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tv   BBC News  BBC News  September 6, 2021 8:00pm-8:31pm BST

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this is bbc news. i'm shaun ley. the headlines at eight. pressure grows on the prime minister ahead of an expected announcement on long—term social care plans in england tomorrow. there's a growing tory backlash amid reports of plans to raise national insurance to fund the changes. this man's mother had to go into residential care — he was forced to sell the family home to pay for it. that's when you start to realise that the money they've got saved and the money that my mum would get was going to go nowhere near paying for the costs they needed. this evening the health secretary sajid javid has confirmed the nhs will be given an extra £51; billion in the next six months to go towards the coronavirus response and the
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backlog of patients still waiting to be treated. also tonight raising the taliban flag as the last remaining part of afghanistan falls after days of heavy fighting. it comes as borisjohnson defends the uk's strategy in afghanistan, and promises that resettled afghans will receive indefinite leave to remain. as millions of children get back at school in england, wales and northern ireland, we'll have a special programme at 8.30 looking at the impact of coronavirus on education. making eye contact for the first time, the conjoined twins separated after rare surgery. spotted by a police helicopter — a three—year—old boy found alive in a gully after three days alone in the australian bush. and india cruise to a comfortable
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win against england in the fourth test at the oval. hello and welcome if you have just joined us. it's good to have your company this evening. the government is preparing to unveil its long—awaited plan for social care and the nhs in england, with the announcement expected tomorrow. but the prime minister is under growing pressure over how it's to be paid for. critics say any rise in national insurance would break manifesto promises and disproportionately affect those on lower wages. tonight the health secretary sajid javid has confirmed that the nhs will be getting an extra £51; billion to help it deal with the backlog of patients
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caused by covid and the winter pressures over the next few months. our first report is from our political editor laura kuenssberg. the strain, the sadness, all too familiar. steve had to sell his parents' worcestershire house after his father passed away and his mother's dementia developed so much she needed full—time care, and she still doesn't know that their family home is gone. why did my dad bother to get a decent pension and pension scheme for that time because when you look at the long run, my mum with dementia, if she was of sane mind and her body had let her down i don't know how i could have sat there and told her this, and said, we have sold the house and it is going to have to pay for your care. the promise to ease that kind of heartache is familiar too. made repeatedly long before his first moment in number 10. we will fix the crisis in social
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care once and for all, with a clear plan we have prepared. cheering. you might remember this commitment, too. we will do all these things without raising income tax, vat or national insurance contributions. that's our guarantee. but forget this part of that manifesto. tomorrow borisjohnson is expected to emerge to say, in fact, you can't have it all. on course to announce a rise in national insurance tax for workers and employers, to raise billions to be styled as a levy for health, and social care. alongside more than £5 billion for the nhs in england by next april. everyone will want to know that we are committed to plans on adult social care, a new settlement, but also today announcement of this extra funding of £51; billion in the next six months for the nhs will really help tackle that backlog and that is a huge priority for us. downing street is preparing to break
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one promise to keep another. after months of haggling, the government is expecting to announce a limit on the amount of any one family in england pays towards the cost of care, and to pump billions into the health service to catch up after the pandemic. the exact price tags not yet clear. the resistance to how it is to be paid for, well, that certainly is. one cabinet minister told me hiking national insurance is the wrong thing to do and the wrong way to do it. others preferred to talk seemingly about the cricket. england have lost the third wicket, i think _ but plenty of mps are publicly worried. in my view national insurance rising is the wrong approach, somebody on £30,000 a year pays a bigger proportion of their income than someone earning is a quarter of £1 million. would you be willing to vote against it? i have not shied away from making my view clear, i want to give the government freedom and flexibility to change, but i see a significant number of colleagues opposed to a national insurance rise per se.
