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tv   BBC News  BBC News  September 14, 2021 2:00pm-5:00pm BST

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this is bbc news. the headlines: a third booster covid jab is to be offered to everyone aged 50 and over across the uk — it can be given six months after the second jab. so if there is good uptake, i think the booster programme will make a very substantial impact on keeping wise in terms of hospitalisations and deaths and keeping pressure the government says it may need to bring in other measures like mandatory face masks if there's a rise in infections this autumn and winter. now we have come so now we have come so far, we have achieved so much, we must stay vigilant as we approach this critical chapter so that we can
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protect the progress lawyers for prince andrew tell a court in new york that sexual assault allegations filed against him are baseless and potentially unlawful. and there's a new star in town: emma raducanu joins the celebrities enjoying the glitz and glamour of the met gala in new york. everyone aged 50 and over, across the uk, is to be offered a coronavirus booster vaccine. the programme is the central plank of the government's strategy to deal with the virus through the autumn and winter. the strategy involves a plan a — which focuses on identifying and isolating positive cases to limit transmission; funding the nhs and social care
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and controlling the borders. but if cases spiral out of control, the government has plan b, which would include "mandating face coverings in certain settings", instructing people to work from home and the introduction of covid passports, which the government says it is "holding in reserve". borisjohnson says society must continue to live with covid—19, and though he wants to avoid another lockdown, nothing has been ruled out. plan a puts an emphasis on vaccines: a third, booster, jab will be offered to everyone over 50, as well as to healthcare workers and other vulnerable people. and children aged 12 to 15 in england, wales and northern ireland will be offered one dose of vaccine, with invitations starting to go out soon. a rollout is yet to be confirmed in scotland but nicola sturgeon will be speaking in the scottish parliament shortly. we'll hear more details when the prime minister hosts a news conference this afternoon from downing street.
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but in parliament this lunchtime, mps have been hearing about the plans from the health secretary, and how more measures may be needed in england if infections rise. our first report is from our political correspondent nick eardley. as summer fades and winter approaches, there are big challenges for the health service. pressures increase every year, and ministers have been drawing up plans to keep us all moving without covid overwhelming the nhs. in the commons, the health secretary said progress had been made, but had this warning... we must be vigilant as autumn and winter are favourable conditions for covid—19 and other seasonal viruses. vaccines are key to the plan — ministers believe they offer the best form of defence. as early as next week, 12 to 15—year—olds will be offered a single dose, and in the next few weeks people over 50 will be offered a third booster dose. the nhs will contact people
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at the right time and nobody needs to come forward at this point. this booster programme will protect the most vulnerable through the winter months and strengthen our wall of defence even further. some of the powers the government has had to shut down venues will be allowed to lapse, but there's also a plan b which could see some measures coming back. these measures would be communicating clearly and urgently to the public the need for caution, legally mandating face coverings in certain settings, and whilst we are not going ahead with mandatory vaccine only covid status certification now, we will be holding that power in reserve. we have got used to society reopening over the last few weeks, a new sort of normal around the country, and ministers here are desperate to avoid anything which looks like a lockdown in future. but winter always brings a tough period for the nhs, and if covid cases continue to add
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to that pressure, there may be some unpopular decisions down the road. he has talked about a plan b. can he say what level of infection and hospitalisations does he think would trigger plan b? yesterday, downing street briefed about a lockdown as last resort. what then, if i may put it like this, his first resort in combating the virus to avoid a winter lockdown? scotland's first minister will update holyrood this afternoon on her plans. an update is expected for northern ireland too. in wales the health minister confirmed it will go ahead with the booster programme. our nhs is ready to deliver this, and we will start next week. the message today is that the pandemic is far from over, and while vaccines are working, there's still more to do. nick eardleyjoins me
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now from westminster. let us pick up on what labour were asking in the commons there. what would trigger plan b? that would be one — what would trigger plan b? that would be one of— what would trigger plan b? twat would be one of the key question is the prime minister will face this afternoon in his press conference, because at the moment, it is not completely clear. we know there will be metrics, as the government puts it, to make that decision, but it is not as if there is a point at which you tip over, at the moment, anyway, from plan a, the vaccine is helping get through the winter, those booster jabs, get through the winter, those boosterjabs, the jabs for over get through the winter, those booster jabs, the jabs for over 12. there is not a point at which that plan tips over into matching all the criteria for planned be, but i have to say, this is the plan here, what the government has published this afternoon. 30 pages of its winter plan, and a lot of what is in that plan, and a lot of what is in that plan b, i think, will raise some
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pretty big questions in the economy and for people in general, so ijust want to pick up, briefly, if i may, on three things that matter. the working from home plan in the plan b element of things would see people urged to work from home again if they can. it is pretty clear from this document that the government's scientists think that is a key way of reducing transmission, so there will be a question about whether the encouragement of some people to go back to work at the moment is the right one at the moment, going into those tough winter months. we heard at the weekend from the health secretary that the government wasn't going to do vaccine passports for the moment in england. they are going ahead in scotland, but the plan that is outlined in this document for if they are brought backin document for if they are brought back in a worst—case scenario looks quite similar, actually, to the one thatis quite similar, actually, to the one that is being introduced in scotland form from next month, so the
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criteria for vaccine passports under plan b would be nightclubs, indoor crowded settings with 500 or more attendees or outdoor crowded settings with 4000 or more attendees, and also any settings with 10,000 or more people, so that would cover things like premier league football matches, big outdoor concerts. and things like that. so there are a few things that businesses will be mulling over in plan b. there is one line in this as well that i suspect is a complete worst—case scenario, something ministers are desperate to avoid, but one which ministers will feel a familiar sense of dread when they read, which says that the government wants to avoid any further lock downs, but that harmful economic restrictions will only be used as a last resort. that is very different from ruling them out completely, so want to use vaccines to get us to
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the next few tricky weeks and months for the health service, but this document contains a lot of what could happen if that doesn't work. nick, thank you very much indeed. 0ur political correspondent. as we've heard, booster jabs are to be offered to everyone aged 50 and over. the rollout will begin with people over 70 and others at high risk. professorjonathan van—tam, england's deputy chief medical officer, says the uk has had one of the most successful covid—19 vaccination programmes in the world — and that it averted 24 million cases of coronavirus in the country. 0ur health correspondent jim reed reports. this project in surrey brings together men over 50 to socialise and learn new skills. it is this target group who will be offered a third booster shot of the covid vaccine this autumn. i always have a flu jab once a year so i can't see there'll be any problem having an extra booster. i would have the booster jab but i would like
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to know more about it. if that keeps me alive, if it's going to help. i i don't know about whether it'll please other people _ but it would help me. government advisers say there is some evidence protection from the first two jabs fades over time in older age groups, so all those who had a second dose of six months ago are being lined up for another pfizerjab to charge up their immunity ahead of the winter. health care workers and care residents will be offered the booster, along with those aged 50 and over and those with underlying health conditions. where possible, it will be given at the same time as a flu jab. we are not past the pandemic, we are in an active phase still. we know that this winter could quite possibly be bumpy at times. so with all of that in mind, the name of the game, the mantra, if you like, is to stay on top of things. this all comes against the backdrop of what is likely to be a busy winter for the health service.
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there's the pandemic, on top of that other viruses are expected to bounce back, after being suppressed by lockdown. then there is the long backlog of other nhs treatment. it is notjust about preventing the nhs becoming overwhelmed from covid alone, it is about enabling the nhs to carry on with the job it needs to do. the booster programme will start alongside first doses for a much younger age group, those between 12 and 15 years old. some teenagers in england will be offered the jab next week, with scotland, wales and northern ireland expected to approve the plan soon. parents will be asked to give their consent although the child can make the final decision if a doctor finds them and competent. it will help me and those around me if it helps me stay safe. i don't want to make a decision i might regret later in life. government scientists say extending the vaccine roll out this autumn
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is needed as we shift away from using social distancing to control the pandemic. ultimately, the hope is millions more of these injections will prevent the need for more lockdowns this winter. let's talk to our health correspondent katherine da costa. first of all, who exactly is going to get the booster and when? well, the expert panel on vaccination, the jcvi, well, the expert panel on vaccination, thejcvi, said it should copy the roll—out from the first round back in december and january, which you will remember was care home residents, adults over 50, front line health and care workers, the 16-49 front line health and care workers, the 16—49 —year—olds deem to be at risk from covid, and household contacts who live with someone with a weakened immune system. so that is who and how it should be rolled out, say the experts. and they say you
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should receive a booster shot six months after your second dose, and they said timing was really important. you don't want to get it too soon, and leaving a longer gap may be beneficial, but equally, you don't want to leave it too late, so it's a precautionary approach, and experts say having it six months after the second dose will maximise protection going through into the winter. now, the preferred choice is a dose of pfizer or, as an alternative, half a dose of mode earner, and that is because that has been recommended by the manufacturers. —— moderna. but if you are allergic to either of those, you are allergic to either of those, you will be offered astrazeneca. it doesn't matter what you had for your first and second shots. the panel looked at a study trialling mix and match vaccines and they found that the mrna vaccines are very very good boost immunity, and that is what has helped make that decision. and of course, we will be entering flu vaccination season quite soon,
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so will people be getting the booster and the flu jab may be at the same time? booster and the flu 'ab may be at the same time?— the same time? yes, that is the lan, the same time? yes, that is the plan. and _ the same time? yes, that is the plan, and jonathan _ the same time? yes, that is the plan, and jonathan van - the same time? yes, that is the plan, and jonathan van tam, i the same time? yes, that is the i plan, and jonathan van tam, chief medical officer for england, suggested that things could start within days rather than weeks, and the idea would be that you would go in and get one jab in one arm of covid vaccine and then your flu jab in the other, that's because there is this concern that we might see an increase in covid infection rates going into the winter, then we might also see other viruses circulating like flu, and that might put additional pressure on the nhs, so the idea is to roll out both at the same time, starting very soon. so it's another huge logistical challenge for the nhs, obviously. 0ur challenge for the nhs, obviously. our other countries doing this third boosterjab in a similar kind of way? booster 'ab in a similar kind of wa ? , ,., booster 'ab in a similar kind of wa ? , ., , booster 'ab in a similar kind of wa? , ., , ~ way? yes, some of the countries like israel and the — way? yes, some of the countries like israel and the us, _ way? yes, some of the countries like israel and the us, nine _ way? yes, some of the countries like israel and the us, nine other - israel and the us, nine other countries have said that they will start a booster campaign, and other countries are expected to follow, so
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the uk is not alone in its decision to roll out booster shots. the world health organization has asked for boosters to be paused until the end of the year to make sure there was more access available to other developing countries, but the government has said it is not an either or decision, that they have enough supply that they can roll out boosters for the over 50s as well as vaccinating more 12—15 —year—olds, and also make vaccines available for developing countries. good to talk to you. thank you. as we've been hearing, covid jabs for school children aged 12 to 15 will be given as soon as next week. 0ur education correspondent sean coughlan says there are concerns from some about this decision. pa rents parents are going to be asked for consent for any vaccinations, but they will be questions about what will happen if parents don't give consent. we heard there will be discussions between families and health professionals, where there are anxieties about the decision. in
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some rare cases, parents and children can't agree and children could overrule their parents and go ahead with vaccines. they will be questions about how that will actually be decided on whether that will be more the case for older children, perhaps, and what happens if parents are keen on the vaccine but it is the children who refuse? it if children have already had covid, parents will wonder, should they get the vaccine as well? and schools will also worry about being dragged into these arguments, because even as they will be the venue is where vaccinations will take place, it will be a scheme run by the health service. we have already heard from health teachers —— head teachers that parents shouldn't put pressure on schools about vaccinations. they say it is health experts, not teachers, who have decided this is a good thing. and whether or not a child is vaccinated, they say, it will not affect access to any other part of school life. it's also worth saying that a key aim of the vaccinations is to help more people stay in school and to actually reduce disruption. 0ther vaccination
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programmes go ahead in schools every year without controversy, and i think ministers will be hoping very much that when this rolls out in the next few weeks, it might be the same with the covid vaccination. that's our education correspondent. just to say, the downing street press conference where the prime minister will prevent the government's covid planned for autumn and winter will be this afternoon. he will be joined autumn and winter will be this afternoon. he will bejoined by autumn and winter will be this afternoon. he will be joined by the chief medical officer afternoon. he will be joined by the chief medical 0fficerfor afternoon. he will be joined by the chief medical officer for england, professor chris whitty, and the government's chief scientific officer patrick vallance. live coverage starts on the bbc news channel at 3pm this afternoon. tune in for that. the prime minister's mother has died at the age of 79. it was announced that charlotte johnson wahl died "suddenly and peacefully" yesterday in hospital in london. borisjohnson once described his mother, who was an artist, as the "supreme authority" in the family. senior figures from across the political spectrum have sent their condolences. the kremlin has announced that president putin is self—isolating after members of his staff tested posititive for covid—19.
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a spokesman insisted the president was "absolutely healthy" and his work was not affected. the number ofjob vacancies in the uk hit a record high over the summer. and the office for national statistics says the number of people on company payrolls has returned to pre—pandemic levels in most parts of the country — although one and a half million people remain on furlough. 0ur economics correspondent andy verity reports. at this lincolnshire haulier, like many companies around the country, the problem is no longer a lack of work but a lack of people to do it. pay for drivers in the sector has jumped over the pandemic by 20 to 30%, according to the company's boss. even then, it has been extremely difficult recruiting the skilled staff he needs. i think we have faced a perfect storm of several different factors. brexit, ageing driver profile in the uk, lack of new entrants, and up until quite recently, relatively poor pay
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compared to other sectors. and that has really driven almost a crisis now as far as lorry driver availability is concerned. the effects of the shortage of lorry drivers have been growing ever more visible, but recruiters fear that shortages of labour — skilled and unskilled — are now widespread across the economy. if companies can't hire enough staff to get all their work done, it is likely to slow down the economic recovery. over the summer, there were more than 20,000 job vacancies advertised in transport and storage. in hotels and restaurants there were nearly 60,000 advertised, and overall the number of vacancies hit a new record of 1,034,000. it has been a real challenge with covid and tiers and blood pounds,
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making people understand the sectors that are available for them. there are vacancies out there and it's about helping people understand where they can transition, they can use the lifetime skills guarantee we have got, in fact we have seen 80,000 people going into apprenticeships, and we are working directly on the haulage challenge. while the number of employees is back up to pre—pandemic levels, about 1.5 million remain on furlough, including skilled people such as pilots whose jobs haven't yet come back, who fear they won't be able to return to the job they trained for. there are thousands of unemployed pilots desperate to be back into work, and compared to our redundant colleagues, we are very lucky and the furlough scheme has done as well but it won't help beyond september and we don't know what it is at the moment. while there are now as many people employed as before the pandemic, the key test for the jobs market will be what happens when the furlough scheme ends in just over two weeks' time. in london, the south—east of england and scotland, many of the previous jobs still haven't come back,
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but the hope remains that any rise in unemployment will be limited. let's cross live to holyrood where scotland's first minister, nicola sturgeon, is updating the scottish parliament about covid. sadly, a further 21 deaths have been reported in the past 24 hours, the number of deaths under the daily definition is now 8263, and as always, i send definition is now 8263, and as always, isend my definition is now 8263, and as always, i send my condolences to everyone who has lost a loved one. good progress continues to be made in the vaccination programme. as of this morning, 4,144,904 people have had a first dose, and 3,000,780 have now had both doses. 95% of people over 40 are now fully vaccinated
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with two doses, as are 73% of 30—39 —year—olds and 60% of 18—29 —year—olds. around 76% of 18—29 —year—olds. around 76% of 18—29 —year—olds have had a first dose, so the proportion in that age group who become fully vaccinated will continue to increase in the weeks ahead. in addition, 65% of 16 and 17—year—olds have had the firstjab, which is five percentage points higher than this time last week. although the level of infection in scotland remains too high, there are continuing signs that the recent spike in cases is now slowing down. indeed, we are now seeing early signs, notjust that indeed, we are now seeing early signs, not just that the indeed, we are now seeing early signs, notjust that the rate of increase is slowing, but that cases are now actually starting to fall slightly. this can be seen in the last three weeks' data, in the week to august to 28, there were an average of 5651 new cases a day, which was an increase of more than
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80% on the previous week. in the week till the 4th of september, the average daily cases were 6290, still an increase, but one ofjust11%. however, in the seven days to the 11th of september, the most recent period, cases have fallen to an average of 5506 per day, which is 12% lower than last week. it might also be worth providing some detail on the age breakdown of cases. in the past week, more than 70% of cases have been in the under 45s, consistent with the pattern we have seen throughout this latest way. however, the picture varies across different age groups. that said, there are broadly positive signs now in all of them. two weeks ago, in the week to 4th of september, the number of cases in the 0—14 year old band rose by 51%. however, in the past week, cases in that age group have fallen by 5%. amongst 15—24
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—year—olds, cases fell by 16% two weeks ago and have now fallen even further by 54% in the most recent week. —— 34%. two weeks ago, cases and the 25—44 —year—old age group rose by 7%. in the last week, they fell by 14%. finally, the number of cases amongst the over 65s has risen slightly, but again, the rate of increase has slowed down over the past week. so this most recent data underpinned cabinet�*s decision earlier today not to reintroduce any restrictions. i'm very grateful to everyone, organisations, businesses and individuals who have taken extra care in recent weeks to try to stop the spike. it does seem these efforts are making a difference. that said, our position remains challenging though new cases have fallen. they remain five times higher than at the start of august. universities are now returning for a new term. that is very welcome, but
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it also creates some additional risk, and i will say more shortly about how we are working to mitigate that risk. but overall, the key point is this. the recent fall in cases is very welcome, but we cannot take it for granted. we must continue efforts to keep cases on a downward track. the nhs is already under considerable pressure, and any further rise in cases would intensify that. as we know, vaccination has significantly weakened the link between cases of covid and serious health harm from covid. the proportion of people with the virus who end up in hospital remains much lower now than before the vaccine programme started. current case numbers reflect how transmissible the delta variant is, so as we can can see already, a percentage of a large number of cases results in a high number of hospitalisations. to illustrate that, in august 28, there were 312 people in hospital with covid. today, there are 1064. the number in
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intensive care has also increased from 34 on the 20th of august two 89 today. of course, these figures do not include people who do not need hospital care, but nonetheless suffer long covid. it is also important to remember that the pressure that the nhs is experiencing falls on staff who have been many cases been working flat out since the start of the pandemic, and it comes at a time when the nhs is working to catch up on a back log and care for everyone who needs it, notjust and care for everyone who needs it, not just covid and care for everyone who needs it, notjust covid patients. the government continues to work closely with health boards to help manage these pressures, but as has been the case throughout the pandemic, everyone has a role to play, and at the start of the pandemic, we constantly emphasised the need to protect our nhs. that is still necessary and should give all of us even more incentive to get vaccinated, test regularly, and take all the basic precautions that we know could slow down transmission. an additional reason for continued caution is that it helps protect
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those most at risk. the uk government announced earlier that it will no longer use its shielding patient list. in light of that and to avoid any mistaken assumption, it's important for us to confirm that the scottish government is not following suit at this stage. we will continue to use our equivalent list, which is the highest risk list. we have used this throughout the pandemic to communicate with all those at highest risk and ensure they have advice and support. we will continue to keep this under review, but for the moment, we believe it is important to retain it. i now provide a brief update on some specific strands of work. firstly, i can confirm cabinet secretaries have continued to engage with representatives from business, the public sector and wider civic society to encourage maximum compliance with the mitigation still in place. i will take part in a roundtable meeting with a range of stakeholders immediately after this statement to underline the importance of this work. i am again grateful to all businesses and
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organisations for the efforts being made to follow and promote measures like the wearing is of face coverings, good ventilation and hygiene, and wherever possible, continued home working. in addition, as i mentioned earlier, the university term is now starting. colleges began their return a few weeks ago, and we have been working closely with universities, colleges and the wider sector to make the return as safe as possible. as a precaution, at this stage, colleges and universities will not be holding large, in—person lectures for now. instead, they will be a mixture of online and in—person learning, with institutions deciding the level of in—person teaching they will offer during this term. physical distancing will remain in place on campuses and face coverings will be required in indoor public spaces. we are also of course encouraging students to get tested regularly. test kits are available on campuses and students moving to term time accommodation should book a pcr test
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before making that move. above all, we are strongly encouraging students to get vaccinated if they haven't done so already. mobile vaccination units are being deployed in universities and colleges during freshers' weeks and vaccination will be made available throughout the term. health board web pages will contain details of local drop—in clinics and also clinics operating within colleges or universities. we are also continuing to work with local authorities to make schools and childcare centres as safe as possible. for example, through support for the use of carbon dioxide monitors and improved ventilation. we have also received further advice from the advisory subgroup on education, and i want to take the opportunity today to highlight two points arising from that advice. first, we indicated at the start of term that secondary school pupils would need to wear face coverings in class for the first six weeks of term, subject to a review at that point. given the
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continuing high levels of infection is still being experienced at this stage, the advisory subgroup has advised that this requirement should remain in place until the october holidays and be reviewed again then. i know this is unpopular with many pupils and i completely understand why, but for now, it remains a prudent and necessary precaution. second, we intend to clarify an aspect of guidance on contact tracing in schools to help ensure a fuller understanding of the process. there is no change in advice for close contacts thought to be at high risk of having covid. they will continue to be advised to self—isolate till they have returned a negative test. for children and young people, a high—risk contact is most likely to be a household member or someone they have stayed overnight with. however, we will clarify guidance on the letters that school send to lower risk contacts stop these letters should be sent on a targeted to those most likely to
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have had low risk contact with someone who has tested positive. they ensure parents, staff and pupils are aware of those cases and offer advice on issues like looking out for symptoms and using testing. the updated guidance may mean it is not necessarily best to send the letter to everyone in their year group and we hope better targeting will reinforce the importance of the messages in these letters while minimising undue anxiety. in addition the advice in the letters will be strengthened in one respect, they will recommend to primary and secondary school pupils and staff who receive them that a lateral flow testis who receive them that a lateral flow test is taken before the next return to school, the test should be in addition to the regular twice weekly lateral flow testing which is recommended for all secondary school pupils and staff. 0ne recommended for all secondary school pupils and staff. one of these measures reflect our commitment to privatising the well—being of children and young people and our
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determination to minimise disruption to education. that consideration was also central to the advice that the scottish welsh and uk governments at the northern irish executive received yesterday from our chief medical officers, and members will recall that thejcvi medical officers, and members will recall that the jcvi concluded that the benefit of vaccination, the health benefit for 12—15 —year—olds outweighed any risks but that because this was marginal they could not recommend a universal offer of vaccine to this age group. on health grounds alone. but they indicated it would be appropriate for a chief medical officers to consider whether any wider issues might tip the balance in the other direction. they have now done so and concluded that vaccination could reduce disruption to education and that taken together with the health benefits previously identified in thejcvi advice, extending the offer of vaccination to all 12—15 —year—olds is justified and taking this broader view of the
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benefits and risks of vaccination, the chief medical officers are recommending that 12—15 —year—olds should be offered one dose of the pfizer vaccine and this advice has been broadly endorsed by the royal couege been broadly endorsed by the royal college of paediatrics and child health and i'm grateful to all of the four chief medical officers for assessing the evidence with such pace and with such rigour. i can confirm that the scottish government welcomes and accepts this recommendation and we believe vaccination of 12—15 —year—olds is important we will therefore move to implement the advice as quickly as possible and our supplies of vaccine are adequate to allow us to do this. it is important to stress how important informed consent is and i know many young people and their parents will have questions, material will be made available online later this week and it will be appropriate to both young people and adults and it will seek to answer questions and provide a
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balanced information to help young people and their parents make informed choices, and i can confirm that from monday, the 20th of september, drop—in clinics will be open for any 12—15 year old who has read the information and in discussion with parents and carers decided they wish to be vaccinated. it will be appropriate for parents and carers to accompany their children to clinics and vaccinate us will be on hand to answer any further questions —— vaccinators. starting the following week, letters will be sent to all 12—15 —year—olds inviting them to an appointment at a drop—in centre or vaccination clinic and again parents and carers will be invited to accompany them and the appointment will include an opportunity to ask questions. finally, after the scheduled community sessions, there will be a programme in schools to make sure that anyone who has not been vaccinated and who decides they want to beat, gets a further opportunity.
