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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  August 10, 2017 11:00am-12:59pm BST

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this is bbc news and these are the top stories developing at 11. police defend paying a child rapist for information as part of an investigation into a grooming gang as "the right thing to do". no, we don't support the police in doing this. we think it was a misguided action, putting a person who had a track record of abusing girls into a situation with other vulnerable girls. the fact of the matter is, we absolutely did not plant xy, the informant in this case, in the midst of vulnerable women and girls. the war of words escalates — north korea promises that a plan to fire missiles near us territory will be ready in days. nhs waiting lists hit a ten—year high — other key targets including urgent referral for cancer care have also been missed. also in the next hour — claims that the number of people sleeping on the streets
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could jump dramatically. the charity, crisis, says the problem may climb by three quarters in the uk over the next ten years. a second chance to gold — botswanan athlete isaac makwala will run in the final of tinai's 200m after running his won alone against the clock. i wish to thank the imf for giving me another chance. and two women are rescued from the top deck ofa women are rescued from the top deck of a double—decker bus after it crashed into a shop on a busy london high street. the driver has been taken to hospital. good morning.
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welcome to bbc newsroom live. northumbria police has defended paying £10,000 to a convicted child rapist. 0fficers did it to gather information in an abuse investigation. the force is standing by its actions after 17 mostly south—asian men and one woman were convicted of grooming vulnerable girls in newcastle. critics said it could have put victims at greater risk. responding to the convictions, a former director of public prosecutions, lord macdonald, said it was time to identify the activity of south asian gangs who target vulnerable white girls as "a profoundly racist crime". dan johnson reports. the faces of just some of those who abused young women across newcastle's west end. vulnerable girls were given drinks and drugs and passed around for sex. the gang was caught in one
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of the biggest child abuse investigations the north of england has seen. but now there are questions, outrage even, over some of the police tactics. was it right to pay a convicted child rapist £10,000 to be an informant? we don't support the police in doing this. we think it was a misguided action, putting a person who had a track record of abusing girls into a situation with other vulnerable girls and perpetrators, and then paying them for the privilege of doing that. northumbria police has strongly defended the payment. it's surprising and disappointing for the nspcc to adopt the stance they have. this is an ill—informed position that they have taken.
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the fact is, we absolutely did not plant xy, the informant, in the midst of vulnerable girls, that did not happen. the force says this information helped get convictions and stopped other girls being abused. northumbria's police commissioner says she was uneasy about paying a rapist, but ultimately, she's satisfied everything was done properly. these are complex cases, and difficultjudgments have to be made. dan johnson, bbc news. a former director of public prosecutions, lord mcdonald, says there has been a reluctance in the past to investigate the activity of asian gangs who target vulnerable white girls — and that the issue can't be ignored: i think some recognition that this is a problem, wide recognition in all communities, people coming together to deal
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with it across communities and recognising it for what it is, not pretending it's something else, not shying away from it, recognising it for what it is, which is profoundly racist crime. 0ur correspondent dan whitworth is outside northumbria police headquarters. chief constable steve ashman has had a lot of criticism directed at his force because of the use of an informer in this situation. what has he said this morning? well, you heard a bit in our reportjust then. he has firmly rejected any criticism of paying the informant. ultimately, chief constable steve ashman, who is in charge at northumbria police headquarters, has said that the ends justify the means. not forgetting, of course, the informant, known as
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xy for legal reasons, or the information provided, helped secure 18 convictions yesterday of asexual exploitative gang who were found guilty of sexual expectation and drugs offences against very young women and girls. 0ne drugs offences against very young women and girls. one of the victims was as young as 1a. so steve ashman admits it is a debate and raises questions about the issue of paying informants such as xy, a convicted child rapist, public money, around £10,000. he admits there is a debate to be had, but he says in this case, the end justifies the means. presumably, the police are pointing to the fact that this is part of a wider operation and is notjust about yesterday's convictions? 10096. this is all part of operation sanctuary. this was a much wider operation and has been going on for four years around newcastle. the
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police here have had 50 full—time detectives working on it. it made more than 460 arrests, and they have made more than 100 convictions in this case. so steve ashman, the chief constable at northumbria police, says yes, that one off payment was not good, but the end justified the means. but it is part ofa justified the means. but it is part of a much wider operation. we heard a clip of lord ken macdonald, the former director of public prosecutions. he is saying that when crimes such as these, predominantly carried out by asian men, are investigated, they must be investigated, they must be investigated for what they are, which is, as ken macdonald puts it, profoundly racist crimes. he has been backed by sarah champion, the labourmpfor been backed by sarah champion, the labour mp for rotherham, who also says more research needs to be done about why people from these
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communities are carrying out these types of crimes. thank you. we will continue the story throughout the morning. in half an hour, i will speak to the man who led the prosecution of the rochdale sex gang in 2012. he also has some criticisms of the police in northumbria and the tactics they used to. the war of words between the us and north korea is intensifying, as pyongyang says a plan to fire missiles overjapan to land in the sea near the us territory guam will soon be ready. state media denounced donald trump's warnings of "fire and fury", saying the us leader was "bereft of reason". the us has warned north korea's actions could mean the "end of its regime". yogita limaye reports from seoul. a show of strength in pyongyang. north korean state television showed a mass of people marching in support of the leadership in the country, even as the government made more threats.
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these are details of its plan to attack guam. four rockets will fly overjapan and land in the pacific ocean near the island, it says. it's drills by us bomber aircraft like these, which are stationed at guam, that have angered pyongyang. but while a fierce reaction from north korea is expected, this time it's matched by aggression from the us president. after saying pyongyang would be met by fire and fury, donald trump boasted about america's nuclear arsenal, a message which will be perceived as another threat by north korea. it's making people around the world nervous, and many countries have urged restraint. 0ur strong wish is that the united states keeps calm and refrains from any moves that would provoke another party into actions that might be dangerous. the border is just about 50 kilometres from here, but things on these streets are not tense.
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this country has dealt with threats from its neighbour for a long time now, and that's why perhaps people here are unlikely to believe just yet that this war of words will turn into something more. yogita limaye, bbc news, seoul. 0ur correspondent robin brant is in seoul. some of the papers here are full of maps of the potential damage that north korea might be able to do if it can nuclear rise weapons and fire them across. it says the american west coast is in the cross hairs. you are sitting right in a country that has been living with this fear for decades. you're right. for a long time, the 10 million people of this city and the people of this country have faced the threat of a military confrontation with the
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regime in the north. more recently, the rhetoric has escalated and so has the threat of a nuclear confrontation with the north. but as you heard in that report, its a drizzly thursday evening in seoul. it has just drizzly thursday evening in seoul. it hasjust gone drizzly thursday evening in seoul. it has just gone seven o'clock at night. people have left work and are having dinner and it is pretty normal here. people are used to the rhetoric and the preparations. if you look at the tone of what we have heard from military representatives here and also government ministry today, we heard from thejoint chiefs of staff, reminding anyone listening of the close military alliance between south korea and the united states. that is crucial to the defence of people in this country. and from the government, the foreign ministry is urging a more conciliatory tone and urges those in the north to come to the negotiating table and resume talks
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aimed at the nuclear rising the whole of this peninsula. that reflects the tone of the new president here, president moon. we have heard from the presidential spokesman in the last few hours after a scheduled meeting of the country's national security council, they are talking about cooperation with any country that wants to resolve tensions. now we had from seoul to the american territory of guam, where we can speak like to victoria guerrero. good evening from your perspective. new chair attack force for independence for guam. robin was outlining some of the thoughts in seoul, but how does it feel to you in guam? well, thoughts in seoul, but how does it feelto you in guam? well, it's thoughts in seoul, but how does it feel to you in guam? well, it's very frustrating to be at the centre of all of this conflict. as you mentioned, guam is a us territory
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and an unincorporated territory. the united states has full sovereignty over the island and we are fighting for our people's sovereignty. the people of guam have been here for 4000 years. we have been colonised by spain, the united states, japan and the united states again. this recent conflict is reminiscent of world war ii, when guam was caught in the conflict between the us and japan. we don't want to repeat the m ista kes japan. we don't want to repeat the mistakes of history and our people have been fighting for our future. we have been fighting to exercise oui’ we have been fighting to exercise our right is of determination. you clearly feel that yet again, geopolitics is interfering in the lives of the people of guam. how is it affecting people psychologically? i have two young children, a five—year—old and a two—year—old boy. and explaining to them what
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this means is always something that is very realfor this means is always something that is very real for me. this isn't the first time we have been threatened with an attack. 0ur first time we have been threatened with an attack. our experience, living in a place that is so heavily militarised is that we regularly see and hear bombers. and to explain that one day, they could really drop a bomb, iasked my son, what that one day, they could really drop a bomb, i asked my son, what would it mean if a bomb hit guam? and he just bowed his head and didn't even wa nt to just bowed his head and didn't even want to express the words. so for them at such a young age to know that live here in this beautiful paradise that is their homeland, they run the risk of something like that, is terrifying. there are people here with ptsd from world war ii, ourelders, people here with ptsd from world war ii, our elders, who have experienced an attack and survived a war. this brings back memories for them. does it feel real? that might sound a strange question, but these are huge
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geopolitics is being dealt with here and the tectonic plates feel as if they are shifting when you read the papers on this side of the world. does it actually feel that it really could happen, or that this isjust more sabre rattling?|j could happen, or that this isjust more sabre rattling? i think we are dealing with two very unpredictable men who are leading this conversation in a very irresponsible way. i wish it felt more real in the sense that our people are not prepared for what we would actually do ifa prepared for what we would actually do if a bomb were launched in the waters near guam. i don't know where the nearest bunker is or fallout shelter. we aren't being prepared, and the us should have a responsibility to notjust prepare its military personnel and dependents, but also us. what would happen's where would we go? would we
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even survive? those are not conversations that are happening. instead, we arejust conversations that are happening. instead, we are just hearing the rhetoric and being reassured that it is not a real threat, guam's threat level has not increased. but that is also short—sighted and irresponsible on the part of the people leading us. we need a plan. 0ne on the part of the people leading us. we need a plan. one of my uncles was saying, this is like a juvenile is doing drive—by shootings, but evenin is doing drive—by shootings, but even in drive—by shootings, sometimes someone gets shot. and if guam were to be bombed, our people need to be prepared. people need the opportunity to be sovereign and avoid these situations. we need to be able to negotiate better relationships with our neighbours. the us presence here is touted as protecting us from these threats, but these threats exist because the us is here. sorry to cut you off,