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number 10 will have to face down the opposition as well as some of their own, but waiting for change has been like watching paint dry. downing street knows there will be a fight, but it is up for a battle to complete the job. beyond this year there are big questions about how much money will be needed in the longer term to fund health and social care. nhs leaders have said that an extra £10 billion will be needed next year alone, to cover day—to—day services. here's our health editor hugh pym. the funding of health and social care, it is one of the biggest and trickiest issues facing ministers and all of the uk's administrations. the needs of an ageing population must be addressed and on top of that, the costs of covid, with some vital decisions for england expected tomorrow. a five—year spending plan for nhs england with annual increases was in an ounce in 2018.
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was announced in 2018. that is what the blue line shows. the orange line shows what has happened in reality, largely because of covid and the big question, how much more will be needed in future years? the scale of the backlog of waiting, that we are seeing already, and we're expecting to grow for many years to come, as people haven't had care over the last 18 months, is going to have a profound effect on the nhs, but also, if we can't run services as efficiently as we used to, because of infection control, that adds to costs. the treasury will have worked out what it thinks is affordable for the nhs. it's understood there's been a fierce debate with health ministers and officials over what is required to tackle the huge challenges ahead. the nhs relies on a smooth—running social care system, but the funding of care in england is another immensely complex issue, notjust how much individuals should pay, but what is required in terms of higher government funding. so, where might the extra money for the nhs and social care come from?
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well, national insurance has been talked about. that is paid by those in work and their employers, but not by those above retirement age. then there's income tax, which covers income above certain limits, including what pensioners get from their investments. other taxes include capital gains tax and vat, but those seem less likely options. then there's higher borrowing, but that would have to be added to already high levels of government debt. choosing income tax is something no government has done other than right at the very top since the early 1970s. it's 50 years since we had an increase in the main rates of income tax, governments hate to do that. national insurance contributions have risen quite a lot over the last 30—1;0 years, but they seem keen to do that because the population seems happier with it. ministers have to decide who pays and how much. higher health spending in england automatically means increases for scotland, wales and northern ireland, and their ministers, in turn,
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need to make awkward decisions on how the money is allocated. hugh pym, bbc news. in afghanistan the taliban say they have taken control of the last area — panjshir — which has been holding out against their rule. the taliban have released a video of their flag being raised in the centre of the provincial capital. the leader of the resistance fighters has called for a national uprising against the taliban. our diplomatic correspondent james landale reports. this is the moment the taliban claimed victory in panjshir. the last bastion of opposition to its rule in afghanistan. if in a video released by the group, fighters raised their flag at the provincial headquarters north east of kabul. in the capital, a spokesman said the taliban had achieved all the goals of its war. translation: we have captured panjshir with the will of god. - the local leaders and religious
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elders have been co—ordinating with us, and our operations went ahead with their help. but forces resisting the taliban in this mountainous stronghold denied the claims, their spokesman saying the group's fighters were only in a few valleys, and still facing concerted opposition. three weeks after seizing kabul, the new rulers have yet to form a government. at the airport some normality is resuming, with a few flights taking off, but none as yet heading overseas. the prime minister. at westminster, mps accused the government of failing to do enough to help afghans wishing to come to britain. we are going to do everything we can to help those who wish to have a safe passage out of afghanistan, and that is why we will continue with our international friends and partners to apply whatever pressure we can, economic, diplomatic on the taliban, to ensure they comply with that, mr speaker, as they have said they will. the man who first sent british forces into afghanistan said despite the withdrawal,
