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tv   BBC News  BBC News  June 19, 2022 7:00pm-7:31pm BST

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this is bbc news — the headlines at seven. the transport secretary accuses union leaders of "punishing millions of innocent people" by pressing ahead with rail strikes this week. itjust seems that the union is determined to go out on strike, the rmt, come what may, and i think it's a very sad situation and i call on them to reconsider. yeah, i feel sorry for them, yeah, ifeel sorry for them, they want to appear rightjust like the rest of us but what can you do? the transort rest of us but what can you do? the transport minister has not been listening — transport minister has not been listening to them for decades and it is time _ listening to them for decades and it is time they listened. it is listening to them for decades and it is time they listened.— is time they listened. it is awful for peeple. _ is time they listened. it is awful for peeple. they _ is time they listened. it is awful for people, they need _ is time they listened. it is awful for people, they need to - is time they listened. it is awful for people, they need to travel| is time they listened. it is awful. for people, they need to travel to -et for people, they need to travel to get to— for people, they need to travel to get to their— for people, they need to travel to get to theiriobs _ for people, they need to travel to get to theirjobs and _ for people, they need to travel to get to theirjobs and places. - polls have closed in france's parliamentary elections — could president macron�*s grip on power be weakened by the result?
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and swimming's world governing body votes to effectively ban transgender competitors like american lia thomas from taking part in women's races. after the uk promises more heavy weapons to ukraine — now the new head of the british army says troops should be prepared to fight russia in europe. we want to start by bringing you some _ we want to start by bringing you some breaking _ we want to start by bringing you some breaking news _ we want to start by bringing you some breaking news from - we want to start by bringing you some breaking news from the i some breaking news from the elections _ some breaking news from the elections in _ some breaking news from the elections in france, _ some breaking news from the elections in france, coming . some breaking news from thei elections in france, coming in some breaking news from the - elections in france, coming in from reuters _ elections in france, coming in from reuters. , ., ., reuters. president emmanuel macron is on course — reuters. president emmanuel macron is on course to — reuters. president emmanuel macron is on course to lose _ reuters. president emmanuel macron is on course to lose his _ reuters. president emmanuel macron is on course to lose his absolute - is on course to lose his absolute majority in the national assembly and the ability to govern with a free hand after the first projections by leading pollsters shows the election delivering a hung
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parliament. this hasjust come through, the polls have now closed and these are the first projections by leading pollsters and they show president macron is on course to lose his absolute majority in the national assembly. that is coming from reuters there. we have more updates coming in, this is afp saying that marine le pen's pyrite makes major gains in the parliament. another one from afp is that micron's allies are to win between 260 seats. the left are to win 149 seats, both our 260 seats. the left are to win149 seats, both our projections but according to those figures micron would not have an absolute majority. —— emmanuel macron would not have an
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absolute majority. more on that when we get it. but first. the transport secretary says it's not for the government to intervene to prevent three days of strikes on the railways this week. grant shapps has dismissed calls from the rmt union to get involved in the dispute as a �*stunt�* — he says it's for the employers and unions to reach an agreement. mr shapps says the strikes would be an �*act of self—harm', but the labour leader, sir keir starmer, says the government wants the strikes to go ahead to �*sow division' in society. here's our political correspondent, nick eardley. get ready for the biggest rail strike in a generation. for three days spread over the next week, the rail workers union will down tools, massive disruption is expected across the country and in some places like hull, no services will be running in or out on strike days. it is awfulfor be running in or out on strike days. it is awful for people with need to get to jobs and to work and places. i do not like strikes. maybe asking for a bit _ i do not like strikes. maybe asking
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for a bit too — i do not like strikes. maybe asking for a bit too much of a pay rise. they— for a bit too much of a pay rise. they have — for a bit too much of a pay rise. they have to strike because the transport — they have to strike because the transport minister— they have to strike because the transport minister has - they have to strike because the transport minister has not - they have to strike because the| transport minister has not been listening — transport minister has not been listening to _ transport minister has not been listening to them _ transport minister has not been listening to them for _ transport minister has not been listening to them for decades. i listening to them for decades. ministers— listening to them for decades. ministers face _ listening to them for decades. ministers face pressure - listening to them for decades. ministers face pressure to - listening to them for decades. ministers face pressure to get| ministers face