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i know these are important decisions for young people and their parents and many will have questions and i would encourage anyone to read the information provided and do not hesitate to visit a clinic to ask any questions or raise any concerns. vaccination is a vital part of our overall protection against the virus and that is why it is important to support people, especially young people, to make informed choices that they feel comfortable with. in addition to the cmo advice on 12—15 —year—olds, we have received this morning the finaljcvi advice on a vaccine booster programme and this is in addition to the third dose is already being offered to people who were severely immunosuppressed or compromised at the time of their first or second vaccination and i can confirm that we are also accepting this advice and again we have adequate supplies to move ahead with this. the booster programme is
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intended to prolong the protection that vaccines provide against severe covid illness and it will run alongside our biggest ever flu vaccine programme since both of these programmes are important for individual and public health, and where ever possible eligible pupae will be offered flu vaccines and covid vaccines together —— eligible people. boosters will be offered to all of those over 50 and to young adults with certain health conditions that put them at high risk and two adult household contacts of people with suppressed immune systems. thejcvi has also advised they should be an interval of at least six months between a second dose and a booster dose. let me give a broad outline of the order in which we will now move to implement the booster programme and of course we will set out more details shortly. front line, health and social care workers can book their booster appointment online from monday the 20th of september,
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and from next week as well, residents in care homes for older people will be offered both the flu vaccine and covid booster vaccines and adults aged 70 and over and everyone aged over 16 on the highest risk list will be contacted very shortly by letter or by their gp and other eligible groups, all adults over 50 and all those 16—49 with underlying health conditions and aduu underlying health conditions and adult carers, unpaid and young carers, and adult household contacts of people who are immunosuppressed will be able to book online from october. these announcements today 0ctober. these announcements today represent a very significant and a very welcome extension of the vaccine programme and they will help us considerably in our ongoing efforts against the virus, so to anyone eligible for vaccination, please do take up the opportunity. the final point about vaccination i want to touch on bravely,
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certification for certain venues which parliament approved in principle last week, and we are now working with businesses and events organises and sports governing bodies to finalise the detail of the regulations. covid certification has already been introduced in many countries across europe and many of them have already gone much further than we are proposing, and we know this is not a magic wand but we believe as part of a package of measures they can help reduce transmission and also keep the economy and our society open which is of course what we want to see. i will close by emphasising the key things we can do to help and to make sure that we keep infections on a downward track, and firstly, as i have said, please get vaccinated if you are eligible and you haven't yet done so, and second, please continue to test yourself regularly with lateral flow devices and you can order these through nhs inform or collect them from a local test site
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or pharmacy and if you test positive or pharmacy and if you test positive or you are identified as a close contact please itself isolate and book a pcr test. finally, continue to comply with the mitigation is still in place and please wear face coverings in indoor public places like shops and public transport and in hospitality settings when you are moving about and think carefully about the number contacts you are having and reduce any that are not strictly necessary and be outdoors as much as possible, indoors, open windows if you can, and although it is not the law, try to give a safe distance from other people especially when you are indoors and remember to continue to wash your hands and surfaces thoroughly. all of this really does make a difference as we can see from the data so please stick with it and let's get cases down even further. studio: nicola sturgeon, the first minister of scotland, in holy writ, confirming that booster vaccines
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will begin at being offered in scotland from monday —— —— holyrood. also saying that secondary school pupils have got to wear face coverings indoors until the october holidays, and she said she knows it is unpopular with many peoples but she says it remains a prudent and necessary precaution at the moment —— with many school pupils. those are the latest announcements from nicola sturgeon. lawyers for prince andrew have told a pre—trial hearing in the us that legal action accusing him of sexual assault should be dismissed, because of a previous settlement reached by the complainant, virginia giuffre. she's launched a civil lawsuit in relation to the alleged assault — which she says happened two decades ago, when she was 17. prince andrew has always denied the allegation. here's our royal correspondent daniela relph.
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the focus of the court hearing was whether the duke of york had been properly notified of the case against him. his lawyers argued that legal documents accusing him of sexual assault had not been delivered properly or legally. the paperwork was handed to a police officer in august, who was working here at royal lodge, prince andrew's home in the grounds of windsor castle. his lawyers, though, said this did not follow legal guidelines. the case has been brought by virginia giuffre, who says she was sexually assaulted by the duke at three separate locations when she was 17 years old. he has denied all the allegations. one of the duke's us lawyers, andrew brettler, who has experience of defending in sexual abuse claims, disputed every detail of the case. he told a new yorkjudge... he also said a previous settlement
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agreed between virginia giuffre and sex offenderjeffrey epstein in 2009 released the duke of all liability, a claim disputed by virginia giuffre's lawyers, who accuse the duke's team of stonewalling. these are detailed and technical legalarguments, but thejudge warned both sides he now wanted to move quickly to what he called the substance of the case. there will be a further court hearing in new york in a month. daniela relph, bbc news. now on bbc news, your questions answered. we are looking at the government's covid winter plan including the vaccinations for 12—15 —year—olds and also booster vaccines.
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with me is dr chris smith who is a virologist at cambridge university. and professor ravi gupta of clinical microbiology at the cambridge institute for therapeutic immunology and infectious diseases. thanks forjoining us. chris, let's begin. dennis has got a question in scotland, he says he is 17, can he get the booster and the flu jab at the same time? —— 70. the get the booster and the flu 'ab at the same time? -- 70. the answer is es and the same time? -- 70. the answer is yes and there's _ the same time? -- 70. the answer is yes and there's no _ the same time? -- 70. the answer is yes and there's no reason _ the same time? -- 70. the answer is yes and there's no reason why - the same time? -- 70. the answer is yes and there's no reason why you i yes and there's no reason why you can't combine these vaccines and i don't mean in the same syringe but at least in the same point of injection, you can have one in one arm and one in the other, and they work in different ways so that is why we do not want to mix them together but they stimulate the immune system in the same way to produce a response which should last four may be months and possibly longer and will fend off infection if you get it, and that is the
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strategy. the government said they would like to combine the flu vaccine and the covid vaccine because it minimises inconvenience and will maximise the uptake of the vaccines and we are anticipating the worst flu year this year so we would like to be protected against it. you can aet a like to be protected against it. you can get a sore _ like to be protected against it. you can get a sore arm from the flu jab and the covid jab at so if you had both at the same time you could have a day of a couple of sore arms presumably?— a day of a couple of sore arms presumably? yes, but you could alwa s presumably? yes, but you could always volunteer _ presumably? yes, but you could always volunteer your _ presumably? yes, but you could always volunteer your bottom i presumably? yes, but you could always volunteer your bottom if| presumably? yes, but you could . always volunteer your bottom if you are feeling adventurous and that would stop you having a sore arm but you would then maybe struggle to sit down instead. you would then maybe struggle to sit down instead-— you would then maybe struggle to sit down instead. thanks for that. .. now this question — down instead. thanks for that. .. now this question from _ down instead. thanks for that. .. now this question from stephen, - down instead. thanks for that. .. now this question from stephen, white i down instead. thanks for that. .. now this question from stephen, white is| this question from stephen, white is the astrazeneca jab not being considered as a boosterjab? —— why is. considered as a booster 'ab? -- why is. ., considered as a booster 'ab? -- why is. . ., ,., , ., is. the main reason is that in the us, for example, _ is. the main reason is that in the us, for example, a _ is. the main reason is that in the us, for example, a third - is. the main reason is that in the us, for example, a third dose i is. the main reason is that in the us, for example, a third dose of| is. the main reason is that in the | us, for example, a third dose of a
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vaccine, _ us, for example, a third dose of a vaccine, especially the pfizer vaccine, _ vaccine, especially the pfizer vaccine, has been used in immune suppressed — vaccine, has been used in immune suppressed people in large numbers and they— suppressed people in large numbers and they have found that the third dose can— and they have found that the third dose can give you a good boost and i think_ dose can give you a good boost and i think the _ dose can give you a good boost and i think the reason for recommending the booster here is on that date and also there _ the booster here is on that date and also there is— the booster here is on that date and also there is information from a mix and metch— also there is information from a mix and match a — also there is information from a mix and match a study in spain, where they started with the astrazeneca first jab _ they started with the astrazeneca first jab and then coming along with the pfizer— first jab and then coming along with the pfizer as a second and they found _ the pfizer as a second and they found some very nice enhancement of responses _ found some very nice enhancement of responses so it is not that there is no other— responses so it is not that there is no other way to do this but we have some _ no other way to do this but we have some good — no other way to do this but we have some good data on use of the vaccine as a booster— some good data on use of the vaccine as a booster or coming after another type of— as a booster or coming after another type of vaccine, so it isjust really — type of vaccine, so it isjust really a _ type of vaccine, so it isjust really a precaution at the moment. it really a precaution at the moment. follow—up to that, shantou, says, can people have a different booster type than the one they received for their first two doses? ——
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type than the one they received for theirfirst two doses? —— shantou. that is right. that has been the subject of a trial, in oxford, it has looked at this very question, because the outstanding question before we went into the summer was, at some point will we want to remind people's immune systems what they learned to be protected against and if so what would be used best and we also had no assurances that the supply chain of any of the vaccines would be guaranteed so it was useful to have that information, given that some people have had two doses and one vaccine and some people have had two doses of another vaccine but they have now done studies on this at home and overseas and it turns out that extra doses of any of the vaccines does help to remind the immune system are what you have learned to fight off i would be useful but it seems like the recommendation is going to be that regardless of whatever vaccine you had to start with, you should have
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had to start with, you should have had two doses, and therefore the next dose is a pfizer vaccine to give you a booster, there is no reason why that would not work. the immune system sees the stimulation thatis immune system sees the stimulation that is the vaccine and it gives the immune system a kick up the backside in order to make the same response as it did before and in some cases broadens the response so you get an even better response by having a slightly different vaccine the next time then you did the first time so as far as we know this is a good strategy and for most people who need a booster it will translate into enhanced protection for them. bernadette says, i'm 55 and i took part in the nhs trial for novavax and i want pfizer for my booster, is it safe for me to do that?— it safe for me to do that? there is no reason — it safe for me to do that? there is no reason why _ it safe for me to do that? there is no reason why it _ it safe for me to do that? there is no reason why it is _ it safe for me to do that? there is no reason why it is not _ it safe for me to do that? there is no reason why it is not safe i it safe for me to do that? there is no reason why it is not safe and i it safe for me to do that? there is no reason why it is not safe and in some _ no reason why it is not safe and in some ways — no reason why it is not safe and in some ways may be beneficial in terms of the _ some ways may be beneficial in terms of the overall impact as chris has mentioned, so mixing and matching does not _ mentioned, so mixing and matching
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does not seem to be a negative thing. _ does not seem to be a negative thing. so — does not seem to be a negative thing. so i _ does not seem to be a negative thing, so i don't see any problem. chris— thing, so i don't see any problem. chris in_ thing, so i don't see any problem. chris in leicester, is the booster covid vaccine the same as the previous one or is it an upgrade to include the variants? people are thinking about this, because we have had variants like the delta one, so has the vaccine been improved or soaked up to make it stronger and more capable? —— souped up. the more capable? -- souped up. the vaccines we _ more capable? -- souped up. the vaccines we are _ more capable? —— souped up. twa: vaccines we are using at the more capable? —— souped up. tue vaccines we are using at the moment of the same ones that were licensed at the beginning of the year but behind the scenes they are additionally experiments going on to look at whether we can enhance those vaccines and modify them or update them and in some cases even make entirely new vaccines to reflect the fact that we have learned a lot about the coronavirus since we started vaccinating people including other ways to vaccinate people even better. for now the boosters are what we have been using all along
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but watch this space because as more variants come along and has more knowledge joins variants come along and has more knowledgejoins the variants come along and has more knowledge joins the party, variants come along and has more knowledgejoins the party, we variants come along and has more knowledge joins the party, we will inevitably see an improvement and an update to the vaccine, including possibly vaccines that you don't have to inject because one of the projects is to look at turning these vaccines into things you can put into the nose, for example, they would be as good ifjust inhaled as they currently are injected. let’s they currently are in'ected. let's no to a they currently are in'ected. let's go to a question i they currently are injected. let's go to a question about _ they currently are injected. let's go to a question about 12-15 i go to a question about 12—15 —year—olds getting the jab. elizabeth says, i'm confused about making a decision for my 12—year—old son on a new vaccine, what information do we have around the long term risks and side effects? we do have information from adults and aduu do have information from adults and adult hood _ do have information from adults and adult hood starts at 18, remember, so we _ adult hood starts at 18, remember, so we have — adult hood starts at 18, remember, so we have been vaccinating young people _ so we have been vaccinating young people globally now for some months
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and we _ people globally now for some months and we don't see any significant long-term — and we don't see any significant long—term effects although we have heard _ long—term effects although we have heard about rare occurrences which leads _ heard about rare occurrences which leads to _ heard about rare occurrences which leads to inflammation in the heart which _ leads to inflammation in the heart which is _ leads to inflammation in the heart which is usually self resolving and response — which is usually self resolving and response to anti—inflammatory and occasional— response to anti—inflammatory and occasional so we don't think there are long—term effects and there's no reason _ are long—term effects and there's no reason to— are long—term effects and there's no reason to think there would be long—term effects in children. there was a _ long—term effects in children. there was a large — long—term effects in children. there was a large study in the us, vaccinating children between 12 and 15 that— vaccinating children between 12 and 15 that showed very good tolerability, in other words very few problems with the vaccine in the short— few problems with the vaccine in the short term, — few problems with the vaccine in the short term, and of course it generates immunity and prevents severe _ generates immunity and prevents severe infection in adults and most probably— severe infection in adults and most probably in— severe infection in adults and most probably in children and of course it has— probably in children and of course it has to _ probably in children and of course it has to he — probably in children and of course it has to be balanced, we have to take _ it has to be balanced, we have to take into — it has to be balanced, we have to take into account the fact that coronavirus can cause severe disease in children— coronavirus can cause severe disease in children occasionally and the problem — in children occasionally and the problem of long covid is not resolved _ problem of long covid is not resolved and some have said one in
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seven— resolved and some have said one in seven childhood infections can lead to long—term infections. seven childhood infections can lead to long-term infections.— to long-term infections. another . uestion to long-term infections. another question here. — to long-term infections. another question here, children - to long-term infections. another question here, children as i to long-term infections. another question here, children as a i to long-term infections. another. question here, children as a whole are asymptomatic so why are we vaccinating them? it is the broad question which has been chewed over by the chief medical officers and by thejcvi, so sum it up for us? children are broadly at much lower risk of severe disease if they catch coronavirus and jenny harries, the deputy chief medical officer, she crystallised it last year when she put it, using a nice school and you are more likely to have a fatal run in with your school bus then if you catch coronavirus but that is not to say no one will have a fatal run in with coronavirus and some will have severe disease, it will be rare but roughly on par with the rate by
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which you get hit by lightning. it does happen. the other thing, the concept of long covid is poorly understood but we are gathering more data on this and it does appear that it does affect a significant proportion of people and terence stephenson from ucl published a paper looking at a significant cohort of young people and concluded that up to one in seven may suffer some form of post viral manifestation, may be long covid, so if you get vaccinated and if you are protected from infection which we think these current vaccines will protect at least two thirds of the time, you can't get severe disease and you can't get long covid so that is part of the equation. and then the broader picture, thejcvi did not want to make a decision on the basis of whether we should offer the vaccines to children because they said that although the benefits are there, they are more marginal, but they said there might be wider
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societal benefits that could be derived and that is for the chief medical officers to consider which is what chris whitty outlined yesterday, looking at the broader picture, there are other advantages, and they consider things like, if a child has a disrupted school experience they will lose out on education and that is already a high price which has been paid by young people and young people also live with older people and if they catch it they could give it to older people and they may also have family members who are at risk of severe disease so taking all that into account it is a reasonable public health measure to offer the opportunity to young people to have the vaccine, initially one dose, we're still waiting for clarification the second dose, and if they do go down that path, your risk of having a problem yourself is reduced but the risk of a problem in those you do and don't know is also reduced. it helps us to keep control of the infection, as we go into
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winter. .. , of the infection, as we go into winter. , :, , :,~ :, :, winter. sandy wants to know, what should parents _ winter. sandy wants to know, what should parents do _ winter. sandy wants to know, what should parents do if— winter. sandy wants to know, what should parents do if their - winter. sandy wants to know, what should parents do if their child i should parents do if their child does suffer myocarditis as a result of the vaccine? that is one of the very rare side effects of the vaccine. what would they do if that was to happen? you vaccine. what would they do if that was to happen?— was to happen? you would need to know what the _ was to happen? you would need to know what the thing _ was to happen? you would need to know what the thing is _ was to happen? you would need to know what the thing is to - was to happen? you would need to know what the thing is to look i was to happen? you would need to know what the thing is to look out | know what the thing is to look out for are _ know what the thing is to look out for are and — know what the thing is to look out forare and any know what the thing is to look out for are and any illness after the vaccination should be taken seriously so you may get shortness of breath _ seriously so you may get shortness of breath or— seriously so you may get shortness of breath or the feeling of palpitations or pain in the chest, and those — palpitations or pain in the chest, and those should prompt urgent medical— and those should prompt urgent medical attention in hospital, ideally, — medical attention in hospital, ideally, i— medical attention in hospital, ideally, i think. medical attention in hospital, ideally, ithink. the medical attention in hospital, ideally, i think. the treatment, they— ideally, i think. the treatment, they would run a battery of tests and then — they would run a battery of tests and then the treatments would likely involve _ and then the treatments would likely involve things like anti—inflammatory medication and in the main _ anti—inflammatory medication and in the main this would be self—limiting and would _ the main this would be self—limiting and would only need a couple of days
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in hospital— and would only need a couple of days in hospital to make sure that all the tests— in hospital to make sure that all the tests have been done and recovery— the tests have been done and recovery has been made, so in the vast majority of cases it is going to he _ vast majority of cases it is going to be self—limiting and safe with no long-term — to be self—limiting and safe with no long—term problems but it is important to seek medical attention when _ important to seek medical attention when this— important to seek medical attention when this arises, partly for the health— when this arises, partly for the health of— when this arises, partly for the health of the child but also secondly so that we know how often this is— secondly so that we know how often this is actually happening. spell out, what are _ this is actually happening. spell out, what are the _ this is actually happening. spell out, what are the risks - this is actually happening. spell out, what are the risks of i out, what are the risks of myocarditis in terms of the vaccine for children? it is extremely rare. something like one in 100,000 so that something like one in100,000 so that is— something like one in 100,000 so that is the — something like one in 100,000 so that is the ballpark figure. last ruestion, that is the ballpark figure. last question, how _ that is the ballpark figure. last question, how is _ that is the ballpark figure. last question, how is the _ that is the ballpark figure. last question, how is the vaccine going to be delivered throughout the uk to all children equally? not sure exactly what that means. have a go at that one. exactly what that means. have a go at that one-— at that one. the most important thin is at that one. the most important thing is that _
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at that one. the most important thing is that it _ at that one. the most important thing is that it is _ at that one. the most important thing is that it is not _ at that one. the most important| thing is that it is not mandatory, this is a voluntary thing, and it will be offered to children who in collaboration with their parents and hopefully they will have consensus between the child and a parent, they will then agree whether they want to have it, and if there is a dispute and one party disagrees, there's a special framework which we use a medicine called judging a person to be competent where a child, if they have the mental capacity to do so, are in the position to make up their own line, and this would be honoured, so this is a very open and transparent process, and i understand that schools will take part in delivering the vaccines to children because that is already used as a mechanism for vaccination strategies already. it is minimally disruptive and a safe place to administer the vaccines for those who want to have them. you would urue who want to have them. you would urge children _ who want to have them. you would urge children and _ who want to have them. you would urge children and parents - who want to have them. you would urge children and parents to - who want to have them. you would urge children and parents to get i who want to have them. you would | urge children and parents to get the vaccine? t urge children and parents to get the vaccine? :, �* :, :, vaccine? i would. i've got two children who _ vaccine? i would. i've got two children who are _ vaccine? i would. i've got two children who are early -
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vaccine? i would. i've got two children who are early teens l vaccine? i would. i've got two i children who are early teens and we have already had this dinner time debate and it was a debate of one half because both of them agreed that they think it is a good idea and i don't think they were just looking after their financial pocket money interests, and actually they along with their friends, i agree that this is probably a good idea and they have seen their education significantly disrupted recently and they think anything that can be done to safeguard the education experience for them and their colleagues going into the year ahead is a good thing and many of their classmates agree. to is a good thing and many of their classmates agree.— is a good thing and many of their classmates agree. to both of you, thanks forjoining _ classmates agree. to both of you, thanks forjoining us. _ classmates agree. to both of you, thanks forjoining us. very - classmates agree. to both of you, thanks forjoining us. very good i classmates agree. to both of you, | thanks forjoining us. very good to take the time to answer our viewers questions and to clear up any misunderstandings and misconceptions. thanks forjoining misconceptions. thanks for joining us.
