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tv   BBC News at Five  BBC News  June 1, 2018 5:00pm-5:45pm BST

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today at 5pm: the us is warned it's playing a ‘dangerous game' — by imposing import tariffs on steel and aluminium. the european union says it will retaliate with tariffs of its own within weeks — but warns of the consequences of a trade war. protectionism can never be a solution and this will hurtjobs here in the european union but also in the us. we'll be examining the legality of the us move with an official from the world trade organisation. the other main stories on bbc news at 5pm: calls for the transport secretary to resign — as thousands of trains are cancelled following the introduction of new timetables. technical problems for visa — customers are experiencing issues using their cards in europe. two police officers are stabbed in an incident in greenock — both are in a serious condition in hospital. a new pm for spain — as a vote of no confidence forces mariano rajoy from office following a corruption scandal. to even be holding this book is
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embarrassing. who isjudging you, your cat? and you like the romance. and the lives of four lifelong friends are turned upside down in "book club". find out what jason solomons thought of that and the rest of the week's top releases in the film review at 5.45pm. our main story at 5pm — the european union says it will impose tariffs on imports from the united states within weeks — in retaliation for new us tariffs on steel and aluminium. the eu is now discussing which of its 10 page list of possible tariffs it will enforce — and says it will take
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action against the us at the world trade organisation. tariffs on american goods like cranberries, blue jeans and florida orange juice are being considered. canada and mexico have also vowed to introduce retaliatory tariffs. theo leggett reports. donald trump has made it clear time and time again, he thinks imports of cheap foreign steel and aluminium are harming the us industry. the american steel and aluminium industry has been ravaged by aggressive foreign trade practices. it's really an assault on our country. his tariffs are meant to protect the workers at steel mills in pennsylvania, michigan and indiana. but they could end up costing jobs outside the united states. the new tariffs could have a significant impact on the uk's steel industry. last year british businesses exported about 350,000 tonnes of steel and steel products to the united states.
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it's a trade worth around £350 million a year and it accounts for about 7% of total production here. but people within the industry are worried that damage to the sector could go beyond the loss of some sales. we're worried about the direct impact, but we are really equally worried from the whole sector point of view about a flood of steel that would normally have gone to the us coming to our market, needing to find a new home in europe, dropping down prices, and destabilising the sector and pushing us right back into a steel crisis. 31,000 people still work within the uk steel industry. the european union is planning its response. it is unfortunate because it is further weakening transatlantic relations. it increases the risk of severe turbulence in the market globally. protectionism can never be
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a solution, this will hurtjobs in the european union but also in the us. consumers may suffer, too. us imports such as harley—davidson motorcycles may be about to become more expensive. they are on a long list of american imports which the eu has targeted for tariffs of its own. so, how likely is a full—blown trade war? it's hard to say. i think it's easier to describe this as a high—stakes poker game and everyone is waiting to see who will be first to give in, whose bluff is going to work best. we think trump is bluffing but we are not sure yet. but if no one backs down, then the conflict could escalate and more tariffs might soon be on their way. that could help some workers in the so—called american rust belt. but analysts say it will come at a high price for businesses and consumers on both sides of the atlantic.
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theo leggett, bbc news. let's talk to our correspondent, adam fleming, in brussels. very strong words, talk of a trade war? yes, but the eu is trying to avoid that metaphor. 0n war? yes, but the eu is trying to avoid that metaphor. on their list of tariffs they could apply to goods coming from america they don't talk about retaliation, they talk about rebalancing because that is the technical name. what is happening todayis technical name. what is happening today is that eu officials in geneva are launching an official dispute against the us because they see the rationale for these tariffs is actually illegal. it's about protecting us industry, not national security. 0ver protecting us industry, not national security. over the next few weeks eu officials and diplomats and politicians will look at this list of products, work out which ones they want to target and they also have to go through internal eu legal
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procedures to make those tariffs actually work. then in the longer term they will be monitoring the effects on the eu steel and aluminium market to see if they are being affected by this glut of steel and aluminium. we also heard from the trade commissioner that the eu will take china to the world trade 0rganisation over intellectual property and technology. that is two fold, firstly it sends a message to donald trump because he cares about that issue and it is also trying to send a message that the existing rule book for global trade works. you do not need to rip it up. it also here in brussels officials have an eye on what donald trump does next. they are particularly anxious that perhaps you will have his eye on the eu car industry which will be particularly worrying to countries like germany. plenty of things to happen but they prefer not to call the trade war.
