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tv   BBC News  BBC News  January 31, 2022 9:00am-10:01am GMT

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this is bbc news with the latest headlines mandatory covid vaccinations for nhs staff in england could be scrapped — ministers meet today to make the final decision. we have to try and balance our protections for public health purposes against our wider action to make sure that our infringements on liberty are as minimal as they can safely be. the manchester united footballer mason greenwood is questioned by police over allegations of rape and assault. streaming giant spotify announces plans to counter covid misinformation on its podcasts — users will be redirected to a hub of coronavirus facts. a warning that up to a million women are in danger
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of becoming problem gamblers — an awareness campaign is launched to offer support. and footballer christian eriksen completes a remarkable comeback — seven months after collapsing with a cardiac arrest during the euros, he's returning to the sport, with a new contract from brentford ministers are meeting today to decide whether to abandon the policy of making covid vaccinations mandatory for most nhs workers in england. unions have warned that the policy could lead to staff shortages at a time when services are under huge pressure. the latest figures show that almost 95% of nhs staff have had at least one covid jab. however that leaves around 77,000
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staff who've still not had anyjab — though not all of them will be in contact with patients. under the proposed plans, all frontline workers would need to have a firstjab by thursday, that would mean they could have a second by the start of april, when the mandatory requirement is due to take effect. here's our health editor, hugh pym. it's proved a highly controversial policy, and there have been warnings that thousands of nhs staff in england could leave or be dismissed by employers for refusing to get vaccinated. the royal college of midwives has already called for a delay, arguing there could be a catastrophic impact on maternity services because of workforce shortages. the latest figures showed that around 77,500 nhs staff in england, about 5%, had not had anyjab, though not all will be in frontlinejobs. vaccination is the right policy but
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forcing vaccination is not, not in the middle of a staffing crisis so assuming it is going to be scrapped, we will certainly support that scrapping but also support the continued conversations to try and encourage as many people as possible to get vaccinated. ministers and health leaders have said before now that the policy is needed to provide reassurance to patients. the health secretary, sajid javid, argued it was the professional duty of frontline staff to get jabbed, but he was challenged by a doctor at a london hospital. i've had covid at some point. yes. i've got antibodies. yeah. and i've been working on covid icu since the beginning. i have not had a vaccination. i did not want to have a vaccination. many health care workers have not opposed mandatory vaccinations for staff. if a patient comes to me and says... "should i have the vaccine? have you been vaccinated, doctor?" that answer should always be, "yes, of course i've been vaccinated - and you should, too." there is no wriggle room ethically
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for doctor or a nurse _ or anybody talking to patients. it's understood the policy is now being reconsidered with a view in government that the landscape has changed because the 0micron variant has not proved as serious as the delta wave, during which the policy was first drawn up. ministers will meet today to decide whether to continue with the plan. it's understood no final decisions have yet been made. the risk is that nhs chiefs, who've tried to defend it will feel undermined by any u—turn, and there will be demands for care home staff in england who lost theirjobs because of a similar compulsory vaccination policy to be reinstated. hugh pym, bbc news. let's speak to our chief political correspondent, adam fleming. good to see you. a possible u—turn on this vaccine mandate? good to see you. a possible u-turn on this vaccine mandate?— on this vaccine mandate? investors are said to — on this vaccine mandate? investors are said to be _ on this vaccine mandate? investors are said to be reflecting _ on this vaccine mandate? investors are said to be reflecting on - on this vaccine mandate? investors| are said to be reflecting on whether it is necessary and there is a bit
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of a timing aspect of this because for nhs workers in england to be fully vaccinated and have their second jab by april and this policy would fully become effective, they would fully become effective, they would need to get their firstjab round about now so there is a deadline coming up, also pressure from nhs bosses saying we will have workforce shortages or we will have to redeploy or even fire people as a result of this and the context of the pandemic is changing because this policy was conceived when the dominant strain was delta which was much more dangerous than omicron. at least that is how the chief secretary to the treasury simon clark explained it this morning. since that time, the omicron variant has become dominant, what we know about that is it is much more transmissible and while still dangerous, it is somewhat less so than delta. any decision taken today will reflect the fact that those fundamental facts have changed. but the extent to which that allows us to move policy on this is something
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which will be decided later. there is a political incentive here as well come up in this policy passed through parliament last year more than 60 conservative mps voted against the government so if you were a conservative prime minister wanting to shore up your support among your backbenchers this could be a decision they could make. we are waiting to find out what they decide on the vaccine mandates, we are also waiting still for that report from sue gray, what's the latest? h0 report from sue gray, what's the latest? ., , ., ~' report from sue gray, what's the latest? ., , , �* latest? no white smoke yet, i'm afraid, latest? no white smoke yet, i'm afraid. we _ latest? no white smoke yet, i'm afraid, we are _ latest? no white smoke yet, i'm afraid, we are still _ latest? no white smoke yet, i'm afraid, we are still waiting - latest? no white smoke yet, i'm afraid, we are still waiting for. afraid, we are still waiting for that report into claims of parties and events in downing street and whitehall during lockdown. we thought we would have had it by now, we saw massive wrangles between the cabinet office who are doing the investigation and the metropolitan police carrying out a separate criminal investigation on friday which held things up even further. we are told it may be today and we may get more clarity about timing later this morning but still, we are