pressure to get involved and brokered a deal to prevent disruption. speaking to bbc this morning, the transport secretary laid the blame at the door of the union. i secretary laid the blame at the door of the union-— of the union. i don't think there's an need of the union. i don't think there's any need for _ of the union. i don't think there's any need for the _ of the union. i don't think there's any need for the strikes - of the union. i don't think there's any need for the strikes at - of the union. i don't think there's any need for the strikes at all - of the union. i don't think there's| any need for the strikes at all and i appealed directly to people working for the railways, you are laid down a cul—de—sac by the union leadership telling you there is no pay rise memories. trying to create some sort of class war when there is none to be had. we people to be paid more, we want sensible reforms and modernisation of the railways to run it for their passengers.— it for their passengers. union leaders say — it for their passengers. union leaders say members - it for their passengers. union leaders say members are - it for their passengers. union i leaders say members are facing it for their passengers. union - leaders say members are facing a real terms pay cut. they're also what about conditions and job cuts. we do not want to be the cause of disruption — we do not want to be the cause of disruption and people's lives, we want _ disruption and people's lives, we want a _ disruption and people's lives, we want a settlement but we are facing a crisis _ want a settlement but we are facing a crisis for— want a settlement but we are facing a crisis for our members. we are
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facing _ a crisis for our members. we are facing thousands ofjob cuts despite what grant shapps says, there has been _ what grant shapps says, there has been no _ what grant shapps says, there has been no guarantee these redundancies will not _ been no guarantee these redundancies will not be _ been no guarantee these redundancies will not be compulsory. the been no guarantee these redundancies will not be compulsory.— will not be compulsory. the blame came will not be compulsory. the blame name is will not be compulsory. the blame game is already — will not be compulsory. the blame game is already under— will not be compulsory. the blame game is already under way. - will not be compulsory. the blame game is already under way. the i game is already under way. the government is adamant its actions does not need to happen but this is comfortable political territory for the conservatives who can say they are taking a hard line on industrial action and blame what they say are unreasonable union bosses. the rmt however says this sort of action is essential to protect members at a time when the cost of living squeeze is hitting the pound and everyone's pocket. this was central london yesterday, thousands calling for better pay. there had been warnings of more disputes in the coming months. labour has avoided questions on the rights and wrongs of a union demands but it has said ministers need to do more. the demands but it has said ministers need to do more.— demands but it has said ministers need to do more. the striker should not no need to do more. the striker should not go ahead _ need to do more. the striker should not go ahead but _ need to do more. the striker should not go ahead but here _ need to do more. the striker should not go ahead but here is _ need to do more. the striker should not go ahead but here is the - need to do more. the striker should not go ahead but here is the truth, l not go ahead but here is the truth, borisjohnson and grant shapps want
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the strength to go ahead. they want the strength to go ahead. they want the country to grind to a halt so they can feed off the division. —— strike to go ahead. plat they can feed off the division. -- strike to go ahead.— strike to go ahead. not true says the government _ strike to go ahead. not true says the government but _ strike to go ahead. not true says the government but this - strike to go ahead. not true says the government but this week i strike to go ahead. not true says| the government but this week will see significant disruption on the railways and there could be more to come. scotrail say 90% of trains will need to be cancelled during the three days of action by the rmt union. the dispute does not involve scotrail staff, but it relies on network rail workers to operate signal boxes and maintain track. our scotland reporter, alexandra mackenzie, has the latest from glasgow queen street station there's going to be a lot of disruption here across scotland. there are some passengers here today, but it is looking quite quiet already, and, yes, ithink you just got it right there — lots of frustration here, and i am joined by someone from scotrail. phil campbell, you're head of customer operations. you're not out on strike, but it is going to affect scotrail. just how much, how many of your services will you be cutting?
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so the uk—wide strike will have a significant impact on scotrail and on the days of the strike, which is the 21st, 23rd and 25th, we'll only be able to operate a very limited service in the central belt, and that will be across five routes. so our advice to customers is to plan ahead, only travel if it's really necessary, and nothing further out operating than the central belt. so, when you talk about the central belt, you're talking about that area around edinburgh and glasgow, so what areas will be covered and how many services will still be running for customers going between the two cities? so there'll be five routes, so we'll connect edinburgh and glasgow. some of those services will run via shotts, falkirk high. we'll also see a service from edinburgh to bathgate, and we'll see larkhall and lanark serviced.
