, we are - modernise and cut costs. we want to give people a pay rise, we are not i give people a pay rise, we are not saying that we don't, but that can only be achieved if we get reform, and the quicker we sort out reform, that means we can then look at how much funding is available. travellers here at euston are braced for a week of travel chaos. this strike may not be the last. the union has a mandate until the end of novemberforfurther union has a mandate until the end of november for further strikes and they have warned that if they don't get the deal they want, they will have another vote and could take strike action into the new year. the unions say they want to negotiate directly with the government to avoid a strike. ministers say the
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unions should only negotiate with the rail industry. labour has called for government to get more involved in. ., ., , , in. the government has it within its ower to in. the government has it within its power to convene _ in. the government has it within its power to convene talks _ in. the government has it within its power to convene talks urgently, i power to convene talks urgently, bring the industry and the unions together in order to find a resolution to this dispute and avoid industrial action, and it is beyond belief, really, that the transport secretary hasn't even tried to do that. �* ., ., ., that. but with no agreement even on who should be _ that. but with no agreement even on who should be talking _ that. but with no agreement even on who should be talking to _ that. but with no agreement even on who should be talking to who, i that. but with no agreement even on who should be talking to who, a i that. but with no agreement even on who should be talking to who, a dealj who should be talking to who, a deal to end this damaging strike seems as far away as ever. ben king, bbc news. our midlands correspondent navteonhal is in nottingham station, onjust one of the many routes affected. what can passages expect in your area, inc start?— area, inc start? they can expect lots of disruption, _ area, inc start? they can expect lots of disruption, reeta. i area, inc start? they can expect lots of disruption, reeta. east l lots of disruption, reeta. east midlands railway have told me there will be a 70% reduction on their services, which means, for example,
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there will be no trains travelling east from this station on strike days to places like lincoln or norwich, and also on strike days, it means there will be a significantly shorter window when people are able to travel, finishing five hours earlier than usual, at 1830. that explains why the word i am hearing most from passengers today is annoying, the frustration about what is happening to them, people having to leave earlier, and set off earlier as well, one person had to cancel a eurostar ticket to amsterdam tomorrow and instead fly there today. but there has also been some understanding, people having some understanding, people having some sympathy for the workers around where they are striking, but it explains also that the rail operator is saying to people to only travel if absolutely necessary and to seek alternative forms of transport. navtej, many thanks. well, there's going to be an extremely limited service in scotland.
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0ur correspondentjames shaw is in glasgow for us. what is running and what isn't, james? what is running and what isn't, james? ~ ,., , what is running and what isn't, james? ~ , ~ , james? well, sounds like it is going to be even more _ james? well, sounds like it is going to be even more limited _ james? well, sounds like it is going to be even more limited in scotland| to be even more limited in scotland thanit to be even more limited in scotland than it is in the midlands. here, we have 90% of services are going to be cut, only five routes will be operating, in the central belt of scotland, that is edinburgh to bathgate, edinburgh to glasgow via falkirk, glasgow to hamilton, glasgow to london and edinburgh to glasgow to london and edinburgh to glasgow via shotts. in terms of the geography of that, that is a very limited area in the central belt of scotland, so, no services at all in the north of scotland, quite large stations like aberdeen and inverness will not have any services tomorrow, on tuesday, and the same situation in the south of scotland as well. there is in fact a pre—existing dispute at the moment between the train drivers union aslef and scotrail, that is the train operating company in scotland, and
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that has already reduced services are significantly. and there is also an unresolved dispute between scotrail and the rmt as well. so, there is definitely a fear of rolling problems on the network through the course of the summer in scotland, and it is a particular issue for the hospitality sector and for tourism, the height of the season, really, onlya for tourism, the height of the season, really, only a few weeks away. let's talk to our political correspondent iain watson, who is in westminster. so, huge potential disruption, iain, and both the government and the opposition being criticised for their positions?— opposition being criticised for their positions? well, they are certainly criticising _ their positions? well, they are certainly criticising each i their positions? well, they arej certainly criticising each other, reeta. labour is saying the government is deliberately sowing division and also saying that ministers should get directly involved and sit around the negotiating table because it is ultimately them, not the companies, who control the purse strings when it comes to pay. for their part, the government are saying labour should be condemning these strikes, they