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all waiting. later this morning but still, we are all waitinu. ., ., ~' later this morning but still, we are all waitin. ., later this morning but still, we are all waiting-— all waiting. looking at the agenda of business _ all waiting. looking at the agenda of business in _ all waiting. looking at the agenda of business in westminster, - all waiting. looking at the agenda of business in westminster, talk i all waiting. looking at the agenda l of business in westminster, talk of a brexit freedom bill, what more can you tell us?— you tell us? first thing to say is when it gets — you tell us? first thing to say is when it gets to _ you tell us? first thing to say is when it gets to parliament - you tell us? first thing to say is when it gets to parliament it. you tell us? first thing to say is| when it gets to parliament it will not be called that because the clerks do not let you have political slogans and legislation so it will be called something more boring but it is quite interesting because what happened, when we left the eu, two years ago today, loads of eu law was inherited and automatically put into british domestic law but for that to be changed you needed an act of parliament, in other words, be changed you needed an act of parliament, in otherwords, go through all the parliamentary stages, the house of commons and the house of lords. at the government is proposing to do is change the status of that inherited eu law so ministers could change it, tweet or amend it but without going through the whole parliamentary procedure. the idea being you could change it more quickly and diverged from the status quo, kind of more nimble
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anyway and lots of conservative backbenchers were coming there because they are complaining they are not seen the benefits of brexit fully yet although you can imagine those same backbenchers complaining actually this is a bit of a power grab by government ministers at the expense of parliament. we are already seeing the devolved administrations in scotland and wales complaining they have not been consulted properly about this and it is a paragraph from them and also it raises the prospect of more divergence from northern ireland which is having to stick with eu law in lots of areas, controversially. so there's quite a lot to look into in this bill and there is no timeframe for when it will be published for everyone to look at so the timing is more to do with the brexit anniversary calendar than the actual parliamentary process. seldom actual parliamentary process. adam fleminu , actual parliamentary process. adam fleming. thank— actual parliamentary process. adam fleming, thank you. _ care home residents in england can have as many visitors as they like from today, as covid restrictions are eased.
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previously they were limited to three designated visitors. the changes will also see self—isolation periods cut or removed altogether. helena wilkinson reports. throughout the pandemic, care homes have faced some of the tightest restrictions, very few visitors have been allowed inside and that has taken its toll on the health and well—being of residents, families and staff. so the easing of restrictions will be a huge relief to many. the changes affect care homes in england. more recently, just named visitors have been allowed inside. from today, there won't be a limit on the number of visitors. self—isolation periods will also be cut. if residents go on a day trip, they'll no longer have to test or self—isolate when they return. and there'll be changes to how care homes manage covid outbreaks. if two or more staff or residents test positive, the length of time the home has to shut for will be reduced from 28 to ia days.
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the changes from today are the latest rolling back of plan b curbs in england. they affect some of the most vulnerable in our society. well, i think for the residents in our services, it'll be lovely for them to see more than one or two people that have been coming in regularly. it will create a little bit more normality wherever possible. i think for staff, there'll be some tension, some concerns, some worries, especially we've got sickness still, we've got outbreaks in care services. so for staff, it is going to be another challenge to maintain the levels that we need to do all of this safely. there will still be some challenges ahead, but this will mean more people will be able to see more of their loved ones in care homes. the manchester united footballer mason greenwood remains in custody for questioning after being arrested on suspicion
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of rape and assault. greater manchester police said it was made aware of "social media images and videos posted by a woman reporting incidents of physical violence". 0ur reporter, dave guest, has been outside old trafford from where he's given us the latest. mason greenwood made his manchester united debut in 2019 and in fact signed a four—year deal with the club just last year after coming up through the ranks of the united academy. well, yesterday, the club issued a statement saying that mason greenwood would not be playing for or training with manchester united until further notice. that statement was made following allegations online by a woman who said she had been assaulted by mason greenwood. greater manchester police later confirmed they had been made aware of the social media posts and they had arrested a man in his 20s on suspicion of rape and assault. now when united issued that
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statement saying mason greenwood would not be rejoining his team—mates until further notice, they also said that the club does not condone violence of any kind. however, they said they would be making no further statement until the full facts were established. 0f the full facts were established. of course, establishing the full facts, is what greater manchester police hopes to do, it is a process which could take some time and so speculation about what may or may not have happened is not only unwise at this time but also potentially prejudicial. meanwhile, the sportswear manufacturer nike who sponsor the player said they are deeply concerned by these disturbing allegations and are monitoring the situation very closely. so far, there has been known statement on behalf of the player. the government is stepping up its diplomatic efforts to counter the threat of russian military action against ukraine. the defence secretary ben wallace
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is on a visit to eastern europe, beginning by holding talks in hungary with his ministerial counterpart there. the united nations security council will meet later to discuss the crisis. 0ur correspondent james waterhouse is in the ukrainian capital kyiv. how are the diplomatic efforts in the west being viewed as things and? the political language is hotting up but in contrast to what is a very snowy morning here in kyiv, behind me, the monastery which sits on the side of a hill in the centre of the city and you can see the eastern partjust city and you can see the eastern part just across the city and you can see the eastern partjust across the river there so you get a sense of the climate but in a political sense, could not be more different. you have the language of the west saying an attack could be imminent, announcing sanctions, the uk announcing more sanctions, the uk announcing more sanctions to target president