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now it's time for a look at the weather with helen willetts. hello there. the threat of local flooding with all the spray and standing water continues to the afternoon and it has already been a wet morning but central and eastern parts of england continuing with the rain throughout the rest of the day and into the rush hour. it peters out for scotland but there are sharp showers to be found further west and across northern ireland. the best of the sunshine in wales and western england. it will feel pleasant enough in the sunshine. a very different day where we have got the rain, which will finally ease away through the evening and overnight to be replaced by patchy mist and fog. more rain on this next weather front, albeit a rather weak one, coming into the west, so mild overnight and rather grey with mist and work first thing but then the fog lifts and it looks dry and bright for much of eastern scotland, central and eastern england. a fairly dry and fine day across wales and the west of england but for northern ireland and western
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scotland, cloudier under the weak weather front and a bit cooler, but further east warmer again. we do have a mostly dry middle part of the week.
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this is bbc news. the headlines: the government has released its autumn and winter plan for tackling covid in england. it includes encouraging the unvaccinated to get the jab, but does not rule out a return to compulsory face masks and other stricter measures if needed. now we have come now we have come so now we have come so far, we have achieved so much, we must stay vigilant as we approach this critical chapter so that we can protect the progress that we have all made together. a third, booster, covid jab is to be offered to everyone aged 50 and over across the uk, it can be given 6 months after the second jab. so if there is good uptake, i think the booster programme will make a very substantial impact on keeping
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the lid _ very substantial impact on keeping the lid on — very substantial impact on keeping the lid on things covid wise in terms — the lid on things covid wise in terms of— the lid on things covid wise in terms of hospitalisations and deaths and keeping pressure of the nhs this winter~ _ all four governments across the uk have now confirmed they will proceed with boosterjabs and jabs for 12 to 15—year—olds. and the prime minister is to lead a press briefing from downing street on the government's autumn and winter plan in half an hour. stay with us for that live on the news channel. in other news, lawyers for prince andrew tell a court in new york that sexual assault allegations filed against him are baseless and potentially unlawful. and there's a new star in town: emma raducanu joins the celebrities enjoying the glitz and glamour of the met gala in new york.
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everyone aged 50 and over across the uk is to be offered a coronavirus booster vaccine. the programme is the central plank of the government's strategy to deal with the virus through the autumn and winter. the strategy involves a plan a, which focuses on identifying and isolating positive cases to limit transmission, funding the nhs and social care and controlling the borders. but if cases spiral out of control, the government has plan b, which would include "mandating face coverings in certain settings", instructing people to work from home and the introduction of covid passports which the government says it is "holding in reserve". borisjohnson says society must continue to live with covid—19, and though he wants to avoid another lockdown, nothing has been ruled out. on vaccines, a third boosterjab will be offered to everyone over 50, as well as to healthcare workers
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and other vulnerable people. all four governments across the uk have accepted vaccines for children aged 12 to 15, who will be offered one dose of the pfizer vaccine, with invitations starting to be sent out soon. we'll hear more details when the prime minister hosts a news conference from downing street in the next half hour. but in parliament this lunchtime, mps have been hearing about the plans from the health secretary, and how more measures may be needed in england if infections rise. our first report is from our political correspondent nick eardley. as summer fades and winter approaches, there are big challenges for the health service. pressures increase every year, and ministers have been drawing up plans to keep us all moving without covid overwhelming the nhs. in the commons, the health secretary said progress had been made, but had this
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warning. the progress had been made, but had this warninu. ~ , , :, :,, warning. we must be vigilant, as autumn and _ warning. we must be vigilant, as autumn and winter— warning. we must be vigilant, as autumn and winter are _ warning. we must be vigilant, as| autumn and winter are favourable conditions for covid—19 and other seasonal viruses. mil conditions for covid-19 and other seasonal viruses.— conditions for covid-19 and other seasonal viruses. all right, sharp scratch. vaccines _ seasonal viruses. all right, sharp scratch. vaccines are _ seasonal viruses. all right, sharp scratch. vaccines are key - seasonal viruses. all right, sharp scratch. vaccines are key to i seasonal viruses. all right, sharp scratch. vaccines are key to the l scratch. vaccines are key to the lan. scratch. vaccines are key to the plan. ministers _ scratch. vaccines are key to the plan. ministers believe - scratch. vaccines are key to the plan. ministers believe they i scratch. vaccines are key to the l plan. ministers believe they offer the best form of defence. mil plan. ministers believe they offer the best form of defence. all done. as early as — the best form of defence. all done. as early as next _ the best form of defence. all done. as early as next week, _ the best form of defence. all done. as early as next week, 12 _ the best form of defence. all done. as early as next week, 12 to - as early as next week, 12 to 15—year—olds will be offered a single dose, and in the next few weeks, people over 50 will be offered a third booster dose. the nhs will offered a third booster dose. tue: nhs will contact people at the right time, nobody needs to come forward at this point. this booster programme will protect the most vulnerable through the winter months and strengthen our wall of defence even some of the powers the government has had to shut down venues will be allowed to lapse, but there is also a plan b which could see some measures— there is also a plan b which could see some measure there is also a plan b which could - see some measures_ these see some measures coming back. these measures would — see some measures coming back. these measures would be _ see some measures coming back. these measures would be communicating i measures would be communicating clearly and urgently to the public the need for caution, legally
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mandating face coverings in certain settings, and whilst we are not going ahead with mandatory vaccine only covid stay to certification now, we will be holding that power in reserve. the now, we will be holding that power in reserve. ~ :, :, now, we will be holding that power in reserve-— in reserve. we have got used to society reopening _ in reserve. we have got used to society reopening over - in reserve. we have got used to society reopening over the i in reserve. we have got used to society reopening over the lastl in reserve. we have got used to i society reopening over the last few weeks, a new sort of normal around the country, and ministers here are desperate to avoid anything which looks like a lockdown in future. but winter always brings a tough period for the nhs, winter always brings a tough period forthe nhs, and if winter always brings a tough period for the nhs, and if covid cases continue to add to that pressure, there may be some unpopular decisions down the road. he has talked about _ decisions down the road. he has talked about a _ decisions down the road. he has talked about a plan _ decisions down the road. he has talked about a plan b. _ decisions down the road. he has talked about a plan b. can i decisions down the road. he has talked about a plan b. can he i decisions down the road. he has| talked about a plan b. can he tell us what _ talked about a plan b. can he tell us what level of infection and hospitalisations does he think would trigger— hospitalisations does he think would trigger plan b? yesterday, downing street— trigger plan b? yesterday, downing street briefed about a lockdown as last resort. what, then, ifi street briefed about a lockdown as last resort. what, then, if i may put it— last resort. what, then, if i may put it like — last resort. what, then, if i may put it like this, its first resorts, in combating the virus to avoid a winter— in combating the virus to avoid a winter lockdown? in combating the virus to avoid a winter lockdown ?_ in combating the virus to avoid a winter lockdown? ~ :, , :, :, winter lockdown? wales and northern ireland winter lockdown? wales and northern ireland have — winter lockdown? wales and northern ireland have both _ winter lockdown? wales and northern ireland have both confirmed _ winter lockdown? wales and northern
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ireland have both confirmed they i ireland have both confirmed they will go ahead with boosters and vaccines for over 12s, and nicola sturgeon said the same in the scottish parliament this afternoon. these two announcements today, presiding officer, represent a very significant and a very welcome extension of the vaccine programme, and they will help us considerably in our ongoing efforts against this virus. , ,:, in our ongoing efforts against this virus. , :, :_ , :, virus. the message today is that the andemic virus. the message today is that the pandemic is — virus. the message today is that the pandemic is far _ virus. the message today is that the pandemic is far from _ virus. the message today is that the pandemic is far from over, _ virus. the message today is that the pandemic is far from over, and i virus. the message today is that the pandemic is far from over, and that l pandemic is farfrom over, and that while vaccines are working, there is still more to do. nick eardleyjoins me now from westminster. as you are saying in your report, the government desperate to avoid any more like downs, but they have this plan b?— any more like downs, but they have this plan b? yes, there are a couple of questions — this plan b? yes, there are a couple of questions that _ this plan b? yes, there are a couple of questions that the _ this plan b? yes, there are a couple of questions that the prime - of questions that the prime minister, i'm sure, will face in his press conference in around half
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overwhelming pressure, then you move to plan b. but i suspect they lots of people at home, businesses and individuals, will wonder exactly what that point is, exactly how you get from the point at which plan a is ok to needing plan b, and some things that could be in that plan b are fairly significant. we have seen them before, but they would matter to people's lives, like working from home. this document makes clear government scientists believe working from home is one of the best ways to cut transmission by cutting people's interactions, so that's an option if the virus continues to run out of control in england. there is also the idea of mandatory face coverings. this document doesn't say exactly what they would be. it is likely to involve situations like public transport, but we are not sure yet if it would may be mean in
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public shops, for example. and then there are vaccine passports, which are pretty confusing, has been a pretty confusing story over the past week. the government last week told us they were planning to go ahead with them at the end of the month in england. at the weekend, the health secretary said, no, we're shoving this plan, it is not happening. this document is completely clear. they are being kept in reservejust in case they are needed. and we get more details in this document of where they would be used. so, night clubs, indoor crowded settings with 500 or more people, outdoor crowded settings with 4000 or more, any settings with 4000 or more, any settings that have more than 10,000 or more attendees. so if you are running a football stadium or getting ready for a big concert or something like that, you will want to know the point at which this might be brought in. that is one of the big outstanding questions for the big outstanding questions for the government. but we do have a
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better idea this afternoon of what the two plans are. plan a is absolutely focused on getting jabs into arms, be that the booster third doses, the over 50s which will be announced, be that the doses for the single doses for over 12s that the government confirmed last night that will now happen across the uk. but plan b is there and it means some restrictions coming back. it doesn't mean lockdown. the government has been clear it wants to avoid lockdown where possible. there is one arm in a slide in this document, which says harmful economic and societal restrictions are a last resort. government doesn't want to do it, but are not ruling it out completely. do it, but are not ruling it out completely-— do it, but are not ruling it out completely. do it, but are not ruling it out comletel . :, :, :, ,, completely. for the moment, thank ou ve completely. for the moment, thank you very much _ completely. for the moment, thank you very much indeed. _ you very much indeed. scotland very much following suit, as we have heard, so let's get the latest on that. as we've been hearing, scotland's first minister nicola sturgeon has approved covid jabs for 12 to 15—year—olds, and the booster programme
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for the over 50's. our correponndent james shaw is in glasgow. just talk us through what she announced this afternoon? yes. announced this afternoon? yes, really accepting _ announced this afternoon? yes, really accepting the _ announced this afternoon? yes, really accepting the same i announced this afternoon? ues really accepting the same advice from the experts that the uk government has so that 12 to 15—year—olds will be able to get an injection from next week. the pfizer jab. and also, there will be booster jabs available for people who are over 50. also from next week, but that will start with vulnerable groups first before it goes to all over 50s. so substantially the same advice on same acceptance by the scottish government. there are a couple of distinctive moves that the scottish government has made. one is that it was already the case that children in secondary schools have to wear facemasks in class. that was supposed to be for six weeks. it has now been extended till the october holidays, so that is one significant difference with england. and of course, the other difference, which nick referred to, is this idea of
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vaccine passports. that is still going ahead in scotland, whatever the uk government decides to do in england. it comes into effect at the start of next month. substantially affecting the same kind of events and venues as the plan b that the uk government has talked about in england, but what we know is that it is definitely going to happen in scotland, but it is only at the moment a possibility in england. so substantially a similar approach by the scottish government, but with some refinements and differences, and perhaps a little bit of extra caution in scotland compared to what is happening south of the border. james, thank you very much indeed. as we've heard, booster jabs are to be offered to everyone aged 50 and over. the rollout will begin with people over 70 and others at high risk. professorjonathan van tam, england's deputy chief medical officer, says the uk has had one of the most successful covid—19 vaccination programmes in the world, and that it averted 24 million cases
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of coronavirus in the country. our health correspondent jim reed reports. this project in surrey brings together men over 50 to socialise and learn new skills. it is this target group who will be offered a third booster shot of the covid vaccine this autumn will stop i always have a flu jab once a year, so i can't see that there is going to be any problem having an extra booster. t to be any problem having an extra booster. :, :, ,:, :,, booster. i would have the booster 'ab, as i booster. i would have the booster jab. as i said. _ booster. i would have the booster jab, as i said, but— booster. i would have the booster jab, as i said, but i'd _ booster. i would have the booster jab, as i said, but i'd like - booster. i would have the booster jab, as i said, but i'd like to i booster. i would have the booster jab, as i said, but i'd like to know| jab, as i said, but i'd like to know more _ jab, as i said, but i'd like to know more about— jab, as i said, but i'd like to know more about it. if jab, as i said, but i'd like to know more about it.— more about it. if that keeps me alive, more about it. if that keeps me alive. yeah. _ more about it. if that keeps me alive, yeah, it's— more about it. if that keeps me alive, yeah, it's going - more about it. if that keeps me alive, yeah, it's going to - more about it. if that keeps me alive, yeah, it's going to help. | more about it. if that keeps me alive, yeah, it's going to help. i don't _ alive, yeah, it's going to help. i don't know— alive, yeah, it's going to help. i don't know whether— alive, yeah, it's going to help. i don't know whether it _ alive, yeah, it's going to help. i don't know whether it will- alive, yeah, it's going to help. i. don't know whether it will please other— don't know whether it will please other people. _ don't know whether it will please other people, but _ don't know whether it will please other people, but it— don't know whether it will please other people, but it will- don't know whether it will please other people, but it will help i don't know whether it will pleasel other people, but it will help me. government— other people, but it will help me. government advisers— other people, but it will help me. government advisers say- other people, but it will help me. government advisers say there i other people, but it will help me. government advisers say there is| government advisers say there is some evidence that protection from the first two jabs fades over time in older age groups, so all those who have had a second dose, at least six months ago, are being lined up for another pfizerjab to charge up their immunity ahead of the winter. health care workers and care home residents will be offered the
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booster along with those with underlying health conditions and all those aged 50 and over. where possible, it will be given at the same time as a flu jab. taste possible, it will be given at the same time as a flu jab.- possible, it will be given at the same time as a flu jab. same time as a flu 'ab. we are not assed same time as a flu 'ab. we are not passed the _ same time as a flu jab. we are not passed the pandemic. _ same time as a flu jab. we are not passed the pandemic. we - same time as a flu jab. we are not passed the pandemic. we are i same time as a flu jab. we are not passed the pandemic. we are in i same time as a flu jab. we are not| passed the pandemic. we are in an active _ passed the pandemic. we are in an active phase still. we know that this winter could quite possibly be humpv_ this winter could quite possibly be humpv at — this winter could quite possibly be bumpy at times, so with all of that in mind, _ bumpy at times, so with all of that in mind, the — bumpy at times, so with all of that in mind, the name of the game, the mantra. _ in mind, the name of the game, the mantra. if_ in mind, the name of the game, the mantra, if you like, is to stay on top of— mantra, if you like, is to stay on top of things. this- top of things. this all comes against the backdrop of what is likely to be a busy winter for the health service. of what is likely to be a busy winterfor the health service. there is the pandemic. on top of that, the viruses are expected to bounce back after being suppressed by lockdown, and then, there is the long backlog of other nhs treatment. it's notjust about preventing the nhs becoming overwhelmed from covid alone, it's about enabling the nhs to carry on with the job it needs to do. third booster doses will start alongside first doses for a much younger group, those aged 12—15
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years old, teenagers and all parts of the uk could be offered the jab as early as next week. parents will be asked to give their consent, they were a child can make the final decision if a doctorfinds decision if a doctor finds them competent. t decision if a doctor finds them competent-— decision if a doctor finds them competent. i think it will really hel me competent. i think it will really help me and — competent. i think it will really help me and the _ competent. i think it will really help me and the people - competent. i think it will really | help me and the people around competent. i think it will really i help me and the people around me if i try and stay as safe as possible. one person will say it is not safe, another_ one person will say it is not safe, another will— one person will say it is not safe, another will say it is. quite contradictory. | another will say it is. quite contradictory.— another will say it is. quite contradictory. another will say it is. quite contradicto. ., ., contradictory. i don't want to make a decision where _ contradictory. i don't want to make a decision where i _ contradictory. i don't want to make a decision where i might _ contradictory. i don't want to make a decision where i might regret - a decision where i might regret later_ a decision where i might regret later in— a decision where i might regret later in life~ _ later in iife.| government later in life. _ government scientists say later in u... — government scientists say extending the vaccine role at this autumn is needed as we shift away from using social distancing to control the pandemic. ultimately, the hope is that millions more of these injections will prevent the need for more lockdown is this winter. jim reed, bbc news. let's talk to our health correspondent katherine da costa. she is with me once again. how have we reached this stage, that we are offering these boosterjabs to everybody aged over 50? there is huge uncertainty going into
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this winter, notjust from covid infection rates, but also the prevalence of flu and other respiratory viruses like rsv or narrow virus, for example. there is also this concern of waning immunity. —— nora virus. that immunity. —— nora virus. that immunity may fade over time. the expert panel, thejcvi, looked at data from england about the effectiveness of hospitalisation, they found that among the over 65 is, it was just over 90% protection, which then dropped to just under 90% protection after 5—6 months, so the w protection after 5—6 months, so the jcvi have been looking at lots of different data around this. they also looked at a study which looked at mixing and matching vaccines about what might give your immune system the best boost, really, and it reached this decision to advise that the over 50s, as well as people in care homes, front line care
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staff, and i6—1i9s deemed to be at risk from covid and household contacts of people with a weakened immune system. so these are the cohorts we saw at the start of the pandemic, and these will be mirrored this time, alongside the flu jabs, so that is who will get it. they have decided it should be given six months after a second dose of covid vaccine. the when to give it was really crucial. you don't want to give it to soon when you don't actually need it. leaving a longer gap might actually benefit the immune response, but they don't want to risk leaving it too late, so they felt that this was the right gap to give maximum boost going into the winter, and the preferred choice is a pfizer dose, as the booster shot. the alternative is half a dose of moderna. that is the recommendation by the manufacturer. and if people are allergic to either of those, they will be offered a dose of astrazeneca. so this is what they
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announced today, these are some of the decisions that have gone through the decisions that have gone through the consideration. and the nhs has been preparing for many months since the end ofjune, or through been preparing for many months since the end ofjune, or throuthuly, august. they have been told to be on standby if they get... as and when they get the green light, the idea is that this could start from next week. are we likely to see this sort of all—time, then, every six months, every time we get a boosterjab? or is this a one—off booster? the is this a one-off booster? the exert is this a one-off booster? the men said — is this a one-off booster? the expert said this _ is this a one—off booster? tue: expert said this advice is this a one—off booster? tte: expert said this advice is is this a one—off booster? t"t;e: expert said this advice is bespoke to this winter, that protection was needed for elderly groups and those at risk, but going forward, they will continue to review data and a decision about what happens next winter or beyond will be made at a later date. it is also not necessary that under 50s need boosters at this stage. it might be that their immune responses are much better than older age groups, so they might not need a
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booster, so these things will be kept under review. thank you very much indeed,. as we've been hearing, covid jabs for school children aged 12 to 15 will be given as soon as next week. our education correspondent sean coughlan says there are concerns from some about this decision. pa rents parents will be asked for consent for any vaccinations, but they will be questions about what will happen if parents don't give consent. we have heard there will be discussions between families and health professionals where there are anxieties about the decision. in some rare cases where children and parents can't agree, children could overrule their parents and go ahead with the vaccines. and i will be questions about how that will actually be decided and whether that will be room more the case for older children, for instance. and what if parents are keen on the vaccine, but the children refuse? children have already had covid, parents will wonder should they get the vaccine as well? and schools are also worried about being dragged into these arguments, because given that
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they will be the venues were vaccinations will take place, this will be a scheme run by the health services. we have already heard from head teacher saying parents shouldn't put pressure on schools about vaccinations. they say it is health services not teachers who decide this is a good thing. and whether or not a child is vaccinated, they would say, it will not affect access to any other part of school life. it is also worth saying that a key aim of the vaccinations is to help more people stay in school and actually reduce disruption. there are other regular vaccination programmes that go ahead each year in school without controversy, and i think ministers will be hoping very much that when this rolls out in the next few weeks, it might be the same with the covid vaccination. our education correspondent there. that downing street press conference, where the prime minister will present the government's covid planned for autumn and winter, gets under way very shortly. he will be joined by the chief medical officer for england, professor chris whitty
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and the government's chief scientific officer, sir patrick vallance. live coverage here on the bbc news channel from 3.30 this afternoon. the prime minister's mother has died at the age of 79. it was announced that charlotte johnson wahl died "suddenly and peacefully" yesterday in hospital in london. borisjohnson once described his mother, who was an artist, as the "supreme authority" in the family. senior figures from across the political spectrum have sent their condolences. the number ofjob vacancies in the uk hit a record high over the summer. and the office for national statistics says the number of people on company payrolls has returned to pre—pandemic levels in most parts of the country, although one and a half million people remain on furlough. our economics correspondent andy verity reports. at this link at this lincolnshire haulier, like many companies around the country, the problem is no
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longer a lack of work but a lack of people to do it. pay for drivers in the sector has jumped over the pandemic by 20 to 30%, according to the company's boss. even then, it has been extremely difficult recruiting the skilled staff he needs. i think we have faced a perfect storm of several different factors. brexit, ageing driver profile in the uk, lack of new entrants, and up until quite recently, relatively poor pay compared to other sectors. and that has really driven almost a crisis now as far as lorry driver availability is concerned. the effects of the shortage of lorry drivers have been growing ever more visible, but recruiters fear that shortages of labour — skilled and unskilled — are now widespread across the economy. if companies can't hire enough staff to get all their work done, it is likely to slow down the economic recovery. over the summer, there were more than 20,000 job vacancies advertised in transport and storage. in hotels and restaurants, there were nearly 60,000 advertised, and overall the number of vacancies hit a new record of 1,031i,000.
