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tv   BBC News  BBC News  June 3, 2017 2:00am-2:31am BST

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welcome to bbc news, broadcasting to viewers in north america and around the globe. i'm duncan golestani. our top stories: brexit, nuclear weapons and the future of social care. voters quiz theresa may and jeremy corbyn ahead of the uk election. the european union and china team up to say they'll keep the paris climate agreement alive, whatever president trump does. when he announced his decision the president said he was elected to serve the voters of pittsburgh, not paris. so what do voters there make of his decision? our president is trying to do everything that he can that is good for the american people, and that's what i like. and ireland's set to have a new prime minister, the gay son of an indian immigrant. the british prime minister, theresa may, and the opposition
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labour party leader, jeremy corbyn, have been facing questions from voters ahead of next week's general election. they were questioned separately by members of the studio audience after mrs may refused to debate directly with other party leaders. our political editor laura kuenssberg reports. nervous? not that he would notice. the labour leader high on campaigning. his crowd was waiting. ready for the question time audience? yes! theresa may, much more to lose. a brave face after a bumpy few days. both facing the ha rd est bumpy few days. both facing the hardest audiences of all. this studio, and you. a smile, buta hard start for the prime minister,
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pressing bruises she has taken on in this campaign. you backtracked on your social care policy and your whole manifesto has holes in it and everybody else can see that. well, first of all... it could have been easy, i could have said, ok, i'm prime minister, there's another couple of years, why don't ijust stay in hang on in the job? i didn't do that. i have called an election because of brexit. i was willing to do that because i think this is a really important moment for our country. you have called a general election for the good of the conservative party and it is going to backfire on you. then to what her tea m to backfire on you. then to what her team thinks is her biggest advantage, brexit. why not give people a second vote? we were all told lies. even people who voted out, perhaps they should be given the second chance, you should have the second chance, you should have the confidence to say, shall we have another vote. i think collectively people here in the uk said, you know what, that is not the way to behave. if the people have made their choice lets listen to the people and actually deliver on it. on the wrong
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information! and question after question about social care and her change of heart. you can spend your whole life working hard to build up a nest egg, but if it is all going to be taken away from you again, if your ca re to be taken away from you again, if your care is needed, then essentially why should you even bother in the first place? so it is today that we see people sometimes having to sell their house in order to pay those bills. what we say is that under the system we introduce, which is important, because we need a sustainable system for the future, given the ageing population, if we do nothing our social care system will collapse. if you can tell us what the problem is now, why can't you tell us the gap? because on the floor, i think it is important that we give people the protection of their savings, which is greater than it is today. that's why we've set that figure at £100,000. but on the cap, as to where you set that figure, the absolute cap that people paid, ithink figure, the absolute cap that people paid, i think it is right we have that consultation. then pressure on the nhs, and business's a packet. my
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wage slips from 2009 reflect exactly what i am earning today. how can that be fair? we have had to take some hard choices across the public sector in relation to public set pay restraint. we did that because of the decisions we had to take to bring public spending under control, because it wasn't under control under the last labour government. i am being honest with you, in terms of saying that we will put more money into the nhs. but there isn't a magic money tree. then the reality of what some people experience over their mental health. i have been waiting a yearand their mental health. i have been waiting a year and a half for this, andl waiting a year and a half for this, and i have suffered so much over that year, in part as of the work capability assessment. i'm not going to make any excuses for the experience that you have had. that is why i think it is so important that we actually do deal with mental health, and this is something where we do look out improving how that assessment takes place. then to her rival, jeremy corbyn. good evening,
