Skip to main content

tv   BBC News  BBC News  September 10, 2021 7:00pm-7:31pm BST

7:00 pm
this is bbc news. i martine croxall. the headlines at seven... the head of mi5 warns that the taliban's takeover of afghanistan may well embolden extremists. it comes on the eve of the 20th anniversary of 9/11.— it comes on the eve of the 20th anniversary of 9/11. whether it's 9/11, anniversary of 9/11. whether it's 9m, whether— anniversary of 9/11. whether it's 9/11, whether it's _ anniversary of 9/11. whether it's 9/11, whether it's january - anniversary of 9/11. whether it's 9/11, whether it'sjanuary13, - 9/11, whether it's january 13, whether it's july the 7th, 9/11, whether it's january 13, whether it'sjuly the 7th, i miss my dad and that will never change. scotland sees its highest level of covid infections since estimates began the first minister says the nhs in scotland is under more since estimates began, the first minister says the nhs in scotland is under more pressure than ever before. 18—year—old emma raducanu reaches the final of the us open, the first british woman to do so for more than four decades.
7:01 pm
i've been taking care of each day, and three — i've been taking care of each day, and three weeks later, i'm in the final_ and three weeks later, i'm in the final and — and three weeks later, i'm in the final and i— and three weeks later, i'm in the final and i can't actually believe it. and coming up, foreign correspondents based in london will be discussing social care and afghanistan. that's in half an hour in dateline. good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. we start with a warning from the head of m15, who says there is no doubt that recent events in afghanistan, and the rise of the taliban, are likely to have emboldened so called "lone wolf" terrorists. ken mccallum told bbc news that 31 late stage attack plots have been foiled in the uk in the last four years. the taliban has promised that afghanistan would never again be a base for terrorists after taking over the country last month.
7:02 pm
the m15 warning comes on the eve of the 20th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks. we'll have more that in a moment, but first, here's our security correspondent gordon corera on ken mccallum's comments. for 20 years, surveillance and security have become ever more entwined in our lives — a sign of a threat that has not gone away, as the head of m15 told the bbc today. we do face a consistent global struggle to defeat extremism and to guard against terrorism. this is a real problem and in the last four years, for example, working with the police, my organisation has disrupted 31 late stage attack plots in great britain. a new counterterrorism operations centre was launched this summer by m15 and the police but the threats have also been changing. since 9/11, we have had a continued evolving huge challenge with islamist extremist terrorism.
7:03 pm
we have the rise of extreme right—wing terrorism and we have definitely a resurgence of sharp and complex state threats. the only major national security threat which has been comparatively better across those 20 years is northern ireland. the uk's terror threat level has fluctuated, spiking up around 2006 when al-qaeda plots were coming out of pakistan. and then again around a decade later, linked to isis in iran and syria. but the hope was that it might now decline. m15 has been trying to focus on wider issues like espionage and foreign interference, but the landscape has just changed once the landscape has just changed once again, drawing it back to worrying more about jihadist terrorism. the concern is that the taliban takeover in afghanistan may both inspire extremists here and perhaps create a safe haven there for groups to plan more sophisticated attacks. there is no doubt that recent events in afghanistan will have heartened and emboldened some
7:04 pm
of those extremists. so, even if the taliban is absolutely in good faith about wanting to prevent terrorism being exported from afghanistan, that will be a difficult task to accomplish. m15 may have expanded and we all may live with more surveillance m15 may have expanded and we all may live with more surveillance and security, but asked if we were safer now than 20 years ago, the head of m15 said there was no simple answer. gordon corera, bbc news. thank you very much forjoining us. what change in terms of the operation in the wake of 9/11? well, very aggressively- — operation in the wake of 9/11? well, very aggressively. in _ operation in the wake of 9/11? well, very aggressively. in the _ operation in the wake of 9/11? well, very aggressively. in the wake - operation in the wake of 9/11? -ii very aggressively. in the wake of 9/11, it was a horrific way flip fall for all the intelligence agencies who had been dealing with terrorism on a much more microcosm level —— since that time, and
7:05 pm
particularly on 9/11, it was a wake—up call to the set driver gets. where a number of different targets were attacked simultaneously. mb? were attacked simultaneously. why haven't the intelligence agencies seen something like 9/11 coming? not necessarily the actual act, but something on the scale. in the united states, _ something on the scale. in the united states, although - something on the scale. in the united states, although they l something on the scale. in the - united states, although they have intelligence capabilities. the measures and steps that were taken by al-qaeda to finance this operation were very, very complex. the way that they left it as such a sufficient amount of time. this was planned over a significant period of time. now, those kind of operations