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it has been a real challenge with covid and tear is in lockdown is to make sure that we can see our customers face—to—face, to make them understand about the sectors that are available for them. there are vacancies out there and it's about helping people understand where they can transition, they can use the lifetime skills guarantee we have got, in fact we have seen 80,000 people going into apprenticeships, and we are working directly on the haulage challenge. while the number of employees is back up to pre—pandemic levels, about 1.5 million remain on furlough, including skilled people such as pilots whose jobs haven't yet come back, who fear they won't be able to return to the job they trained for. there are thousands of unemployed pilots desperate to be back into work, and compared to our redundant colleagues, we are very lucky and the furlough scheme has done as well but it won't help beyond september and we don't know what it is at the moment. while there are now as many people
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employed as before the pandemic, the key test for the jobs market will be what happens when the furlough scheme ends in just over two weeks' time. in london, the south—east of england and scotland, many of the previous jobs still haven't come back, but the hope remains that any rise in unemployment will be limited. andy verity, bbc news. britain is to delay the introduction of post—brexit checks on agricultural food imports. some measures which were expected to come into force next month will instead be introduced next year. ministers have blamed the pandemic and pressure on global supply chains. lawyers for prince andrew have told a pre—trial hearing in the us that legal action accusing him of sexual assault should be dismissed, because of a previous settlement reached by the complainant, virginia giuffre. she's launched a civil lawsuit in relation to the alleged assault, which she says happened two decades ago, when she was 17. prince andrew has always
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denied the allegation. here's our royal correspondent daniela relph. the focus of the court hearing was whether the duke of york had been properly notified of the case against him. his lawyers argued that legal documents accusing him of sexual assault had not been delivered properly or legally. the paperwork was handed to a police officer in august, who was working here at royal lodge, prince andrew's home in the grounds of windsor castle. his lawyers, though, said this did not follow legal guidelines. the case has been brought by virginia giuffre, who says she was sexually assaulted by the duke at three separate locations when she was 17 years old. he has denied all the allegations. one of the duke's us lawyers, andrew brettler, who has experience of defending in sexual abuse claims, disputed every detail of the case. he told a new yorkjudge...
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he also said a previous settlement agreed between virginia giuffre and sex offenderjeffrey epstein in 2009 released the duke of all liability, a claim disputed by virginia giuffre�*s lawyers, who accuse the duke's team of stonewalling. these are detailed and technical legalarguments, but thejudge warned both sides he now wanted to move quickly to what he called the substance of the case. there will be a further court hearing in new york next month. daniela relph, bbc news. three people have died after a car crashed into a block of flats in west london and burst into flames. emergency crews were called to the crash in notting hill shortly before 5am. the fire was extinguished but the three people in the car were pronounced dead at the scene. there were sequins, feathers
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and a gold suit of armour on show at the met gala in new york last night, as part of one of the biggest and starriest annual events in fashion, which raises money for the metropolitan museum of art. billie eilish, kim kardashian and the new us open champion emma raducanu were among the guests, as our entertainment correspondent lizo mizimba reports. an exuberant opening of one of the most talked about events of the year. emma raducanu has already triumphed once this weekend... now, the 18—year—old us open champion has done it again. the british teenager clearly thrilled to still be here in new york, because this is seen by many as the most a—list event of the year. with outfits ranging from the restrained to the outrageous. in music, reinventing yourself over the years is a useful skill. rapper lil nas x did it in a few seconds.
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his original regal outfit revealing this — c—3po meets the tin man perhaps — and underneath that, a glittering crystal—covered catsuit. ensuring it keeps its relevance to younger audiences, the event was co—hosted by 19—year—old billie eilish, who channelled marilyn monroe, and three stars in their 20s — timothee chalamet, tennis player naomi osaka, who made a powerful statement about herjapanese and american heritage, and the poet amanda gorman. the theme was "in america: a lexicon of fashion". some chose to express their hope for change. the back of democratic congresswoman alexandria ocasio—cortez�*s dress revealed the message, "tax the rich." while another democratic congresswoman, carolyn maloney�*s dress bore the message "equal rights for women". despite this being a very american occasion, brits are always well represented, from its organiser anna wintour
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through to the younger generation, like model brooklyn beckham. but perhaps the night's most enigmatic outfit belonged to who else... kim kardashian. lizo mzimba, bbc news. in a few minutes, the prime minister will outline further details behind the government's strategy in dealing with covid during the autumn and winter months. we already know that everyone aged over 50 and over will be offered a coronavirus booster vaccine. with me is our health correspondent, nick triggle. just some up for us why it is thought that we need boosterjabs? —— sum up. thought that we need booster “abs? -- sum up.— -- sum up. this uncertainty about what is happening _ -- sum up. this uncertainty about what is happening in _ -- sum up. this uncertainty about what is happening in the - -- sum up. this uncertainty about what is happening in the coming l what is happening in the coming months. in fact, what is happening in the coming months. infact, it what is happening in the coming months. in fact, it is uncertain what is going to happen in the next few weeks, because we expect covid
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cases to start going up in september. it is still early in the month, but the signs are that the opposite is happening. but what the vaccine advisers were saying and the government ministers have accepted is that we need to take the precautionary principle. boosters are needed because there are some signs that the vaccine�*s effect does start to wane. we don't know how much, but even a little dip in effectiveness can have a big impact on the numbers admitted to hospital when you consider the size of the population. so they say this is really belt and braces to provide that extra protection going into winter, if covid cases do go up, but that's by no means certain. another unknown is the return of other respiratory illnesses. last year, we saw very little flu and other viruses circulating because of lockdown and social distancing, and as a result, our immunity to those viruses has waned, so experts fear we could be in for a bad flu season
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and a bad winter season for other viruses. already, a virus called rsv, a leading cause of admissions for respiratory illness among the under fives, for respiratory illness among the underfives, is circulating for respiratory illness among the under fives, is circulating at very high levels, which is unusual at this time of year. that is why the nhs is being told to prepare for the worst but hope for the best. might we get these boosters every year or even every six months? in other words, will this be a regular occurrence, orjust a kind of one—off? occurrence, or 'ust a kind of one-offsh occurrence, or 'ust a kind of one-off? ., .. , , ., one-off? the vaccine experts would not commit — one-off? the vaccine experts would not commit to _ one-off? the vaccine experts would not commit to that _ one-off? the vaccine experts would not commit to that and _ one-off? the vaccine experts would not commit to that and the one-off? the vaccine experts would not commit to that and the sa , not commit to that and they say, this is macro and we will see what next year brings but this is a step you take in a pandemic —— this is winter. they did suggest, actually, in future years you could have a combined covid and flu jab but they
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want to provide as much protection to make sure that this winter is not anywhere near as bad as last year. there is a way of having it at the same time, one in each arm. indeed. what they have _ same time, one in each arm. indeed. what they have said _ same time, one in each arm. indeed. what they have said to _ same time, one in each arm. indeed. what they have said to people, - same time, one in each arm. indeed. what they have said to people, covid| what they have said to people, covid boosters will start very soon, as early as next week, we believe, this is the time of year where people start getting their flu vaccine so it might be that you are giving them both —— given them both at the same time, but for others you might get the flu vaccine before the covid booster because you have got to wait six months after your second dose before getting the boost it so that would mean for people in their 50s, may be, who completed their course in may, they will be waiting until just before christmas to get the booster but certainly they can be given at the same time if appropriate. given at the same time if appmpriate-_
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given at the same time if a- --roriate. ., ., ., appropriate. for the moment, thanks. if ou have appropriate. for the moment, thanks. if you have any — appropriate. for the moment, thanks. if you have any questions _ appropriate. for the moment, thanks. if you have any questions about - if you have any questions about booster jabs and if you have any questions about boosterjabs and vaccines for teenagers or in fact any questions about the winter plan we would love to hear from you. about the winter plan we would love to hearfrom you. i will about the winter plan we would love to hear from you. i will be putting them to our health correspondent and also our education correspondent. that is later at 530. please do get in touch. nick eardleyjoins me now from westminster. one of the questions we may hear the prime minister asked at this press briefing, you have got plan a, and plan b, one is optimistic and one is pessimistic, at what stage do we tip overfrom one to pessimistic, at what stage do we tip over from one to the other? that pessimistic, at what stage do we tip over from one to the other?- over from one to the other? that is riuht over from one to the other? that is right because _ over from one to the other? that is right because the _ over from one to the other? that is
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right because the document - over from one to the other? that is right because the document we - over from one to the other? that is. right because the document we have had from the government does not set out that criteria. it talks about data and whether the nhs was going to be overwhelmed but we don't know exactly what that means, and for businesses and employers, and individuals, this will matter because plan a changing to plan b would mean working from home a lot more and the return of face coverings in some settings and it could mean vaccine passports for some bigger venues like football stadiums and theatres and concerts, so this really matters. it matters to a lot of businesses. one other important thing, the tone about the prime minister takes, and we had overnight from downing street, boris johnson thinks that the pandemic is farfrom over and he wants johnson thinks that the pandemic is far from over and he wants to emphasise that message to the public but exactly what he says over the next hour will matter because a lot of people have seen freedoms come
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back to our everyday lives and it feels something like the new normal outside with people back in pubs and restaurants and cinemas, football matches, whatever it is. it will matter for how the prime minister frames the autumn and winter period and whether he is optimistic and thinks that plan a is more than likely to get through the next few weeks, the focus on vaccines and whether he thinks there's a chance we will need the back—up plan and just one line in this document we have got today that he might be asked about, as well, where it says, harmful societal and economic restrictions will only be used as a last resort. that means starting to shut down stuff and a last resort is not ruling it out completely so i suspect a lot of people will want to know in what circumstances the prime minister might be prepared to do that again. something that number
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ten do not want to do but when it comes to levelling with people about what the next few weeks and months look like, some of the language is going to be very important. back to our health correspondent, - going to be very important. back to our health correspondent, those i our health correspondent, those questions about the boosterjab and the jabs for 12—15 —year—olds, they are part of the scheme of learning to live with coronavirus, notjust for this year, and this winter, but in future years. in other words we need to live with it and we need to find mechanisms to deal with it. indeed. vaccines, we are almost entirely— indeed. vaccines, we are almost entirely going to be reliant upon vaccines— entirely going to be reliant upon vaccines for this winter. now entirely going to be reliant upon vaccines for this winter.- vaccines for this winter. now we have the prime _ vaccines for this winter. now we have the prime minister. - i want to set out our plan for managing covid this winter and i want you to cast your mind back
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exactly one year and think where we were last september as schools went back and the colder months approached because in one way our position today is actually more challenging. we have higher levels of daily cases, thousands more, but in many other crucial respects the british people collectively and individually are incomparably better placed to fight the disease. we have more than 80% of all obit i6s now double vaccinated and we have covid antibodies in around 90% of the aduu antibodies in around 90% of the adult population. those vaccines are working. we have seen the extraordinary vaccine induced falls in deaths and serious disease and depending on your age, you are up to nine times more likely to die, sadly, if you are not vaccinated thanif sadly, if you are not vaccinated than if you have had both jabs. the
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result of this vaccination campaign is that we have one of the most free societies and one of the most open economies in europe and that is why we are now sticking with our strategy. in essence, we are going to keep going. we will continue to offer testing and we will continue to offer to the macro urge everyone to offer to the macro urge everyone to be sensible and responsible —— we will continue to urge everyone to be sensible, wash your hands, consider ventilation, where a face covering in crowded places, stay at home if you feel unwell, download and use the app and we are investing massively in the nhs to meet the pressures of covid with an additional £5.1i billion in england over the next six months on top of almost 36 billion over the next three years to help the nhs recover and fix the long—standing problems of social care as well. as i said last week. we are helping to
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vaccinate the world with 100 million doses for developing countries by nextjune. i think this country should be proud and continue to be very proud that the oxford astrazeneca vaccine remains the workhorse of global immunisation. we will keep further measures in reserve. plan b. we do not see the need now to proceed with mandatory certification but we will continue to work with the many businesses that are getting ready such schemes, indeed over 200 events have already used covid certification, voluntarily. it isjust used covid certification, voluntarily. it is just not sensible to rule out completely this kind of option now. when we must face the fact that it might still make the
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difference between keeping businesses open and at full capacity or not. it will also keep open the option of mandating face coverings as they have elsewhere or advising people again to work from home, reflecting the fact that when you have a large proportion of the country as we have now, with immunity, then smaller changes can make a bigger difference and give us the confidence that we don't need to go back to the lockdowns of the past. we will continue to update our advice to you based on the latest data but in the meantime we are confident in the vaccines that have made such a difference to our lives. we are now intensifying that effort, offering jabs to 12—15 —year—olds on the advice of the chief medical officers who have given that advice based on the health and well—being
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and educational prospects of the children themselves. and for those over 50 and those under 50 who are more at risk, we are now motoring ahead with the booster programme, and a third dose six months after your second dose, so that means we will build even high walls of immunisation, orvaccine will build even high walls of immunisation, or vaccine protection, in this country. the uk government has secured at scale jabs for every part of the uk and we will be sending doses to the devolved administrations in scotland, wales and northern ireland. covid is still out there. the disease sadly still remains a risk but i'm confident that we can keep going with our plan to turn jabs intojobs that we can keep going with our plan to turn jabs into jobs and protect
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the gains that we have made together. thank you very much. chris is going to do the slide. the together. thank you very much. chris is going to do the slide.— is going to do the slide. the first is going to do the slide. the first is the number _ is going to do the slide. the first is the number of _ is going to do the slide. the first is the number of people - is going to do the slide. the first is the number of people testing l is the number of people testing positive for covid in the uk and as everybody knows there is a significant dip that was in the middle part of the year, it started to rise injune and july and there was a peak which then eased off but there has been a gradual drifting up over the last few weeks, although it has stabilised in the last week but we should be careful neither to over or under interpret this. it is stable as i say but we are going into a more difficult period of the year. the next slide, please. the number of people in hospital with covid has inevitably mirrored this and what we have seen is a gradual drifting up of the number of people in hospital. it is not anywhere near the point it was in the first peak
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and in the subsequent peaks in the early part of last year and the beginning of this year but there is a general upward trend, variable around different parts of the country. next slide, please. the good news is that the number of people who are dying following a positive test for covid—19 is significantly lower proportional to the number of cases than it was at the number of cases than it was at the end of last year at the beginning of this year but these cases are not trivial. by any means. every one of these is a tragedy for the family so around 140 deaths in terms of the seven day average and again this is gradually drifting up but very slowly. broadly it is flat to just drifting up. but very slowly. broadly it is flat tojust drifting up. next but very slowly. broadly it is flat to just drifting up. next slide, please. the number of people who have received a vaccination for covid is also increasing both the second doses, people who have previously been vaccinated, to
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really strengthen their production, and also for first doses. —— protection. these are the trends which have been widely circulated in the media but that was just to bring people up—to—date. next slide. we wanted to add three additional slides because i think these make a point and reinforce the point is that the prime minister has made. the first slide, this is on public health england, this data, it shows the number of people with covid—19 coming to emergency care within 28 days of a positive test, just with covid, in most cases, which led to a hospital admission, and what it shows is that every age there is a substantially smaller proportion risk of doing this if you were vaccinated compared to if you were not vaccinated, in every age. if you do a crude look at the numbers,
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someone who is in their 30s and not vaccinated, is running about the same risk as someone in their 70s who is vaccinated. it is that level of difference. i want to reinforce why people of every age should be trying to get vaccinated and one of the most pressing things for doctors is talking to people who have just chose not to get vaccinated and you then see them being wheeled down to intensive care. this has been a serious problem as a result of them not being vaccinated, so we must encourage everybody we know to get vaccinated and the great majority of people who have not been vaccinated, it is not because they are against vaccination but because they have not got around to doing it. winter is coming and people should take it seriously. next slide. this is even more clear if you look at the mortality rates which are very
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starkly different between those who are vaccinated and those who are not vaccinated. i really would encourage and i'm sure you would all encourage everybody we know to get vaccinated and then double vaccinated. three layers of defence from vaccination. the first one, children and young people, 12—15, which we talked about yesterday, and today a discussion of people having their booster doses, we have the third and be the most important, people who have had no vaccines, they should be encouraged to get there first and then their second vaccination, is critical. the final point with the data is, this is a comparison of where final point with the data is, this is a comparison of where we final point with the data is, this is a comparison of where we are final point with the data is, this is a comparison of where we are now and this reinforces the point the prime minister made at the beginning of his opening remarks, in 2021, in the orange line, and along the bottom is the date, and where we
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were in 2020, what you can see in this, this time last year, we were only beginning to get the take—off that you see in autumn and into winter. we are entering this period at a much higher level in terms of the number of cases and in terms of the number of cases and in terms of the number of hospitalisations and in terms of the number of deaths than we were this time last year. the reason that is possible for that to be happening, the nhs under extreme pressure, but not at the point where it was at the turn of the year, is because of vaccination, but we are entering the winter with this reasonably high level and it would not take long to get into trouble and so people still need to take the disease very seriously because you don't need a medical degree to know that autumn and winter is when respiratory viruses are hugely advantaged, as people come together indoors with windows
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closed and so on. it's a reinforcement of people that if you have not had your vaccination, now is a very good time to do so. thank ou ve is a very good time to do so. thank you very much. _ is a very good time to do so. thank you very much, chris. _ is a very good time to do so. thank you very much, chris. we - is a very good time to do so. thank you very much, chris. we can - is a very good time to do so. thank you very much, chris. we can go i is a very good time to do so. thankj you very much, chris. we can go to questions. first of all michael from dorset. he asked, the government said 20,000 deaths... michael, i'm not certain that is what we suggested but what we are doing with our policies and everything we have done since the beginning of the pandemic is to prevent unnecessary deaths and every death has been a tragedy but i think i'm right in saying that the vaccination programme alone had saved perhaps 100,000 lives, maybe 120,000 lives, and that is why what
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chris has said about getting your jab is so absolutely crucial. now a question from kirsty in leeds. thank you very much for that. i appreciate that people are very frustrated about the travel rules but it is vital that we do whatever we can to stop the virus being reimported, especially to control new variants, when they are at risk of coming, and that is why we have got the rules and the red lists. i know travellers have been frustrated in having to take tests in order to
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do this but i think it is a reasonable thing to ask people to do that to help protect the population. we will say more shortly about the traffic light system and about simplifying it and about what we can do to make the burdens of testing less owner risk for those who are coming back into the country. that will be coming shortly. now questions from the media, starting with vicki young from the bbc. can t with vicki young from the bbc. can i offer our condolences _ with vicki young from the bbc. can i offer our condolences to _ with vicki young from the bbc. can i offer our condolences to you and your _ offer our condolences to you and your family _ offer our condolences to you and your family-— offer our condolences to you and our famil . ., ~' ,, , . the first question is about what is the criteria _ the first question is about what is the criteria for _ the first question is about what is the criteria for when _ the first question is about what is the criteria for when you - the first question is about what is the criteria for when you think- the first question is about what is the criteria for when you think we | the criteria for when you think we have _ the criteria for when you think we have passed _ the criteria for when you think we have passed a _ the criteria for when you think we have passed a particular- the criteria for when you think we| have passed a particular threshold and when — have passed a particular threshold and when you _
