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tv   BBC News  BBC News  December 3, 2017 5:00pm-6:00pm GMT

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this is bbc news. the headlines at five. the entire board of the government's social mobility commission resigns, saying theresa may's rhetoric isn't matched by reality. the government, probably for understandable reasons, is focused on brexit and seems to lack the bandwidth to be able to translate the rhetoric about converting social justice into a reality. pressure on the prime minister to refuse to settle the uk's "divorce bill" unless the eu agrees to a series of demands. donald trump hits out at the fbi in a series of angry tweets, claiming the agency's reputation is in tatters a new scheme to make it easier for children in england to access mental health services is outlined by the government. also in the next hour... it's 50 years since the world first successful heart transplant it's 50 years since the world's first successful heart transplant.
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the surgery revolutionised the way heart disease is treated. i was iwasa i was a second—year medical student in london, and it was of similar impact to people walking on the moon for the first time, or president kennedy being shot in dallas. and england's cricketers face a battle to stay in the second ashes test after australia take command on day two in adelaide. more to come in sports day — in half an hour. good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. all four board members of the government's social mobility commission have stood down in protest at what they say is a lack of progress towards a fairer britain. ex—labour minister alan milburn, who chairs the commission, said he had little hope the current
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government could make the necessary progress. the resignations also include the former conservative cabinet minister gillian shephard. downing street insists it is working to provide opportunities for all. here's our political correspondent jonathan blake. your chances of getting a job, finding a good school for your children, and being able to afford somewhere decent to live — issues at the heart of social mobility. and from day one in power, tackling inequality was a personal priority for theresa may. the mission to make britain a country that works for everyone means more than fighting these injustices. if you are from an ordinary working—class family, life is much harder than many people in westminster realise. but for the former labour cabinet minister alan milburn, who was until now in charge of monitoring the government's progress on social mobility, not enough is being done. what is lacking is meaningful political action transferring very
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what is lacking is meaningful political action to translate very good words into deeds. in the end what counts in politics it is not about what you talk about, it is what you do. i'm afraid the divisions in britain are becoming wider — socially, economically and geographically. downing street said they already told mr milburn they planned to appoint a new chair, as his term in office had ended, so is the former minister's public resignation sour grapes or political point scoring? well, alan milburn and i both care deeply about social mobility and equality of opportunities. he said that, and he said you wanted to keep him on. is that true? i am not going to get into the discussions we had inside government. he has done a fantasticjob, but his term had come to an end. and i think it was about getting fresh blood into the commission. the education secretary went on to defend the government's record. we are seeing standards in our schools rise, and critically we are seeing the attainment gap in schools narrow — this is the difference in outcomes between disadvantaged children and their better—off peers. in the report they found
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children's life chances vary in every part of england. two thirds of areas where young people have the best chance of success are in london, but many rural, coastal and former industrial areas are being left behind. the midlands is the worst performing region in england. deprived areas registered some of the highest support for leaving the european union. the government is facing criticism that it is so focused on brexit that it is ignoring the reasons which led people to vote for it. jonathan blake, bbc news. earlier, i spoke to christian guy, formerly david cameron's special leading brexit supporters have urged the prime minister not to settle the uk's "divorce bill" unless the eu agrees to a series of conditions. the leave means leave group, which contains former cabinet ministers, says brussels must end the european court ofjustice's jurisdiction over the uk. it also wants freedom of movement to the uk for eu citizens to stop when britain leaves the bloc in march 2019. theresa may is to hold more meetings next week on the terms of the uk exit. theresa may is to hold more meetings next week
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on the terms of the uk exit. one of those signatories was the conservative mp jacob rees—mogg. he told the bbc‘s andrew marr show that paying the divorce bill reduces the uk's hand in negotiations. it's very important that we don't hand over a great deal of money, unless we have an agreement. the risk is, that we pay the money from the day we leave, and that reduces our negotiating clout to get the trade deal finalised, if it hasn't been done before 29th march 2019, and that seems an obvious point. jacob rees—mogg. the irish foreign minister says his government cannot and will not allow the re—emergence of a hard border with ireland. simon coveney warned the brexit talks cannot move onto phase two without having some credible answers on the border issue. it comes amid reports that the irish cabinet are to hold an emergency meeting ahead of tomorrow's talks between theresa may and jean claude—juncker. earlier, i spoke with our correspondent louise cullen in belfast.