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prudence government, energy companies, wealthy individuals in the uk, you ukrainian foreign minister calling on russia to say if you are going to honour the peace process then pull your troops back, those 100,000 estimated troops on the border. there are concerns in the border. there are concerns in the eastern donbas regent that there are more russian tanks and artillery there but the ukrainian ministers saying they have no intelligence to suggest russia may invade in moscow has agreed, saying it is the west wrapping things up and engaging in provocative behaviour. we still have these military drills to the north and belarus were russia has denied putting command posts in there, there remains a security threat for kyiv. the difference this week is with the ukrainian government saying stay calm, more and more ukrainians are telling us that doesn't make sense, why are you thinking western countries for giving us this military aid if you are telling us there is nothing to worry about because shops are starting to shut here because the economy is starting
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to be affected by this continued uncertainty. to be affected by this continued uncertainty-— to be affected by this continued uncertain . ~ ., , , , ., ., uncertainty. what is the sense among --eole uncertainty. what is the sense among people living — uncertainty. what is the sense among people living there _ uncertainty. what is the sense among people living there because _ uncertainty. what is the sense among people living there because they - uncertainty. what is the sense among people living there because they are i people living there because they are no strangers to the unsettled nature of politics there. there was the situation in eastern ukraine several years ago with the breakaway separatists? how worried are people about the current situation? i separatists? how worried are people about the current situation?- about the current situation? i think the sense in _ about the current situation? i think the sense in kyiv _ about the current situation? i think the sense in kyiv at _ about the current situation? i think the sense in kyiv at least _ about the current situation? i think the sense in kyiv at least is - about the current situation? i think the sense in kyiv at least is that. the sense in kyiv at least is that there are growing anxieties. it is becoming harder and harder to ignore the language of imminent threat, military aid, the promise of nato troops, albeit not here on ukrainian soil so as you say, ukrainians are no strangers to russian aggression. for the last eight years there's been ongoing fighting in the east of the country which has claimed 111,000 lives, crimea was annexed, there has been misinformation wars, cyber attacks. the question people are
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asking is ok, not only do we have the uncertainty around a possible invasion which should there be one, should russian troops cross the border, who is going to help us fight, not in nearby estonia, for example or other nato members. it is going to fight on ukrainian soil? the former security chief in the country told the bbc when they asked what kind of invasion, if there would be what he would expect and he said it is not likely to be a small incursion given the political, economic and military cost so if there is going to be an invasion he suspected it would be full—scale albeit that is a lot less likely than this being one big political statement by russia to get the west �*s attention over the ongoing issue it sees as ukraine potentially joining nato. it sees as ukraine potentially joining nato-_ it sees as ukraine potentially “oininu nato. , . , .,, , joining nato. james, it has been said over the _ joining nato. james, it has been said over the weekend - joining nato. james, it has been said over the weekend there - joining nato. james, it has been said over the weekend there is l joining nato. james, it has beenj said over the weekend there is a danger in the talk of invasion and fighting and war that it becomes a
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self—fulfilling prophecy but as things stand today, is there any obvious path to de—escalate from it, is there any obvious concession that could be agreed that would be acceptable to both sides, nato and russia, that would allow this to subside? ~ �* ., ., , ., ., subside? we've had a few hints for a biden for subside? we've had a few hints for a ihiden for the — subside? we've had a few hints for a biden for the first _ subside? we've had a few hints for a biden for the first time _ subside? we've had a few hints for a biden for the first time last - subside? we've had a few hints for a biden for the first time last week - biden for the first time last week said ukraine is not going to become a member of nato in a day any time soon, the ongoing arguments about what help countries are offering, ministers in germany said the issue of ukrainejoining nato has been addressed, it is not going to be joining nato however, nato has said it is up to individual countries if they want to choose, the us has reiterated that so what are the ways out from this? is it behind closed doors conversations between russia and the west, giving that implicit assurance that ukraine would never join which would not go down very well here, the majority of the country wants to join both nato and
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the eu. that is one option. there are also what we call normandy format talks between ukraine, russia, germany and france over the eastern donbas region, for the first time last week talks resumed and it has been welcomed on all sides say they are open to the process however that relies on both russia de—escalate its military activity in the donbas region which has not happened, and on the other hand it involves ukraine recognising the seized russian territories by militants and holding local elections. kyiv would never go for that because they say that would give moscow a direct hand into ukrainian politics and the president, one of his big election promises here was to sort the russian crisis out diplomatically and for not to be any big conflict. to give any kind of concession to russia would be politically hugely damaging for him. {lilia
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russia would be politically hugely damaging for him.— russia would be politically hugely damaging for him. 0k, james, thank ou for the damaging for him. 0k, james, thank you for the update. _ the headlines on bbc news... mandatory covid vaccinations for nhs staff in england could be scrapped — ministers meet today to make the final decision. the manchester united footballer mason greenwood is questioned by police over allegations of rape and assault. a warning that up to a million women are in danger of becoming problem gamblers — an awareness campaign thousands of homes across scotland could remain without power for several days after storm corrie brought winds of more than 90 miles an hour overnight. it came just a day after storm malik brought down trees which killed two people. 0ur scotland correspondent alexandra mackenzie has this update.