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mr corbyn. the first challenge, whether he would play brexit hardball. if the eu understands your position, that's no deal is a bad deal, then you've got no chance. we are not approaching these negotiations by threatening europe with setting up some kind of low tax haven for big corporations in this country. we are instead saying we wa nt to country. we are instead saying we want to continue that trading relationship outside the european union. he was pressed on whether he would work with the snp, and whether the country can afford his plans. would work with the snp, and whether the country can afford his plansm is labour's manifesto a realistic wish list, or is itjust a letter to sa nta wish list, or is itjust a letter to santa claus? i urge you to read it. i think it is a serious and realistic document that addresses theissues realistic document that addresses the issues that many people in this country face. i'm thinking of last time labour were country face. i'm thinking of last time labourwere in government, they
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left a note in the chancellor's office, saying, we've no money left. do you know what? the very richest in our society have got richer. there has been more and more tax giveaways at the top end and more and more charges at the other end. it is time to rebalance it. then his own long—held resistance to nuclear weapons came under pressure.“ own long—held resistance to nuclear weapons came under pressure. if the uk were under imminent threat from nuclear weapons, how would you react? i think the idea of anybody ever using nuclear weapons anywhere in the world is utterly appalling and terrible. it would result in the destruction of the lives and the communities and the environment for millions of people. i use saying there are no circumstances under which you would use it? any circumstances where anybody is prepared to nuclear weapons is disastrous for the whole planet. that is why there has to be a policy of disarmament, globally, but through multilateral policy, not a unilateral policy. would you allow
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north korea or some idiot in iran to bomb us and then say, we'd better start talking. you would be too late! of course not. of course i would not do that. you would allow them to do it. of course not. how would you stop them? that is why made the point a short time ago about the need for president obama's agreement with iran to be upheld. it is quite important, actually. and also to promote disarmament in north korea. that is difficult, i appreciate. i don't understand why everyone in this room seem so keen on killing millions of people with a nuclear bomb. difficult moments for him, too, on the ira. buta nuclear bomb. difficult moments for him, too, on the ira. but a tough night for both the rivals. a brief but again counter. 90 vital minutes after weeks of campaigning. those moments that could make the difference. there are still minds to change. there's been a swift and harsh reaction around the world to donald trump's decision to withdraw the us from the paris
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climate change agreement. in response india, china and the european union have restated their commitment to the accord. but president trump's team and his supporters are standing by the decision. they argue that pulling out is the best deal for america. from brussels, damian grammaticas reports. in the fight against global warming, and just hours after donald trump retreated, and to new leaders. the european union and china. apart from the us, these are the world's other two economic heavyweights, prompted by president trump to act in concert. what we are seeing here with thisjoint reaction concert. what we are seeing here with this joint reaction to donald trump's statement is striking. not just for the swiftness, but also for the message it sends, at a time when the message it sends, at a time when the us, under president trump, is withdrawing from global leadership on climate change, instantly the
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european union and china are stepping in to take up that mantle. it isa stepping in to take up that mantle. it is a striking global change and could herald a decline in us influence. so at this special summit in brussels, the eu and china are making a joint declaration. they will not abandon the paris agreement. the opposite. they are committed to it. today we are stepping up our cooperation on climate change with china. this means that today, china and europe have demonstrated solidarity with future generations and responsibility for the whole planet. we are convinced that yesterday's decision by the united states to leave the paris agreement is a big mistake. president trump announced his decision last night and said that paris was a bad deal for the us. but this steelmaker will not be able to renegotiate, say e u countries, who have issued their own co—ordinated condemnation, a single statement signed by germany, france
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and italy. —— this deal—maker. angela merkel today called the us decision regrettable. translation: the decision will not stop all of us dedicated to the protection of our planet earth. quite the opposite. we in germany, in europe and in the world a re in germany, in europe and in the world are now more determined than ever to pull our strength to face one of the challenges of humankind. theresa may did not signed a joint letter with europe's other g7 members. that wanted this scathing attack onjeremy corbyn today. members. that wanted this scathing attack on jeremy corbyn today. given the chance to present a united front with our international partners, she has instead opted to silence, and once again, subservience to donald trump. it is eight dereliction of both her duty to this country and our duty to our planet. downing street says the prime minister did not act together with other european nations because she spoke directly