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she explained what the irish government is hoping for. well, annita, simon coveney, the minister for foreign affairs, and the recently appointed irish deputy prime minister, the tanaiste, has said ireland is simply seeking reassurances there won't be regional divergences between it and northern ireland post brexit. he said they need an agreed wording ahead of the crucial eu summit later in december, on the 14th and 15th, and the deadline set tomorrow by donald tusk ahead of that working lunch with may and juncker is rather focusing minds of course. he says ireland is asking questions that need credible answers before any brexit negotiations can move on, and donald tusk said of course if the uk offer on the border is not acceptable to ireland it will not be to the eu. at that special cabinet meeting tomorrow morning in dublin, simon coveney and the taoiseach leo varadkar will brief their cabinet members. louise, of course we know that the former prime minister tony blair has warned about the possible impact
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on the peace process, depending the results of any negotiations over the border, but that has drawn some sharp criticism from politicians in northern ireland, hasn't it? it has indeed. the former prime minister tony blair is of course one of the architects of the good friday agreement, which reaches its 20th birthday next year, and he said that agreement is now at risk. he said the uk and irish membership of the eu was central to it, as was the concept of free movement. now, a hard border, he said, would create tensions on the island, but ian paisley of the dup who, of course, are the tories' partners in government, he said that is simply a rekindling of project fear. louise cullen reporting. donald trump has hit out at the fbi in a series of angry tweets. he claimed the agency's reputation was in tatters. he also denied asking the ex—fbi chiefjames comey to drop an investigation into the former national security advisor michael flynn, who was sacked for lying to the agency about his contacts with russia. the president is under renewed
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pressure after a tweet on his account implied that he knew mr flynn had lied to the fbi. mr trump's personal lawyer john dowd has now said that he drafted the tweet, which he said was a mistake. north korea has accused the united states of being a war monger on the eve ofjoint us — south korean military exercises. it appears now that mr trump's personal lawyer drafted this particular tweet, which is odd in itself because it seems to imply that president trump knew his national adviser had lied to the fi by saddling to the fbi, which is criminal offence. and then remember the day after he fired michael flynn, he has allegedly gone to
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james comey, the former fbi director, and urged him to drop the investigation into his former adviser. and then, of course, he fired james comey. that sequence of events is what has led to many raising a few eyebrows and wondering, because of this tweet, whether or not president trump is guilty of objection ofjustice. well, now, his personal lawyersays he wrote it, and in fact he says, i am out of the tweet business, i did not mean to break news. but a lot of people will look at it and whether —— and will wonder whether or not this is a suspicious, it still raises those questions. as you said, the timing is very significant, and donald trump is accompanying all of this with a series of tweets, basically a tirade against the fbi calling it the worst period in the agency's history? it undermines the whole investigation. he believes james comey made many mistakes, he believes the investigation into his former rival hillary clinton should have been far
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more rigorous, and he made a call to his supporters and he had called for further investigations into hillary clinton. of course there were those chants of " lock her up!" in fact he has done so recently. but i think if you look beyond that, this is something his supporters will love. the fact they believe hillary clinton was guilty, one of the reasons why they voted and wanted donald trump in office, and they believe their man. they want their man to be able to do what he wants to do in washington and not be undermined, in their view, by this russian investigation, so when it comes to donald trump's claims that this is a witchhunt and the fbi is in tatters, that is what it is doing in the mind of his supporters, undermining the entire investigation and elevating him in their eyes. north korea has accused the united states of being a war monger on the eve ofjoint us — south korean military exercises.
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monday's drills are the largest ever involving us and south korean troops. meanwhile president trump's national security advisor has said the us and its allies are "in a race" to tackle the problem with north korea before the reclusive state achieves its nuclear ambitions. celia hatton reports. american military might on display near the korean peninsula death here, a rarer sight, three us aircraft carriers, so—called super carriers, brought together last month for the first time in a decade. and now, the us' decision to hold another round of air exercises has raised tensions again. on monday, five days of air drills will begin, the largest everjoint drills with us and south korean forces. they will simulate air strikes on
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mock north korean nuclear and missile targets. this comes as president trump's national security advisor warns the possibility of war with pyongyang is increasing by the day. the greatest immediate threat to the united states and to the world is the threat posed by the regime in north korea and his continued efforts to develop a long—range nuclear capability. there are ways to address this problem, short of armed conflict. but it is a race, because he's getting closer and closer. and there's not much time left. in north korea, news of the military exercises through dire warnings. translation: if the korean peninsula and the world are involved in the crucible of a nuclear war because of the reckless united states, the us must take full responsibility for it. on friday,
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north korea held a massive event celebrating the success of recent weapons tests. the latest1 cent and missile than ever before, putting the continental united states in a striking range. now, john danks is rushing to perfect its weapons technology, including the development of a nuclear warhead that can fit on a missile. kim jong—un is getting closer to his nuclear ambitions. here, he jong—un is getting closer to his nuclearambitions. here, he inspects a factory making tyres for missile launch vehicles. some are quick to brush off the exchange of threats between kim jong—un and the tramp administration, dismissing them as blaster. but as the us and north korea ramp up their military capabilities, making no secret that the other is the target, it raises the other is the target, it raises the prospect that one missed step or one missed adulation could ignite a sudden military confrontation,