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have passed a particular threshold and when you -- _ have passed a particular threshold and when you —— do— have passed a particular threshold and when you —— do you _ have passed a particular threshold and when you —— do you think- and when you —— do you think conditions _ and when you —— do you think conditions should _ and when you —— do you think conditions should be - and when you —— do you think. conditions should be imposed? and when you -- do you think conditions should be imposed? thank ou ve conditions should be imposed? thank you very much _ conditions should be imposed? thank you very much for _ conditions should be imposed? thank you very much for your— conditions should be imposed? thank you very much for your kind _ conditions should be imposed? you very much for your kind words and two others who have said the same thing. on your point about plan band same thing. on your point about plan b and when and how and what the trigger might be for that, bear in mind what we are trying to prevent, and that is the overwhelming of the nhs. that has got to remain the objective. there are all sorts of data which we will continue to study as we have during the pandemic in terms of deciding what the risks are and what the state of the disease is and what the state of the disease is and we will keep you updated about where we are. you have heard about the state of things at the moment and we are confident we can proceed with plan a but what i would say about plan b, it contains different shots, and you would not necessarily play them all at once. you want to do things in a graduating way. i
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would emphasise what patrick has said many times, we are now in a situation when because so many of the population have some degree of immunity, smaller changes in the guidance and the way we are asking people to behave can have a bigger impact and a small but tilt on the tiller can affect a bigger change in the direction of the pandemic. patrick can say more about that if he wants. we patrick can say more about that if he wants. ~ ., , patrick can say more about that if he wants. . ., , ., he wants. we have high levels of immunity now — he wants. we have high levels of immunity now and _ he wants. we have high levels of immunity now and if _ he wants. we have high levels of immunity now and if we - he wants. we have high levels of immunity now and if we can - he wants. we have high levels of immunity now and if we can get. immunity now and if we can get everyhody— immunity now and if we can get everybody who is not vaccinated to be vaccinated, that is the most important _ be vaccinated, that is the most important thing, there are 5 million people _ important thing, there are 5 million people who are eligible for vaccines now who _ people who are eligible for vaccines now who have not been vaccinated. and trying — now who have not been vaccinated. and trying to persuade those people it is the _ and trying to persuade those people it is the right thing to do to get vaccinated, that would make a significant difference. getting the
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immunity up means that the barrier against _ immunity up means that the barrier against rises is that much greater if you _ against rises is that much greater if you think— against rises is that much greater if you think about where we are now with infection rates, and the openness that we currently have, if you try _ openness that we currently have, if you try to _ openness that we currently have, if you try to do this six months ago, the number— you try to do this six months ago, the number of cases and hospitalisations would be through the roof— hospitalisations would be through the roof so the immunity is really important — the roof so the immunity is really important to keep this down and allows— important to keep this down and allows lighter measures to be put in ptace _ allows lighter measures to be put in ptace to— allows lighter measures to be put in place to keep it under control. that said, _ place to keep it under control. that said. the _ place to keep it under control. that said, the things to look at our hospitalisations, they are really important as a measure of when things— important as a measure of when things are — important as a measure of when things are going in the wrong direction, _ things are going in the wrong direction, and the relationship between — direction, and the relationship between cases and hospitalisations because _ between cases and hospitalisations because one of the things the vaccines— because one of the things the vaccines has done is made that relationship much less so if you saw that changing again that would be a cause _ that changing again that would be a cause for— that changing again that would be a cause for concern so those are things— cause for concern so those are things to — cause for concern so those are things to look at. the final thing to say. — things to look at. the final thing to say. the — things to look at. the final thing to say, the principles which have been _ to say, the principles which have been really clear across the world,
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are when _ been really clear across the world, are when you make a move you have -ot are when you make a move you have got to _ are when you make a move you have got to go— are when you make a move you have got to go earlier than you think you want _ got to go earlier than you think you want to— got to go earlier than you think you want to and — got to go earlier than you think you want to and harder than you think you want— want to and harder than you think you want to — want to and harder than you think you want to and you need to make sure you _ you want to and you need to make sure you have got the right geographical coverage, so if this goes _ geographical coverage, so if this goes in — geographical coverage, so if this goes in the wrong direction and cases— goes in the wrong direction and cases increase followed by hospitalisations it is important that the — hospitalisations it is important that the measures are put in place early— that the measures are put in place early enough and significant enough. to add _ early enough and significant enough. to add to _ early enough and significant enough. to add to that, there are three things which it is worth looking at and the first is the absolute numbers going into hospital. the second is the rate of change, a gradual drift up is one thing, but if you saw a very rapid increase, you have to consider taking early action, and the third is the overall state of the nhs which varies over the year and as you go into winter there tends to be greater pressures so these other things which have got to be taken into account but no one is claiming there is good number, we would all like them to be as low as possible, but in terms of what would trigger change those are the things
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most likely. trigger change those are the things most likel . ., , trigger change those are the things most likely._ we - trigger change those are the things most likely._ we are i trigger change those are the things | most likely._ we are all most likely. robert, itv. we are all relieved at — most likely. robert, itv. we are all relieved at the _ most likely. robert, itv. we are all relieved at the way _ most likely. robert, itv. we are all relieved at the way in _ most likely. robert, itv. we are all relieved at the way in which - most likely. robert, itv. we are all relieved at the way in which the - relieved at the way in which the vaccine — relieved at the way in which the vaccine reduces— relieved at the way in which the vaccine reduces severe - relieved at the way in which the vaccine reduces severe disease| relieved at the way in which the - vaccine reduces severe disease and i nrysetf— vaccine reduces severe disease and i myself have — vaccine reduces severe disease and i myself have just _ vaccine reduces severe disease and i myself have just recovered - vaccine reduces severe disease and i myself have just recovered from - myself have just recovered from covid, _ myself have just recovered from covid, but — myself have just recovered from covid, but as— myself have just recovered from covid, but as the _ myself have just recovered from covid, but as the chart - myself have just recovered from covid, but as the chart show, i covid, but as the chart show, numbers— covid, but as the chart show, numbers going _ covid, but as the chart show, numbers going into— covid, but as the chart show, numbers going into hospital. covid, but as the chart show, . numbers going into hospital are covid, but as the chart show, - numbers going into hospital are five times— numbers going into hospital are five times what— numbers going into hospital are five times what they _ numbers going into hospital are five times what they were _ numbers going into hospital are five times what they were one _ numbers going into hospital are five times what they were one year - numbers going into hospital are five times what they were one year ago, sorry. _ times what they were one year ago, sorry, four— times what they were one year ago, sorry, four times, _ times what they were one year ago, sorry, four times, deaths— times what they were one year ago, sorry, four times, deaths are - times what they were one year ago, sorry, four times, deaths are five i sorry, four times, deaths are five times— sorry, four times, deaths are five times what— sorry, four times, deaths are five times what they _ sorry, four times, deaths are five times what they were _ sorry, four times, deaths are five times what they were one - sorry, four times, deaths are five times what they were one year i sorry, four times, deaths are five i times what they were one year ago, and as— times what they were one year ago, and as you — times what they were one year ago, and as you pointed _ times what they were one year ago, and as you pointed out _ times what they were one year ago, and as you pointed out we - times what they were one year ago, and as you pointed out we are - times what they were one year ago, | and as you pointed out we are about to get— and as you pointed out we are about to get colder — and as you pointed out we are about to get colder weather— and as you pointed out we are about to get colder weather and _ and as you pointed out we are about to get colder weather and we - and as you pointed out we are about to get colder weather and we will i and as you pointed out we are about to get colder weather and we will be indoors _ to get colder weather and we will be indoors blankets _ to get colder weather and we will be indoors blankets are _ to get colder weather and we will be indoors blankets are going - to get colder weather and we will be indoors blankets are going back- to get colder weather and we will be indoors blankets are going back to l indoors blankets are going back to schoot~ _ indoors blankets are going back to schoot~ what — indoors blankets are going back to school. what is— indoors blankets are going back to school. what is the _ indoors blankets are going back to school. what is the argument - indoors blankets are going back to school. what is the argument for. indoors blankets are going back to i school. what is the argument for not taking _ school. what is the argument for not taking mitd _ school. what is the argument for not taking mild suppressive _ school. what is the argument for not taking mild suppressive measures i school. what is the argument for not i taking mild suppressive measures now as a preventative — taking mild suppressive measures now as a preventative measure? _ taking mild suppressive measures now as a preventative measure? —— - taking mild suppressive measures now as a preventative measure? —— we - as a preventative measure? —— we will be — as a preventative measure? —— we will be indoors — as a preventative measure? —— we will be indoors more _ as a preventative measure? —— we will be indoors more and - as a preventative measure? —— we will be indoors more and kids- as a preventative measure? —— we will be indoors more and kids are i will be indoors more and kids are going _ will be indoors more and kids are going back— will be indoors more and kids are going back to— will be indoors more and kids are going back to school. _ will be indoors more and kids are going back to school. secondly, i will be indoors more and kids are l going back to school. secondly, we saw what _ going back to school. secondly, we saw what sarah _ going back to school. secondly, we saw what sarah gilbert _ going back to school. secondly, we saw what sarah gilbert said - going back to school. secondly, we saw what sarah gilbert said in- saw what sarah gilbert said in oxford. — saw what sarah gilbert said in oxford. and _ saw what sarah gilbert said in oxford, and others, - saw what sarah gilbert said in oxford, and others, and - saw what sarah gilbert said in oxford, and others, and the i saw what sarah gilbert said in- oxford, and others, and the argument for in _ oxford, and others, and the argument for in their— oxford, and others, and the argument for in their view, _ oxford, and others, and the argument for in their view, the _ oxford, and others, and the argument for in their view, the argument- oxford, and others, and the argument for in their view, the argument for- for in their view, the argument for boosters _ for in their view, the argument for boosters is — for in their view, the argument for boosters is not _ for in their view, the argument for boosters is not overwhelming, - for in their view, the argument for| boosters is not overwhelming, and many _ boosters is not overwhelming, and many of _ boosters is not overwhelming, and many of those _ boosters is not overwhelming, and many of those people _
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boosters is not overwhelming, and many of those people feel - boosters is not overwhelming, and many of those people feel we - boosters is not overwhelming, and. many of those people feel we would do a better— many of those people feel we would do a betteriob — many of those people feel we would do a betteriob by— many of those people feel we would do a betterjob by setting _ many of those people feel we would do a betterjob by setting those - do a betterjob by setting those vaccines— do a betterjob by setting those vaccines to _ do a betterjob by setting those vaccines to countries _ do a betterjob by setting those vaccines to countries that - do a betterjob by setting those vaccines to countries that don't| vaccines to countries that don't have _ vaccines to countries that don't have any— vaccines to countries that don't have any vaccines _ vaccines to countries that don't have any vaccines at _ vaccines to countries that don't have any vaccines at all, - vaccines to countries that don'tj have any vaccines at all, places like africa _ have any vaccines at all, places like africa. why— have any vaccines at all, places like africa. why do _ have any vaccines at all, places like africa. why do you - have any vaccines at all, placesl like africa. why do you disagree with that — like africa. why do you disagree with thatjudgment? _ like africa. why do you disagree with that judgment? it - like africa. why do you disagree with that judgment? it is - like africa. why do you disagree with that judgment? it is an - with that judgment? it is an important _ with that judgment? it is an importantjudgment. - with that judgment? it is an i importantjudgment. scientists with that judgment? it is an - importantjudgment. scientists for important judgment. scientists for the latter— important judgment. scientists for the latter one _ importantjudgment. scientists for the latter one and _ importantjudgment. scientists for the latter one and all— importantjudgment. scientists for the latter one and all of _ importantjudgment. scientists for the latter one and all of you - importantjudgment. scientists for the latter one and all of you for. the latter one and all of you for why not — the latter one and all of you for why not take _ the latter one and all of you for why not take early _ the latter one and all of you for why not take early action - the latter one and all of you for why not take early action now. i the latter one and all of you for| why not take early action now. i why not take early action now. would say to you, robert, on why not take early action now]- would say to you, robert, on that, because the vaccines have made a huge difference in reducing mortality and the ratio of cases to serious disease and deaths is vast. we are continuing to advise everybody to be sensible and responsible so plan a, what we are doing at the moment, continue to think about using a face covering in a confined space, when you are meeting people you don't know, wash your hands and use ventilation, get a test, stay at home if you feel
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unwell, these are very important restrictions which i think... these are ways in which we can behave responsibly that people should continue to maintain, but i think thatis continue to maintain, but i think that is the right balance, given where the pandemic is at the moment and given what we have been able to achieve, and the priority, there are 5 million more people who could get a vaccination, who haven't yet done so, and those of the people that i think we should be encouraging now to come forward and get yourjab, it will be good for you, for the reasons chris has set out. you are overwhelmingly more likely to die or suffer serious disease if you have not been vaccinated and so vaccination should be the key thing we advocate. vaccination should be the key thing we advocate-— we advocate. firstly, on the measures. _ we advocate. firstly, on the measures, if— we advocate. firstly, on the measures, if we _ we advocate. firstly, on the measures, if we had - we advocate. firstly, on the measures, if we had a -
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we advocate. firstly, on the i measures, if we had a situation where everybody was back to behaving as they did before march 2020, we would have a much higher rate than we do at the moment, so actually people are taking measures, lots of people are taking measures, lots of people are taking measures, lots of people are taking measures, they are meeting with fewer people, research demonstrates that and many people are wearing masks in crowded places and the other thing the prime minister has talked about so it is not that we are not taking measures, there are a lot of measures and many people still are taking some or a lot of measures to reduce the risk, in addition to being vaccinated which of course is the most important thing. we should notjust say there is nothing happening, but there already is. on the booster vaccine, there are a couple of things which can be conflated and can lead to confusion, the first thing, everybody agrees we want to get vaccines out all around the world including developing
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countries, that is an absolute moral imperative and an practical imperative. that is not a contentious point. everybody agrees. is there some waning of immunity that means a third dose, a booster dose,is that means a third dose, a booster dose, is a sensible thing to do? there is good evidence that is the case. uk has taken a middle way on this, led byjcvi, it is neither saying no boosters at all because there is evidence that especially when the top page of the age range and those with pre—existing health conditions, which other groups which have been recommended it in addition to health and social care workers because of the chance this will reduce the residual effect of others, so that is very good logic, but they have not gone all the way recommending universal boosters for everybody, so they have taken the middle path which some nations have gone for. the logic is clear and science —based and the ethical
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imperative as well as the overall need to do that i think it is widely agreed and those two are separate discussions and if we suddenly stopped having boosters, given the vaccines we are using which are ones with ultracold chains at the moment, very long shelf lives, the idea that will transform the situation in developing countries is a misunderstanding. those are separate issues but both are important. t issues but both are important. i agree with what chris has said and also if— agree with what chris has said and also if you — agree with what chris has said and also if you think about the degree of immunity we had and the levels of behavioural— of immunity we had and the levels of behavioural restriction people have imposed _ behavioural restriction people have imposed upon themselves, people are not meeting as many people, and we know contact happens but it is a long _ know contact happens but it is a long way— know contact happens but it is a long way down, but they are changing fast. long way down, but they are changing fast the _ long way down, but they are changing fast. the faster they change the more _ fast. the faster they change the more pressure this will come under and that— more pressure this will come under and that may well lead to a significant increase. if you look, io significant increase. if you look, go across— significant increase. if you look, go across the channel, countries where _ go across the channel, countries where you — go across the channel, countries where you have similar levels of immunity— where you have similar levels of immunity and some higher degrees of
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restriction, _ immunity and some higher degrees of restriction, what you can see is that— restriction, what you can see is that cases _ restriction, what you can see is that cases are going down, so you can see _ that cases are going down, so you can see we — that cases are going down, so you can see we are at the pivot point where _ can see we are at the pivot point where things are flat at the moment, reasonably— where things are flat at the moment, reasonably flat, but you cannot wait until it _ reasonably flat, but you cannot wait until it is _ reasonably flat, but you cannot wait until it is late, so that is where we are — until it is late, so that is where we are on— until it is late, so that is where we are on that. on the boosters, the waning _ we are on that. on the boosters, the waning of— we are on that. on the boosters, the waning of immunity is clear, it is greater— waning of immunity is clear, it is greater for— waning of immunity is clear, it is greater for infection than it is for the waning — greater for infection than it is for the waning of hospitalisations and deaths. _ the waning of hospitalisations and deaths, they are holding up very well, _ deaths, they are holding up very well, and — deaths, they are holding up very well, and the really important point, — well, and the really important point, these vaccines are really good _ point, these vaccines are really good. they are really effective vaccines, _ good. they are really effective vaccines, far more effective than we could _ vaccines, far more effective than we could have _ vaccines, far more effective than we could have dared hope for at the beginning. this is some waning and that waning is most evident in the people _ that waning is most evident in the people who are most at risk and so getting _ people who are most at risk and so getting on— people who are most at risk and so getting on and getting that topped up getting on and getting that topped up does _ getting on and getting that topped up does a couple of things, it gives a very— up does a couple of things, it gives a very high— up does a couple of things, it gives a very high level of antibody coverage and it probably broadens
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the coverage across variants, as well, _ the coverage across variants, as well, because you have got such high response. _ well, because you have got such high response. so— well, because you have got such high response, so it is a sensible thing to do _ response, so it is a sensible thing to do. jcvi — response, so it is a sensible thing to do. jcvi had considered it carefully— to do. jcvi had considered it carefully and i think their recommendation is very sensible. now ga gibbon recommendation is very sensible. thu-hr gary gibbon from channel 4. professor, he talked about the metrics— professor, he talked about the metrics to _ professor, he talked about the metrics to help _ professor, he talked about the metrics to help you _ professor, he talked about the metrics to help you decide - professor, he talked about the metrics to help you decide to i professor, he talked about the - metrics to help you decide to move from _ metrics to help you decide to move from the _ metrics to help you decide to move from the lockdown _ metrics to help you decide to move from the lockdown light, _ metrics to help you decide to move from the lockdown light, may- metrics to help you decide to move from the lockdown light, may be. i from the lockdown light, may be. what _ from the lockdown light, may be. what about — from the lockdown light, may be. what about the _ from the lockdown light, may be. what about the trigger, _ from the lockdown light, may be. what about the trigger, currently| from the lockdown light, may be. i what about the trigger, currently it is most _ what about the trigger, currently it is most likety— what about the trigger, currently it is most likely to _ what about the trigger, currently it is most likely to be _ what about the trigger, currently it is most likely to be a _ what about the trigger, currently it is most likely to be a new- what about the trigger, currently it is most likely to be a new variant i is most likely to be a new variant that would — is most likely to be a new variant that would actually— is most likely to be a new variant that would actually change - is most likely to be a new variant that would actually change the i is most likely to be a new variant - that would actually change the game here 0k _ that would actually change the game here 0k is _ that would actually change the game here 0k is that— that would actually change the game here 0k is that the _ that would actually change the game here ok is that the real— that would actually change the game here 0k is that the real game - here ok is that the real game changer— here ok is that the real game changer that— here 0k is that the real game changer that you _ here 0k is that the real game changer that you would - here 0k is that the real game i changer that you would expect a transform — changer that you would expect a transform horizon? _ changer that you would expect a transform horizon? with - changer that you would expect a transform horizon? with the - changer that you would expect a i transform horizon? with the prime minister— transform horizon? with the prime minister said— transform horizon? with the prime minister said he— transform horizon? with the prime minister said he would _ transform horizon? with the prime minister said he would urge - transform horizon? with the primej minister said he would urge people to consider— minister said he would urge people to consider wearing _ minister said he would urge people to consider wearing a _ minister said he would urge people to consider wearing a facemask- minister said he would urge people to consider wearing a facemask in. to consider wearing a facemask in crowded _ to consider wearing a facemask in crowded places. _ to consider wearing a facemask in crowded places, you _ to consider wearing a facemask in crowded places, you said - to consider wearing a facemask in crowded places, you said it- to consider wearing a facemask in crowded places, you said it wouldj to consider wearing a facemask in i crowded places, you said it would be a serious _ crowded places, you said it would be a serious condition. _ crowded places, you said it would be a serious condition. this— a serious condition. this considering _ a serious condition. this considering if— a serious condition. this considering if you - a serious condition. this