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so that's around 180 services, so around 10% of what we've been operating, so quite a significant drop. and, as i've said, we need customers to plan ahead, understand it's a very limited timetable. it also finishes earlier in the day as well, and to make sure that they have not got themself in a position where they can't travel. and what about commuters around the rest of the country? dundee, inverness, aberdeen? just no trains for anyone north or south of the central belt area? yeah, it's very unfortunate. this uk—wide strike is affecting all train operating companies up and down the country. those roles who will be on strike from network rail are safety critical, so roles like signal people, so we just can't get that service to operate without people being there, and that's why we're seeing such a reduction in the services from network rail. and it is over three days with a day in between, so what are the chances of getting services up and running on the days when there isn't a strike? yeah, so the days in between the strike action, we'll start to see the timetable return. however, there'll be services that'll start later in the day than they traditionally would, and that's just to allow the train service to get back into service, so, again, we ask people to go
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onto the website, plan their journey, speak to our teams in the stations, and understand what services are running where and when, but the days between strikes will see a slower start—up in the day, roundabout 7am as opposed to earlier in the morning. and your advice to customers, briefly? plan ahead. pop on and look at the website. it'll give you all the details that you need. if you need to speak to staff in the stations, please do so. on the days of the strike, we will have staff available in stations. they will still be here — scotrail are not on strike and we'll do all we can to help people and advise. that's great. appreciate your time. thank you very much. and apart from scotrail, cross—border services will also be affected, and the caledonian sleeper, as well. it will run tonight but that will be the last one this week, and customers are being advised to check the website, and caledonian sleeper customers will get a refund if they were planning to travel later this week. alexandra mackenzie reporting from glasgow.
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just a handful of train routes will run in wales during the strikes. although transport for wales are not involved in the dispute, the vast majority of lines rely on network rail signallers. these passengers in wrexham shared their thoughts on the strikes it's a pain. it is a pain, to be honest. so...nothing, really, i can say. yeah, ifeel sorry for them — they want a pay rise just like the rest of us, but what can you do? we were going to go and visit grace's family. yeah, so we've kind of had to cancel that one, - cos we can't get down. i get the bus to work every day to the court, so... and it goes under the tunnel — i guessing it will be packed with everyone off the trains and on the buses, but you'vejust got to muck on, haven't you? polls have closed in france's parliamentary elections, with president macron's party facing the prospect of being unable to command a majority. hugh schofield is in paris, let's hear the latest. it is bad news for emmanuel macron.
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it is bad news for emmanuel macron. it looks unequivocal that he has lost his majority, his absolute majority in parliament. the figures are coming in and they arejust projections, dvd. different tv companies are giving slightly different pictures. farfrom being the last word on this but it does look as if emmanuel macron's party will be getting around about 230 seats in parliament maybe as as much as one —— 260 but whatever, it is far shorter than the 289 he needs for the majority by himself in parliament. so this is a big blow for macron, he cannot rely on getting his own reforms through parliament without help from somebody else. you will that be? the second party in this parliament will be the far left coalition run by
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jean—luc melenchon which looks like it will get between 150 and 190 seats. the big surprise of the evening is a very strong showing for the front national, the far right who were expecting to get 30 or 40 seats, they look like they will get 90 seats and then the moderate conservative opposition looks like it will get 60 or 70 or perhaps as few as 40. it looks probable therefore that macron might be able to form some ad hoc coalition, and arrangement with the moderate conservatives to get reforms through but this is far from what he wanted. he wanted to waltz through selection, come out with a big majority and therefore reform the present system but he will not be able to do that. he will have to