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the west should still be ready to put boots on the ground to defend itself. in my view, islamism, both the ideology and the violence, is a first order security threat. it operates in many different arenas and dimentions. and like it, its defeat will come ultimately through confronting both the violence and the ideology by a combination of hard and soft power. as it is, the taliban are still facing some internal challenges to the ideology, with women here in the northern city of mazar—e—sharif demanding a presence in the future government. james landale, bbc news. and we will be returning to the situation — and we will be returning to the situation in afghanistan a little later_ situation in afghanistan a little later in— situation in afghanistan a little later in this half an hour.- later in this half an hour. let's take a look— later in this half an hour. let's
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take a look at _ later in this half an hour. let's take a look at the _ later in this half an hour. let's take a look at the latest - later in this half an hour. let's take a look at the latest uk i take a look at the latest uk coronavirus figures, there were an average of 7606 people in hospital being treated for the virus, 1;5 deaths reported through the 2041 was to monday, that's people who died within 28 days of testing positive for covid, and that takes the average number of deaths per day 219th last week. on vaccinations, nearly 88.8% of people over the age of 16 have had theirfirstjab, and the number who have received both vaccination jabs has now reached almost 80%. some coronavirus restrictions are to be eased in northern ireland from friday afternoon. stormont says that 15 people from four households will be able to meet in private homes. table service will no longer be required in bars and restaurants, dancing will be allowed at weddings and people going to live events will
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no longer have to have seats allocated. a court in the netherlands has begun hearing testimony from families whose relatives died on flight mh17. it was shot down over ukraine in 2011; and all 298 people on board were killed. no—one has ever been brought tojustice. last year, a criminal trial began. four men — three russians and a ukrainian — are being tried for murder — though none are present and only one is being legally represented. let's return to the story we were discussing, the fact that the panjshir area of afghanistan has fallen to the taliban. professor amalendu misra has written a number of books about conflict and violence in afghanistan, and you have had plenty on which to write about over
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the last few decades. let me ask you first about this claim the taliban make that it has taken control of the panjshir valley. presumably it is hard to independently verify it. what evidence is there that this is more than just propaganda talk? we more thanjust propaganda talk? - have to believe the visuals, and they have occupied the governor's house. but having said that, panjshir valley has a very plex strategic location. it is surrounded by high mountain peaks that are not accessible, and we understand that many soldiers have escaped to these unconquerable peaks and they will strike from there. so the taliban might have occupied the central town area, the city area, the capital, but it is unlikely that they will have a hand in maintaining it in the
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days to come. for have a hand in maintaining it in the days to come-— days to come. for now, it is fair to sa that days to come. for now, it is fair to say that the _ days to come. for now, it is fair to say that the taliban _ days to come. for now, it is fair to say that the taliban at _ days to come. for now, it is fair to say that the taliban at least - days to come. for now, it is fair to say that the taliban at least is - days to come. for now, it is fair to say that the taliban at least is the | say that the taliban at least is the dominant player in afghanistan, not least presumably because foreign actors who so want to meddle in the country over the last half—century are for now at least absent. the situation on _ are for now at least absent. the situation on the _ are for now at least absent. tie situation on the ground is are for now at least absent. tij: situation on the ground is such that nobody wants to intervene. there have been some attempts by iran today, the iranian prime minister said that they are closely watching how the taliban will treat minorities. so everyone is sitting on the fence and watching. but in the months and years to come, perhaps there will be some support to the government. the