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claiming hundreds of thousands, if not millions, of lives. i am joined 110w not millions, of lives. i am joined now by the director at the think—tank of the centre for european reform, has just think—tank of the centre for european reform, hasjust returned to from the security conference in london and washington, where has been speaking to us officials about north korea. thanks forjoining us here on the bbc news channel. what intelligence have you gathered from those three days of discussions about what might happen next between the us and north korea?|j about what might happen next between the us and north korea? i think we're rather closer to military action by the us than perhaps many of us knew all realised or had been thinking. that's not to say it is certain civil what i learnt was that many people at a senior level in the us administration don't believe that deterrents can work, the idea that north korea would not attack us because we would whack it if it did. they think the nature of the regime may not be susceptible to deterrence. they're worried that their missiles could reach us cities
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and there could be an attempt to blackmail the us into taking its troops out of south korea so that the whole of the peninsula could be reunified. anti—trump has said he will not allow us cities to be threatened. so my view following recent conservations is that unless the chinese and tighten the economic squeeze and make the north koreans think twice about continuing their current policies, then military action is certainly a possibility. is it possible do you think to tighten that economic squeeze? will china play ball mess case the chinese seem responsible to do that, for example, by cutting off oil supplies. if they did they could probably bring the north korean regime to heal quite quickly, but they don't seem to want to do that. they don't want chaos and pandemonium in north korea, they don't want the regime to collapse. soi don't want the regime to collapse. so i think time is running out. the main argument against taking military action is that most people think if the us did strike north
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korea, south korea would be immediately struck by lots of artillery shells from the north and artillery shells from the north and a lot of south koreans would get killed. so, the south koreans are very nervous indeed. at that factor does not necessarily seem to be making it certain that trump will not take military action against the north. what was your sense from those three days of talks about how far planning for an attack by the us is advanced and how far is planning advanced for whatever scenario might follow a n advanced for whatever scenario might follow an attack? i think planning is advanced, and i think there is certainly talk amongst senior officials about a kind of surgical strike, a modest attack on north korea's military facilities, to teach kim jong—un a lesson, korea's military facilities, to teach kimjong—un a lesson, rather than all—out war. but the danger is that even a fairly modest set of precision strikes could still provoke the north to rain fire on the south, as they put it, and kill an awful lot of south koreans. so, it is not clear that even a modest
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attack would not have pretty ghastly consequences. was anybody prepared to say anything to you about the personalities involved here under you look at donald trump and kim jong—un? you look at donald trump and kim jong-un? well, us officials keep saying this country, north korea, is run bya saying this country, north korea, is run by a madman, saying this country, north korea, is run bya madman, so saying this country, north korea, is run by a madman, so deterrence won't apply as normal to that country. of course, some people more critical of the us ink that north korea is not the us ink that north korea is not the only country run by a madman. charles grant, director at the centre for european reform, thank you for your time. the headlines on bbc news... the entire board of the government's social mobility commission resigns, saying theresa may's rhetoric isn't matched by reality. pressure on the prime minister to refuse to settle the uk's divorce bill unless the eu agrees to a series of demands. donald trump hits out at the fbi in a series of angry tweets, claiming the agency's reputation is in tatters claiming the agency's
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reputation is in tatters. children will be able to get access to mental health support at schools or colleges in england under plans announced by the government. it's a joint initiative between the departments of health and education. campaigners say the measures are welcome, but long overdue. tom burridge reports. i didn't have any therapy. it was sort ofjust to talk about things... one young person's story of suffering from an eating disorder and depression for five years. she waited two years before she got help. ifeel i have not been properly treated for the mental side. theyjust sort of put me in hospital when my physical side is bad and then don't treat anything else, and then they wonder why it keeps happening and i keep having to go back into hospital. the hospital she was sent to, hundreds of miles away, a nightmare scenario
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which the government now promises no family should face. so, ministers, chatting here with pupils in east london, are publishing plans to provide support in schools for so many children who face issues regarding their mental well—being. teachers will be trained at spotting problems early. i put excessive pressure on myself wanting to achieve high grades. and there will be new mental health support teams, the idea, to bridge the gap between schools and the nhs. if your child has a mental health issue, we want to make sure you get the help much, much earlier than happens at the moment, and if possible, we want to work within the schools system, to prevent that condition deteriorating. but labour claims mental health care in england has been desecrated by cuts. services are really overstretched and children are waiting years for that vital support that they need. this is a drop in the ocean compared with the cuts
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that many services have faced. the government is facing up to the scale of the issue. it now hopes schools can spot problems and address them early. pope francis has defended his decision not to mention the word rohingya during his trip to generate. he said he knew he could achieve more in private meetings with the myanmar authorities if he didn't use the word in his speech. rail passengers travelling to and from london's euston station were told not to travel after all train lines from the station were closed. the disruption was caused by emergency repairs which were needed after overhead power lines came down. our correspondent sent this update from the station. things here have improved greatly this afternoon.