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to president trump last night to tell him she supports the paris deal. i've made the uk's position on the paris agreement clear. we remain committed to it. it is an important international agreement on climate change. i made the uk's '5 edition clear to president trump last week of the g7 meeting, as did the other g7 leaders, and i made the uk's '5 edition clear to president trump la st edition clear to president trump last night. canada and japan have not signed that letter, neither has the uk, but we all have the same view, that we remain committed to the paris agreement. in brussels, the paris agreement. in brussels, the eu and china have been prompted to ta ke the eu and china have been prompted to take a stand because they share the belief that fighting climate change makes both environmental and economic sense, and the eu says, puts it on the right side of history. let's take a look at some of the other stories making the news. prosecutors in belgium say that yassine atar has been formally charged in connection with the november 2015 attacks in paris. atar was arrested in march 2016, five days after bomb attacks on the airport and metro in brussels. his brother oussama is suspected
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of coordinating both attacks and there is an international warrant out for his arrest. one of germany's biggest music festivals has been evacuated following what police have described as a possible terrorist threat. fans hoping to see german rock giants rammstein streamed out of the arena in the city of nuerburg after organisers asked them to leave in a "calm and controlled" way. the organisers say they hope the festival will resume on saturday. anti—government protests are continuing in northern morocco. a group of children conceived through ivf have won the right to have the dna of the doctor at the sperm bank tested. they believe he may have been their biological father. the doctor, who died last april, is suspected of replacing this burn chosen by the mothers with his own. he could have fathered around 60 children. anti—government protests are continuing in northern morocco.
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the latest protests have been triggered by the arrest of the leader of the protest movement. nasser zefzafi has been charged with threatening national security after organising months of protests against unemployment and corruption. it's the worst unrest in morocco for several years. and the congolese health minister says an outbreak of ebola which killed four people has been brought under control. no new cases have in recorded for 21 days. maximum period between exposure to the disease and initial symptoms. in an effort to stop the disease spreading, health workers were authorised to use an experiment all—american vaccine. —— experimental american vaccine. did russia hack the us presidential election? it's the question that's been hanging over washington ever since donald trump took office. russian president, vladimir putin, had earlier suggested that private citizens, so—called patriotic hackers, may have interfered. but moscow has always denied any state involvement. the topic came up again when he spoke to nbc news' sunday night with megyn kelly.
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translation: hackers can be anywhere. they can be in russia, in asia, even in america. latin america. there could even be hackers, by the way, in the united states. very skilfully and professionally shifted the blame, as we say, on to russia. can you imagine something like that? in the midst of a political battle. by some calculations, it was convenient for them to release this information so they released it. citing russia. could you imagine something like that? i can. stay with us on bbc news. still to come, almost everyone in the west african country of togo wants a motorbike, and now the arrival of cheap chinese imports means that dream is coming true. the queen and her husband began
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their royal progress to westminster. the moment of crowning, in accordance with the order of service, higher signal given, the great guns of the tower. tanks and troops are patrolling the streets of central peking after the bloody operation to crush student led protests, and the violence has continued. the army firing on civilians throughout the following day and night. over there you can see its mighty tale, the only sign left, almost, that an aircraft had been here. uefa imposes an indefinite ban on english clubs playing in europe. today is the 20th anniversary of the release of the
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beatles' album sergeant pepper '5 lonely hearts club band, an album described as the record of the century. welcome back. this is bbc news. the latest headlines: with less than a week until the uk general election theresa may and jeremy corbyn have faced questions on brexit, nuclear weapons and the future of social care from a live television audience. and china, the european union and india have restated their commitment to the paris agreement on combating climate change. but president donald trump's team is standing by his decision to pull the united states out. well, in his speech on thursday, donald trump said he had been elected to represent the citizens of pittsburgh, not paris. but the mayor of pittsburgh was quick to point out that he and those who voted for him actually embrace the paris climate accord. the bbc‘s nick bryant has spent the day in pittsburgh hearing