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in the future, we might see many minorities fighting against centralised rule of the taliban. find centralised rule of the taliban. and we have the _ centralised rule of the taliban. and we have the national resistance front as it cause itself. they say they continue to fight. from what you are saying, the potential is that afghanistan remains a country divided and with the potential at least four civil war never entirely banished. . , . . , , least four civil war never entirely banished. . , . , , ., banished. there has always been a divided country. _ banished. there has always been a divided country. you _ banished. there has always been a divided country. you have - banished. there has always been a divided country. you have got - banished. there has always been a divided country. you have got the. divided country. you have got the majority who are dominated by the taliban at the moment, that you have got the uzbeks and the tajiks, and none of them are friends with each other, so although we might see initially that the taliban is in charge, it is not going to last very
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long, and also there is factionalism that exists within the taliban's ranks, and that is the reason why we haven't got a government there as yet. so i won't be surprised if a couple of weeks down the line everything unravels and the knives come out. . , ., come out. the critical question i su - ose come out. the critical question i sunpose in _ come out. the critical question i sunpose in at — come out. the critical question i suppose in at least _ come out. the critical question i suppose in at least delaying - come out. the critical question i | suppose in at least delaying that come out. the critical question i i suppose in at least delaying that if not preventing it is for the taliban to be able to do something effective for the economy. i have seen reports that fuel for vehicles is now at 11;0% more than it was before the withdrawal. basics are becoming harder to afford if you can even find them. presumably that is almost more important than whether or not there are armed resistance groups in there are armed resistance groups in the panjshir valley.— the pan'shir valley. indeed. the taliban the panjshir valley. indeed. the taliban have _ the panjshir valley. indeed. the taliban have proved _ the panjshir valley. indeed. the taliban have proved themselves the panjshir valley. indeed. the i taliban have proved themselves to the panjshir valley. indeed. the - taliban have proved themselves to be a fighting force, but can they prove
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themselves as a government authority? unlikely. let's not forget that almost 70% of the country public budget was from external aid, and most of its hard currencies have been frozen in the united states, the central bank of afghanistan doesn't have access to it. so unless the taliban does a magic trick and starts to address these challenges, it is not going to have control and there will be pockets of resistance all over the country because at the end of the day people want to know who is in power so unless and until taliban troops excel as a governing power, it is too early to say that, but i don't see them doing something very positive to come out of this. professor amalendu misra at the university of lancaster, thank you very much for being with us, fascinating to talk to you.
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let's take a look at the headlines now on bbc news. it is just approaching 90 minutes past eight. pressure grows on the prime minister ahead of an expected announcement on long term social care plans in england tomorrow. there's a growing tory backlash amid reports of plans to raise national insurance to fund the changes. the nhs in england will receive an extra £51; billion over the next six months to support the treatment of coronavirus and tackling the backlog of patients waiting for treatment stop raising the taliban flag as the last remaining part of afghanistan falls after days of heavy fighting. sport and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre. good evening. we are going to start with we are going to start with cricket. england's cricketers have gone 2—1 down in their five match test series against india —
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after being outclassed on the final day of the fourth test at the oval. england resumed on 77 without loss but suffered an all—too—familiar batting collapse that left them struggling on 147 for six. they were bowled out for 210 — india winning by 157 runs to go 2—1 up in the series. emma raducanu hasjust begun her bid to reach a grand slam quarter—final for the first time in her career. she's taking on the home favourite shelby rogers at the us open having not lost even a set so far at the tournament. the 18 year old has looked on fire in the last week and so far. and she was broken in her opening game. shelby rogers knocked out ash barty in the last round, but i can see that raducanu has held her second service game, so she is 2—1 down in that opening set, and you can follow it on the website. it's been a paralympics to rememberfor britain. they came second in the medals table in tokyo with a remarkable