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what happened was on friday was that the wires overhead on the line coming out of euston towards north london, they came down. there were 5000 metres of wires that came down, and they had emergency repair work this morning, so there were no services coming in and out of the station here, for london midland, virgin trains, and london overground trains, nothing at all. but from midday, they started picking up again and the lines are running, but there have been lots of cancellations and quite a lot of delays. but now, things are a lot better. i'm looking at a board in fact, just a minute ago, and there are hardly any more cancellations, but we have been warned they will go on during the day, but we've been assured everything will be back to normalfor the rush hour tomorrow and there will be no problems tomorrow. also, people who have bought tickets, their tickets will also be able to be used tomorrow. or people can use other routes to get home or to get to euston,
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so places like glasgow, birmingham new street, manchester, a lot of the main arteries coming into london and going out of london, they were affected, but things are much better now, and it's all getting back to normal. pioneering surgeons successfully completed a human heart transplant for the first time 50 years ago today — a procedure which has changed the way heart disease is treated. a heart surgeon at thejohn radcliffe hospital in oxford has explained to us that 50 years on, more progress is needed to ensure a longer survival rates. the patients that we all like to hear about are the ones who get to ten years or more, but a that's only a0%. the
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patients with coronary heart disease, those who have had a heart attack, and have diabetes or impaired kidneys and so on, 60% of those don't make it to ten years. and the average survival for those is just less than four years. so, heart transportation is not a pa na cea . heart transportation is not a pa na cea. we heart transportation is not a panacea. we have to be able to do better. and i hope in the future that a combination of these small mechanical assist devices, which we implant within the patient‘s own heart, together with stem cells to regenerate their diseased muscle, might provide a direct alternative for those thousands of patients that will never ever have a chance of a donor heart. james tottle received a heart transplant 20 years ago, and he told me earlier how it changed his life. 20 years ago i had a life—saving transplant
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at middlesex hospital, six and a half hour heart transplant that saved my life. i had condition which is heart failure so it gave me a new lease of life. having a heart transplant is like winning the national lottery. it's a legacy that lasts a lifetime. in my respect it's 20 years. tell us how you felt after that transplant, compared to the time before it. beforehand, i had terminal heart failure, as i said. i had a condition where you get fluid retention, and i felt very unwell, couldn't walk at all, couldn't breathe properly, and after my transplant it was like a new lease of life. i basically felt back to normal again. i had a new heart and 20 years later, i'm here to tell you about it, and 50 years ago, as you said in your bulletin, it was the year in 1967 when there was the first heart transplant. and you have a son who would not
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be here without that transplant? yes, michael, 17 years old, and he was born in bristol like me and without my transplant he would not be here, so in some ways two lives were sort of saved. tell us about the band, then? well, 11 transplants have been in the band so far, hearts, lungs, livers and kidneys. there have been three heart transplants. myself, james tottle, and paul rooney, who had a heart transplant has well. sadly one of our members, simon cooper, who had a liver and lung transplant, died last year of cancer. we have been trying to find someone to replace him but we are hoping next year to relaunch the band and do another song and celebrate the gift of life through music. we do associate music, don't we, very often with occasions of great happiness and joy? of being a form of celebration, so perhaps it is a really appropriate way for all
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of you people in the band to say thank you to your donors, to say thank you for this second chance at life. do you know much about your donor? sadly, i don't know anything about my donor, but i think they might have been 19 years old and they might have been from the west midlands, and that is where they died. my life was saved on easter weekend 1997. i've written one song for the gifted organs, called tomorrow. i've had 20 years' worth of tomorrows because of my donor. one line is, it's not a gift for christmas, it's for life. and as the years have gone on, when we look back to first transplant and look at transplant technology now, actually, people who have had transplants actually, people who have had
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transplants are living much longer in general because of the after—care as well? yes, the length of time you are living is a lot longer, over 30 years, the record. there are lots more immunosuppressa nts available now which help to stop my heart from being rejected, my heart did reject after about three months, but they saved my life again at the hospital, so that is always a bit of a worry, but the after—care is amazing and it is all free with the national health service, so it is something we should really be grateful for in this country. another great story of a successful heart transplant. and american football stadium which was due to be demolished has failed to implode in the united states. rooms of smoke was seen rising from the building. but that was it — it remained