7:06 pm
have been able to be diffused and intercepted because if there is a large planning cycle, that makes it easier for large planning cycle, that makes it easierfor the large planning cycle, that makes it easier for the intelligence agencies to pick up at some stage. the head of mis to pick up at some stage. the head of m15 was staying they were able to stop attacks on the later state, but when they're spontaneous, they are incredibly difficult to stop. h0??? incredibly difficult to stop. how much better— incredibly difficult to stop. how much better equipped are the intelligence agencies now? bearing intelligence agencies now? bearing in mind the nature of terrorism can change, can transform itself very quickly. sometimes you deal with large next works and the people who are asking alone. figs large next works and the people who are asking alone.— are asking alone. as we've seen with the islamic — are asking alone. as we've seen with the islamic state, _ are asking alone. as we've seen with the islamic state, al-qaeda - are asking alone. as we've seen with the islamic state, al-qaeda have - the islamic state, al-qaeda have looked at your lone wolves to carry out these attacks. we have to look at the advancement in technology, and when one imagines that iphones only came out and i believe 2007, we
7:07 pm
now look at the smartphone devices that we have in our pockets right now. technology has advanced on many platforms, which can be advantaged not only by the terrorists, but especially groups like gc hq and the nsa in intercepting and identifying particular groups of chatter or propaganda that could be pushed out. will geddes, it's good to talk to you. no doubt more conversations in the coming weeks.— tomorrow marks the 20th anniversary of 9/11, the deadliest foreign attack ever on us soil. almost 3,000 people died as suicide attackers highjacked four passenger planes crashing two of them into the twin towers in new york. 0ur north america editor jon sopel has been hearing the stories of three people impacted by the horror of that day, and a warning, his report does include footage of the attack on the twin towers. the one thing that time hasn't
7:08 pm
dulled is just how profoundly shocking the sights and sounds were that tuesday morning two decades ago. screaming this terrorist attack changed the world. nearly 3000 people died and thousands more had their lives upended. this is the story of three of those people who found themselves at the eye of the storm. my dad was an amazing human being. max was a ten—year—old schoolboy when he was called to the principal�*s office. his father, joseph, worked at the world trade center. i went down the hallway, and my mum was standing there with tears in her eyes. she told me what had happened, and we had a moment in the hallway. i think i was just very confused at first. you're an innocent ten—year—old thinking, "the world is great." and then, you find out someone killed your father.
7:09 pm
hundreds of miles south in florida, andy was also at an elementary school. the chief of staff to president bush knew he had to interrupt him. that's when i walked up to the president and i leaned down and i whispered to him, "a second plane hit the second tower. america is under attack. " ann was in her car when she heard the news, and she knew as people were trying to escape the twin towers, herfirefighter husband, bruce, would be heading in. my kids went to bed. emily and megan were 17 and 14 at the time. - i stayed dressed, i laid down - with them but i didn't go to sleep because i figured someone was coming to the house and i would _ be in my pyjamas. it's weird, the things you worry about. - and at about midnight, somebody came to the house to say that bruce _ was unaccounted for. this memorial, with great restraint, does justice to the terrible
7:10 pm
events of that day. but nothing can capture the sense of chaos, anger, disbelief of what was unfolding. then, there was steely resolve, and americans were united and most of the rest of the world stood with america. the taliban in power in afghanistan, who'd harboured the al-qaeda terrorists, would be driven from power and the us would try to replace the warlords with democracy. but 20 years on, america has abandoned afghanistan. i think we're still the greatest democracy in the history of the world, but we are not shining the way we used to shine, and, yes, we are tarnished. i do think it has been a defeat for the pride of america and the respect that we have had around the world. 20 years ago, america was never more united. two decades on and the terrorist threat largely quelled,
7:11 pm
and america has never been more divided. the way we came together was... it was awe—inspiring. and in 20 years, the pendulum has . swung, in my opinion, the other way. every day, i miss my dad. every single day. whether it's 9/11, whether it's january 13th, whether it's july 7th. i miss my dad and that will never change. and so to 2021, and the most powerful country in the world seems to be suffering a crisis of confidence. in the manner of its departure from afghanistan, the kabul debacle, a crisis of competence. just off the tip of manhattan, lady liberty symbolises america opening its arms to the world. but 20 years on, the us feels much more introspective place. jon sopel, bbc news, new york.