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rely on the republicans to get anything through and they will take their price and it will make him seem politically speaking, like a man of the right which means on the left, there will be strong left—wing opposition in parliament led by this new coalition and on top of that, there is a very strong far right presence as well. up to 90 seats for marine le pen's party is unprecedented.- marine le pen's party is unprecedented. marine le pen's party is unrecedented. , , ., , _ unprecedented. these big gains by the far left and _ unprecedented. these big gains by the far left and far _ unprecedented. these big gains by the far left and far right, _ unprecedented. these big gains by the far left and far right, what - unprecedented. these big gains by the far left and far right, what do l the far left and far right, what do they suggest, i know they are projections but what do they suggest about the mood of voters and the feeling in france?— about the mood of voters and the feeling in france? they suggest that macron presidential— feeling in france? they suggest that macron presidential victory - feeling in france? they suggest that macron presidential victory was - feeling in france? they suggest that macron presidential victory was one | macron presidential victory was one that they reluctantly gave him in france. 0nce that they reluctantly gave him in france. once again they wanted to keep marine le pen out of the elysee palace, 40% voted for emmanuel macron. many simply wanted to keep
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marine le pen out. macron, outside of the most prosperous parts of the country, is not a popularfigure. we knew that from the presidential election and what this parliamentary election and what this parliamentary election has shown is that the majority of the country has come together to deliver a slap in the face and bring him back down to size, he now faces a double pinscher from the far left and the far right. he has controlled the centre of french politics but that means the opposition has come from the extremes, far left and far right and he is now squeezed by these two blocks which have emerged as more representative together of the country than he and his centrist bloc is. . ~' , ., , country than he and his centrist bloc is. ., ,, i. , . country than he and his centrist bloc is. . ~ ,, , . ., bloc is. thank you very much for that, hugh _ bloc is. thank you very much for that, hugh scofield _ bloc is. thank you very much for that, hugh scofield live - bloc is. thank you very much for that, hugh scofield live for- bloc is. thank you very much for that, hugh scofield live for us i bloc is. thank you very much for that, hugh scofield live for us in paris. now with us is lex paulson, the former advisor to emmanuel macron's 2017 presidential campaign— hejoins us from paris.
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thank you forjoining us. terrible night president macron? i am thank you forjoining us. terrible night president macron? i am not sure ou night president macron? i am not sure you can _ night president macron? i am not sure you can call— night president macron? i am not sure you can call it _ night president macron? i am not sure you can call it terrible - night president macron? i am not sure you can call it terrible when | sure you can call it terrible when he has won more seats in the parliament than any other political party in france. i think the person with the most seats is in the most favourable position. yes with the most seats is in the most favourable position.— favourable position. yes but big rains favourable position. yes but big gains from _ favourable position. yes but big gains from the _ favourable position. yes but big gains from the far— favourable position. yes but big gains from the far left - favourable position. yes but big gains from the far left in - favourable position. yes but big gains from the far left in the - favourable position. yes but big gains from the far left in the far right which was not expected, especially from the far right so definitely not a good night for president macron?— definitely not a good night for president macron? ., ., president macron? compared to five ears a . o. president macron? compared to five years ago- five _ president macron? compared to five years ago. five years _ president macron? compared to five years ago. five years ago _ president macron? compared to five years ago. five years ago was - president macron? compared to five years ago. five years ago was so - years ago. five years ago was so exceptional in how emmanuel macron demolish the existing political landscape in france. it set the expectation to be ex historically high. having strong coalitions on the left and right is probably where i centrist moderate party is likely to end up. it is not a wave election
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like five years ago. the french people are exhausted from the pandemic and news of war in europe andindeed pandemic and news of war in europe and indeed the economic news, they chose stability so i do not look at this election is a rejection of macron but a continuing rejection of the french electoral system as a whole. and macron is still leading the largest group of deputies in the assembly. the largest group of deputies in the assembl . , , ., ., ., assembly. yes, but not enough to have an absolute _ assembly. yes, but not enough to have an absolute majority - assembly. yes, but not enough to i have an absolute majority according to current projections. that have an absolute majority according to current projections.— to current pro'ections. that is ri . ht. to current pro'ections. that is right. we — to current projections. that is right. we will _ to current projections. that is right. we will have _ to current projections. that is right. we will have to - to current projections. that is right. we will have to look . right. we will have to look carefully at the next five years, how do these new deputies do, how ideological and pragmatic are they? the people on his right will have around 78 seats according to —— projections. they are interested in reforming the pension and retirement