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standing after 10% of the charges failed to go off. definitely no touchdown there! the moon is going touchdown there! the moon is going to move closer to the earth tonight and will appear larger and brighter in the sky, a phenomenon known as a supermoon. a strong is say skywatchers will get spectacular views tonight and tomorrow morning. let's have a look at the weather. a lot of twists and turns for the week ahead, but it all started on a fairly quiet and mundane note. it was a quiet day today with large areas of cloud, some sunshine as well. this evening and overnight central and eastern areas will receive the lion's share of the clear spells. the odd spot of rain further west, but temperatures should hold above freezing. monday is not bad, some early fog in east anglia and the south—east. thick fog could produce
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the odd bit of rain, but it is largely dry with spells of sunshine and temperatures 8—11. but as we look deeper into the week after that quiet start, the middle of the week will bring some very wet and windy weather and for the end of the week it will turn much colder and with that cold air some of us will get to see some snow. this is bbc news, the headlines: all four board members of the government's social mobility commission have resigned in protest at what they see as a lack of progress towards a fairer britain. the government, probably for understandable reasons, is focused on brexit and seems to lack the bandwith to be able to translate the rhetoric of healing social division and promoting social
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justice into reality. pressure mounts on the prime minister to refuse to settle the uk's "divorce bill" unless the eu agrees to a series of demands. donald trump hits out at the fbi in a series of angry tweets, claiming the agency's reputation is in tatters. all our programme this week my guess is leona mosley. this powerful story is leona mosley. this powerful story is her first novel. now it is time for the sport. an update on the football in a moment and a surprising scoreline at manchester city. but england are in trouble
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in the 2nd ashes test, australia declared a42 for 8 on the second day and england, who are already one down in the series, closed on 29—1. from adelaide, here's our sports correspondent andy swiss. welcome to adelaide where we might have seen a significant date in the ashes series. ultimately it is a dispiriting day as far as england fa ns dispiriting day as far as england fans are concerned. they began well enough with an early breakthrough but the wickets they needed failed to materialise and instead an unbeaten century from shaun marsh has left the english batsman with a mountain to climb. if they won had been tricky for england, they two was to prove even tupper as pursed their hopes of restricting australia's batsman were dashed. shaun marsh has had a stop— start career, and seemed a strange selection, but he completed a
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brilliant century and it suddenly made sense. in indication for him and euphoria for the adelaide crowd. when he did offer up a chat, this is summed up england's day, alastair cook and james vince with a moment they would rather forget. cook and james vince with a moment they would ratherforget. a cook and james vince with a moment they would rather forget. a symbol of england's struggles as marsh piled on the misery. australia eventually declared on 4112—8 leaving england with a cricketing mountain to climb. under floodlights and under the fiercest pressure they needed a solid start, but they did not get it. mark stoneman stopped but i just not get it. mark stoneman stopped but ijust 18. not get it. mark stoneman stopped but ijust18. it was cricket at its most compelling, cook surviving another big appeal. england were jittery but in the nick of time the rain arrived ending play for the day but still leaving the visitors facing a huge batting challenge. it has been a tough day for england, particularly their bowlers with not
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enough pace in the england bowling attack. once again joe enough pace in the england bowling attack. once againjoe root‘s decision to put australia in to bat yesterday has come under the microscope. trevor bayliss insists it was not a mistake. he would not do anything different. it is well documented that one of our challenges is taking wickets on flatter wickets and joe root wanted to give our guys the best opportunity to take 20 wickets. as we have just opportunity to take 20 wickets. as we havejust said, on opportunity to take 20 wickets. as we have just said, on this occasion it did not work out our way. we thought we bowled pretty well. it is just the way it is. it is a huge match in the context of the series. how confident i do pray players that they can turn this around? it is a good feeling in the dressing room. shaun showed it is not impossible to score runs out of there. it is not impossible to score runs. there is a
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long time left in the game. as far as australia are concerned, no doubting their hero of the day, shaun marsh. his selection in this series was questioned by people. it was pretty controversial. he has been recalled eight times for his country, a very stop — start career. afterwards he explained just what this innings meant to him. there we re this innings meant to him. there were a few emotions. probably at 90 i started to get a bit nervous. just extremely happy to get 100 for my country and to get 100 is pretty special. australia have left england with a huge challenge on day three. they need a big century from someone. they have had lots of cameos so far, we saw that in brisbane, but steve smith's1li1 not out and the unbeaten century from marsh here, that is what england