7:12 pm
are corresponded in washington, gary 0'donoghue. very deeply day for many in the united states, what's being planned? in the united states, what's being lanned? , ., , , ., planned? there will be a series of ceremonies _ planned? there will be a series of ceremonies and _ planned? there will be a series of ceremonies and commemorations planned? there will be a series of- ceremonies and commemorations across the three separate sites where the attacks took place in new york. in pennsylvania, where flight 93 was brought down by those heroic acts of those passengers on board who took the plane and took the hijackers down with them. across the weather from where i am at the pentagon, where hundred and 84 people lost their lives flew straight into the west side of the building. there will be lots of memories and solemnity, there will be a
7:13 pm
revisiting of that anger, of that fear, of that real incredulity that was experienced on 9/11. how could this happen in america, to america? i think also a lot of contemplation of what came in the 20 years after that — the war on terror, and those questions are very real right now. given what we've seen in terms of the american withdrawal from afghanistan, the way it was done and who took over. afghanistan, the way it was done and who took over-— afghanistan, the way it was done and who took over. gary, for the moment, thank ou who took over. gary, for the moment, thank you very — who took over. gary, for the moment, thank you very much _ who took over. gary, for the moment, thank you very much indeed. - who took over. gary, for the moment, thank you very much indeed. gary - thank you very much indeed. gary 0'donoghue in washington. scotland's first minister says the nhs is under more pressure before with one in 45 people having a virus last week. in england, the culture secretary has said vaccine passports
7:14 pm
were almost certainly required this autumn, along with boosterjabs for the elderly and vulnerable. here's our health editor, hugh pym. a pop—up testing site in glasgow. a scottish infections increase, the first minister has told the bbc that covid has contributed to increasing strain on hospitals. i have never known a period where the nhs has been under pressure that is as intense as it is now. right now? yes, and that is ahead of winter. the vaccine passports will be required in scotland at nightclubs and some large events from 0ctober1st. nicola sturgeon didn't rule out extending that and there was a similar message from ministers in england. we will almost certainly be doing it for nightclubs. we will make a determination as to whether we need to move more more broadly than that. the office of national statistics infection survey suggests
7:15 pm
one in 45 people in scotland had the virus last week, the highest since the survey began. in wales, there were increases to one in 65. in england, at one in 70 and northern ireland at one in 60 people, there was no change broadly. four out of five of those eligible have had both eligible have had both vaccines, but that leaves work to be done for health chiefs trying to persuade more people to come forward forjabs. after a surge, as the programme was rolled out, vaccination rates in england have been tailing off in most age groups. amongst the oldest nearly 100% have had a first dose, it is 60% for younger groups. it's still rising among 16 and 17—year—olds. a decision by the vaccine expert committee is due soon on booster jabs. there are varying views on how necessary they will be. to get good protection
7:16 pm
after a single dose and then improved by a second dose, and we would expect it to be maintained or improvedbe athird dose. maintained or improved be at hird dose. we wait to see. but getting the first dose is port. some argue priority groups could get a third jab. there's a strong case for some people to be offered booster vaccines and a case for people over 80, people who would not necessarily have responded to the initial vaccine. the nhs is ready to roll out boosterjabs and to start vaccinating 12 to 15—year—olds, if experts give the green light. hugh pym, bbc news. joining us... and professor of immunology at imperial college london. welcome to you both. thank you forjoining us. let me start
7:17 pm
with you, professor altman. you forjoining us. let me start with you, professoraltman. how inclined are you to think boosters are going to be a good idea or necessary? i are going to be a good idea or necessary?— are going to be a good idea or necessa ? ., �* ~' , are going to be a good idea or necessa ? ., �* ~ , ., necessary? i don't think there is an answer on the _ necessary? i don't think there is an answer on the whole. _ necessary? i don't think there is an answer on the whole. i _ necessary? i don't think there is an answer on the whole. i think - answer on the whole. i think most immunologists would want to see data driven monitoring boosters for the people who need it.— driven monitoring boosters for the people who need it. professor moss, it's all still intensely _ people who need it. professor moss, it's all still intensely news. _ people who need it. professor moss, it's all still intensely news. what - it's all still intensely news. what new data would you want that would be helpful in making this decision? i think that's a critical point. we have _ i think that's a critical point. we have two— i think that's a critical point. we have two new vaccine platforms. we also have _ have two new vaccine platforms. we also have a — have two new vaccine platforms. we also have a new virus target, so we've _ also have a new virus target, so we've only — also have a new virus target, so we've only had nine months of information with these vaccines. 0f information with these vaccines. of course _ information with these vaccines. of course it's— information with these vaccines. of course it's the immune system that provides— course it's the immune system that provides the system. we collect study _ provides the system. we collect study in —