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jennifer hillman is a professor of law at georgetown university, who has been both a commissioner on the united states international trade commission, and a judge on the wto's appellate body. she's in washington. very good of you to talk to us. your ta ke very good of you to talk to us. your take first of all if i'm a pure and simple on why donald trump is doing this? the honest answer is nobody really knows. i think you see that to some degree in the criticism you have heard from everyone from members of congress both republican and democrat all the way to the united steel workers union saying we object to this incoherence and lack of what is a clear strategy. i think the other criticism is we have moved a long way from where this started. this all started as a concern over overca pacity
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this all started as a concern over overcapacity and oversupply largely coming out of china. as it is turning out, china is not suffering very much from these tariffs and yet they are going to have a very dramatic affect on the united states's staunchest allies and longest trading partners in the european union and canada and mexico and others. as i hope you heard the view from brussels, eu saying this move they consider illegal because it is ostensibly about trying to protect usjobs. you it is ostensibly about trying to protect us jobs. you say nobody really knows why resident trump is doing this, is he not concerned about the reaction, the reaction we are talking about? again, it's not clear. in the sense that i think thatis clear. in the sense that i think that is one of the very real long—term damages which is potentially already been done. it appears the trump administration is prepared to throw out the rule book and make it very hard for our trading partners to trust us again
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if we are going to make all these decisions on the basis of an essence political whim. you raise the question, is it legalfor political whim. you raise the question, is it legal for the political whim. you raise the question, is it legalfor the united states to do this and i think it's clear that the answer is negative back. the rules are very clear, if you agree as the united states has agreed, to set your tariffs at a certain level and the united states agreed to set its tariffs add zero, for steel and 0—6% for a aluminium. seek out at this tariff without breaking that commitment. they noted state has done that. secondly you cannot discriminate between wto members yet the state is not applying these tariffs to brazil or south korea or australia or argentina and yet is applying them again to the eu and others. so clearly the united states has broken
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the commitments it made. that is interesting so what are the ramifications of doing that, what would they be whoever did that? again, the concern i think everyone who follows the trading system has is that the hopp administration is going to attempt to justify these under the guise of national security. there are rules in the wto that cis countries can do this, you can break most—favoured—nation commitments if you are doing so to pursue your essential security interest but provisions limit that to items affecting trade in nuclear materials trafficking in arms or ammunition, or measures during times of warand ammunition, or measures during times of war and international emergency and that's not the case with respect to these imports. i don't believe they can be justified.
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to these imports. i don't believe they can bejustified. but to these imports. i don't believe they can be justified. but the wto rules are perceived in this one area to be selfjudging, that a country can take measures it believes are in its essential self security interests. if the wto side with the united states, that they can judge what ever is in their security interest every other country can do the same thing, say that whatever this product is it is essential to my national security and i can do whatever i want. so that's a dangerous road. 0n the flip side if the wto says you are not correct, this does not involve trafficking of arms or time of war you may not do it, the concern is the united states will say who you to judge our national security interests, we are going to withdraw from the or in some way walk away from that system. that's a concern. so interesting to
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get your perspective, we might be talking about this for quite some time. very good of you to talk to us. time. very good of you to talk to us. thank you. large numbers of visa customers are experiencing issues using their cards to make payments. the company said in a statement they are experiencing ‘a service disru ption' affecting some transactions in europe. with me now is our technology correspondent rory cellan—jones. this seems to be building as the hours go by, what our customers saying, what has been happening? it's becoming a bit more clear, for the last couple of hours we have seen the last couple of hours we have seen reports the last couple of hours we have seen reports across the last couple of hours we have seen reports across the on social media from people having card is declined, payment is not going through. retailers having problems. telling people to use cash. people thought it was all cards but i think it's coming down to being a visa problem. they said they are investigating the cause and working