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we understand this damage might have been from a previous storm but on our way to dundee last night we saw lots of trees on the roads surrounding dundee and lots of damage. the worst affected area has been aberdeenshire over the weekend. it may look brighter and quite calm here this morning but scotland was pummelled by both storms over the weekend, storm malikfirst pummelled by both storms over the weekend, storm malik first of all on saturday and then storm corrie overnight last night. now winds of “p overnight last night. now winds of up to 92 miles an hour were recorded at stornoway airport in the western isles last night. winds of up to 120 miles an hour in the cairngorms. and also a 60—year—old woman lost her life in the storm in aberdeen on saturday. as you mentioned, thousands of people have been without electricity, i think at one point over the weekend it was up to
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98,000 people. that has improved because work has been going on tirelessly over the weekend to get people back on the grid as quickly as possible. but we understand the latest figures are around 7000 people still with no electricity from storm malik and an additional 30,000 from overnight from storm corrie. we have been told some of those people although work will continue to get people on as quickly as possible, some people may not have electricity until tuesday night. the deputy first minister john swinney said over the weekend that we are in for a very difficult few days. i think today will be about finding out what the damage has been overnight, the worst of the damage expected to be in aberdeenshire and also the clean—up is likely to begin. we have seen over the weekend damage to people's homes and damage to cars and a lot of debris across many of the roads
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here. , , ., , ., of debris across many of the roads here. , , ., i. ., , ., here. just to give you the latest on the disruption, _ here. just to give you the latest on the disruption, rail— here. just to give you the latest on the disruption, rail passengers - the disruption, rail passengers facing major disruption on services between edinburgh and newcastle, they are suspended because of storm corrie, the line was closed this morning because of strong winds and heavy rain. that was across the east coast of scotland and the north—east of england. we will of course at the latest on the weather and the outlook for you later. the streaming giant spotify has revealed plans to tackle covid misinformation on its podcasts. it says it will add advisory warnings to any podcast that discusses covid—19. the move follows criticism of its hosting ofjoe rogan, an american podcaster who has promoted scepticism about covid vaccines. singersjoni mitchell and neil young removed their music from spotify in protest at mr rogan's continued presence on the platform. mark lobel has the latest.
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following a chorus of disapproval from a number of musical stars, spotify has sought to clarify its stance on covid misinformation on its platform. the online streaming giant is now publishing its platform rules for the first time. users will get a content advisory when podcast episodes contain covid 19 discussions, and listeners will be directed to an updated covid 19 hub to combat misinformation. the row erupted after a podcast hosted byjoe rogan, one of spotify�*s star signings. he had dr robert malone, who was strongly anti—vax and especially anti—vax for children. now i think a lot of people are maybe on the fence about vaccinating their kids. i think a lot more people are thinking maybe they won't do that over adults getting the vaccine. so when this came out, a few hundred health experts, scientists, wrote to spotify, saying, this is very dangerous.
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following that, spotify�*s other star podcasters, harry and meghan, issued a statement from their foundation archewell. .. so can spotify now win over their sceptics? just a slight adjustment of several words is what is allowing joe rogan to not have his podcast touched or taken down or isolated episodes. the devil is in the details as it pertains tojoe rogan, and people still aren't happy with the actions that spotify is taking. this episode underlines the challenge of policing these platforms, as even podcasts now become potential minefields of misinformation. mark lobel, bbc news.
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let's get more on this with our music correspondent mark savage. there's been a response from joe rogan. he there's been a response from joe roan. , ., ., rogan. he put out a ten minute instagram — rogan. he put out a ten minute instagram statement _ rogan. he put out a ten minute instagram statement a - rogan. he put out a ten minute instagram statement a couple l rogan. he put out a ten minute | instagram statement a couple of hours ago saying he welcomed the decision to add advisory warnings to any of his podcast other other people's podcasts that discuss covid—19 and he said he would in the future do his best to try and balance out more controversial viewpoints with other people's perspectives and said he could maybe do better research. but he also defended some of his podcast saying some of the things he discussed that were previously thought of as misinformation are now being discussed as real possibilities in the treatment and the origins of covid—19 so it's not an apology as such but he is certainly accepting the discussion needs to be had. this decision by some artist, neil young
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and joni mitchell for example to take their music off spotify, how big a concern will not be for spotify or as a couple of artists inconsequential for a streaming giant of this size, its only if it gets to a critical mass? i giant of this size, its only if it gets to a critical mass? i think you are riaht, gets to a critical mass? i think you are right. a _ gets to a critical mass? i think you are right, a critical— gets to a critical mass? i think you are right, a critical mass _ gets to a critical mass? i think you are right, a critical mass would - are right, a critical mass would need big name artists like taylor swift or drake or ed sheeran who power the streaming economy to join in and take part and i suspect spotify was wary that that might happen over the next couple of days. i am sure there have been discussions behind the scenes between managers of some of the bigger artists about their concerns over covid misinformation on the platform and that they have driven what spotify released as a statement today but of course that is all speculation. i do think that really the bottom line for spotify is that if you play a joni mitchell or neil young song, 70% of the money that generates has to go to the artists and the record labels and the publishers when one person plays the joe rogan podcast, spotify keeps all
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of that money and that will very much be behind the business decision here. it’s here. it's interesting because other social media _ here. it's interesting because other social media platforms have - here. it's interesting because other l social media platforms have grappled with this issue of covid—19 misinformation and it's one thing if you are looking at, i don't know, a post on instagram or twitter and you see a physical label. it is more complicated with audio because either they have to interrupt or a warning cuts across, do we know how that redirection to the covid—19 information hub will work yet? we that redirection to the covid-19 information hub will work yet? we do not because — information hub will work yet? we do not because it — information hub will work yet? we do not because it has _ information hub will work yet? we do not because it has not _ information hub will work yet? we do not because it has not been - information hub will work yet? we do not because it has not been ruled - not because it has not been ruled out yet but what spotify have said as there will be a warning at the start of every podcast, i guess, a bit like a sponsorship morning would go a different of most regular podcasts, giving people information about how to access this covid—19 help they have established which will have data driven facts provided by scientists and trusted sources. thank you.