7:18 pm
provides the system. we collect study in a — provides the system. we collect study in a lab about a immune protection. at least as important as the clinical— protection. at least as important as the clinical data. protecting against _ the clinical data. protecting against him —— serious infection and death _ against him -- serious infection and death. ., , ., ., ., death. how wide is the variation? these are two _ death. how wide is the variation? these are two extraordinary - death. how wide is the variation? i these are two extraordinary vaccines on the _ these are two extraordinary vaccines on the whole, and we've studied patients— on the whole, and we've studied patients over 80. they do still have excellent _ patients over 80. they do still have excellent vaccine responses. however. _ excellent vaccine responses. however, there are vulnerable groups. — however, there are vulnerable groups, as professor altman said, particularly — groups, as professor altman said, particularly those with immune suppression. that's about half a million — suppression. that's about half a million people in the uk. they're probably— million people in the uk. they're probably first on the list. it might not be a blanket _ probably first on the list. it might not be a blanket coverage - probably first on the list. it might not be a blanket coverage with i not be a blanket coverage with boosters. what would you say in terms of who might be an appropriate
7:19 pm
recipient and when? i terms of who might be an appropriate recipient and when?— recipient and when? i think we need to do our homework _ recipient and when? i think we need to do our homework and _ recipient and when? i think we need to do our homework and look - to do our homework and look carefully. to some extent, we're guided by israeli data that says there are lots of delta breakthroughs in the older people who have their two doses. it clearly is useful for some people sometimes, so let's try and do it intelligently and get a maximum bang from our box tjy and get a maximum bang from our box by giving it to people who really need it —— bang for our buck. what need it -- bang for our buck. what would you — need it -- bang for our buck. what would you say _ need it -- bang for our buck. what would you say to — need it -- bang for our buck. what would you say to people _ need it —— bang for our buck. what would you say to people arguing that the rest of the world need to catch up first before we start operating boosters, particularly to people who are not necessarily the most vulnerable? i are not necessarily the most vulnerable?— are not necessarily the most vulnerable? ,, . �* , ., �* vulnerable? i think that's what i'm caettin at vulnerable? i think that's what i'm getting at when — vulnerable? i think that's what i'm getting at when i— vulnerable? i think that's what i'm getting at when i say _ vulnerable? i think that's what i'm getting at when i say let's - getting at when i say let's maximise. let's not pop up people who are already popped up and let's save those doses and spread them around because we get enormous benefits if all of our neighbours in the world are vaccinated and there are fewer lungs breathing fewer new
7:20 pm
variants of concern.— are fewer lungs breathing fewer new variants of concern. professor moss, some people — variants of concern. professor moss, some people are _ variants of concern. professor moss, some people are often, _ variants of concern. professor moss, some people are often, the - variants of concern. professor moss, some people are often, the flu - variants of concern. professor moss, some people are often, the flu jab . some people are often, the flu jab for example. but if you have some of the more tropical disease of infections, you may have it only once every five or ten years. how clear is that at the moment how often we might need to have a covid booster? it’s often we might need to have a covid booster? �* , . ., , ., ., booster? it's a great question, and every virus — booster? it's a great question, and every virus is _ booster? it's a great question, and every virus is different. _ booster? it's a great question, and every virus is different. we - booster? it's a great question, and every virus is different. we have i booster? it's a great question, and every virus is different. we have to have _ every virus is different. we have to have a _ every virus is different. we have to have a vaccine strategy that's appropriate for it. you're absolutely right, we have one vaccine — absolutely right, we have one vaccine for yellow fever. if you go to africa, — vaccine for yellow fever. if you go to africa, many countries will demand _ to africa, many countries will demand a _ to africa, many countries will demand a certificate to show you have _ demand a certificate to show you have that — demand a certificate to show you have that vaccine. flu is annual. we don't _ have that vaccine. flu is annual. we don't know— have that vaccine. flu is annual. we don't know where covid vaccines will stick _ don't know where covid vaccines will stick. remembertwo don't know where covid vaccines will stick. remember two things — we've used the _ stick. remember two things — we've used the astrazeneca vaccine a lot