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considering if you have? a serious condition. this- considering if you have? vaccine passports, — considering if you have? vaccine passports. you _ considering if you have? vaccine passports, you have _ considering if you have? vaccine passports, you have said - considering if you have? vaccine passports, you have said in- considering if you have? vaccine passports, you have said injulyi considering if you have? vaccine i passports, you have said injuly and this building — passports, you have said injuly and this building that— passports, you have said injuly and this building that used _ passports, you have said injuly and this building that used to _ passports, you have said injuly and this building that used to notice - passports, you have said injuly and this building that used to notice if. this building that used to notice if you're _ this building that used to notice if you're planning _ this building that used to notice if you're planning to _ this building that used to notice if you're planning to bring. - this building that used to notice if you're planning to bring. were i this building that used to notice ifi you're planning to bring. were you really— you're planning to bring. were you really planning _ you're planning to bring. were you really planning to _ you're planning to bring. were you really planning to get _ you're planning to bring. were you really planning to get bring - you're planning to bring. were you really planning to get bring them i really planning to get bring them in? we _ really planning to get bring them in? we have _ really planning to get bring them in? we have lots— really planning to get bring them in? we have lots of— really planning to get bring them in? we have lots of other- really planning to get bring them in? we have lots of other mixedi in? we have lots of other mixed messaging — in? we have lots of other mixed messaging which— in? we have lots of other mixed messaging which is— in? we have lots of other mixed messaging which is not- in? we have lots of other mixed messaging which is not good i in? we have lots of other mixed messaging which is not good ini messaging which is not good in public— messaging which is not good in public health _ messaging which is not good in public health. what _ messaging which is not good in public health. what is - messaging which is not good in public health. what is going i messaging which is not good in. public health. what is going on? thank— public health. what is going on? thank yod — public health. what is going on? thankyod in— public health. what is going on? thank you. in terms _ public health. what is going on? thank you. in terms of- public health. what is going on? thank you. in terms of new - public health. what is going on? - thank you. in terms of new variants, they are one thing we need to look seriously at. variants have happened all the time. they worry would be one escaping from the vaccination. the delta variant is a very bad form, let's be very clear. that is the reason we have had such trouble from the last year as every country has around the world. we have not faced able to do with dealt with, so it is possible that the combination of winter events, plus the highly transmissible delta variant, could lead to a situation where on the basis of the data, ministers decided they wanted to trigger some or all of the plan b is the prime minister set out, so i think we have to take
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it as it comes. anyone who can say with confidence they know how this will work has not fully understood the range of possible ways this could happen. were there to be a variant that could escape, that would put us in a new situation and no doubt the prime minister would come back and explain where he would wish to go at that point in time. i think over autumn and winter, that is what we face in terms of masks, my previous situation remains what i recommend. if you are in a crowded environment, wearing a mask is helping protect other people. vaccinated protection. get infected and transmit. it is probability have
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been proposed. mask helps to reduce that. they consider it a matter of simple courtesy. there are situations where you would want to wear a mask but thatis you would want to wear a mask but that is not universal and it is a recommendation and not something the government has put into regulation. on your point about covid certification and vaccine passports, as it were, i do defend these in principle and it was right to set out injuly principle and it was right to set out in july that we could principle and it was right to set out injuly that we could go principle and it was right to set out in july that we could go forward with those measures and what has happened, if you think a year ago, last september, imagine if we had had covid certification, we would have been able with that to keep
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open businesses that had been forced to close and were going through a wretched time, there would have been a total game changing aspect of that. last year. so i think they are an important part of our repertoire. it is great that loads of events have been working using them and people have made the system work. and we may, because of where the disease gets to come up we may have to use them in a more thoroughgoing way and we reserve the right to come back to you and say that we think that would be necessary and i do think the public understands that. they can see how it could work and there are other countries that are doing it right now but at present we don't think it is necessary to proceed on that basis. we think we can keep going, with all the
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stipulations that i mentioned and chris reinforced, that we are asking people to observe, we think that is the right balance, given where the data is right now but you have got to be mindful that the disease has a way of changing and moving. what is absolutely for certain is the vaccines have made a vast difference and what i hope people will take away from this, from this press conference, above all, not the importance of plan a or plan b, but the fixing of a gap in the number of people who have had their vaccine, of whatever age, and the statistic about the risks to an unvaccinated person in their 30s, it was very powerful, and the numbers are going up powerful, and the numbers are going up and it is very encouraging to see
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so many people coming forward to get vaccinations. i would urge everybody who is a bit apathetic about it to join the club because it is worthwhile. now steve from the times newspaper. professor, one of the's biggest female celebrities nicki minaj has today linked people in various vaccination to impotence. what would you say to her fans and how concerned _ what would you say to her fans and how concerned only _ what would you say to her fans and how concerned only with _ what would you say to her fans andj how concerned only with comments like that _ how concerned only with comments like that from — how concerned only with comments like that from public— how concerned only with comments like that from public figures? - like that from public figures? prime — like that from public figures? prime minister, _ like that from public figures? prime minister, sage - like that from public figures? prime minister, sage and - like that from public figures? i prime minister, sage and others like that from public figures? - prime minister, sage and others have advised _ prime minister, sage and others have advised the _ prime minister, sage and others have advised the government _ prime minister, sage and others have advised the government that - prime minister, sage and others have advised the government that working| advised the government that working from home _ advised the government that working from home is— advised the government that working from home is one _ advised the government that working from home is one of— advised the government that working from home is one of the _ advised the government that working from home is one of the most - from home is one of the most effective — from home is one of the most effective measures _ from home is one of the most effective measures that - from home is one of the most i effective measures that reducing transmission. _ effective measures that reducing transmission, but _ effective measures that reducing transmission, but looking - effective measures that reducing transmission, but looking at - effective measures that reducing| transmission, but looking at your autumn— transmission, but looking at your autumn and — transmission, but looking at your autumn and winter— transmission, but looking at your autumn and wintertime, - transmission, but looking at your autumn and wintertime, it- transmission, but looking at your autumn and wintertime, it is - transmission, but looking at your autumn and wintertime, it is not part autumn and winter time, it is not part of— autumn and winter time, it is not part of plan— autumn and wintertime, it is not part of plan b. _ autumn and wintertime, it is not part of plan b, it _ autumn and wintertime, it is not part of plan b, it seems - autumn and winter time, it is not part of plan b, it seems to- autumn and wintertime, it is not part of plan b, it seems to have i part of plan b, it seems to have some _ part of plan b, it seems to have some kind — part of plan b, it seems to have some kind of— part of plan b, it seems to have some kind of plan _ part of plan b, it seems to have some kind of plan c— part of plan b, it seems to have some kind of plan c with- part of plan b, it seems to have some kind of plan c with a - part of plan b, it seems to have i some kind of plan c with a decision on the _ some kind of plan c with a decision on the shelf— some kind of plan c with a decision
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on the shelf for _ some kind of plan c with a decision on the shelf for a _ some kind of plan c with a decision on the shelf for a later— some kind of plan c with a decision on the shelf for a later date - some kind of plan c with a decision on the shelf for a later date when i on the shelf for a later date when you look— on the shelf for a later date when you look at— on the shelf for a later date when you look at the _ on the shelf for a later date when you look at the document. - on the shelf for a later date when you look at the document. why i on the shelf for a later date when i you look at the document. why are you look at the document. why are you reticent— you look at the document. why are you reticent to _ you look at the document. why are you reticent to working _ you look at the document. why are you reticent to working from - you look at the document. why are i you reticent to working from home? and a _ you reticent to working from home? and a lot _ you reticent to working from home? and a lot of— you reticent to working from home? and a lot of your— you reticent to working from home? and a lot of your cabinets _ you reticent to working from home? and a lot of your cabinets are - and a lot of your cabinets are feeling — and a lot of your cabinets are feeling very— and a lot of your cabinets are feeling very anxious - and a lot of your cabinets are feeling very anxious about i and a lot of your cabinets are i feeling very anxious about their and a lot of your cabinets are - feeling very anxious about their own futures _ feeling very anxious about their own futures can— feeling very anxious about their own futures can you _ feeling very anxious about their own futures. can you formally— feeling very anxious about their own futures. can you formally rule - feeling very anxious about their own futures. can you formally rule out i feeling very anxious about their own futures. can you formally rule out a| futures. can you formally rule out a reshuffle _ futures. can you formally rule out a reshuffle ahead _ futures. can you formally rule out a reshuffle ahead of _ futures. can you formally rule out a reshuffle ahead of the _ futures. can you formally rule out a reshuffle ahead of the conservative j reshuffle ahead of the conservative party conference? _ party co nfe re nce ? thank _ party conference? thank you, - party conference? thank you, primel party conference? - thank you, prime minister. party conference? _ thank you, prime minister. there are a number— thank you, prime minister. there are a number of— thank you, prime minister. there are a number of myths that fly around, some _ a number of myths that fly around, some of— a number of myths that fly around, some of which are clearly ridiculous and some _ some of which are clearly ridiculous and some of which are designed just to scare _ and some of which are designed just to scare. that is ridiculous and untrue — to scare. that is ridiculous and untrue my— to scare. that is ridiculous and untrue. my own strong suggestion, if i untrue. my own strong suggestion, if i may. _ untrue. my own strong suggestion, if i may. to _ untrue. my own strong suggestion, if i may, to media present and not present. — i may, to media present and not present. is— i may, to media present and not present, is repeating them in public actually— present, is repeating them in public actuallyjust gives them credence which _ actuallyjust gives them credence which they don't need. they are untrue. — which they don't need. they are untrue. ~~ — which they don't need. they are untrue. ~~ if— which they don't need. they are untrue, .. if you look at where we are overall. — untrue, .. if you look at where we are overall, and i think this is a slightly— are overall, and i think this is a slightly longer but important question, the vast majority of people — question, the vast majority of people are getting vaccinated, so they are — people are getting vaccinated, so they are ignoring these myths, and if you _ they are ignoring these myths, and if you talk— they are ignoring these myths, and if you talk about people in their 505. _ if you talk about people in their 50s. 60s— if you talk about people in their 50s, 60s and 70s, over 90% are getting _ 50s, 60s and 70s, over 90% are getting vaccinated and very few people —
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getting vaccinated and very few people actively anti—vaccination. there _ people actively anti—vaccination. there are — people actively anti—vaccination. there are a _ people actively anti—vaccination. there are a group of people with strange — there are a group of people with strange beliefs, and, fine, and they make _ strange beliefs, and, fine, and they make their— strange beliefs, and, fine, and they make their own choices, and in a sense. _ make their own choices, and in a sense. also— make their own choices, and in a sense, also fine. people are adults who can _ sense, also fine. people are adults who can make their choices, however strange _ who can make their choices, however strange. that is a basic principle of medical— strange. that is a basic principle of medical ethics, actually. but there _ of medical ethics, actually. but there are — of medical ethics, actually. but there are also people who go around trying _ there are also people who go around trying to— there are also people who go around trying to discourage other people from _ trying to discourage other people from taking a vaccine which could be life-saving _ from taking a vaccine which could be life—saving or prevent them from having _ life—saving or prevent them from having life — life—saving or prevent them from having life changing injuries to themselves. many of those people, i regret— themselves. many of those people, i regret to _ themselves. many of those people, i regret to say, i think know that they— regret to say, i think know that they are — regret to say, i think know that they are peddling entries, but they still do _ they are peddling entries, but they still do it — they are peddling entries, but they still do it. in my view, they should be ashamed. i will leave it at that. and on— be ashamed. i will leave it at that. and on that. — be ashamed. i will leave it at that. and on that, i am not familiar, or as familiar with the works of nicki minaj as i probably should be, but i am familiar with the superstar gp of bexley who has appeared many times before you who will tell you that vaccines are wonderful and everybody should get them, sol vaccines are wonderful and everybody should get them, so i prefer to
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listen to that person. and on your point about working from home, i think this is one where we look at what the public are doing. i think people are coming back to their offices. you see the numbers all the time which suggest that people are more confident. they are getting back into their places of work, and for the reasons i have given many times before, i think that that is a good thing. i think on the whole, particularly for younger people, you need the social capital you get from the workplace, you need is a learning from colleagues. i think that on the whole, we will be more productive and it is fairer to everybody if we can do that, but people are also being sensible and responsible. if we have to change the guidance that we have to change the guidance that we give on that, then we will, but thatis we give on that, then we will, but that is plan b, as you have heard earlier on. that is plan b, as you have heard earlier om— earlier on. the point about something _ earlier on. the point about something like _ earlier on. the point about something like working i earlier on. the point about i something like working from earlier on. the point about - something like working from home earlier on. the point about _
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something like working from home is about contact patterns. in a way, this is quite straightforward, that disease spreads more rapidly than more contacts we have, and in certain environments, the more contacts you have, the more risk. working from home isjust contacts you have, the more risk. working from home is just a way in which contacts inevitably go down, so that is why it is highlighted as a particularly effective measure to decrease spread at times when you have big increases in levels. thanks. lizzie bock, the mira. thank ou. you thanks. lizzie bock, the mira. thank you- you spoke _ thanks. lizzie bock, the mira. thank you. you spoke about _ thanks. lizzie bock, the mira. thank you. you spoke about reserving - thanks. lizzie bock, the mira. thank you. you spoke about reserving the ti l i'it you. you spoke about reserving the right to _ you. you spoke about reserving the right to use — you. you spoke about reserving the right to use vaccine _ you. you spoke about reserving the right to use vaccine passports, - you. you spoke about reserving the right to use vaccine passports, and| right to use vaccine passports, and how they— right to use vaccine passports, and how they could _ right to use vaccine passports, and how they could be _ right to use vaccine passports, and how they could be imposed - right to use vaccine passports, and how they could be imposed in - right to use vaccine passports, and| how they could be imposed in large venues. _ how they could be imposed in large venues. but — how they could be imposed in large venues, but that _ how they could be imposed in large venues, but that does _ how they could be imposed in large venues, but that does not - how they could be imposed in large venues, but that does not rule - how they could be imposed in large venues, but that does not rule outl venues, but that does not rule out mandating — venues, but that does not rule out mandating the _ venues, but that does not rule out mandating the more _ venues, but that does not rule out mandating the more widely. - venues, but that does not rule out mandating the more widely. are i venues, but that does not rule out. mandating the more widely. are you considering — mandating the more widely. are you considering imposing _ mandating the more widely. are you considering imposing them - mandating the more widely. are you considering imposing them in - mandating the more widely. are you considering imposing them in pubs, | considering imposing them in pubs, or would _ considering imposing them in pubs, or would you — considering imposing them in pubs, or would you rule _ considering imposing them in pubs, or would you rule that _ considering imposing them in pubs, or would you rule that out? - considering imposing them in pubs, or would you rule that out? and - considering imposing them in pubs, or would you rule that out? and to. or would you rule that out? and to the scientists, _ or would you rule that out? and to the scientists, what— or would you rule that out? and to the scientists, what are _ or would you rule that out? and to the scientists, what are your- the scientists, what are your evidences _ the scientists, what are your evidences and _ the scientists, what are your evidences and the _ the scientists, what are your evidences and the subject i the scientists, what are your evidences and the subject ofj the scientists, what are your- evidences and the subject of vaccine passports? — evidences and the subject of vaccine passports? it — evidences and the subject of vaccine passports? it was _ evidences and the subject of vaccine passports? it was found _ evidences and the subject of vaccine passports? it was found they - passports? it was found they mitigate _ passports? it was found they mitigate transmission, - passports? it was found they mitigate transmission, so i passports? it was found theyl mitigate transmission, so why passports? it was found they - mitigate transmission, so why are we not using _ mitigate transmission, so why are we not using them — mitigate transmission, so why are we
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not using them now? _ not using them now? i not using them now? i have _ not using them now? i have never- not using them now? i have never been. not using them now? i have never been ini not using them now? - i have never been in favour of vaccine passports for pubs. i think i have been pretty clear about that throughout the pandemic. but i think there are settings, as we put it, nightclubs, large music venues and so on, or venues with big, closely packed crowds, where they might be appropriate. as we all know, some events have been using them over the summer very effectively to get going. i think it would be sensible for the government not to rule that out. tn for the government not to rule that out. . for the government not to rule that out. , ., , ., ., , out. in terms of the question to us, the question _ out. in terms of the question to us, the question about _ out. in terms of the question to us, the question about whether - out. in terms of the question to us, the question about whether it - out. in terms of the question to us, the question about whether it is i out. in terms of the question to us, the question about whether it is a l the question about whether it is a passport is one for political leaders. that is a legislative and societal one but from the science point of view, no one would doubt you are safer if you go to any indoor venue, where everyone around
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you is vaccinated. it reduces the probability you will get covid at all. it reduces the probability if they do have covid, they will pass it on, and if everyone in the environment is vaccinated, the chance of a mass spreading event is greatly reduced. to encourage everyone to get vaccinated, if there were particularly if they're going to large mass indoor events, the evidence of that is going to be a goodidea evidence of that is going to be a good idea is rock—solid. how it is done is very much a matter for ministers. thank you. adam payne, politics home. b. thank you. adam payne, politics home. �* , ., thank you. adam payne, politics home. , ., , home. a question, please, the otential home. a question, please, the potential mandating _ home. a question, please, the potential mandating a - home. a question, please, the potential mandating a vaccine l potential mandating a vaccine passports _ potential mandating a vaccine passports. the _ potential mandating a vaccine passports. the ceo _ potential mandating a vaccine passports. the ceo of- potential mandating a vaccine passports. the ceo of a - potential mandating a vaccine passports. the ceo of a night potential mandating a vaccine - passports. the ceo of a night time industries— passports. the ceo of a night time industries association _ passports. the ceo of a night time industries association told - passports. the ceo of a night time industries association told us - passports. the ceo of a night timej industries association told us today that the _ industries association told us today that the government _ industries association told us today that the government handling - industries association told us today that the government handling of. industries association told us todayl that the government handling of this issue has— that the government handling of this issue has been— that the government handling of this issue has been chaotic, _ that the government handling of this issue has been chaotic, and - that the government handling of this issue has been chaotic, and the - issue has been chaotic, and the government— issue has been chaotic, and the government policy— issue has been chaotic, and the government policy could - issue has been chaotic, and the government policy could makel issue has been chaotic, and the - government policy could make night clubs and _ government policy could make night clubs and venues _ government policy could make night clubs and venues to _ government policy could make night clubs and venues to make _ government policy could make night clubs and venues to make massive i clubs and venues to make massive logistical— clubs and venues to make massive logistical changes _ clubs and venues to make massive logistical changes that _ clubs and venues to make massive logistical changes that the -