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1;1 golds coming home, and a number of the team are arriving back this evening. our senior sports news reporter laura scott is at heathrow for us in anticipation of that. ican i can see the flag is waving behind you. what is the mood like? joyous, i would say- — you. what is the mood like? joyous, i would say- a _ you. what is the mood like? joyous, i would say. a lot _ you. what is the mood like? joyous, i would say. a lot of— you. what is the mood like? joyous, i would say. a lot of cheering - you. what is the mood like? joyous, i would say. a lot of cheering as - i would say. a lot of cheering as the athletes, through the arrivals hall, about 120 athletes from paralympics gb were on the plane from tokyo, the last remaining athletes who competed in the last few days. 1;1 gold medals, and i'm delighted to say i'm joined by two of our gold medallists, laura sugar and charlotte henshaw. how is it to be reunited with your families? it is lovely, and both of us weren't sure _ is lovely, and both of us weren't sure whether they would be here, and we were _ sure whether they would be here, and we were trying to find out all day at the _ we were trying to find out all day at the airport in tokyo. it is lovely— at the airport in tokyo. it is lovely to see them.- at the airport in tokyo. it is lovely to see them. at the airport in tokyo. it is lovel to see them. �* ., lovely to see them. and how did you find the experience _ lovely to see them. and how did you find the experience out _ lovely to see them. and how did you find the experience out there? - lovely to see them. and how did you find the experience out there? you i find the experience out there? you couldn't have your family and friends with you. could you describe is what it was like?—
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is what it was like? obviously it was really _ is what it was like? obviously it was really hard _ is what it was like? obviously it was really hard to _ is what it was like? obviously it was really hard to be _ is what it was like? obviously it was really hard to be without i was really hard to be without friends — was really hard to be without friends and _ was really hard to be without friends and family, _ was really hard to be without friends and family, but - was really hard to be without friends and family, but the l friends and family, but the volunteers— friends and family, but the volunteers and _ friends and family, but the volunteers and the - friends and family, but the volunteers and the staff i friends and family, but the . volunteers and the staff made friends and family, but the - volunteers and the staff made us feel so— volunteers and the staff made us feel so welcome that _ volunteers and the staff made us feel so welcome that even - volunteers and the staff made us feel so welcome that even after. volunteers and the staff made us i feel so welcome that even after our medai— feel so welcome that even after our medal ceremony. _ feel so welcome that even after our medal ceremony, or— feel so welcome that even after our medal ceremony, or a _ feel so welcome that even after our medal ceremony, or a couple - feel so welcome that even after our medal ceremony, or a couple of- medal ceremony, or a couple of hundred — medal ceremony, or a couple of hundred volunteers— medal ceremony, or a couple of hundred volunteers or- medal ceremony, or a couple of hundred volunteers or making l medal ceremony, or a couple ofl hundred volunteers or making us medal ceremony, or a couple of- hundred volunteers or making us feel so happy, _ hundred volunteers or making us feel so happy, or— hundred volunteers or making us feel so happy, or coming _ hundred volunteers or making us feel so happy, or coming up— hundred volunteers or making us feel so happy, or coming up to _ hundred volunteers or making us feel so happy, or coming up to us. - hundred volunteers or making us feel so happy, or coming up to us. find i so happy, or coming up to us. and these gold — so happy, or coming up to us. these gold medals, you are so happy, or coming up to us.- these gold medals, you are reunited with your families, showing these gold medals, you are reunited with yourfamilies, showing off these gold medals, you are reunited with your families, showing off your medals. how does it feel to be returning as paralympic champions? we shared a flat in the village, and we both— we shared a flat in the village, and we both said when we walked back in after that_ we both said when we walked back in after that day, whatjust happened? it after that day, whatjust happened? it still— after that day, whatjust happened? it still doesn't feel real, and then the next — it still doesn't feel real, and then the next morning we said to each other, _ the next morning we said to each other, does— the next morning we said to each other, does it feel real to you yet? we asked — other, does it feel real to you yet? we asked emma who won two in rio when _ we asked emma who won two in rio when it— we asked emma who won two in rio when it starts to feel normal and she said — when it starts to feel normal and she said it— when it starts to feel normal and she said it doesn't. so maybe it will sink— she said it doesn't. so maybe it will sink in— she said it doesn't. so maybe it will sink in soon but it is a great