7:21 pm
more _ used the astrazeneca vaccine a lot more than — used the astrazeneca vaccine a lot more than israel, and secondly, we extended _ more than israel, and secondly, we extended the vaccine interval from three _ extended the vaccine interval from three weeks to 12 weeks. that may prove _ three weeks to 12 weeks. that may prove to— three weeks to 12 weeks. that may prove to be — three weeks to 12 weeks. that may prove to be very useful and strong perfection — prove to be very useful and strong perfection. there are three things we need _ perfection. there are three things we need to— perfection. there are three things we need to study. how perfection. there are three things we need to study.— we need to study. how important would it be _ we need to study. how important would it be to _ we need to study. how important would it be to have _ we need to study. how important would it be to have enough - we need to study. how importantl would it be to have enough people receiving the booster? we've been told that we've got to get used to having covid in the community, but we're also being encouraged to have these first two vaccines. i we're also being encouraged to have these first two vaccines.— these first two vaccines. i think the thing about boosters - these first two vaccines. i think the thing about boosters is no. the thing about boosters is no different than the first two doses. delta is a very punishing enemy. some people will have that on board in their first two doses, some because they're older, need the third dose.
7:22 pm
because they're older, need the third dose-— third dose. the jcvi will make a recommendation, _ third dose. the jcvi will make a recommendation, but _ third dose. the jcvi will make a recommendation, but as - third dose. the jcvi will make a recommendation, but as we - third dose. the jcvi will make a i recommendation, but as we know, politicians are so have to have their say as well. how much more important is it with a booster in terms of efficacy, cost? i important is it with a booster in terms of efficacy, cost?- terms of efficacy, cost? i think professor _ terms of efficacy, cost? i think professor altman _ terms of efficacy, cost? i think professor altman is _ terms of efficacy, cost? i think professor altman is right - terms of efficacy, cost? i think professor altman is right that l terms of efficacy, cost? i think i professor altman is right that we need _ professor altman is right that we need to— professor altman is right that we need to act on the information we have _ need to act on the information we have that's— need to act on the information we have. that's why i think it's been sensible — have. that's why i think it's been sensible to — have. that's why i think it's been sensible to wait until we've got the uk specific information. i think we will see _ uk specific information. i think we will see a — uk specific information. i think we will see a tiered approach. we will see vaccines from immunosuppressed patients _ see vaccines from immunosuppressed patients i_ see vaccines from immunosuppressed patients. i suspect we will see boosters — patients. i suspect we will see boosters from resident care residents, and perhaps those over 80s _ residents, and perhaps those over 80s i_ residents, and perhaps those over 80s ithink— residents, and perhaps those over 80s. i think we need to see the evidence, — 80s. i think we need to see the evidence, and that will take a little — evidence, and that will take a little longer.— evidence, and that will take a
7:23 pm
little longer. evidence, and that will take a little loner. ., , little longer. you both been so good at answering — little longer. you both been so good at answering my _ little longer. you both been so good at answering my questions. - little longer. you both been so good l at answering my questions. professor paul moss and professor danny altman, thank you both. at 7.30, it'll be dateline london. that's lizzie greenwood—hughes, not sure why we put her in the screen. keep smiling! first the sport. that's me now! where is lizzie at? emma raducanu flies the flag for britain tomorrow in the us open women's singles final, but we have a british winner today at flushing meadows. joe salisbury and rajeev ram of the united states have beatenjamie murray and the brazilian bruno soares in the men's doubles final. murray and soares took the first set 6—3 before ram and salisbury fought back to level the match by 6—2. the momentum stayed with them and the pair won the deciding set to become champions. it's their second doubles title together after winning last yea r�*s australian open. the great and good in tennis have