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as quickly as possible to solve it. tesco have said we are experiencing this problem. they say it works for chip and pin but not contactless. we are getting a patchy effect. some people, i spoke to one retailer that said it worked fine. it's obvious visa have a problem and across europe. i have had messages on twitter from ireland and europe. i have had messages on twitterfrom ireland and germany europe. i have had messages on twitter from ireland and germany but it's patchy. some indications it might be getting resolved. further clarification later in the hour and you might come back to us but for now, that's the latest. an emergency timetable is to come into effect on northern rail services from monday — after nearly two weeks of delays and cancellations brought about by a new schedule. some 165 trains will be removed from schedules each day
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until the end ofjuly to "stabilise service levels". the transport secretary, chris grayling, said network rail had finalised the new timetables far too late, and described recent disruption as "wholly unacceptable". alison freeman reports. they stand, they watch, they wait. for almost three weeks now, passengers on the northern rail network have been facing severe disruption after a new timetable was introduced. here at manchester piccadilly station, frustration is growing. very inconvenient and inconsiderate. i don't think it's cost—effective, what they're doing. everybody‘s disgruntled with it. every day, it's the same thing, it's cancelled or delayed. after work, i have to get a taxi to get home. these things probably don't count for the national rail service, but for me, it's money lost out of my pocket. it's five miles into manchester
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and you'd rather catch the train, but it seems to me that people are going to stop using the trains and go back to the car. they keep saying there's no drivers. well, the drivers were there before they changed the times. i don't understand it. northern rail says this isn't a problem caused by a lack of staff or rolling stock. instead, it's blaming logistics, saying under the new timetable, it's struggling to get trains and their drivers in the right place at the right time. the information board paints a picture of the problem, trains delayed or cancelled. it's the same story every day for hundreds of services between the north‘s major cities. the passenger action group northern fail says 2,224 routes have been fully cancelled since 18th may and a further 1,377 routes have been part—cancelled. today, all trains have been cancelled on the lakes line in cumbria, a total of 3a services. it sometimes feels to me
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like northern commuters are invisible to them. they just don't care, and the time of northern commuters is not the same as commuters in london and the south. well, frankly, as mayor of greater manchester, i'm not going to accept that. things are just beyond a joke at the moment. people's lives are being ruined by this shambolic rail industry. the rail workers' union, the rmt, has accused the transport secretary chris grayling of going into hiding, leaving front—line staff to deal with the brunt of public anger. they've called for his resignation and the rail company to be sacked, with the network brought back into public ownership. but in the meantime, the disruption and frustration for passengers continues. this is bbc news at 5 — the headlines: the us is warned it's playing a ‘dangerous game' —
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by imposing import tariffs on steel and aluminium. the european union says it will retaliate with tariffs of its own. technical problems for visa with customers reporting issues using their cards in europe. calls for the transport secretary to resign — as thousands of trains are cancelled following the introduction of new timetables. in sport the shoe is on the other foot at headingley as this time it's england who bowled pakistan out cheaply in the first day of the second test, the two to make only 100 on sunday for, england 64—1 in reply. gareth southgate says tattoo ‘s area reply. gareth southgate says tattoo ‘s are a work of art and have an individual meaning as raheem sterling reveals a picture of a assault rifle on his leg which he says has a different meaning. and
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novak djokovic survives a four hour marathon against roberto bautista agut to get to do the next round of the french open. more on the stories just after 5:30pm. there are commemorations this sunday to remember those who lost their lives in the terror attack on london bridge, one year ago. eight people were killed, and dozens more injured, when three men drove a van into pedestrians on the bridge, before getting out of the vehicle and then stabbing people enjoying a summer night out in borough market. i've been speaking to one of our bbc colleagues, producer hollyjones, who was caught up in the attack that night. i was just walking by myself and i was looking at my phone, and i was alerted to what sounded like an engine really over—revving. so i looked up and that was the first time i saw this van,
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a white van, and it was heading south and it kind of came onto the bridge and it completely went straight into a group of people. and i know that one of the people, well, one of the persons went into the river. and it was like skittles going off. i've never felt fear like it. it was kind of like when you hear the phrase that your life flashes before your eyes, i can understand that now, what that means. i was frozen to the spot, and i remember seeing it coming directly towards me and the couple that were behind me, and something in the back of my mind just said "get out of the way". and i couldn't tell you how it happened. i remember looking directly in the eyes of the van driver, and i managed to get out of the way but unfortunately, the van then hit the couple that were behind me also. and i just remember, i got up and people were screaming. there were bodies all over the road.