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but thank you very much. the number of people waiting for routine surgery in england injune was the highest since december 2007. 3.83 million patients were on lists for operations. other key nhs targets were also missed — including urgent referrals for cancer care. iamjoined by i am joined by our health editor hugh pym. take us through these figures. what do these numbers mean? this is all about waiting lists for routine surgery. in other words, you wait for something that is not an emergency. you may be referred for a hip and knee replacement and you have to wait for it. the number waiting in total is now the highest since late 2007. there were 3.83
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million patients in england on the lists for operations in june. million patients in england on the lists for operations injune. nhs england say it is actually probably more than 4 million, because not all hospitals reported. how many were seen within 18 weeks? that is the key benchmark for routine surgery. injune, the key benchmark for routine surgery. in june, the percentage key benchmark for routine surgery. injune, the percentage seen within 18 weeks was 90.3%. the target is 9296. 18 weeks was 90.3%. the target is 92%. so that is an increasing number who are waiting longer than 18 weeks and that target being missed again. 0n cancer treatment, this is for urgent referrals by a gp to a specialist to start cancer treatment. that should be within 62 days. in june, treatment. that should be within 62 days. injune, the percentage who did start within 62 days was 80.5%, again below the target of 85%. cancer charities say that leaves a lot of people with cancer having to wait too long to start their badly
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needed treatment. can we extrapolate anything from these figures to learn something about the nhs? well, these key targets have been missed for a year or key targets have been missed for a year 01’ more key targets have been missed for a year or more in key targets have been missed for a year 01’ more in some cases. so key targets have been missed for a year or more in some cases. so it tells us that there are benches which are to give patients some form of assurance that they will be seen quickly and that, in some cases, is not happening and in some cases, it is getting worse. the nhs will say they are seeing more patients year—on—year and more procedures are being carried out. demand continues to rise and to a certain extent, they are trying to meet that higher demand, but the resources are not keeping up. funding is not rising as fast as patient numbers. things are stretched, and this is borne out by these figures. when figures like this come out, it inevitably
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increases political pressure. but on the political level, we are dealing with what would need to be a seismic shift, ie pumping in a lot more money so that the nhs is well funded. and yet these figures suggest that the nhs still struggles. so what do you think the political options are in the coming months and years? there have been increasing calls for a cross—party consensus for, in the case of england, the three main parties at westminster to get together to come up westminster to get together to come up with a solution. that was the call before the election. it is a lot harder now, with all the complex parliamentary arithmetic of theresa may's government not being a majority. you need a consensus on how to raise the money. how much more money do you need, how much taxation would be needed, how much are people prepared to pay and what about social care? some say the nhs needs to be more efficient as well and could make better use of
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resources . and could make better use of resources. i suspect this debate will carry on, with the government focusing on other issues like brexit, and more patients will see longer waits for treatment. one wonders at what point you hit a limitand it wonders at what point you hit a limit and it moves the whole agenda on, but let's see. the headlines on bbc newsroom live: police defend paying a child rapist for information as part of an investigation into a grooming gang as "the right thing to do". north korea says a plan that could see it 54 missiles near the us territory of guam will be ready in a matter of days. nhs waiting lists have hit a ten—year high in england — other key targets including urgent referral for cancer care have also been missed. and sn sport... after his reprieve in the 200 metres, issac makwala goes for gold tonight at the world athletics championships. the botswanan qualified via a time trial and then the semi finals
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after his quarantine period for sickness had elapsed. katarina johnson thompson will attempt to qualify for the high jump final. she'll have to improve on her efforts in the heptathlon high jump competition though to make it through. and jordan spieth sez he isn't feeling the pressure as he attempts to become the youngest player to win a career grand slam at the us pga golf which starts later today. the open champion tees off at quail hollowjust before 1.30 our time. i'll be back with more on those stories. the botswa nan athlete isaac makwala has qualified for the final of the world athletics 200m after running his heat alone against the clock. he was unable to take part in the heats on monday night, because the athletics authorities said he had the norovirus. our sports correspondent jessica creighton is at the london stadium for us now.
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i was watching isaac makwala last night after he ran in the semis, and he was angry in the interview. he said he was being fired on by his anger at what had happened, his lack of ability to take part in the 400m, and it seemed that he was firing on all cylinders because of his predicament. do you think he is putting it behind him now and do you think you can win gold? as you said, he did say in that interview that he was running with anger in his belly and perhaps that was what spurred him on to get into this final. but yesterday was certainly one of the more unusual base at these world athletics championships. as you say, one of the major talking points has been about this norovirus outbreak. isaac makwala, the botswanan athlete, has been at the heart of this story and whether or not he would be allowed to compete. 4+1 on this track, he was given this
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remarkable second chance by the iaaf to compete. it was just him against the clock, with the crowd roaring him on, a rare sight on the athletics circuit. 0ur sports correspondent andy swiss has more. 24 hours ago his dream seemed dashed. tonight, he could be world champion. isaac makwala's remarkable evening began with a race against the clock after the athletics authorities said he could finally run his 200 metres heat two days after his rivals. after meeting his qualifying time, he hardly seemed to be suffering. and barely two hours later, he roared through on the inside to reach the final, with britain's nethaneel mitchell—bla ke also through. afterwards, makwala thanked the authorities for his chance, but said the crowd also inspired him. i want to thank the iaaf for giving me another chance and the crowd is so amazing.
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they didn't need to believe, the crowd being british, i just want to thank this crowd, it's so amazing! it was also a good evening for sir mo farah, as he is through his 5,000 metres heat in second place. he'll be joined in saturday's final by fellow briton andrew prichard. but tonight, the focus here will be on the men's 200 metres and for isaac makwala, after an extraordinary few days, there just might be a fairy tale finish. andy swiss, bbc news, at the london stadium. jessica is still at the london stadium. what of makwala's chances of winning? if he has got all this anger and the talent and the strength, one would think he would bea strength, one would think he would be a hard guy to beat. yes, but he has been through a lot mentally. as tuesday, he went into these world
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championships as the fastest man in the world over 200m and was expected to be one of the closest challengers to be one of the closest challengers to one of the favourites in this race, the south african sprinter wayde van niekerk. so we will have to see how it all plays out. the race begins at 9:50pm tonight. a bit of news coming in. modern slavery and human trafficking, we are called after a briefing from the national crime agency, is more prevalent than had been previously thought. there are more than 300 lives policing operations currently targeting those responsible in this country. that is a developing story. we have had our correspondent at the national crime agency briefing this morning and we
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will try to get hold of him in the next half—hour. the homelessness charity crisis has predicted that the problem could rise by more than 70% in the next ten years. crisis says there are already 250,000 people in the uk sleeping rough, or in hostels, refuges, and even cars and bus shelters. it's urged the government to rapidly increase the number of houses built over the next 20 years. earlier today barry deighan, a chef who lost his home after becoming unemployed, spoke to victoria derbyshire about his journey into homelessness. when i became homeless, i suffer served for a while and that i was booking into hostels to enable me to have a shower, change of clothes and a good night's sleep. there were times when i was sleeping in doorways in blocks of flats. in the stairwell? because it is sheltered. and a bit warmer and safer than
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being on the street. i never experienced this before. and how would you describe it?|j experienced this before. and how would you describe it? i think it's disgraceful that anybody has to live like that. i am not about me. but what words would you use to describe it? well, i think it's shamefulthat we have to put ourselves in a position where we can evict people and expect them to sleep on the pavement. it makes you feel like you are isolated. you feel rejected by society. you immediately come under that label where people make stereotypical remarks about you. you encounter more aggression from members of society. and it is very
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difficult day in and day out because you are constantly exhausted because you are constantly exhausted because you don't ever get a decent night's sleep. let's get more on this story. jon sparkes is the ceo for the homeless charity crisis, and hejoins me now. a bit about your methodology, please? you are estimating that something may happen ten years into the future. how have you come to this figure? we worked with the experts in herriot watt who have been working on homelessness analysis for many years. they have looked at trends in the last few yea rs. looked at trends in the last few years. they have made some projections going forward and we have come up with these estimates. tell us about the trends in the last few years and then going forward. tell us about the trends in the last few years and then going forwardm the last five years, the most acute forms of homelessness, rough sleeping and people living in hostels and sofa surfing, have
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increased by 35%. it is nearly a quarter of a million people. the projection is that that headline figure will continue to go up by 25% in the next ten years. and why is it predicted that it will continue to go up? the other thing the report highlights is what the three causes of homelessness are. firstly, poverty. it is well established that living in poverty makes the likelihood of becoming had was much higher. the second factor is housing, therefore availability —— the affordability of validity of housing. and then the third factor is where there is good prevention activity, we see the figure going up more slowly or even reducing. but
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presumably, you will acknowledge that it presumably, you will acknowledge thatitis presumably, you will acknowledge that it is difficult to be certain about how this is going. are you basing it on preconceived notions of what you expect policy to be in that there will be not more money for renewed housing stock and that incomes will continue to not keep pace with inflation? presumably, thatis pace with inflation? presumably, that is what you are basing much of this on. that's right. and that is why it we need to look at how we can avoid this. but this is not a crystal ball. if we continue with the same policies that we have today, the report also talks about how we can bring those figures down. all right. john sparkes, from the charity crisis. thank you very much. the driver of a double—decker bus has been taken to hospital after it crashed into a shop on a busy london high street. police were called early this morning to reports of a bus hitting a kitchen shop near clapham junction train station in south—west london. a route 77 double—decker bus
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was involved in the incident. let's get the latest from the scene. what are you hearing about injuries and about anything as far as the state of the driver's health is concerned? well, state of the driver's health is concerned ? well, the state of the driver's health is concerned? well, the crash happened just before seven o'clock this morning and went into a kitchen design showroom on this very busy pa rt design showroom on this very busy part of south london. two women were trapped on the top deck of the bus. 0ne eyewitness described it as a scene of panic and there was yelling and screaming. they were eventually rescued by london fire brigade and the bus driver was also taken to hospital along with the two women. 0ne eyewitness claims to the press association that he had some sort of fit and lost consciousness, but that has not been verified by any other source at the moment. the ten other passengers who were on board at the
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time were also treated here at the scene. all right. thank you very much indeed. i am sure you will keep as up—to—date with that through the morning. time for the weather now. hello. good morning. we had an awful day across the south—east of england yesterday. torrential rain for much of the day. today, a much improved picture. for most of us, we have this ridge of high pressure moving in and keeping things settled. but whether fat that brought the rain yesterday is clearing away. still one or two showers. maybe a bit of rain towards the northern and western isles of scotland. foremost, it should feel quite pleasant. temperatures getting up to 17—20dc. the breeze picks up in the north—west. the rain will edge its way further south and east words as we go into friday morning and the ring will spread through northern england, wales and the south—west, eventually into the midlands as well. the south—east of england