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talk about labour's closeness to the unions, but it is still not clear in the court of public opinion what the verdict would be if industrial action is sustained for a lengthy period, but certainly later this week the government is going to begin the process of scrapping a regulation that dates back to the conservative government of the early 19705, conservative government of the early 1970s, which vented employers from bringing in agency workers to cover the work done by striking staff a dispute. this is not particularly aimed at the current rail dispute, the measures would not come in until mid—july, what the government really is thinking about doing is giving employers more flexibility if other strike ballots, potentially in schools and hospitals and councils, are successful, and i think that is are successful, and i think that is a sign that government ministers are really expecting something of a summer of discontent, as demands for wage increases go up along with prices and indeed along with the political temperature. iain watson,
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thank ou. and you can stay up to date with all the latest developments on the rail strikes at bbc.co.uk/news. there's more trouble in store for air travellers. easyjet has announced it's cutting more flights up to the end of september, blaming staff shortages. and heathrow airport says it has asked airlines to take 10% of flights out of their schedules today due to problems with baggage at the airport. 0ur correspondent matt graveling has more. so, matt, different issues at play but more misery for travellers? for an bod but more misery for travellers? if?" anybody trying to get away this summer, it is turning into a nightmare. the aviation industry is still trying to recover from all of the job losses suffered during the pandemic, it hasn't quite recruited enough staff to deal with the increase passenger numbers. easyjet were hit by this and they announced today that they are going to be
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returning to a pre—pandemic level of 90% capacity, rather than the 97% that we were told. they said that this was a result of staff shortages, but that the majority of passengers affected will be put on other flights. passengers affected will be put on otherflights. they passengers affected will be put on other flights. they also said a problem with other airports such as gatwick and amsterdam, they are now capping the number of total flights across the summer so they are not able to get as many flights into the air as before. talking about airports, i have spoken to heathrow because of those pictures we have seen of the mountains of bags as a result of an issue at terminal two. they told me they have asked karius to reduce their flights today and thatis to reduce their flights today and that is going to affect about 5000 passengers. that is going to affect about 5000 passengers-— that is going to affect about 5000 assenuers. . ~' ,, , . passengers. thank you very much, met travel . barristers have voted to take industrial action in england and wales in protest at pay and conditions. the criminal bar association says its membership has voted for the highest form of escalation, starting a week today. downing street says borisjohnson has undergone an operation on his sinuses under general anaesthetic at a london hospital this morning.
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he is now back in downing street and resting after what his office described as a "very minor routine operation". there were "serious failings" in oldham by authorities meant to protect children from grooming and sexual exploitation, according to a report into historical offences in the town between 2011 and 2014. greater manchester police and 0ldham council have both offered apologies for the way they let down and failed to protect a number of children. but the report found no evidence of a cover—up. let's join our correspondent rowan bridge who's in manchester for us now. just tell us a bit more about what the report says? the just tell us a bit more about what the report says?— the report says? the report was commissioned _ the report says? the report was commissioned after _ the report says? the report was commissioned after rumours i the report says? the report was i commissioned after rumours darted circulating online that men of predominantly pakistani heritage had been abusing white girls in the town of 0ldham. the report says there is no evidence to back up those allegations but it did find other