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around a million women in the uk are at risk of harm through problem gambling, according to new research from gambleawa re. the charity is launching a campaign aimed specifically at women, to alert them of the dangers. jon donnison reports. it's never been easier to gamble. 0nline apps are much more accessible than the old high street betting shops. this new research says it's one factor that has seen a sharp rise in the number of women with gambling issues. it estimates as many as 2.5 million british women experience some level of problem gambling. of those, around a million are causing themselves moderate harm, and out of that figure, half a million are experiencing serious harm. no, i ended up having to remortgage my house. then, after i remortgaged my house, i ended up spending that money. and then unfortunately, when the children were 10 and 11, i ended up homeless without anything, and then i ended up in a hostel with them.
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this video showing how all consuming online gambling can be is part of gambleaware's new campaign to encourage women who think they might have a problem to seek help. that's what lisa did, and she now runs a support groups for other women. i understand about gambling and i understand where it takes people, and so ijust think women can come in and talk about their problems, you know, and just feel empowered and just give them that bit of hope that you can overcome a gambling addiction. gambleaware says the number of women gambling online rose sharply during the pandemic, with many people stuck at home during lockdowns. it says three key signs you might have a problem are losing track of time while gambling, spending more than you can afford, and keeping your habit secret from those around you. john donnison, bbc news. for information and support around gambling addictions, you can visit the bbc action line.
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now for a look at the weather. good morning. the storm is still with us but moving awake now and moving into the north sea and the continent. strong gusty went down part of eastern england. they will ease a touch throughout the day. wintry showers across the north of scotland. rain showers across the home counties. they will move further west throughout the day. these will be the speeds by the time we get to the afternoon. wind is coming from a core direction. it is going to be a cold day. a new band of rain comes in overnight. it pushes southwards and eastwards. brisk wins, clear skies. the lowest temperatures in the east. milder
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from the west. tomorrow, cloudy for northern ireland england and wales with rain. that sink south. better conditions behind with some showers. very mild and windy, especially in the north.
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hello, this is bbc news. the headlines... mandatory covid vaccinations for nhs staff in england could be scrapped — ministers meet today to make the final decision. we have to try and balance our protections for public health purposes against our wider action to make sure our infringements on liberty are as minimal as they can safely be. the manchester united footballer mason greenwood is questioned by police over allegations of rape and assault. streaming giant spotify announces plans to counter covid misinformation on its podcasts — users will be redirected to a hub of coronavirus facts. a warning that up to a million women are in danger of becoming problem gamblers — an awareness campaign is launched to offer support.
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sport and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, we canjoin we can join john watson. good morning... brentford have announced the signing of denmark international christian eriksen until the end of this season. eriksen you'll remember suffered a cardiac arrtest on the pitch playing for his country at the euros last summer. he had his contract with the italian club inter milan terminated because the heart starting device he had fitted is not permitted in seire a. here's how brentford made the announcement on their social media page. eriksen had previously been at spurs where he made 226 appearances. he said it's his hope to compete at the world cup with denmark and he needed to find a club to complete that aim. and that sees a return to the premier league with brentford. this was his message to the fans.
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hello, everyone. iam happy to announce i have signed for brentford football club and i can't wait to get started and hopefully i will see you all very soon. he get started and hopefully i will see you all very soon.— you all very soon. he would have redicted you all very soon. he would have predicted that — you all very soon. he would have predicted that return _ you all very soon. he would have predicted that return after - you all very soon. he would have predicted that return after the i predicted that return after the events of last summer? —— who would have predicted that return? plenty more deals could be done today before the transfer window closes. everton are expected to confirm frank lampard as their new manager on a two—and—a—half—year deal, and it's thought lampard is close to securing his first signing. everton are reportedly close to a deal to sign manchester united midfielder donny van de beek on loan until the end of the season. faces a challenge to turn things round for everton who sacked rafa benitez afterjust one win in 13 games. everton lie 16th in the premier league, four points above the relegation zone having levelled their t20 series against the west indies on saturday england's cricketers lost the deciding match after a dramatic finale
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in barbados last night. it had started well for england with their spinners taking four quick west indies wickets, but some big hitting saw the hosts finish strongly, setting a target of 180. england were always struggling, needing twenty from the last over and what an over it proved to be. jason holder taking four wickets in four balls. he's only the fourth man to do that in t20 internationals what a start to the year for this man — tom pidcock — who won the mountain biking olympic gold in tokyo — is now the cyclo—cross world champion. the ineos grenadiers rider beat lars van der haar to claim the coveted rainbowjersey and gold medal for the first time. the cyclo—cross is one of three world titles pidcock could win in 2022, including the mountain bike and road championships. and he signed off his win in style with an impressive celebration.