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clubs and venues to make massive logistical changes that the last - logistical changes that the last minute — logistical changes that the last minute what— logistical changes that the last minute. what is— logistical changes that the last minute. what is your- logistical changes that the last minute. what is your messagej logistical changes that the last i minute. what is your message to them? _ minute. what is your message to them? and — minute. what is your message to them? and the _ minute. what is your message to them? and the scientists, - minute. what is your message to them? and the scientists, what i minute. what is your message to i them? and the scientists, what data do you _ them? and the scientists, what data do you have. — them? and the scientists, what data do you have. if— them? and the scientists, what data do you have. if any. _ them? and the scientists, what data do you have, if any, the _ do you have, if any, the effectiveness _ do you have, if any, the effectiveness of - do you have, if any, the effectiveness of the - do you have, if any, the - effectiveness of the booster do you have, if any, the _ effectiveness of the booster shot? professor — effectiveness of the booster shot? professor ferguson _ effectiveness of the booster shot? professor ferguson yesterday - effectiveness of the booster shot? professor ferguson yesterday saidj effectiveness of the booster shot? i professor ferguson yesterday said a study _ professor ferguson yesterday said a study in _ professor ferguson yesterday said a study in israel— professor ferguson yesterday said a study in israel suggested _ professor ferguson yesterday said a study in israel suggested people - study in israel suggested people were ten— study in israel suggested people were ten times _ study in israel suggested people were ten times less _ study in israel suggested people were ten times less likely - study in israel suggested people were ten times less likely to - study in israel suggested people i were ten times less likely to catch mild disease — were ten times less likely to catch mild disease after— were ten times less likely to catch mild disease after receiving - were ten times less likely to catch mild disease after receiving a - were ten times less likely to catch| mild disease after receiving a third dose _ mild disease after receiving a third dose do— mild disease after receiving a third dose. do either— mild disease after receiving a third dose. do either of— mild disease after receiving a third dose. do either of you _ mild disease after receiving a third dose. do either of you have - dose. do either of you have information— dose. do either of you have information you _ dose. do either of you have information you could - dose. do either of you have| information you could share dose. do either of you have i information you could share on dose. do either of you have - information you could share on that? thanks_ information you could share on that? thanks very— information you could share on that? thanks very much, _ information you could share on that? thanks very much, adam. _ information you could share on that? thanks very much, adam. our- thanks very much, adam. our nightclubs and the whole night—time economy, —— on nightclubs, we want to keep it open, the big difference between this year and last year is that thanks to vaccination, we are able to keep it open. it is a great thing. wejust have able to keep it open. it is a great thing. we just have to be sensible and look at the risks that we face, and look at the risks that we face, and i think that some sort of covid certification system are very kind that plenty of venues have been using already —— of a kind that plenty of venues have been using already, would be sensible. we are
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working with industries including the nightclub industry to make them understand what could be required of them, and i understand the frustration of people who are wondering whether or not they will have to put this in. at the moment, we are confident that you won't, that we will be able to proceed without it. but the choice is, and the reason for wanting to have this option, is because it's a choice between proceeding with covid certification or sadly, once again, asking places to close. i certainly don't want to do that. so that's why i think it is a good idea to keep this up our sleeve, keep this in reserve. h, w , this up our sleeve, keep this in reserve. h, , , , , reserve. on boosters, it is very clearthat _ reserve. on boosters, it is very clear that the _ reserve. on boosters, it is very clear that the booster - reserve. on boosters, it is very clear that the booster shots - reserve. on boosters, it is very - clear that the booster shots because a bi- clear that the booster shots because a big increase in antibody responses and that_ a big increase in antibody responses and that will be expected to have a very big _ and that will be expected to have a very big knock—on effect for protection in terms of infection and hospitalisations and deaths, so the data look_ hospitalisations and deaths, so the data look pretty clear on that. one final point. — data look pretty clear on that. one
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final point. just — data look pretty clear on that. one final point, just on _ data look pretty clear on that. que: final point, just on the first one, i think a lot of people believe young people aren't taking up the vaccine. not true. the great majority of people, 16—29, have already taken up their first vaccine and are taking up their second, so the idea that this is just a minority of younger people who haven't is completely untrue, and we should always start from that basis. thanks very much, everybody. thank you. so, there we are. the conclusion of the latest coronavirus press briefing from the prime minister and borisjohnson they're briefing from the prime minister and boris johnson they're saying briefing from the prime minister and borisjohnson they're saying that the government would plan to deal with the pandemic, with vaccinations and other measures in reserve, which is the only way to keep the country safe. let's ta ke let's take a look at some key points that were outlined there in downing street. a central plank of the strategy is the booster programme. everyone aged 50 and over will be offered a booster vaccine, starting
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from next week. plan b would re—introduce compulsory face coverings, and working from home, if the nhs comes under pressure. and the prime minister said it's not sensible to rule out covid certification when it might mean the difference between businesses staying open or not. nick eardleyjoins me now from westminster. we were asking before this, really, what would be the trigger for that plan b, we didn't really get a precise answer on that. there was no secific precise answer on that. there was no specific answer. _ precise answer on that. there was no specific answer, was _ precise answer on that. there was no specific answer, was there, _ precise answer on that. there was no specific answer, was there, ben, - specific answer, was there, ben, just like there isn't in the document outlining these plans today. but i thought we got a hint of what the government would focus on. boris johnson said his priority would be to make sure that the nhs was not overwhelmed, and in adding to that, chief scientific adviser patrick vallance said that he was
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concentrating on hospitalisations, not just the concentrating on hospitalisations, notjust the number of people in hospital, but the link between people getting the virus and the number of people who end up in hospital. because one thing that has given ministers a lots of encouragement over the last few months is the link between those things, with the number of people testing positive and the number ending up in hospital, that that link has been severely reduced. it has not been entirely broken but severely reduced. one thing sir patrick suggested he would keep an eye on was whether that remains the case, or whether a high percentage of people testing positive end up in hospital over the next few months. there is no doubt from what we just heard from the scientist and prime minister that the big concern here is that the winter period always leads to more pressure on the nhs and that would only be exacerbated by the fact that this is the first winter period where the delta
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variant has been circulating. so we got a rough idea of what they will be looking at. also really interesting that we have kind of had this back and forth over vaccine passports over the last week or so, when ministers were going to do it, they're not going to do it, then said they would not do it for now. there was a pretty passionate defence of the concept of keeping vaccine passports as an option from the prime minister there, saying that had they been part of that armoury last year, some of the venues that had to close wouldn't have had to close. so quite clearly, borisjohnson thinks that in keeping the economy open, that is something that he has to keep on the
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table and it's a trade—off that he is prepared to end active things get to a point where the choice is vaccine passports or may be thinking about imposing fresh restrictions like closing the venues again. thank you very much, nick eardley. with me is our health correspondent, nick triggle. we pretty much knew everything the prime minister was setting out there, but in a nutshell, plan a is about learning to live with covid isn't it, in terms of backs booster vaccinations, vaccinations for younger schoolchildren, and so on? yes, it means relying almost entirely on vaccines to protect us. society is fully open, and as nick said there, this is the first winter where we will have to face the delta variant in this position, a more infectious one. the concern is we are just entering autumn and cases are just entering autumn and cases are a lot higher than they were this time last year, over 30,000 cases a day being seen on average. it has
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been bobbling around for a few weeks, and what is not clear is what will happen next. there has been a lot of talk about cases going up. certainly, the signs in september so far are the opposite, but with this virus, there is no guarantee what will happen next. and if we think about hospital numbers, there are just over 8000 in hospital, 7% of beds occupied by covid patients. it doesn't sound a lot, the nhs does run very close to capacity, and that means already, the amount of other care, and emergency care, knee and hip operations, they are a fifth of the pre—pandemic level, what would be considered normal activity, and professor chris whitty, the chief medical adviser, talked about a gentle drift upwards. the numbers are doubling every six or seven weeks, so if they continue going up, that starts to get to the point where there is a pressure on the
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nhs, and people will start asking even more whether plan b will be needed. but as i say, so many unknowns, so much uncertainty, one of which is what will happen with other respiratory viruses, things like flu and a virus called rsp which particularly affects children. so it's a matter of seeing what these coming weeks bring. —— rsv. this matter of boosterjabs over the autumn and winter for over 505, is that likely to become a regular occurrence? is part of learning to live with covid that we may be have to have a boosterjab every covid that we may be have to have a booster jab every year covid that we may be have to have a boosterjab every year like a flu jab for some people? scientists have said covid is — jab for some people? scientists have said covid is here _ jab for some people? scientists have said covid is here to _ jab for some people? scientists have said covid is here to stay. _ jab for some people? scientists have said covid is here to stay. it - jab for some people? scientists have said covid is here to stay. it will - said covid is here to stay. it will be circulating for many, many years, but when the vaccine advisers were explaining their thinking behind the boosterjabs this morning, they said we shouldn't assume this will be a regular thing every six months, we will need a boosterjab or at least the most vulnerable groups will need
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one. they said in the future, it may be that you combine covid with a flu jab, a combined jab, and as we get more used to it and covid moves into the endemic phase, reading it is circulating at relatively low levels in society and can be managed, much like flue, then that would change the approach in terms of vaccination. so we should not assume this is going to be a constant situation where we are constantly tapping up the vaccination. because some peeple _ tapping up the vaccination. because some peeple will — tapping up the vaccination. because some people will say _ tapping up the vaccination. because some people will say why _ tapping up the vaccination. because some people will say why are - tapping up the vaccination. because some people will say why are we i some people will say why are we tapping it up when there are millions and millions of people around the world who have not been vaccinated at all, and we are talking about giving ourselves boosterjabs.— talking about giving ourselves booster 'abs. , ., boosterjabs. yes, we heard the same ara ument boosterjabs. yes, we heard the same argument put — boosterjabs. yes, we heard the same argument put forward _ boosterjabs. yes, we heard the same argument put forward when _ boosterjabs. yes, we heard the same argument put forward when we - boosterjabs. yes, we heard the same argument put forward when we heard | argument put forward when we heard about vaccinating kids, who are at very low risk. professor whitty did address that, pointing out the booster programme, and that also were children we are reliant on the pfizer vaccine that needs to be kept
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at ultralow temperatures to store, which is just not feasible in at ultralow temperatures to store, which isjust not feasible in many low income countries. but the thinking behind the boosterjab is that there are some signs protection that there are some signs protection that there are some signs protection that the vaccines offer is waning. it is not exactly clear how much, but the scientists want to take precautionary approach to top up the protection that those most vulnerable, who are most susceptible to the vaccine effect waning, to top their protection up, to try and ensure restrictions are not reimposed this winter. and finally, on 12—15 —year—olds, now being confirmed, as we know, that will get under way next week, we think, the vaccination programme. and this is going to be an interesting decision, isn't it, for children and parents? it interesting decision, isn't it, for children and parents?— interesting decision, isn't it, for children and parents? it will be. it should start _ children and parents? it will be. it should start in _ children and parents? it will be. it should start in schools _ children and parents? it will be. it should start in schools from - children and parents? it will be. it should start in schools from next. should start in schools from next week. it has been a long time coming, and an almost painful
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decision making process, it seemed, at times. that is really because it is very finely balanced to what benefit this will have. we had a couple of weeks ago from the vaccine experience in terms of the health benefits alone, that there is only a marginal gain, but again, that is because children are at slightly lower risk of covid, and there is a slightly higher risk of heart inflammation as a following vaccinations, and then yesterday we had the chief medical officer's report looking at what will vaccinating do to reduce disruption in schools, and that found it would do a little, but not necessarily a huge amount. they estimated it could save 110,000 missed days of schooling or in—person learning, they called it, now putting that into context, that is one day for 20 children. if so it is not a dramatic effect, but it has some benefit, and that combined with a small marginal
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gain in terms of health is enough to warrant vaccinations, but obviously, it will be up to parents and their children to decide. thank you very much indeed, nick. here with me now is devi sridhar, who is the chair of global public health at the university of edinburgh. thank you very much for being with us. what do you make of this government strategy of sort of a plan a, learning to live with covid, as we have heard, and then if things go wrong and hospitalisations increase very rapidly, there is this plan b is well? does all of that make sense for the autumn and winter 0k yes, i think if you look at the components of the plan, they make a lot of sense. a heavy focus on vaccines and other medical interventions, and testing to identify positive cases, an nhs capacity, building up hospitals that i ready for the inter—there were winter intake of patients. looking at external issues like vaccinating the world, how to
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protect against new variants. as well as the issue of advising people how to get through winter as safely as possible. face are seeing a reintroduction, avoiding indoor gatherings or if you're going to be inside, ventilation. —— facemasks. and also how to keep businesses open but as safely as possible. the idea of boosterjabs, as we were just talking about, do you see that as being a regular coherence, as part of learning to live with it? in other words, certain people are offered this pretty much every year, like the flu jab? or is this just a one—off, this third booster vaccine? it's really hard to say right now. the one thing you can say with covid is, while we could see what might happen this winter, as we did last winter, to look ahead one or two years is really difficult with this virus. so right now, the issue is how to get through a really stormy winter period without a national stay lockdown, how do we keep businesses open, how do we avoid the
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nhs being pressurised and a large wave where people die. we need to avoid hospitals being overwhelmed. so i don't dig anyone in the world can say whether we will need boosters in two or three years. every country is looking at their winter season and saying, how do we survive the next 6—12 months. [30 winter season and saying, how do we survive the next 6-12 months. do you auree survive the next 6-12 months. do you a . ree with survive the next 6-12 months. do you agree with those _ survive the next 6-12 months. do you agree with those experts _ survive the next 6-12 months. do you agree with those experts who - survive the next 6-12 months. do you agree with those experts who say - agree with those experts who say cases will start rocketing pretty soon, especially when schools go back and so on? we were warned when restrictions opened in england in july 19 that cases could go up to 100,000, maybe even 200,000 a day. that didn't happen, actually. they have hovered around 30,000 or so. so is that a sort of prediction that they would hold with, that they will increase deeply soon? i think we have seen steep increases whenever there is a new social phenomenon, university return all schools return are coming back from holidays or certain things opening up. but the interesting thing, looking at the scottish data is that we haven't seen that steady increase. we are seeing a plateauing
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increase. we are seeing a plateauing in today's cases, which i don't think anyone could have predicted given the modelling. you would say all the breaks are out of the system, people are mixing more, universities are back, going into winter. it's a really complex system right now, especially when we know there are significant antibodies in there are significant antibodies in the population stop i think they're doing the right steps, which is vaccinating 12 pluss, getting boosterjabs vaccinating 12 pluss, getting booster jabs and vaccinating 12 pluss, getting boosterjabs and to those most vulnerable, health care workers, social care workers, over 505, looking at when things get bumpy, how do we protect riskier settings like nightclubs, indoor events, large events, to make sure people there are vaccinated, that's really there are vaccinated, that's really the message to people that we heard from the chief medical officer. the best way to stay safe is to get vaccinated for your own health, so when you get covid, it will be less likely that you get it, and if you do, you will be able to manage it at home and hopefully will pass within a few days and you can go back to your normal life after years of age
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in period. so i think that's really what we have to hammer home, there is a solution to this in vaccines, for the individual, because people need to take their vaccine, and be willing to take both poses and protect themselves. good to talk to you as ever. thanks for being with us. —— both doses. the kremlin has announced that president putin is self—isolating after members of his staff tested posititive for covid—19. a spokesman insisted the president was "absolutely healthy" and his work was not affected. now it's time for a look at the weather. the same weather front is still with us and this is the radar pitch at the moment and as we follow it through, the rain is turning more patchy towards the south so late sunshine and brightness, easing over scotland a little, but still a few showers to the night. by the time we
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get to late evening, the rain starts to fizzle out but because it has been so moist and humid and the winds are light, we will get dense fog by the time we get to morning but it will continue on the really rather warm side for this time of year. another weather front tomorrow, far weaker, but it will bring rain over northern ireland and western scotland but for many parts it is another dry day and the west, and even further east, it will be drier and brighter and it will feel warmer although not wall—to—wall sunshine. as for the outlook, the fine weather continues into thursday and friday sees the approach of a weather front which will be around through the weekend, rain around. more weather on the website.
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hello, this is bbc news. the headlines.
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the prime minister has outlined the government's plan for tackling covid—19 in england and says there's also a plan b. he won't rule out compulsory face masks or other stricter measures if needed. a third, booster, covid jab is to be offered to everyone aged 50 and over across the uk — it can be given six months after the second jab. all four governments across the uk have now confirmed they will proceed with boosterjabs and jabs for 12 to 15—year—olds. in other news, lawyers for prince andrew tell a court in new york that sexual assault allegations filed against him are baseless and potentially unlawful. and there's a new star in town: emma raducanu joins the celebrities enjoying the glitz and glamour of the met gala in new york. lawyers for prince andrew have told a pre—trial hearing
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in the us that legal action accusing him of sexual assault should be dismissed, because of a previous settlement reached by the complainant, virginia giuffre. she's launched a civil lawsuit in relation to the alleged assault — which she says happened two decades ago, when she was 17. prince andrew has always denied the allegation. here's our royal correspondent daniela relph. the focus of the court hearing was whether the duke of york had been properly notified of the case against him. his lawyers argued that legal documents accusing him of sexual assault had not been delivered properly or legally. the paperwork was handed to a police officer in august, who was working here at royal lodge, prince andrew's home in the grounds of windsor castle. his lawyers, though, said this did not follow legal guidelines. the case has been brought by virginia giuffre, who says she was sexually assaulted by the duke at three separate locations when she was 17 years old.
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he has denied all the allegations. one of the duke's us lawyers, andrew brettler, who has experience of defending in sexual abuse claims, disputed every detail of the case. he told a new yorkjudge... he also said a previous settlement agreed between virginia giuffre and sex offenderjeffrey epstein in 2009 released the duke of all liability, a claim disputed by virginia giuffre�*s lawyers, who accuse the duke's team of stonewalling. these are detailed and technical legalarguments, but thejudge warned both sides he now wanted to move quickly to what he called the substance of the case. there will be a further court hearing in new york next month. daniela relph, bbc news.
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the prime minister's mother has died at the age of 79. it was announced that charlotte johnson wahl died "suddenly and peacefully" yesterday in hospital in london. borisjohnson once described his mother, who was an artist, as the "supreme authority" in the family. senior figures from across the political spectrum have sent their condolences. the number ofjob vacancies in the uk hit a record high over the summer. and the office for national statistics says the number of people on company payrolls has returned to pre—pandemic levels in most parts of the country — although 1.5 million people remain on furlough. our economics correspondent andy verity reports. at this lincolnshire haulier, like many companies around the country, the problem is no longer a lack of work but a lack of people to do it. pay for drivers in the sector has jumped over the pandemic by 20 to 30%, according to the company's boss. even then, it has been extremely difficult recruiting the skilled staff he needs.