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serious allegations around how some cases of child exploitation were dealt with. the most serious of those in the report involves a 12—year—old girl called sophie who was taken from under police station and subsequently wrecked by several men. severalyears and subsequently wrecked by several men. several years later she reported the allegations to the authorities but the report says that the authorities, the police and local authority, seemed more concerned about covering up their previous failings than addressing what happened to her. irate previous failings than addressing what happened to her.— what happened to her. we have concluded _ what happened to her. we have concluded that _ what happened to her. we have concluded that the _ what happened to her. we have | concluded that the interventions what happened to her. we have i concluded that the interventions of both the _ concluded that the interventions of both the council and greater manchester police and the investigations into her allegations fell for_ investigations into her allegations fell far short of what was required to protect — fell far short of what was required to protect sophie, who was only 12 years— to protect sophie, who was only 12 veers old _ to protect sophie, who was only 12 years old at the time of her abuse. now, _ years old at the time of her abuse. now. the _ years old at the time of her abuse. now, the report also looked at ten other cases and it found that in those the casework was generally very poor and procedures that should have been in place to protect children were not working as effectively or efficiently as they should have done. in a news
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conference this morning the leader of 0ldham council and the chief constable of greater manchester police both fully accepted the report and apologised to all victims of child sexual exportation in the town. the chief constable of greater manchester police, stephen watson, said, we were not there for you when you desperately needed us, but he ended with a statement, a message to offenders, saying, if you think you've got away with this, you're wrong, we're coming for you. rowan bride, wrong, we're coming for you. rowan bridge. thank— wrong, we're coming for you. rowan bridge, thank you. _ police in brazil say they're looking forfive more people believed to be involved in the murder of the british journalist dom phillips and his colleague bruno pereira. three suspects have already been arrested in connection with the killing in the amazon. the pair were investigating the involvement of criminal gangs in illegalfishing and mining when they went missing. the european union's foreign policy chief has described the russian blockade of ukrainian ports as a war crime, as ministers discuss how to transfer millions of tonnes of grain to countries that need it. eu foreign ministers are meeting to discuss how
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to ensure that the grain, which is stuck in ukraine because of the war, can reach those countries that need it. josepp borell said the blockade was having a direct impact on people around the world who are going hungry. france's president emmanuel macron has experienced a major political setback, losing his parliamentary majority in the country's elections. his party, ensemble, is still the biggest in the national assembly, holding 2115 seats. but it suffered the loss of dozens more. it means president macron will now be forced to negotiate with opposition parties in order to get his policies through. the election saw major advances for a new left—wing alliance and for marine le pen's party of the far—right. 0ur paris correspondent lucy williamson reports. president macron's centrist coalition has lost a third of its seats. just look at the mood. translation: the situation is unprecedented. _ the national assembly has never seen
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a configurations of this type a configuration of this type in the fifth republic. the situation constitutes a risk for our country in view of the challenges that we have to face. this is now president macron's main opposition, a new alliance of green and left—wing parties dominated by far left mps. the initial estimates confirming their unused status confirming their new status as the first opposition party of france. translation: it's the total defeat of the president's party, _ and there is no majority. we have achieved the political objective we gave ourselves, to bring down the men who with such arrogance twisted the arm of the whole country to get elected. applause and cheering. but this was the big surprise of the night, marine le pen's far right national partyjumped from a handful of seats to almost 90. plenty of opposition to the president, from all sides.
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translation: we're going to continue to bring french people together - as part of a great popular movement unifying all patriots from the right and the left. the parliamentary opposition to mr macron's centrist coalition is now much stronger than before, but it's also more fractured, with one bloc led by jean—luc melenchon on the far left of the chamber and another by marine le pen on the far right. french politics is realigning around these three political groups. some voters say it's no bad thing if president macron is forced to negotiate with his opponents. others believe denying the government a majority only leads to stagnation. president macron is facing a new era of political opposition that some see as good for democracy, and others as bad for france. lucy williamson, bbc news, paris. let's speak to hugh schofield who is outside the national assembly in paris.