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from residents who have found themselves thrust into the middle of this debate. pittsburgh, pennsylvania, a city linked by the present with paris. but this morning, it was not hard to find citizens delighted by his decision. —— president. out president is trying to do everything he can. —— i think our. and that is what i like. the president is putting america at first. and he is doing it and showing that these agreements are not fair to the united states. it is time they renegotiated and became fair. the old pittsburgh was different to you. steel city, it was known as, eight manufacturing capital often shrouded in smog. but it is remade itself as a high—tech hub, often called
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roboburgh. it is where gruber is testing its driverless cars. you we re testing its driverless cars. you were in paris? yes, i was one of the representatives. —— uber. were in paris? yes, i was one of the representatives. -- uber. the mayor has hit back. the decision to withdraw is not only bad for the united states economy, but it wea ke ns united states economy, but it weakens us throughout the world. united states economy, but it weakens us throughout the worldm is the old rusting steel town on the outside pittsburgh, left behind by the new economy, where the slogan make america great again reverberated me strongly. donald trump would not today be president ever wasn't for the support he received in the rustbelt states. they became critical battleground in us presidential politics. there are many us presidential politics. there are ma ny voters us presidential politics. there are many voters here who believe that the global anger over his paris decision offers proof of his decision offers proof of his decision and determination to fight on their behalf. at this derelict
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still plug, we found something unexpected. the old economy meet in the new. employees from google on a day out, learning about the region's industrial past. this man runs the area. the green industry is the future of this region. unfortunate, this industry is not. is donald trump trying to revive old declining industries in a way that impedes the development of the new? nick bryant, bbc news, pittsburgh. now, he's ireland's first openly gay minister, the son of an indian immigrant, and at the age of 38, leo varadkar is now set to be the youngest leader in europe as ireland's next prime minister. he was voted in tonight as the new leader of fine gael — the biggest party in ireland's ruling coalition. he'll succeed enda kenny. here's our ireland correspondent chris buckler. leo varadkar is the new face of
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modern ireland. the son of an immigrant, openly gay, and four months, he is been the favourite to become this country's new primers. months, he is been the favourite to become this country's new primerslj have become this country's new primers.” have been elected the 11th leader of fine gael. he set out his vision of leadership. amid a sea of signs with his name. as leader of fine gael, i have shown that predators has no place in this republic. and so every proud parent in ireland today can dream big dreams and their children. —— prejudice has no place. there is no limit to the possibilities if they are given the opportunity. varadkar‘s father migrated from india, becamea
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varadkar‘s father migrated from india, became a doctor, and married a nurse. last year, he came out as 93v- a nurse. last year, he came out as gay. he celebrated the "yes" vote on 93v gay. he celebrated the "yes" vote on gay marriage on stage. and leo is very different to andy kenney. he is a different kind of man. —— enda. he has steel and determination in. ireland may have emerged from crisis and bailouts, but as head of minority government, varadkar is go to find that his leadership is tested sooner rather than later. 0k. let's rev things up a bit. motorbikes are, of course, common throughout africa, but in the togolese capital, lome, they really are everywhere.
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such is their popularity that, as a visitor to the west african country, you may be forgiven for thinking everyone in togo seems to either own a motorbike, borrow one, fix them or sell them. the bbc‘s vumani mkhize has more. despite not having a licence yet, this university student is excited to have just bought her very first motorcycle. the cacophony of small engines are ubiquitous part of life in the togolese capital of lume. the only thing holding back is deciding which colour to choose. this, maybe. i don't know which one exactly. but i think i don't know which one exactly. but ithinki i don't know which one exactly. but i think i have two go with one of the covers. whichever colour she decides on, when she pulls into traffic for the first time, she will certainly not be alone. in lome, motorcycles a re certainly not be alone. in lome, motorcycles are everywhere. and they have proved to be reliable, it
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cheaper options to cars. the dealerships can be found on nearly every street corner. and the influx of cheap chinese brands has made it easierfor of cheap chinese brands has made it easier for togolese to buy them. of cheap chinese brands has made it easier for togolese to buy themm is very important for the economy, because people are using this for a taxi driving. now, we have 200 motorcycles, i think. taxi driving. now, we have 200 motorcycles, ithink. i don't taxi driving. now, we have 200 motorcycles, i think. i don't know exactly the quantity. and what we can tell you is that because we have many agencies in togo here. there are literally thousands of motorcycles here on the streets of lome in togo. it is a mode of transport very popular in the area and is known by a local word that