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staying dry and bright for much of the day. 16—21dc. then things improve again for the weekend. many others, it should be dried. perhaps one or two showers but the emphasis is on one or two showers but the emphasis isona one or two showers but the emphasis is on a dry weekend with some sunshine. goodbye. this is bbc newsroom live. the headlines at 11.30am: criticism of police mounts after it emerges that during the court process that led to 18 convictions of child abuse in newcastle, they paid a convicted child rapist £10,000 as an informant. north korea says its plan to fire four missiles near the us territory of guam will soon be ready, as a war of words with washington intensifies. it denounced donald trump's warnings of "fire and fury" and said the us leader was "bereft of reason." the number of people waiting
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for routine surgery in england is at its highest level for a decade, figures from nhs england show.the rise is partly because of growing demand and the nhs performing more procedures. now it's time for a look at the sports news. 0ne one of the stories that the world athletics championships could reach its conclusion tonight. we could have the athlete banned and then reprieved claiming an extraordinary title so let's go to the stadium. good morning. i don't think too many people have heard of isaac makwala before now,
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but he has been the centre of much controversy after he was given the second chance to compete in a solo time trial, just him, without his rivals, against the clock. just the crowd roaring him on. he was required to meet a qualifying time which he did meet. there he is showing off his strength and showing that he was not bothered by the fact that he was not bothered by the fact that he was not bothered by the fact that he had been down with sickness, really showing that he was able to compete. he reached the semifinals following that solo time trial. he came second in that and tonight he will be racing for gold. and also racing for gold for great britain will be nathaniel mitchell blake in that 200 metre final. silly is one of the brits going tonight, but there are plenty more besides, are there. —— so he is. yes, we have
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katarina johnson—thompson. earlier, i spoke to denise lewis, who said that katarina johnson—thompson should fare a lot better tonight than she did in her previous trial. she will have talked to her coaches and got rid of the negative baggage from the heptathlon, even though she did runa from the heptathlon, even though she did run a hard 800. this is a hard culmination that she's put on herself but she wants to give it a go and with morgan lake in the competition as well, those two have come through the ranks together. they've just got to give it their all. well, also in action for great britain will be the team captain ailey doyle. she goes in the final of the woman's 400 metre hurdles. she is an outside chance for a medal and i'm sure the british team will be hoping to get a few more medals in the bag because they have been set this quite ambitious target, and
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so far it has just been served mo farah who has managed to achieve that. so love for british fans to cheer for. thank you very much indeed. the british woman's team will be entered into the tokyo 0lympics. will be entered into the tokyo olympics. the chief executive says talks about the game have gone well. we worked really well with the other home nations to get them behind the idea that a british team would be good for football, both idea that a british team would be good forfootball, both in england but also scotland, wales and northern ireland. they‘ re but also scotland, wales and northern ireland. they're not going to stand in the way. they're not going to actively supported either but they're not going to stand in the way and on that basis we will make an application to the all of the authorities for us to coordinate a british team and we go confident that once the details are sorted out we will have a british team competing for medals in tokyo 2020.
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jordan spieth says he free rolling into the us pga championship. he could be the youngest player to win all four majors. he has won three bags of his victory at the open last month and that is starting atjust before 1:30pm today. don't forget, you can follow coverage on the bbc red button, but that is all for now. more in an hour. should be exciting. thanks very much. the chief constable of northumbria police has defended his force's decision to pay a registered sex offender to act as an informant in a child grooming investigation. 18 people were convicted of systematically abusing vulnerable girls in newcastle. speaking on bbc breakfast, chief constable, steve ashman challenged criticism of the use of the informant in the case. we can't give you that, but suffice
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it to say that the chief constable of northumbria fed that he could not have conducted the investigation in the way that they did manage to do without the use of this informant. we do now have the interview. we absolutely did not plan the environment in the midst of vulnerable women and girls. that did not happen. he was never tasked to go to these parties are sessions as they have been referred to in the trial, so not only did we not asking to do it, there is no evidence that he did do it because if you look in detail at thejudge's he did do it because if you look in detail at the judge's assessment and thejudge's detail at the judge's assessment and the judge's rolling and the legal finding in this case, there is no evidence whatsoever that he was involved are engaged in against these victims are indeed anybody
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else. so it does beggar belief. it didn't happen. just by way of clarification, is it true that you're in former‘s handlers asked him to take the probable children to parties? is that true? i can't go into the detail of what we did or didn't do with the deployment. what ican didn't do with the deployment. what i can say is that we absolutely did not ask him to go to parties with vulnerable women and girls. that did not happen and we are very clear and very specific about that. i think there's been a sort of drawing away from the central point here that the use of the informant was principally about finding out who might be involved, because they were driving, the addresses they were living out, who might be using dogs and supplying those dogs. so it's very much the case that this was a starting point for an investigation. it never resulted in the informant being exposed to offending any form whatsoever. had it done so, there would have been one of two outcomes. he would either have been giving
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evidence against the people who were convicted, which he didn't, or he would have been in the dock alongside them, which he wasn't. that is the chief constable of northumbria police defending some of the ways in which they conducted their investigation. lets speak now to former chief prosecutor nazir afzal, who was instrumental in convicting the rochdale grooming gang — he joins us from salford. a very good morning to you. what do you make of northumbria police's defence of their views and there painting of a man who had been convicted of a sex offence against a minor? first of all, let me congratulate them for bringing these offenders to justice. we congratulate them for bringing these offenders tojustice. we must congratulate them for bringing these offenders to justice. we must not lose sight of the fact that this was ultimately a successful outcome. in relation to the paid informant, i have my concerns and they are assured by the nspcc and others that you would not necessarily want to bid a child sex offender with other child sex offenders alone with children. because i don't know how you could manage that risk and that
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ultimately is why you would not want to do it. there are other options. i would like to know whether or not i'm sure we all would want to know whether they considered surveillance, whether they considered technical options such as listening devices or whether they considered an undercover opts, which they could manage. and also why not have an informant that did not have previous convictions for child sexual abuse, so there were a number of options that they could have considered or may well have considered or may well have considered but we don't know. this person did not provide any reliable evidence. we know that because the judge said so. we also know that this person nearly completely destroyed this case because the abuse of process allegation was made by the defence alleging that the case was no longer credible because of his involvement. sadly, thejudge did not drop the case or order the case to be dismissed. —— thankfully. but he did say that the evidence could not be used and so we have to recognise that it is dangerous territory. child sex offenders do not immediately change their behaviour is. and so the reality is
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that just because behaviour is. and so the reality is thatjust because you are convicted doesn't mean that he would have suddenly seen the light and not be involved in this kind of activity. the chief constable is rightly saying that he was not tasked to do any of the start but the reality is that he told the court at that hearing that he went to these parties. he said that he left because he knew what was happening, but we are bidding ourselves in a situation where we don't know how much danger those young people are in and particularly with his involvement and undoubtably this could have sidetracked the case tremendously. that's your thoughts on that. i wonder if we could broaden this out now. i would like you to stay their pleas unless it on comments made today by the labour shadow secretary of state for women and equality, sarah champion. she had been talking about this case but she has been talking about the wider context she has been talking about the wider co ntext a nd she has been talking about the wider context and she says it is time now to deal with any effect what she thinks is the problem and she says we have now got to illustrate that this is hundreds of men, pakistani men, who are being convicted of this
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crime. let's listen to what she had to say this morning. ijust can't believe that we're here doing the same story in a different town and this is going to keep going on and on and on until we actually grasp the metal. what we need to be looking at is why this specific crime is occurring and this specific crime is occurring and this specific crime is occurring and this specific crime is organised gangs of predominantly pakistani british men who are going out and looking for vulnerable children, predominantly girls, grooming, exploiting, trafficking, abusing them across the country. and what frustrates me is that were not going to the root of the problem. we not protecting our children properly so that they understand about this crime. but also we now have probably hundreds of these perpetrators injail, so let's go, let's start doing some research. the government needs to pay some money to do some research and see what i the commonalities that are happening because it is not rocket science. this is a specific group of men that are doing this crime. so let's understand why. what
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are the drivers, what can we do to prevent it in the future? because i don't want to be sitting here in another six months with another town. sarah champion there. a specific group of men, she says. sarah has been talking about the subject quite rightly for the last six years. i have do. i give evidence to parliament, the home affairs select committee in 2012 uncalled for this research because i thought there was an issue here. it's not the issue. the reality is the availability and vulnerable at the availability and vulnerable at the young girls, and the fact that these perpetrators take advantage of that. but disproportionately when it comes to this type of sex offending, group grooming, asian men, pakistani men are disproportionately involved in that has to be an issue for us. i have tried to understand it myself, whether it is the night—time economy, whether there is some cultural baggage that needs to be addressed. the reality is we need to explore this in more detail. i have said before and i will say to get little grey stone and you will find this kind of abuse happening up and
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down the country. the vast majority of children are more likely to be abusing their homes or in institutions or online, but when it comes to street grooming, pakistani men, men from south asian backgrounds are disproportionately involved. why? let's find out.|j suppose finding out why is the important part of addressing my next question. but what could be done specifically to address what you have clearly set out there as a major part of the issue. well, it's really contradicted. part of the issueis really contradicted. part of the issue is sex education relationship education or a lack of it. too many people from... & myself, british pakistani, born here. but people don't want their children to learn this at school. a lot of young men are forced into marriage or forced to have arranged marriages and then they look for sex elsewhere, to put it bluntly. all of those cultural issues. there are lack of education,
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lack of awareness. yes, there is a sizeable amount of work happening within these communities to stop it happening in the future but my concern is that once this case is over and done with and sentencing has happened, people move on to another subject. no. we have to be relentless in tackling this issue. that means all the committees and particularly the pakistani and south asian communities where these perpetrators in the men come from. 0therwise, sadly we will have another one of these cases in some weeks' time and be asking the same questions. former chief prosecutor. thank you very much forjoining us on that story. more on it as well throughout the morning, of course. in a moment, a summary of the business news this hour, but first, the headlines on bbc newsroom live: police defend paying a child rapist for information — as part of an investigation into a grooming gang — as "the right thing to do". the war of words escalates — north korea says a plan that could see it fire four missiles near the us territory of guam will be ready in a matter of days.