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this means that president macron will be hampered now in the coming years. will be hampered now in the coming ears. . . , will be hampered now in the coming ears. ., , , ., , years. inevitably and definitely. for the last _ years. inevitably and definitely. for the last five _ years. inevitably and definitely. for the last five years _ years. inevitably and definitely. for the last five years he i years. inevitably and definitely. for the last five years he has i years. inevitably and definitely. | for the last five years he has not had to think about this place, the national assembly, parliament, because in the french system if you are president with a strong majority, which he had, you can put everything through, parliament is not a big issue. now, everything through, parliament is nota big issue. now, quite suddenly, it is. he has lost his majority and france shifts from being a presidential system to a mixed presidential and parliamentary system. the national assembly has become a very important place indeed. in this assembly now, and new members are beginning to arrive behind me, there are two very big blocks of opposition who are dedicated to stopping everything that emmanuel macron stands for. that is the left wing dominated by the far left and the resurgent far right, who success yesterday was a
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big surprise, 90 mps. there is also a rump of the old conservative party, the old jacques chirac party, the gaullists, who i am sure will want to come to some arrangement. but are they going to be in any mood to do him any favours? i think not. it is going to be a very tough and turbulent time ahead.— it is going to be a very tough and turbulent time ahead. many thanks, huh turbulent time ahead. many thanks, hugh schofield. _ our top story this lunchtime. rail travellers face the first of three days of strikes in what's expected to be the biggest walkout on the railways in 30 years. and england's matt fitzpatrick wins the us open after clinching his first major trophy. coming up on the bbc news channel... it's the warm—up to wimbledon. we'll bring you the latest from eastbourne as heather watson continues her preparations for the start of the championships which start next week. sir david attenborough said recently that meeting the mountain gorillas
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of central africa was one of the most memorable experiences of his life. during his trip more a0 years ago, the gorillas were on the brink of extinction but now, thanks to a huge conservation effort, their numbers are on the up. this week the united nations is continuing talks in kenya about maintaining the earth's biodiversity and saving species from extinction. our climate editor, justin rowlatt, has been to visit the mountain gorillas in uganda to find out more about the successful project. this park is one of the last two places on earth where mountain gorillas still survive. we are just hacking our way through the forest because the gorillas go wherever they want, there are no paths around here. he has seen something moving. there is one down
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there it's a gorilla. gorilla mumble. this is just incredible, you can hear the sound of gorillas all around us. you can't see most of them because the vegetation is so thick. there are baby gorillas in the trees. adults withjuvenile gorillas on the ground. it's incredible to be so close to one of our closest relatives on earth. low burblinig. and that is a gorilla fart. wow. the population is growing steadily, it is a dramatic turnaround. sir david attenborough feared he might be seeing the last of their kind when he visited a mountain gorilla family in the �*70s.
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so how have the gorillas been saved? conservation charities say this ecotourism is a large part of the answer. tourism really does help wild animals if it is done right. when i first started out they were only about five lodges, now there are as many as 70. the lodges have created jobs, the ngos have created jobs, so there is lots of employment that has happened. but tourism alone is not enough. look how abruptly the tree cover ends here in uganda. the parks are big, but as the gorilla population grows... we are definitely seeing that gorilla families are more crowded, they are bumping into each other more, which unfortunately is often associated with aggression. we are seeing higher rates of infanticide, so infants can oftentimes be killed when these families come together. and bigger parks cost more money. the un is asking countries to set aside a third of their land and sea area for conservation.
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the developing world says it needs $100 billion a year to help fund that. the hope is deadlock can be broken in nairobi this week. we have been told by scientists we only have this century and we only have one planet, there is no planet b. the mountain gorilla shows we can save species from the brink of extinction. the question now is whether the world is now ready to commit the money and resources to make it happen on a much bigger scale. justin rowlatt, bbc news, windy impenetrable forest. windy, impenetrable forest. and you can watch mountain gorrilas, a conservation success on bbc iplayer now. the parents of a brain—damaged 12—year—old boy, archie battersbee, are returning to court this afternoon to seek permission to appeal against the decision to turn off his life—support. last week the high court agreed with doctors
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at the royal london hospital that he was brain dead. but his parents disagree and say they'll continue to fight for treatment. the full inquest into the guildford pub bombings finally gets under way nearly 48 years after the bombings killed four soldiers and a civilian. the attacks, in 1974, led to one of britain's biggest miscarriages ofjustice after the guildford four were wrongly convicted. the ira later claimed responsibility for the attacks. the inquest will examine the timing of one of the explosions, the location of the bomb, and how the victims died. our correspondent duncan kennedy is outside guildford coroner's court. well, the pub bombings are amongst the most investigated crimes ever carried out in this country. as you say, no one has ever been brought to justice for them. there was the sir
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john may inquiry and the prime ministerial apology from tony blair to the guildford four further miscarriage ofjustice, but nobody has ever been brought to court and nobody has ever been charged. for the families of the five people who died they have never had a full understanding of exactly what went on that night. all the details have never been made clear to them. that is why 48 years on, they are hoping this inquest will finally give them some of the answers to the questions they have been seeking. in the words of the coroner, it was the day terror came to surrey. a saturday night when two ira bombs destroyed two pubs full of off—duty soldiers. private caroline slater, private ann hamilton, guardsman william forsyth, guardsmanjohn hunter, and a civilian, paul craig, all died. paul made scenery for films like murder on the orient express. paul's sister pat came to tell the inquest what kind of man he was.