7:24 pm
been lining up to heap praise on emma raducanu. the 18—year—old is yet to drop a set at the us open and the 18—time grand slam champion martina navratilova says it's even more impressive that she has reached the final as a qualifier, which has never been done before. the speed with which she did it... nobody could have respected it —— predicted it. she didn't get the wall wild card, she didn't waltz here, saying,... and i think it paid off because she didn't play that well at the beginning of the tournament in the qualifying, but it grew and each match, got better and better... we knew she was going to get better. but again she has just taken it to another level here and it's very impressive. former england captain michael vaughan has criticised the decision to call off today's fifth and final test between england and india just two hours before the match was due to start at old trafford. a number of india's backroom staff tested positive for covid—19 and they were so concerned about it
7:25 pm
spreading to the playing squad that it was decided they wouldn't be able to field a team. i'll be honest, i think all this is about— i'll be honest, i think all this is about money. i completely get players — about money. i completely get players and what they've gone through — players and what they've gone through in the last year. it's been difficult — through in the last year. it's been difficult. the mental health side is very important. we have to look after _ very important. we have to look after that — very important. we have to look afterthat. i very important. we have to look after that. i believe this week was about— after that. i believe this week was about money, making sure those players _ about money, making sure those players get to the ipl, because they want to— players get to the ipl, because they want to earn those big checks, but i don't get _ want to earn those big checks, but i don't get it— want to earn those big checks, but i don't get it when it's at the expense _ don't get it when it's at the expense of the test match. formula one is experimenting again this weekend with its new sprint race format to decide the grid for sunday's italian grand prix. the traditional style of qualfying took place this evening and in the week he was told he'd be leaving mercedes at the end of the season. valtteri bottas had the last laugh topping the timesheets. he'll start saturday's sprint race ahead of lewis hamilton and championship leader max verstappen. that's all the sport for now.
7:26 pm
coming up now, it is the weather with helen willetts. good evening. with low pressure, it has been a showery picture. sunny spells between the showers as we saw in suffolk, but we've also seen a lot of lively showers and through the second half of the afternoon across the eastern half of england. the weekend will bring fewer showers for many of us, but it'll feel fresher, and the region — the low pressure is moving out into the north sea. bringing wet and windy weather to scandinavia. we still got the remnants, but the change i talked about is the wind direction. it's a fresher feel. you can see the heat gradually through the day on saturday. still a few thunderstorms. possibly one or two in northern ireland. but they fade away through the night. the wet areas really
7:27 pm
dominated by the low pressure across north scotland, notjust tonight, but tomorrow as well. the most —— for most of us, it's misty and great and quite warm. we haven't lost that humidity yet. quite a warm start, but also quite misty, particularly over the hills but there could be fog. it does take a little longer to clear and once it does so, some brighter spells coming through. still a scattering for northern ireland, but not as many as today. fearing quite well for drier weather, but it is really looking quite wet across northern scotland. temperatures dropping away, a fresher feel and generally quite brisk breeze. that weather front weekend, but there is a fly in the ointment. how far north and east it will spread its influence of the time we get to sunday. cloudier for the east of scotland on that
7:28 pm
weakening weather front, the east of scotland on that weakening weatherfront, but the east of scotland on that weakening weather front, but drier further north and brighter. fewer showers for northern ireland and further east, some drier weather. it could be that weather front gets stuck across western areas, so by monday, most of the rain... quite a bit of uncertainty surrounding that next area of low pressure at this stage. we'll keep up to date.
7:29 pm
7:30 pm
hello and welcome to dateline london. i am martine croxall. this week our discussion is all about money. here in the uk the government has announced the biggest set of tax rises since the second world war. the imf, the world bank and about banks everywhere are trying to decide whether they will release afghanistan's frozen assets and thereby avoid humanitarian
7:31 pm
disaster. 0ur guest this week... the

19 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on