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nhs waiting lists have hit a ten —year high in england — other key targets including urgent referral for cancer care have also been missed. i'm ben thompson. in the business news: industrial output unexpectedly picked up injune but falling car production and a slide in construction looks set to affect coming months. the figures show the economy saw sluggish growth in the first half of the year as consumers contended with rising inflation after last yea r‘s brexit vote. a slowdown in the housing market is spreading from london to other parts of the south east of england. the royal institution of chartered surveyors says while the region pulled down activity and average prices across the uk, other areas still saw prices go up. the co—operative bank has posted a £135m loss in it's first earnings report since it was rescued after plans to sell it collapsed. but the bank said it lost
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about 25,000 current accounts during the first half of the year amid the uncertainty over its future. more on that unexpected rise in the uk‘s industrial output — despite what's been described as a sluggish overall performance for the economy in the first half of the year. but construction, which accounts for 6% of the economy, fell slightly in june and was down 1.3% in the second quarter as a whole — a bigger fall than earlier thought and the sharpest drop in almost five years. sarah mcmonagle is from the federation of master builders. it is nice to see you. let's talk about these numbers because the biggest fall in six years, it suggests that construction activity, building firms are finding it pretty tough out there. yes, as you said, construction dropped by 1.3% in the second quarter of this year compared
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to the first three months. 0bviously, to the first three months. obviously, we had a general election injune so obviously, we had a general election in june so construction obviously, we had a general election injune so construction output may have been affected by the political uncertainty that sometimes comes with general elections. we know that consumers, for example, sometimes delay any big spending decisions on things like loft conversions and extensions until things become a bit clearer. how directly related they? because it strikes me that there is uncertainty in the market and people may put things but builders don't stop building, do they? no, of course not, but there are other pressures on the construction industry. construction is small and medium enterprises are struggling with rising costs soar material prices are a particular problem. since we had the eu referendum last june, the materials that we import from europe have increased in price because of the depreciation in stirling. there's also cost pressures in terms of wages and
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salaries. there's a really serious construction and skills shortage, so those tradespeople that are working in the industry are charging more for their services. and that the wto, isn't it? we know that we need to build more because there is still a housing squeeze and not enough new houses being built but at the same time all of those pressures facing the industry. it is hard to see how we can move on from this because higher costs and a lack of skills and yet we are being told we need to build more and more and more. the federation of master builders is asking the government to make sure that the new housing minister implements the housing white paper that was first published in march of this year and that contains some really positive measures for sme house—building and were only building about half the number of new homes we need at the moment. so although the house—building figures today statistics were quite healthy, we are still not where we need to be in terms of house—building. we are still not where we need to be in terms of house-building. ok, sarah. it is good to talk to you. thanks for a clinic that. in other business news:
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toymaker lego has replaced its 61—year—old chief executive, bali padda, afterjust eight months in thejob, saying he was never expected to remain in the post long—term because of his age. the danish company's new chief executive will be 51—year—old niels christiansen. he was the first non—dane to hold thejob. the new guy is danish again. facebook has announced plans for a new tv service — putting it head to head with services like youtube and netflix. users will soon see a new watch tab only in the us for the time being that will offer a range of shows, some of which have been funded by the social network. it will also allow users to see recommended shows based on what their friends are watching. the owner of fox news and 21st century fox movie studio looks to have benefited from a trump bump. fox said revenues were up 1.5% to $6.8 billion in the fourth quarter after ratings at its cable tv business improved and drew in more advertisers.
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a quick look at the numbers. this is what is happening on the ftse100. there is still that nervousness about the tension between the united states and north korea. that is keeping a lot of investors out of the equity markets. they are putting money into safe havens. that is why the euro dollar is doing that. that's all the business news. as the world athletics championships carries on in london, there's another huge sporting event happening in sheffield this week — the uk special olympics. around 2,600 competitors are taking part in the games, featuring athletes with a variety of learning disabilities. hayley hassall has been to watch some of the action. yeah! this year's special olympics has had more interest than ever before. and more athletes have taken to the tracks. kiera byland is the current women's world champion in cycling for women with intellectual abilities, and she's been training for three years for today's special olympics. 0k, not long until the race, how are you feeling? i am nervous, i'm not going to lie.
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there are quite a lot of great riders here, so obviously the competition is going to be high. do you find that your learning difficulty does have an affect on your training, does it make it difficult? yes, because i struggle with direction and time as well. special olympics gave me a place where i could be myself with everybody else, it's just amazing. kiera's dad has taken her around the world to compete, but lack of financial support from the games does makes things difficult. in terms of funding, that's an ongoing battle all the time, that's doing whatever fund—raising you can do to help with the cost of getting to the events and things. so unlike the olympics, you have to fund yourself? completely. that's a lot of pressure. yes. is it worth it? at the end of the day, you wouldn't change a thing with the success and the experiences that she's had, you know. and, as i say, it does, it develops them as people. there's no age limit
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in the special olympics, and ian has been training with the special olympics for the past 17 years. he has autism, which he used to find stopped him joining in things like sports, but now it's the complete opposite. i used to be a nervewracker back in the beginning, you know, that would shy away and all of that. and then suddenly i got hooked on it for life. so we're not only competing, but we're also doing other things behind the scenes as well to try to make it more accessible to our... to the other athletes with intellectual disabilities. but for athletes like kiera, has all of that hard work paid off? now, i'vejust found out the results, and i can tell you that you came...second. yes! well done, how do you feel? really good. more to go, but you just got a silver medal, well done! thank you.
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she seems very proud of herself and so she should be. time for a look at the weather now. hello, good morning. yesterday was ana hello, good morning. yesterday was an a atrocious day across south east england. 60 millimetres of rainfall. the sort of values are what we expect by the end of august. a whole month worth of rain in a couple of days. now, what do they say? when the sun shines, make hay. looking pretty good for most parts of the uk. sunshine a year down towards turkey. we also have this ridge of high pressure which is moving in but we still have this weather front which brought the rain yesterday giving one or two showers, but really for the majority it's going to bea really for the majority it's going to be a fine and dry afternoon. with some fairly light winds it should feel quite pleasant in the sunshine.