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means take me from here to there. there are mechanics everywhere. translation: i fix motorcycles. four, five, sometimes ten or 12 hours a day. i enjoy thejob. it is something i want to do. and today i have my own workshop. there is a lot of work. so it is good. it is good! from transporting to people around the busy streets of lome, it is clear that the motorcycle plays a role in the burgeoning economy. an economy that without them would very quickly grind to a halt. vumani mkhize, bbc news, lome, togo. a map of disneyland dating back more than 60 years could raise nearly a million dollars at auction. the map is part of a collection of early disneyland memorabilia, which is up
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for auction in los angeles. it dates from 1953, before the theme park was even built, and was used as part of presentations to get funding for the plan. it was drawn in 48 hours flat by one of walt disney's favourite artists. 0k. let's get a reminder of our top story, now. with less than a week until the uk general election, theresa may and jeremy corbyn have faced a grilling from eight tv audience. theresa may was challenged about mental healthcare and nhs funding. mr corbyn got questions over whether he would use the uk's nuclear deterrent. they also wanted to know if he would join forces with the scottish national party in the event ofa scottish national party in the event of a hung parliament. —— national party. don't forget you can get in touch with me and some of the team of the team on twitter. stay with us on bbc news.
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hello. we will do the easy bit first and then i will give you the forecast, which is probably the bit you are after. a mixture of sunny spells and showers. friday was not just as straightforward. you see why go back to friday in a moment. it started well, then it started to look more threatening. that is properly because many of you were getting tied up with the weather front which had fresh air on its western flank, but ahead of it, warm, moist, muggy air, which ended two thunderstorms or parts of east anglia and the south—east, which is why some of you and your date looking more like that. yes, there we re looking more like that. yes, there were some localised flooding, due to be heavy downpours. that muggy air is still there to be had as we start saturday across this south—eastern quarter. the remnants of the —— weather front still producing some rain. it is through the west that we see the finest conditions as other day. one or two showers to start the
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day. one or two showers to start the day across the western facing coasts and hills. they are there through the western side of scotland. but it is out towards the east that we saw that overhang of cloud and the re m na nts of that overhang of cloud and the remnants of friday's whether, if you like. still enough about the cloud to create misty conditions east of the pennines and on the eastern side of scotland. through the day, this is how things will shape up. there are many showers and weddings on tomorrow. as we get through the day, the bulk of the showers will be found across central and northern parts of scotland, northern ireland, too, and fewer showers, but still there to be had, across the western side of england and wales. that murk will just drift side of england and wales. that murk willjust drift up the eastern shores and eventually the eastern side of england will improve as the bulk of that cloud and showery rain comes to lie there across the eastern side of scotland. so that is saturday. into sunday, it will be a quiet start for central and eastern parts, again. later on, ithink we
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will see more of showery rain in the south—west and into parts of wales, perhaps. and if slightly fresher feel through the day. this is monday. look at theirs. not one, too, but three areas of low pressure. this being the real drier of the weather. they could bring 50 millimetres of rain too. enjoy the rain ‘s —— priced at because it was there that way. —— look at this. a simple bit of low pressure will provide a regime of rain on tuesday across the british isles. this is bbc news. the headlines: theresa may and jeremy corbyn have been facing questions from voters in the final televised debate before next week's general election. mrs may stressed that she was the best person to lead brexit negotiations and mr corbyn promised a left—wing alternative to the government's
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planned spending cuts. the white house has defended donald trump's decision to pull the us out of the paris climate agreement. administration officials say it's now up to other world leaders to decide whether to sit down and negotiate a new deal. however, china, india and the eu have recommitted to the original agreement. the new leader of the biggest party in ireland's coalition government, fine gael, is leo varadkar, the son of an indian immigrant who is ireland's first openly gay minister. aged 38, he is set to become ireland's youngest prime minister in a few weeks' time. now let's take a brief look at some of this morning's front pages. we start with the mirror which leads with the conservative candidate
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