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system. therefore his party will have a majority. the far left want to go further on climate change and macron says he wants a new minister for climate planning. so those seats together could produce a majority. if there is a deal—breaker, emmanuel macron could have a productive five years but instead if everyone just wants to block all legislation whatsoever, it could be five very boring years domestically indeed. i boring years domestically indeed. i admire your optimistic outlook on this, you're very positive take on it but the fact that there were big gains made by the far right when months ago it was considered they were pretty much neutralised as a threat so again, it cannot possibly be seen as a triumphant night four wrong? iiii be seen as a triumphant night four wron: ? , ., ~'
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be seen as a triumphant night four wron: ? i. ,, ., be seen as a triumphant night four wron: ? ,, ,, ., ., wrong? if you think that emanuele macron stands _ wrong? if you think that emanuele macron stands further _ wrong? if you think that emanuele macron stands further status - wrong? if you think that emanuele macron stands further status quo i wrong? if you think that emanuele | macron stands further status quo in france but also marine le pen have been against the establishment so whilst macron has been head of state his rise is very similar, due to some of the same frustrations at the far right and the far left face. the socialist, traditional centre—left has essentially been eliminated as a major force has essentially been eliminated as a majorforce in has essentially been eliminated as a major force in french has essentially been eliminated as a majorforce in french politics. we see disruption all across the political spectrum, macron did not get a result he wanted but we see a longer trend away from traditional parties and towards new kinds of coalitions, hopefully solving problems anyway.— coalitions, hopefully solving problems anyway. onto that, otential problems anyway. onto that, potential talks _ problems anyway. onto that, potential talks lie _ problems anyway. onto that, potential talks lie ahead - problems anyway. onto that, potential talks lie ahead in i problems anyway. onto that, - potential talks lie ahead in terms of coalition but does that not his arms behind his back, what power does macron realistically have to put into force any of the policies
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he wants? the forces resting on negotiations in a coalition. the fifth republic _ negotiations in a coalition. the fifth republic in _ negotiations in a coalition. tie: fifth republic in comparison negotiations in a coalition. tte: fifth republic in comparison with other systems in the anglo—saxon world gives us quite a lot of power to the president when it comes to foreign. all of the issues that he campaigned on, a stronger role for europe, a stronger military, independence for europe, stronger support for ukraine, none of them have the power to do that because there was majority held views in france but because the president constitutionally has a lot of power so those are major issues and i think macron will be able to carry policy on europe and ukraine successfully. the domestic issues will require some more sophisticated coalition building. will he be able to pull it off? with the left and right standing as spoilers, it remains to be seen. if some of the younger generation of deputies want
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to make progress on climate change for example, are willing to make deals then he can legislate because his policies are moderate policies that the majority of french people support. if a coalition can be made around the policy, it is not the preference of macron but he has the team with the skills to go with it in terms of the environment. thank ou for in terms of the environment. thank you for coming _ in terms of the environment. thank you for coming to — in terms of the environment. thank you for coming to speak— in terms of the environment. thank you for coming to speak to - in terms of the environment. thank you for coming to speak to us - in terms of the environment. thank you for coming to speak to us so i you for coming to speak to us so soon after the polls close. that was a former adviser to president macron. and the biggest teaching union, the neu, has said it will ballot its members on strike action in england unless the government offers a pay rise of more than three per cent. the union, which has 450,000 members, will write to the education secretary, nadhim zahawi, this week. any strike would take place in the autumn. the new head of the british army has told troops they need to prepare to "fight in europe once again". in a letter addressed to all ranks and civil servants,
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general sir patrick sanders, said there was a �*burning imperative' for the army to be ready to fight "alongside allies" to defeat russia in battle. earlier i spoke with our defence correspondent jonathan beale: ido i do not think it is a price that a new head of army has set out a vision and challenge for his soldiers all that the letter has been leaked, given it was sent to every soldier and civil servant working in the mod and that might have been the purpose behind it. nor is it surprising he mentions russia. what is a surprise is the bluntness and also directness of the language he uses on russia, which he mentions four times in the short letter and that standout quote you just gave, there is now a burning imperative to forge an army capable of fighting alongside our allies in defeating russia in battle so essentially saying the raison d'etre of the army is to deter russia and if necessary to be ready to fight russia and europe. not because of language usually get from a civil servant.