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temperatures getting up into the 20s. still the odd shower and more cloud down here but otherwise good sunny skies across much of wales, northern england and scotland and northern england and scotland and northern ireland. perhaps more cloud around for the far north and north—west of scotland, and with that cloud some outbreaks of rain as well. there are deceiving and tonight, the breeze will pick up in the north—west and with that bit more cloud moving in, that of rain spreading in as well, but clear skies for england and wales. pretty good if you want to watch the perseid meteor shower. should get a good few of those. temperatures in the towns and cities 10—13dc, but colder than that in the countryside. finally, rain will gradually move further south and east. after a sunny start, the cloud will increase but it will stay sunny across east anglia and the south—east well into the afternoon. the rain bricking up as it moves south and eastwards, is becoming more showery into the afternoon. that weather front will clear away and into saturday high
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pressure starts to build in again. so it's improving again. largely dry weather and sunny spells and again it should feel quite pleasant in that sunshine. let's have a look at saturday, then. the odd shower dotted around but really for most it'll be a dry day without sunshine temperatures were they should be for august. it will feel quite warm and pleasa nt august. it will feel quite warm and pleasant in that sunshine. a similar story for sunday. again, just the odd shower cropping up, particularly for eastern parts of england but again temperatures up into the high teens and low 20s. bit of rain for friday but improving again for the weekend. that's it from me. goodbye. this is bbc news and these are the top stories
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developing at midday: police defend paying a child rapist for information — as part of an investigation into a grooming gang — the government say they should be left to do theirjobs. what the police do is a matter for the police. it is not right for the politicians to comment on how the police carry out their investigations. the important thing is that people who committed some really serious crimes are today facing jail sentences. nhs waiting lists hit a ten—year high in england — other key targets including urgent referral for cancer care have also been missed. north korea promises a plan to fire missiles near us territory will be ready in days — after donald trump threatened pyongyang with "fire and fury". the scale of modern slavery and human trafficking into the uk is far larger than previously thought — the national crime agency say tens of thousands are affected. also in the next hour — a stark warning on rough sleeping.
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the charity, crisis, says the problem may climb by three quarters in the uk over the next ten years. a second chance for gold — botswanan athlete, isaac makwala, will race in tonight's final of the world athletics 200m — after norovirus fears force him to run a one—man time trial. i wish to thank the iaaf for giving me another chance. and the crowd is so amazing. and two women are rescued from the top deck of a london double—decker bus after it crashed into a busy high street. the driver has been taken to hospital. good afternoon. welcome to bbc newsroom live.
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northumbria police has defended its decision to pay £10,000 to a convicted child rapist to gather information in an serious abuse case. the force is standing by its actions after 17 men, mainly of south asian heritage, and one woman were convicted in newcastle of charges including rape, sexual activity with children, grooming vulnerable girls and supplying drugs to them. a former director of public prosecutions, lord macdonald, said it was time to identify the activity of gangs who target vulnerable white girls as "a profoundly racist crime". dan johnson reports. the faces of just some of those who abused young women across newcastle's west end. vulnerable girls were given drinks and drugs and passed around for sex. the gang was caught in one of the biggest child abuse
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investigations the north of england has seen. but now there are questions, outrage even, over some of the police tactics. was it right to pay a convicted child rapist £10,000 to be an informant? we don't support the police in doing this. we think it was a misguided action, putting a person who had a track record of abusing girls into a situation with other vulnerable girls and perpetrators, and then paying them for the privilege of doing that. northumbria police has strongly defended the payment and its use of the informant. it's quite surprising and disappointing for the nspcc to adopt the stance they have. this is an ill—informed position that they have taken. the fact is, we absolutely did not plant xy, the informant, in the midst of vulnerable girls, that did not happen.
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the force says this information helped get convictions and stopped other girls being abused. northumbria's police commissioner said she was uneasy about paying a rapist, but ultimately, she's satisfied everything was done properly. these are complex cases, and difficultjudgments have to be made. dan johnson, bbc news. a former director of public prosecutions, lord mcdonald, says there has been a reluctance in the past to investigate the activity of asian gangs who target vulnerable white girls — and that the issue can't be ignored: i think some recognition that this is a problem, wide recognition in all communities, people coming together to deal with it across communities and recognising it for what it is, not pretending it's something else, not shying away from it, recognising it for what it is, which is profoundly racist crime. 0ur correspondent dan whitworth
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is outside northumbria police headquarters. the police are still being asked to defend their use of this informant. presumably, they are sticking by their mind that this investigation would not have been so successful, had he not been used? exactly. the one quote that sums up the police response from northumbria police headquarters is that the ends justify the means. you heard in that report from dan johnson, chief co nsta ble report from dan johnson, chief constable steve report from dan johnson, chief co nsta ble steve ashma n report from dan johnson, chief constable steve ashman saying that without the information supplied by this convicted child rapist, known legally as xy, they would not have secured those convictions. the 17 men and one woman yesterday were convicted of some horrendous crimes against young women and girls. we heard details in that report again
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of sexual exploitation, rape and drug offences. so steve ashman at northumbria police headquarters is saying that the ends justify the means. and in this case, it was worth it. and what is to be made of the wider context that some are now putting this in and deliberate calls from some to call this as what they say it is, predominantly south asian gangs. do northumbria police believe thatis gangs. do northumbria police believe that is the case? do they believe a focus on south asian gangs would help? this morning, steve ashman would not be drawn on that. he didn't want to comment. the two key voices in this conversation so far today, we just heard from one of them, lord ken macdonald. he was the director of public prosecutions
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between 2003—2008. the clip we heard is him describing how crimes like these, sex abuse crimes, must be investigated for they are, which is profoundly racist crimes. i have another quote from him here which says that similar cases in the past may not have been investigated thoroughly enough. the second voice in this conversation is sarah champion, the labour mp for rotherham, another town blighted by these crimes. she is also the shadow minister for women these crimes. she is also the shadow ministerfor women and these crimes. she is also the shadow minister for women and equality is. she says there is a need to acknowledge that the majority of the perpetrators in these crimes are british pakistani and the government must carry out research to find out why this is the case. thank you very much. a quick bit of breaking news coming in. relatives of the 0magh bomb victims have announced that they are to sue northern ireland police chief for investigative
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failings that they believe let the killers escape justice. the 0magh bomb happened in august of 1998 at a time when it looked as though the conflict in northern ireland was coming to an end. it was the worst atrocity in that conflict and killed 29 people, two of them unborn babies. now the relatives of the bomb victims are saying that they will sue northern ireland's police chief for investigative failings which they believe let the killers escape justice. we will bring you more on that as we get it. the war of words between the us and north korea is intensifying, as pyongyang says a plan to fire missiles overjapan to land in the sea near the us territory guam will soon be ready. state media denounced donald trump's warnings of "fire and fury", saying the us leader was "bereft of reason". the us has warned that
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north korea's actions could mean the "end of its regime". yogita limaye reports from seoul. a show of strength in pyongyang. north korean state television showed a mass of people marching in support of the leadership in the country, even as the government made more threats. these are details of its plan to attack guam. four rockets will fly overjapan and land in the pacific ocean near the island, it says. it's drills by us bomber aircraft like these, which are stationed at guam, that have angered pyongyang. but while a fierce reaction from north korea is expected, this time it's matched by aggression from the us president. after saying pyongyang would be met by fire and fury, donald trump boasted about america's nuclear arsenal, a message which will be perceived as another threat by north korea. it's making people around the world nervous, and many countries have urged restraint.
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0ur strong wish is that the united states keeps calm and refrains from any moves that would provoke another party into actions that might be dangerous. the border is just about 50 kilometres from here, but things on these streets are not tense. this country has dealt with threats from its neighbour for a long time now, and that's why perhaps people here are unlikely to believe just yet that this war of words will turn into something more. yogita limaye, bbc news, seoul. robin brant told me that people are concerned about the stand—off between mr trump and kim jong—un. for a long time, the 10 million people of this city and the people of this country have faced
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the threat of a military confrontation with the regime in the north. more recently, the rhetoric has escalated and so has the threat of a nuclear confrontation with the north. but as you heard yogita say in that report, its a drizzly thursday evening in seoul. it has just gone seven o'clock at night. people have left work and are having dinner and it is pretty normal here. people are used to the rhetoric and the preparations. if you look at the tone of what we have heard from military representatives here and also government ministry today, we heard from thejoint chiefs of staff, reminding anyone listening of the close military alliance between south korea and the united states. that is crucial to the defence of people in this country. and from the government, the foreign ministry is urging a more conciliatory tone and urges those in the north to come to the negotiating table and resume talks aimed at denuclearising
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the whole of this peninsula. that reflects the tone of the new president here, president moon. we have heard from the presidential spokesman in the last few hours after a scheduled meeting of the country's national security and they are talking about cooperation with any country that wants to resolve tensions. the number of people waiting for routine surgery in england injune was the highest since december 2007. 3.83 million patients were on lists for operations. other key nhs targets were also missed — including urgent referrals for cancer care. earlier, hugh pym said resources are not keeping up with the rising demand for nhs services. this is all about waiting lists
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for routine surgery. in other words, you wait for something that is not an emergency. you may be referred for a hip and knee replacement and you have to wait for it. the number waiting in total is now the highest since late 2007. there were 3.83 million patients in england on the lists for operations in june. nhs england say it is actually probably more than 4 million, because not all hospitals reported. how many were seen within 18 weeks? that is the key benchmark for routine surgery. injune, the percentage seen within 18 weeks was 90.3%. the target is 92%. so that's an increasing number who are waiting longer than 18 weeks and that target being missed again. 0n cancer treatment, this is for urgent referrals to a specialist to start cancer treatment. that should be within 62 days. injune, the percentage who did start within 62 days was 80.5%, again below the target of 85%.