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finally, what a moment for rafa nadal yesterday. his australian open success what he called the most unexpected win of his career and his greatest comeback. becoming the first person in history to come from two sets down to win the australian open. as he beat danil medvedev to win a record 21st grand slam title. 13 years ago, nadal won his first title in melbourne, yesterday came a memorable second, to stand alone as the greatest men's tennis player of all—time. {iii the greatest men's tennis player of all-time. . ., , , ., ., the greatest men's tennis player of all-time. _, , , ., ., ., all-time. of course it is amazing to win another — all-time. of course it is amazing to win another grand _ all-time. of course it is amazing to win another grand slam _ all-time. of course it is amazing to win another grand slam at - all-time. of course it is amazing to win another grand slam at this - win another grand slam at this moment of my career. it means a lot to me and of course i know it is a special number, 21, and i am not... i mean, special number, 21, and i am not... imean, i special number, 21, and i am not... i mean, i know what it means and it is a big significance this title. it is a big significance this title. it is a big significance this title. it is one of the great sporting moments
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from a player who almost retired last year through injury. andy did it the hard way. nadal was two sets down. the ration on course to spoil another party. he stopped novak djokovic's when. backed by a raucous melbourne crowd, he took the next sets. 0verfive hours of breathtaking tennis, nadal proving his time in this era remains. how good was it? his greatest rivals were quick to praise his efforts. 0n social media novak djokovic said... and roger federer said...
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but his great rivals are not far behind. he leads the big three with 21 grand slams. roger federer with 20 and novak djokovic, who was deported from australia before the tournament began, also has 20. so how many more could he win? next on the calendar is the french open, where you would not bet against the so—called king of clay rafa nadal winning an extended break my unprecedented 22 titles. why wouldn't that become 14? a brilliant story they are from rafa nadal. it just goes to show why we love sport and its unpredictable best. absolutely. john watson there. clean—up operations are underway on the us east coast after a major blizzard over the weekend.
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more than a thousand flights were cancelled on sunday as crews worked to clear runways. boston's logan airport was one of the worst affected — after the city was hit by sixty centimetres of snow. even florida was affected by the freezing conditions — unusually low temperatures there had a serious affect on the local wildlife. these iguanas — you'll be glad to hear they're not dead — but they got so cold that they become immobile and fell out of the trees they live in. the florida weather service had to issue a warning to the public this about the falling reptiles — but they'vegiven assurances that most will recover as temperatures rise. their bodies start to shut down so they lose their functions. the? their bodies start to shut down so they lose their functions. they are u . they lose their functions. they are u- on the they lose their functions. they are up on the branches _ they lose their functions. they are up on the branches sleeping - they lose their functions. they are up on the branches sleeping in - up on the branches sleeping in because they get so cold, you lose the ability to hold on and they do fall out of trees a lot. it is life—threatening thing for them because they are from close to the equator where it usually stays very warm.
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a survey suggests high street brands could be missing out on £4.5 billion pounds spent by multi—ethnic shoppers due to lack of diversity in brands. the black pound report, a survey of 3,500 people, found that black, asian and multi—ethnic consumers often spend their money in specialist shops instead due to the limited product range in the uk's biggest chains. lydia amoah is the founder of backlight, a culture change agency that helps companies become more inclusive. she also authored the black pound report. were you surprised by what you found in this report?— in this report? good morning. i could say _ in this report? good morning. i could say to — in this report? good morning. i could say to a _ in this report? good morning. i could say to a certain _ in this report? good morning. i could say to a certain degree i l in this report? good morning. i i could say to a certain degree i was surprised and then i wasn't because of the experience i had over 20 years ago when i walked into a store and wanted to buy some make up and the shop assistant stopped and said, look, sorry we only stock normal colours in this store. that is
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staggering that someone would say that and is it always is directly obvious as that or is it a lot more subtle in some ways, things that are subtle in some ways, things that are subtle messaging and puts people off from going into certain shops? it is from going into certain shops? it is a aood from going into certain shops? it is a good question. 0ne from going into certain shops? it is a good question. one of the things that came out of the surgery was this term we call psychological passing. what that is is when a consumer, a multiethnic consumer, will make a considered effort to change the way they speak, their body language, for example how they reach out for a product, it is almost like putting on a performance to the store to let them know, i am not about to steal this item, i do belong in this story. there are so many psychological aspects to make the consumer feel safe in that store. psychological passing is something that has come out of the black pound report. and is it about
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stocking products that are suitable for people from different ethnic backgrounds or is it about, for example the representations on advertising posters in the window? which is more important? it is a combination. for example, the most important thing is for a brand to be conclusive. i am concerned about the consumer. you want to walk into the store and or you have choice. also in advertising, that is important. you want to know that at the top level of the business, the ceos, thinkers, innovators, ifrom all different backgrounds, all walks of life because that way you can ensure your brand can be inclusive. that is what really important. if it isn't, thatis what really important. if it isn't, that is what demonstrates at the bottom line and also in the way that consumers feel in your store or how people feel at work as well. it people feel at work as well. it seems a no—brainer that actually if you don't stock products that are