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it was absolute chaos. has london changed at all for you? do you feel that it got back to normal quite swiftly? ifeel like london has definitely bounced back from this. and notjust london, but the whole of the uk, like with the manchester attacks. the response of the people who have been out there in support has just been overwhelmingly astounding, really. and on the day of the first anniversary, what will you do? i will actually be with friends, surrounded by close friends. i'm in touch with some of the people that were injured that night. so no doubt i will be in touch with them throughout the day. we've actually been messaging. i'm meeting some of them this week, which will be incredible. 0n the night itself, i was comforting a french lady. all i knew was that her name was christine. i didn't know anything up more about her. i waited until she went into the ambulance and that was
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the last i heard of her. a few weeks after the incident, i was approached on twitter by christine's sister, and she said, "she wants to be in touch with you, she wants to contact you." since then, we've messaged every day, pretty much, or at least a few times a week and we've got a really good friendship now. will you two be speaking on sunday? yes, we will. we've got plans to see each other, so yes, we will definitely be speaking. hollyjones talking to me on london bridge. the impact was also enormous in nearby borough market which had to close for the best part of two weeks in the aftermath of the attack. i've been talking to people who run local businesses there about the impact of that night and how they will be marking the first anniversary. very emotional, we have felt locked out of our home, our space, are safe place for two weeks
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while the we fmi‘if" be cautious? ,. _ “5.777”. . - ._ “5.77”... 7 does it mean fifzfl, w” does it mean for %?:,7 ———— does it mean for our %?:,7 ———— does it mean for our business, 777.1” ———— what does it mean for our business, what does it mean for our business, what we feel when we see the place again, the street where it happens? mixed emotions but it was beautiful. it was busy, a lovely day and we rang the bell which is cathartic, it isa rang the bell which is cathartic, it is a way of going we are ready for business. i am struck you keep calling this place your home because you don't live here, this is where you don't live here, this is where you work, this is your income, your livelihood, yet that speaks to that sense of community you have therefore tomorrow, close of business on saturday, the first anniversary approaches. what will be the mood, what will you be doing together? it'll be a busy day,
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saturdays and sundays are often busy, we will carry on with business as normal and enjoying ourselves but it will be in the back of our mind and the market closes, we close at 5pm, around 5:30pm the market management are planning to ring the market bell as a symbolic way of closing the day on this particular day, it's not something we do all the time, just taking a moment to reflect on it and market as done. it's been a year and hopefully we have all had a great saturday that feels a normal saturday should. then privately i think we will do things on the sunday, there is a community service and some people might go that but for myself i thinkjust a quiet day at home reflecting and thinking about the people that genuinely lost something. sam sa m walla ce sam wallace who runs a stall at borough market in london, she referenced the service on sunday, it is mid—afternoon at southwark
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cathedral and we will have full coverage of the commemorations from sunday lunchtime on bbc news. two police officers are being treated for serious injuries after being stabbed in greenock. a 43—year—old man has been detained and is being assessed in hospital. colleagues have praised the bravery of the two injured officers. 0ur scotland correspondent lorna gordon is at the scene. this afternoon the streets where this took place remained cordoned off, there has been a lot of police activity here all day. trying to piece together the exact sequence of events which led to this incident which took place just before nine o'clock this morning. two police officers, one a probationer a few weeks into thejob, the officers, one a probationer a few weeks into the job, the other who had several years experience were stabbed, one in the neck and the other in the arm. assistant chief co nsta ble other in the arm. assistant chief constable bernie higgins was speaking to the media couple of hours ago, he said they displayed
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courage and utmost professionalism in their actions and he had visited the officers earlier this afternoon. it demonstrates the threats officers face on a daily basis and potentially if an officer with a taser had been deployed to this incident it could have been resolved. it's very speculative, the fa ct of resolved. it's very speculative, the fact of the matter is the officer still received their training on how to deal with individuals who are violent to deal with individuals who are viole nt and have to deal with individuals who are violent and have weapons. the training kicked in and thankfully the individual has been arrested and not posing further threat to the public. those comments reiterated by the scottish police federation who also added their thoughts are with the injured officers and their family. as to the 43—year—old who has been arrested in connection with this incident, he remains in hospital with minor injuries where he tonight is being assessed. spain's new prime minister —