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feeling — will sink in soon but it is a great feelina. �* ,. will sink in soon but it is a great feelina. �* i. . ., will sink in soon but it is a great feelina. j . ., feeling. and you have got your paralympics — feeling. and you have got your paralympics homecoming - feeling. and you have got your| paralympics homecoming party feeling. and you have got your. paralympics homecoming party on sunday, but for you personally, have you got big celebrations planned? unfortunately we can't go, we've got the world _ unfortunately we can't go, we've got the world championships _ unfortunately we can't go, we've got the world championships and - unfortunately we can't go, we've got the world championships and we - unfortunately we can't go, we've got . the world championships and we leave a week— the world championships and we leave a week today— the world championships and we leave a week today for — the world championships and we leave a week today for the _ the world championships and we leave a week today for the world _ a week today for the world championships _ a week today for the world championships in - a week today for the world - championships in copenhagen, so to keep everyone — championships in copenhagen, so to keep everyone safe _ championships in copenhagen, so to keep everyone safe we _ championships in copenhagen, so to keep everyone safe we need - championships in copenhagen, so to keep everyone safe we need to - championships in copenhagen, so to keep everyone safe we need to not i keep everyone safe we need to not no. keep everyone safe we need to not go but— keep everyone safe we need to not go but we — keep everyone safe we need to not go but we have _ keep everyone safe we need to not go. but we have got _ keep everyone safe we need to not go. but we have got a _ keep everyone safe we need to not go. but we have got a chance - keep everyone safe we need to not go. but we have got a chance to i keep everyone safe we need to not. go. but we have got a chance to bond with the _ go. but we have got a chance to bond with the wider— go. but we have got a chance to bond with the wider team _ go. but we have got a chance to bond with the wider team mates, - go. but we have got a chance to bond with the wider team mates, there - go. but we have got a chance to bond with the wider team mates, there are ei-ht with the wider team mates, there are eight of— with the wider team mates, there are eight of us _ with the wider team mates, there are eight of us here— with the wider team mates, there are eight of us here at the _ with the wider team mates, there are eight of us here at the games, - with the wider team mates, there are eight of us here at the games, and i with the wider team mates, there are eight of us here at the games, and a i eight of us here at the games, and a team— eight of us here at the games, and a team of— eight of us here at the games, and a team of 18_ eight of us here at the games, and a team of 18 at— eight of us here at the games, and a team of 18 at home. _ eight of us here at the games, and a team of 18 at home. we _ eight of us here at the games, and a team of 18 at home. we will- eight of us here at the games, and a team of 18 at home. we will delay. eight of us here at the games, and a team of 18 at home. we will delay it| team of 18 at home. we will delay it for a team of18 at home. we will delay it for a week_ team of 18 at home. we will delay it for a week and — team of 18 at home. we will delay it for a week and just _ team of 18 at home. we will delay it for a week and just stay _ team of 18 at home. we will delay it for a week and just stay with - for a week and just stay with close family— for a week and just stay with close family and — for a week and just stay with close famiiyand in— for a week and just stay with close family and in our— for a week and just stay with close family and in our bubbles, - for a week and just stay with close family and in our bubbles, and - for a week and just stay with close i family and in our bubbles, and then we can— family and in our bubbles, and then we can celebrate _ family and in our bubbles, and then we can celebrate when _ family and in our bubbles, and then we can celebrate when that - family and in our bubbles, and then we can celebrate when that is - family and in our bubbles, and then we can celebrate when that is over. j we can celebrate when that is over. it we can celebrate when that is over. it shows _ we can celebrate when that is over. it shows your — we can celebrate when that is over. it shows your dedication that - we can celebrate when that is over. it shows your dedication that you i it shows your dedication that you are not going to that. congratulations on your success out in tokyo. congratulations on your success out in to 0. . ~ congratulations on your success out in to 0. . ,, i. congratulations on your success out in tokyo-_ you _ congratulations on your success out in tokyo._ you can i congratulations on your success out in tokyo._ you can see i in tokyo. thank you. you can see athletes coming _ in tokyo. thank you. you can see athletes coming through - in tokyo. thank you. you can see athletes coming through all- in tokyo. thank you. you can see athletes coming through all the l in tokyo. thank you. you can see i athletes coming through all the time here and being greeted by their family and friends after that summer they will surely never forget.