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suitable for certain people, they are not going to spend their money with you. are not going to spend their money with ou. ~ , , ., are not going to spend their money with ou. , , ., , ., with you. absolutely. that is what ha--ened with you. absolutely. that is what happened with — with you. absolutely. that is what happened with me _ with you. absolutely. that is what happened with me over _ with you. absolutely. that is what happened with me over 20 - with you. absolutely. that is what happened with me over 20 years i with you. absolutely. that is what - happened with me over 20 years ago. things have improved. there is still room for more growth. 0ne things have improved. there is still room for more growth. one of the things is this 4.5 billion expenditure, this disposable income thatis expenditure, this disposable income that is there for the economy and the economy rights now needs that type of income. this is a really exciting audience to be considering, for all businesses. we explored the travel industry, we looked into health and beauty, we looked into financial investment, we have covered a broad range of industries and there are flaws across all of those areas. and, lydia, the could be a business watching and listening to you now thinking we could do a bit more, we could improve on this front. what could they do easily today are this week to improve the situation? , ., , , ., situation? obviously i would say the best thing to — situation? obviously i would say the
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best thing to do _ situation? obviously i would say the best thing to do is _ situation? obviously i would say the best thing to do is invest _ situation? obviously i would say the best thing to do is invest in - situation? obviously i would say the best thing to do is invest in the - best thing to do is invest in the black pound report and let us as an organisation to help you be more inclusive. this is not a quick fix. businesses who want to become more inclusive and want to improve their bottom line come forward. those who are not interested, it is fine. for those who want to become more inclusive, have a better working environment, reach the needs of your consumers, that is the best way you can make the beginning. a change for 2022. really interesting to talk to you. 2022. really interesting to talk to ou. . ~' 2022. really interesting to talk to ou. . ~ , ., y 2022. really interesting to talk to ou. . ~' , ., , . 2022. really interesting to talk to you. thank you very much. thank you so much. the defence secretary ben wallace is in hungary and he is speaking live now — let's take a listen it is important that president putin hears from allies and friends across europe our disquiet and our worries about what is happening in ukraine. i think it is very important to deliver some very clear messages. it
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was here in budapest, the budapest memorandum was signed when russia promised to respect the sovereignty of ukraine and that is very important. the to treaties, i think it is very important that president putin hears from a country, such as hungary, that they will face direct economic consequences of any instability. i don't know what the prime minister of hungary will actually say to putin but i think it is clear that we all are in agreement that we don't want instability and we don't want war in the east, we don't want casualties, we don't want migrant flows, we don't want high fuel and food prices, which would inevitably follow from any actions. and i think there is an opportunity to see those messages directly to the russian leadership. that is why i am fully supportive of a visit and dialogue
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in the end we have to de—escalate this and we have to stand up for the sovereign rights of ukraine but we also have to recognise that it is in both nato, europe and russia's interests not to resolve issues through conflict. questions in hungarian we are going to stay with this press conference in little bit longer. it is being conducted in english and hungarian. there is translation going on. we will stick with itjust
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for a little while longer because this is part of the defence secretary's visit eastern europe, discussing with nato allies what they can do together to counter the concerns about russian aggression towards ukraine. let's keep listening in for a little longer. he speaks hungarian thank you very much. i do not intend to repeat the thoughts and words of the secretary. i would like to
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emphasise that it is always great to talk and sit down and negotiate. that is always a good thing. let's not forget that nato has a dual approach concerning russia. a dual approach concerning russia. a dual approach concerning russia. a dual approach consisting of deterrence and dialogue. and why the deterrence is about military force is about the threat of sanctions, so that is one thing.
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the other thing is dialogue and dialogue is about sitting down and talking. nato also refers dialogue, so dialogue comes first and not armed conflict. so our approach and our stance is whenever there are conflicts, number one is diplomacy, dialogue and talks and if that feels, only then do we use force.
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translation i don't think it is a mistakejust the translation i don't think it is a mistake just the opposite to the country. i mistake 'ust the opposite to the count . ~ , ., ., country. i think it is important for arties country. i think it is important for parties that _ country. i think it is important for parties that are _ country. i think it is important for parties that are set _ country. i think it is important for parties that are set up _ country. i think it is important for parties that are set up to - country. i think it is important for parties that are set up to sit - parties that are set up to sit together and try to use dialogue as the means of de—escalation and solving the conflict. the other thing, as mentioned by the secretary, cooperation and cohabitation is not only have military and political side.
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and i also mentioned to the secretary in the course of our discussion that encase there is a decision about sanctions all involved party should consider that important. let'sjust involved party should consider that important. let's just take a look at the previous set of sanctions, who adhered to and he respected those sanctions to what extent? and i think here we should be very consistent. so let's not only consider the smaller countries, whenever sanctions are levied, but everyone who is part of the scheme.