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cancer charities say that leaves a lot of people with cancer having to wait too long to start their badly needed treatment. can we extrapolate anything from these figures to learn something about the nhs? well, these key targets have been missed for a year or more in some cases. so it tells us that there are benchmarks which are set up to give patients some form of assurance that they will be seen quickly and that, in some cases, is not happening and in some cases, it is getting worse. the nhs will say they are seeing more patients year—on—year and more procedures are being carried out. demand continues to rise and to a certain extent, they are trying to meet that higher demand, but the resources are not keeping up. funding is not rising as fast as patient numbers. things are stretched,
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and this is borne out by these figures. when figures like this come out, it inevitably increases political pressure. but on the political level, we are dealing with what would need to be a seismic shift, ie pumping in a lot more money so that the nhs is well funded. and yet these figures suggest that the nhs still struggles. so what do you think the political options are in the coming months and years? there have been increasing calls for a cross—party consensus for, in the case of england, the three main parties at westminster to get together to come up with a solution. that was the call before the election. it is a lot harder now, with all the complex parliamentary arithmetic of theresa may's government not being a majority. you need a consensus on how to raise the money. how much more money do you need, how much taxation would be needed, how much are people prepared to pay and what about social care?
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some say the nhs needs to be more efficient as well and could make better use of resources. i suspect this debate will carry on, with the government focusing on other issues like brexit, and more patients will see longer waits for treatment. the national crime agency says modern slavery and human trafficking is "far more prevalent than previously thought". it said that there were tens of thousands of unidentified victims in large towns and cities across the uk. more than 300 police operations are targeting the criminals responsible. the headlines on bbc newsroom live: police defend paying a child rapist for information as part of an investigation into a grooming gang as "the right thing to do". nhs waiting lists have hit a ten—year high in england —
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other key targets including urgent referral for cancer care have also been missed. relatives of the 0magh bomb link tyms artut sue northern ireland's police chief for investigative failings. they believe the killers escape justice. —— relatives failings. they believe the killers escapejustice. —— relatives of failings. they believe the killers escape justice. —— relatives of the 0magh bomb victims are to sue northern ireland's police chief. time for a check on the sport now. well, yesterday he said he'd lost everything... but isaac makwala could end today as a world champion. he's hoping to complete his remarkable story with victory in the 200 metres at the london stadium, where we can join jess. not many had heard of him, but he
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has now become one of the major talking point at these championships regarding this outbreak of norovirus and whether or not he would be allowed to compete because of this sickness bug. but what an unusual day yesterday, because he was given this second chance to compete in a solo time trial, such a rare sight on the athletics circuit. it was just him against the clock, with the crowd roaring him on. it is so rare to see something like this. after the race, he said he was running with fire in his belly, having been so angry with not being able to race in the 200m heat and then the 400m final. he reached the necessary qualifying time in that solo run, and then he went into the semifinals alongside his rivals, where he finished second. so tonight, he will race for 200m gold. also in that
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semifinal was britain's nathaniel mitchell blake, who finished third. also on the track for great britain will be eilidh doyle in the final of the 400m. and laura muir goes in the heats of the 5000m. in terms of field events, there will be heptathlete is katarina johnson—thompson going in the qualifying for the high jump. johnson—thompson going in the qualifying for the highjump. she struggled with this event in the heptathlon, but it is one of her strongest. she is the british record—holder and would expect her to comfortably qualify for the final. thank you, jess. the english football association say they're planning to enter a british women's team for the tokyo olympics in 2020 even if the other home nations don't support the idea. that's why there wasn't a team at rio last summer but the fa chief executive sez talks about the games in three years' time have gone well. we have worked really hard with the
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other home nations to get them behind the idea that a british team would be good for football both in england, but also scotland, wales and northern ireland. they are not going to stand in the way. they are not going to support it either, but they will not stand in the way and on that basis, we will make an application to the olympic authorities for us to coordinate a british team. we feel confident that once the details are sorted out, we will have a british team competing for medals in tokyo 2020. that's all the sport for now. i'll have more in the next hour. a police investigation is under way after a man from north wales was allegedly left with only a few thousand pounds after selling his house through a firm offering a quick cash sale. philip edwards says £96,000 was taken from the sale of his family home in hawarden. he's one of four alleged victims of what's believed to be a house sale scheme based in the midlands. let's get more on this story
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with our correspondent geraint thomas, whojoins us from cardiff. how did mr edwards end up with so little money? he had to sell his house fast because he owed money to his ex—wife. he saw an advert for a firm called speedy property in a national newspaper. the property was valued at £165,000, and achieved that when it was sold. mr edwards owed his wife over 60,000, so he expected to receive around £100,000 for the sale because he was unclear how much speedy property would take. but when the sale was completed and his ex—wife had been paid, he received only just over his ex—wife had been paid, he received onlyjust over £4000 while two companies to 51000 and £40,000 each. lam i am mortified. lam mortified. it i am mortified. it is as if everything but parents worked for
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and what i have worked for, and at the end of the day, there is nothing. we understand that the director of speedy property is also the director of another company which received the payments. it appears to be a large—scale operation. west midlands police have confirmed that they are investigating a number of complaints. of course, there are legitimate companies in this sector, but the warning to consumers is that they need to do their homework before committing to schemes like this. there are concerns that schemes are becoming more sophisticated in targeting the elderly. we tried to contact speedy property about this story, but they didn't respond. there are estimates that up to four people a month use
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speedy property of a four year period and that they were active as recently as june this year, period and that they were active as recently asjune this year, so it is likely that there are many more potential victims out there as well as mr edwards. a shocking story. thank you. the driver of a double—decker bus has been taken to hospital after it crashed into a shop on a busy london high street. police were called early this morning to reports of a bus hitting a kitchen shop near clapham junction train station in south—west london. 0ur correspondent ayshea buksh gave us the latest from the scene. the crash happened just before seven this morning and went into a kitchen design showroom on this busy part of south london. two women were trapped on the top deck of the bus. 0ne eyewitness described it as a scene of panic and i was yelling and screaming. they were eventually rescued by london fire brigade and the bus driver was also taken to hospital along with the two women.
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0ne eyewitness claimed to the press association that he had some sort of fit and lost consciousness, but that has not been verified by any other source. the ten other passengers who we re source. the ten other passengers who were on board at the time were also treated at the scene. a widow has spoken of her "shock and horror" after a private gp who treated her late husband admitted failings in the case. dr peter wheeler, who was princess diana's doctor, has acknowledged he failed to properly monitor his patient by not arranging the recommended blood tests. 0ur health correspondent, jane dreaper, has the details. a mother and son seeking answers. stefanos vavalidis died from liver failure after spending the last eight months of his life in hospital. his widow is suing the private gp who was the family's trusted doctor over the prescribing of a drug mr vavalidis took for a skin condition for over a decade. it's heartbreaking enough
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to lose your partner of 45 years, but the complete shock and horror when we found out that it had been totally avoidable. that last period of his life was horrifying, so we'd like to prevent it from happening to other people. dr peter wheeler continues to practise at this private surgery, which was declared safe when audited four years ago, but he's the—lawyer working on the family's e‘ gfliili 5515; '3‘ liiélefégi
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died from liverfailure because of his diabetes and obesity. the doctor is under investigation by the general medical council. jane dreaper, bbc news. let's return to the breaking news that relatives of the 0magh bomb victims have announced that they are to sue northern ireland's police chief for investigative failings that they believe let the killers escape justice. next week will mark 19 years since the bombing which left 29 people dead. 0ur correspondent chris buckler joins us from belfast. for those who don't remember this atrocity in 1998, remind us. this was a car bomb left in the centre of 0magh, a market town and county tyrone, a very busy saturday afternoon. people
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will remember the pictures of the carnage that was left after that bomb exploded in the centre of the town. telephone warnings were given, but they were mistaken in the information they gave and people we re information they gave and people were moved around the town and they we re were moved around the town and they were not moved out of the range of the blast. it became what was known as the worst atrocity during the troubles in northern ireland. 29 people were killed including a woman pregnant with twins. since then, the families have been pushing to hold those built they believe were responsible for the attack to account. it was a real ira bombing and they have taken civil actions against men that they believe were responsible. action has also been taken in the courts. there was a failed trial against a man was found not guilty of the bombings. last year, a prosecution was abandoned before it reached trial because of m ista kes before it reached trial because of mistakes in the evidential gathering of some of the information. and
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there have been questions and failings about that investigation raised over the years since the bombing in 1998, not least in police ombudsman's reports which looked at the failings both in arresting and questioning suspects, but also in the gathering and passing on of information. and now we have this latest attempt by the families to try to hold people to account for those failings, and that is by suing the chief constable of the psni for some of the failings in that investigation. do you think that this announcement of that attempt to sue is a significant development? does it move anything on for the relatives of the victims? when you talk to the relatives, many have different views. as you can imagine, it is 19 years after the bombing, but when you talk to them you get a sense that what is important is that people are held to account for the
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bombing. this legal action will not do that. this is about trying to get damages for the failings in the police investigation. it is also about saying that their human rights we re about saying that their human rights were breached. by not having a proper and coherent investigation into this. so it is about damages more than anything else. the families continue to push for a full cross—border public inquiry into what happened in 0magh, the bombing itself and the questions raised about the investigation. all of them will probably feel that that is more important to them. nonetheless, it is yet another step for them to try and get recognition for the loss they suffered 19 years ago next week. the weather is looking pretty good for most of the uk today. some
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sunshine, a nice day, light winds, get out there and enjoy it if you can. a very different story across the south—east after yesterday's deluge. we have got rid of that rain however there have been won or two showers this morning in kent and sussex. i want to show you the comparison from yesterday. this was yesterday, that pouring rain. it has gone now, in the near continent. we are just left over with a few showers and bits of cloud in the south—east, the rest of the country, a fine day. clouds are increasing just the north—west of our neighbourhood, some rain well. that is a weather front approaching the north—west of the country but not until a lot later tonight and into tomorrow. a fine and dry evening, a dry night for england and wales. through the night there will be some damp weather getting into belfast and glasgow, turning windy in western scotland. driver most of us. friday, eastern areas of the uk, east anglia and london probably a fine day. most of us cloudy with a
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little bit of rain from time to time, especially in western areas. a little more mixed tomorrow, today is a better day. this is bbc newsroom live. iam i am matthew price. the headlines at 12:31pm: northumbria police has defended paying a child rapist £10,000 to infiltrate a sex grooming gang. 18 people were convicted but critics say it could have put victims at greater risk. we did not plant the informant in the midst of vulnerable women and girls. figures from nhs england show the number of people waiting for routine surgery in england is at its highest level for a decade. the rise is partly because of growing demand and the nhs performing more procedures. relatives of the 0magh bomb victims are to sue northern ireland's police chief for investigative failings