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does this mean we are likely to see british troops deployed to ukraine? it does not mean that. politicians had been clear that will not be happen, no other western countries saying that but what it does mean and what we have seen in the last few years ever since russia invaded crimea, british troops and other troops being sent to eastern european countries to act as a deterrent to russia and we will see more of that, leaders will meet at the end of this month at the nato summit where they will raise the question cut this raises a question about the size of the british army air corps is smaller than a has—been since the napoleonic wars, 73,000. it is no secret that the former head of the army in his last interview made a case for reversing some of those cuts and i think some of those calls will get louder. so
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those cuts and i think some of those calls will get louder.— calls will get louder. so you think actually this _ calls will get louder. so you think actually this might _ calls will get louder. so you think actually this might be _ calls will get louder. so you think actually this might be something| actually this might be something that drives or continues to add meant to a reversal —— reversal of those cuts? it meant to a reversal -- reversal of those cuts?— those cuts? it is not set out in this letter— those cuts? it is not set out in this letter and _ those cuts? it is not set out in this letter and sir _ those cuts? it is not set out in this letter and sir patrick - those cuts? it is not set out in i this letter and sir patrick sanders has not said that but his predecessor has and many other experts are saying that, given what russia has done in ukraine, there is a case to reverse some of the cuts to the british arm, to treat numbers and tank numbers and also increase defence spending. the government would say they have increased defence spending already biting that will continue. —— but that will continue. four months into the war in ukraine, many of those most badly—injured by shelling and rocket attacks are being treated overseas. the bbc met some of the younger victims in the early days of the conflict who are now being cared for in germany. but, as wyre davies reports, emergency laws in ukraine which mean
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men of fighting age must serve in the army make it difficult to keep families together — something that's especially hard on father's day. the victim of a russian rocket attack on the besieged city of mariupol, 13—year—old diana was eventually she had life—threatening wounds. shrapnel lodged in her blood and brain and other terrible injuries. her recovery will be long and difficult. a talented dancer before the war, she still has big dreams. but the russian shell that maimed diana tore her family apart. her older sister natasha and four—year—old niece were both killed. as the only surviving child, the person diana wants most by her side as her father vladimir. they speak every day on the phone. translation: i am glad to see my dad but i wish i could talk to him like we are talking with you now. in the immediate aftermath of the attack, vladimir was a broken man. it was heartbreaking
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to see him imploring god, vladimir still looks to god for solace and answers but stuck in western ukraine is where he needed to be. he western ukraine is where he needed to be. , , , ., ., western ukraine is where he needed tobe. , ,, ., to be. he is desperate to be with his surviving _ to be. he is desperate to be with his surviving daughter _ to be. he is desperate to be with his surviving daughter and - to be. he is desperate to be with his surviving daughter and wife l to be. he is desperate to be with| his surviving daughter and wife in germany but the current state of emergency rules here in ukraine mean that as a man of fighting age, he cannot travel but he is clearly in no fit state to pick up guns while he waits, he comes here to church every day and praise for those he has lost. translation: if they give me that permit, i am definitely going to go, i cannot be without them. t going to go, i cannot be without them. ., ., , ., , ,, , them. i am without my family, i keep thinkin: them. i am without my family, i keep thinking about _ them. i am without my family, i keep thinking about them, _ them. i am without my family, i keep thinking about them, i _ them. i am without my family, i keep thinking about them, i need - them. i am without my family, i keep thinking about them, i need to - them. i am without my family, i keep thinking about them, i need to go i thinking about them, i need to go there to support my family, for the sake of diana and physique of my wife. i need to carry on for them and even for the seat of my deceased
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children. ~ , ., ., ., ., children. with diana due to go another brain _ children. with diana due to go another brain operation - children. with diana due to go another brain operation is i children. with diana due to go l another brain operation is weak, vladimir has lobbied president zelensky directly for permission to travel and tonight at the 11th hour, his prayers were answered. his daughter is still seriously ill but at least her father will now be by her side. the world governing body of swimming has voted to ban transgender athletes from competing in women's events — unless they have transitioned by the age of 12. it follows controversy over swimmers who were born male — but who transitioned and then went on to win women's races. let's speak to our sports correspondent jane dougall. the clarity in this policy has been prompted by leo thomas was the first known transgender swimmer to win the highest american national title elderly this year. this policy. competing in any women's categories. it states that the categories of male and female must be kept