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and it is, i think, and it is, ithink, clear that and it is, i think, clear that a prime minister of a given country is responsible for the security of the country, the economy of the country and also the well—being of the people of the country. so i think we should also consider the flip side of the coin are not only one side of it. the other question that came up was the use of force in eastern european countries.
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i told the secretary during the course of the talks that hungary has been undergoing such a forced development since 2017 that right now the country is in a situation of fulfilling this task on its own. this the country, our country, has developed capabilities and also offer the capabilities and committed those capabilities to nato. capabilities that do not require other countries to provide assistance in the current situation. we are not saying that we do not
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agree with the deployment of forces are build up of force in the region, we arejust saying are build up of force in the region, we are just saying that right here, right now, we have the necessary capabilities in place to fulfil our obligations. i mention to make pier, the secretary, that we have been members of nato for 27 years now. therefore, we have grown up, we are of legal age now.
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therefore, we actually don't need right now any assistance to handle the situation and actually ukraine is our neighbour country and we share borders with ukraine and in addition to that there are over 100,000 ethnic hungarians living in the territory of ukraine, therefore everyone should believe and understand that the stability and security and sovereignty of ukraine is important to us. we are committed members of nato and the first development we have
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carried out also underlines our commitment is because i think, ladies and gentlemen, you can look around and single out any other european country that has gone through such first development over the last years. i think that speaks for itself. thank you very much. thank you. next question. my my question is what do you think about usability, deep liability for the hungarian defence forces in the russian and ukrainian conflict based on your experience and discussion you have had?—
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you have had? well, first of all hunua you have had? well, first of all hungary has — you have had? well, first of all hungary has a _ you have had? well, first of all hungary has a very _ you have had? well, first of all| hungary has a very professional force _ hungary has a very professional force and — hungary has a very professional force and excellent leadership and are able _ force and excellent leadership and are able to deploy to lots of parts of the _ are able to deploy to lots of parts of the world and closer to home, as we see _ of the world and closer to home, as we see in_ of the world and closer to home, as we see in kosovo and cyprus as well. ithink— we see in kosovo and cyprus as well. ilhink to _ we see in kosovo and cyprus as well. i think to echo the comments, britain — i think to echo the comments, britain has _ i think to echo the comments, britain has also forces through naio — britain has also forces through naio it— britain has also forces through naio it is— britain has also forces through nato. it is for nato to decide where it wants _ nato. it is for nato to decide where it wants to— nato. it is for nato to decide where it wants to deploy it and for nato to ask— it wants to deploy it and for nato to ask for— it wants to deploy it and for nato to ask for more or less depending on the issues _ to ask for more or less depending on the issues. as i said, i think we have _ the issues. as i said, i think we have the — the issues. as i said, i think we have the highest regard for hungary plasma _ have the highest regard for hungary plasma capabilities and skill sets. there _ plasma capabilities and skill sets. there are — plasma capabilities and skill sets. there are lots of opportunities to work_ there are lots of opportunities to work together. we do already. i don't _ work together. we do already. i don't think— work together. we do already. i don't think we are standing here because — don't think we are standing here because we are worried about hungary's commitment are hungry's ability— hungary's commitment are hungry's ability to— hungary's commitment are hungry's ability to deploy forces. we are here _ ability to deploy forces. we are here because we want to make sure we have the _ here because we want to make sure we have the uniform voice to the russians— have the uniform voice to the russians to say, think again, step back— russians to say, think again, step back from — russians to say, think again, step back from this. step back from the
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destabilising activity and there is deterrent as well in place, which is what _ deterrent as well in place, which is what we _ deterrent as well in place, which is what we are — deterrent as well in place, which is what we are working together about. reporter speaks hungarian
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adam parsons from sky news. i wonder if you could _ adam parsons from sky news. i wonder if you could tell— adam parsons from sky news. i wonder if you could tell us _ adam parsons from sky news. i wonder if you could tell us nato _ adam parsons from sky news. i wonder if you could tell us nato plans, - if you could tell us nato plans, whether— if you could tell us nato plans, whether they _ if you could tell us nato plans, whether they are _ if you could tell us nato plans, whether they are ambitious - if you could tell us nato plans, i whether they are ambitious where would _ whether they are ambitious where would you — whether they are ambitious where would you put— whether they are ambitious where
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would you put british _ whether they are ambitious where would you put british troops - whether they are ambitious where would you put british troops in - whether they are ambitious where| would you put british troops in the sense _ would you put british troops in the sense and — would you put british troops in the sense and what _ would you put british troops in the sense and what would _ would you put british troops in the sense and what would be - would you put british troops in the sense and what would be the - would you put british troops in the i sense and what would be the triggers in terms _ sense and what would be the triggers in terms of— sense and what would be the triggers in terms of russian _ sense and what would be the triggers in terms of russian aggression? - this is bbc news. eight welcome to viewersjoining us on bbc world news. we are following this press conference live in the hungarian capital of budapest, the uk defence secretary on a visit there as part of his visit to speak to eastern european allies, nato allies, on the issue of the situation with russia �*s build—up of troops on its border with ukraine. we are going to keep listening in. to let you know, another press conference in english, some of it in hungarian but there is translation as it goes along so we will stick with this and listen in.

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