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have to replicate and they have to do it tomorrow if they want to get back into this match and this series. andy swiss in adelaide. ben stokes' involvement in the ashes is still dependent on the cps as they decide whether he will face charges or not for assault. he played in his first match for canterbury in new zealand today and he was bowled forjust canterbury in new zealand today and he was bowled for just two canterbury in new zealand today and he was bowled forjust two runs as they lost to otago in the one—day cup. the england all—rounder also bowled nine overs but failed to take a wicket. their next match is on wednesday. manchester city can regain their 8—point lead at the top if they beat west ham. it should be a formality against the hammers who are in the bottom three. but they were stunned just before half—time despite having most of the possession. angelo ogbonna headed
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west ham in front. but they brought on gabrieljesus after the break and his cross found its way to nicolas otamendi. a couple of fine saves. it was 1—1 between bournemouth and southampton. eddie howe turned a0 this week. today a chance for the bournemouth manager to mark the occasion by having the neighbours round. if he was hoping for celebrations, southampton had other ideas. this is one of a number of fine saves from fraser forster. the referee was in no mind to offer gifts, the home side convinced it was a penalty. it was not given. it was a penalty. it was not given. it was up to his players to lift the mood and before half—time brian fraser did that. it was no more than they deserved. still the visitors did have chances, and eventually won fell to charlie austin, the striker
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seizing the opportunity to dampen spirits and forcing the home fans to calm down a bit. not quite how eddie howe had hoped his afternoon would turn out. it almost got worse, austin with a missed chance to ruin his party. nathan aki should have saved the day in the last moment, but both sides take the point. eddie howe left to reflect. today we were good. i thought southampton were good. i thought southampton were good as well and it was a great game. two very good attacking teams. there was no thought of any team settling for a point and both teams went for it right to the end. we are disappointed not to hold onto the lead. a much improved performance. disappointed not to hold onto the lead. a much improved performancelj lead. a much improved performance.” think it was a nice derby. at the end of the first half they were a bit better than us after they scored. but in the second half it was really positive, our reaction. after they equalised both teams
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tried to win the game. for me it was a nice game. rangers are up to second in the scottish premiership on goal difference. they've jumped above aberdeen after beating them 2—1 at pittodrie. they'vejump in above aberdeen they've jump in the ve aberdeen they've jump in the table erdeen they've jump in the table atieen they've jump in the table at stake and aberdeen's manager derek mckinney is odds—on favourite in the running to become the next rangers boss. plenty of sideshows at pittodrie, but in the main event rangers took an early lead. danny wilson's header looping perfectly into the far corner. it took aberdeen until the a5th minute to get close and it could not have come much closer, and the concert i'm rattling the bar. rangers remained one go up rattling the bar. rangers remained one go up but then when one man down. former dons midfielder ryan jack seeing red, the referee deciding this was a stamp on his old stomping ground. it did not seem to affect rangers much. josh windass tucked home a second. aberdeen hit
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back immediately, teenage substitute frank ross making quite an impression, but they could not force an equaliser. rangers had taken six points of aberdeen in a week, next will they take their manager as well? nine more second—round ties in the fa cup. all the results and the goals you can find on the bbc sport website. non—league woking is into the third round draw after drawing with league one peterborough. jo ward fired home this late equaliser for the national league side. that is the fifth tier to force a replay. they were last in the third round in 1997. they were last in the third round in 1997. alfie hewett has become the first british singles winner at the end of season wheelchair masters. he beat compatriot gordon reid in the loughborough final today. the 19—year—old won in straight sets 6—3, 6—2 to become the first british champion in 23 years of the event. it was a repeat of the rio 2016 and
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paralympic final, gordon reid versus alfie hewitt. back then gordon reid was crowned champion, but today the ta bles were was crowned champion, but today the tables were turned as the 19—year—old alfie hewitt beat his team—mates in straight sets to become masters champion. gordon reid won the first three games but struggled to maintain the intensity and hewitt capitalised winning the next eight consecutive games and winning the match 6—3, 6—2.” next eight consecutive games and winning the match 6-3, 6-2. i have had a tough couple of weeks and to come through like i have and have performances like i had today i am kind of shocked myself to be honest. i feel great. if andy lapthorne was to win his quarterfinal against david wagnerfrom to win his quarterfinal against david wagner from america he would become world number one, but today was not his day. david wiped there was not his day. david wiped there was a formidable opponent, playing smart and tactical tennis that he could not keep up with. he lost the match in straight sets. it is tough
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to take, it is the story of my career, i have had to bounce back every so often and it will be hard to do this time, but i will go again. it has been a positive tournament for the brits, three out of five of them making it to the finals. alfie hewitt becomes the first british player to win the men's masters title. one game in the by men's masters title. one game in the rugby union aviva premiership. harlequins staged a remarkable fightback to beat saracens by a point. quins trailed by eight points going into the final minutes before this converted try by charlie walker reduced the deficit to one. saracens then extended their lead. but then they went over with two minutes remaining. the score was 20—19.