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great to hear from them, they will surely never forget. great to hearfrom them, laura scott at heathrow, thank you. fantastic scenes at heathrow. that is all your support for now, back to you, shaun. and a lively end to it, too. in israel a twelve hour operation has seen the separation of conjoined twins, fused at the head. the surgical procedure on the one year old sisters took months of preparation and involved dozens of experts. sisters face—to—face for the first time after surviving a miraculous marathon operation. conjoined at the back of their heads from birth a year ago, separation surgery was meticulously planned between major blood vessels in their heads. a very delicate task — one bleed could be catastrophic. translation: of course, after all the preparationsl and all of the models we have built
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in a designated surgery room, we specifically prepared for this thing with a surgical theatre and vr of the twins and with a 3d model we prepared in advance. where the two were attached, there was no skin and skull, so doctors needed the babies to essentially grow more skin. inflatable silicon bags were inserted into their heads and gently expanded to stretch their skin slowly. this meant that when doctors reconstructed their skulls after the separation, they had excess skin, which they could use to seal their new heads. we are just finishing the twins' separation procedure. it has gone extremely well and i'm delighted how well the whole team's done. it's an excellent team here and it's been a real pleasure to be a part of it. medics say this type of surgery, a first for israel, has only ever happened 20 times worldwide. separating them so young, they say there is now a high chance they will live normal lives —
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already breathing and eating on their own. there is rehabilitation for their physical and cognitive development planned, which will, no doubt, be spurred on by these remarkable sisters' own determination to succeed. mum and dad are going to have quite a story to tell them when they are old enough to understand. and here is a story the parents may have to tell their little one. a three—year—old boy who was missing for days in australian bushland has been found alive. he was spotted scooping water from a creek in a deep gully in new south wales. he'd wandered away from his parents last friday. here's our correspondent in sydney — shaimaa khalil. a glimpse of hope. i have got the boy. four days after this toddler disappeared in the unforgiving bushland of new south wales. the moment anthony elfalak, known as aj, was found by rescue teams.
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spotted from a helicopter, taking water from a creek in the heat, 500 metres from his family's rural home in the hunter valley, in an area that had been searched several times. aj! his mum, kelly, overwhelmed by relief. four days after he went missing, finally, reunited with her child. hundreds worked tirelessly, scouring this rugged, remote terrain. rescue teams with air support, search dogs and divers, as well as aj's family and friends. many feared the worst, wondering how a lone three—year—old could survive in this dangerous bushland. then came news of his rescue. thank god! thank you for everyone. he was taken straight for a medical checkup. his father said that little aj had some nappy rash and ant bites but was in reasonably good shape. what has sustained you
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through all of this? just seeing my son. a huge relief. the family's nightmare turned into what they describe as their miracle. shaimaa khalil, bbc news, sydney. one of the biggest stars of cinema in france — jean—paul belmondo — has died. he was 88. jean—paul belmondo shot to internationalfame injean—luc godard's revolutionary classic, breathless. he became a key figure in french new wave cinema. the actor appeared in 80 films across many genres, including comedies and thrillers. now it's time for a look at the weather with tomaz. most of us had a fine day on monday, lots of sunshine and now a dose of summer heat is on the way over the next couple of days as temperatures are expected to hit 30 degrees in one or two spots. i think in the midlands is where we will really
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feel the heat. in the short term it is quiet on the weather front across england and wales. little bit more cloud and some dampness there in the north—west of the country. these in the morning temperatures, 15 in glasgow and london, a lot of us will be waking up to sunshine, some of us to some mist and fog which will last through the morning, and one of two spots, essentially speaking, a quiet day with hot sunshine particularly in the midlands, 27 in hull, mid 20s in the midlands, 27 in hull, mid 20s in southern and central scotland. on wednesday, we expect some showers, maybe some thunderstorms out west.
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hello and welcome. the autumn term is under way across the uk now, with everyone hoping that the disruption of the last 18 months is behind us. yet covid and the pandemic has left a legacy. for the next half an hour, my guests will be discussing that — how best to help pupils to catch up, how to address the mental health problems, and what permanent changes can be made in schools to make post—pandemic education better than what came before. joining us are natalie perea from the education policy institute, jules white — headteacher at tanbridge house school in surrey. with me in the studio, mary bousted — co—general secretary at the national education union.

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