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the socialist, pedro sanchez — says his country's democracy has turned a new page with a vote in parliament to force his predecessor, mariano rajoy, out of office. mr rajoy‘s people's party was implicated in a corruption scandal. 0ur europe reporter, gavin lee is in madrid for us. a political first, first a politicalfirst, first time in spanish history a prime minister has been ousted by a motion of no confidence and as we were inside congress behind us for the boat we could hear the tannoy system going off for mps to come to take their seats and decide whether or not to oust marioano rajoy. the man they call mr wait oust marioano rajoy. the man they calerwaitand see, oust marioano rajoy. the man they call mr wait and see, one of europe's longest serving leaders, in
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office since 2017 apart from a brief spell, he was thought to be teflon, bullet—proof. he seemed to know before he went in because he gave a speech which seemed like his farewell, thanking all his party for his time in office, he said it was an honourand his time in office, he said it was an honour and congratulated pedro sanchez. they needed 176 mps to vote against him, and 80 dead so they surpassed the target. marianne araya went his —— mariano rajoy went, backed by his staff for his time. protesters were outside with placards saying it's been corrupt and 1990. the allegation and ultimately this of allegations about corruption which led to the downfall of mariano rajoy because last week a high courtjudge of mariano rajoy because last week a high court judge ruled of mariano rajoy because last week a high courtjudge ruled in sentencing a number of former people's party members to prison for taking cash in
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exchange for handing out government contracts, he stated the people's party was implicated entirely with this corruption scandal. so who is the new man in charge? the man who called the no—confidence motion, pedro sanchez. they call him mr handsome. there are six other parties behind the socialists who agreed to the motion who have got conflicting needs, the catalans, baskin adam ashe lists. critics say it's a frankenstein coalition which could lead to a political monster but it's the first day of a new government today. thanks gavin. italy has a new prime minister — and government — ending three months of political uncertainty. little known lawyer and academic giuseppe conte was sworn in alongside other cabinet ministers to lead western europe's first anti—establishment government. yesterday we reported on the sale of the script of one
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of the nation's best—loved two ronnies script — in which ronnie barker walks into a hardware shop looking for... well... fork handles. four candles. four candles? here you are four candles. no fork handles. there you are, four candles. no fork handles. handles for forks. well the script sold at auction for £33,880 — slightly less than expected — and good value for a piece of comedy history. i'm sure that is a bargain. four pages of ronnie barker's handwritten script. let's take a look at the weather. no script here, i may get up as i go
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along. i shouldn't say that! the forecast contains the possibility of heavy and thundery downpours, this was the scene, this is the other side of scotland and there is still an issue of localised flooding, disruption from these thunderstorms which have been a realfeature disruption from these thunderstorms which have been a real feature of the day again, this time as was forecast its further north than perhaps we've seen of late so northern ireland and also into the southern uplands of scotland, the cumbrian fells seeing their fair share, through time we've seen these thunderstorms edging their way to the areas either side of the central belt and through the heart of edinburgh and glasgow as well. they will take time before they die away, it will be a slow all to do. there area it will be a slow all to do. there are a few more to be had little bit further south and then it turns more grey overnight on what will be at another close and muggy night. this is bbc news — the headlines.
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the us is warned it's playing a "dangerous game" by imposing import tariffs on steel and aluminium. the european union says it will retaliate with tariffs of its own — but warns of the consequences of a trade war. calls for the transport secretary to resign — as thousands of trains are cancelled following the introduction of new timetables. he blames network rail for the failures. technical problems for visa — customers are experiencing issues using their cards. visa hasjust said it's corrected the problem — but there is still a backlog. two police officers are stabbed in an incident in greenock — both are in a serious condition in hospital. one man has been arrested. we will talk more about some of
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those stories, particularly rail, right now we will catch up with the sports news. hugh has there's been a reversal of roles on day one of the second test between england and pakistan at headingly. a week ago it was the home side bowled out cheaply. but this time pakistan have struggled after deciding to bat first. the tourists were all out for 174 and the wickets started falling in the second over of the match. stuart board getting his first of three. captain joe root with a fantastic catch to remove imam ul—haq. the only resistance from the pakistani batsman came from shadab khan. as he made a second consecutive half—century and he was the final man to go. england debutant sam curran, who replaced the injured ben stokes, is the latest score
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75-1 is the latest score alastair cook not out withjoe root with him at crease. gareth southgate insists there's no need for the fa to police the england players‘ tattoos, after raheem sterling's picture of an assault rifle on his leg drew criticism. the forward has responded by claiming it‘s in memory of his father, who was shot to death when sterling was two. southgate says the manchester city player has had the tattoo for a few my view it is a very individual