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separate according to scientifically grounded six based criteria and any athlete has gone through any part of male puberty will not be eligible to compete against female swimmers. one of the experts giving evidence said even after the suppression of testosterone, the effects of male puberty with still be retained. an open category is due to be set up for bigger events. the decision was welcomed by olympic silver medallist sharron davies who is a long—time campaigner. she said she was standing upforfear campaigner. she said she was standing up forfear sport campaigner. she said she was standing up for fear sport for females but the lgbtq bus group said the criteria was discriminatory and harmful and unscientific and not in line with their olympic committee criteria. leaders of 54 commonwealth countries will meet in rwanda this week — where the queen will be represented
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most of the commonwealth states are republics — with barbados becoming the latest —— having decided to remove the queen as head of state last year. jamaica's prime minister has told the bbc that plans for his country to become a republic have already begun and has set out a two year timeline for constitutional change. he was speaking to our correspondent adina campbell. in the swell of the summer heat in downtown kingston, coronation market is the lifeblood of this lively community. if you want to know how jamaicans feel about politics, there is no better place. if you ask about the british royal family. is no better place. if you ask about the british royalfamily. do you thinkjamaica should become a republic? thinkjamaica should become a reublic? ., , ., thinkjamaica should become a republic?_ l - thinkjamaica should become a| republic?_ i feel thinkjamaica should become a i republic?_ i feel the republic? no. yes. yeah. ifeelthe queen should _ republic? no. yes. yeah. ifeelthe queen should still _ republic? no. yes. yeah. ifeelthe queen should still be _ republic? no. yes. yeah. ifeelthe queen should still be in _ republic? no. yes. yeah. ifeelthe queen should still be in control. i republic? no. yes. yeah. ifeelthe| queen should still be in control. we need queen should still be in control. we. need to queen should still be in control. we need to develop more herself. we l need to develop more herself. we need to develop more herself. need help and only the queen need to develop more herself.“ need help and only the queen can help us. it need help and only the queen can hel us. , ., ., , ., ., help us. it is an important year for this caribbean _ help us. it is an important year for this caribbean island, _
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help us. it is an important year for this caribbean island, the - help us. it is an important year for this caribbean island, the country | this caribbean island, the country will soon be celebrating its 60th anniversary, marking the end of british rule but even more independence could be on the horizon. speaking at the opening of a new art exhibition, jamaica's prime minister confirmed that his government is pressing ahead. it is now the time forjamaica to become a republic? t now the time forjamaica to become a re - ublic? ~ now the time forjamaica to become a re - ublic? ,, , now the time forjamaica to become a re - ublic? ~' , , republic? i think the sentiment is that jamaica _ republic? i think the sentiment is that jamaica should _ republic? i think the sentiment is that jamaica should move - republic? i think the sentiment is | that jamaica should move towards becoming a republic. the legal and constitutional matters are not straightforward but the process towards becoming a republic is fairly identified and seamlessly executed and we expect that will be done within the next year.— done within the next year. earlier this ear done within the next year. earlier this year the _ done within the next year. earlier this year the duke _ done within the next year. earlier this year the duke and _ done within the next year. earlier this year the duke and duchess i done within the next year. earlier| this year the duke and duchess of cambridge were injamaica as part of the caribbean tour but it was
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overshadowed by protests and this picture, and unintended remainder of britain's colonial past, becoming one of the defining images of their visit. but the future of jamaica will be decided by its people. if rare will be decided by its people. if we become a republic, _ will be decided by its people. if we become a republic, we _ will be decided by its people. if "t-cr'2 become a republic, we will will be decided by its people. tt1n2 become a republic, we will stop will be decided by its people. if "22 become a republic, we will stop your member of the commonwealth. of the british but not ruled. the member of the commonwealth. of the british but not ruled.— british but not ruled. the queen has enslaved us — british but not ruled. the queen has enslaved us and _ british but not ruled. the queen has enslaved us and abandoned - british but not ruled. the queen has enslaved us and abandoned us, i british but not ruled. the queen has. enslaved us and abandoned us, that's what the _ enslaved us and abandoned us, that's what the queen did forjamaica. there _ what the queen did forjamaica. there is— what the queen did forjamaica. there is no— what the queen did forjamaica. there is no doubt that ifjamaica there is no doubt that if jamaica did end up breaking away from the british monarchy, it would be a symbolic move but questions over surviving completely alone are still fiercely debated here. today marks five years since the finsbury park terror attack. one man died and many others were injured when a van was driven into worshippers outside a mosque
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in north london. a service of remembrance has been held.

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