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i think we have faced a perfect storm of several different factors. brexit, ageing driver profile in the uk, lack of new entrants, and up until quite recently, relatively poor pay compared to other sectors. and that has really driven almost a crisis now as far as lorry driver availability is concerned. the effects of the shortage of lorry drivers have been growing ever more visible, but recruiters fear that shortages of labour — skilled and unskilled — are now widespread across the economy. if companies can't hire enough staff to get all their work done, it is likely to slow down the economic recovery. over the summer, there were more than 20,000 job vacancies advertised in transport and storage. in hotels and restaurants, there were nearly 60,000 advertised, and overall the number of vacancies
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hit a new record of 1,034,000. it has been a real challenge with covid and tiers in lockdowns to make sure that we can see our customers face—to—face, to make them understand about the sectors that are available for them. there are vacancies out there and it's about helping people understand where they can transition, they can use the lifetime skills guarantee we have got, in fact we have seen 80,000 people going into apprenticeships, and we are working directly on the haulage challenge. while the number of employees is back up to pre—pandemic levels, about 1.5 million remain on furlough, including skilled people such as pilots whose jobs haven't yet come back, who fear they won't be able to return to the job they trained for. there are thousands of unemployed pilots desperate to be back into work, and compared to our redundant colleagues, we are very lucky and the furlough scheme has done us well but it won't help beyond september and we don't know what it is at the moment. while there are now as many people
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employed as before the pandemic, the key test for the jobs market will be what happens when the furlough scheme ends in just over two weeks' time. in london, the south—east of england and scotland, many of the previous jobs still haven't come back, but the hope remains that any rise in unemployment will be limited. andy verity, bbc news. britain is to delay the introduction of post—brexit checks on agricultural food imports. some measures which were expected to come into force next month will instead be introduced next year. ministers have blamed the pandemic and pressure on global supply chains. three people have died after a car crashed into a block of flats in west london and burst into flames. emergency crews were called to the crash in notting hill shortly before 5am. the fire was extinguished but the three people in the car were pronounced dead at the scene. more than a third of families in the uk who have at least one child aged underfive is living in poverty, according to new research.
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the nuffield foundation says larger families in particular are struggling. the government says it is helping to get people into jobs. every adult in northern ireland will be entitled to apply for a £100 voucher later this month, to spend in retail and hospitality outlets on the high street — as part of a new scheme to try to boost economic recovery. northern ireland is the only part of the uk doing this — so how is it being paid for? chris page has been finding out. times were tough on the high street even before the pandemic, but in northern ireland there is a new idea to help the butcher, the baker and the cappuccino maker. people will be able to spend their £100 vouchers on almost anything, except online shopping. business owners are delighted. i think it's going to be fantastic. it's a great opportunity for the public to get back out.
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we've been very lucky with the local neighbourhood supporting us and i think this is something which gives back to them as well, so i think it is going to be really great to see people back out spending again in store. northern ireland is the only one of the uk's four nations to run a scheme like this. money is going from the public purse into the wallets of shoppers and then into the tills of retailers. the total cost is about £140 million. the devolved government says the scheme is designed to get the cash flowing in towns and cities instead of on the internet. well, i'm quite pleased to be a trailblazer for northern ireland in comparison to other regions of the uk. i think there has been actually interest from other areas about what it is that we are doing here. our research has shown that people will notjust spend £100, but they might spend a little bit more as well of their own money, so that creates a multiplier effect. and shoppers are extremely enthusiastic. i think it is brilliant. i mean, anything we can do to support our economy and anything
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that means i can shop with a little bit less guilt is brilliant. it's great, you know?. for struggling people it will help, you know? it will be pretty exciting to get out and shop local again and support that, yeah. everyone over 18 can apply for a voucher from september 27th for four weeks. the extra buying power does have a shelf life — the money must be spent by the end of november. chris page, bbc news, belfast. a global survey has highlighted the anxiety many young people are feeling about climate change. nearly 60% of the 10,000 young people questioned across 10 countries said they felt very worried or extremely worried. more than half said they thought humanity was doomed. our environment analyst, roger harrabin reports on the findings. as fires scorch the earth, the reality of climate change is finally hitting home.
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three inches of rain in an hour in new york, siberia with massive forest fires, temperature records annihilated. no wonder the young are worried. when you think about your children and your grandchildren and their grandchildren growing up, you don't want them to be left in a world where there's no animals that they can look at or there is no beautiful things in the world that they can see. it is quite worrying, and it makes me think about our future and it's definitely not a place i want my kids to live in. that's the most scary bit, really. what's going to happen in future generations down the line? - not so much, selfish as it sounds, not so much my life but how- it is going to impact down the line. over half of people in the survey were very or extremely worried. three quarters found the future frightening. almost half were hesitant about having their own children. actually, their anxiety is notjust about environmental problems, it is also about the fact that adults, primarily governments and big business, are failing to act. so that's what we asked them about.
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and children started telling us that they were feeling betrayed and abandoned and they felt that governments were lying about the effectiveness of the action they were taking to address the climate emergency. meanwhile, polluting projects worldwide, like the uk's high speed 2 rail line, are rolling on. young voters think the climate�*s more important than the economy. politicians clearly disagree. roger harrabin, bbc news. the headlines on bbc news... the government has released its autumn and winter plan for tackling covid in england. it includes encouraging the unvaccinated to get the jab — but does not rule out a return to compulsory face masks and other stricter measures if needed. a third, booster, covid jab is to be offered to everyone aged 50 and over across the uk — it can be given six months after the second jab. all four governments across the uk have now confirmed
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they will proceed with boosterjabs and jabs for 12 to 15—year—olds. in australia, a growing number of children are testing positive for covid—19, although it's still rare for them to become seriously ill. with more than half of the population in lockdown, schools are closed for many students. they've spent months learning from home with parents, and caregivers. from sydney, phil mercer takes a look at how some students and families are adjusting to learning during a pandemic. learning at home in lockdown can be a slog and for many australian teenagers about to finish high school, the stakes are high, as exams approach. h0 school, the stakes are high, as exams approach.— school, the stakes are high, as exams approach. school, the stakes are high, as examsauroach. ., ., , ., exams approach. no one has been that motivated any — exams approach. no one has been that motivated any more _ exams approach. no one has been that motivated any more and _ exams approach. no one has been that motivated any more and everybody's i motivated any more and everybody's mental health has been degraded significantly so everyone is a bit lost and we are not sure what are doing. we are not confident in being able to get the marks we wanted to
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get. able to get the marks we wanted to ret_ ., ., able to get the marks we wanted to get._ schoolchildren i able to get the marks we wanted to get._ schoolchildren in | get. schooltime! schoolchildren in arts of get. schooltime! schoolchildren in parts of australia _ get. schooltime! schoolchildren in parts of australia have _ get. schooltime! schoolchildren in parts of australia have now - get. schooltime! schoolchildren in parts of australia have now had - get. schooltime! schoolchildren in| parts of australia have now had two years of their education effected by covid—19. and for some there will be longer term consequences. i’m covid-19. and for some there will be longer term consequences. i'm doing a sto . longer term consequences. i'm doing a story- others _ longer term consequences. i'm doing a story. others will _ longer term consequences. i'm doing a story. others will take _ longer term consequences. i'm doing a story. others will take it _ longer term consequences. i'm doing a story. others will take it in - a story. others will take it in their stride. _ a story. others will take it in their stride. it _ a story. others will take it in their stride. it will _ a story. others will take it in their stride. it will be - a story. others will take it in their stride. it will be a - a story. others will take it in their stride. it will be a sea i a story. others will take it in - their stride. it will be a sea horse with wings- _ their stride. it will be a sea horse with wings- it _ their stride. it will be a sea horse with wings. it enables _ their stride. it will be a sea horse with wings. it enables our - with wings. it enables our schoolchildren _ with wings. it enables our schoolchildren to - with wings. it enables our schoolchildren to develop | with wings. it enables our - schoolchildren to develop skills which _ schoolchildren to develop skills which are — schoolchildren to develop skills which are profoundly— schoolchildren to develop skills which are profoundly importantj schoolchildren to develop skills i which are profoundly important to deal with— which are profoundly important to deal with the _ which are profoundly important to deal with the challenges - which are profoundly important to deal with the challenges that - which are profoundly important to deal with the challenges that willi deal with the challenges that will come _ deal with the challenges that will come in — deal with the challenges that will come in the _ deal with the challenges that will come in the rest _ deal with the challenges that will come in the rest of— deal with the challenges that will come in the rest of their- deal with the challenges that will come in the rest of their lives - deal with the challenges that will| come in the rest of their lives and we also _ come in the rest of their lives and we also need _ come in the rest of their lives and we also need to _ come in the rest of their lives and we also need to think _ come in the rest of their lives and we also need to think about - come in the rest of their lives and we also need to think about their| we also need to think about their stress _ we also need to think about their stress looks _ we also need to think about their stress looks different _ we also need to think about their stress looks different to - we also need to think about their stress looks different to our- we also need to think about their. stress looks different to our stress and they— stress looks different to our stress and they might _ stress looks different to our stress and they might be _ stress looks different to our stress and they might be rude _ stress looks different to our stress and they might be rude or- stress looks different to our stress and they might be rude or angry. stress looks different to our stress i and they might be rude or angry and they might _ and they might be rude or angry and they might be — and they might be rude or angry and they might be defiant. _ and they might be rude or angry and they might be defiant.— they might be defiant. children in new south wales _ they might be defiant. children in new south wales which _ they might be defiant. children inj new south wales which continues they might be defiant. children in i new south wales which continues to battle the delta variant could start heading back to school later in october and while experts say it is not an innocent disease in the gun, it affects adults much more.
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vaccinations have been approved for those over the age of 12 as australia charts a future beyond the pandemic. school closures have a broader economic consequences as parents and carers juggle childcare with working from home. there parents and carersjuggle childcare with working from home.— parents and carersjuggle childcare with working from home. there is a lot of peeple _ with working from home. there is a lot of people that _ with working from home. there is a lot of people that are _ with working from home. there is a lot of people that are being - lot of people that are being disrupted in their work, it is not for economic reasons, they have not had their hours cut, but it is because of the other reasons, one of which would be working from home, so we know it is having an impact and it will start to come through in the activity data when we get that later in the year. activity data when we get that later in the ear. ~' _, , in the year. like their counterparts in the year. like their counterparts in other countries, _ in the year. like their counterparts in other countries, australian - in other countries, australian children are learning some hard lessons about resilience and isolation. lessons about resilience and isolation-— lessons about resilience and isolation. ~ ., , , ., , isolation. we have spent the last term crying _ isolation. we have spent the last term crying a _ isolation. we have spent the last term crying a bit _ isolation. we have spent the last term crying a bit too _ isolation. we have spent the last term crying a bit too much! - isolation. we have spent the last term crying a bit too much! we l isolation. we have spent the last i term crying a bit too much! we did not know the end of the third term it was goodbye. not know the end of the third term it was goodbye-— not know the end of the third term it was goodbye. these are times the andemic it was goodbye. these are times the pandemic generation _ it was goodbye. these are times the pandemic generation will _ it was goodbye. these are times the pandemic generation will never - pandemic generation will never forget. phil mercer, bbc news,
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australia. this is the latest coronavirus data in the uk. 26,628 cases, new cases, which is down compared to 30,000 a day earlier. deaths substantially up on yesterday, 185 new covid—19 deaths. those are the latest figures. vaccinations, another 19,500 getting their first dose and another 60,000 their second days. 48,000,001st dose. 44 million have had both doses. let's go back to our main story and the prime minister has outlined the government's plan for tackling covid—19 in england over the autumn and winter.
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we can speak now to the liberal democrats health spokesperson, munira wilson. there is a plan a in the strategy for the winter which is booster vaccinations and vaccinating children but also a plan b if necessary which is stricter measures, is that broad strategy, do you agree with that and support that kind of strategy? it is you agree with that and support that kind of strategy?— kind of strategy? it is right that we have got — kind of strategy? it is right that we have got to _ kind of strategy? it is right that we have got to be _ kind of strategy? it is right that we have got to be cautious - kind of strategy? it is right that we have got to be cautious in l kind of strategy? it is right that - we have got to be cautious in terms of making sure that there are contingency plans in place but the plan we have heard about today leaves many questions unanswered. throughout the pandemic one thing we have pressed for as the liberal democrats is real transparency and honesty from government so people know what to expect. a bit more clarity on what the numbers would need to look like on any of their given measures, to then tip us into the measures in plan b would be a
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help. there is a serious lack of clarity yet again, another flip—flop, another u—turn, on covid passports. one day they are off the agenda and the next day they are on the agenda and now maybe they are in the agenda and now maybe they are in the back pocket. parents and children as well around the country just want to make sure that there planned to keep open safely because one thing we cannot countenance is schools being closed again and i have asked twice in the last 2a hours, but i have not been given any assurances by ministers on this point. assurances by ministers on this oint. ,., ., ,., ., ., point. the point about having hard and fast data _ point. the point about having hard and fast data as _ point. the point about having hard and fast data as to _ point. the point about having hard and fast data as to when _ point. the point about having hard and fast data as to when we - point. the point about having hard and fast data as to when we tip . point. the point about having hard l and fast data as to when we tip from plan a into plan b, that was asked ljy plan a into plan b, that was asked byjournalists, but very hard for the government to give specific data now at this point in terms of hospitalisations and case numbers and deaths, at which point we would move from plan a to plan b, you can't really expect that now? a,
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can't really expect that now? range is not unfeasible in terms of giving an indicator to the public so people know what they need to be looking out for, frankly. but also, we need confidence that government is taking on board any early warnings from the chief medical officer and the chief scientific adviser and we know last year throughout the pandemic, things happened too late, and let's be clear, we do not want to see any restrictions being imposed upon us and it is incumbent upon everyone to make sure that we are keeping each other safe and taking precautions necessary so that we don't end up in any further restrictions, but unfortunately, given the nature of the virus, some of those things have got to be kept potentially in reserve, especially if we end up with some sort of terrible variant that enters our country and that is one of the reasons why the liberal
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democrats have been pushing hard for us to make sure we are sharing more of our vaccine supply were some of the poorest countries to vaccinate the poorest countries to vaccinate the most vulnerable around the world. it is the right thing to do but also in our interests to keep us safe especially as we open up international travel a bit more. for internationaltravel a bit more. for now, international travel a bit more. for now, thanks forjoining us. there were sequins, feathers and a gold suit of armour on show at the met gala in new york last night — as part of one of the biggest and starriest annual events in fashion, which raises money for the metropolitan museum of art. billie eilish, kim kardashian and the new us open champion emma raducanu were among the guests — as our entertainment correspondent lizo mizimba reports. an exuberant opening of one of the most talked about events of the year. emma raducanu has already triumphed once this weekend... now, the 18—year—old us open
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champion has done it again. the british teenager clearly thrilled to still be here in new york, because this is seen by many as the most a—list event of the year. with outfits ranging from the restrained to the outrageous. in music, reinventing yourself over the years is a useful skill. rapper lil nas x did it in a few seconds. his original regal outfit revealing this — c—3p0 meets the tin man perhaps — and underneath that, a glittering crystal—covered catsuit. ensuring it keeps its relevance to younger audiences, the event was co—hosted by 19—year—old billie eilish, who channelled marilyn monroe, and three stars in their 20s — timothee chalamet, tennis player naomi osaka, who made a powerful statement about herjapanese and american heritage, and the poet amanda gorman.
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the theme was "in america: a lexicon of fashion". some chose to express their hope for change. the back of democratic congresswoman alexandria ocasio—cortez's dress revealed the message, "tax the rich." while another democratic congresswoman, carolyn maloney�*s dress bore the message "equal rights for women". despite this being a very american occasion, brits are always well represented, from its organiser anna wintour through to the younger generation, like model brooklyn beckham. but perhaps the night's most enigmatic outfit belonged to who else... kim kardashian. lizo mzimba, bbc news. we have followed the story of captain tobias who is raising money for charity. inspired by captain tom moore, tobias hasjust finished his latest challenge, his own version of
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a triathlon. supports on the streets of sheffield for captain tobias. he is known as this locally because after a year fundraising the ten—year—old has finally completed an ironman challenge to the delight and applause of his admirers and he has raised more than £150,000 for charity. i has raised more than £150,000 for chari . ~ , , has raised more than £150,000 for chari . ~' , , , , has raised more than £150,000 for chari. ~' ,, i, charity. i like pushing myself as hard as i charity. i like pushing myself as hard as i can — charity. i like pushing myself as hard as i can and _ charity. i like pushing myself as hard as i can and enjoying - charity. i like pushing myself as. hard as i can and enjoying myself charity. i like pushing myself as - hard as i can and enjoying myself at the same time. so completing challenges lets me do this. i also love raising money for charity. tobias has cerebral palsy and autism, he has walked a marathon, swum four kilometres and also peddled a trike 180 kilometres. his inspiration was captain tom moore whose fundraising efforts he has continued and honoured. i’m whose fundraising efforts he has continued and honoured. i'm bursting with ride continued and honoured. i'm bursting with pride for— continued and honoured. i'm bursting with pride for everything _ continued and honoured. i'm bursting with pride for everything he _ continued and honoured. i'm bursting with pride for everything he has - with pride for everything he has
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done. he has completed yet another challenge, it is incredible. it has exceeded our highest expectations and dreams. exceeded our highest expectations and dreams-— and dreams. what will be next for the unstoppable _ and dreams. what will be next for the unstoppable tobias? - and dreams. what will be next for the unstoppable tobias? i'm - the unstoppable tobias? i'm definitely — the unstoppable tobias? i�*m definitely going to have a well earned rest but i will then talk with my mum about a sponsored walk. maybe i could make this an event for lots of children. i would be chuffed to bits if lots of childrenjoined in a fundraising event with me. cheering now it's time for a look at the weather. this time last week 30 degrees was recorded in parts of england and wales but today we have had over 60 millimetres of rain in newmarket in
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east anglia, so we have had over a month of rain in the past 6—12 hours. it is still raining for some parts of eastern england so it's stilljust parts of eastern england so it's still just a parts of eastern england so it's stilljust a concern if you are on the road because there will be lots of spraying and standing water and the risk of flooding as well and we have a flood warning in one area, and you can see the extent of the rain on the chart. further west dry weather and sunny skies and a scattering of showers further north over scotland and northern ireland and a weather front taking shape here as we go to the night but as we go through this evening this will gradually clear out of the way, the area of rain, and you can see why it has been so persistent through the afternoon, and many areas have had about 30—1r0 millimetres of rain which has kept temperatures down. 20-21, which has kept temperatures down. 20—21, further west. fine evening sunshine in western areas but for the east it will be a long time before the cloud clears away and the rain certainly does so but the night time period, will see the cloud
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lowering, and where it breaks, in scotland, mist and fog, so all in all we will hold the temperature is around 9—13, still quite warm. tomorrow, low pressure is moving out of the way, a weak weather front in the north bringing cloudy skies but by and large the middle part of the week with the ridge of high pressure, it should be mainly dry with sunny spells and feeling warmer, the michael k williams switching around to the south, but for tomorrow, switching around to the south, but fortomorrow, —— switching around to the south, but for tomorrow, —— the winds switching round to the south, but for tomorrow, may be a lot of cloud into eastern areas, but on the whole, dry and northern ireland, a bit cloudier, temperatures down, but eastern scotland looks drier. a bit cooler to start on thursday morning under the starry skies but dense fog around on wednesday morning, lifting, 20, 21 in the south, feeling quite warm, so it looks like
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the warmest day of the week, and probably the driest for many parts of the uk with good sunshine. friday, things are turning more unsettled, the atlantic front and the low pressure coming in, slow to push its way east, so it looks like it will be a feature for scotland and northern ireland, wales and western england, but eastern england holds onto the drier and brighter weather but there is a question as to how quickly eased this weather system is going to drift as we head through friday. —— quickly east. more unsettled by the weekend.
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this is bbc news. i'm jane hill. the headlines at 5pm: the prime minister has outlined the governments plan for tackling covid—19 in england and says there's also a plan b. he won't rule out compulsory face coverings or other measures such as vaccine passports if needed. it's just not sensible to rule out completely this kind of option now when we must face the fact that it might still make the difference. a third booster covid jab is to be offered to millions of people aged 50 and over across the uk — it can be given six months after the second jab. there is evidence of waning, particularly at the top end of the age range and in those who have got pre—existing health conditions.

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