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meaning, the intent is all with the individual, and with the person, and what has been clear from his own statement and his own experience, is that he‘s not somebody that supports 01’ that he‘s not somebody that supports or wants to promote guns, in the way that was perceived at first. now he‘s the favourite to succeed zinedine zidane at real madrid, and tottenham boss mauricio pochettino is in spain today. but he isn‘t in the capital, instead he‘s in barcelona, where he used to manage espanyol. he‘s there to promote a book. despite pledging his future to tottenham last week, have a listen to what he‘s said today. i understand all the rumours around the world, but that is our life, thatis, the world, but that is our life, that is, that is the sport that we choose to stay, that is the passion thatis choose to stay, that is the passion that is relayed to everyone. look i
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am so that is relayed to everyone. look i am so happy, i am so excited, i sign am so happy, i am so excited, i sign a new contract seven days ago, what is going to happen tomorrow? i don‘t know. i don‘t know. novak djokovic came through a gruelling four—hour match against spanish 13th seed roberto bautista agut to reach the last 16 at the french open. he lost his first set of the tournament so far and broke his first racket of the week too, after what was at times a frustrating match for him. but he‘s through to face fernando verdasco in the fourth round. verdasco beat fourth seed grigor dimitrov. while the women‘s fourth seed, elina svitolina‘s also out. the former world heavyweight champion tyson fury has told bbc sport he believes he can beat every major name in the division, including current title holders anthonyjoshua and deontay wilder. fury returns to the ring next weekend more than two years since his last fight. he admitted it‘s been a difficult time away from the sport. it was very dark, very dark, very dark and lonely, grey days every
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day, i would wake up in the morning, let‘s face it i didn‘t have anything to be depressed about. i had fame, title, a loving family but i suppose anyone with depression who has been suffering can relate to where i am coming from. i had never experienced anything like this and i wouldn‘t wish it on my worst enemy. it is a horrible thing, the most horrible thing, if you haven‘t witnessed it you might think i‘m a nut case or whatever, but it is very hard, now more than ever, people are speaking openly that is all the sport for now. you can find more on all those stories on the bbc sport website. that‘s bbc.co.uk/sport. it has been blamed on the do shown
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the new timetables, well, friday evening rush hour, let us find out what is happening, let us talk to alison free monday who is at manchester piccadilly. dare i ask what it is like, can people get home? well, we have been watching the platform behind me which has a train on it at the moment. all afternoon. we have been listening to announcements telling people their trains are cancelled. we know today that northern rail is on the verge of its worst day, since this new timetable came in two weeks‘ ago, we understand that so far, 362 trains have been fully or partially cancelled, across their network, now that means when it is partially cancelled it might not reach its destination or stop at all of its stops. 0n
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destination or stop at all of its stops. on monday and emergency timetable is going to be introduced. northern rail announced that and they said they are going to cancel 6% of their trains on monday, to prevent other cancellations taking place, that will be 165 trains a day. amurng those are the lakes line trains which will be fully cancelled for two week, andy burnham described this as a threadbare second class service which is no solution, we know the transplant secretary chris grayling has been criticised for the amount of action he appears to have taken over this amount of action he appears to have ta ken over this crisis amount of action he appears to have taken over this crisis but on monday, he said to be meeting with mps whose constituents are affected by this, to try to come up with some sort of solution. all right. alison, thank you for the update. let us talk to lilian greenwood, she is chair of the transport select committee, good evening. this is disastrous for so many people, what is your feeling
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tonight, what is your committee going to do about this?” tonight, what is your committee going to do about this? i mean i think people have had their lives turned absolutely upside down, you only have to look on twitter or on the reports about people being late for work, unable to fit in with their childcare arrangement, family commitment, it has been a nice co—there are two things, one is that we have got to have the whole industry doing a review and coming toa industry doing a review and coming to a consensus about how this has happened, how only have to look on twitter or on the reports about people being late for work, unable to fit in with their childcare arrangement, family commitment, it has been a nice co—there are two things, one is that we have got to have the whole industry doing a review and coming to a consensus about how this has happened, how this has arisen & what needs to be put in place to ensure it doesn‘t happen again in the future when there are future timetable changes, but there needs to be immediate action, in the short—term, to try to improve life forethose passengers who suffered such terrible disruption, we need a clear plan for how things are going to improve, in the next few days, and weeks, we need some certainty for passenger, there needs to be better communication so they know which