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that they believe let the killers escape justice. the car bombing took place on august 15th 1998, claiming 29 lives. north korea says its plan to fire four missiles near the us territory of guam will soon be ready, as a war of words with washington intensifies. it denounced donald trump's warnings of "fire and fury" and said the us leader was "bereft of reason". the national crime agency says modern slavery and human trafficking are "far more prevalent than previously thought". it said that more than 300 police operations were currently targeting the criminals involved. the war of words between the us and north korea is intensifying, as pyongyang says a plan to fire missiles overjapan, to land in the sea near the us territory guam, will soon be ready. state media denounced donald trump's warnings of "fire and fury",
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saying the us leader was "bereft of reason". the us has warned north korea's actions could mean the "end of its regime". a little earlier i spoke to victoria guerrero from guam — she told me she's "terrified" at the prospect of military action. it's very frustrating to be sort that the centre of all of this conflict. guam, as you is us territory and unincorporated territory and unincorporated territory at that. the united states has full sovereignty over the island. we are fighting for our people sovereignty. we have been here for over 4000 years, we have been colonised by spain, the united states, japan and the united states again. this recent conflict is reminiscent of world war ii when guam was caught in the middle of a conflict between the us and japan. so we don't want to repeat the m ista kes so we don't want to repeat the mistakes of history, and our people have been fighting for more say in
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our future. we've been have been fighting for more say in ourfuture. we've been fighting have been fighting for more say in our future. we've been fighting to exercise our right to self—determination. .. exercise our right to self-determination. .. you clearly feel that yet again geopolitics is interfering in the lives of your people and the people of guam. how is it affecting people psychologically? i mean i particularly have two young children, a five—year—old and two—year—old boy. explaining to them what this means is always something thatis what this means is always something that is very real for me, because this isn't the first time that we've been threatened with an attack. you know, alec experience, —— our experiences we regularly see and hear bombers. for them, to explain to them that one day that could drop a bomb... my son very simply, i asked him, isaid a bomb... my son very simply, i asked him, i said what would it mean ifa bomb asked him, i said what would it mean if a bomb hit guam? asked him, i said what would it mean ifa bomb hit guam? he asked him, i said what would it mean if a bomb hit guam? hejust bowed his head and didn't even want to
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express the words. so for them is a pretty young age to know that to live here in this beautiful paradise thatis live here in this beautiful paradise that is their homeland, they run the risk of something like that, it's very terrifying. there are people here that live with ptsd from world war ii, elders who have experienced an attack and survived a war. this brings back those memories for them. does it feel real? that might sound a bit ofa does it feel real? that might sound a bit of a strange question, but this is huge geopolitics that is being dealt with here, and the tectonic plates feel as if they are shifting when you read the papers on this side of the world. does it actually feel that it really could happen, or that nearly this isjust more sabre rattling?|j happen, or that nearly this isjust more sabre rattling? i think that we're dealing with two very unpredictable men, who are leading this conversation in a very irresponsible way. i wish that it
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actually felt more real. 0ur irresponsible way. i wish that it actually felt more real. our people are not prepared for what we would actually physically do if a bomb we re actually physically do if a bomb were launched as is being threatened in the waters near guam. i don't know where the nearest bunker is or shelter. we aren't being prepared. the us should have a responsibility to not just pretty the us should have a responsibility to notjust pretty pair its military personnel and dependence but also asks, ina personnel and dependence but also asks, in a very real and significant way. what would happen, where would we go, would we even survive it? those are not conversations that are happening, instead we are just hearing all the rhetoric. guam's threat level has not increased at all. but i think that is also short—sighted and irresponsible on behalf of the people that are leading us. we need more. we need to have a plan, no matter what... you know, one of my uncles would say this is likejuveniles know, one of my uncles would say
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this is like juveniles doing drive—by shootings, but even in drive—by shootings, but even in drive—by shootings, but even in drive—by shootings, sometimes on its shot. if guam was shot or bombed, which is very serious, our people need to be prepared. 0ur which is very serious, our people need to be prepared. our people need to have the opportunity to be sovereign and avoid these kinds of situations. we need to be able to negotiate better relationships with our neighbours. the us's presence here is touted as protecting us from these threats but the reality is these threats but the reality is these threats but the reality is these threats exist because the us is here. here, the chief constable of northumbria police has defended his force's decision to pay a registered sex offender to act as an informant in a child grooming investigation. 18 people were convicted of systematically abusing vulnerable girls in newcastle. meanwhile, a former director of public prosecutions — lord mcdonald — says there has been a reluctance in the past to investigate the activity of south asian gangs who target vulnerable white girls, and that the issue shouldn't be ignored any longer.
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not all sex crime takes place in a single community, of course we know that, that's obvious. not all sex crime belongs in a particular community. but there is a particular issue about some men, in some communities, who feel that these young girls are trash, who are available for sex, and we all know that. we've seen it in this case, we've seen it in other cases, we know it's going on as we speak. law enforcement has a response, the police have a response, prosecutors have a response, judges have a response, but communities need a response. i think some recognition that this is a problem, wide recognition, in all communities, and people coming together to deal with it in all communities and across communities, and recognising it for what it is. not pretending it's something else, not shying away from it, recognising it for what it is, which is profoundly racist crime. lord macdonald speaking earlier this morning on the bbc. the number of people waiting
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for routine surgery in england injune was the highest since december 2007. nhs england said three point eight three million patients were on lists for operations. other key targets were also missed — including urgent referrals for cancer care. i'm joined now in the studio by nigel edwards, the chief executive of the nuffield trust. which is an independent health charity. good afternoon, thank you for coming in. what are we to make in your opinion from these figures? we know the nhs is under pressure. demand for a&e and elective surgery, planned surgery, has been going up, particularly elective surgery, 5% in the last year. i'm slightly surprised that although the waiting list... surprised that although the waiting list. . . why surprised that although the waiting list... why are you surprised much about i will tell you. slightly surprised although the waiting list has been growing, the numbers of people on the waiting list is growing, though a number of people waiting is relatively stable. i'm wondering how long that is
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sustainable for, given the fact we continually seek demand increasing and the funding available for the nhs is almost completely flat and has a growing staffing problem. i think we are seeing the early stages here with this growth in the waiting list that there will be further trouble ahead, perhaps particularly in the winter, depending on whether. we're not in winter territory. it is winter that is said to put the real severe pressure on the nhs and yet these figures from june suggest that that pressure is sustained throughout the year? yes, a little bit of a change. what happens in summer is there is more minor attendances. the pressure in winter is often older people with respiratory conditions and they don'tjust respiratory conditions and they don't just use respiratory conditions and they don'tjust use a&e but they tend to be admitted for long periods of time and that is what causes the system to sort of back up. we have seen this long—term trend of people admitted to hospital and then it's increasingly difficult to discharge,
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and that is again available and these figures today, they are called delaet transfers of care. they are waiting for social care and community services, and that is likely to worsen, i think it's been worsening over the years. social services have been cut and community services have been cut and community services have been cut and community services have not had the investment that they need to keep up with the changes that we have in the population. so do you see this as a sort of coming together of all of these problems that we have spoken about for a long time coming together and creating... we talk about a cute crisis in the nhs, but it seems to be saying what you are saying although you are being calm about it, that there is a build—up of pressure and at some point we are going to really notice it? definitely a build—up of pressure. there is not a crisis at the moment. it's quite tempting to call it a crisis. i never quite know, sorry to interrupt, when we should. these stories, these figures seem to keep
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happening and yet people get treatment and are still seen by doctors, the nhs still perform. this isa doctors, the nhs still perform. this is a most extraordinary thing. by any objective standard, given the increases in demand, the funding position the nhs has had, the staffing problems it suffers from, the changes in social care, that these performance numbers don't seem to be dipping in the way you might expect. it is quite an achievement. the interesting question is, how long can they keep it up for? these staff are on the receiving end of this. we are increasingly seeing signs of them feeling under a great deal of pressure. the fact is demand does continue to increase. when you have 4 million people, more than the population of wales, half the population of wales, half the population of wales, half the population of london waiting for treatment, there is a question about how long that is sustainable for. they are seeing them very quickly but can they keep it up, in the face of some of the challenges they currently face? nigel edwards, thank you very much for talking to us about the nhs figures this morning. a little bit of breaking news. you
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will remember perhaps that story about contaminated eggs in the netherlands, which then implicated people being consuming eggs in germany and belgium and elsewhere. there had been an original estimate that around 21,000 eggs had been distributed off the —— to britain. the first estimate was 201000. we now hear from the food standards agency that it could be as many as 700,000 eggs from dutch farms implicated in fact contamination scare, have been distributed to britain. up from 21,000 to 700,000. 0fficials britain. up from 21,000 to 700,000. officials on the continent say there is thought to be no particular risk to human health but it is a story that has worried officials in belgium and germany, and i noticed also earlier this morning belgian officials appear to be taking legal
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action on that story. we will bring you more on that as and when we get it. the director of the national crime agency's child exploitation and 0nline protection command, will kerr, has been outlining the scale of the problem. 0ver over the last year law enforcement agencies across the united kingdom have been significantly stepping up their efforts and focus on modern human trafficking. the scale and the scope of this problem has shocked and worried as big as this is a crime that exists, vulnerable people
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are being exploited in every large town and city across the united kingdom. it affects every nationality, offenders and victims. it isa nationality, offenders and victims. it is a symptom of the fact criminals and crime gangs have recognised whilst you might be able to sell drugs once make a profit, you can exploit vulnerable people repeatedly and make a lot of money from it. in terms of what we have seen, i will start again... we have had previous figures of 10—13,000 of being an estimate of victims, is it no longer reliable, that figure? we think that figure will significantly increase. what we've been doing in a project in the last six months, lead and coordinated by the national crime agency, is to pick a theme or type of exploitation of vulnerable people and for a week every month engaged in intensive lorenzen falls
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in activity across all 43 police forces in the united kingdom, border force, immigration control, to try and geta force, immigration control, to try and get a truer sense of the scale and get a truer sense of the scale and scope of modern slavery into human traffic. what we have found a hundreds and hundreds of victims. what we've made our hundreds and hundreds of arrests. these this is a problem that exists in every part and corner of the united kingdom, thatis and corner of the united kingdom, that is why we are asking for public support, recognising the signs and symptoms of modern slavery and reporting it to the modern slavery helpline or police. why can you put an actualfirm helpline or police. why can you put an actual firm figure on the number of victims who are out there? we can't, because it is a hidden crime and because very often victims don't see themselves as victims. they are subject to so much psychological fear or physical violence, they genuinely don't see themselves as victims, which is why we need the public‘s helped to act as our eyes and ears, to help us tackle this insidious crime, whether most
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vulnerable people are being exploited on a daily and hourly basis across uk. it is impossible to put a figure on it. there are tens of thousands of victims of this crime across the uk today. the latest on that news developing a modern slavery in britain. the headlines on bbc newsroom live! police defend paying a child rapist for information as part of an investigation into a grinning gang is threatening to do. nhs waiting lists have had a 10—year w @ when you say in blocks of flats, you mean in the stairwell? yeah, in the stairwell. because it's sheltered at least. a little bit warmer, and obviously a little more safer than being out on the street. i never experienced this ever before, it's the first time i experienced it and it was a new experience for me, and i'm pleased i've overcome it. how would you describe it, being homeless? i think it's disgraceful that anybody has to live like that. and not just talking about me, anybody. what is it like, what words would you use to describe it?