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quins move up to seventh in the table. ronnie o'sullivan is looking like the man to beat at snooker‘s uk championship. the defending champion mark selby was knocked out yesterday in york but there was no problem for o'sullivan, who's going for a record—equalling sixth uk title. he wasn't at his best against michael georgiou but still won by 6—1. the world number four goes into the third round where he'll face either michael white or matthew selt. anotherformer uk another former uk champion anotherformer uk champion is into the third round. but shaun murphy survived a major scare against liam highfield. he was 5—a up when he missed that red. murphy came through ina dramatic missed that red. murphy came through in a dramatic decider, 6—5. murphy came through in a dramatic decider, 6—5. that's all the sport for now. and now it is time for meet the author. fiona mozley‘s elmet is a story that you might describe as contemporary gothic, raw and dark and lyrical with a rich bit of melodrama, debut novel powerfully enough to take it to the man booker
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shortlist in the autumn, told by a 1a—year—old, it sets the here and now against a brutal and more elemental past and explores a complex and ambiguous relationship between three members of a family who are all in their own ways different. welcome. it's interesting that in trying to write about the contemporary world, trying to say something about the contemporary world, you were drawn to a wild past, a man who lives on land that he doesn't own in a house that was built with his own hands. how did you come to feel that that was the best avenue to write about the here and now? i think contrast is always a good two when trying to talk
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tool when trying to talk about something very specific, and i did want to address the issues of today. i think those are brought into relief by considering the history of the place, kind of old ways of living, different ways of living, and i wanted to place those things were many years ago, that is not necessarily true? modes of morality change, sometimes for the better
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it is told by daniel who is 1a, and it is a story that revolves around his slightly older sister and their father. it is a very tight conception. the stage is not very crowded. they are very
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her issue is that she takes ifte hefithe in. "new ~ ~ , ,. daniel is stuck with telling the story which it does worry daniel is stuck with telling the story which he does very
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touchingly and lyrically. when you have described it justifies the phrase which i used moment ago, that it is a gothic novel in many ways. it uses extremes, almost as if it is lit in bright colours and darknes. i do see this as a genre piece and i was influenced by the narrative arc of westerns, i was influenced by the setting of yorkshire, and because this plays with the genre there are moments which are familiar in there in their extremity and melodrama. there's a lot of touching the landscape involved in this. elmet is a place to this day, but it was the last celtic kingdom? that's right. in around the seventh and eighth century, it was the last kingdom that kept... in england, that is, that kept its celtic heritage, and that was a term
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which is problematic in many respects, but there is something separate and distinct about it. ted hughes has written about this. ted hughes came from that soil and he did write about this, did that influence you? yes and no. i read his poems as i was drawing to the end of the project. but i think that they did influence it in some respects. the passion that he instils in the relationship between people and their surroundings, physical surroundings, is one of his great characteristics, and that is clearly what you are trying to get to here, there's a great deal of lyricism in the course of a story which is sometimes quite dark and spare and even brutal, in the plot, but you imbue this with a lyrical top. i was aware there were so much
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darkness in it, so much which was unpleasant and i really wanted to counter balance it with some lightness. i wanted the description of the place and the family relationships to have a warmth and in terms of the landscape it is so much about physicality and i wanted it to be a landscape that you could reach out and touch, something that appealed to all the human senses. without going into the details of the climax of the book, there is a sense with which there is a victory of sorts but nevertheless the book has a feeling of something that has been lost. there is a sense of loss. so much of the book is about a lost world, people trying to recover that lost world. you are still in your 20s. just about. so, this is a book that to some degree must be seen as one that speaks of your generation. do you think the sensibility
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you are bringing to this is one which is quite common? that there is a feeling as people of your age look forward, that it is inescapable that something has gone? i think so. certainly in terms of forging a home and finding a place to live, that is one of the greatest challenges. that is at the centre of the story. it is a book set in yorkshire but i started writing it in london, so it has a double identity. first novel, you end up on the man booker short list, alongside the winning book and authors like paul auster, extraordinary. yes, it is. the enormity of it only hit me at the ceremony, because part of me had been trying to shut it down, and just take it one step at a time, but when i got to the ceremony and all those people around me,
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that is when it dawned on me, that my life had changed. to put it crudely, it must be encouraging, you want to write, you are doing a ph.d. part—time at the university of york. fundamentally you want to write fiction and that is not bad way to start. yes, it is a pretty good way to start, and one other thing is the short listing has done for me is allowed me to be more daring in the future. there is an issue with who gets to write, the sort of fiction that different people get to write and feel entitled to write and this short listing allows me to be brave in the future, i hope. fiona mozley, author of elmet, thank you very much. thank you. hello. our weather story for the coming week starts off on a fairly mundane note, just as it was today
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really. a lot of dry weather, large areas of cloud, some spells of sunshine. that is how it looked on the isle of wight a bit earlier on. this evening it will stay relatively quiet. central and eastern areas will see clear spells and there could be apache frost and fog patches. more cloud keeping into western areas with the odd spot of rain and temperatures should hold up quite nicely. but it will be a chilly start to monday morning in eastern areas and in east anglia and the south—east there could be fog patches around for the monday morning commute. further west brightness. cloud in devon and cornwall and the western half of wales. the odd spot of rain in east wales, the west midlands and in northern england. a chilly start in eastern areas. eastern scotland is fine, dry and bright. west of scotla nd fine, dry and bright. west of scotland and northern ireland will be affected by patchy cloud and