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trains are running and if there is a new emergency timetable that that is what is actually delivered and there isn‘t the terrible overcrowding we have seen people know they can get to work and get home or get to other places they need to be. and i think the their thing is we probably would like to hear more about the compensation that is going to be available to those passengers who have been affected by this appalling service, because i think at moment there are some parts of the country where people will be getting some compensation if their trains is cancelled is or delay after 15 minutes and in other parts it will be different. that is something the government and train operators should be looking at. 0k, government and train operators should be looking at. ok, but are you going to call chris grayling, are you going to sit him down as ask how he is going to fulfil those three criteria you have outlined? well, look, the transport committee meets on monday, afternoon, i am sure all the members like i have been watching what has been happening, over the last week and we will be discussing on monday
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afternoon what future action we want to take, in order to either investigate or conduct an inquiry. that is a matter for the committee. we meet on monday afternoon. 0k, that is a matter for the committee. we meet on monday afternoon. ok, but in the here and now, people following this today, they are thinking, 0k, compensation is one thing but they are thinking i need to get to, who on monday morning, what are politicians going to do to sort this out and make sure i can? well, i mean there is no doubt, there is anger among politicians up and down the country, you have said what has happened with the mayor of greater manchester and i am sure mps are equally concerned is. there is no question in my mind that answers need to be given from the secretary of state, from network rail and from the train operators, because this is a shared responsibility, railways are complex, it requires everyone to be working together, everyone needs to ta ke be working together, everyone needs to take responsibility for their pa rt to take responsibility for their part in this, because if we don‘t do that, we won‘t understand precisely what has gone wrong, we won‘t be able to put it right, in the
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long—term and in the immediate days and weeks ahead, because passengers deserve much better than what they have endured in rhys days. do you think andy burnham is right when he says the sanction of an operator has to be on the table now? well, that is always something that is open to the department for transport, i think we obviously we want to hear from the secretary of state about the action he is taking to ensure that our railways deliver the proper service that passengers expect, i don‘t think this is just a matter for train operator, they are part of this, particularly in relation to the availability of drivers and drivers being properly trained to deliver the timetables that they bid to provide, there is also issues for network rail to answer, in terms of some of the delays to the electrification, in the north—west, and the impact of late timetable planning, but there are also questions for the department for tpt
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because they sit at the centre, they know what is going on, they are responsible for running the railway, andi responsible for running the railway, and i think questions need to be a nswered and i think questions need to be answered by all three parties. all right. we must leave it there. thank you. let us talk more about our main story here, those tariffs, president trump making that announcement earlier today, the european union saying it will impose tariffs on imfors from the us in retaliation for the tariffs that donald trump announced on steel and aluminium. we have had more reaction in the last few minute, we have been hearing from the international trade secretary liam fox who has been giving his response. let us hear that. well, we very much regret that these ta riffs well, we very much regret that these tariffs were put in place, we certainly agree with the european union, that the mechanism of dealing with what is a chinese problem is inappropriate, we think it is of dubious legality and we will be with
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the eu 100% in taking this to a dice pout, which is the proper place to ta ke pout, which is the proper place to take it up if you believe in a rules based system. it will take some time for us to get an agreement on exactly what those will be, that time would be usefully spent trying to get the united states to rethink this particular measure, it is very u nfortu nate if we this particular measure, it is very unfortunate if we get into this tit—for—tat position, especially with one of our closest allies, nobody wins in a trade war there are original casualties. liam fox the international trade secretary talking about dubious legality and saying nobody wins in a trade war. that is the latest government reaction and much more on that story throughout the evening. let us remind ourselves of tonight‘s headlines. as we have been discussing the us is warned it is playing a dangerous game businessman posing import ta riffs game businessman posing import tariffs on steel and aluminium. customers are experiencing problems
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using visa cards, although the company says it has now corrected the technical fault. and there are calls for the transport secretary to resign, as thousands of trains are cancelled following the introduction more in the six 0‘clock news. let us look ahead to sportsday at 6.30. coming up, we will have the latest from headingley where england‘s bowlers got off to perfect start. in football the england manager‘s defended raheem sterling over the controversy caused by his tattoo of a gun. southgate says he doesn‘t deserved to be hounded and in, going tyson fury says he can beat the likes of o on
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