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well, i think it's shameful, yeah, that we have to put ourselves in a position where we can evict people and expect them to sleep on the pavement, and it makes you feel like you're isolated. you feel rejected by society. you immediately come under that label where people make stereotypical remarks about you. you encounter more aggression by members of society, and i think it's very difficult to do it day in and day out, because you're constantly exhausted because you don't ever have an opportunity to have a decent night's sleep. that was a chef who lost his home after becoming unemployed. a little earlier i spoke tojon sparkes, chief executive for the homeless charity crisis, who explained the figures.
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actually we are going to move on to a story about schoolchildren in some of the most deprived parts of wales. they are getting free school meals these summer holidays, paid for by the welsh government. 500 thousand pounds has been allocated which still means only a small number of schools are covered. a report earlier this year said that up to 3 million children across the uk risked going hungry in the holidays. catrin nye has been meeting children in cardiff.. can you tell me what your favourite foods are? i love chicken nuggets with beans! chicken nuggets with beans! school holidays equals hungry kids. what did you have for lunch yesterday? bolognese! and how many balls did you have? three balls! this is millbank primary in cardiff. it's one of 39 schools in the most deprived parts of wales providing breakfast, lunch and activities in the school holidays.
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it's funded by the welsh government's education department, a budget controlled in cardiff rather than westminster. do you guys have to go to school all year round ? are you not fed up? no. you don't mind coming in the summer? no. my mum think it's good because she works, has a full—time job and normally i sit home with my nan, but because i'm at this school, it makes a big difference. if the parents don't have enough money they can put us into school and then we get to have food. i think every parent that brings a child in here is grateful for it. for lots of different reasons — childcare, food, entertainment. at this time so many people are struggling, like me. i'm not working at the moment. having to make sure your kids get fed, notjust feeding them
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with anything but giving them the right food. they're interacting with other children, playing, having a nice meal... it's not a full school day. they don't look at it as they're in school, they look at it as fun. you guys have eaten more of your vegetables than me. i'll be in trouble! a report by a cross party group of mps warned that three million children across the uk risk going hungry in school holidays. a third of the children who go to this school have free school meals but you don't need to be eligible to get the free food in the holidays. if you think that it's been decided that children need free school meals because of the amount of income the family has got, its not surprising during the long summer holidays, when suddenly those things are not there, families are struggling. this is still only in a tiny proportion of the schools in wales and at the moment the education departments in england and scotland are not allocating specific
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funding to lunch clubs. charities and local authorities are able to set them up but there are calls for more central government money. as the world athletics championships carries on in london, there's another huge sporting event happening in sheffield this week — the uk special olympics. around 2,600 competitors are taking part in the games, featuring athletes with a variety of learning disabilities. hayley hassall has been to watch some of the action. yeah! this year's special olympics has had more interest than ever before. and more athletes have taken to the tracks. kiera byland is the current women's world champion in cycling for women with intellectual abilities, and she's been training for three years for today's special olympics. 0k, not long until the race, how are you feeling? i am nervous, i'm not going to lie. there are quite a lot of great riders here, so obviously the competition
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is going to be high. do you find that your learning difficulty does have an affect on your training, does it make it difficult? yes, because i struggle with direction and time as well. special olympics gave me a place where i could be myself with everybody else, it's just amazing. kiera's dad has taken her around the world to compete, but lack of financial support from the games does makes things difficult. in terms of funding, that's an ongoing battle all the time, that's doing whatever fund—raising you can do to help with the cost of getting to the events and things. so unlike the olympics, you have to fund yourself? completely. that's a lot of pressure. yes. is it worth it? at the end of the day, you wouldn't change a thing with the success and the experiences that she's had, you know. and, as i say, it does, it develops them as people. there's no age limit in the special olympics, and ian has been training with the special olympics
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for the past 17 years. he has autism, which he used to find stopped him joining in things like sports, but now it's the complete opposite. i used to be a nervewracker back in the beginning, you know, that would shy away and all of that. and then suddenly i got hooked on it for life. so we're not only competing, but we're also doing other things behind the scenes as well to try to make it more accessible to our... to the other athletes with intellectual disabilities. but for athletes like kiera, has all of that hard work paid off? now, i'vejust found out the results, and i can tell you that you came...second. yes! well done, how do you feel? really good. more to go, but you just got a silver medal, well done! thank you. a nice story. an intriguing piece of
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scientific news coming out at the moment. miscarriages and birth defects could be significantly reduced if women take vitamin b3 supplements. scientists at a research institute in sydney believe the vitamin can prevent embryos and babies' organs developing incorrectly inside the womb. the discovery has been called the most significant breakthrough in pregnancy research and will transform the way mothers—to—be are cared for. almost time to say goodbye to viewers on bbc two shortly. coming up next it's the news at one with kate silverton. first though let's take a look at the weather with thomas shafernaker what a change in the south—east today, yesterday a deluge. today's sunshine for most of us. 12—macro showers still across the extreme south—east, kent and sussex had a thunderstorm earlier on, but on balance looking fine. a lot of cloud
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in the atlantic, moving in the direction of northern ireland and scotland, but the day will be fine, high pressure in charge of the weather. any cloud and rain and wind won't reach you in the north—west until later tonight. this is what the weather looks like in the south. a fine day for the wales, the midlands, east anglia are little more cloudy and just a few showers in the extreme south—east, the re m na nts of in the extreme south—east, the remnants of what we had yesterday. the rest of the country, very little to say, scattered fairweather cloud. 18-20d. this to say, scattered fairweather cloud. 18—20d. this next weather system will push into the western isles of scotland. it probably won't reach, won't bring the wind and rain until about midnight. also into belfast through the early hours of the morning. you can clearly see wales and england tonight is going to stay dry and quite clear, not gold, around 12—13d. here is the weather system that will be pushing through the country during friday. initially, this is the morning, some sunshine across central and eastern
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areas, from hull to london, the day starting absolutely fine. cloud, brain and windy conditions in the far north—west. in the afternoon, the cloud and rain moves a little further east, but norwich london probably staying dry through most of friday. friday. friday night into saturday, this is the forecast. the weather front moves through, the high pressure builds, so that means that the weekend, at least saturday at this stage, is looking fine. some sunshine, a lot of dry weather, looking absolutely fine full stops in meteor showers over the weekend. i think saturday night will be a good night watch them. a fine day, a bit of a north—westerly breeze. those temperatures are not going to be spectacularly high, but sunday, apart from maybe a few showers here and there, just isolated ones in the east, it's looking absolutely fine. enjoy the weekend. north korea accuses donald trump of being bereft of reason after his "fire and fury" nuclear threat.
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the regime says only absolute force can work on the us president as it says it may fire four rockets towards the american territory of guam. we'll be live from guam in the western pacific as we assess where this war of words might lead. also this lunchtime: the latest nhs figures are released. waiting lists hit a ten—year high in england. other key targets, including urgent referral for cancer care, have also been missed. after 18 people are convicted of abusing girls in newcastle, the former director of public prosecutions says treat the crime as a racist one too. modern slavery and human trafficking is said to be far more prevalent than previously thought, as the national crime agency reveals there are tens of thousands of potential victims.
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