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light rain. as we go on through monday there will be fairly large areas of cloud drifting from the north west to the south east. the figures cloud produces rain and many places will be dry with temperatures not doing too badly for this time of the year. on tuesday there could be some fog in the south east. things should brighten up with some sunny spells. things begin to change in the north west. the winds will strengthen and we see rain setting in across the hills in scotland and on wednesday those changes get a bit more dramatic. the wind will strengthen further in the west and the rain turns heavier and drifts in across northern ireland. it will be across northern ireland. it will be a mild day ahead of this. quite a deep area of low pressure which will bring in very heavy rain and strong winds on wednesday night. it could cause some disruption and as it clears the way we get plunged back
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into the deep freeze. this cold air blowing down all the way from the arctic on a strong, northerly wind. after that quiet start to the week it will turn wet and windy and the end of the week means some of us will see some snow. theresa may comes under renewed pressure to take a tougher line on the eu over brexit. a group of leading brexiteer ‘s demand guarantees before any divorce bill is paid. the risk is that we paid the money from the day we leave and that reduces our negotiating hand. also on programme: the government defended its record on improving social equality after all four members of the social mobility commission resigned. australia take control on day two of the second
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ashes test in adelaide. and in the race to become uk city of culture 2021 we look at coventry‘s chances in the first of our profiles. theresa may is coming under increasing pressure to adopt a tougher line during brexit negotiations as she prepares to travel to brussels tomorrow for talks with the president of the european commission. an influential group of brexit supporters has written an open letter urging the prime minister to refuse to settle the uk's so—called divorce bill u nless the uk's so—called divorce bill unless brussels agrees to a series of demands. they have met plenty of
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times before, always appearing friendly, but there is a lot riding when they get together tomorrow, whether eu leaders can be persuaded to move brexit talks on later this month, while back home some of her mps have upped the pressure. a handful of brexit backing tories have written to the prime minister, laying down conditions they want met, including a promise that the european court of justice met, including a promise that the european court ofjustice will cease to have anyjurisdiction over the uk. for some this goes to the heart of the brexit debate. the european court ofjustice is there to rule on all matters to do with the european union. we will have left the european union and therefore the simple point is we should not therefore have to look to the european court of justice therefore have to look to the european court ofjustice or to have judgments made by them found directly back here in the uk. when it comes to the european court of justice theresa may has signalled it will have a role during any
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transitional period but not after. some ardent brexiteers fear there could be compromised as the eu wants it to keep overseeing citizens' writes. today the government insisted european law would not hold sway over british law and had a warning for backbenchers. the supreme court will decide what the law of the country is in this country as voted on by parliament. that is the big thing theresa may has achieved. there is an even bigger point. the choice we face now is not between this brexit or that brexit. if we do not back theresa may, we will have no brexit. but there are competing views over several aspects of these talks. ireland will be wary weather the uk meet the eu. today the irish government still was not convinced as to how that can be achieved. the irish government is not being unreasonable. we are asking
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questions that need more credible a nswe rs questions that need more credible answers before we can allow this process to move on. tonight there is still no agreement in key areas on theissues still no agreement in key areas on the issues the eu said it wanted progress before moving on to talk trade. tomorrow's meeting is a crucial step in deciding whether enough has been done. the outcome is vital but far from certain. the government has been defending its record on promoting greater social equality after all four members of the social mobility commission resigned. led by the former labour cabinet minister alan milburn, they say the government is not doing enough to improve the life chances of people in england from poorer backgrounds. downing street said mr milburn had been told he was already going to be replaced as chair of the commission. your chances of getting a good job, finding a school for your children and being able to afford somewhere decent to live, issues at the heart
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of social mobility and from day one in power tackling inequality was a personal priority for theresa may. the mission to make britain a country that works for everyone means more than fighting these injustices. if you are from an ordinary, working—class family life is harder than many people in westminster realise. what is lacking here is meaningful political action to translate very good words into deeds. in the end, what counts in politics is not what you talk about, it's what you do. in politics is not what you and i'm afraid the divisions in britain are becoming wider. they're becoming wider economically, socially and geographically. economically, socially downing street says it had already told mr milburn it planned to appoint a new chair as his term in office had ended. so, is the former labour minister's very public resignation sour grapes or political point scoring? very public resignation sour grapes well, alan milburn and i both care deeply about social mobility and equality of opportunity. he said that. and equality of opportunity.
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and he said you wanted to keep him on, is that true? i'm not going to get into the discussions we have inside the government. the discussions we have inside the he's done a fantasticjob. the discussions we have inside the
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