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oh, ajoy. he was only 21 when died, he died one day before his birthday. this is it for me. i feel free now. once i have done that speech, i will feel free. yes. the original inquest was adjourned straight after the attacks because of the criminal investigation by surrey police. that investigation led to the conviction of four people who came to be known as the guildford four. they spent 15 years in jail protesting their innocence before having their convictions quashed. the release of the guildford four means no one has ever been convicted for these pub bombings. some members of the ira were named in connection with the attacks but no charges were ever brought, which means this inquest is the closest that families will ever come to finding out what really happened. the inquest won't examine who carried out the bombings but will hear witness and other evidence over the next 16
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days from surrey police, the metropolitan police, and the ministry of defence. it will look at the locations and timings of the bombings and how the five people died. it has taken 48 years for this full inquest to be held, an historical gap and a time for the victims' stories to be told. duncan kennedy, bbc news and guildford. news in guildford. social media is the main source of news for older children, according to a study commissioned by the bbc, with tiktok being the most popular platform. the poll of 2,000 11 to 16—year—olds suggests they trust politicians less than social media influencers to tell them the truth about current affairs. the singer ed sheeran has been named as the most played artist of last year in the uk. # bad habits lead to late nights.
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his song bad habits was also the most played single of 2021, according to data from music licensing company ppl. sheeran is the first artist to manage both feats in two different years, having also done it in 2017. england's matt fitzpatrick has claimed his first major title with a one—shot victory in the us open. fitzpatrick, who's 27, isjust the third englishman in 52 years to win the second oldest major. our sports correspondent joe lynsky reports. on the boston greens the sound came from sheffield. for matthew fitzpatrick this was a moment for his family and history for british golf. fitzpatrick played on the last day with will zalatoris, south yorkshire against san francisco, and between them they were so close. the two were neck and neck through the back nine. to stay in touch fitzpatrick found the spectacular.
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at 27 he had not won a major before, but here he was in the sand at the last hole with a shot the greats would be proud of. that is one of the best shots i've ever seen. zalatoris would need this putt to force a play—off. for him it was heartbreak. but for fitzpatrick to do it here meant so much. it's what you grow up dreaming of, it's something i've worked so hard for, for such a long time. you know, there was a big monkey on my back trying to win over here and everyone, all they ever talked about was that. to do it at a major as my first win, there's nothing better. fitzpatrick wraps his clubs in a sheffield united badge. now he has won where so few brits have before and us open silver is heading to the steel city. joe, lynsky, bbc news. nesta mcgregor is at hallamshire golf club in sheffield where matt fitzpatrick
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played as an amateur. there must be lots of pride there. yes, good afternoon. not a bad day for around or two, yes, good afternoon. not a bad day foraround ortwo, is yes, good afternoon. not a bad day for around or two, is it? as you can imagine, lots of pride and proud faces. the green behind me were matthew fitzpatrick would have spent hours perfecting his game. today he is waking up in america, if he has been to sleep, realising all the hard work has paid off. at 27 he is the us open champion, his first major. this club means a lot to him and brookline does as well. in 2013 he won the amateur championship there and a replica of that trophy is in sight at the club has, so to the golf bag he donated. as you can imagine, replace from last night all over the screens in the clubhouse. he is the top of the clubhouse and it is going to be some homecoming in a few weeks when he is back for the scottish open.
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a few weeks when he is back for the scottish open-— time for a look at the weather.

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